WorldWideScience

Sample records for cellular radiobiological action

  1. Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This text-book (electronic book - multi-media CD-ROM) constitutes a course-book - author's collection of lectures. It consists of 13 lectures in which the reader acquaints with the basis of radiobiology: Introduction to radiobiology; Physical fundamentals of radiobiology; Radiation of cells; Modification of radiation damage of cells; Reparation of radiation damage of cells; Radiation syndromes and their modification; Radiation injury; Radiation damage of tissues; Effect of radiation on embryo and fetus; Biological effects of incorporated radionuclides; Therapy of acute irradiation sickness; Delayed consequences of irradiation; Radiation oncology and radiotherapy. This course-book may be interesting for students, post-graduate students of chemistry, biology, physics, medicine as well as for teachers, scientific workers and physicians. (author)

  2. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    OpenAIRE

    Bordelon, David E.; Zhang, Jian; Graboski, Sarah; Cox, Adrienne; Schreiber, Eric; Zhou, Otto Z.; Chang, Sha

    2008-01-01

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiothera...

  3. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, David E.; Zhang, Jian; Graboski, Sarah; Cox, Adrienne; Schreiber, Eric; Zhou, Otto Z.; Chang, Sha

    2008-12-01

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiotherapy cancer treatment outcomes. In this paper, initial results of the system development are reported. The relationship between field emission current, the dose rate, and the dose distribution has been investigated. A beam size of 23 μm has been achieved with variable dose rates of 1-100 Gy/s, and the system dosimetry has been measured using a radiochromic film. Cell irradiation has been demonstrated by the visualization of H2AX phosphorylation at DNA double-strand break sites following irradiation in a rat fibroblast cell monolayer. The prototype single beam cellular irradiator is a preliminary step to a multipixel cell irradiator that is under development.

  4. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiotherapy cancer treatment outcomes. In this paper, initial results of the system development are reported. The relationship between field emission current, the dose rate, and the dose distribution has been investigated. A beam size of 23 μm has been achieved with variable dose rates of 1-100 Gy/s, and the system dosimetry has been measured using a radiochromic film. Cell irradiation has been demonstrated by the visualization of H2AX phosphorylation at DNA double-strand break sites following irradiation in a rat fibroblast cell monolayer. The prototype single beam cellular irradiator is a preliminary step to a multipixel cell irradiator that is under development.

  5. The principles of Katz's cellular track structure radiobiological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular track structure theory (TST), introduced by Katz in 1968, applies the concept of action cross section as the probability of targets in the radiation detector being activated to elicit the observed endpoint (e.g. cell killing). The ion beam radiation field is specified by the charge Z, speed β (or energy), fluence and linear energy transfer (LET) of the ion, rather than by its total absorbed dose or dose-averaged LET. The detector is represented by radiosensitive elements of size a0 and radiosensitivity D0, its gamma-ray response being represented by c-hit or multi-target expressions rather than by the linear-quadratic formula. Key to TST is the Dδ(r) formula describing the radial distribution of delta-ray dose (RDD) around the ion path. This formula, when folded with the dose response of the detector and radially integrated, yields the 'point target' action cross section value, sPT. The averaged value of the cross section, σ, is obtained by radially integrating the a0-averaged RDD. In the 'track width' regime which may occur at the distal end of the ion's path, the value of s may considerably exceed its geometrical value, πa20. Several scaling principles are applied in TST, resulting in its simple analytic formulation. Multi-target detectors, such as cells, are represented in TST by m, D0, σ0 (the 'saturation value' of the cross section which replaces a0) and k (a 'detector saturation index'), as the fourth model parameter. With increasing LET of the ion, the two-component formulation of TST allows for successive transition from shouldered survival curves at low LET values to exponential ones at radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) maximum, followed by 'thin-down' at the end of the ion track. For a given cell line, having best-fitted the four model parameters (m, D0, σ0 and k) to an available data set of measured survival curves, TST is able to quantitatively predict cell survival and RBE for

  6. Direct relationship between radiobiological hypoxia in tumors and monoclonal antibody detection of EF5 cellular adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Siemann, D W; Koch, C J; Lord, E M

    1996-07-29

    While the potential importance of hypoxia in limiting the sensitivity of tumor cells to ionizing radiation has long been appreciated, methods for accurately quantifying the number of radiation-resistant hypoxic cells within tumors have been lacking. We have used the pentafluorinated derivative [2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)-acet amide] of etanidazole (EF5), which binds selectively to hypoxic cells. The adducts formed between EF5 and cellular proteins in the hypoxic cells were detected using the specific monoclonal antibody (MAb), ELK3-51 conjugated to the flurochrome Cy3, and the number of hypoxic cells was quantified by flow cytometry. To verify the validity of this technique for the detection of hypoxic cells, mice bearing KHT sarcomas were treated with various agents to alter tumor oxygenation and hence vary the fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic tumor cells. The percentage of EF5 binding cells was then compared directly with the clonogenic survival of the tumor cells following radiation treatment under the various pretreatment conditions. The results showed that allowing the mice to breathe carbogen (5% CO2/95% O2) prior to irradiation reduced clonogenic cell survival approx. 6-fold and led to an absence of cells binding high levels of EF5. In contrast, pretreating the tumor-bearing animals with either hydralazine, which decreased tumor blood flow, or phenylhydrazine hydrochloride, which made the mice anemic, increased tumor cell survival following irradiation 2- to 4-fold, indicative of an increase in the fraction of hypoxic tumor cells. EF5 measurements made under identical conditions illustrated a shift in the cells in the tumor to high EF5 binding. Our results demonstrate that flow cytometric measurement by fluorescent MAb binding to EF5 adducts may relate directly to radiobiological hypoxia in KHT tumors measured by conventional methods. PMID:8707411

  7. Physical and cellular radiobiological properties of heavy ions in relation to cancer therapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of experiments have been carried out in vitro on several mammalian cell lines with carbon, neon, silicon and argon beams at 14 and 24 cm depth penetration. The results of these experiments substantiate the conceptual basis for physical and radiobiological advantages of accelerated heavy-ion beams in cancer therapy. The best biologically effective depth dose ratio for situations corresponding to therapy needs can be obtained with accelerated carbon beams. The depression of the oxygen effect with silicon or argon ion beams is greater than that achievable with neutrons or pions, or with heavy ions of lower atomic number

  8. Molecular and cellular fundamentals of stochastic radiation action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of basic radiobiological processes in order to assess the risk of carcinogenesis due to radiotherapeutic procedures; demonstration of direct radiation-induced damage to DNA and indirect effects due to radiolysis of cellular water; description of repair mechanisms; radiation- induced chromosomal aberrations, genome mutations and disturbances of the cell cycle and their contributions to the carcinogenic effects of radiotherapy.(MG)

  9. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    OpenAIRE

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira; João Paulo Ferreira Schoffen

    2010-01-01

    Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the fac...

  10. Basic radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiology, a branch of science concerned with the action of ionizing radiation on biological tissues and living organisms, is a combination of two disciplines: radiation physics and biology. For use in radiobiology and radiation protection the physical quantity that is useful for defining the quality of an ionizing radiation beam is the linear energy transfer (LET). In contrast to the stopping power, which focuses attention on the energy loss by an energetic charged particle moving through a medium, the LET focuses attention on the linear rate of energy absorption by the absorbing medium as the charged particle traverses the medium. When cells are exposed to ionizing radiation the standard physical effects between radiation and the atoms or molecules of the cells occur first and the possible biological damage to cell functions follows later. The biological effects of radiation result mainly from damage to the DNA, which is the most critical target within the cell; however, there are also other sites in the cell that, when damaged, may lead to cell death

  11. Basic Radiobiology. Chapter 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiology is the study (both qualitative and quantitative) of the actions of ionizing radiations on living matter. Since radiation has the ability to cause changes in cells which may later cause them to become malignant, or bring about other detrimental functional changes in irradiated tissues and organs, consideration of the associated radiobiology is important in all diagnostic applications of radiation. Additionally, since radiation can lead directly to cell death, consideration of the radiobiological aspects of cell killing is essential in all types of radiation therapy

  12. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the factors such as cellular oxidative damage, its consequences and the main protective measures taken to prevent or delay this process. Tests with antioxidants: vitamins A, E and C, flavonoids, carotenoids and minerals, the practice of caloric restriction and physical exercise, seeking the beneficial effects on human health, increasing longevity, reducing the level of oxidative stress, slowing the cellular senescence and origin of certain diseases, are discussed.Diferentes teorias tentam explicar o envelhecimento biológico através da alteração das funções e estrutura dos sistemas orgânicos e células. Ao longo da vida, os radicais livres presentes no estresse oxidativo conduzem à peroxidação dos lipídios das membranas celulares, desequilíbrio da homeostase, formação de resíduos químicos, mutações gênicas no DNA, disfunção de certas organelas, bem como ao surgimento de doenças devido à lesão e/ou morte celular. Nesta revisão descreve-se a ação do estresse oxidativo no processo de envelhecimento das células, enfatizando fatores como os danos oxidativos celulares, suas conseqüências e as principais medidas protetoras adotadas para se prevenir ou retardar este processo. Testes com antioxidantes: vitaminas A, E e C, flavonóides, carotenóides e minerais; a prática de restrição calórica e exercícios físicos, que buscam efeitos benéficos sobre a saúde humana, aumentando a longevidade, reduzindo o nível de estresse oxidativo

  13. Radiobiological Research in JINR

    CERN Document Server

    Krasavin, E A

    2000-01-01

    The results of long-term radiobiological and radiation-genetical research in DRRR (Division of Radiobiology) are summarized. The different radiation-induced effects in bacteria, yeasts, mammalian and human cells after irradiation by gamma-rays and heavy charged particles are considered. The important role of DNA repair processes in biological effectiveness of different types of radiation were shown. The data on mutagenic action of such kinds of radiation on pro- and eukaryotic cells were analyzed. On the basis of our data the hypersensitivity of human and mammalian chromosomes after low doses of gamma-rays (10-20 sGy) was revealed. The radiobiological effect of ^{211}At - methylene blue complex on human melanoma cells was studied. The extremely high effectiveness of this complex on melanoma cells was shown.

  14. A combined hit theory-microdosimetric explanation of cellular radiobiological action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hit theory is combined with microdosimetry in a stochastic approach that explains the observed responses of cell populations exposed in radiation fields of different qualities. The central thesis is that to expose a population of cells in a low-level radiation field is to subject the cells to the potential for interaction with charged particles, quantifiable in terms of the charged particle fluence PHI. When such an interaction occurs there is resulting stochastic transfer of energy to a critical volume (CV) of cross-section σ within the cell(s). The severity of cell injury is dependent on the amount of energy thus imparted, or the hit size. If the severity is above some minimal level, there is a non-zero probability that the injury will result in a quantal effect (e.g., a mutational or carcinogenic initial event, cell transformation). A microdosimetric proportional counter, viewed here as a phantom cell CV that permits measurements not possible in the living cell, is used to determine the incidence of hit cells and the spectrum of hit sizes. Each hit is then weighted on the basis of an empirically determined function that provides the fraction of cells responding quantally, as a function of hit size. The sum of the hits so weighted provides the incidence of quantally responding cells, for any amount of exposure PHI in a radiation field of any quality or mixture of qualities. The hit size weighting function for pink mutations in Tradescantia is discussed, as are its implications in terms of a replacement for relative biological effectiveness and dose equivalent. (author)

  15. Radiobiological aspects of application of interleucine as agents for the first aid under strong radiation action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper substantiates the application of the interleucine-1 beta (IL-1) as an emergency medical care agent in case of the acute emergency exposure of a human being. During simulation experiments a human recombinant IL-1 was added to suspension of the affected bony marrow-cells extracted a few minutes following the total 5 Gy exposure of Fi male-mice (CBAxC57B1). Recombinant mouse IL-3 and GM-CSF agents (produced by Bering company, Germany) were used for comparison purpose (agent concentration constituted 100-10000 unit/ml). The incubated bony marrow cells were tested for trunk potencies in mice-recipients irradiated by 8.5 Gy dose during 24 h. Following nine days the colonies in their spleen and bony marrow cellular texture were estimated. IL-1 was shown to have the protective effect both on separated trunk type hemopoietic cells and on the whole body irradiated hemopoietic system. IL-1 turned to be similar to radiation-protective agents of polysaccharide nature and to radiation-protective EIR procedure. It is pointed out that IL-1 has no whole body toxic or any other by effects

  16. Cellular signaling in eclosion hormone action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, David B.; Simpson, P Jeanette

    2002-01-01

    Eclosion hormone (EH) is a 62 amino acid neuropeptide that plays an integral role in triggering ecdysis behavior at the end of each molt. At least three populations of cells are thought to be targets for EH, each of which show an EH-stimulated increase in the intracellular messenger guanosine 3', 5' cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). These EH target cells are believed to include two pairs of neurons in each of the ganglia of the ventral nerve cord (VNC) that contain the neuropeptide crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), the Inka cells of the peripheral epitracheal glands and intrinsic non-neuronal cells in the abdominal transverse nerves. This review describes likely signaling cascades that result in the EH-stimulated cGMP increase. Several lines of evidence suggest the involvement of a novel nitric oxide insensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC). A novel GC with these properties has recently been identified and we also present evidence to suggest that it is activated by EH and describe possible pathways for its activation. In addition, we review our current knowledge on the cellular and molecular events that take place downstream of the increase in cGMP. PMID:12770127

  17. Molecular studies on the nature of the repair defect in ataxia-telangiectasia and their implications for cellular radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have utilized DNA transfer and recombinant DNA techniques to probe DNA double-strand break repair in the human ionizing radiation-sensitive genetic syndrome ataxia-telangiectasis (A-T). Using restriction enzyme-generated double-strand breaks in the coding sequence of a selectable gene we have detected a significantly greater frequency of mis-repair of such breaks in a permanent A-T cell line compared with cell lines of normal radiosensitivity. This mis-repair in A-T can explain many of the clinical features of the disease but was insufficiently detailed to address the broad problem of DNA repair mechanisms relevant to ionizing radiation-induced damage. To extend these observations of DNA double-strand break mis-repair we have now applied this type of repair assay to novel, de novo induced mammalian X-ray-sensitive cell lines and to appropriate Escherichia coli mutants. In both cellular systems we have found some equivalence to the A-T repair defect. Studies on one E. coli mutant suggest an involvement of a topoisomerase activity in DNA double-strand break mis-repair, which may be relevant to the biochemical defect in A-T. (author)

  18. Cancer radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work i have done in this dissertation, was mainly aimed at the literature review of radiotherapy radiobiology discussing the cure of tumours with ionizing radiation, from both the biological and physical point of view. The first chapter an introduction about the radiotherapy and includes: definition, working dose, benefit of radiotherapy, risk of radiotherapy, external and internal radiotherapy and treatment planing. In chapter two the theories of radiobiology and main effects caused by the radiation in the interaction with the biological matter were explained, the damages caused by the use of low and high LET (linear energy transfer) particles to mammalian cells were discussed. And discuss a therapeutic advantage may be gained by one of four hypothetical mechanism: repair the damage of DAN, so when sublethal injury can be repaired if no further hits are sustained. Also the reoxygenation of tumor is important for its effects on stabilization of free radicals produced by ionizing radiation. Hypoxic cells generally require an increased dose of radiation for lethal effect, redistribution, within the cell cycle depends on location of cells and their radiosensitivity also cells undergoing DNA synthesis, the S phase, are much more radioresistant than cells in other phase of the cell cycle, and repopulation of tumor cells is indicator of the surviving cells respond by increased regeneration or repopulation. Repopulation is a greater problem with rapidly proliferating tumors than slower growing neoplasms. These mechanisms are known as the classical four R's of radiation biology. One of the important applications of radiobiology is the radiotherapy and cancer treatment, experimental and theoretical studies in radiation biology contribute to the development of radiotherapy, in this dissertation we discussed the dose response relation so as the size of the tumor increases, and the dose needed for local control like wise increases, the risk of injury to normal tissue

  19. Geometric domains in cellular radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint consideration of experimental findings and microdosimetric facts leads to the conclusion that the biological effects of ionizing radiations are determined by local concentration of absorbed energy at two types of sites that differ greatly in magnitude. They are of the scale of nanometres in primary DNA damage, and of micrometres in the especially deleterious combinations of damaged DNA fragments. Both kinds depend on LET; however, at the nanometre level the dependence is much smaller. Depending on the relative contribution of the two types, the RBE values for observed biological effects can vary considerably but they may be assumed to be larger for cell transformation than for cell killing. (author)

  20. Microirradiation techniques in radiobiological research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guido A Drexler; Miguel J Ruiz-Gómez

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work is to review the uses of laser microirradiation and ion microbeam techniques within the scope of radiobiological research. Laser microirradiation techniques can be used for many different purposes. In a specific condition, through the use of pulsed lasers, cell lysis can be produced for subsequent separation of different analytes. Microsurgery allows for the identification and isolation of tissue sections, single cells and subcellular components, using different types of lasers. The generation of different types of DNA damage, via this type of microirradiation, allows for the investigation of DNA dynamics. Ion microbeams are important tools in radiobiological research. There are only a limited number of facilities worldwide where radiobiological experiments can be performed. In the beginning, research was mostly focused on the bystander effect. Nowadays, with more sophisticated molecular and cellular biological techniques, ion microirradiation is used to unravel molecular processes in the field of radiobiology. These include DNA repair protein kinetics or chromatin modifications at the site of DNA damage. With the increasing relevance of charged particles in tumour therapy and new concepts on how to generate them, ion microbeam facilities are able to address unresolved questions concerning particle tumour therapy.

  1. Radiation Protection Research: Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium; to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (2) to participate in the IARC study; (3) to elucidate the molecular basis of the effects of ionising radiation in the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (4) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (5) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 1999 are reported

  2. Radiation Protection Research: Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaintes, C

    2000-07-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium; to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (2) to participate in the IARC study; (3) to elucidate the molecular basis of the effects of ionising radiation in the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (4) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (5) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 1999 are reported.

  3. Radiobiology and radiation protection. Recent developments and future trends in radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 28th annual meeting of the Fachverband fuer Strahlenschutz, held from October 23 - 25, 1996 in Hannover, discussed the various aspects of the leading theme, radiation protection and radiobiology, recent developments and future trends in radiobiology. The papers presented in the proceedings volume address the three main aspects: (1) Mechanisms of the radiation effects - molecular and cellular mechanisms, genetic and prenatal radiation effects, cancerogenesis and mutagenesis; (2) Novel methods in radiobiology research: microdosimetry from the biological angle, novel methods in molecular biology including computerized simulation of DNA, methods of biological dosimetry, radiobiological aspects of neutrons and other densely ionizing radiation (Pt, Rn); (3) Knowledge and concepts for radiological protection: individual radiosensitivity, radiobiological aspects in medical applications of ionizing radiation, accidents in industry, radiation exposure in aeronautics and astronautics. (vhe)

  4. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 20. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings include contributions on the following issues: laser driven proton accelerators on the way for radiotherapy, radiobiological evaluation of new radiations; molecular factors of radiation response; biological targeting; EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor/targeting - combined internal and external irradiation, radiobiology of normal tissues; dose-volume histograms for the radiotherapy: curves without radiobiological relevance or important information for the therapy planning; HPV (human papilloma virus) and radiation sensitivity of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinomas): evidence, radiobiological mechanism, clinical consequences and perspectives; mechanisms of action and intertumoral heterogeneity of response to EGFR inhibition in radiotherapy of solid tumors; evaluation of biomarkers for radiotherapy.

  5. Radiobiology and Epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaintes, C; Holmstock, L

    2001-04-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium and to co-ordinate the Belgian contribution to the 'International Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry'; (2) to elucidate the molecular basis of individual susceptibility to ionizing radiation in mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (3) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (4) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (5) to monitor the early variations of gene expression induced by ionising radiation and cytokines; (6) to evaluate the use of cytokines and natural substances for improving radiotherapy protocols; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are reported.

  6. Radiobiology and Epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium and to co-ordinate the Belgian contribution to the 'International Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry'; (2) to elucidate the molecular basis of individual susceptibility to ionizing radiation in mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (3) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (4) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (5) to monitor the early variations of gene expression induced by ionising radiation and cytokines; (6) to evaluate the use of cytokines and natural substances for improving radiotherapy protocols; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are reported

  7. DOE/CEC [Department of Energy/Commission of the European Communities] workshop on critical evaluation of radiobiological data to biophysical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's Office of Health and Environmental Research and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) Radiation Protection Program support the majority of Research in the Field of Radiobiological Modeling. This field of science develops models based on scientifically sound principles to predict biological response (at the cellular, molecular, and animal level) to exposure to low level ionizing radiation. Biophysical models are an important tool for estimating response of ionizing radiation at low doses and dose rates. Generally speaking, the biophysical models can be classified into two groups: (1) mechanistic models and (2) phenomenological models. Mechanistic models are based on some assumptions about the physical, chemical, or biological mechanisms of action in association with radiobiological data whereas the phenomenological models are based solely on available experimental data on radiobiological effects with less emphasis on mechanisms of action. There are a number of these models which are being developed. Since model builders rely on radiobiological data available in the literature either to develop mechanistic or phenomenological models, it is essential that a critical evaluation of existing radiobiological data be made and data that is generally considered good and most appropriate for biophysical modeling be identified. A Workshop jointly sponsored by the DOE and the CEC was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee from June 23--25, 1988, to review the data available from physical and chemical, cellular and molecular and animal studies with ionizing radiation

  8. Investigation of molecular mechanisms in photodynamic action and radiobiology with nanosecond flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis. Progress report, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liposomes have been employed as membrane models applicable to photosensitization in phototherapy procedures. The results with 8-methoxypsoralen, the sensitizer in PUVA therapy of psoriasis, show that singlet oxygen generated by near-uv (uv-A) irradiation induces membrane damage leading to lysis. A similar role of singlet oxygen has been shown for photosensitization of liposomes by methylene blue, with the new observation that hydrodynamic forces promote the lytic action initiated by singlet oxygen attack on an unsaturated site of phosphatidylcholine. Liposome photosensitization by hematoporphyrin follows a Type II mechanism mediated by singlet oxygen for low sensitizer concentrations, and a Type I, anoxic, mechanism when the hematoporphyrin is aggregated. Similar concentration effects obtain with hematoporphyrin derivative (hpd), the photosensitizer in photoradiation therapy of malignant tumors. Studies on the components of hpd separated by gel chromatography show that the putative biological active fraction can photosensitize membrane damage under oxic and anoxic conditions. The oxic pathway was suppressed by binding to human serum albumin, as involved in serum transport of hpd prior to localization in tumor tissue. A study on hematoporphyrin photosensitization of targets other than membranes has shown that singlet oxygen is responsible for the photosensitized inactivation of subtilisin BPN' and photooxidation of tryptophan in human and bovine serum albumin. In the case of the serum proteins, the singlet oxygen is generated by the sensitizer-protein complex and it may react with all protein in the system. 11 references

  9. Cellular function of neuropathy target esterase in lysophosphatidylcholine action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) plays critical roles in embryonic development and maintenance of peripheral axons. It is a secondary target of some organophosphorus toxicants including analogs of insecticides and chemical warfare agents. Although the mechanistic role of NTE in vivo is poorly defined, it is known to hydrolyze lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) in vitro and may protect cell membranes from cytotoxic accumulation of LPC. To determine the cellular function of NTE, Neuro-2a and COS-7 cells were transfected with a full-length human NTE-containing plasmid yielding recombinant NTE (rNTE). We find the same inhibitor sensitivity and specificity profiles for rNTE assayed with LPC or phenyl valerate (a standard NTE substrate) and that this correlation extends to the LPC hydrolases of human brain, lymphocytes and erythrocytes. All of these LPC hydrolases are therefore very similar to each other in respect to a conserved inhibitor binding site conformation. NTE is expressed in brain and lymphocytes and contributes to LPC hydrolase activities in these tissues. The enzyme or enzymes responsible for erythrocyte LPC hydrolase activity remain to be identified. We also show that rNTE protects Neuro-2a and COS-7 cells from exogenous LPC cytotoxicity. Expression of rNTE in Neuro-2a cells alters their phospholipid balance (analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with single ion monitoring) by lowering LPC-16:0 and LPC-18:0 and elevating glycerophosphocholine without a change in phosphatidylcholine-16:0/18:1 or 16:0/18:2. NTE therefore serves an important function in LPC homeostasis and action

  10. Synthesis, cellular evaluation, and mechanism of action of piperlongumine analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Drew J.; Dai, Mingji; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Wagner, Bridget K.; Stern, Andrew M.; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2012-01-01

    Piperlongumine is a naturally occurring small molecule recently identified to be toxic selectively to cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This compound was found to elevate cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) selectively in cancer cell lines. The synthesis of 80 piperlongumine analogs has revealed structural modifications that retain, enhance, and ablate key piperlongumine-associated effects on cells, including elevation of ROS, cancer cell death, and selectivity for cancer cells ...

  11. Action principle for cellular automata and the linearity of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an action principle for a class of integer valued cellular automata and obtain Hamiltonian equations of motion. Employing sampling theory, these discrete deterministic equations are invertibly mapped on continuum equations for a set of bandwidth limited harmonic oscillators, which encode the Schr\\"odinger equation. Thus, the linearity of quantum mechanics is related to the action principle of such cellular automata and its conservation laws to discrete ones.

  12. Action of Selenium Compounds on the Cellular Metabolism by Microcalorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new method is introduced to study the action between biomaterials and organism.By using an LKB-2277 bioactivity monitor and ampoule method,the fundamental thermogenesis curves of the metabolic process of pk-15 and the toxic effect of three kinds of selenomorpholine compounds on it were studied at 37℃.From the thermogenesis curves,the heat released by pk-15 metabolism was calculated.The results show that the selenium compounds all have toxic action on the metabolism process of pk-15 at the range of experimental concentrations.The sequence of the toxic action of selenium compounds is:Na2SeO3>β-(N-selenomorpholine)-ethyl phenylketone hydrochloride>selenomorpholine.

  13. Research in Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the tables of contents for the reports published by the University of Utah Radiobiology Laboratory from 1953--1987. Also included is a keyword index for the reports, and references for all books, book and symposia chapters and journal article published by Laboratory staff between 1950 and 1988

  14. With the Radiobiology Group

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Radiobiology Group carries out experiments to study the effect of radiation on living cells. The photo shows the apparatus for growing broad beans which have been irradiated by 250 GeV protons. The roots are immersed in a tank of running water (CERN Weekly Bulletin 26 January 1981 and Annual Report 1980 p. 160). Karen Panman, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Roger Paris.

  15. Oxygen as a product of water radiolysis in high-LET tracks. II. Radiobiological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given to the possibility that molecular oxygen generated in the tracks of energetic heavy ions is responsible for the reduction in oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) observed for the loss of reproductive capacity caused by radiation in many cellular organisms. Yields of oxygen relationship of OER to LET for two organisms, Chlamydomonas reinhardii and Shigella flexneri, using a simple diffusion kinetic model for radiobiological action which takes account of the diffusion of oxygen after its formation. The results of these calculations show that the model accounts well for the shape of the OER vs. LET relationship

  16. Department of Radiobiology - foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research program of the Department of Radiobiology of the Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics is performed by two laboratories: 1/Laboratory of Neutron Therapy and Applied in Radiobiology Therapy and Agriculture. 2/ Laboratory of Radiation and Environmental Mutagenesis. The aim of the first mentioned Laboratory is to determine the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of fast 5.6 MeV neutrons with regard to regime of fractionation. Our goal is to reduce the number of fraction of neutron therapy what makes possible increasing the total dose. The second mentioned Laboratory engages in research on the mutagenesis in rape-seed in vitro regeneration of dihaploids and pollen grains. The object is to find how much fast neutrons, X and γ-rays irradiations stimulate the dihaploide production and to determine their reaction in flower buds microspores and anther cultures. (author)

  17. DMPD: Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mechanisms. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17981503 Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmol...) (.html) (.csml) Show Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mech...anisms. PubmedID 17981503 Title Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new in

  18. Cellular actions of somatostatin on rat periaqueductal grey neurons in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Connor, Mark; Bagley, Elena E.; Mitchell, Vanessa A; Ingram, Susan L; Christie, MacDonald J.; Humphrey, Patrick P A; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2004-01-01

    Functional studies indicate that the midbrain periaqueductal grey (PAG) is involved in the analgesic actions of somatostatin; however, the cellular actions of somatostatin in this brain region are unknown. In the present study, whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat PAG neurons in vitro. In 93% of acutely isolated neurons, somatostatin inhibited Ca2+-channel currents. This effect was mimicked by the sst-2 selective agonist BIM-23027, but not by the sst-1 and sst-5 selective agon...

  19. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 20. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 20. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, Hans-Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    The proceedings include contributions on the following issues: laser driven proton accelerators on the way for radiotherapy, radiobiological evaluation of new radiations; molecular factors of radiation response; biological targeting; EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor/targeting - combined internal and external irradiation, radiobiology of normal tissues; dose-volume histograms for the radiotherapy: curves without radiobiological relevance or important information for the therapy planning; HPV (human papilloma virus) and radiation sensitivity of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinomas): evidence, radiobiological mechanism, clinical consequences and perspectives; mechanisms of action and intertumoral heterogeneity of response to EGFR inhibition in radiotherapy of solid tumors; evaluation of biomarkers for radiotherapy.

  20. Radiobiological models of normal tissue reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The present review summarizes radiobiological models of normal tissue responses to radiation and their consequences for potential therapeutic interventions. Material and Methods: Common radiobiological principles and pathogenetic models can be established for classes of tissues. These models may support the development of general modalities, both therapeutic and supportive, for the modulation of these responses. Results: The stem cell concept, based on studies in standard tissue culture, describes the clonogenic survival after radiation treatment. The factors affecting cell survival are summarized as the 4 Rs of radiotherapy. Based on the stem cell concept, the reactions of normal tissue to ionising radiation were considered a consequence exclusively of the proliferative sterilisation of cells of a given target cell population. Once stem cells are inactivated, responses develop in a passive manner. However, recent studies into the pathogenesis of radiation tissue injury have clearly shown that numerous postirradiation events occur during the symptom-free latent time in irradiated cells and tissues, which modulate the manifestation of damage. These are summarized by models of tissue radiation pathology. Conclusions: Cellular radiobiology and the tissue models based on the stem cell concept assume that exclusively the sterilisation of target cells is the radiation effect which results in both acute and late tissue responses. As a consequence, the radiation sensitivity can only be modulated by modification of radiobiological parameters at the time of irradiation, while at later time points only symptomatic treatment can be applied. Tissue radiation pathology, in contrast, allows for post-irradiation modification of the manifestation of radiation sequelae in tissues. (orig.)

  1. In vivo tumor radiobiology of heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of tumor cells systems to irradiation with carbon, neon and argon beams at various positions in the plateau and extended-peak regions of the Bragg ionization curve is being evaluated from experiments conducted both in vivo and in vitro. The radiobiological end points being studied include: tumor volume response, cellular survival after tumor irradiation in situ, and cell-kinetic parameters

  2. Non-extensive radiobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.

    2011-03-01

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation and conditions. Here we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. A generalization of the exponential, the logarithm and the product to a non-extensive framework, provides a simple formula for the survival fraction corresponding to the application of several radiation doses on a living tissue. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature, also providing a new interpretation of some of the parameters introduced anew. It is also shown how the presented formalism may have direct application in radiotherapy treatment optimization through the definition of the potential effect difference, simply calculated between the tumour and the surrounding tissue.

  3. New developments in fundamental and applied radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 23rd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Radiation Biology was held in Dublin, Eire, 23-26 September 1990. Papers presented were grouped into two themes:- (a) Promoting areas where new developments in cell and molecular biology are fundamentally altering concepts of radiation action (papers on radiation induced mutagenesis and transformations, dosimetry and risk, DNA damage and repair, low dose/low dose rate effects, and non-ionising radiation). (b) Areas where radiobiological information is directly important to the topic (papers on food irradiation, diagnostic imaging, environmental radiation, radiotherapy, and the oxygen effect). (UK)

  4. Radiobiological effects of metallic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiobiological effects of nanoparticles and its cellular mechanism in normal tissue regeneration are investigated. About 2 nm diameter gold nanoaprticies are used in this study with bovine endothelial eells as normal cells and glioma type cells. The imtdiation was conducted using Spring8 synchrotron in Japan and the cell culture studies were performed at the school of Medical Sciences RMIT-University. AuNPs accelerate eells migration esp cially normal endothelial cells. This effect has been observed when AuNPs are introduced into the cells and the cells impregnated with AuNPs migrate faster than the ones without AuNPs. The cells with AuNPs have been found to fill in gaps created in cultures about five times faster than those without AuNPs. The effects have been observed with gaps generated by radiations or when such gaps are made by scratehes 'wounds'. Filling of artificial scratch have been found to be much faster than radiation created gaps. Two aspects of this phenomenon are given; one is biology based where it is thought of disrupts caused by such particles to the cells eytoskeleton org nisation and hence induces different chemical pathways promoting cells motility. The other reason (physics) can be due to Coulomb repulsion force generated by polarised cells pushing the cells into gaps and also cell-polarisation could lead into cells symmetr breaking hence accelerating their motion. Conclusion Radiotherapy treatment efficiency can be improve by using AuNps where dose can be enhance to kill the tumour cells and at the same time helping normal cells to regenerate.

  5. Modern concepts for basic radiobiological factors characterizing tumor tissue radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally radiotherapy is prescribed at doses consistent with the expected therapeutic response and tolerance of tumor and normal tissues without consideration to individual differences in radiosensitivity. However, the basic radiobiological knowledge and clinical experience along this line point to significant variations in the observed therapeutic results. It has been established that cells and tissues under experimental and clinical conditions manifest a wide spectrum of individual radiosensitivity. The aim of this survey is to outline the current concepts for the basic radiobiological factors influencing tumor radiosensitivity. A thorough discussion is done of the essence, mechanisms of action, methods of determination and measurement, and effect on the prognosis in patients with malignant diseases of a number of radiobiological factors, such as: tumor-cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumor hypoxia and neovascularization. Although the knowledge of the mechanisms of radiosensitivity is constantly expanding, its clinical implementation is still rather limited. The true role of radiosensitivity in predicting the therapeutic response should be more accurately defined. (authors)

  6. Radiobiology and isotopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 6. workshop occurs after more than 10 years of meaningful scientific exchanges between the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and the Life Science Division of the French Atomic Commission. The aim of the workshops held alternatively in Japan and France every two years is to promote new collaboration and stimulate exchange of scientists. In this respect, encouraging results have been obtained, since young scientists are currently working at the partner's institution; this is highlighted this year, with the presentation of their results as speakers from each country. New projects are under way to enlarge scientific collaboration. This sixth workshop will allocate three days to specialized working groups within the laboratories at the various locations of the Life Science Division. We hope that all participants will take this opportunity to develop further collaborative research activities in connection with the recent major advances in the field of radiobiology and medical imaging. Such a meeting appears of high interest within the context of new nuclear energy developments

  7. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  8. Investigation of molecular mechanisms in photodynamic action and radiobiology with nanosecond flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis. Progress report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossweiner, L I

    1981-06-01

    Laser flash photolysis experiments have led to a new mechanism for the ultraviolet photolysis of aqueous tryptophan (Trp), indole (Ind) and certain indole derivatives. Excitation at 265 nm leads to photoionization via a pre-fluorescent state with thermal activation. A new formula is proposed for predicting enzyme inactivation quantum yields. The predictions are in good agreement with measurements on six important enzymes at 254 nm and 280 nm. Kinetics models have been developed and tested for important stages in the photosensitization of DNA to near-ultraviolet radiation by furocoumarin compounds currently used for PUVA therapy (psoralen plus UV-A) of psoriasis and other human skin diseases. Experiments on photobinding of psoralen (Ps) and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) to calf thymus DNA are consistent with the assumption that equilibrium dark complexing of the furocoumarin to the DNA is a precondition for the formation of covalent monoadducts and cross-links. Singlet oxygen generation by furocoumarins has been investigated with liposomes and human erythrocytes (rbc). Results obtained with 3-carbethoxypsoralen (3-CPs), an experimental alternate PUVA sensitizer claimed to be non-tumorigenic, show that 3-CPs interacts with liposome and rbc membranes in the dark. Studies on photosensitization of egg lecithin liposomes by methylene blue (MB) incorporated in the membrane have led to the new result that membrane lysis is a two-stage process. The first stage induced by red light irradiation leads to membrane damage initiated by O/sub 2/*. Membrane lysis takes place in the dark, second stage under the action of mild hydrodynamic stress, such as slow gas bubbling.

  9. The ATM gene and the radiobiology of ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is the classic human genetic disease involving severe ionizing radiation sensitivity and as such has been intensely studied by radiation biologists over the years. Unlike its counterpart for UV light sensitivity -xeroderma pigmentosum - A-T has no obvious DNA repair defect; and there has been much speculation as to the mechanism underlying the altered radioresponses associated with this disease. The gene defective in A-T (ATM) has recently been cloned, and its primary coding sequence determined. The primary sequence of the ATM protein suggests that it has some regulatory functions related to cellular radioresponse and maintenance of genomic stability, and shares these functions with a growing family of other proteins in various organisms. At this juncture it is appropriate to review our current knowledge about the radiobiology of A-T and reflect on the possible radiobiological mechanisms that are suggested by the ATM gene itself. This article will attempt briefly to review current knowledge about the radiobiology of A-T and to introduce new speculations about underlying radiobiological mechanisms that are suggested by the primary amino acid sequence of the predicted ATM gene product. (Author)

  10. Basics of radiobiology and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors successively reveal the topics of the biological impact of radiation (radiobiology) and the diagnostic and the therapeutic application of radiopharmaceuticals (nuclear medicine). Data on the influence of radiation on subcellular, cellular, tissue and organ level are given, on early and late radiation changes, as well. Indication for the application of the different radionuclide methods in the diagnosis of the diseases in the endocrinology, nephrology, cardiology, gastroenterology, haematology of lungs, bones, tumors are pointed out and the main trends of the growing therapeutical use of nuclear medicine are presented. The aim is to teach students the nuclear medicine methods in the complex investigation of the patients, his preliminary preparation and the biological impact of radiation and its risk. Self assessment test for students are proposed and a literature for further reading

  11. Two cellular hypotheses explaining the initiation of ketamine's antidepressant actions: Direct inhibition and disinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Oliver H; Moran, Jacqueline T; Hall, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    A single, low dose of ketamine evokes antidepressant actions in depressed patients and in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Unlike classic antidepressants, which regulate monoamine neurotransmitter systems, ketamine is an antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) family of glutamate receptors. The effectiveness of NMDAR antagonists in TRD unveils a new set of targets for therapeutic intervention in major depressive disorder (MDD) and TRD. However, a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects is required for guiding future therapeutic strategies, in order to minimize side effects and prolong duration of efficacy. Here we review the evidence for and against two hypotheses that have been proposed to explain how NMDAR antagonism initiates protein synthesis and increases excitatory synaptic drive in corticolimbic brain regions, either through selective antagonism of inhibitory interneurons and cortical disinhibition, or by direct inhibition of cortical pyramidal neurons. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'. PMID:26211972

  12. Cellular action of cholecystokinin-8S-mediated excitatory effects in the rat periaqueductal gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Mi; Chung, Jun-Mo; Rhim, Hyewhon

    2006-09-27

    The peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) is one of the major neurotransmitters modulating satiety, nociception, and anxiety behavior. Although many behavioral studies showing anti-analgesic and anxiogenic actions of CCK have been reported, less is known about its cellular action in the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, we examined the action of CCK in rat dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) neurons using slice preparations and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Application of CCK-8S produced an inward current accompanied by increased spontaneous synaptic activities. The CCK-8S-induced inward current (I(CCK)) was recovered after washout and reproduced by multiple exposures. Current-voltage plots revealed that I(CCK) reversed near the equilibrium potential for K(+) ions with a decreased membrane conductance. When several K(+) channel blockers were used, application of CdCl(2), TEA, or apamin significantly reduced I(CCK). I(CCK) was also significantly reduced by the CCK(2) receptor antagonist, L-365,260, while it was not affected by the CCK(1) receptor antagonist, L-364,718. Furthermore, we examined the effects of CCK-8S on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in order to determine the mechanism of CCK-mediated increase on synaptic activities. We found that CCK-8S increased the frequency of mEPSCs, but had no effect on mEPSC amplitude. This presynaptic effect persisted in the presence of CdCl(2) or Ca(2+)-free bath solution, but was completely abolished by pre-treatment with BAPTA-AM, thapsigargin or L-365,260. Taken together, our results indicate that CCK can excite PAG neurons at both pre- and postsynaptic loci via the activation of CCK(2) receptors. These effects may be important for the effects of CCK on behavior and autonomic function that are mediated via PAG neurons. PMID:16797032

  13. Radiobiology software for educational purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand radio-nuclide therapy and the basis of radiation protection, it is essential to understand radiobiology. With limited time for classroom teaching and limited time and resources for radiobiology experiments students do not acquire firm grasp of theoretical mathematical models and experimental knowledge of target theory and Linear quadratic models that explain nature of cell survival curves. We believe that this issue might be addressed with numerical simulation of cell survival curves using mathematical models. Existing classroom teaching can be reoriented to understand the subject using the concept of modeling, simulation and virtual experiments. After completion of the lecture, students can practice with simulation tool at their convenient time. In this study we have developed software that can help the students to acquire firm grasp of theoretical and experimental radiobiology. The software was developed using FreeMat ver 4.0, open source software. Target theory, linear quadratic model, cell killing based on Poisson model have been included. The implementation of the program structure was to display the menu for the user choice to be made and then program flows depending on the users choice. The program executes by typing 'Radiobiology' on the command line interface. Students can investigate the effect of radiation dose on cell, interactively. They can practice to draw the cell survival curve based on the input and output data and they can also compare their handmade graphs with automatically generated graphs by the program. This software is in the early stage of development and will evolve on user feedback. We feel this simulation software will be quite useful for students entering in the nuclear medicine, radiology and radiotherapy disciplines. (author)

  14. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  15. Characteristics of Middle School Students Learning Actions in Outdoor Mathematical Activities with the Cellular Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Wajeeh; Baya'a, Nimer

    2012-01-01

    Learning in the cellular phone environment enables utilizing the multiple functions of the cellular phone, such as mobility, availability, interactivity, verbal and voice communication, taking pictures or recording audio and video, measuring time and transferring information. These functions together with mathematics-designated cellular phone…

  16. Conjunct action of gamma radiation and casiopeinas in two cellular types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Mexico the cancer occupies the second place in the causes of death and although already there are diverse useful treatments to attack this suffering, the search of new pharmaceuticals that present positive effect in the treatment of the cancer there is taken to the development of a group of substances called Casiopeinas. Its are coordination compounds constituted by a central atom of copper (Cu II) joined to organic ligands, with general condensed formula [Cu (NN)(ON)]NO3, or [Cu(NN)(OO)]NO3. Its present different cytotoxicity levels, as well as in vitro antineoplastic activity in diverse tissues derived of tumors. Even its ignore the mechanisms of it action, but one of them, it could be by generation of reactive species of oxygen (ERO), mediated by the metallic center that contain. Thinking of this possibility was carried out in vitro experiments, exposing lymphocytes or HeLa cells, to ionizing radiation, at two casiopeinas (Casiopeina llgly and the Casiopeina Ill-e-a) or the combination of both agents, in order to determine if the antineoplastic capacity of both types of treatments increase in conjunct action. To determine it its were carried out cytotoxicity tests by means of the differential dyeing of fluorescein diacetate and etidio bromide, in these the cells alive fluorescein in green color while the dead ones only the nucleus of red tinged. The genotoxicity was evaluated by means of the comet essay. The results hurtled that as much the casiopeinas as the radiation by separate don't present difference among both cellular types, probably due to the used method that only quantifies the damages at the moment and not to long term. And according to those treatments on the whole only to the concentrations and the doses more high it favors the additive effect due to an overproduction of free radicals that not can be neutralized. According to the genotoxicity, only proven for the radiation indicates that the HeLa cells presents a major number of cells with

  17. Repeatedly administered antidepressant drugs modulate humoral and cellular immune response in mice through action on macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Kozlowski, Michael; Bryniarski, Pawel; Strobel, Spencer; Bryk, Agata; Myszka, Michal; Tyszka, Anna; Kuszmiersz, Piotr; Nowakowski, Jaroslaw; Filipczak-Bryniarska, Iwona

    2016-08-01

    Depression is associated with an altered immune response, which could be normalized by antidepressant drugs. However, little is known about the influence of antidepressants on the peripheral immune response and function of macrophages in individuals not suffering from depression. Our studies were aimed at determining the influence of antidepressant drugs on the humoral and cellular immune response in mice. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with imipramine, fluoxetine, venlafaxine, or moclobemide and contact immunized with trinitrophenyl hapten followed by elicitation and measurement of contact sensitivity by ear swelling response. Peritoneal macrophages from drug-treated mice were either pulsed with sheep erythrocytes or conjugated with trinitrophenyl and transferred into naive recipients to induce humoral or contact sensitivity response, respectively. Secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates, nitric oxide, and cytokines by macrophages from drug-treated mice was assessed, respectively, in chemiluminometry, Griess-based colorimetry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the expression of macrophage surface markers was analyzed cytometrically. Treatment of mice with fluoxetine, venlafaxine, and moclobemide results in suppression of humoral and cell-mediated immunity with a reduction of the release of macrophage proinflammatory mediators and the expression of antigen-presentation markers. In contrast, treatment with imipramine enhanced the humoral immune response and macrophage secretory activity but slightly suppressed active contact sensitivity. Our studies demonstrated that systemically delivered antidepressant drugs modulate the peripheral humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, mostly through their action on macrophages. Imipramine was rather proinflammatory, whereas other tested drugs expressed immunosuppressive potential. Current observations may be applied to new therapeutic strategies dedicated to various disorders associated with excessive

  18. Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of metridazole and nitroimidazole on the survival time of cultured hamster cells following exposure to various doses and dose rates of 60Co γ radiation or neutrons were studied. Both were found to increase the radiosensitivity of the cells. Data are included on the modifying effects of neutron spectra, energy levels, LET, OER, dose, and dose fractionation schedules on the γ and neutron sensitivity of cultured hamster cells. Studies on the sensitivity of cultured hamster cells and normal liver and hepatoma cells to hyperthermia and hypoxia, with and without the added effects of x irradiation showed that heat treatment at 430C enhanced the radiosensitivity of the cells, with hypoxic cells being the most sensitive. A system was developed for the study of radioinduced carcinogenesis in cultured hamster embryo cells. Preliminary data are presented on the dose response relationships for transformation following exposure to x radiation or neutrons. (U.S.)

  19. Radiobiological comparison of pions and heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical and radiobiological differences between some aspects of pions and heavy ions are discussed, followed by a discussion of acute and late effects of high LET radiations compared to low LET radiations

  20. Fundamental aspects of LET in radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the radiobiological features of radiation studies using radiations with different distributions of LET or y have been discussed, with emphasis on the areas of doubt. A considerable amount of data can be explained reasonably well, but some very basic questions remain unanswered, such as how much radiation injury is due to damage to DNA and why does OER go down as LET rises. Further studies using radiations of different LET are essential to help solve basic problems in radiobiology

  1. Studies in the radiobiology of osteoradionecrosis and their clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, R.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1987-10-01

    The radiobiology of osteoradionecrosis is a complex of cellular death and cellular functional impairments from radiation energy transfers. Four studies of irradiated patients and a data base from 536 patients with osteoradionecrosis revealed separate pathophysiologic conditions for osteoradionecrosis induced by early trauma, osteoradionecrosis induced by late trauma, and spontaneous osteoradionecrosis. A large body of data suggested useful clinical guidelines for the management of irradiated patients. The guidelines, in part, include a recommendation for deferring radiation treatment for 21 days after tissue wounding, if possible; a relative contraindication to wounding tissue during a radiation course; a recommendation for the use of hyperbaric oxygen before wounding; and a strong recommendation to provide comprehensive dental care to the irradiated patient.

  2. Cellular Mechanisms of High Mobility Group 1 (HMGB-1) Protein Action in the Diabetic Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Andrea Rachelle C.; Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Li, Yiwen; Mohammad, Ghulam; Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Wen, Rong; Ivanov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the main microvascular complications of diabetes and remains one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Recent studies have revealed an important role of inflammatory and proangiogenic high mobility group 1 (HMGB-1) cytokine in diabetic retinopathy. To elucidate cellular mechanisms of HMGB-1 activity in the retina, we performed this study. The histological features of diabetic retinopathy include loss of blood-vessel pericytes and endothelial cells, as we...

  3. National Radiobiology Archives distributed access programmer's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Radiobiology Archives is a comprehensive effort to gather, organize, and catalog original data, representative specimens, and supporting materials related to significant radiobiology studies. This provides researchers with information for analyses which compare or combine results of these and other studies and with materials for analysis by advanced molecular biology techniques. This Programmer's Guide document describes the database access software, NRADEMO, and the subset loading script NRADEMO/MAINT/MAINTAIN, which comprise the National Laboratory Archives Distributed Access Package. The guide is intended for use by an experienced database management specialist. It contains information about the physical and logical organization of the software and data files. It also contains printouts of all the scripts and associated batch processing files. It is part of a suite of documents published by the National Radiobiology Archives

  4. Problems, pitfalls, perspectives and potentials of quantitative theoretical models for cellular radiation action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of quantitative mathematical models in cellular radiation biology is discussed in a general way. It is emphasized that there are a number of stages, starting from the spatial pattern of energy deposition and ending with repair/misrepair processes which all need to be incorporated. Since different types of radiation commonly yield very similar dose-response curves a model which is only valid for one special case cannot claim general applicability. Interaction experiments with ultraviolet and ionizing radiation are discussed in this context. Also the role of different experimental systems (microorganisms versus mammalian cells) has to be taken into account. A number of current model approaches are discussed within this context, and it is shown that most of them do not satisfy the criterion of universal applicability and can therefore not claim to give a 'true' picture of biological reality. Shouldered survival curves are taken as an example to illustrate these points in a more specific way

  5. Hypoxic sensitizers: radiobiological studies at the cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitroimidazoles have been found to selectively sensitize hypoxic cells to the effects of irradiation. The latest in this family of drugs is RO-07-0582, which is able to mimic 80 percent of the oxygen effect at a concentration of 5 mM by modifying the sensitivity of hypoxic cells to single doses of gamma rays; however, it is not a substitution for oxygen in promoting the repair of sublethal radiation damage between split doses. Studies show that it is a powerful cytotoxic agent as well and selectively operates against hypoxic cells. (auth)

  6. Multiple Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Action of Lycopene in Cancer Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Trejo-Solís

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  7. Evolution of radiobiological models in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predicting treatment outcome to radiotherapy from in-vitro radiobiological parameters and utilizing the BED approach helps to tailor individual patient treatments and design new promising treatment protocols for patients in whom unfavorable treatment outcome is anticipated. This paper presents the present status of the LQ model of dose effect relationship

  8. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems

  9. Soft x rays for radiobiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lethal effects and chromosome aberrations induced in cells exposed to low energy (soft) X rays demonstrated that these relatively low energy X rays are just as effective as those of higher energy for radiobiological studies, and even more effective for irradiating cultured mammalian cells than laboratory animals. (author)

  10. Radiobiological and clinical aspects of neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological investigations and their interpretation are discussed. The history of neutrontherapy, the results of RBE-investigations in man as well as clinical results are given. The hypothesis on reaction of human tissue and tumours towards neutron irradiation is presented. (A.S.)

  11. Evaluation of radiobiological effects in 3 distinct biological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. The present work aims at sharing the process of development of advanced biological models to study radiobiological effects. Recognizing several known limitations and difficulties of the current monolayer cellular models, as well as the increasing difficulties to use advanced biological models, our group has been developing advanced biological alternative models, namely three-dimensional cell cultures and a less explored animal model (the Zebra fish - Danio rerio - which allows the access to inter-generational data, while characterized by a great genetic homology towards the humans). These 3 models (monolayer cellular model, three-dimensional cell cultures and zebra fish) were externally irradiated with 100 mGy, 500 mGy or 1 Gy. The consequences of that irradiation were studied using cellular and molecular tests. Our previous experimental studies with 100 mGy external gamma irradiation of HepG2 monolayer cells showed a slight increase in the proliferation rate 24 h, 48 h and 72 h post irradiation. These results also pointed into the presence of certain bystander effects 72 h post irradiation, constituting the starting point for the need of a more accurate analysis realized with this work. At this stage, we continue focused on the acute biological effects. Obtained results, namely MTT and clonogenic assays for evaluating cellular metabolic activity and proliferation in the in vitro models, as well as proteomics for the evaluation of in vivo effects will be presented, discussed and explained. Several hypotheses will be presented and defended based on the facts previously demonstrated. This work aims at sharing the actual state and the results already available from this medium-term project, building the proof of the added value on applying these advanced models, while demonstrating the strongest and weakest points from all of them (so allowing the comparison between them and to base the subsequent choice for research groups starting

  12. Workshop on radiobiological effectiveness of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons has become the subject of some heated discussions in both scientific and radiation-protection oriented communities. This has become especially so since the realization that neutron exposures of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima were considerably lower than previously assumed, thus ''devaluating'' the importance of what we thought was a solid human data base. At the same time, more recent data from radiobiological research appeared to indicate that, at least for some biological endpoints, the RBE of neutrons at low doses and low dose rates was increased dramatically compared to the RBE at higher dose and dose rates. As a consequence, the protection of health against neutrons became a subject of some urgency. The objective of this workshop was to evaluate the existing data base in order to determine the need for additional research in this field. 22 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  13. Refined testicular dosimetry and radiobiology in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full text of the publication follows. The testes are one of the most radiosensitive organs. They constitute an important critical target tissue both for external and internal exposure during diagnostic or therapeutic use of radionuclides. The testis consists of an egg-shaped tissue containing a large number of lobules. These are occupied by one to four seminiferous tubules, where the spermatogenesis takes place, i.e. the complex process where germ cells proliferate and transform into spermatozoa. The testicular cells have different sensitivity to radiation with the highest sensitivity of the undifferentiated spermatogonia close of the basal cell layer, and lowest sensitivity of the more mature sperm cells migrating towards the lumen. Exposure of the testis may occur due to radiopharmaceutical administration in patients either for therapy or diagnostic purposes, which may result in considerable high absorbed dose to the testis and may harm the testicular germ cells. In general the mean absorbed dose to the whole testis is estimated, which has been reported for different radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals in the literature. However, due to the difference in radiosensitivity of the germ cells the absorbed doses to each type of cells in the seminiferous epithelium is of importance for a radiobiological interpretation. Testicular dosimetry on the cellular level is a complex matter and has not yet been addressed. The aim of this project was to design a small-scale anatomy model for calculation of S-factors (Gy MBq-1) for different source-target combinations, i.e. the interstitial tissue and different germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium. Based on this small-scale anatomy model it should be possible to estimate radiobiological effects based on radioactivity distribution determined by autoradiography, calculated differentiated absorbed doses, and known radiosensitivity of the different germ cells. The novel small-scale anatomy model will be presented and its

  14. The Fundamentals of Imaging Physics and Radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Selman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Like its well-known predecessor, this new and expanded Ninth Edition presents numerous important changes, beginning with the title and continuing throughout the text. Drawing on current knowledge and his own extensive experience, Dr. Selman provides a thorough revision and overview of each previously included chapter. Definitions, foundations, and principles are presented along with changes in methods and procedures. The text presents five new chapters on computed tomography, radioactivity and diagnostic nuclear medicine, radiobiology, protection in radiology/health physics, and nonradiologic

  15. Scientific projection paper for space radiobiological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nationale for the radiobiological research requirements for space is rooted in a national commitment to the exploration of space, mandated in the form of the National Space Act. This research is almost entirely centered on man; more specifically, on the effects of the space radiation environment on man and his protection from them. The research needs discussed in this presentation include the space radiation environment; dosimetry; radiation biology-high LET particles (dose/response); and operational countermeasures

  16. Dosimetry for radiobiology experiments at GANIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durantel, Florent; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Cassimi, Amine; Chevalier, François; Ngono-Ravache, Yvette; Madi, Toiammou; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Ramillon, Jean-Marc; Rothard, Hermann; Ropars, Frédéric; Schwob, Lucas; Testard, Isabelle; Saintigny, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    Mainly encouraged by the increasing application of ion beams for cancer treatment (hadron-therapy) including carbon beams, the use of heavy ion facilities for radiobiology is expanding rapidly today. As an alternative to dedicated centers for treatment and medical research, accelerators like GANIL offer the possibility to undertake such experiments. Since 20 years, CIMAP, reinforced 15 years ago by the biological host laboratory LARIA, has been receiving researchers in radiobiology and assisted them in performing experiments in different fields such as hadron-therapy, space radioprotection and fundamental biological and physico-chemical mechanisms. We present here a short description of the beam line and the on-line equipments that allow the automatic irradiation of up to 24 biological samples at once. We also developed an original on-line beam monitoring procedure for low ion flux (low dose rates) based on the measurement of the K-shell X-rays emitted from a thin iron foil. This detector is calibrated on an absolute scale before each experiment by counting etched tracks on an irradiated CR39 polymer plate. We present the performances and limits of this method and finally give typical fluence (dose) uncertainties for a standard irradiation in radiobiology.

  17. Particle beam therapy for cancer. A radiobiological perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As for the particle beam therapy, there is to theoretical evidence by radiobiology. The particle beam therapy becomes high precision by development of the medicine engineering. We demonstrated the past contribution for the particle beam therapy and recent knowledge about radiobiological phenomenon such as (1) DNA damage and the repair, (2) cell killing effect, (3) metastasis, and (4) therapeutic gain. Finally, we discuss it about the radiobiological perspective for the particle beam therapy. (author)

  18. Radiobiological basis of radiation protection and ICRP 2007 general recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICRP 2007 General Recommendations are based on the detailed review of the new information on the biological effects and risk evaluation done during the last decade. Most of this information reinforces the validity of earlier findings. Since the publication of ICRP 60 general recommendations in 1991(ICRP 1991b), sufficient new information on the health effects of ionizing radiations has accrued based on radiobiological and epidemiological studies (UNSCEAR 2000, ICRP Publication 99). There is an improvement in understanding the mechanistic aspects of the induction of radiation damage at cellular level. Biophysical studies based on Monte Carlo track structure codes have provided information on the nature of critical damage to DNA leading to the radiation effects at cellular level. Experimental work with model animal systems has provided information on the role of post irradiation repair processes and the genes influencing the process of radiation carcinogenesis. Longer follow up of A-Bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provides a more reliable risk estimate based on the cancer incidence data and also a better model for the transfer of risk among different populations with varying frequency of background incidence. At present it is clear that the breast cancer contributes substantially to the radiation risk and provides quantitative risk estimates for brain and salivary glands. In the light of the new information, Tissue Weighting factors (WT) have been revised

  19. VI Congress on radiation research (radiobiology, radioecology, radiation safety). Abstracts. Volume 1 (sections I-VII)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains abstracts at the VI Congress on radiation studies, a program that included various aspects of the action of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on living organisms, problems of radioecology and radiation safety of human health and environment. Congress is confined to the 25th anniversary of the accident at the Chernobyl NPP. Several reports have summarized the 25-years studying the effects of the accident, articulated forecasts and the main directions of further research. The first volume contains the plenary reports, presentations on the sections of radiation biochemistry and molecular radiobiology, radiation genetics, radiation immunology and hematology, medical and biological aspects of radiation effect, mechanisms of low dose and low intensity radiation effects, long-term effects of radiation. Radiation protection and modification of radiation effects, radiobiology of tumors, problems of radiation therapy are under consideration

  20. Radiobiological investigations of the accelerators at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) has the different accelerators of heavy charged particles for various energies. The radiobiological investigations at these machines have been commenced some tens years ago. The main task of scientific research at the Laboratory of Radiation Biology of JINR is connected with investigations of genetic effects of accelerated charged particles with wide spectrum of energies. Using accelerated heavy ions with low energy, the following directions of researches in radiobiology and radiation genetics were performed: study of RBE problem in connection with DNA repair processes; investigation of the molecular mechanisms of point and structural mutation induction in prokaryotic cells and the influence of the repair systems on the mutagenic processes after irradiation in a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET); study of the SOS-response of bacterial cells by using SOS-chromo test, SOS-lux test and by criteria of α-prophage induction in lysogenic bacteria after irradiation by heavy ions; study of the regularities of gene mutation inductions in yeast cells under action of ionizing radiation with different LET; investigations of the regularities of unstable and stable chromosomal aberrations (translocations) in human cells under action of ionizing radiation with wide LET range; study of mutagenic (HPRT gene) effects in mammalian cells in culture after heavy charged particle irradiation and chromosomal instability in HPRT-mutant clones after irradiation; study of the cytogenetic effects in mammalian cells irradiated by heavy ions in low doses. The radiobiological investigations with high energy are carried out at the Nuclotron - the new JINR accelerator. The programme involves the most vital tasks of modern radiobiology: study of the regularities and mechanisms of stable and unstable chromosome aberration induction in human cells; genetic control of check-point regulation in low eukaryotic cells; study of the

  1. Radiation monitoring considerations for radiobiology facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, conducts a wide variety of radiobiology and radioecology research in a number of facilities on the Hanford Reservation. Review of radiation monitoring problems associated with storage, plant and animal experiments, waste handling and sterile facilities shows that careful monitoring, strict procedural controls and innovative techniques are required to minimize occupational exposure and control contamination. Although a wide variety of radioactivity levels are involved, much of the work is with extremely low level materials. Monitoring low level work is mundane and often impractical but cannot be ignored in today's ever tightening controls

  2. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Yong [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Hutt, Julie A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Padilla, Mabel T. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Gott, Katherine M. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-02-01

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  3. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2010-01-01

    From a distinguished author comes this new edition for technologists, practitioners, residents, and students in radiology and nuclear medicine. Encompassing major topics in nuclear medicine from the basic physics of radioactive decay to instrumentation and radiobiology, it is an ideal review for Board and Registry examinations. The material is well organized and written with clarity. The book is supplemented with tables and illustrations throughout. It provides a quick reference book that is concise but comprehensive, and offers a complete discussion of topics for the nuclear medicine and radi

  4. Generalized calculus in radiobiology: Physical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Grau, O; Antoranz, J C; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Non-extensive statistical physics has allowed to generalize mathematical functions such as exponential and logarithms. The same framework is used to generalize sum and product so that the operations allow a more fluid way to work with mathematical expressions emerging from non-additive formulation of statistical physics. In this work we employ the generalization of the exponential, logarithm and product to obtain a formula for the survival fraction corresponding to the application of several radiation doses on a living tissue. Also we provide experimental recommendations to determine the universal characteristics of living tissues in interaction with radiation. These results have a potential application in radiobiology and radiation oncology.

  5. [Radiobiological analysis of cancerogenic risk values in radioepidemiological investigations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhdestvenskiĭ, L M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present article consisted in critical analysis of the epidemiological approach to radiocancerogenic risk estimation in region of low level radiation (LLR). The estimation is making by means of mathematician models that ignore a principal difference in biological action of LLR and high level radiation (HLR). The main formal characteristic of LLR action is the presence of a plateau in beginning of a dose-effect curve of radiogenic risk. It may be argued by the following positions: repeating the plateau-phenomenon on various radiobiological effects, in different tests and bioobjects, first; a paradoxical trend of reciprocal ERR/Sv increasing regarding dose decreasing in region of plateau, second, and third, the increasing of the curvature in dose-effect curve beginning. The presence of a plateau is associated with the presence of a real radiogenic risk threshold. Besides, the analysis of processes influencing significantly the dynamics of initial radiation injury of biologically important macromolecules showed the preference in region of LLR those, decreasing/eliminating genome damages. There is follows from mentioned above a necessity to evaluate radiogenic risks in LLR region separately from HLR region. PMID:18825986

  6. Melanomas: radiobiology and role of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: This course will review the radiobiology of malignant melanoma (MM) and the clinical use of radiation therapy for metastatic melanoma and selected primary sites. The course will emphasize the scientific principles underlying the clinical treatment of MM. Introduction: The incidence of malignant melanoma has one of the fastest growth rates in the world. In 1991, there were 32,000 cases and 7,000 deaths from MM in the United States. By the year 2000, one of every 90 Americans will develop MM. Wide local excision is the treatment of choice for Stage I-II cutaneous MM. Five-year survival rates depend on (a) sex: female-63%, male-40%; (b) tumor thickness: t 4 mm-25%; (c) location: extremity-60%, trunk-41%; and (d) regional lymph node status: negative-77%, positive-31%. Despite adequate surgery, 45-50% of all MM patients will develop metastatic disease. Radiobiology: Both the multi-target model: S = 1-(1-e-D/Do)n and the linear quadratic mode: -In(S) = alpha x D + beta x D2 predict a possible benefit for high dose per fraction (> 400 cGy) radiation therapy for some MM cell lines. The extrapolation number (n) varies from 1-100 for MM compared to other mammalian cells with n=2-4. The alpha/beta ratios for a variety of MM cell lines vary from 1 to 33. Other radiobiologic factors (repair of potentially lethal damage, hypoxia, reoxygenation, and repopulation) predict a wide variety of clinical responses to different time-dose prescriptions including high dose per fraction (> 400 cGy), low dose per fraction (200-300 cGy), or b.i.d. therapy. Based on a review of the radiobiology of MM, no single therapeutic strategy emerges which could be expected to be successful for all tumors. Time-Dose Prescriptions: A review of the retrospective and prospective clinical trials evaluating various time-dose prescriptions for MM reveals: (1) MM is a radiosensitive tumor over a wide range of diverse time-dose prescriptions; and (2) The high clinical response rates to a

  7. BNL ACCELERATOR-BASED RADIOBIOLOGY FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    2000-05-28

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40--3,000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} ions per pulse. The BAF Project is described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans are presented.

  8. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2013-01-01

    The Fourth Edition of Dr. Gopal B. Saha’s Physics and Radiobiology of Nuclear Medicine was prompted by the need to provide up-to-date information to keep pace with the perpetual growth and improvement in the instrumentation and techniques employed in nuclear medicine since the last edition published in 2006. Like previous editions, the book is intended for radiology and nuclear medicine residents to prepare for the American Board of Nuclear Medicine, American Board of Radiology, and American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine examinations, all of which require a strong physics background. Additionally, the book will serve as a textbook on nuclear medicine physics for nuclear medicine technologists taking the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board examination.

  9. Radiobiological characteristic of tritium-labelled lysine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on mice and rats injected with tritium-labeled lysine have revealed that one day after injection about 80% of the label was retained in organs and tissues as tissue-bound tritium. Retention curves for tritium in the body were decomposed into two exponentials. The biological half-lives of tritium-labeled lysine in various tissues exceed half-lives of other tritiated amino acids and of triated water. The average dose in different tissues following injection of tritiated lysine exceeds that from equal of tritium oxide (THO) by 1.5-8 times. Contribution of the tissue-bound tritium in dose is about 90%. radiobiological experiments showed strong genetic and citotoxic effects in male mice after injection of tritium-labeled lysine

  10. Harmonization of radiobiological assays: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has made available a technical manual for cytogenetic biodosimetry assays (dicentric chromosome aberration (DCA) and cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assays) used for radiation dose assessment in radiation accidents. The International Standardization Organization, which develops standards and guidelines, also provides an avenue for laboratory accreditation, has developed guidelines and recommendations for performing cytogenetic biodosimetry assays. Harmonization of DCA and CBMN assays, has improved their accuracy. Double-blinded inter-laboratory comparison studies involving several networks have further validated DCA and CBMN assays and improved the confidence in their potential use for radiation dose assessment in mass casualties. This kind of international harmonization is lacking for pre-clinical radiobiology assays. The widely used pre-clinical assays that are relatively important to set stage for clinical trials include clonogenic assays, flow-cytometry assays, apoptotic assays, and tumor regression and growth delay assays. However, significant inter-laboratory variations occur with respect to data among laboratories. This raises concerns on the reliability and reproducibility of preclinical data that drives further development and translation. Lack of reproducibility may stem from a variety of factors such as poor scientist training, less than optimal experimental design, inadequate description of methodology, and impulse to publish only the positive data etc. Availability of technical manuals, standard operating procedures, accreditation avenues for laboratories performing such assays, inter-laboratory comparisons, and use of standardized protocols are necessary to enhance reliability and reproducibility. Thus, it is important that radiobiological assays are harmonized for laboratory protocols to ensure successful translation of pre-clinical research on radiation effect modulators to help design clinic trials with

  11. Radiobiology with heavy charged particles: a historical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarsgard, L.D. [Dept. of Medical Biophysics, B.C. Cancer Research Centre and TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation will attempt to briefly review some of radiobiological data on the effects of heavy charged particles and to discuss the influence of those studies on the clinical application which followed. (orig./MG)

  12. Population of Computational Rabbit-Specific Ventricular Action Potential Models for Investigating Sources of Variability in Cellular Repolarisation

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Gemmell; Kevin Burrage; Blanca Rodriguez; T Alexander Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Variability is observed at all levels of cardiac electrophysiology. Yet, the underlying causes and importance of this variability are generally unknown, and difficult to investigate with current experimental techniques. The aim of the present study was to generate populations of computational ventricular action potential models that reproduce experimentally observed intercellular variability of repolarisation (represented by action potential duration) and to identify its potential causes. A s...

  13. Radiobiology of Radiosurgery for the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Santacroce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Leksell radiosurgery is defined as “the delivery of a single, high dose of irradiation to a small and critically located intracranial volume through the intact skull.” Before its birth in the early 60s and its introduction in clinical therapeutic protocols in late the 80s dose application in radiation therapy of the brain for benign and malignant lesions was based on the administration of cumulative dose into a variable number of fractions. The rationale of dose fractionation is to lessen the risk of injury of normal tissue surrounding the target volume. Radiobiological studies of cell culture lines of malignant tumors and clinical experience with patients treated with conventional fractionated radiotherapy helped establishing this radiobiological principle. Radiosurgery provides a single high dose of radiation which translates into a specific toxic radiobiological response. Radiobiological investigations to study the effect of high dose focused radiation on the central nervous system began in late the 50s. It is well known currently that radiobiological principles applied for dose fractionation are not reproducible when single high dose of ionizing radiation is delivered. A review of the literature about radiobiology of radiosurgery for the central nervous system is presented.

  14. DNA-Destabilizing Agents as an Alternative Approach for Targeting DNA: Mechanisms of Action and Cellular Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Lenglet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA targeting drugs represent a large proportion of the actual anticancer drug pharmacopeia, both in terms of drug brands and prescription volumes. Small DNA-interacting molecules share the ability of certain proteins to change the DNA helix's overall organization and geometrical orientation via tilt, roll, twist, slip, and flip effects. In this ocean of DNA-interacting compounds, most stabilize both DNA strands and very few display helix-destabilizing properties. These types of DNA-destabilizing effect are observed with certain mono- or bis-intercalators and DNA alkylating agents (some of which have been or are being developed as cancer drugs. The formation of locally destabilized DNA portions could interfere with protein/DNA recognition and potentially affect several crucial cellular processes, such as DNA repair, replication, and transcription. The present paper describes the molecular basis of DNA destabilization, the cellular impact on protein recognition, and DNA repair processes and the latter's relationships with antitumour efficacy.

  15. Differential Effects of Polymer-Surface Decoration on Drug Delivery, Cellular Retention, and Action Mechanisms of Functionalized Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuanyuan; Hu, Hao; He, Lizhen; Chen, Tianfeng

    2015-12-01

    Polymer-surface decoration has been found to be an effective strategy to enhance the biological activities of nanomedicine. Herein, three different types of polymers with a cancer-targeting ligand Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD) have been used to decorate mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) and the functionalized nanosystems were used as drug carriers of oxaliplatin (OXA). The results showed that polymer-surface decoration of the MSNs nanosystem by poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) significantly enhanced the anticancer efficacy of OXA, which was much higher than that of chitosan (CTS). This effect was closely related to the enhancement of the cellular uptake and cellular drug retention. Moreover, PEI@MSNs-OXA possessed excellent advantages in penetrating ability and inhibitory effects on SW480 spheroids that were used to simulate the in vivo tumor environments. Therefore, this study provides useful information for the rational design of a cancer-targeted MSNs nanosystem with polymer-surface decoration. PMID:26248202

  16. Nuclear Physics and Radiobiology - Issues for Humans in Space and on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ram

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear physics is playing a vital role in human biological applications, specifically in planned space missions, in hadron radiotherapy, and in low dose radiobiology. While seemingly disparate, these and other areas share a common need for the understanding of nuclear interactions in biological systems. Radiobiology continues to provide valuable information that will help develop better methods for using radiation in the treatment of disease as well as provide a scientific basis for radiation protection standards. NASA is now focused on the agency's vision for space exploration encompassing a broad range of human and robotic missions including missions to the Moon, Mars and beyond. As a result, there is a focus on long duration space missions. Protection from hazards of space radiation has been identified as one of the five NASA critical areas for human space flight. The cost effective design of spacecraft demands a very stringent requirement on the optimization process. Exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space and/or long duration missions are very different from that of low earth orbit, and much needs to be done about their effects. However, it is clear that revolutionary technologies will need to be developed. Here on earth, particulate radiation treatment for cancer, such as proton radiotherapy, is playing an increasing important role, while the biological effectiveness remains less well understood than for x-rays and other forms of medical radiation treatments. Advanced imaging, dosimetric, Monte Carlo, and other techniques from nuclear physics are utilized to study the molecular basis of fractionation dependency and other tumor and normal tissue radiation responses, such as radiosensitivity. Moreover, advances developed by biological research efforts, such as the sequencing of the human genome, have opened new horizons for radiobiology. New techniques have made it possible to determine at the cellular / molecular level how living

  17. The European Radiobiology Archives (ERA), its present status, relation to other radiobiology archives and future development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Radiobiology Archives (ERA) in cooperation with the US (National Radiobiology Archives, NRA) and Japanese (Japanese Radiobiology Archives, JRA) aim to collect most of the information still available in Europe on long-term animal experiments - including some selected human studies suitable for comparison with animal data - and to make them available to the scientific community for further analysis. Presently, the archives contain a description of the exposure conditions, animal strains, etc from ∝350.000 individuals, and data on survival and pathology are available from ∝200.000 individuals. These data are incorporated in an ACCESS 2000 database, which also includes means (forms with underlying computer code) for browsing through the data, searching for groups given certain treatments, using specific animal strains or age, etc. Other forms allow the selection of experimental groups, their evaluation by some statistical programs and their export for further detailed studies by interested scientists. The forms also allow researchers to combine groups and to pool diseases into larger classes, e.g. all malignant tumours, all lung tumours etc., features that are important when studies from different laboratories are to be evaluated. The use of the database is illustrated by an example on the selection and preparation for further analysis of data dealing with the effects of 224Ra. The collection of data will continue in the future; and the archives will liase with similar ventures such as the European 'pathbase'. The user interface will be developed further for accessibility and user friendliness and be continuously adjusted to the current state of the art of hardware and software. The archives are to be transferred to the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Neuherberg, Germany under the sponsorship of the European Commission and in collaboration with the European Late Effect Project Group (EULEP). (orig.)

  18. In vitro irradiation system for radiobiological experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cell cultures provide important information on basic tumor biology and radiobiology, they are not representative of the complexity of three-dimensional (3-D) solid tumors. In particular, new models reproducing clinical conditions as closely as possible are needed for radiobiological studies to provide information that can be translated from bench to bedside. We developed a novel system for the irradiation, under sterile conditions, of 3-D tumor spheroids, the in vitro model considered as a bridge between the complex architectural organization of in vivo tumors and the very simple one of in vitro monolayer cell cultures. The system exploits the same equipment as that used for patient treatments, without the need for dedicated and highly expensive instruments. To mimic the passage of radiation beams through human tissues before they reach the target tumor mass, 96-multiwell plates containing the multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are inserted into a custom-built phantom made of plexiglass, the material most similar to water, the main component of human tissue. The system was used to irradiate CAEP- and A549-derived MCTS, pre-treated or not with 20 μM cisplatin, with a dose of 20 Gy delivered in one session. We also tested the same treatment schemes on monolayer CAEP and A549 cells. Our preliminary results indicated a significant increment in radiotoxicity 20 days after the end of irradiation in the CAEP spheroids pre-treated with cisplatin compared to those treated with cisplatin or irradiation alone. Conversely, the effect of the radio- chemotherapy combination in A549-derived MCTS was similar to that induced by cisplatin or irradiation alone. Finally, the 20 Gy dose did not affect cell survival in monolayer CAEP and A549 cells, whereas cisplatin or cisplatin plus radiation caused 100% cell death, regardless of the type of cell line used. We set up a system for the irradiation, under sterile conditions, of tumor cells

  19. Antidiabetic actions of aqueous bark extract of Swertia chirayita on insulin secretion, cellular glucose uptake and protein glycation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather-Anne J. Thomson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is renewed scientific interest in the potential of plant-derived agents for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the antidiabetic actions of Swertia chirayita, a plant used traditionally in the management of diabetes. Methods: Insulin secretion from BRIN-DB11 cells was assessed in the absence or presence of plant extract and modulators of beta cell function. Glucose uptake was assessed using 3T3-L1 cells while effects of the plant extract on protein glycation was assessed using model peptide. Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay and intracellular calcium by FlexStation and reg;. Results: Swertia chirayita significantly stimulated concentration-dependent insulin secretion from BRIN-BD11 cells. Its insulinotropic effects were abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium or by diazoxide and were significantly decreased by verapamil and in beta cell depolarization with KCl. S.chirayita extracts evoked a 28-59% increase in basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by 3T3-L1 cells. Protein glycation was significantly inhibited by S.chirayita in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: This study reveals that the antidiabetic actions of S.chirayita aqueous bark extracts involves the stimulation of insulin secretion and enhancement of insulin action. Inhibition of protein glycation may also help counter diabetic complications. These actions of S.chirayita may provide new opportunities for the treatment of diabetes. [J Exp Integr Med 2014; 4(4.000: 268-272

  20. Mobile communication. Radiobiology problems and danger evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actual problem of the effect of mobile radio communication on the healths of cellular telephone users is discussed. Dosimetric data of the specific absorbed rate of electromagnetic field in a human head during cellular telephone using. Results of physiological, biochemical, clinical and physiological investigations of the effect of electromagnetic field of cellular telephones on the health stable of volunteers are analyzed. It is found out that MPL of power density for the user of cellular telephone is equal to 100 μW/cm2

  1. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsässer, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  2. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsaesser, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Markus-Krankenhaus, MVZ Radiologisches Institut, D-60431 Frankfurt/M. (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  3. Biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of my biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology is presented. Early adventures involved developing ''state-vector models'' for specific harmful effects (cell killing, life shortening) of exposure to radiation. More recent adventures led to developing ''hazard-function models'' for predicting biological effects (e.g., cell killing, mutations, tumor induction) of combined exposure to different toxicants. Hazard-function models were also developed for predicting harm to man from exposure to large radiation doses. Major conclusions derived from the modeling adventures are as follows: (1) synergistic effects of different genotoxic agents should not occur at low doses; (2) for exposure of the lung or bone marrow to large doses of photon radiation, low rates of exposure should be better tolerated than high rates; and (3) for some types of radiation (e.g., alpha particles and fission neutrons), moderate doses delivered at a low rate may be more harmful than the same dose given at a high rate. 53 refs., 7 figs

  4. Radiobiological foundation of thermal neutron capture treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five radiobiological problems in thermal neutron capture treatment were considered on the basis of experimental data. As a result of an experiment of irradiation using thermal neutron generated by an atomic pile of Kyoto University, RBE of thermal neutron on cultured B-16 melanoma cells was determined to 2.43. Cultured B-16 melanoma cells did not recovered from sublethal damage when fractionated irradiation of thermal neutron was performed. To know additive effects of 10B-compounds, an amount of 10B-boric acid equivalent to 5 μg/ml of 10B was administered to culture medium for melanoma cells before the irradiation. As a result, Do values when 10B-boric acid was administered before irradiation were 3.3 times as much as those when only thermal neutron was irradiated, and RBE of thermal neutron when 10B-boric acid was administered was 3.04 RBE of 10B(n, α)7Li reaction (3.43) was also calculated. It was pointed out that it was difficult to estimate absorbed dose precisely by 10B(n, α)7Li reaction. It was also necessary to know the movement from proliferation to differentiation of cells accurately when neutron capture treatment using differential plasma of cancer cells was performed. (Tsunoda, M.)

  5. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the α/β ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor α/β and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF2) data, and the above α/β ratio, the estimated median α value was 0.077 Gy-1, β was 0.009 Gy-2, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy9.3 (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis

  6. Toward a national consensus: teaching radiobiology to radiation oncology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The ASTRO Joint Working Group on Radiobiology Teaching, a committee composed of members having affiliations with several national radiation oncology and biology-related societies and organizations, commissioned a survey designed to address issues of manpower, curriculum standardization, and instructor feedback as they relate to resident training in radiation biology. Methods and Materials: Radiation biology instructors at U.S. radiation oncology training programs were identified and asked to respond to a comprehensive electronic questionnaire dealing with instructor educational background, radiation biology course content, and sources of feedback with respect to curriculum planning and resident performance on standardized radiation biology examinations. Results: Eighty-five radiation biology instructors were identified, representing 73 radiation oncology residency training programs. A total of 52 analyzable responses to the questionnaire were received, corresponding to a response rate of 61.2%. Conclusion: There is a decreasing supply of instructors qualified to teach classic, and to some extent, clinical, radiobiology to radiation oncology residents. Additionally, those instructors with classic training in radiobiology are less likely to be comfortable teaching cancer molecular biology or other topics in cancer biology. Thus, a gap exists in teaching the whole complement of cancer and radiobiology curricula, particularly in those programs in which the sole responsibility for teaching falls to one faculty member (50% of training programs are in this category). On average, the percentage of total teaching time devoted to classic radiobiology (50%), clinical radiobiology (30%), and molecular and cancer biology (20%) is appropriate, relative to the current makeup of the board examination. Nevertheless large variability exists between training programs with respect to the total number of contact hours per complete radiobiology course (ranging from

  7. Monte Carlo role in radiobiological modelling of radiotherapy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, Issam; Pater, Piotr; Seuntjens, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Radiobiological models are essential components of modern radiotherapy. They are increasingly applied to optimize and evaluate the quality of different treatment planning modalities. They are frequently used in designing new radiotherapy clinical trials by estimating the expected therapeutic ratio of new protocols. In radiobiology, the therapeutic ratio is estimated from the expected gain in tumour control probability (TCP) to the risk of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). However, estimates of TCP/NTCP are currently based on the deterministic and simplistic linear-quadratic formalism with limited prediction power when applied prospectively. Given the complex and stochastic nature of the physical, chemical and biological interactions associated with spatial and temporal radiation induced effects in living tissues, it is conjectured that methods based on Monte Carlo (MC) analysis may provide better estimates of TCP/NTCP for radiotherapy treatment planning and trial design. Indeed, over the past few decades, methods based on MC have demonstrated superior performance for accurate simulation of radiation transport, tumour growth and particle track structures; however, successful application of modelling radiobiological response and outcomes in radiotherapy is still hampered with several challenges. In this review, we provide an overview of some of the main techniques used in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy, with focus on the MC role as a promising computational vehicle. We highlight the current challenges, issues and future potentials of the MC approach towards a comprehensive systems-based framework in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy.

  8. Molecular, cellular and medical aspects of the action of nutraceuticals and small molecules therapeutics: from chemoprevention to new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colic, M; Pavelic, K

    2002-01-01

    Dietary supplements, functional foods and their concentrated, sometimes purified, active forms, the so-called nutraceuticals, are becoming increasingly popular throughout the world. Small molecules that regulate signal transduction cascades and gene expression are being tested by many pharmaceutical companies. A rapidly and exponentially growing industry (close to $30 billion in 1999 worldwide) exists to commercialize and exploit this interest. However, the scientific basis of the action of such unproved products is in the very early stages of development. While supporters claim they produce miracle cures, opponents argue that such unproved agents do more harm than good. PMID:12635491

  9. Proceedings of the 4th Radiobiological conference with international participation 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientific conference deals with problems in radiobiology, photobiology and radio-environmental sciences. The Conference included the following sessions: (i): Radiobiology; (ii) Biology. Proceedings contains thirty-two papers dealing with the scope of INIS

  10. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E A; Kronenberg, A

    1998-11-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue. PMID:9806616

  11. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E. A.; Kronenberg, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  12. National Radiobiology Archives distributed access programmer's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prather, J. C. [Linfield Coll., McMinnville, OR (United States); Smith, S. K.; Watson, C. R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The National Radiobiology Archives is a comprehensive effort to gather, organize, and catalog original data, representative specimens, and supporting materials related to significant radiobiology studies. This provides researchers with information for analyses which compare or combine results of these and other studies and with materials for analysis by advanced molecular biology techniques. This Programmer's Guide document describes the database access software, NRADEMO, and the subset loading script NRADEMO/MAINT/MAINTAIN, which comprise the National Laboratory Archives Distributed Access Package. The guide is intended for use by an experienced database management specialist. It contains information about the physical and logical organization of the software and data files. It also contains printouts of all the scripts and associated batch processing files. It is part of a suite of documents published by the National Radiobiology Archives.

  13. [Radiobiological aspects of diagnostic X-ray use in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeveen, R C; van den Aardweg, G J M J

    2015-05-01

    Soon after the discovery of X-rays, it became clear that their use can cause detrimental effects. The field of radiobiology deals with these detrimental effects. In this article, the theoretical concepts of radiobiology relevant to diagnostic X-ray use are presented. The effects of radiation on living tissues, the relationship between dose and effect, and a translation of these effects into the dental application are discussed. X-rays cannot be considered to be harmless even when used at the relatively low doses as in dentistry. If applied with justification and optimization, the risk to the patient will, however, be small. PMID:26210221

  14. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Marshall, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represent a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space.

  15. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represents a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space. (author)

  16. A Mechanism to Enhance Cellular Responsivity to Hormone Action: Krüppel-Like Factor 9 Promotes Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β Autoinduction During Postembryonic Brain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fang; Knoedler, Joseph R; Denver, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR)-β (trb) is induced by TH (autoinduced) in Xenopus tadpoles during metamorphosis. We previously showed that Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9) is rapidly induced by TH in the tadpole brain, associates in chromatin with the trb upstream region in a developmental stage and TH-dependent manner, and forced expression of Klf9 in the Xenopus laevis cell line XTC-2 accelerates and enhances trb autoinduction. Here we investigated whether Klf9 can promote trb autoinduction in tadpole brain in vivo. Using electroporation-mediated gene transfer, we transfected plasmids into premetamorphic tadpole brain to express wild-type or mutant forms of Klf9. Forced expression of Klf9 increased baseline trb mRNA levels in thyroid-intact but not in goitrogen-treated tadpoles, supporting that Klf9 enhances liganded TR action. As in XTC-2 cells, forced expression of Klf9 enhanced trb autoinduction in tadpole brain in vivo and also increased TH-dependent induction of the TR target genes klf9 and thbzip. Consistent with our previous mutagenesis experiments conducted in XTC-2 cells, the actions of Klf9 in vivo required an intact N-terminal region but not a functional DNA binding domain. Forced expression of TRβ in tadpole brain by electroporation-mediated gene transfer increased baseline and TH-induced TR target gene transcription, supporting a role for trb autoinduction during metamorphosis. Our findings support that Klf9 acts as an accessory transcription factor for TR at the trb locus during tadpole metamorphosis, enhancing trb autoinduction and transcription of other TR target genes, which increases cellular responsivity to further TH action on developmental gene regulation programs. PMID:26886257

  17. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were dealt with: DNA repair as therapeutical target in radiation therapy, biological imaging and tumor microenvironment, molecular factors of radiation therapy, molecular factors and modulation of the radiation reaction of normal tissues, experimental tumor therapy, EGFR inhibition, the endothel cell as primary target of radiation therapy, molecular and cellular foundations of the radiation biology of protons and ions. (HSI)

  18. Micro-and nanodosimetry for radiobiological planning in radiotherapy and cancer risk assessment in radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Microdosimetry and nanodosimetry can provide unique information for prediction of radiobiological properties of radiation, which is important in radiation therapy for accurate dose planning and in radiation protection for cancer induction risk assessment. This demand measurements of the pattern of energies deposited by ionizing radiation on cellular scale and DNA levels.Silicon microelectronics technology is offering a unique opportunity for replacing gas proportional counters (TEPC) with miniature detectors for regional microdosimetry. Silicon on Insulator (SOI) technology has been used for the development of arrays of micron size sensitive volumes for modelling energy deposited in biological cells. The challenge in silicon microdosimetry is the development of well defined sensitive volume (SV) and full charge collection deposited by ionizing radiation in the SV. First generation SOI microdosimeters were developed at CMRP and investigated in a wide range of radiation fields for proton and neutron therapies and recently on isotopic neutron sources and heavy ions with energy up to lGeV/jj,m which are typical for deep space radiation environment. Microdosimetric spectra were obtained in a phantom that are well matched to TEPC and Monte Carlo simulations. Evidence that radiations with the same LET exhibit different biological effects demand development of new sensors sensitive to the track structure of ions or the type of particle for prediction of radiobiological effect of radiation using radiobiological models. New monolithic Si AE-E telescope of cellular size for simultaneous regional microdosimetry and particle identification will be presented and results will be discussed. The new design of the SOI microdosimeter is based on 3D micron and submicron size of Si SVs. This approach allows improvement in the accuracy of the Si microdosimetry because of full charge collection and the ability to measure low LET as low as 0.01 keV/jjm, which is similar to TEPC

  19. New radiobiological, radiation risk and radiation protection paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-standing conventional paradigm for radiobiology has formed a logical basis for the standard paradigm for radiation risk of cancer and heritable effects and, from these paradigms, has developed the internationally applied system for radiation protection, but with many simplifications, assumptions and generalizations. A variety of additional radiobiological phenomena that do not conform to the standard paradigm for radiobiology may have potential implications for radiation risk and radiation protection. It is suggested, however, that the current state of knowledge is still insufficient for these phenomena, individually or collectively, to be formulated systematically into a new paradigm for radiobiology. Additionally, there is at present lack of direct evidence of their relevance to risk for human health, despite attractive hypotheses as to how they might be involved. Finally, it remains to be shown how incorporation of such phenomena into the paradigm for radiation protection would provide sufficient added value to offset disruption to the present widely applied system. Further research should aim for better mechanistic understanding of processes such as radiation-induced genomic instability (for all radiation types) and bystander effects (particularly for low-fluence high-LET particles) and also priority should be given to confirmation, or negation, of the relevance of the processes to human health risks from radiation.

  20. Radiobiological researches on Dianthus caryophyllus L. carnation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis reports a radiobiological study of Dianthus periclinal chimeras performed by submitting plants and plant cuttings at different physiological stages to cobalt-60 gamma irradiation under different dose conditions and rates. The effects of these treatments are studied while growing the so-processed plants and by microscopic examination of sections of irradiated meristems

  1. Biometrical analysis in radiobiological works of N.V. Luchnik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of the famous Russian geneticist and biophysics N.V. Luchnik into biometrical analysis of radiobiological data is discussed. His works on radiation mortality of mice (2) and the process of post-radiation repair of chromosome aberrations (10) are thoroughly observed. The conclusion of necessity to develop biometrical analysis as separate part of biometry is made

  2. Research in radiobiology. Annual report, Internal Irradiation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual progress report for the Radiobiology Division of the University of Utah College of Medicine is presented. Summaries of twenty-four projects concerning the metabolism, dosimetry and toxicity of a variety of actinide elements in beagles or rats are given. Individual papers within this report have been separately indexed and abstracted for the data base

  3. Tritium radiobiology research in the US DOE program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of the original US Atomic Energy Commission, its replacement, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the present Department of Energy's interest and sponsorship of tritium radiobiology is reviewed beginning in 1971 and continuing through 1986. In particular, the four remaining US Department of Energy, Division of Health and Environmental Research programs are described in some detail

  4. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, C.; Smith, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Prather, J. (Linfield Coll., McMinnville, OR (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems.

  5. Evidence for intermittent radiobiological hypoxia in experimental tumour systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes flow and static fluorescence cytometry techniques to visualize and quantitate acute radiobiological hypoxia resulting from transient fluctuation in tumour blood flow in experimental tumour systems. The application of these techniques in two murine tumour systems provides evidence that such hypoxia exists and reduces the effectiveness of single doses of radiation. Possible mechanisms for and implications of these findings are discussed. (author)

  6. Cellular basis of radiation-induced fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibrosis is a common sequela of both cancer treatment by radiotherapy and accidental irradiation and has been described in many tissues including skin, lung, heart and liver. The underlying mechanisms of the radiation-induced fibrosis still remain to be resolved. In the present review we tried to illustrate the basic cellular mechanisms of radiation-induced fibrosis based on the newest findings arising from molecular radiobiology and cell biology. Based on these findings the cellular mechanism of radiation-induced fibrosis can be seen as a multicellular process involving various interacting cell systems in the target organ resulting in the fibrotic phenotype of the fibroblast/fibrocyte cell system

  7. Modification of radiobiological effects of 171 MeV protons by elements of physical protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulinina, Taisia; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Ivanov, Alexander; Molokanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation includes protons of various energies. Physical protection is effective in the case of low energy protons (50-100 MeV) and becomes insufficient for radiation with a high part of high-energy protons. In the experiment performed on outbred mice, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the radiobiological effect of 171 MeV protons and protons modified by elements of physical protection of the spacecraft, on a complex of indicators of the functional condition of the system hematopoiesis and the central nervous system in 24 hours after irradiation at 20 cGy dose. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a «protective curtain», and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Mass thickness of the " protective curtain" in terms of water equivalent was ̴ 6,2 g/cm2. Physical shielding along the path of 171 MeV protons increases their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, the two types of shielding together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. The effects observed in the experiment indicate the necessity to carry out comprehensive radiobiological researches (physical, biological and mathematical) in assessing the effects of physical protection, that are actual for ensuring radiation safety of crews in

  8. Optimization in brachytherapy with the implementation of Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the brachytherapy planning treatments with High dose rates (HDR), the optimization algorithms used are based in dosimetric considerations and/or geometric ones, ignoring the radiobiological response of the tissue treated. In this work we wish to show the implementation of radiobiological concepts in the optimization. Assuming that the subtiles differences that result in the dose distribution among the different optimization models which are not visible in an isodose plane, it is studied how is classically make it , the quality implant through natural histograms about dose volumes and the resulting parameters. Also is studied the necrosis probability which may be caused by the choice of some optimization model, allowing with this the choice of the best implant. (Author)

  9. Proceedings of the international conference on radiation biology and clinical applications: a molecular approach towards innovations in applied radiobiology and a workshop on strategies in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innovations in radiotherapy approaches to cancer and radiation biology research is of growing interest in radiation researchers to conduct preclinical studies at their centers and translating the results as soon as possible to clinical radiotherapy practice. Recent papers have greatly enriched the current knowledge of radiation oncology, especially radiobiology and molecular oncology, and this has radically changed the oncology practice in radiation therapy in just a few years. The conference theme highlights the molecular and cellular responses within tissue and higher levels of mammalian biological organization. New experimental radiobiology research to underpin current and future regulatory decisions setting workplace exposure limits. To develop rapid, high-precision analytical methods that assess radiation exposure doses from clinical samples and thus aid in the triage and medical management of radiological casualties. Innovative approaches to improve the accuracy, dose range, ease of use, and speed of classical biodosimetry. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  10. Amchitka radiobiological program progress report, January 1976--December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program is a continuing program to collect biological and environmental samples for radiometric analyses. Results of analyses for samples collected during 1976 include gamma-emitting radionuclides in air filters, freshwater, birds, lichens, marine algae, marine invertebrates, fish, aufwuchs, and freshwater moss and plants; 90Sr in rats, birds, and soil; 239240Pu in sand, soil, marine algae and fish; and tritium (3H) in seawater, freshwater, and biological organisms

  11. Radiobiology Department. Report of Activities 1977-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different research activities carried out by the Radiobiology Department of the CNEA over the 4-year period 1977-1980 are summarized. These activities were devoted to the study of the effects of radiation on different biological systems, to the search for adequate experimental models, and to the development of techniques permiting a correct evaluation of the information obtained. Topics covered are genetics, microbiology, somatic effects of radiation, pathology and the operation of the animal's house. (M.E.L.)

  12. (RadioBiological Optimization of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E. Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available “Biological optimization” (BIOP means planning treatments using (radiobiological criteria and models, that is, tumour control probability and normal-tissue complication probability. Four different levels of BIOP are identified: Level I is “isotoxic” individualization of prescription dose at fixed fraction number. is varied to keep the NTCP of the organ at risk constant. Significant improvements in local control are expected for non-small-cell lung tumours. Level II involves the determination of an individualized isotoxic combination of and fractionation scheme. This approach is appropriate for “parallel” OARs (lung, parotids. Examples are given using our BioSuite software. Hypofractionated SABR for early-stage NSCLC is effectively Level-II BIOP. Level-III BIOP uses radiobiological functions as part of the inverse planning of IMRT, for example, maximizing TCP whilst not exceeding a given NTCP. This results in non-uniform target doses. The NTCP model parameters (reflecting tissue “architecture” drive the optimizer to emphasize different regions of the DVH, for example, penalising high doses for quasi-serial OARs such as rectum. Level-IV BIOP adds functional imaging information, for example, hypoxia or clonogen location, to Level III; examples are given of our prostate “dose painting” protocol, BioProp. The limitations of and uncertainties inherent in the radiobiological models are emphasized.

  13. In vitro irradiation station for broad beam radiobiological experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wéra, A.-C.; Riquier, H.; Heuskin, A.-C.; Michiels, C.; Lucas, S.

    2011-12-01

    The study of the interaction of charged particles with living matter is of prime importance to the fields of radiotherapy, radioprotection and space radiobiology. Particle accelerators and their associated equipment are proven to be helpful tools in performing basic science in all these fields. Indeed, they can accelerate virtually any ions to a given energy and flux and let them interact with living matter either in vivo or in vitro. In this context, the University of Namur has developed a broad beam in vitro irradiation station for use in radiobiological experiments. Cells are handled in GLP conditions and can be irradiated at various fluxes with ions ranging from hydrogen to carbon. The station is mounted on a 2 MV tandem accelerator, and the energy range can be set up in the linear energy transfer (LET) ranges that are useful for radiobiological experiments. This paper describes the current status of the hardware that has been developed, and presents results related to its performance in term of dose-rate, energy range and beam uniformity for protons, alpha particles and carbon ions. The results of clonogenic assays of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells irradiated with protons and alpha particles are also presented and compared with literature.

  14. In vitro irradiation station for broad beam radiobiological experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wera, A.-C., E-mail: anne-catharine.wera@fundp.ac.be [NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur-FUNDP (Belgium); Riquier, H., E-mail: helene.riquier@fundp.ac.be [NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), Unite de Recherche de Biologie Cellulaire (URBC), University of Namur-FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Heuskin, A.-C., E-mail: anne-catherine.heuskin@fundp.ac.be [NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur-FUNDP (Belgium); Michiels, C., E-mail: carine.michiels@fundp.ac.be [NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), Unite de Recherche de Biologie Cellulaire (URBC), University of Namur-FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Lucas, S., E-mail: stephane.lucas@fundp.ac.be [NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur-FUNDP (Belgium)

    2011-12-15

    The study of the interaction of charged particles with living matter is of prime importance to the fields of radiotherapy, radioprotection and space radiobiology. Particle accelerators and their associated equipment are proven to be helpful tools in performing basic science in all these fields. Indeed, they can accelerate virtually any ions to a given energy and flux and let them interact with living matter either in vivo or in vitro. In this context, the University of Namur has developed a broad beam in vitro irradiation station for use in radiobiological experiments. Cells are handled in GLP conditions and can be irradiated at various fluxes with ions ranging from hydrogen to carbon. The station is mounted on a 2 MV tandem accelerator, and the energy range can be set up in the linear energy transfer (LET) ranges that are useful for radiobiological experiments. This paper describes the current status of the hardware that has been developed, and presents results related to its performance in term of dose-rate, energy range and beam uniformity for protons, alpha particles and carbon ions. The results of clonogenic assays of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells irradiated with protons and alpha particles are also presented and compared with literature.

  15. Conjunct action of gamma radiation and casiopeinas in two cellular types; Accion conjunta de radiacion gamma y casiopeinas en dos tipos celulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos V, N.I

    2006-07-01

    In Mexico the cancer occupies the second place in the causes of death and although already there are diverse useful treatments to attack this suffering, the search of new pharmaceuticals that present positive effect in the treatment of the cancer there is taken to the development of a group of substances called Casiopeinas. Its are coordination compounds constituted by a central atom of copper (Cu II) joined to organic ligands, with general condensed formula [Cu (NN)(ON)]NO{sub 3}, or [Cu(NN)(OO)]NO{sub 3}. Its present different cytotoxicity levels, as well as in vitro antineoplastic activity in diverse tissues derived of tumors. Even its ignore the mechanisms of it action, but one of them, it could be by generation of reactive species of oxygen (ERO), mediated by the metallic center that contain. Thinking of this possibility was carried out in vitro experiments, exposing lymphocytes or HeLa cells, to ionizing radiation, at two casiopeinas (Casiopeina llgly and the Casiopeina Ill-e-a) or the combination of both agents, in order to determine if the antineoplastic capacity of both types of treatments increase in conjunct action. To determine it its were carried out cytotoxicity tests by means of the differential dyeing of fluorescein diacetate and etidio bromide, in these the cells alive fluorescein in green color while the dead ones only the nucleus of red tinged. The genotoxicity was evaluated by means of the comet essay. The results hurtled that as much the casiopeinas as the radiation by separate don't present difference among both cellular types, probably due to the used method that only quantifies the damages at the moment and not to long term. And according to those treatments on the whole only to the concentrations and the doses more high it favors the additive effect due to an overproduction of free radicals that not can be neutralized. According to the genotoxicity, only proven for the radiation indicates that the HeLa cells presents a major number of

  16. Radiobiological modeling with MarCell software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, J.S.; Jones, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.

    1999-01-01

    A nonlinear system of differential equations that models the bone marrow cellular kinetics associated with radiation injury, molecular repair, and compensatory cell proliferation has been extensively documented. Recently, that model has been implemented as MarCell, a user-friendly MS-DOS computer program that allows users with little knowledge of the original model to evaluate complex radiation exposure scenarios. The software allows modeling with the following radiations: tritium beta, 100 kVp X, 250 kVp X, 22 MV X, {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, 2 MeV electrons, triga neutrons, D-T neutrons, and 3 blends of mixed-field fission radiations. The possible cell lineages are stem, stroma, and leukemia/lymphoma, and the available species include mouse, rat, dog, sheep, swine, burro, and man. An attractive mathematical feature is that any protracted protocol can be expressed as an equivalent prompt dose for either the source used or for a reference, such as 250 kVp X rays or {sup 60}Co. Output from MarCell includes: risk of 30-day mortality; risk of cancer and leukemia based either on cytopenia or compensatory cell proliferation; cell survival plots as a function of time or dose; and 4-week recovery kinetics following treatment. In this article, the program`s applicability and ease of use are demonstrated by evaluating a medical total body irradiation protocol and a nuclear fallout scenario.

  17. Impact of microgravity on radiobiological processes and efficiency of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horneck, G. [Radiation Biology Division, Institute of Aerospace Medicine, DLR German Aerospace Center, Linder Hohe, 51170 Cologne (Germany)

    1999-12-06

    To study the influence of microgravity on radiobiological processes in space, space experiments have been performed, using an on-board 1xg reference centrifuge as in-flight control. The trajectory of individual heavy ions was localized in relation to the biological systems by use of the Biostack concept, or an additional high dose of radiation was applied either before the mission or during the mission from an on-board radiation source. In embryonic systems, such as early developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster and Carausius morosus, the occurrence of chromosomal translocations and larval malformations was dramatically increased in response to microgravity and radiation. It has been hypothesized that these synergistic effects might be caused by an interference of microgravity with DNA repair processes. However, recent studies on bacteria, yeast cells and human fibroblasts suggest that a disturbance of cellular repair processes in the microgravity environment might not be a complete explanation for the reported synergism of radiation and microgravity. As an alternative explanation, an impact of microgravity on signal transduction, on the metabolic/physiological state or on the chromatin structure at the cellular level, or modification of self-assembly, intercellular communication, cell migration, pattern formation or differentiation at the tissue and organ level should be considered.

  18. Impact of radiobiological considerations on epidemiological inferences of age-dependent radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current epidemiological studies of the age-dependent risk of radiogenic carcinomas are based on populations still in the early stages of cancer expression. The result is a set of logical uncertainties concerning the manner in which inferences may be drawn from the existing data. These uncertainties may be formalized and examined through the application of various radiobiological principles developed from more fundamental experimental data. Chief amongst these considerations are the time course of tumor expression, the role of relative and absolute risk models, the distribution of effects between initiation and promotion, the age-dependent fraction of time a critical cell remains in radiosensitive stages and the combinatorics of the critical cellular subpopulations. Each of these and the combinatorics of the critical cellular subpopulations. Each of these principles are examined in light of their impact on the structuring of epidemiologic data and the drawing of inferences concerning age-dependent radiogenic risk. The data on atomic bomb survivors are employed as a relevant example

  19. In vitro and in vivo ion beam targeted micro-irradiation for radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of radiobiology is to understand the effects of ionizing radiations on the living. These past decades, ion microbeams have shown to be important tools to study for example the effects of low dose exposure, or the bystander effect. Since 2003, the CENBG has been equipped with a system to perform targeted micro-irradiation of living samples. Recently, microbeams applications on this subject have diversified and the study of DNA repair mechanisms at the cellular and multicellular scales, in vitro and in vivo, has become possible thanks to important evolutions of fluorescence imaging techniques and cellular biology. To take into account these new approaches, the CENBG micro-irradiation beamline has been entirely redesigned and rebuilt to implement new features and to improve the existing ones. My PhD objectives were i) commissioning the facility, ii) characterizing the system on track etch detectors, and on living samples, iii) implementing protocols to perform targeted irradiations of living samples with a con-trolled delivered dose, at the cellular and multicellular scales, and to visualize the early consequences online, iv) modelling these irradiations to explain the biological results using the calculated physical data. The work of these past years has allowed us i) to measure the performances of our system: a beam spot size of about 2 μm and a targeting accuracy of ± 2 μm, and to develop ion detection systems for an absolute delivered dose control, ii) to create highly localized radiation-induced DNA damages and to see online the recruitment of DNA repair proteins, iii) to apply these protocols to generate radiation-induced DNA damages in vivo inside a multicellular organism at the embryonic stage: Caenorhabditis elegans. These results have opened up many perspectives on the study of the interaction between ionizing radiations and the living, at the cellular and multicellular scales, in vitro and in vivo. (author)

  20. Studies of UV-cured CR-39 recording properties in view of its applicability in radiobiological experiments with alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiobiology, low doses of high-LET radiation correspond to a few particle traversals through the cell population. Therefore, for studies on cell monolayers irradiated with a low dose of α-particles, it is extremely useful if the number and position of particle traversals can be determined. In this study we describe a new method, based on UV-curing, to obtain a 10μm thick CR-39 grafted onto a 2.5μm thick PolyEthylene Terephtalate (PET). This thin double polymeric layer, used as a dish base, has a regular and reproducible detector thickness which can be traversed by 3.5MeV α-particles, with a sufficient residual energy to traverse mammalian cells attached to the base. The recording properties of a PET-CR-39 dish, together with a demonstration of its use for radiobiological experiments, are presented. This new tool allows the precise determination of single-track impact parameters at a sub-cellular level.

  1. Application of SSNTDs in radiobiological investigations aboard recoverable satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R Q; Gu, R Q; Li, Q

    1997-01-01

    In recent years some Biostack experiments including a wide spectrum of biological objects have been devoted to study of the radiobiological effects on dry seeds aboard recoverable satellites. Some impressive phenomena have been observed. Clearly, the large amount of energy deposited by the highly ionizing heavy nuclei of cosmic rays is the principal reason for the induced aberrations of the chromosomes of wheat root tip cells. A methodical description of the experimental arrangement and procedure of handling and evaluation of given. The preliminary physical and biological results from the experimental "wheat seeds" are presented. PMID:11541794

  2. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 22. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the 25th symposium on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology include papers on the following issues: radiotherapy individualization based on imaging; pre-clinic imaging and new experimental methods; methods and models, micromilieu and metabolism, combined therapy; secondary tumors following radiotherapy; radiogenic effects in normal tissue; resistance mechanism of tumors and normal tissue; personalized radio-oncology - which biological data are needed; pre-clinic and personalized radio-oncology; biomarkers - pre-clinic and translational; translational examinations for personalized radio-oncology.

  3. Toxicological and radiobiological characteristics of some S -derivatives of meprin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural variants with radiobiological properties of alpha-mercaptopropinolylglycine (α-MPG, thiol, meprin) are searched with the aim of revealing preparations with increased radioprotective properties. Results of studying toxicologic and radioprotective properties of a number of synthesized compounds-thiosulphate (TSPG) isothiouranium (ITPG) diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTCPG) and thiophosphate (TPPG) α-MPG derivatives, are presented. The experiments on mice have shown that PSPG has low toxicity and satisfactory radioprotective activity when introduced 4 hours before irradiation. DDTCPG brings about a slight protective effect in the dose of 1300 mg/kg it does not produce radioprotective effect. Low toxicity and high radioprotective TPPG effect prove the necessity of its further study

  4. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 18. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology contain two review articles (prediction of normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy, ?H2AX foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks) and 34 contributions to the following topics: Hypoxia and molecular mechanisms of radiation resistance; biological imaging of the tumor micromilieu; DNA repair, genomic instability and carcerogenesis; molecular factors of radiation resistance; actual controversial discussion on possible irradiation caused metastasis risk enhancement; EGFR inhibition and irradiation; biology of experimental radiation/ normal tissue toxicity

  5. VI Congress on radiation research (radiobiology, radioecology, radiation safety). Abstracts. Volume 2 (sections VIII-XIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains abstracts at the VI Congress on radiation research, in which program is included various aspects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations on living organisms, problems of radioecology and radiation safety of humans and the environment. The Congress is dedicated to the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident . Several reports have summarized the 25-year study of the effects of the accident, formulated forecasts and the main directions of further research. The second volume includes reports in sections : radioecology, combined effect of radiation and other environmental factors, agricultural radioecology, radiobiology of heavy ions, theoretical problems of radiobiology, systematic radiobiology. Radiobiology of non-ionizing radiation, biological effects, electromagnetic safety and regulation, radiobiological and radioecological education are discussed

  6. Development of radiobiology for oncology-a personal view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When I came into radiotherapy in 1950, I was puzzled that some patients were treated to 3000 rads (cGy) in 3 weeks but others received 4000 in 5 or 6000 in 6 weeks. When I asked why, there were no convincing answers given, except 'this is what we usually do'. It wasn't until I went to a course on 'Radiobiology for Radiotherapy' in Cambridge that I learnt about the basic theories of Douglas Lea and the very considerable history of research into radiobiology and clinical radiotherapy. And there were still some questions outstanding, such as the relative importance of intracellular repair between 'daily' fractions, whether a 2 day gap each week was a good or a bad idea, and the role of proliferation, if any, during irradiation. I thought that a few simple animal experiments might help to give answers! That led me to a continuing interest in these questions and answers, which has taken me more than 50 years to pursue. This is the very personal story of what I saw happening in the subject, decade by decade. I was happy to experience all this together with scientists in many other countries, and our own, along the way. (review)

  7. A radiobiological review on melatonin. A novel radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. For the sake of improvement in radiation therapy, radiobiology plays a crucial role through explaining observed phenomena, and suggesting improvements to existing therapies. Due to the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, radiobiologists have long been interested in identifying novel, nontoxic, effective, and convenient compounds to protect humans against radiation induced normal tissue injuries. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), the chief secretory product of the pineal gland in the brain, has been documented to ameliorate the oxidative injuries due to ionizing radiation. This article reviews different features that make melatonin a potentially useful radioprotector. Moreover, based on radiobiological models we hypothesize that melatonin may postpone the saturation of repair enzymes which leads to repairing more induced damage by repair system and more importantly allows the use of higher doses of radiation during radiotherapy to get a better therapeutic ratio. The implications of the accumulated observations suggest by virtue of melatonin's radioprotective and anticancer effects; it is time to use it as a radioprotector both for radiation workers and patients suffering from cancer either alone for cancer inhibition or in combination with traditional radiotherapy for getting a favorable efficacy/toxicity ratio during the treatment. Although compelling evidence suggests that melatonin may be effective for a variety of disorders, the optimum dose of melatonin for human radioprotection is yet to be determined by further research. We propose that, in the future melatonin improve therapeutic ratio in radiation oncology.

  8. An irradiation facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological studies

    CERN Document Server

    Besserer, J; Dellert, M; Gahn, C; Moosburger, M; Pemler, P; Quicken, P; Distel, L; Schuessler, H

    1999-01-01

    A vertical beam facility for radiobiological experiments was designed and constructed at the Munich Tandem-Accelerator Laboratory. The main part of the facility is a 90 deg. dipole magnet bending the beam of protons or heavy particles into a vertical upward direction, which is advantageous for wet-cell irradiation. After collimation the beam is spread out passively by thin scattering foils and dynamically by magnetic coils. A homogeneity of the radiation field better than +-5% has been achieved over the diameter of the exit window of 60 mm. The dose rate can be widely adjusted from single particles to more than 10 sup 1 sup 0 particles (i.e. hundreds of Grays) per second. The dose measurement is based on single-particle counting and on standard dosimeters. The detector system for dosimetry and irradiation control is described. In a first radiobiological experiment the cell survival of chinese hamster cells was measured after irradiation with 22.7 MeV protons and compared with the X-ray result.

  9. Hypofractionation in prostate cancer: radiobiological basis and clinical appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangoni, M; Desideri, I; Detti, B; Bonomo, P; Greto, D; Paiar, F; Simontacchi, G; Meattini, I; Scoccianti, S; Masoni, T; Ciabatti, C; Turkaj, A; Serni, S; Minervini, A; Gacci, M; Carini, M; Livi, L

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76-80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α / β . Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose) demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting. PMID:24999475

  10. Hypofractionation in Prostate Cancer: Radiobiological Basis and Clinical Appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mangoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76–80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α/β. Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting.

  11. Some applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter illustrate the use of radiation chemistry as a tool in investigating biologically important radical reactions, and also outline some studies of models for radiobiological damage. Because aqueous solutions usually offer the most important matrix, an appreciation of the main features of water radiolysis will be essential. Most of the illustrations involve pulse radiolysis, and some familiarity with chemical kinetics is assumed. In addition to these and other chapters in this book, readers find the proceedings of a recent NATO Advanced Study Institute most useful. The authors shall not try to review here all the applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and biology, but they will illustrate, using selected examples, the main principles and practical advantages and problems. Another recent volume covers the main contributions of flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis to the chemistry of biology and medicine, complementing earlier reviews. Papers from symposia on radical processes in radiobiology and carcinogenesis, and on super-oxide dismutases, and proceedings of recent international congresses of radiation research, together with the other publications referred to above will enable the reader to gain a comprehensive overview of the role of radicals in biological processes and the contributions of radiation chemistry

  12. Influence of oxygen on the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Pisaková, Hana; Simr, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    The simulation of the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism may be very helpful in studying the radiobiological effect of ionizing radiation when the water radical clusters formed by the densely ionizing ends of primary or secondary charged particle may form DSBs damaging DNA molecules in living cells. It is possible to study not only the efficiency of individual radicals but also the influence of other species or radiomodifiers (mainly oxygen) being present in water medium during irradiation. The mathematical model based on Continuous Petri nets (proposed by us recently) will be described. It makes it possible to analyze two main processes running at the same time: chemical radical reactions and the diffusion of radical clusters formed during energy transfer. One may study the time change of radical concentrations due to the chemical reactions running during diffusion process. Some orientation results concerning the efficiency of individual radicals in DSB formation (in the case of Co60 radiation) will be presented; the influence of oxygen present in water medium during irradiation will be shown, too.

  13. Contribution to fundamental aspects of biophysics, radiobiology, and modeling of cellular response to low radiation doses

    OpenAIRE

    Belchior, Ana Lúcia Vital, 1979-

    2014-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Engenharia Biomédica e Biofísica, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2014 This thesis aims at studying the direct and bystander effects (observations in which effects of ionizing radiation arise in non-irradiated cells) induced by alpha-particle irradiation, using a Po-210 source, in a human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549), and at investigating and providing a contribution to the clarification of the protective or potentially detrimental effects of low-do...

  14. Osteopontin and splice variant expression level in human malignant glioma: Radiobiologic effects and prognosis after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We investigated the role of the hypoxia-associated secreted glycoprotein osteopontin (OPN) in the response of malignant glioma to radiotherapy by characterizing OPN and its splice variants in vitro and in patient material. Material and methods: The effect of siRNA knockdown of OPN splice variants on cellular and radiobiologic behavior was analyzed in U251MG cells using OpnS siRNA (inhibition of all OPN splice variants) and OpnAC siRNA (knockdown only of OPNa and OPNc). OPN and splice variant mRNA levels were quantified in archival material of 41 glioblastoma tumor samples. Plasma OPN was prospectively measured in 33 malignant glioma patients. Results: Inhibition of OPNa and OPNc (OpnAC) reduced clonogenic survival in U251MG cells but did not affect proliferation, migration or apoptosis. Knockdown of all OPN splice variants (OpnS) resulted in an even stronger inhibition of clonogenic survival, while cell proliferation and migration were reduced and rate of apoptosis was increased. Additional irradiation had additive effects with both siRNAs. Plasma OPN increased continuously in malignant glioma patients and was associated with poor survival. Conclusions: OPNb is partially able to compensate the effects of OPNa and OPNc knockdown in U251MG cells. High OPN plasma levels at the end of radiotherapy are associated with poor survival

  15. The challenge for the paradigms heat have guided the radiobiology in the past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently, it has been commonly accepted that the biological consequences following ionizing radiation exposure are attributable to direct DNA damage. However, in the last decade some evidence have emerged to suggest that the classical genetic effects associated with radiation exposure (i.e. mutations, chromosomal aberrations, micronucleus) are not necessarily the result of the direct damage induced in the cellular DNA. These effects have been termed non-targeted and include radiation-induced genomic instability, effects detected after cytoplasmic irradiation and bystander effects. All of them support the hypothesis that important genetic consequences of radiation may arise in cells that in themselves receive no direct radiation exposure at all. The radioinduced damage signals could be transmitted to these cells from those that have been directly irradiated. The non-targeted effects challenge the paradigms that have guided radiobiology in the past and may change our thinking about the early events in the carcinogenic process and in particular about the critical targets for genetic and carcinogenic damage by radiation. These effects could be particularly important at low doses, when non all the cells are directly exposed to an ionizing track. (Author) 45 refs

  16. Is there a role for comparative radiobiology in the development of a policy to protect the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation? Comparative radiobiology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last few years has seen what people are now referring to as a 'shifting paradigm' in our way of thinking about radiation effects on biological systems. The concept of the central role of DNA damage due to double strand breaks induced by a radiation 'hit' has been itself hit by many studies showing persistent effects in the distant progeny of radiation exposed cells. This phenomenon is known as radiation induced genomic instability. More recently evidence has been accumulating that not even the parent cell need be exposed to radiation (the bystander effect), and that the bystander cells can demonstrate genomic instability and effects at low doses which are inconsistent with a mechanism based on DNA hits as important targets at low doses. The new paradigm suggests that cellular stress responses or damage signalling through a range of signal transduction pathways are involved. Cell-cell contact or secretion of damage signalling molecules can induce responses in undamaged and unirradiated cells. Are these new effects relevant to risk assessment, or does it matter how radiation affects cells if we have good epidemiological evidence on which to base our risk estimates? If DNA based dose responses are not so important at environmentally relevant doses, then it is not logical to base our environmental protection system on consideration of radiation dose as if this is in some way unique and not affected by the presence of other environmental stressors. The aim of this paper is to review the new concepts and to consider reasons why they might alter our methods of risk estimation. In particular the paper considers the impact of the new concepts on environmental protection and discusses the need for research in the field of comparative radiobiology if we are to develop policies which can adequately protect biodiversity. (author)

  17. Collimator design for spatially-fractionated proton beams for radiobiology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunsin; Meyer, Juergen; Sandison, George

    2016-07-01

    Preclinical and translational research is an imperative to improve the efficacy of proton radiotherapy. We present a feasible and practical method to produce spatially-modulated proton beams for cellular and small animal research for clinical and research facilities. The University of Washington (UW) 50.5 MeV proton research beamline hosting a brass collimation system was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. This collimator consisted of an array of 2 cm long slits to cover an area of 2  ×  2 cm2. To evaluate the collimator design effects on dose rate, valley dose and the peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR) the following parameters were varied; slit width (0.1–1.0 mm), peak center-to-center distance (1–3 mm), collimator thickness (1–7 cm) and collimator location along the beam axis. Several combinations of slit widths and 1 mm spacing achieved uniform dose at the Bragg peak while maintaining spatial modulation on the beam entrance. A more detailed analysis was carried out for the case of a slit width of 0.3 mm, peak center-to-center distance of 1 mm, a collimator thickness of 5 cm and with the collimator flush against the water phantom. The dose rate at 5 mm depth dropped relative to an open field by a factor of 12 and produced a PVDR of 10.1. Technical realization of proton mini-beams for radiobiology small animal research is demonstrated to be feasible. It is possible to obtain uniform dose at depth while maintaining reasonable modulation at shallower depths near the beam entrance. While collimator design is important the collimator location has a strong influence on the entrance region PVDRs and on dose rate. These findings are being used to manufacture a collimator for installation on the UW cyclotron proton beam nozzle. This collimator will enable comparative studies on the radiobiological efficacy of x-rays and proton beams.

  18. Operation and Maintenance of the National Radiobiology Archives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Anthony C. James; Stacey L. McCord

    2012-03-07

    The National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) are an archival program, started in 1989, to collect, organize and maintain data, laboratory notebooks, and animal tissue specimens from government (Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies) sponsored radiobiology life-span animal studies. These unique records, histopathology slides and paraffin embedded tissue blocks are maintained in a central facility and are available for further research study. The materials include electronic and paper records for each of more than 6,000 life-span-observations on dogs as well as details of major studies involving nearly 30,000 mice. Although these studies were performed over many years and at different laboratories with differing data management systems, the NRA has translated them into a standardized set of relational database tables. These can be distributed to interested individuals on written request. Specific Aims are: (1) To Maintain the Archive of Written Records from the Animal Experiments - The USTUR continued to maintain the NRA archives which consist of approximately 175 storage boxes containing laboratory notebooks, animal exposure records, animal pathologic records, and radiographs. These were stored in a 6,000 square foot leased facility in Richland, WA. Additionally, through a collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Low Dose Program, many of these records were scanned into digital files. These totaled 34 GB of data, which are saved in 2,407 separate PDF files that are organized by box number and animal identification number. (2) To Maintain the Archive of Animal Tissues at Washington State University - The USTUR continued to house the NRA dog tissue collection in the leased facility. The NRA tissue collection consisted of pathology slides and tissue blocks. Approximately 25% of the laboratory facility was dedicated to the storage of the NRA materials. (3) To Organize the Datasets of These Animals in the Context of Other Datasets so

  19. Characterization and performances of DOSION, a dosimetry equipment dedicated to radiobiology experiments taking place at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Boissonnat, G; Balanzat, E; Boumard, F; Carniol, B; Colin, J; Cussol, D; Etasse, D; Fontbonne, C; Frelin, A -M; Hommet, J; Peronnel, J; Salvador, S

    2016-01-01

    Currently, radiobiology experiments using heavy ions at GANIL(Grand Acc\\'el\\'erateur National d'Ions Lourds) are conducted under the supervision of the CIMAP (Center for research on Ions, MAterials and Photonics). In this context, a new beam monitoring equipment named DOSION has been developed. It allows to perform measurements of accurate fluence and dose maps in near real time for each biological sample irradiated. In this paper, we present the detection system, its design, performances, calibration protocol and measurements performed during radiobiology experiments. This setup is currently available for any radiobiology experiments if one wishes to correlate one's own sample analysis to state of the art dosimetric references.

  20. Philosophy of veterinary radiobiology twenty years after the Chernobyl disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic objective is to provide safe foodstuffs. This approach has connection with the food chain protection including the diagnostics and the acute radiation disease therapy at the farm animals. The extra significance is given to the research of technologies which can reduce the activity of the contaminated foodstuffs. In the field of the ionizing radiation effect research in live organisms attention should be devoted to the new alternative bio-tests. The low-dose effect or the interaction with other negative physical and chemical aspects of the environment is mainly considered. In cooperation with human medicine, it is necessary to develop radiotherapy and to study the effects of therapy and radiotherapy. From the standpoint of perspective technologies, it is advisable to focus on irradiation of the foodstuffs in veterinary radiobiology. (authors)

  1. Dictionary of radiation protection, radiobiology and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection, including aspects of radiobiology, nuclear medicine, and nuclear legislation, has an important role within nuclear research and the use of radioactive materials. Radiation protection comprises all measures and efforts to prevent the unwanted distribution and negative influence of ionizing radiation, especially where the human organism and the living environment are involved. The increasing role of radiation protection is reflected by the foundation of institutes in all industrial countries to control such radiant energy and prevent radiation damage. Nowadays ionizing radiation is employed on a large scale for basic investigations in biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics, in soil tests, fertilization problems and pest control in agriculture, as well as for medicinal diagnoses and therapy. This dictionary is a thematic enlargement of the four-language 'Dictionary of Nuclear Engineering', compiled by the same author. It comprises about 12,000 terms in each language. (orig.)

  2. Method for validating radiobiological samples using a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an immediate need for rapid triage of the population in case of a large scale exposure to ionizing radiation. Knowing the dose absorbed by the body will allow clinicians to administer medical treatment for the best chance of recovery for the victim. In addition, today's radiotherapy treatment could benefit from additional information regarding the patient's sensitivity to radiation before starting the treatment. As of today, there is no system in place to respond to this demand. This paper will describe specific procedures to mimic the effects of human exposure to ionizing radiation creating the tools for optimization of administered radiation dosimetry for radiotherapy and/or to estimate the doses of radiation received accidentally during a radiation event that could pose a danger to the public. In order to obtain irradiated biological samples to study ionizing radiation absorbed by the body, we performed ex-vivo irradiation of human blood samples using the linear accelerator (LINAC). The LINAC was implemented and calibrated for irradiating human whole blood samples. To test the calibration, a 2 Gy test run was successfully performed on a tube filled with water with an accuracy of 3% in dose distribution. To validate our technique the blood samples were ex-vivo irradiated and the results were analyzed using a gene expression assay to follow the effect of the ionizing irradiation by characterizing dose responsive biomarkers from radiobiological assays. The response of 5 genes was monitored resulting in expression increase with the dose of radiation received. The blood samples treated with the LINAC can provide effective irradiated blood samples suitable for molecular profiling to validate radiobiological measurements via the gene-expression based biodosimetry tools. (orig.)

  3. A statistical method for descriminating between alternative radiobiological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological models assist understanding of the development of radiation damage, and may provide a basis for extrapolating dose-effect curves from high to low dose regions. Many models have been proposed such as multitarget and its modifications, enzymatic models, and those with a quadratic dose response relationship (i.e. αD + βD2 forms). It is difficult to distinguish between these because the statistical techniques used are almost always limited, in that one method can rarely be applied to the whole range of models. A general statistical procedure for parameter estimation (Maximum Liklihood Method) has been found applicable to a wide range of radiobiological models. The curve parameters are estimated using a computerised search that continues until the most likely set of values to fit the data is obtained. When the search is complete two procedures are carried out. First a goodness of fit test is applied which examines the applicability of an individual model to the data. Secondly an index is derived which provides an indication of the adequacy of any model compared with alternative models. Thus the models may be ranked according to how well they fit the data. For example, with one set of data, multitarget types were found to be more suitable than quadratic types (αD + βD2). This method should be of assitance is evaluating various models. It may also be profitably applied to selection of the most appropriate model to use, when it is necessary to extrapolate from high to low doses

  4. The radiobiology/radiation protection interface in healthcare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current knowledge of radiation effects is reviewed and implications for its application in healthcare considered. The 21st L H Gray conference gathered leading experts in radiobiology, radiation epidemiology, radiation effect modelling, and the application of radiation in medicine to provide an overview of the subject. The latest radiobiology research in non-targeted effects such as genomic instability and the bystander effect challenge the old models, but the implications for health effects on humans are uncertain. Adaptive responses to external stresses, of which radiation is one, have been demonstrated in cells and animal models, but it is not known how these might modify human dose-effect relationships. Epidemiological evidence from the Japanese A-bomb survivors provides strong evidence that there is a linear relationship between the excess risk of cancer and organ dose that extends from about 50 mSv up to 2.5 Sv, and results from pooled data for multiple epidemiological studies indicate that risks extend down to doses of 20 mSv. Thus linear extrapolation of the A-bomb dose-effect data provides an appropriate basis for radiological protection standards at the present time. Risks from higher dose diagnostic procedures fall within the range in which health effects can be demonstrated. There is therefore reason for concern about the rise in the number of computed tomography (CT) scans performed in many countries, and in particular the use of CT for screening of asymptomatic individuals. New radiotherapy techniques allow high dose radiation fields to be conformed more effectively to target volumes, and reduce doses to critical organs, but they tend to give a higher and more uniform dose to the whole body which may increase the risk of second cancer. It is important that radiation protection practitioners keep abreast of developments in understanding of radiation effects and advise the medical community about the implications of fundamental research when

  5. Strategies to improve the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy: Radiobiologic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate methods of improving the therapeutic index (dose to tumor/dose to normal organs) and, hence, the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT). One method investigated was to increase the biologic response for a given radiation dose to tumor. To enhance the biologic efficacy of the dose, initial studies focused on first understanding the radiobiology of RIT irradiation and determining what role factors, such as radiation repair, repopulation, and redistribution, play in determining RIT response. In vitro studies using 4 colon carcinoma cell lines have compared the radiobiologic efficacy of low dose-rate irradiation delivered by Yttrium-90 (Y-90) with conventional high dose-rate external beam irradiation (XRT). Results suggested that one factor which determined a cell's sensitivity to Y-90 irradiation was its ability to repair radiation sublethal damage. In vivo studies demonstrated that those cell lines which were more sensitive to Y-90 irradiation in vitro were also more sensitive to RIT in vivo. For a more radioresistant line, WiDr, RIT was approximately two-fold less effective than an equivalent dose of single fraction XRT, while for a more radiosensitive line, LS174T, RIT was approximately as effective as an equivalent dose of single fraction XRT. Therefore, a tumor's response to RIT in vivo appeared to be, in part, dependent on the tumor cell's ability to repair radiation damage. Finally, studies investigated strategies at enhancing the biologic efficacy of RIT irradiation by combining RIT with chemotherapy agents that can potentially inhibit radiation repair. Agents, such as 5-fluorouracil, appeared to be synergistic with RIT irradiation n vitro and may therefore prove promising in improving the therapeutic index of RIT

  6. Decoding the dynamics of cellular metabolism and the action of 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose using pulsed stable isotope-resolved metabolomics

    OpenAIRE

    Mudrich Epouse Dorosz, Susann Antonia; Pietzke, Matthias; Zasada, Christin

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellular metabolism is highly dynamic and continuously adjusts to the physiological program of the cell. The regulation of metabolism appears at all biological levels: (post-) transcriptional, (post-) translational, and allosteric. This regulatory information is expressed in the metabolome, but in a complex manner. To decode such complex information, new methods are needed in order to facilitate dynamic metabolic characterization at high resolution. Results Here, we descri...

  7. Decoding the dynamics of cellular metabolism and the action of 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose using pulsed stable isotope-resolved metabolomics

    OpenAIRE

    Pietzke, M.; Zasada, C.; Mudrich, S.; Kempa, S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellular metabolism is highly dynamic and continuously adjusts to the physiological program of the cell. The regulation of metabolism appears at all biological levels: (post-) transcriptional, (post-) translational, and allosteric. This regulatory information is expressed in the metabolome, but in a complex manner. To decode such complex information, new methods are needed in order to facilitate dynamic metabolic characterization at high resolution. RESULTS: Here, we describe pul...

  8. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  9. Knowledge evolution on effects of ionizing radiations on living being. New prospects of radiobiological researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge increase of all the steps going from the material radiation interaction to the risk evaluation, prevention and irradiation consequences treatment leads to new prospects in radiobiology research, such as the low doses effects. (A.B.)

  10. Recent trends in radiobiology of skin and repercussions for dose limitation and personal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the radiobiology of skin are reviewed with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the updating of radiological protection criteria for skin dose limitation which is currently being undertaken by the ICRP and NCRP. (author)

  11. Press breakfast, radiobiology stakes: an European context, Thursday 25 March 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiobiology endeavours to know the ionizing radiations effects on living systems, particular at low doses exposures. The researches in this area contribute to the elaboration of international regulation on nuclear industry. The individual radiosensitivity is an other aspect of the research in radiobiology. These studies should allow the establishing of radiation protection standards founded on a direct approach and an individual estimation of the level of acceptable dose. (N.C.)

  12. Proceedings of scientific conference of young scientists 'Fundamental and applied problems of radiobiology and radioecology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains modern views on mechanisms of biological effects of ionising radiation in low doses and peculiarities of radionuclide migration in different ecosystems which are based on experimental data in works of young scientists represented on research conference 'Fundamental and applied problems of radiobiology and radioecology'. Special attentions of this publication are investigations in fields of radiation genetics and biochemistry, medical an biological aspects of radiation exposure, plant radiobiology and radioecology

  13. Elucidating the cellular actions of demineralised dentine matrix extract on a clonal dental pulp stem cell population in orchestrating dental tissue repair

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chi P; Colombo, John S; Ayre, Wayne Nishio; Sloan, Alastair J; Waddington, Rachel J

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive growth factors identified within the extracellular matrix of dentine have been proposed roles in regulating the naturally inherent regenerative dentine formation seen in teeth in response to trauma and infection, which may also be harnessed for novel clinical treatments in augmenting mineralised tissue repair. This study examined the specific biological action of demineralised dentine matrix extract on a clonal population of dental pulp stem cells in stimulating the prerequisite sta...

  14. Fisheries Radiobiology and the Discharge of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United Kingdom authorizations to discharge radioactive wastes are granted by the Minister of Housing and Local Government, the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, and by the Secretary of State for Scotland. The hazards arising from contamination of aquatic animals and plants concern the Department of Fisheries ; before authorizations to discharge liquid wastes have been given, the Department has made independent forecasts of permissible levels of discharge based on extensive studies carried out in its research vessels and radiobiological laboratory: for example, where fish have been affected this has meant studies of fish populations and fish migration: uptake of radioactivity by fish : public consumption of fish : commercial distribution of affected fish: L.D.50: effects of radiation on tissue, etc. In the course of such work there has been close consultation with the Atomic Energy Authority, and agreement with the Atomic Energy Authority about the safety factor to be incorporated during the first two years of discharge. During these two years, monitoring data collected by the Atomic Energy Authority and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food enable checks and revisions of the original estimates to be made, and at the end of that time formal authorizations, based on operating experience, are issued. (author)

  15. Why do we need a new paradigm in radiobiology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 20 or so years experimental evidence, which questions the fundamentals of some 50 years standing, of both biology and radiobiology has accrued. In order to accommodate this new evidence within a framework that encompasses existing knowledge, attention has to be paid to the organisational or epigenetic, features of the cell. In recent years the high dimensional dynamic attractor has emerged as a potential organisational or regulatory agent that represents phenotype. It is argued here that its limited robustness provides a modus operandi to account for stress induced genomic instability. When radiation deposition events act to overcome the robustness of a normal or 'home' attractor in the cell of an established species and cause a transition to a variant attractor or phenotype, the consequences are unrelated to any specific molecular damage to the genomic DNA. Rather they correspond to the loss of evolutionarily acquired stability (genotypic replicative integrity) and robustness. Such processes are termed type B events and give rise to a separate category of effects and risk to those associated with the conventional effects of radiation, type A effects. How type B risks might be assessed is discussed.

  16. Amchitka Radiobiological Program. Final report, July 1970-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program, to collect biological and environmental samples for radiological analyses, began in 1970 and continued through 1979. The principal objective was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from worldwide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground test sites would be suspected if the amount of contamination was significantly greater than could be attributed to worldwide fallout or if an unexpected assemblage of radionuclides was detected. No radionuclides from the underground sites were detected, except for tritium from the Long Shot test (1965) which produced increased tritium concentrations in surface water and freshwater plants near the test site. This final report compiles all previous data into one report and considers the temporal trends in these data. Two naturally occurring radionuclides, 40K and 7Be, were the most abundantly occurring radionuclides in most samples; in lichen samples either 137Cs or 144Ce had the highest activity. All samples were below applicable Radiation Protection Guides and by 1979 most samples were near or below the statistical detection limits. Increased concentrations of short-lived fallout radionuclides following the Chinese atmospheric tests were found in freshwater and seawater samples and in most indicator organisms

  17. Amchitka Radiobiological Program. Final report, July 1970-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibley, T.H.; Tornberg, L.D.

    1982-11-01

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program, to collect biological and environmental samples for radiological analyses, began in 1970 and continued through 1979. The principal objective was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from worldwide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground test sites would be suspected if the amount of contamination was significantly greater than could be attributed to worldwide fallout or if an unexpected assemblage of radionuclides was detected. No radionuclides from the underground sites were detected, except for tritium from the Long Shot test (1965) which produced increased tritium concentrations in surface water and freshwater plants near the test site. This final report compiles all previous data into one report and considers the temporal trends in these data. Two naturally occurring radionuclides, /sup 40/K and /sup 7/Be, were the most abundantly occurring radionuclides in most samples; in lichen samples either /sup 137/Cs or /sup 144/Ce had the highest activity. All samples were below applicable Radiation Protection Guides and by 1979 most samples were near or below the statistical detection limits. Increased concentrations of short-lived fallout radionuclides following the Chinese atmospheric tests were found in freshwater and seawater samples and in most indicator organisms.

  18. Optimisation of exposure conditions for in vitro radiobiology experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the long history of using cell cultures in vitro for radiobiological studies, there is to date no study specifically addressing the dosimetric implications of flask selection and exposure environment in clonogenic assays. The consequent variability in dosimetry between laboratories impedes the comparison of results. In this study we compare the dose to cells adherent to the base of three types of commonly used culture flasks or plates. The cells are exposed to a 6MV clinical photon beam using either an open or a half blocked field. The depth of medium in each flask is varied with the medium surrounding the flask either water or air. The results show that the dose to the cells is more affected by the scattering conditions surrounding the flasks than by the level of filling within the flask. It is recommended that water or a water equivalent phantom material is used to surround the flasks or plates to approximate full scatter conditions at the cell layer. However for modulated fields, surrounding the 24 well plates with water-equivalent material is inadequate because of the large volume of air surrounding individual wells. Our results stress the importance of measuring the dose for new experimental configurations.

  19. Radiobiological problems connected to exposure from cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civil aircrews are exposed to cosmic radiation where the radiation contains a hadronic high energy component. Although radiobiological studies based on X-rays, γ-rays, fast neutrons and ions of varying LET values have shown that the repair of sublethal damage takes place in living cells at low doses, this ability decreases with increasing LET so that maximum radiation effects is observed at about 120 keV/μm. Experimental studies of the biological significance of the strong nuclear interaction reactions via very high energy neutrons, stopped negative pi mesons give signs of an increased effectiveness at very low doses from the present data. The few results obtained indicate that a collapse of the repair-mechanisms might take place for these fundamental reaction in nature. It is stressed that the contribution to the dose at present days civil air transport from cosmic radiation is small and taken care of by the existing recommendation for radiation protection., 8 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Amchitka Radiobiological Program. Progress report, January-December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program began in 1970 and is a continuing program to collect biological and environmental samples for radiometric analyses. This report is an account of the program for calendar year 1978. Results of analyses for samples collected in August 1978 have been added to the tables of Seymour and Johnson (1978) which summarize the Amchitka program from 1970 to 1977 and include analyses for: (1) gamma-emitting radionuclides in freshwater, birds, lichens, marine algae, marine invertebrates, fish, aufwuchs, and freshwater moss and plants; (2) strontium-90 (90Sr) in rats, birds, and soil; (3) 239, 240Pu in sand, soil, marine algae, and fish; and (4) tritium (3H) in seawater, freshwater, and biological organisms. Monitoring of background radiation with survey instruments was added to the Laboratory's program in 1974, and the results of the five annual surveys since that date are included in this report. Conclusions from the results of the recent analyses are a reiteration of the results stated in Nelson and Seymour (1975a); namely, (1) no new radionuclides are present; (2) the most abundant radionuclides are naturally occurring beryllium-7 (7Be) and potassium-40 (40K); (3) the trace quantities of fission products and induced radionuclides are from world fallout; and (4) a trace of 3H contamination remains in some Long Shot ponds, as previously reported. It is concluded that there were no radionuclides of Milrow or Cannikin origin in the water, plants, or animals of Amchitka Island

  1. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Kawachi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-07-01

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  2. Amchitka Radiobiological Program progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Amchitka Radiobiological Program for the period 1970-1979 was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from world-wide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear blasts on Amchitka Island. The objective is achieved, by the collection and radiological analyses of biological and environmental samples and by background radiation measurements. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground sites of the Amchitka nuclear detonations would be suspected if the contamination was significntly greater than would be expected from world fallout. An account of the program from July 1970 to December 1978 has been given in nine previous reports from the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology to the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy. This report is an account of the program for calendar year 1979. The results of analyses of the samples collected in 1979 lead to the same conclusions as in previous years; i.e., there is no evidence that the radionuclide contamination at Amchitka Island is greater than would be expected from world fallout except for a slight contamination of the Long Shot Mud Pits with tritium

  3. Feasibility of BNCT radiobiological experiments at the HYTHOR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, J.; Ceballos, C.; Soncin, M.; Fabris, C.; Friso, E.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Jori, G.; Rosi, G.; Nava, E.

    2008-06-01

    HYTHOR (HYbrid Thermal spectrum sHifter tapirO Reactor) is a new thermal-neutron irradiation facility, which was installed and became operative in mid 2005 at the TAPIRO (TAratura PIla Rapida potenza 0) fast reactor, in the Casaccia research centre (near Rome) of ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie Energia ed Ambiente). The facility has been designed for in vivo radiobiological studies. In HYTHOR irradiation cavity, 1-6 mice can be simultaneously irradiated to study skin melanoma treatments with the BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy). The therapeutic effects of HYTHOR radiation field on mouse melanoma has been studied as a preliminary investigation before studying the tumour local control due to boron neutron capture effect after boronated molecule injection. The method to properly irradiate small animals has been precisely defined. Results show that HYTHOR radiation field is by itself effective in reducing the tumour-growth rate. This finding has to be taken into account in studying the effectiveness of new 10B carriers. A method to properly measure the reduction of the tumour-growth rate is reported and discussed.

  4. Dosimetry for radiobiological experiments using energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of the Bevalac facility of energetic heavy ions with range greater than the size of small mammals makes possible the determination of the biological effects of relatively well defined high LET, whole body irradiation. With the increasing application of high-energy heavy ions in radiobiology there is a corresponding need to develop reliable techniques of both relative and absolute absorbed dose measurement. This paper describes dosimetry studies by the Health Physics Department of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory with activation detectors, ionization chambers, nuclear emulsion, thermoluminescent dosimeters and X-ray film. The application of these techniques to an experiment designed to study the leukemogenic effect of the whole-body irradiation of mice by 250 MeV/amu carbon ions is briefly described. Values of absorbed dose in tissue, obtained during this experiment, with a nitrogen filled ionization chamber and 7LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters are compared and shown to be in good agreement. As a result of this work a value for the average energy to produce an ion pair (W) in nitrogen by 250 MeV/amu 6+C ions of 37 +- eV was determined. Values of the efficiency of 7LiF relative to 60Co γ-rays for ions with dE/dx in the range 110-260 MeV g-1 cm2 are reported

  5. Radiobiological research on carnation chimerae Dianthus Caryophyllus L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiobiological study of periclinal carnation chimerae is carried out by subjecting whole plants and cuttings at different physiological stages to cobalt 60 gamma radiation under different dose and dose rate conditions. The effects of these treatments are observed during cultivation of the treated plants and by microscopic examination of irradiated meristem sections. The destruction of meristem cells in proportions varying with the irradiation conditions leads to structural changes in the chimerae; the more frequent change is the formation of genetically homogeneous stalks from different genotypes existing in the irradiated plant. Treatment by ionizing radiations is thus a practical means of detecting periclinical chimerae which, as in the case of carnations, are very common in plants grown by vegetative propagation. However since more than two independent meristem cell groups are usually present it is not possible by this method alone to define the distribution of the differentent genotypes in these groups; additional genetic studies or cell labelling such as chlorophyll or genoma mutations are then necessary

  6. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Iori, E-mail: sumida@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  7. The significance of the choice of radiobiological (NTCP) models in treatment plan objective functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A Clinician's discrimination between radiation therapy treatment plans is traditionally a subjective process, based on experience and existing protocols. A more objective and quantitative approach to distinguish between treatment plans is to use radiobiological or dosimetric objective functions, based on radiobiological or dosimetric models. The efficacy of models is not well understood, nor is the correlation of the rank of plans resulting from the use of models compared to the traditional subjective approach. One such radiobiological model is the Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP). Dosimetric models or indicators are more accepted in clinical practice. In this study, three radiobiological models, Lyman NTCP, critical volume NTCP and relative seriality NTCP, and three dosimetric models, Mean Lung Dose (MLD) and the Lung volumes irradiated at lOGy (V|0) and 20Gy (V20), were used to rank a series of treatment plans using, harm to normal (Lung) tissue as the objective criterion. None of the models considered in this study showed consistent correlation with the Radiation Oncologists plan ranking. If radiobiological or dosimetric models are to be used in objective functions for lung treatments, based on this study it is recommended that the Lyman NTCP model be used because it will provide most consistency with traditional clinician ranking.

  8. Elucidating the cellular actions of demineralised dentine matrix extract on a clonal dental pulp stem cell population in orchestrating dental tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi P; Colombo, John S; Ayre, Wayne Nishio; Sloan, Alastair J

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive growth factors identified within the extracellular matrix of dentine have been proposed roles in regulating the naturally inherent regenerative dentine formation seen in teeth in response to trauma and infection, which may also be harnessed for novel clinical treatments in augmenting mineralised tissue repair. This study examined the specific biological action of demineralised dentine matrix extract on a clonal population of dental pulp stem cells in stimulating the prerequisite stages of wound healing associated with mineralised tissue repair. A clonal dental pulp stem cell population with sustained proliferative capacity and multi-potentiality towards osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages was isolated from the pulp of human third molars. Dentine was collected from human healthy teeth, powdered and treated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to obtain a solubilised DDM protein extract. The influence of DDM on the DPSC clonal population was assessed in vitro. Exposure of cells to proteolytically degraded DDM or unsupplemented media served as controls. Compared to controls, DDM stimulated cell expansion, reduced apoptotic marker caspase 3, increased cell survival marker Akt1 and enhanced mineralised matrix deposition as determined by mineral deposition and increased expression of bone-related markers, alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin. Dental pulp stem cells successfully migrated into collagen gels supplemented with demineralised dentine matrix, with cells remaining viable and expanding in numbers over a 3-day period. Collectively, the results provide evidence that soluble proteins extracted from dentine matrix are able to exert a direct biological effect on dental pulp stem cells in promoting mineralised tissue repair mechanisms. PMID:26019808

  9. Radiobiological waste treatment-ashing treatment and immobilization with cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of the study on the treatment of radioactive biological waste in the China Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP). The possibility of radiobiological waste treatment was investigated by using a RAF-3 type rapid ashing apparatus together with the immobilization of the resulted ash. This rapid ashing apparatus, developed by CIRP, is usually used for pretreatment of samples prior to chemical analysis and physical measurements. The results show that it can ash 3 kg of animal carcasses a batch, the ashing time is 5-7 h and the ash content is less than 4 wt%. The ashing temperature not exceeding 450 deg. C was used without any risk of high losses of radionuclides. The ash from the rapid ashing apparatus was demonstrated to be immobilized with ordinary silicate cement. The optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form was 35 ± 5 wt% cement, 29 ± 2 wt% water, and 36 ± 6 wt% ash. The performance of the waste form was in compliance with the technical requirements except for impact resistance. Mixing additives in immobilization formulations can improve the performance of the cemented ash waste form. The additives chosen were DH4A flow promoter as a cement additive and vermiculite or zeolite as a supplement. The recommended formulation, i.e. an improved formulation of the cemented ash waste form is that additives DH4A flow promoter and vermiculite (or zeolite) are added on the ground of optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form, the dosage of water, DH4A and vermiculite (or zeolite) is 70 wt%, 0.5 wt% and ≤ 5 wt% of the cement dosage, respectively. The cemented ash waste forms obtained meet all the requirements for disposal. (author). 12 refs, 7 figs, 13 tabs

  10. Radiobiological basis for setting neutron radiation safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present neutron standards, adopted more than 20 yr ago from a weak radiobiological data base, have been in doubt for a number of years and are currently under challenge. Moreover, recent dosimetric re-evaluations indicate that Hiroshima neutron doses may have been much lower than previously thought, suggesting that direct data for neutron-induced cancer in humans may in fact not be available. These recent developments make it urgent to determine the extent to which neutron cancer risk in man can be estimated from data that are available. Two approaches are proposed here that are anchored in particularly robust epidemiological and experimental data and appear most likely to provide reliable estimates of neutron cancer risk in man. The first approach uses gamma-ray dose-response relationships for human carcinogenesis, available from Nagasaki (Hiroshima data are also considered), together with highly characterized neutron and gamma-ray data for human cytogenetics. When tested against relevant experimental data, this approach either adequately predicts or somewhat overestimates neutron tumorigenesis (and mutagenesis) in animals. The second approach also uses the Nagasaki gamma-ray cancer data, but together with neutron RBEs from animal tumorigenesis studies. Both approaches give similar results and provide a basis for setting neutron radiation safety standards. They appear to be an improvement over previous approaches, including those that rely on highly uncertain maximum neutron RBEs and unnecessary extrapolations of gamma-ray data to very low doses. Results suggest that, at the presently accepted neutron dose limit of 0.5 rad/yr, the cancer mortality risk to radiation workers is not very different from accidental mortality risks to workers in various nonradiation occupations

  11. SU-E-T-385: 4D Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourkal, E; Hossain, M; Veltchev, I; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Horwitz, E [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nahum, A [Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Bebington (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The linear-quadratic model is the most prevalent model for planning dose fractionation in radiation therapy in the low dose per fraction regimens. However for high-dose fractions, used in SRS/SBRT/HDR treatments the LQ model does not yield accurate predictions, due to neglecting the reduction in the number of sublethal lesions as a result of their conversion to lethal lesions with subsequent irradiation. Proper accounting for this reduction in the number of sublethally damaged lesions leads to the dependence of the survival fraction on the temporal structure of the dose. The main objective of this work is to show that the functional dependence of the dose rate on time in each voxel is an important additional factor that can significantly influence the TCP. Methods: Two SBRT lung plans have been used to calculate the TCPs for the same patient. One plan is a 3D conformal plan and the other is an IMRT plan. Both plans are normalized so that 99.5% of PTV volume receives the same prescription dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions. The dose rate in each individual voxel is calculated as a function of treatment time and subsequently used in the calculation of TCP. Results: The calculated TCPs show that shorter delivery times lead to greater TCP, despite all delivery times being short compared to the repair half-time for sublethal lesions. Furthermore, calculated TCP(IMRT) =0.308 for the IMRT plan is smaller than TCP(3D) =0.425 for 3D conformal, even though it shows greater tumor hot spots and equal PTV coverage. The calculated TCPs are considerably lower compared to those based on the LQ model for which TCP=1 for both plans. Conclusion: The functional dependence of the voxel-by-voxel dose rate on time may be an important factor in predicting the treatment outcome and cannot be neglected in radiobiological modeling.

  12. Toxicological characteristics and primary radiobiological screening of Cystizid-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxic and radioprotective properties of the potential radioprotector of the mollecular combination Cystisid-M (cysteamine-adenosin-5'-monophosphate - CAM) were investigated. The experiments were carried out on male mice C57BI irradiated with 137Cs source. The intraperitoneal administration of 1000 mg/kg b.w. and 500 mg/kg b.w., injected 15 min prior to the irradiation with 8,5 Gr (LD90/30) was performed, and orally 3000 mg/kg b.w. and 1500 mg/kg b.w. was introduced into the stomach 45 min prior to the irradiation with 8,2 Gr (LD83/30). The radioprotective effect of CAM was recorded according to: individual survival curves up to the 30th day; the biometrical coefficients 'ALPHA' (the individual survival expectancy in the population); and S30 (the group survival expectancy). At the intraperitoneal administration of the protector the values of LD50 = 1390 mg/kg b.w. and MPD (maximum permissible dose) = 1200 mg/kg b.w. were found. At the oral administration these doses were LD50/3 = 4630 mg/kg b.w. and MPD = 3500 mg/kg b.w. It was established that CAM injected intraperitoneally in a dose of 1000 mg/kg b.w. ensured 75% survival of the protected mice against 10% of the control ones, increased the mean survival of the deceased and reduced the percentage of the animals died during the height of the bone marrow syndrome. The twofold lower dose exetted a considerably slighter effect. At oral administration the protector did not significantly modify the survival of the animals. The data obtained revealed the perspectiveness of the tested protective agent radiobiological investigations are required

  13. Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnoli, Franco

    1998-01-01

    An introduction to cellular automata (both deterministic and probabilistic) with examples. Definition of deterministic automata, dynamical properties, damage spreading and Lyapunov exponents; probabilistic automata and Markov processes, nonequilibrium phase transitions, directed percolation, diffusion; simulation techniques, mean field. Investigation themes: life, epidemics, forest fires, percolation, modeling of ecosystems and speciation. They represent my notes for the school "Dynamical Mod...

  14. Research trends in radiobiology since 40 years. a new approach: the enzymatic repair function of DNA, internal factor in evolution of biological systems under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of the report, the author attempts to draw an historical scheme of successive research working hypotheses in radiobiology since 1924. Less than a generation ago the effect of radiation exposure were viewed as being direct, immediate, irreparable and unmodifiable. Now it is generally accepted that radiation lesion can also be indirect, delayed, reparable and often modified with appropriate chemical or biochemical treatment. It was however in 1962-1964 that came the decisive breakthrough in radiobiology with the discovery that the cell possesses a natural active self-defense mechanism against whatever stress would affect the integrity of the genetic message contained in the DNA structure itself. The existence of what could be considered as a fourth DNA function i.e. self-repair by enzymatic action under genetic control-brings at least to radiobiology the missing molecular biology basis it needed to get out of its 'phenomenological night' after abandon of the generalization of Lea's theory through lack of experimental evidence. In the second part, which is a prospective one, the author tries to set an enlarged synthesis considering the possible role of DNA repair system not only in cell survival - in presence or absence of dose modifiers or mutagens - but also in the artificial and natural evolution of biological system exposed to sub-lethal doses of radiation. Most recent data from the literature fit well with what must be still considered as a general working hypothesis. Studies dealing with phenotypic and genotypic characters linked with the acquisition of gamma and UV radiation resistance in 'Escherichia coli K12' has been started by the author, in collaboration with O. Tremeau, in order to bring a new experimental contribution in this respect. (author)

  15. Influence of physical and biological factors in cellular radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals is associated with radiation damage, and this at-nuclear physical properties of radionuclides used and the characteristics of the irradiated cells. The work deals with the damage caused by radiation to DNA, factors that condition and tools that can be used to measure it. It presents current concepts of death and cellular radiosensitivity, based on the pioneering work in this field. Enter the neighborhood effect and adaptive response and evaluates the influence of the same in the paradigms of classical radiobiology. (author)

  16. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yañez, Elvia; López, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerología de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  17. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yanez, Elvia; Lopez, Jesus [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Durango, Victoria de Durango, Durango (Mexico); ISSSTE General Hospital Dr. Santiago Ramon y Cajal, Victoria de Durango, Durango (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  18. Actual problems of toxicology and radiobiology. Russian scientific conference with international participation. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains abstracts of the Russian scientific conference with international participation, which took place May 19-20, 2011 in St. Petersburg. Proceedings of the conference include a general description of the chemical and radiological factors of nature, questions of radiation ecology and ecotoxicology. Modern methods of toxicological and radiobiological researches, including evaluation of radiation and chemical risks, mechanisms of development, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of various forms of toxic and radiation processes are under consideration. Current approaches to prevention and early therapy of chemical and radiation injuries are given. Issues of radiation and chemical safety, as well as the problems of training in toxicology and radiobiology are discussed

  19. Skin carcinomas: Radiobiological principles, radiotherapeutic techniques and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The course will be divided into three major topics: (1) Review of radiobiological principles as they apply to the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas: (2) review of radiotherapeutic techniques including beam qualities, beam collimation, tissue dose profiles, and the relative indications of external beam irradiation vs. brachytherapy; (3) comprehensive review of the tumor biology of skin malignancies, including malignant melanoma, and of the relative indications for radiotherapeutic and/or surgical management. (1) Review of critical data which have lead to currently applied principles of time-dose-volume concepts in the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas. Emphasis will be placed on the relative importance of fraction size and overall treatment time on tumor control probability and acute and late normal tissue toxicity. (2) Considering that radiotherapy in the management of skin carcinomas is often used to minimize patient disfiguration and to preserve critical body functions (e.g. eye lids) the technical aspects of radiotherapy delivery are most critical. Careful evaluation of the extent of the lesions including evaluation of their depth of invasion will determine the quality of the radiation beams, orthovoltage and low energy electrons being the most useful. Beam harding for orthovoltage beams and secondary and tertiary (skin) collimation of appropriate electron beams are critical. For more extensive and deeply invasive lesions contour-shaping through customized bolus material is essential. Equally important is the familiarity with custom shielding of critical structures, such as eyes, ears, oral cavity and central nervous system structures. Brachytherapy applications in the treatment of skin carcinomas is limited but should be considered when implants with high dose uniformity can be constructed. (3) The discussion of clinical management will start with a discussion of tumor biological properties of the diverse malignant

  20. Skin carcinomas: radiobiological principles, radiotherapeutic techniques and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The course will be divided into three major topics: (1) Review of radiobiological principles as they apply to the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas; (2) review of radiotherapeutic techniques including beam qualities, beam collimation, tissue dose profiles, and the relative indications of external beam irradiation vs. brachytherapy; (3) comprehensive review of the tumor biology of skin malignancies, including malignant melanoma, and of the relative indications for radiotherapeutic and/or surgical management. (1) Review of critical data which have lead to currently applied principles of time-dose-volume concepts in the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas. Emphasis will be placed on the relative importance of fraction size and overall treatment time on tumor control probability and acute and late normal tissue toxicity. (2) Considering that radiotherapy in the management of skin carcinomas is often used to minimize patient disfiguration and to preserve critical body functions (e.g. eye lids) the technical aspects of radiotherapy delivery are most critical. Careful evaluation of the extent of the lesions including evaluation of their depth of invasion will determine the quality of the radiation beams, orthovoltage and low energy electrons being the most useful. Beam harding for orthovoltage beams and secondary and tertiary (skin) collimation of appropriate electron beams are critical. For more extensive and deeply invasive lesions contour-shaping through customized bolus material is essential. Equally important is the familiarity with custom shielding of critical structures, such as eyes, ears, oral cavity and central nervous system structures. Brachytherapy applications in the treatment of skin carcinomas is limited but should be considered when implants with high dose uniformity can be constructed. (3) The discussion of clinical management will start with a discussion of tumor biological properties of the diverse malignant

  1. Skin carcinomas: Radiobiological principles, radiotherapeutic techniques and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The course will be divided into three major topics: (1) Review of radiobiological principles as they apply to the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas; (2) review of radiotherapeutic techniques including beam qualities, beam collimation, tissue dose profiles, and the relative indications of external beam irradiation vs. brachytherapy; (3) comprehensive review of the tumor biology of skin malignancies, including malignant melanoma, and of the relative indications for radiotherapeutic and/or surgical management. (1) Review of critical data which have led to currently applied principles of time-dose-volume concepts in the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas. Emphasis will be placed on the relative importance of fraction size and overall treatment time on tumor control probability and acute and late normal tissue toxicity. (2) Considering that radiotherapy in the management of skin carcinomas is often used to minimize patient disfiguration and to preserve critical body functions (e.g. eye lids) the technical aspects of radiotherapy delivery are most critical. Careful evaluation of the extent of the lesions including evaluation of their depth of invasion will determine the quality of the radiation beams, orthovoltage and low energy electrons being the most useful. Beam harding for orthovoltage beams and secondary and tertiary (skin) collimation of appropriate electron beams are critical. For more extensive and deeply invasive lesions contour-shaping through customized bolus material is essential. Equally important is the familiarity with custom shielding of critical structures, such as eyes, ears, oral cavity and central nervous system structures. Brachytherapy applications in the treatment of skin carcinomas is limited but should be considered when implants with high dose uniformity can be constructed. (3) The discussion of clinical management will start with a discussion of properties and routes of spread of the diverse

  2. Cellular resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  3. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - A challenge to the current radiobiological paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, after exposure to ionising radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the primary target, are responsible for the harmful biological effects of radiation. The radiation-induced changes are thought to be fixed already in the first cell division following the radiation exposure and health effects are considered to result as a consequence of clonal proliferation of cells carrying mutations in specific genes. Since the initial damage induced in DNA has been shown to be directly proportional to dose, risk is also considered to be directly proportional to dose. Risk from multiple exposures is considered to be additive, and risk from high and low LET radiation exposure is assumed to be qualitatively the same. These assumptions are incorporated into the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) Hypothesis that is used in all radiation protection practices. A range of evidence has now emerged that challenges the universality of the target theory of radiation induced effects. These effects have also been termed 'non-(DNA)-targeted' and include radiation-induced bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive response, low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity, abscopal (out-of-field) effects of radiotherapy, clastogenic factors, delayed reproductive death and induction of genes by radiation. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences on the health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. The non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer

  4. Emerging issues in radiobiology and cancer research - the impact of non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the acceptance that non-targeted effects (NTE) can be measured in unirradiated cells or distant progeny of irradiated cells, the discussion has developed about the relevance of these effects for radiobiology and radiation protection since they increase the complexity of the radiation response and allow for outcomes which are not as predictable as they were under the 'old rules'. Specific examples will be presented and analysed which challenge accepted paradigms. 1. Data show that bystander mechanisms are either on or off in cells and that the 'on' threshold appears to be at a very low dose (mGy range). 2. Data suggest that adaptive responses are induced not only in neighbouring cells but in organisms which receive bystander signals. 3. Data show that chronic exposures to alpha or gamma irradiation lead to complex responses in organisms which can be adaptive and protective. 4. Evidence suggests that mixed contaminant exposures which include radiation can have sub-additive or synergistic effects. A key consequence of findings in NTE biology is that at any given level of organization, from gene to ecosystem - communication of stress signals and heritability of stress adaptations provide the bridges linking one hierarchical level to the next and enable the rapid propagation of change triggered by stress at one level, resulting in change at a higher (or lower?) level. Evolution could thus be regulated through communicated signals between cells, individuals, and populations which control and optimize responses coordinating the emergence of exquisitely tuned systems which can adapt rapidly to micro or macro environmental change. A current view of cancer is that it is a 'systems level' disease which can not be understood or treated by looking at individual genes or pathways in the traditional way. Rather, a system approach is required with looks at the environment at both cellular and organismal levels to understand what has been perturbed. We suggest that bystander

  5. Modeling detector response in solid-state systems for radiation therapy and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -filled proportional counters (TEPC) where it is anticipated that intercomparisons with experiment will help to validate the use of such codes for the microdosimetry predictions on the sub-cellular scale in radiobiological systems. Monte Carlo based microdosimetry calculations are also expected to assist in explaining LET dependencies found in many solid-state detector systems. (Author)

  6. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 8, special issue 1. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication contains the abstracts of all papers and posters presented at the symposium. The headings were as follows: Radiobiology of the lung, mediation of radiation damage in the lung, clinical studies, future clinical directions, as well as documentation and management. (MG)

  7. Radiological and Environmental Research Division, Center for Human Radiobiology. Annual report, July 1980-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 22 papers of this annual report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. Abstracts were not written for 2 appendices which contain data on the exposure and radium-induced malignancies of 2259 persons whose radium content has been determined at least once

  8. IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear and atomic data for radiotherapy and related radiobiology in co-operation with the Radiobiological Institute of the Division for Health Research TNO, 16-20 September 1985, Rijswijk, the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on ''Nuclear and Atomic Data for Radiotherapy and Related Radiobiology'' was held at Rijswijk, the Netherlands, from 16 to 20 September 1985, in co-operation with the Radiobiological Institute TNO. The meeting participants reviewed the current and future requirements on nuclear and atomic data for radiotherapy and radiobiology, identified data requirements and their priorities, and issued a number of specific recommendations for future technical work in nuclear and atomic data required to establish a more solid nuclear physics foundation of radiotherapy and related radiobiology. The recommendations in this report are directed to three areas, namely beam production and field description, dosimetry, and interpretation and optimization of biological effects. The final proceedings will be issued as an IAEA publication in 1986. (author)

  9. Report of the Van de Graaff Group: radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There exists a need for relevant information on the molecular and cellular processes induced by radiation. In this project several aspects of the problem of developing a human tumor model and growing human cells in culture, have been investigated. Human embryo fibroblasts were grown in 1000 mm plastic Petri dishes in a suitable nutrient medium, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and antibiotics. The following series of mutagens were utilized: ultra-violet radiation, chemical carcinogens and nucleosite analogues, such as 5-azacytidine (aza C). Some of the treated human fibroblasts were also examined by electron microscopy and the reverse transcriptase assay

  10. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs

  11. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaeuenstein, P.; Gschwend, B. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs.

  12. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex II: PSI life sciences and Institute for Medical Radiobiology Newsletter 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annex to the PSI Annual Report 1996 reports on the progress achieved by the PSI Department II during 1996 in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy, radiation hygiene, positron emission tomography and medical radiobiology. figs., tab., refs

  13. Activities of the radiobiological institute, the institute for experimental gerontology, and the primate center. Annual report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities, presented by way of concise articles, cover the following subjects: radiation physics, radiobiology, experimental tumor therapy, tumor induction and tumor biology, immunology, transplantation and immunogenetics, hematology, gerontology, ethology, microbiology and quotobiology, techniques, and animals

  14. Radiobiological effects in small mammals populations dwelled at radioactive waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major issue in evaluating the ecological acceptability of a disposal system for radioactive waste is in preventing the ecological risk that may arise from exposures in the distant future. There is uncertainty surrounding any estimate of these doses or risks due to lack of knowledge about future conditions. Therefore, the adequate estimation of the ecological acceptability of a radioactive waste disposal system required a complex radioecological and radiobiological approach. Environmental surveillance at the Sergievo-Posadsky radioactive waste disposal system of the Scientific and Industrial Association Radon in additional to a standard complex radiological testing includes also the study of the radiobiological effects in different biological objects sampled from the contaminated areas. In present report the results obtained on small rodents (mice and voles) sampled from the strict mode and fence zones of this disposal system are displayed and discussed. (author)

  15. Nematode radiobiology and development in space. Results from IML-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Schubert, W. W.; Kazarians, G. A.; Richards, G. F.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Henke, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Radiat experiment was one of 17 investigations which used the ESA Biorack on IML-1 (International Microgravity Laboratory) and it had two objectives. The first objective was to isolate and characterize mutations induced by cosmic rays; the second was to assess the fidelity of development in 0-gravity over two consecutive generations. Two strategies were used to isolate mutations in a set of essential genes or a specific gene and to correlate the genetic events with the passage of charged particles. The results were isolation of 60 lethal mutations whose phenotypes are related to the local pattern of energy deposition. 12 mutations in the unc-22 gene include large deletions as characterized by DNA hybridization studies. Development of nematodes proceeded through two consecutive generations with no obvious defects. Cytoplasmic determinants in embryos, nuclear location and symmetry of cellular anatomy were normal as were Mendelian segregation and recombination of genetic markers.

  16. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more

  17. Radiobiological work using a negative pion beam at the Rutherford Laboratory 1971-76

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed in two sections: physics experiments (including, inter alia, dose measurement, LET distribution, radiation products of spallation); radiobiological studies (including separate reports as follows: review of experimental programme; some in vivo effects of negative pions in mice; survival and recovery of Hela cells in vitro; negative pion dose-response curves for frozen Hela cells; response of vicia faba to irradiation with negative pions; pion experiments with chromosome aberrations). (U.K.)

  18. Radiobiological impact of dose calculation algorithms on biologically optimized IMRT lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plans

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, X.; Penagaricano, J.; Zheng, D.; Morrill, S.; Zhang, X; Corry, P.; Griffin, R. J.; Han, E. Y.; Hardee, M.; Ratanatharathom, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) vs. Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms in combined dose-volume and biological optimized IMRT plans of SBRT treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Twenty eight patients with NSCLC previously treated SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse (V11) with combined dose-volume and biological optimization IMRT sliding window technique. The total dos...

  19. Installation of a flow cytometry facility and some applications in radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow cytometry has enormous potential in many areas of experimental pathology. Details of the installation and commissioning of a flow cytometer at the Harwell Laboratory are described. Following an explanation of the principles of flow cytometry, several applications to specific problems in radiobiology are discussed. Also included are results of some preliminary studies with the Harwell flow cytometer on samples such as blood, bone marrow, macrophages and cell cultures, and a discussion of future applications. (author)

  20. A community call for a dedicated radiobiological research facility to support particle beam cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Dosanjh, Manjit;

    2012-01-01

    Recently more than one hundred researchers followed an invitation to a brainstorming meeting on the topic of a future dedicated radio-biological and radio-physical research center. 100 more joint the meeting via webcast. After a day of presentations and discussions it was clear, that an urgent ne...... for such a development exists, resulting in a community call for the construction of a dedicated laboratory. Below we comment on the essential points....

  1. [From microdosimetry to nanodosimetry--the link between radiobiology and radiation physics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuchuan; Li, Ping

    2014-06-01

    The link between micro- and macro-parameters for radiation interactions that take place in living biological systems is described in this paper. Meanwhile recent progress and development in microdosimetry and nanodosimetry are introduced, including the methods to measure and calculate these micro- or nano-parameters. The relationship between radiobiology and physical quantities in microdosimetry and nanodosimetry was presented. Both the current problems on their applications in radiation protection and radiotherapy and the future development direction are proposed. PMID:25219261

  2. The impact of modeling nuclear fragmentation on delivered dose and radiobiology in ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of nuclear interactions for ion therapy arises from the influence of the particle spectrum on, first, radiobiology and therefore also on treatment planning, second, the accuracy of measuring dose and, third, the delivered dose distribution. This study tries to determine the qualitative as well as the quantitative influence of the modeling of inelastic nuclear interactions on ion therapy. Thereby, three key disciplines are investigated, namely dose delivery, dose assessment and radiobiology. In order to perform a quantitative analysis, a relative comparison between six different descriptions of nuclear interactions is carried out for carbon ions. The particle transport is simulated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT10A while dose planning and radiobiology are covered by the analytic treatment planning program for particles TRiP, which determines the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with the local effect model. The obtained results show that the physical dose distribution can in principle be significantly influenced by the modeling of fragmentation (about 10% for a 20% change in all inelastic nuclear cross sections for a target volume ranging from 15 to 25 cm). While the impact of nuclear fragmentation on stopping power ratios can be neglected, the fluence correction factor may be influenced by the applied nuclear models. In contrast to the results for the physical dose, the variation of the RBE is only small (about 1% for a 20% change in all inelastic nuclear cross sections) suggesting a relatively weak dependence of radiobiology on the detailed composition of the particle energy spectrum of the mixed radiation field. Also, no significant change (about 0.2 mm) of the lateral penumbra of the RBE-weighted dose is observed. (paper)

  3. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Jac A Nickoloff

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilitie...

  4. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvetsov, Alevei V.; Sandison, George A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more

  5. Fast neutrons set the pace. [Radiobiological investigations with fast neutrons at the CSIR cyclotron in Pretoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, J.H.; Slabbert, J.P. (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa). National Accelerator Centre)

    1985-01-01

    Radiobiological investigations with fast neutrons have been initiated at the CSIR cyclotron in Pretoria. It was proposed some years ago to create a neutron therapy facility using the CSIR cyclotron. Neutrons are classified as high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. Biological damage occurring in tissue is a direct function of the LET of the incident radiation. To quantify the biological effects of different types of radiation on mammalian cells, several procedures and concepts have evolved from radiobiological research. Probably the most significant laboratory techniques developed, were the derivation of cell survival curves which are obtained by determining the number of cell colonies that have survived a certain radiation dose. A semi-logarithmic plot of surviving fraction versus the absorbed dose yields the survival curve. Dose modifying factors such as the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the radiation can be quantified in terms of this relationship. A radiobiological programme has to be undertaken before patients can receive neutron therapy at the CSIR cyclotron. The article is a discussion of this programme.

  6. The European Radiobiology Archives (ERA) - Content, structure and use illustrated by an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Radiobiology Archives (ERA), supported by the European Commission and the European Late Effect Project Group (EULEP), together with the US National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) and the Japanese Radiobiology Archives (JRA) have collected all information still available on long-term animal experiments, including some selected human studies. The archives consist of a database in Microsoft Access, a web site, databases of references and information on the use of the database. At present, the archives contain a description of the exposure conditions, animal strains, etc. from ∼350,000 individuals; data on survival and pathology are available from ∼200,000 individuals. Care has been taken to render pathological diagnoses compatible among different studies and to allow the lumping of pathological diagnoses into more general classes. 'Forms' in Access with an underlying computer code facilitate the use of the database. This paper describes the structure and content of the archives and illustrates an example for a possible analysis of such data. (authors)

  7. 78 FR 70307 - Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy... and Gene Therapies (OCTGT). The product areas covered by this guidance are cellular therapy,...

  8. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  9. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeeva, I. D.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A. M.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  10. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. V.; Anikeeva, I. D.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied. The seeds were located inside the satellite in an open space, protected with aluminum foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminum foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival rate and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can thus be regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  11. SU-E-T-194: From Dicom-RT to Radiobiological Dose Metrics in 5 Minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, B; Holloway, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a flexible and standalone framework for batch calculation of radiobiological dose metrics from Dicom-RT. Methods: Software has been developed which allows (1) The calculation of DVH data from DICOM dose and structure files (DVHgenerator), (2) Calculation of a wide range of radiobiological metrics from this data (CompPlanGui). Both these tools are run via graphical user interface (GUI), making them fast and simple. Part 1 is a new tool which has not previously been published, whilst part 2 is a GUI overlay for the previously published software ‘Comp-Plan’ (Holloway et. al., Medical Dosimetry, 2012), previously reliant on command line interface. The time taken for an experienced user to evaluate a test case of 6 plans with and without CompPlanGUI was quantified. Results: The DVH-generator has been found to be faster, more robust and require far less physical memory then using alternative software solutions for the same purpose. The Comp Plan GUI significantly reduces the amount of time required to set up a base directory, eliminates code crashes arising from typographical errors, and renders the code far more accessible to non-expert users. It took an experienced user of the code around 3 minutes to set up a base directory of 6 plans compared around 8 minutes without, indicating that using CompPlanGUI reduced setup time by over 50%. Conclusion: A standalone GUI based framework has developed which allows for the batch calculation of radiobiological dose metrics directly from Dicom-RT files. As with the original code, this work will be made freely available on request, as well as via matlab file exchange.

  12. SU-E-T-194: From Dicom-RT to Radiobiological Dose Metrics in 5 Minutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a flexible and standalone framework for batch calculation of radiobiological dose metrics from Dicom-RT. Methods: Software has been developed which allows (1) The calculation of DVH data from DICOM dose and structure files (DVHgenerator), (2) Calculation of a wide range of radiobiological metrics from this data (CompPlanGui). Both these tools are run via graphical user interface (GUI), making them fast and simple. Part 1 is a new tool which has not previously been published, whilst part 2 is a GUI overlay for the previously published software ‘Comp-Plan’ (Holloway et. al., Medical Dosimetry, 2012), previously reliant on command line interface. The time taken for an experienced user to evaluate a test case of 6 plans with and without CompPlanGUI was quantified. Results: The DVH-generator has been found to be faster, more robust and require far less physical memory then using alternative software solutions for the same purpose. The Comp Plan GUI significantly reduces the amount of time required to set up a base directory, eliminates code crashes arising from typographical errors, and renders the code far more accessible to non-expert users. It took an experienced user of the code around 3 minutes to set up a base directory of 6 plans compared around 8 minutes without, indicating that using CompPlanGUI reduced setup time by over 50%. Conclusion: A standalone GUI based framework has developed which allows for the batch calculation of radiobiological dose metrics directly from Dicom-RT files. As with the original code, this work will be made freely available on request, as well as via matlab file exchange

  13. Controlling radioactive waste disposal: the work of the Fisheries Radiobiological Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fisheries Radiobiological Laboratory (FRL) is based at Lowestoft and forms the Aquatic Environment Protection Division 1, within the Directorate of Fisheries Research of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. The FRL undertakes a range of duties throughout the UK, and is primarily concerned with liquid wastes to the sea, and surface waters and solid wastes dumped at sea. Summaries are given of the work, responsibilities and interests of the three groups within FRL (Radiological Control, Research and Supporting Services). (U.K.)

  14. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 22. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 22. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Cordes, Nils; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Krause, Mechthild; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, H. Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2013-03-01

    The proceedings of the 22th Symposium on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiotherapy contain lectures and poster on the following issues: Radiation induced immuno-targeting of tumors; targeting in the radiotherapy; biomarkers; targeting; radio-oncological therapy of rectal carcinoma - contribution of radiobiology for therapy optimization; biomarkers for radiation sensibility; resistance mechanisms of tumors; resistance mechanisms of normal tissue; micro ambience, P13L inhibition in radiotherapy: improvement of the local tumor control by molecular mechanisms or the influence of the tumor micro-ambience? DNA repair; radiation effects and technical development.

  15. Radiobiological and radioecological studies with the unicellular marine algae Acetabularia, Batophora and Dunaliella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological studies of the biological and chemical effects of X-rays on the marine algae Acetabularia and Batophora and the incorporation of 3H in Acetabularia and Dunaliello were performed. It was shown that the main morphogenetic process of Acetabularia and Batophora are affected by the radiations. Experiments with tritiated water revealed that Acetabularia cells are unable to concentrate 3H. However, a significant amount of this radionuclide is incorporated into the genetic material of the cells. When organically bound 3H is supplied to Acetabularia or Dunaliello, a selective accumulation of some substances is observed. (H.K.)

  16. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 22. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 25. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild [Universitaetsklinikum Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologie; Cordes, Nils [Universitaetsklinikum Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - Nationales Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Radioonkologie; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Rodemann, H. Peter [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Strahlenbiologie; Rothkamm, Kai [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Lab. fuer Strahlentherapie und Experimentelle Radioonkologie; Zips, Daniel (ed.) [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie

    2016-05-01

    The proceedings of the 25th symposium on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology include papers on the following issues: radiotherapy individualization based on imaging; pre-clinic imaging and new experimental methods; methods and models, micromilieu and metabolism, combined therapy; secondary tumors following radiotherapy; radiogenic effects in normal tissue; resistance mechanism of tumors and normal tissue; personalized radio-oncology - which biological data are needed; pre-clinic and personalized radio-oncology; biomarkers - pre-clinic and translational; translational examinations for personalized radio-oncology.

  17. Extrapolation ionisation chamber measurements on beta-emitting sources produced for the CEGB collaborative radiobiology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the structure and application of an extrapolation ionisation chamber used for measuring dose-rates from plane and point beta-emitting sources. These measurements form the basis of the dosimetry for a collaborative radiobiological study of skin to study both stochastic and non-stochastic effects. A small sample from the wide range of measurements undertaken in the programme has been selected to illustrate the procedures involved. The extrapolation chamber is currently being automated and it is intended that this report should provide a source reference to the basis of the measurements made between 1977-86. (author)

  18. Environmental Research Division annual report: Center for Human Radiobiology, July 1982-June 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fourteenth Annual Report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. New cases of bone cancer and carcinoma of head sinuses are occurring at a rate of about one per year in patients who acquired radium burdens 50 to 60 years ago. Several papers deal with dosimetry of alpha-emitting radionuclides in man, in animals, or in the environment. The report concludes with an appendix containing data on the exposure of 2312 persons whose radium content has been determined and an appendix listing the classical radium-related malignancies (osteosarcomas and carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid)

  19. Dictionary of radiation protection, radiobiology and nuclear medicine. English-German-French-Russian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This multilingual dictionary covers the subject fields of radiation protection, radiobiology, and nuclear medicine with about 12,000 terms in each language. All terms are supplemented by one or more abbreviations of 22 special branches to assure the use of the very relevant terms. Special branches listed are for instance decontamination, dosimetry, atomic legislation, radiation detectors, radiography (medical), radiotherapy, safeguards, shielding, tansportation and storage. The terminology used in the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) of the IAEA has been completely taken into account

  20. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adjei, D.; Ayele, M.G.; Wachulak, P.; Bartnik, A.; Wegrzynski, L.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, A.; Lekki, J.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Pina, L.; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 364, Dec (2015), s. 27-32. ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GA13-28721S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASER LAB-EUROPE Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : laser -produced plasma * soft X-rays * radiobiology * gas puff target * water window Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2014

  1. Tcp and NTCP radiobiological models: conventional and hypo fractionated treatments in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo V, A.; Paredes G, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Resendiz G, G.; Posadas V, A. [Hospital Angeles Lomas, Av. Vialidad de la Barranca s/n, Col. Valle de las Palmas, 52763 Huixquilucan de Degallado, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mitsoura, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Medicina, Paseo Tollocan, Esq. Jesus Carranza s/n, Col. Moderna de la Cruz, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Rodriguez L, A.; Flores C, J. M., E-mail: armando.astudillo@inin.gob.mx [Hospital Medica Sur, Puente de Piedra 150, Col. Toriello Guerra, 14050 Tlalpan, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The hypo and conventional fractionated schedules performance were compared in terms of the tumor control and the normal tissue complications. From the records of ten patients, treated for adenocarcinoma and without mastectomy, the dose-volume histogram was used. Using radiobiological models the probabilities for tumor control and normal tissue complications were calculated. For both schedules the tumor control was approximately the same. However, the damage in the normal tissue was larger in conventional fractionated schedule. This is important because patients assistance time to their fractions (15 fractions/25 fractions) can be optimized. Thus, the hypo fractionated schedule has suitable characteristics to be implemented. (Author)

  2. Tcp and NTCP radiobiological models: conventional and hypo fractionated treatments in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypo and conventional fractionated schedules performance were compared in terms of the tumor control and the normal tissue complications. From the records of ten patients, treated for adenocarcinoma and without mastectomy, the dose-volume histogram was used. Using radiobiological models the probabilities for tumor control and normal tissue complications were calculated. For both schedules the tumor control was approximately the same. However, the damage in the normal tissue was larger in conventional fractionated schedule. This is important because patients assistance time to their fractions (15 fractions/25 fractions) can be optimized. Thus, the hypo fractionated schedule has suitable characteristics to be implemented. (Author)

  3. Research in radiobiology. Annual report of work in progress in the Internal Irradiation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival data on 160 nonirradiated control beagles of the University of Utah's Radiobiology Laboratory were analyzed. The animals died during a period from 1958 into 1979. The average age at death of animals which died during the 1958 to 1965 interval was significantly less than that of those whose deaths occurred in the 1965 to 1979 interval. The best estimate for average age at death for Super-Selected nonirradiated control beagles of the colony is 4864 +- 901 days. The Super-Selected dogs excluded those dying because of epilepsy, lymphosarcoma, lymphoma or accidents, and also excluded all dogs dying before 1966

  4. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 18. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 18. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemann, H. Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2009-07-15

    The proceedings on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology contain two review articles (prediction of normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy, ?H2AX foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks) and 34 contributions to the following topics: Hypoxia and molecular mechanisms of radiation resistance; biological imaging of the tumor micromilieu; DNA repair, genomic instability and carcerogenesis; molecular factors of radiation resistance; actual controversial discussion on possible irradiation caused metastasis risk enhancement; EGFR inhibition and irradiation; biology of experimental radiation/ normal tissue toxicity.

  5. Investigations on the quality of treatment plans for carbon ion radiotherapy. Beam delivery systems and radiobiological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillmann, Clarissa

    2014-07-01

    In a worldwide effort in research and development, radiation therapy with carbon ions has evolved to a technologically challenging but clinically very promising treatment option for cancer patients. To further improve patient benefit, optimal use of the physical and biological characteristics of carbon ions as well as of the available technologies should be made. The present thesis investigates the impact of different beam delivery systems and radiobiological models on the quality of treatment plans in carbon ion radiotherapy. The results of the study may provide pointers as to the role and the possible future implementation of the different techniques and radiobiological models in existing and upcoming particle therapy centers.

  6. Simulation of cellular irradiation with the CENBG microbeam line using GEANT4

    CERN Document Server

    Incerti, S; Villeneuve, R; Aguer, P; Gontier, E; Michelet-Habchi, C; Moretto, P; Nguyen Dinh Thao; Pouthier, T; Smith, R W; Barberet, Ph.; Moretto, Ph.

    2003-01-01

    Light-ion microbeams provide a unique opportunity to irradiate biological samples at the cellular level and to investigate radiobiological effects at low doses of high LET ionising radiation. Since 1998 a single-ion irradiation facility has been developed on the focused horizontal microbeam line of the CENBG 3.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. This setup delivers in air single protons and alpha particles of a few MeV onto cultured cells, with a spatial resolution of a few microns, allowing subcellular targeting. In this paper, we present results from the use of the GEANT4 toolkit to simulate cellular irradiation with the CENBG microbeam line, from the entrance to the microprobe up to the cellular medium.

  7. Design of a radiation facility for very small specimens used in radiobiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A design of a radiation facility for very small specimens used in radiobiology is presented. This micro-irradiator has been primarily designed to irradiate partial bodies in zebrafish embryos 3-4 mm in length. A miniature x-ray, 50 kV photon beam, is used as a radiation source. The source is inserted in a cylindrical brass collimator that has a pinhole of 1.0 mm in diameter along the central axis to produce a pencil photon beam. The collimator with the source is attached underneath a computer-controlled movable table which holds the specimens. Using a 45 deg. tilted mirror, a digital camera, connected to the computer, takes pictures of the specimen and the pinhole collimator. From the image provided by the camera, the relative distance from the specimen to the pinhole axis is calculated and coordinates are sent to the movable table to properly position the samples in the beam path. Due to its monitoring system, characteristic of the radiation beam, accuracy and precision of specimen positioning, and automatic image-based specimen recognition, this radiation facility is a suitable tool to irradiate partial bodies in zebrafish embryos, cell cultures or any other small specimen used in radiobiology research

  8. Relationship between tumour oxygenation, bioenergetic status and radiobiological hypoxia in an experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour oxygenation and bioenergetic status were measured in the same tumour and these results related to radiobiological hypoxia. A C3H mouse mammary carcinoma grown in the feet of CDF1 mice was used. Bioenergetic status was assessed by 31P MRS using a SISCO 7 Tesla magnet, oxygen measurements were done by a polarographic electrode and the hypoxic fraction was determined from direct analysis of the radiation dose-response data. During all examinations restrained, non-anaesthetized mice were allowed to breathe either 100% oxygen, carbogen, normal air, carbon monoxide (CO) at 75, 220, or 660 ppm or had blood flow occluded by clamping. Results showed a significant correlation between the radiobiological hypoxic fraction and % pO2 ≤ 5 mmHg under the different treatment conditions, whereas no correlation was found between beta nucleosidetriphosphate/inorganic phosphate (β-NTP/Pi) ratio and either the hypoxic fraction or the % of pO2 values ≤ 5 mmHg under the different treatment conditions. In conclusion, oxygen electrode measurements were sensitive to changes in tumour hypoxia whereas the bioenergetic status alone seemed to be a less precise measure of hypoxia in this tumour model. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that tumour cells in vivo can actually maintain the bioenergetic status during a period of severe hypoxia. (orig.)

  9. Bringing the heavy: carbon ion therapy in the radiobiological and clinical context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer is undergoing an evolution, shifting to the use of heavier ion species. For a plethora of malignancies, current radiotherapy using photons or protons yields marginal benefits in local control and survival. One hypothesis is that these malignancies have acquired, or are inherently radioresistant to low LET radiation. In the last decade, carbon ion radiotherapy facilities have slowly been constructed in Europe and Asia, demonstrating favorable results for many of the malignancies that do poorly with conventional radiotherapy. However, from a radiobiological perspective, much of how this modality works in overcoming radioresistance, and extending local control and survival are not yet fully understood. In this review, we will explain from a radiobiological perspective how carbon ion radiotherapy can overcome the classical and recently postulated contributors of radioresistance (α/β ratio, hypoxia, cell proliferation, the tumor microenvironment and metabolism, and cancer stem cells). Furthermore, we will make recommendations on the important factors to consider, such as anatomical location, in the future design and implementation of clinical trials. With the existing data available we believe that the expansion of carbon ion facilities into the United States is warranted

  10. Preparatory study of a ground-based space radiobiology program in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; Kraft, G.; O'Neill, P.; Reitz, G.; Sabatier, L.; Schneider, U.

    Space radiation has long been acknowledged as a potential showstopper for long duration manned interplanetary missions. Our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models. In an effort to gain more information on space radiation risk and to develop countermeasures, NASA initiated several years ago a Space Radiation Health Program, which is currently supporting biological experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator-based radiobiology research in the field of space radiation research is also under way in Russia and Japan. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently established an ambitious exploration program (AURORA), and within this program it has been decided to include a space radiation research program. Europe has a long tradition in radiobiology research at accelerators, generally focussing on charged-particle cancer therapy. This expertise can be adapted to address the issue of space radiation risk. To support research in this field in Europe, ESA issued a call for tender in 2005 for a preliminary study of investigations on biological effects of space radiation (IBER). This study will provide guidance on future ESA-supported activities in space radiation research by identifying the most appropriate European accelerator facilities to be targeted for cooperation, and by drafting a roadmap for future research activities. The roadmap will include a prioritisation of research topics, and a detailed proposal for experimental campaigns for the following 5 10 years.

  11. The radiobiological principles of boron neutron capture therapy: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiobiology of the dose components in a BNCT exposure is examined. The effect of exposure time in determining the biological effectiveness of γ-rays, due to the repair of sublethal damage, has been largely overlooked in the application of BNCT. Recoil protons from fast neutrons vary in their relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as a function of energy and tissue endpoint. Thus the energy spectrum of a beam will influence the RBE of this dose component. Protons from the neutron capture reaction in nitrogen have not been studied but in practice protons from nitrogen capture have been combined with the recoil proton contribution into a total proton dose. The relative biological effectiveness of the products of the neutron capture reaction in boron is derived from two factors, the RBE of the short range particles and the bio-distribution of boron, referred to collectively as the compound biological effectiveness factor. Caution is needed in the application of these factors for different normal tissues and tumors. - Highlights: ► Radiobiological properties of different dose components in BNCT are considered. ► Effectiveness of γ-ray dose depends strongly on exposure time due to sublethal damage repair. ► Effectiveness of fast neutron dose depends on neutron energy spectrum. ► γ-ray and fast neutron characteristics vary between beams and thus weighting factors will differ. ► Weighing factors for boron dose depend on the carrier, the tissue and its mode of administration.

  12. The effect of dose escalation on gastric toxicity when treating lower oesophageal tumours: a radiobiological investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using radiobiological modelling to estimate normal tissue toxicity, this study investigates the effects of dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in lower third oesophageal tumours on the stomach. 10 patients with lower third oesophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE 1 database (ISCRT47718479) with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 348 cm3. The original 3D conformal plans (50Gy3D) were compared to newly created RapidArc plans of 50GyRA and 60GyRA, the latter using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique using a boost volume, PTV2. Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were compared. There was a significant increase in NTCP of the stomach wall when moving from the 50GyRA to the 60GyRA plans (11–17 %, Wilcoxon signed rank test, p = 0.01). There was a strong correlation between the NTCP values of the stomach wall and the volume of the stomach wall/PTV 1 and stomach wall/PTV2 overlap structures (R = 0.80 and R = 0.82 respectively) for the 60GyRA plans. Radiobiological modelling suggests that increasing the prescribed dose to 60Gy may be associated with a significantly increased risk of toxicity to the stomach. It is recommended that stomach toxicity be closely monitored when treating patients with lower third oesophageal tumours with 60Gy

  13. Development of a soft X-ray microprobe for single cell radiobiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Liang; YAN Jingwen; JIANG Shiping; YU Yang

    2009-01-01

    An X-ray microprobe for radiobiological studies was developed which deliver precise doses of radiation to the selected individual cells. The facility used synchrotron radiation as soft X-ray source. A zone plate combining with a pinhole produced a fine probe from bending magnet for single cell irradiating with defined doses. The diameter of microprobe at the target position was about 2 μm by scanning a knife-edge with an AXUV photo diode. The fluxes of soft X-rays at 516.7 eV (2.4 nm) were about 5.4×104 photons/s.100mA measured with the photo diode. The absorbed dose rate for typical yeast cells was about 11.34 Gy/s with the storage current of 100 mA. A preliminary experiment for yeast cells irradiation has shown that the microprobe had a definite biological effect for radiobiological investigations. The soft X-ray microprobe at "water window" region has provided a useful tool for single cell irradiating damage and a capability of individually irradiating a certain numbers of cells each time.

  14. Research in radiobiology: Annual report of work in progress in the internal irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1950's the Atomic Energy Commission established at the University of Utah a large, long-term study designed to investigate the toxicity of internally deposited radionuclides in beagles. The first animals were injected on December 1, 1952 and thus began an odyssey unusual in modern science both for its duration and continued scientific interest and relevance. The original dogs were injected with 239Pu and 226Ra. Later, studies were initiated with 241Am, 249Cf, 252Cf, 253Es, 224Ra, 228Ra, 90Sr, and 228Th. These studies were unique and have and will continue to contribute valuable scientific information on the behavior and effects of these substances in biological systems. We feel that the data collected from these studies will be useful for many decades to come as we ask more demanding questions relative to radionuclides and environmental, biological and health issues. While this publication will be the last of our series Research in Radiobiology, the lifespan carcinogenesis studies are continuing under a collaborative arrangement with the I.T.R.I. Beginning in 1988, the colony status tables of dogs in the Utah studies and reports of research by the Radiobiology faculty will be included in the annual I.T.R.I. report. Under our new collaborative arrangements with the I.T.R.I. for the conduct of the lifespan carcinogenesis studies, we expect a continued high level of scientific productivity from our faculty

  15. Preliminary results in the application of radiobiological models in the evaluation of radiotherapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notwithstanding the limitations of radiobiological models in the clinical application, its use is becoming more widespread in order to quantitatively assess the bioequivalence of different regimens of irradiation, the effective comparison between different treatment plans by estimating the probability tumor control (TCP) or the probability of normal tissue complication (NTCP), or solve problems, such as the rescheduling of treatments in case of failure. The response to irradiation in the tissues at risk (OARS) depends on factors such as volume irradiated or its organizational structure and behavior can vary for a given dose distribution. Another important aspect is the sensitivity of these models to the variation of parameters (a, a / β, proliferation, clonogenic density, etc.) Measuring the difference between-subjects. Commercial planning systems do not always possible to estimate the biological response of the OARS and CTV. This study presents an assessment of the results of two applications (free ware) and Albireo Target BIOPLAN Cygnus X1 that calculate statistical parameters of the DVH: equivalent uniform dose (EUD), equivalent biological dose (BED), medium dose and other to estimate TCP (Poisson model) and NTCP (Lyman-models-Kutcker Burman and relative seriality) for the calculation of the objective functions: the probability of uncomplicated control (UTCP) based on generalized EUD (f). We studied the response of both systems to the variation of relevant radiobiological parameters and the shape of the DVH. (author)

  16. Radiobiological and PK assays at advance Centre for Training Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological, pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies are of paramount importance for drug development and more so in the development of newer radiation modulators. Radiobiological studies have now graduated from simple cell survival and viability assays to more complex molecular and imaging studies to study radiation modulation both in in-vitro and in-vivo models. Tata Memorial Centre and its research centre (ACTREC) is a premiere cancer centre in India dedicated to cancer research. The Department of Radiation Oncology treats approximately 7000 new patients in a year and is uniquely placed to do both translational radiation and clinical research in the field of drug development. The Clinical Biology Lab of the Department of Radiation Oncology at ACTREC in collaboration with other labs at ACTREC has standardized cell survival assays, DNA damage assays such as Gamma H2AX assay (by flow as well as confocal microscopy), Micronuclei assay and COMET assays using CASP software for quantification. We have also done apoptotic assays. These assays have been conducted for development newer drug formulations (for e.g liposomal radiosensitizers). We also have a strong imaging division having sophisticated microscopes (confocal and single molecule super resolution microscopes) for in-vitro optical imaging and a dedicated preclinical PET/CT/SPECT for in-vivo imaging. The clinical 3T MRI and PET/CT is being used to study the effect of hypoxia in various cancers

  17. Radiobiologically optimized couch shift: A new localization paradigm using cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yimei, E-mail: yhuang2@hfhs.org; Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Gordon, James; Brown, Stephen; Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 W Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery by utilizing radiobiological response knowledge and evaluate its use during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Five patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan with one 358° arc was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Five representative pretreatment cone beam CTs (CBCT) were selected for each patient. The CBCT images were registered to PCT by a human observer, which consisted of an initial automated registration with three degrees-of-freedom, followed by manual adjustment for agreement at the prostate/rectal wall interface. To determine the optimal treatment position for each CBCT, a search was performed centering on the observer-matched position (OM-position) utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (EUD{sub prostate}, D99{sub prostate}, NTCP{sub rectum}, and NTCP{sub bladder}) for the prostate, rectum, and bladder. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The dosimetric indices, averaged over the five patients’ treatment plans, were (mean ± SD) 79.5 ± 0.3 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 78.2 ± 0.4 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 11.1% ± 2.7% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 7.6% (NTCP{sub bladder}). The corresponding values from CBCT at the OM-positions were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.8 ± 0.7 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 12.1% ± 5.6% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 51.6% ± 15.2% (NTCP{sub bladder}), respectively. In comparison, from CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the dosimetric indices were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.3 ± 0.6 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 8.0% ± 3.3% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 15.7% (NTCP{sub bladder}). Excessive NTCP{sub rectum} was observed on Patient 5 (19.5% ± 6.6%) corresponding to localization at OM

  18. Literature study of the radiobiological parameters of Caesium-137 required for evaluating internal irradiation doses as a function of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reassembles information published in scientific literature on radiobiological parameters of Cs-137, necessary for the estimate of the internal irradiation dose of man according to his age (during growth). The data are completed by a commented review of the mathematical models, proposed in order to value the irradiation doses from ingested cesium and the biological parameters. (author)

  19. Radiological and Environmental Research Division, Center for Human Radiobiology. Annual report, July 1980-June 1981. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 22 papers of this annual report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. Abstracts were not written for 2 appendices which contain data on the exposure and radium-induced malignancies of 2259 persons whose radium content has been determined at least once. (KRM)

  20. 77 FR 68155 - The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No. R-84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... NRC's E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139; August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants to... filing requirements of the NRC's E-Filing Rule (72 FR 49139; August 28, 2007) apply to appeals of NRC... COMMISSION The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No....

  1. Proton Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tommasino, Francesco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Durante, Marco, E-mail: m.durante@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Festkörperphysik, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2015-02-12

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed.

  2. Proton Radiobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tommasino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak, the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE, protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed.

  3. Proton Radiobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Tommasino; Marco Durante

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming...

  4. Assessment of radiobiological metrics applied to patient-specific QA process of VMAT prostate treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Gutiérrez, Francisco; Pérez-Vara, Consuelo; Clavo-Herranz, María H; López-Carrizosa, Concepción; Pérez-Regadera, José; Ibáñez-Villoslada, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    VMAT is a powerful technique to deliver hypofractionated prostate treatments. The lack of correlations between usual 2D pretreatment QA results and the clini-cal impact of possible mistakes has allowed the development of 3D verification systems. Dose determination on patient anatomy has provided clinical predictive capability to patient-specific QA process. Dose-volume metrics, as evaluation crite-ria, should be replaced or complemented by radiobiological indices. These metrics can be incorporated into individualized QA extracting the information for response parameters (gEUD, TCP, NTCP) from DVHs. The aim of this study is to assess the role of two 3D verification systems dealing with radiobiological metrics applied to a prostate VMAT QA program. Radiobiological calculations were performed for AAPM TG-166 test cases. Maximum differences were 9.3% for gEUD, -1.3% for TCP, and 5.3% for NTCP calculations. Gamma tests and DVH-based comparisons were carried out for both systems in order to assess their performance in 3D dose determination for prostate treatments (high-, intermediate-, and low-risk, as well as prostate bed patients). Mean gamma passing rates for all structures were bet-ter than 92.0% and 99.1% for both 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria. Maximum discrepancies were (2.4% ± 0.8%) and (6.2% ± 1.3%) for targets and normal tis-sues, respectively. Values for gEUD, TCP, and NTCP were extracted from TPS and compared to the results obtained with the two systems. Three models were used for TCP calculations (Poisson, sigmoidal, and Niemierko) and two models for NTCP determinations (LKB and Niemierko). The maximum mean difference for gEUD calculations was (4.7% ± 1.3%); for TCP, the maximum discrepancy was (-2.4% ± 1.1%); and NTCP comparisons led to a maximum deviation of (1.5% ± 0.5%). The potential usefulness of biological metrics in patient-specific QA has been explored. Both systems have been successfully assessed as potential tools for evaluating the clinical

  5. Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days Growth of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2 Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days'Grown of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days Growth of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2 Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days'Grown of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2

  6. Radiobiologic risk estimation from dental radiology. Part I. Absorbed doses to critical organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to generate one consistent set of data for evaluating and comparing radiobiologic risks from different dental radiographic techniques. To accomplish this goal, absorbed doses were measured in fourteen anatomic sites from (1) five different panoramic machines with the use of rare-earth screens, (2) a twenty-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long round cone, (3) a twenty-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, (4) a four-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long round cone, and (5) a four-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone. The dose to the thyroid gland, the active bone marrow, the brain, and the salivary glands was evaluated by means of exposure of a tissue-equivalent phantom, fitted with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) at the relevant locations

  7. Radiobiologic risk estimation from dental radiology. Part II. Cancer incidence and fatality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the use of the measured absorbed doses from part I of this article, the specific radiobiologic risk to the patient from (1) five different panoramic machines with rare-earth screens, (2) a 20-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long round cone, (3) a 20-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, (4) a 4-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long round cone, and (5) a 4-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, was calculated. The estimated risks are expressed in two ways: the probability of radiation-induced cancer in specific organs per million examinations and the probability of expression of a fatal cancer per million examinations. The highest risks calculated were from the complete-mouth survey with the use of round collimation. The lowest risks calculated were from panoramic radiography and four interproximal radiographs with rectangular collimation

  8. Treatment plan comparison between helical tomotherapy and MLC-based IMRT using radiobiological measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Costa Ferreira, Brigida; Shi, Chengyu; Lind, Bengt K.; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2007-07-01

    The rapid implementation of advanced treatment planning and delivery technologies for radiation therapy has brought new challenges in evaluating the most effective treatment modality. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using multi-leaf collimators (MLC) and helical tomotherapy (HT) are becoming popular modes of treatment delivery and their application and effectiveness continues to be investigated. Presently, there are several treatment planning systems (TPS) that can generate and optimize IMRT plans based on user-defined objective functions for the internal target volume (ITV) and organs at risk (OAR). However, the radiobiological parameters of the different tumours and normal tissues are typically not taken into account during dose prescription and optimization of a treatment plan or during plan evaluation. The suitability of a treatment plan is typically decided based on dosimetric criteria such as dose-volume histograms (DVH), maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviation of the dose distribution. For a more comprehensive treatment plan evaluation, the biologically effective uniform dose ({\\bar{\\bar{D}}}) is applied together with the complication-free tumour control probability (P+). Its utilization is demonstrated using three clinical cases that were planned with two different forms of IMRT. In this study, three different cancer types at different anatomical sites were investigated: head and neck, lung and prostate cancers. For each cancer type, a linac MLC-based step-and-shoot IMRT plan and a HT plan were developed. The MLC-based IMRT treatment plans were developed on the Philips treatment-planning platform, using the Pinnacle 7.6 software release. For the tomotherapy HiArt plans, the dedicated tomotherapy treatment planning station was used, running version 2.1.2. By using {\\bar{\\bar{D}}} as the common prescription point of the treatment plans and plotting the tissue response probabilities versus {\\bar{\\bar{D}}} for a range of prescription doses

  9. A method for radiobiological investigations in radiation fields with different LET and high dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For investigations: 1. Performed in the field of radiobiology with different LET-radiation and a relatively high background dose rate of one component (e.g. investigations with fast and intermediate reactor neutrons) 2. Concerning radiation risk studies within a wide range 3. Of irradiations, covering a long time period (up to 100 days) a test system is necessary which on the one hand makes it possible to analyze the influence of different LET radiation and secondly shows a relative radiation resistant behaviour and allows a simple cell cycle regulation. A survey is given upon the installed device of a simple cell observation method, the biological test system used and the analysis of effects caused by dose, repair and LET. It is possible to analyze the behaviour of the nonsurvival cells and to demonstrate different reactions of the test parameters to the radiation of different LET. (author)

  10. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  11. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, April-June 1985. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The following titles are included in this collection of reprints: Presence of a high-affinity Ca(s+) - and Mg(2+) - dependent ATPase in rat peritoneal mast-cell membranes; Prostanoid production by lipopolysaccharide stimulated Kupffer cells; Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines; WR-2721 inhibition of radiation-induced prostaglandin excretion in rats; Effects of mixed neutron-gamma total-body irradiation on physical activity performance of rhesus monkeys; Immunologic and hematologic perturbations in models of combined injury; Hematopoiesis in conventional mice after wound trauma; Carrier generation recombination, and transport in organic crystals; Energy transfer and molecular weight effects on polymer luminescence. Keywords: Radiobiology; Military research.

  12. Hypo-fractionated treatment in radiotherapy: radio-biological models Tcp and NTCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time the breast cancer in Mexico has the first place of incidence of the malignant neoplasia s in the women, and represents 11.34% of all the cancer cases. On the other hand, the treatments for cancer by means of ionizing radiations have been dominated under the approaches of the medical radio-oncologists which have been based on test and error by many years. The radio-biological models, as the Tcp, NTCP and dosimetric variables, for their clinical application in the conventional radiotherapy with hypo-fractionation have as purpose predicting personalized treatment plans that they present most probability of tumor control and minor probability of late reactions, becoming this way support tools in the decisions taking for the patient treatments planning of Medical Physicists and Radio-oncologists. (Author)

  13. Water versus DNA: new insights into proton track-structure modelling in radiobiology and radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, C.; Quinto, M. A.; Monti, J. M.; Galassi, M. E.; Weck, P. F.; Fojón, O. A.; Hanssen, J.; Rivarola, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    Water is a common surrogate of DNA for modelling the charged particle-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, a self-consistent quantum mechanical modelling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. Their respective probability of occurrence—expressed in terms of total cross sections—as well as their energetic signature (potential and kinetic) are assessed in order to clearly emphasize the differences existing between realistic building blocks of living matter and the controverted water-medium surrogate. Consequences in radiobiology and radiotherapy will be discussed in particular in view of treatment planning refinement aiming at better radiotherapy strategies.

  14. Linear versus non-linear: a perspective from health physics and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a vigorous debate about whether or not there may be a 'threshold' for radiation-induced adverse health effects. A linear-no threshold (LNT) model allows radiation protection practitioners to manage putative risk consistently, because different types of exposure, exposures at different times, and exposures to different organs may be summed. If we are to argue to regulators and the public that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, it is incumbent on us to prove this. The question is, therefore, whether any consonant body of evidence exists that the risk of low doses has been over-estimated. From the perspectives of both health physics and radiobiology, we conclude that the evidence for linearity at high doses (and arguably of fairly small total doses if delivered at high dose rate) is strong. For low doses (or in fact, even for fairly high doses) delivered at low dose rate, the evidence is much less compelling. Since statistical limitations at low doses are almost always going to prevent a definitive answer, one way or the other, from human data, we need a way out of this epistemological dilemma of 'LNT or not LNT, that is the question'. To our minds, the path forward is to exploit (1) radiobiological studies which address directly the question of what the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor is in actual human bodies exposed to low-level radiation, in concert with (2) epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to fairly high doses (to obtain statistical power) but where exposure was protracted over some years. (author)

  15. Radioembolisation with 90Y-microspheres: dosimetric and radiobiological investigation for multi-cycle treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioembolisation with 90Y-microspheres is a new locoregional treatment of hepatic lesions, usually applied as single cycle. Multi-cycle treatments might be considered as a strategy to improve the risk-benefit balance. With the aim to derive suitable information for patient tailored therapy, available patients' dosimetric data were reviewed according to the linear-quadratic model and converted into biological effective dose (BED) values. Single vs. multi-cycle approaches were compared through radiobiological perspective. Twenty patients with metastatic lesions underwent radioembolisation. The 90Y-administered activity (AA) was established in order to respect a precautionary limit dose (40 Gy) for the non-tumoral liver (NTL). BED was calculated setting α/β 2.5 Gy (NTL), 10 Gy (tumours); T1/2,eff = T1/2,phys = 64.2 h; T1/2,rep = 2.5 h (NTL), 1.5 h (tumours). The BED to NTL was considered as a constraint for multi-cycle approach. The AA for two cycles and the percent variations of AA, tumour dose, BED were estimated. In one-cycle, for a prescribed BED to NTL of 64 Gy (NTL dose = 40 Gy), AA was 1.7 (0.9-3.2) GBq, tumour dose was 130 (65-235) Gy, and tumour BED was 170 (75-360) Gy. Considering two cycles, ∝15% increase was found for AA and dose to NTL, with unvaried BED for NTL. Tumour dose increase was 20 (10-35) Gy; tumour BED increase was 10 (3-11) Gy. In different protocols allowing 80 Gy to NTL, the BED sparing estimated was ∝50 Gy (two cycles) and 65 Gy (three cycles). From a radiobiological perspective, multi-cycle treatments would allow administering higher activities with increased tumour irradiation and preserved radiation effects on NTL. Trials comparing single vs. multiple cycles are suggested. (orig.)

  16. Radiobiological research for improving cancer therapy in India: rationale, problems and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is emerging as a very important health hazard in India. According to recent studies by the Indian Council of Medical Research, about 2.25 million patients are presently suffering from different types of cancer in India. Approximately one million new cases are diagnosed, and nearly 0.3 million deaths occur every year on account of this disease. About 2/3rd of the cancers are at an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. However, the allocation of funds for healthcare in India to support the research efforts for developing more potent radio-chemotherapy protocols for cancer treatment is too little. Studies by the W.H.O. have estimated that less developed countries including India use less than 5% of world resources destined for cancer control. It follows from the above discussions that it is imperative to further encourage and diversify the radiobiological research in India. This can be achieved by creating radiobiological research facilities, mainly in all the cancer centers and post graduate medical institutions, and further expanding the upcoming laboratories in the universities such as Bikaner. Collaborative research programs between laboratories at different centers could facilitate systematic evaluation of various pharmacological agents and neutraceuticals for potential application for treatment of different cancers. Our studies on combination of radiation with temozolomide and certain adjuvants with selective effects on brain tumour cells will be very briefly discussed in this presentation. Finally the possible administrative set up and multi dimensional collaborations for cost effective utilization of existing resources to further augment radiation biology research will also be discussed

  17. Estimation of the radiobiological and kinetic factors of radiosensitivity and radiocurability of metastases of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx to neck lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of theoretical model of tumour growth and experimental methods of kinetic and radiobiological factors for analysis of clinical data to improve the effectiveness of dose fractionation are checked. 176 refs., 27 figs., 19 tabs. (author)

  18. Immunomodulatory actions of antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minić Svetlana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antimicrob drugs and immune system interaction has been studied since the pioneer works of Metchnikoff. After the introduction of antibiotics in clinical practice this area has attracted little attention of investigators, because of the lack of standards. This is the reason that the studying of the influence of antibiotics on immune system is still at its beginning. Aim: To point out the immunomodulatory action of some antibiotics on certain components of immune system. Methods and results. The literaure findings show that antibiotics exspress immunomodulatory action on some components of immune system such as fagocytes (polymorphonucleary, macrophages, monocytes, cytokines, immunoglobulines, and on cellular immunity. The principles of antibiotics action on phagocyte are the inhibition of chemotaxis and oxidants production. Macrolides applied for a short time enchance the phagocytic functions while their long use leads to immunosupression. Some cephalosporines and rifampicin in therapeutic doses inhibit the oxydative metabolism of macrophages. Tetracyclines, clindamycines, chloramphenicol and tobramycin inhibit the synthesis of superoxyd anione. The action of some antibiotics on cytokine and specific antibodies is also important. Cellular immunity can be affected as well. After administration of certain antibiotics it takes 1-2 weeks to reestablish normal cellular immunity, and for other even more. Conclusion. There is still no clear standing on real effects of antibiotics on the immune system. Clinicians should search for more information from this new-old field of investigation in order to give more adequate therapy to patients.

  19. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes span a huge range of length and time scales from the molecular to the near-macroscopic. Understanding how effects on one scale influence, and are themselves influenced by, those on lower and higher scales is a critical issue for the construction of models in Systems Biology....... Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle...... soon be coupled to Mass Action models allowing the parameters in such models to be continuously tuned according to the finer resolution simulation. This will help realize the goal of a computational cellular simulation that is able to capture the dynamics of membrane-associated processes such as...

  20. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renis, M.; Borghesi, M.; Favetta, M.; Malfa, G.; Manti, L.; Romano, F.; Schettino, G.; Tomasello, B.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2013-07-01

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  1. Modelling cellular behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  2. Optimization in brachytherapy with the implementation of Radiobiology; Optimizacion en Braquiterapia con la implementacion de la Radiobiologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, M.P.; Bourel, V.J.; Rodriguez, I.; Torre, M. de la; Caneva, S. [Braqui S.R.L. Viamonte 1861, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1998-12-31

    In the brachytherapy planning treatments with High dose rates (HDR), the optimization algorithms used are based in dosimetric considerations and/or geometric ones, ignoring the radiobiological response of the tissue treated. In this work we wish to show the implementation of radiobiological concepts in the optimization. Assuming that the subtiles differences that result in the dose distribution among the different optimization models which are not visible in an isodose plane, it is studied how is classically make it , the quality implant through natural histograms about dose volumes and the resulting parameters. Also is studied the necrosis probability which may be caused by the choice of some optimization model, allowing with this the choice of the best implant. (Author)

  3. Radiation-induced cardiac damage in early left breast cancer patients: Risk factors, biological mechanisms, radiobiology, and dosimetric constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today there is general awareness of the potential damage to the heart in left-sided (more than in right-sided) breast cancer radiotherapy (RT). Historical changes in tumor and heart doses are presented here along with the impact of different RT techniques and volumes. Individual and pharmacological risk factors are also examined with respect to radiation damage. The biological mechanisms of harm are only partially understood, such as the radiobiology of heart damage due to the presence of various radiosensitive structures and their topographic heterogeneity. Furthermore, individual variability may expose patients to higher or lower risks of late cardiac damage or death. Damage mechanisms and radiobiological characteristics in heart irradiation are presented in relation to dosimetric and biological parameters.

  4. Radiobiological effects in organisms of plants and animals exposed to ionizing irradiation in the Chernobyl NPP zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of ionizing radiation on forest ecosystems most clearly revealed itself near the Chernobyl NPP (ChNPP), were magnitudes of absorbed doses reached 'lethal' values, as applied to conifers. Main contribution to absorbed dose was due to beta-radiation of short-living radionuclides. To largest extent the radiobiological effects appeared at injured plantations of pines and firs. Nevertheless, during the first year maximum absorbed doses influenced also on leaf-bearing trees (birch, alder, asp) which then rehabilitated themselves completely

  5. Relationships Between Rectal Wall Dose-Volume Constraints and Radiobiologic Indices of Toxicity for Patients With Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to investigate how exceeding specified rectal wall dose-volume constraints impacts on the risk of late rectal bleeding by using radiobiologic calculations. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the rectal wall of 250 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. All patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, receiving mean target doses of 80 Gy. To study the main features of the patient population, the average and the standard deviation of the distribution of DVHs were generated. The mean dose , generalized equivalent uniform dose formulation (gEUD), modified equivalent uniform dose formulation (mEUD)0, and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) distributions were also produced. The DVHs set was then binned into eight classes on the basis of the exceeding or the fulfilling of three dose-volume constraints: V40 = 60%, V50 = 50%, and V70 = 25%. Comparisons were made between them by , gEUD, mEUD0, and NTCP. Results: The radiobiologic calculations suggest that late rectal toxicity is mostly influenced by V70. The gEUD and mEUD0 are risk factors of toxicity always concordant with NTCP, inside each DVH class. The mean dose, although a reliable index, may be misleading in critical situations. Conclusions: Both in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and particularly in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, it should be known what the relative importance of each specified dose-volume constraint is for each organ at risk. This requires a greater awareness of radiobiologic properties of tissues and radiobiologic indices may help to gradually become aware of this issue

  6. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    OpenAIRE

    Beyreuther, Elke

    2010-01-01

    More than hundred years after the discovery of X-rays different kinds of ionizing radiation are ubiquitous in medicine, applied to clinical diagnostics and cancer treatment as well. Irrespective of their nature, the widespread application of radiation implies its precise dosimetric characterization and detailed knowledge of the radiobiological effects induced in cancerous and normal tissue. Starting with in vitro cell irradiation experiments, which define basic parameters for the subsequent t...

  7. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of non-malignant disorders. Part I: physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synopsis of the introductory paragraph of the DEGRO consensus S2e-guideline recommendations for the radiotherapy of benign disorders, including physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk. This work is based on the S2e-guideline recommendations published November 14, 2013. The basic principles of radiation physics and treatment delivery, evaluation of putative underlying radiobiological mechanisms, and the assessment of genetic and cancer risk following low-dose irradiation will be presented. Radiation therapy of benign diseases is performed according to similar physical principles as those governing treatment of malignant diseases in radiation oncology, using the same techniques and workflows. These methods comprise usage of orthovoltage X-ray units, gamma irradiation facilities, linear accelerators (LINACs), and brachytherapy. Experimental in vitro and in vivo models recently confirmed the clinically observed anti-inflammatory effect of low-dose X-irradiation, and implicated a multitude of radiobiological mechanisms. These include modulation of different immunological pathways, as well as the activities of endothelial cells, mono- and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and macrophages. The use of effective dose for radiogenic risk assessment and the corresponding tumor incidence rate of 5.5 %/Sv are currently controversially discussed. Some authors argue that the risk of radiation-induced cancers should be estimated on the basis of epidemiological data. However, such data are rarely available at present and associated with high variability. Current radiobiological studies clearly demonstrate a therapeutic effectiveness of radiation therapy used to treat benign diseases and implicate various molecular mechanisms. Radiogenic risks should be taken into account when applying radiation treatment for benign diseases. (orig.)

  8. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortalities in the world. The precise diagnosis of the disease helps the patients to select the appropriate modality of the treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The physics of X-radiation and the advanced imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the efficient diagnosis and therapeutic treatments in cancer. However, the accuracy of the measurements of the metabolic target volumes (MTVs) in the PET/CT dual-imaging modality is always limited. Similarly the external beam radiation therapy (XRT) such as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common modality in the radiotherapy treatment. These treatments are simulated and evaluated using the XRT plans and the standard methodologies in the commercial planning system. However, the normal organs are always susceptible to the radiation toxicity in these treatments due to lack of knowledge of the appropriate radiobiological models to estimate the clinical outcomes. We explored several methodologies to estimate MTVs by reviewing various techniques of the target volume delineation using the static phantoms in the PET scans. The review suggests that the more precise and practical method of delineating PET MTV should be an intermediate volume between the volume coverage for the standardized uptake value (SUV; 2.5) of glucose and the 50% (40%) threshold of the maximum SUV for the smaller (larger) volume delineations in the radiotherapy applications. Similarly various types of optimal XRT plans were designed using the CT and PET/CT scans for the treatment of various types of cancer patients. The qualities of these plans were assessed using the universal plan-indices. The dose-volume criteria were also examined in the targets and organs by analyzing the conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The biological models such as tumor

  9. Studies of SSNTDs made from LR-115 in view of their applicability in radiobiological experiments with alpha particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerschel, B. E-mail: doerschel@physik.tu-dresden.de; Hermsdorf, D.; Pieck, S.; Starke, S.; Thiele, H.; Weickert, F

    2003-06-01

    Radiobiological studies on cell monolayers irradiated by charged particles need to determine the number and position of particle traversals. Solid state nuclear track detectors used as basic substrate for the cell layers are in principle suitable for this purpose. The detector foils must be as thin as possible but still guaranteeing mechanical stability. Two types of LR-115, red coloured and colourless, were tested in the present work. The studies aimed at optimisation of the etching conditions and determination of the registration efficiency for alpha particles in a wide range of energies and angles of incidence. Specific requirements have to be fulfilled for application of the detector foils under the environmental conditions of radiobiological experiments. Most important are biocompatibility between detector and cells and registration properties insensible against special treatments, as UV sterilisation and cell plating prior to irradiation as well as cell incubation after the irradiation. The experimental studies performed with alpha particles showed that environmental conditions of radiobiological experiments do not change the registration properties of LR-115 detectors significantly.

  10. WE-E-BRE-04: Dual Focal Spot Dose Painting for Precision Preclinical Radiobiological Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J; Lindsay, P [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Jaffray, D [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); The Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recent progress in small animal radiotherapy systems has provided the foundation for delivering the heterogeneous, millimeter scale dose distributions demanded by preclinical radiobiology investigations. Despite advances in preclinical dose planning, delivery of highly heterogeneous dose distributions is constrained by the fixed collimation systems and large x-ray focal spot common in small animal radiotherapy systems. This work proposes a dual focal spot dose optimization and delivery method with a large x-ray focal spot used to deliver homogeneous dose regions and a small focal spot to paint spatially heterogeneous dose regions. Methods: Two-dimensional dose kernels were measured for a 1 mm circular collimator with radiochromic film at 10 mm depth in a solid water phantom for the small and large x-ray focal spots on a recently developed small animal microirradiator. These kernels were used in an optimization framework which segmented a desired dose distribution into low- and high-spatial frequency regions for delivery by the large and small focal spot, respectively. For each region, the method determined an optimal set of stage positions and beam-on times. The method was demonstrated by optimizing a bullseye pattern consisting of 0.75 mm radius circular target and 0.5 and 1.0 mm wide rings alternating between 0 and 2 Gy. Results: Compared to a large focal spot technique, the dual focal spot technique improved the optimized dose distribution: 69.2% of the optimized dose was within 0.5 Gy of the intended dose for the large focal spot, compared to 80.6% for the dual focal spot method. The dual focal spot design required 14.0 minutes of optimization, and will require 178.3 minutes for automated delivery. Conclusion: The dual focal spot optimization and delivery framework is a novel option for delivering conformal and heterogeneous dose distributions at the preclinical level and provides a new experimental option for unique radiobiological investigations

  11. Radioembolisation with {sup 90}Y-microspheres: dosimetric and radiobiological investigation for multi-cycle treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, Marta; Ferrari, Mahila; Pedroli, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Bartolomei, Mirco; Arico, Demetrio; De Cicco, Concetta [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Orsi, Franco; Bonomo, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Interventistic Radiology, Milan (Italy); Mallia, Andrew [Gamma Unit, Radiology Department, St. Luke' s Hospital (Malta); Paganelli, Giovanni [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy)

    2008-11-15

    Radioembolisation with {sup 90}Y-microspheres is a new locoregional treatment of hepatic lesions, usually applied as single cycle. Multi-cycle treatments might be considered as a strategy to improve the risk-benefit balance. With the aim to derive suitable information for patient tailored therapy, available patients' dosimetric data were reviewed according to the linear-quadratic model and converted into biological effective dose (BED) values. Single vs. multi-cycle approaches were compared through radiobiological perspective. Twenty patients with metastatic lesions underwent radioembolisation. The {sup 90}Y-administered activity (AA) was established in order to respect a precautionary limit dose (40 Gy) for the non-tumoral liver (NTL). BED was calculated setting {alpha}/{beta} = 2.5 Gy (NTL), 10 Gy (tumours); T{sub 1/2,eff} = T{sub 1/2,phys} = 64.2 h; T{sub 1/2,rep} = 2.5 h (NTL), 1.5 h (tumours). The BED to NTL was considered as a constraint for multi-cycle approach. The AA for two cycles and the percent variations of AA, tumour dose, BED were estimated. In one-cycle, for a prescribed BED to NTL of 64 Gy (NTL dose = 40 Gy), AA was 1.7 (0.9-3.2) GBq, tumour dose was 130 (65-235) Gy, and tumour BED was 170 (75-360) Gy. Considering two cycles, {proportional_to}15% increase was found for AA and dose to NTL, with unvaried BED for NTL. Tumour dose increase was 20 (10-35) Gy; tumour BED increase was 10 (3-11) Gy. In different protocols allowing 80 Gy to NTL, the BED sparing estimated was {proportional_to}50 Gy (two cycles) and 65 Gy (three cycles). From a radiobiological perspective, multi-cycle treatments would allow administering higher activities with increased tumour irradiation and preserved radiation effects on NTL. Trials comparing single vs. multiple cycles are suggested. (orig.)

  12. An in vitro study of the radiobiological effects of flattening filter free radiotherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators allow for an increase in instantaneous dose-rate of the x-ray pulses by a factor of 2–6 over the conventional flattened output. As a result, radiobiological investigations are being carried out to determine the effect of these higher dose-rates on cell response. The studies reported thus far have presented conflicting results, highlighting the need for further investigation. To determine the radiobiological impact of the increased dose-rates from FFF exposures a Varian Truebeam medical linear accelerator was used to irradiate two human cancer cell lines in vitro, DU-145 prostate and H460 non-small cell lung, with both flattened and FFF 6 MV beams. The fluence profile of the FFF beam was modified using a custom-designed Nylon compensator to produce a similar dose profile to the flattened beam (6X) at the cell surface but at a higher instantaneous dose-rate. For both cell lines there appeared to be no significant change in cell survival. Curve fitting coefficients for DU145 cells irradiated with constant average dose-rates were 6X: α = 0.09 ± 0.03, β = 0.03 ± 0.01 and 6FFF: α = 0.14 ± 0.13, β = 0.03 ± 0.02 with a significance of p = 0.75. For H460 cells irradiated with the same instantaneous dose-rate but different average dose-rate the fit coefficients were 6FFF (low dose-rate): α = 0.21 ± 0.11, 0.07 ± 0.02 and 6FFF (high dose-rate): α = 0.21 ± 0.16, 0.07 ± 0.03, with p = 0.79. The results indicate that collective damage behaviour does not occur at the instantaneous dose-rates investigated here and that the use of either modality should result in the same clinical outcome, however this will require further validation in vivo. (note)

  13. An in vitro study of the radiobiological effects of flattening filter free radiotherapy treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R. B.; Hyland, W. B.; Cole, A. J.; Butterworth, K. T.; McMahon, S. J.; Redmond, K. M.; Trainer, C.; Prise, K. M.; McGarry, C. K.; Hounsell, A. R.

    2013-03-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators allow for an increase in instantaneous dose-rate of the x-ray pulses by a factor of 2-6 over the conventional flattened output. As a result, radiobiological investigations are being carried out to determine the effect of these higher dose-rates on cell response. The studies reported thus far have presented conflicting results, highlighting the need for further investigation. To determine the radiobiological impact of the increased dose-rates from FFF exposures a Varian Truebeam medical linear accelerator was used to irradiate two human cancer cell lines in vitro, DU-145 prostate and H460 non-small cell lung, with both flattened and FFF 6 MV beams. The fluence profile of the FFF beam was modified using a custom-designed Nylon compensator to produce a similar dose profile to the flattened beam (6X) at the cell surface but at a higher instantaneous dose-rate. For both cell lines there appeared to be no significant change in cell survival. Curve fitting coefficients for DU145 cells irradiated with constant average dose-rates were 6X: α = 0.09 ± 0.03, β = 0.03 ± 0.01 and 6FFF: α = 0.14 ± 0.13, β = 0.03 ± 0.02 with a significance of p = 0.75. For H460 cells irradiated with the same instantaneous dose-rate but different average dose-rate the fit coefficients were 6FFF (low dose-rate): α = 0.21 ± 0.11, 0.07 ± 0.02 and 6FFF (high dose-rate): α = 0.21 ± 0.16, 0.07 ± 0.03, with p = 0.79. The results indicate that collective damage behaviour does not occur at the instantaneous dose-rates investigated here and that the use of either modality should result in the same clinical outcome, however this will require further validation in vivo.

  14. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  15. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  16. Dosimetric measurements and radiobiological consequences of radioimmunotherapy in tumor bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of the hybridoma technology, the production of highly specific tumor associated monoclonal antibodies has provided new optimism for the adjuvant delivery of therapeutic radiation doses via radioimmunotherapy. The authors have used a modified form of the well-established TL dosimetry technology to measure the dose resulting from radioimmunotherapy experiments in tumor bearing mice. Their laboratory has designed and tested a miniature CaSO4:D TLD which fits conveniently inside a 20 gauge needle for the direct implantation of the dosimeter in an animal model undergoing radiolabeled antibody therapy. Direct measurement of absorbed dose from beta and gamma radiation in the animals may be obtained upon removal of the dosimeter at animal sacrifice or by surgery. This absorbed dose data may then be related to antibody affinity and localization data obtained by serial biodistribution studies. Using p96.5 melanoma antibody with a Brown Tumor Model in athymic mice, localization indices measured in the range of 2 to 4 and scored 4 to 7 days post antibody injection, yielded a tumor dose/whole body dose ratio of 1.10 +/- 0.04 (no enhancement). The dose to liver showed marker time-dependent enhancement relative to the whole body, however. An outline of suggested control radiobiological experiments to be performed in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy experiments has been included in order to provide comparative dose response data. 11 references, 14 figures, 3 tables

  17. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5–7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1–4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread. (author)

  18. Development of a single ion micro-irradiation facility for experimental radiobiology at cell level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro-irradiation device has been developed for radiobiology applications at the scale of the cell. This device is based on an upgrade of an existing micro-beam line that was already able to deliver a 1 to 3 MeV proton or alpha beam of low intensity and whose space resolution is lower than 1 micrometer in vacuum. The important part of this work has been the development of an irradiation stage designed to fit on the micro-probe and able to deliver ions in the air with an absolute accuracy of a few micrometers. A program has been set up to monitor the complete irradiation line in testing and in automatic irradiation operating phases. Simulation tools based on Monte-Carlo calculations have been validated through comparisons with experimental data particularly in the field of spatial resolution and of the number of ions delivered. The promising results show the possibility in a near future to use this tool to study the response of cells to very low irradiation doses down to the extreme limit of one ion per cell

  19. Postoperative radiotherapy in DBCG during 30 years. Techniques, indications and clinical radiobiological experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overgaard, Marie; Juul Christensen, Jens (Dept. of Oncology and Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2008-05-15

    During the time period 1977-2007 postoperative radiotherapy in DBCG has varied considerably with regard to techniques and indications together with changes in the extent of surgery and adjuvant systemic therapy. The radiation treatment has been developed on the basis of clinical, radiophysical and radiobiological principles, encompassing also practical problems such as available equipment in the different centres and at times lack of sufficient machine capacity. The paper focus especially on the comprehensive work done prior to the DBCG 82 b and c studies, in order to optimize radiotherapy in all aspects prior to the evaluation of the efficacy of this treatment modality. The results from these trials did succeed in clear evidence that radiotherapy has an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of early breast cancer. In parallel to these studies a new and challenging use of radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery was evaluated in the DBCG TM 82 protocol. The experience obtained with different techniques in this study formed the basis for the current principles of radiotherapy after lumpectomy. Reduction of radiation related morbidity has been a major issue for the DBCG radiotherapy group, and in this aspect several studies, including quality control visits, have been carried out to make the relevant modifications and to evaluate deviations from the guidelines between the centres. The background for the changes in radiotherapy is described for each of the programme periods as well as future perspectives which will include further refinements of the target and adjustments of dose and fractionation in selected patients

  20. Radiobiological modeling of interplay between accelerated repopulation and altered fractionation schedules in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcu Loredana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer represents a challenge for radiation oncologists due to accelerated repopulation of cancer cells during treatment. This study aims to simulate, using Monte Carlo methods, the response of a virtual head and neck tumor to both conventional and altered fractionation schedules in radiotherapy when accelerated repopulation is considered. Although clinical trials are indispensable for evaluation of novel therapeutic techniques, they are time-consuming processes which involve many complex and variable factors for success. Models can overcome some of the limitations encountered by trials as they are able to simulate in less complex environment tumor cell kinetics and dynamics, interaction processes between cells and ionizing radiation and their outcome. Conventional, hyperfractionated and accelerated treatment schedules have been implemented in a previously developed tumor growth model which also incorporates tumor repopulation during treatment. This study focuses on the influence of three main treatment-related parameters, dose per fraction, inter fraction interval and length of treatment gap and gap timing based on RTOG trial data on head and neck cancer, on tumor control. The model has shown that conventionally fractionated radiotherapy is not able to eradicate the stem population of the tumor. Therefore, new techniques such as hyperfractionated/ accelerated radiotherapy schedules should be employed. Furthermore, the correct selection of schedule-related parameters (dose per fraction, time between fractions, treatment gap scheduling is crucial in overcoming accelerated repopulation. Modeling of treatment regimens and their input parameters can offer better understanding of the radiobiological interactions and also treatment outcome.

  1. Radiation-induced cataract-genesis: pathophysiologic, radiobiological and clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataract-genesis is a widely reported late effect of irradiated crystalline lens. In this review the authors discussed the different aspects of radiation cataract pathogenesis, and the different mechanisms involved in the lens opacification, particularly the epithelium modifications such as epithelial cell death. The authors also reported the influence of radiation exposure on cataract formation following total body irradiation TBI) and autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for hematologic malignancies. Moreover, the radiobiological parameters are not studied for the crystalline lens of human. We applied for the first time the linear quadratic (LQ) and biological effective dose (BED) concept to TBI data. The calculated value of α/β of 1 Gy is in the range of the values reported for the other late responding tissues. The other risk factors for cataract development after TBI such as age, gender, central nervous system boost, long-term steroid therapy and heparin administration are discussed. In terms of cataract or sicca syndrome prevention, numerous compounds have been successfully tested in experimental models or used for the prevention of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients treated for head and neck cancer. However, none of them has been clinically evaluated for ocular radiation late effects prevention. In this report the authors discussed some of the radioprotectors potentially interesting for radiation-induced cataract or sicca syndrome prevention. (author)

  2. Water versus DNA: new insights into proton track-structure modelling in radiobiology and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, C; Quinto, M A; Monti, J M; Galassi, M E; Weck, P F; Fojón, O A; Hanssen, J; Rivarola, R D

    2015-10-21

    Water is a common surrogate of DNA for modelling the charged particle-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, a self-consistent quantum mechanical modelling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. Their respective probability of occurrence-expressed in terms of total cross sections-as well as their energetic signature (potential and kinetic) are assessed in order to clearly emphasize the differences existing between realistic building blocks of living matter and the controverted water-medium surrogate. Consequences in radiobiology and radiotherapy will be discussed in particular in view of treatment planning refinement aiming at better radiotherapy strategies. PMID:26406277

  3. Radiobiological investigation on the ray induced sterilization of east worm (Grapholita molesta busc., lepidoptera:tortricidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of radiobiological investigations on the sterilizing effect of the ionizing radiation, used to treat pupae and imagines of the oriental fruit moth (G. molesta) are reported. The irradiation is realized with gamma rays (60Co) of 12-13 Gy/s (±5%). The parameters of the induced sterility are determined differently for male and female specimen. The sterilizing effect of gamma radiation on male specimen irradiated as pupae and adults results in lethal spermatozoa mutations. The functional interrelation (dose-dominant lethals) is described by curves of a mixed type, consisting of a linear and non-linear component. The established dynamics in the frequency of the mutations in the dose range suggests that the optimum sterilizing ray doses are in the range 400-500 Gy. Doses below 500 Gy (pupae) and 450 Gy (imago) do not reduce considerably the life of the male butterflies. The sterilizing effect on the female specimen after pupae and imagines irradiation is due to dominant lethal mutations in the oocytes. The interrelation (dose-dominant lethals) is described by curves of sigmoid configuration. The absolutely sterilizing dose for both ontogenic stages is 150 Gy. The irradiation of the female specimen causes partial sterility along with the induction of dominant lethals in the ovules

  4. Environmental Research Division annual report: Center for Human Radiobiology, July 1983-June 1984. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological studies of the late effects of internal radium in man, and mechanistic investigations of those effects, have continued. The current status of the study is summarized. An experimental technique for preparing thin sections of bone and the application of that technique in studying the comparative distribution of radium and plutonium are described. Radiological dental changes due to radium in man and dog are compared. Survival of human fibroblasts irradiated with alpha particles in vitro was found to be higher when the average LET was higher. In the study of the late effects of thorium in man, the relative activities of the daughter products in the lung have been determined spectrometrically in vivo. The exhalation of thoron in these persons has been investigated in relation to lung burden of thorium and to personal factors such as smoking, age, and weight. The administration of two isotopes to large mammals has been used to demonstrate that the metabolism of plutonium is independent of route of entry and to determine the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium. The effect of thermoluminescence on a scintillation radon counting system has been investigated quantitatively. Data on the exposure of 88 persons to radium were added to the data base, bringing the total to 2400 radium cases under study by the Center for Human Radiobiology. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers

  5. Bucharest cyclotron as intense fast neutron source for radiobiological and analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to interest for applications in radiobiology and material testing, Bucharest U-120 classical variable energy Cyclotron is employed as an intense source of fast neutrons, using 13.5 MeV deuterons bombarding a Beryllium target placed at 20 deg against the incident beam. Energy spectra, yields, average energy and irradiation doses were determined using time-of-flight (TOF), multiple foils and thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) methods. The average energy is 5.24 MeV. The total yield at 0 deg, obtained by summing up the yields for neutron energies between the lower (0.3 MeV) and upper (17 MeV) thresholds, is 6.7 x 1016 n/sr.C.MeV. The yield of the low energy component (0.3-2 MeV) is 1.88 x 1016 n/sr.C.MeV, i.e. 28% of the total yield at 0 deg. We present studies on the influence of thyotepa, thyroxine, metallic ions (Cs1+ and AL3+) and D3 vitamin on fast neutron radiolysis in tumor DNA conclusions on the role of thyotepa (accelerator for tumor destruction) and of thyroxine, metallic ions and D3 vitamin (protectors). The potential for elemental analysis, especially for light elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si) on archaeological glass and ceramics objects is discussed. (authors)

  6. Biological effects of embedded depleted uranium (DU). Summary of Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Persian Gulf War resulted in injuries of US Coalition personnel by fragments of depleted uranium (DU). Fragments not immediately threatening the health of the individuals were allowed to remain in place, based on long-standing treatment protocols designed for other kinds of metal shrapnel injuries. However, questions were soon raised as to whether this approach is appropriate for a metal with the unique radiological and toxicological properties of DU. The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) is investigating health effects of embedded fragments of DU to determine whether current surgical fragment removal policies remain appropriate for this metal. These studies employ rodents implanted with DU pellets as well as cultured human cells exposed to DU compounds. Results indicate uranium from implanted DU fragments distributed to tissues far-removed from implantation sites, including bone, kidney, muscle, and liver. Despite levels of uranium in the kidney that were nephrotoxic after acute exposure, no histological or functional kidney toxicity was observed. However, results suggest the need for further studies of long-term health impact, since DU was found to be mutagenic, and it transformed human osteoblast cells to a tumorigenic phenotype. It also altered neurophysiological parameters in rat hippocampus, crossed the placental barrier, and entered fetal tissue. This report summarizes AFRRI's depleted uranium research to date

  7. Radiobiological characterization of different energy-photon beams used in radiotherapy from linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this study was to perform a radiobiological characterization of different energy photon beams (6 MV and 15 MV) from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, and comparison of different treatment modalities, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Using two end points, cell survival and micronucleus induction, in the biological system (Chines hamster V79 cell line). Chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beams and immediately after irradiation were counted and re seeded in different numbered for each dose. For evaluation of surviving fraction samples were incubated at 37oC for 6 days, five samples were counted for each dose. At the same time three samples were seeded for the micronuclei frequency and incubated at 37oC after 24 hours cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis. The survival curve showed similar curves for the two beams and decreased with dose. The micronuclei frequency was positively correlated with dose and the energy of the photon. This indicates the presence of low dose of photoneutrons produced by using high energy photon beams. (Author)

  8. Neutron flux characterisation of the Pavia TRIGA Mark II research reactor for radiobiological and microdosimetric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloni, D; Prata, M; Salvini, A; Ottolenghi, A

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays the Pavia TRIGA reactor is available for national and international collaboration in various research fields. The TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor of the Pavia University offers different in- and out-core neutron irradiation channels, each characterised by different neutron spectra. In the last two years a campaign of measurements and simulations has been performed in order to guarantee a better characterisation of these different fluxes and to meet the demands of irradiations that require precise information on these spectra in particular for radiobiological and microdosimetric studies. Experimental data on neutron fluxes have been collected analysing and measuring the gamma activity induced in thin target foils of different materials irradiated in different TRIGA experimental channels. The data on the induced gamma activities have been processed with the SAND II deconvolution code and finally compared with the spectra obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison between simulated and measured spectra showed a good agreement allowing a more precise characterisation of the neutron spectra and a validation of the adopted method. PMID:25958412

  9. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constanzo, J. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Fallavier, M., E-mail: m.fallavier@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Alphonse, G. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Faculté de Médecine Lyon-Sud, LRCM, F-69921 Oullins (France); Hospices-Civils-de-Lyon, CHLS, F-69495 Pierre-Bénite (France); Bernard, C. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Battiston-Montagne, P. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Faculté de Médecine Lyon-Sud, LRCM, F-69921 Oullins (France); Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Faculté de Médecine Lyon-Sud, LRCM, F-69921 Oullins (France); Hospices-Civils-de-Lyon, CHLS, F-69495 Pierre-Bénite (France); and others

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  10. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4

  11. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Danielle; Chun, Stacey; Follett, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5-7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1-4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread. PMID:26470205

  12. Decontamination activities at the National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology in Havana, Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology had a facility contaminated with 137Cs. The contamination was produced by a leaking source stored in the place. First decontamination work was performed in 1988. Some highly contaminated floor tiles and other contaminated items were removed. Spent sealed sources stored in the facility were collected. The facility was closed because of the remaining contamination. As the Regulatory Body allowed the unrestricted use of the facility, decontamination and decommissioning were needed. D and D activities were requested to the CPHR. Contamination surveys conducted in 1999 confirmed the extent of contamination with 137Cs. Items inside the contaminated area were carefully monitored and segregated. Six Radium sources were recovered. Physical and chemical methods of decontamination were used. For different reasons, the requirements established by the Regulatory Authority for decommissioning could not be achieved, and therefore the facility could not be released from regulatory control. A Radiological Status Report was done explaining the high cost of decontamination according to the established clearance levels. New alternatives were then proposed for decommissioning of this facility. (author)

  13. Differential two colour X-ray radiobiology of membrane/cytoplasm yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the experiment entitled 'Differential Two Colour X-Ray Radiobiology of Membrane/Cytoplasm Yeast Cells'; carried out at the Central Laser Facility (CLF) from the 6th January to the 3rd February 1997. The experiment, funded by the Framework IV Large-Scale Facilities Access Scheme, was proposed by Dr. M. Milani, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, University of Milan, Italy, and carried out by visiting researchers from his institute, the University of Modena and with technical support from the Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Experimental highlights: The development of an investigation technique based on the use of very soft X-ray in order to damage specific structures inside the cell structure (specifically cell wall and membrane); the use of pressure sensors as a diagnostics of cell response which allows to monitor cell response over a large range of times from fast response up to several hours; the use of dry yeast cells as an 'easy to handle' type of sample; the development of a simple model for X-ray dosimetry of the different cell compartments; the study of metabolic oscillation in yeast cell suspension and the observation of the oscillation frequency shift following an exposure to soft X-rays. (author)

  14. Water versus DNA: new insights into proton track-structure modelling in radiobiology and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water is a common surrogate of DNA for modelling the charged particle-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, a self-consistent quantum mechanical modelling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. Their respective probability of occurrence—expressed in terms of total cross sections—as well as their energetic signature (potential and kinetic) are assessed in order to clearly emphasize the differences existing between realistic building blocks of living matter and the controverted water-medium surrogate. Consequences in radiobiology and radiotherapy will be discussed in particular in view of treatment planning refinement aiming at better radiotherapy strategies. (paper)

  15. Neutron flux characterisation of the Pavia Triga Mark II research reactor for radiobiological and microdosimetric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays the Pavia TRIGA reactor is available for national and international collaboration in various research fields. The TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor of the Pavia University offers different in- and out-core neutron irradiation channels, each characterised by different neutron spectra. In the last two years a campaign of measurements and simulations has been performed in order to guarantee a better characterisation of these different fluxes and to meet the demands of irradiations that require precise information on these spectra in particular for radiobiological and microdosimetric studies. Experimental data on neutron fluxes have been collected analysing and measuring the gamma activity induced in thin target foils of different materials irradiated in different TRIGA experimental channels. The data on the induced gamma activities have been processed with the SAND II deconvolution code and finally compared with the spectra obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison between simulated and measured spectra showed a good agreement allowing a more precise characterisation of the neutron spectra and a validation of the adopted method. (authors)

  16. Dosimetric validation of the MCNPX Monte Carlo simulation for radiobiologic studies of megavoltage grid radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To validate the MCNPX Monte Carlo simulation for radiobiologic studies of megavoltage grid radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: EDR2 films, a scanning water phantom with microionization chamber and MCNPX Monte Carlo code, were used to study the dosimetric characteristics of a commercially available megavoltage grid therapy collimator. The measured dose profiles, ratios between maximum and minimum doses at 1.5 cm depth, and percentage depth dose curve were compared with those obtained in the simulations. The simulated two-dimensional dose profile and the linear-quadratic formalism of cell survival were used to calculate survival statistics of tumor and normal cells for the treatment of melanoma with a list of doses of the fractionated grid therapy. Results: A good agreement between the simulated and measured dose data was found. The therapeutic ratio based on normal cell survival has been defined and calculated for treating both the acute and late responding melanoma tumors. The grid therapy in this study was found to be advantageous for treating the acutely responding tumors, but not for late responding tumors. Conclusions: Monte Carlo technique was demonstrated to be able to provide the dosimetric characteristics for grid therapy. The therapeutic ratio was dependent not only on the single α/β value, but also on the individual α and β values. Acutely responding tumors and radiosensitive normal tissues are more suitable for using the grid therapy

  17. Cellular oncogenes in neoplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, V T; McGee, J O

    1987-01-01

    In recent years cellular homologues of many viral oncogenes have been identified. As these genes are partially homologous to viral oncogenes and are activated in some tumour cell lines they are termed "proto-oncogenes". In tumour cell lines proto-oncogenes are activated by either quantitative or qualitative changes in gene structure: activation of these genes was originally thought to be a necessary primary event in carcinogenesis, but activated cellular oncogenes, unlike viral oncogenes, do ...

  18. Cellular Cardiomyoplasty: Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Chachques, J. (J.); Acar, C; J. Herreros; Trainini, J. (Jorge); Prosper, F.; D’Attellis, N. (N.); Fabiani, J. N.; Carpentier, A

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration can be induced with the implantation of a variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types. More than 150 patients have been treated with cellular cardiomyoplasty worldwide, 18 patients have been treated by our group. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit postischemic remodelling, and restore regional myocardial contractility. Techniques for skeletal myoblasts culture and ex vivo expansion using auto...

  19. Intentional Action and Action Slips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckhausen, Heinz; Beckmann, Jurgen

    1990-01-01

    An explanation of action slips is offered that examines controlled actions in the context of an intentional behavior theory. Actions are considered guided by mentally represented intentions, subdivided into goal intentions and contingent instrumental intentions. Action slips are categorized according to problem areas in the enactment of goal…

  20. PI3K signalling in GnRH actions on dispersed goldfish pituitary cells: relationship with PKC-mediated LH and GH release and regulation of long-term effects on secretion and total cellular hormone availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Joshua G; Orr, Michael E; Stafford, James L; Chang, John P

    2014-09-01

    Goldfish pituitary cells are exposed to two GnRHs, salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) both participate in acute sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-stimulated LH and GH release. Using goldfish pituitary cells, we examined the relationship between PI3K and PKC in acute LH and GH secretion, and PI3K involvement in chronic hormone release and total LH and GH availability. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 did not affect PKC agonists-induced LH or GH release, and PKC agonists did not alter PI3K p85 phosphorylation, suggesting PKC activation is not upstream of PI3K in acute hormone release. In 2, 6, 12 and 24h treatments, LY294002 did not affect LH release but stimulated total LH availability at 6h. sGnRH stimulatory actions on LH release and total availability at 12 and 24h, and cGnRH-II effects on these parameters at 6h were inhibited by LY294002. LY294002 enhanced basal GH release at 2 and 6h, but reduced total GH at 12 and 24h. Increased GH release was seen following 6, 12 and 24h of sGnRH, and 2, 6 and 24h of cGnRH-II treatment but total GH availability was only elevated by 24h cGnRH-II treatment. Whereas LY294002 inhibited GH release responses to sGnRH at 12h and cGnRH-II at 6h, it attenuated cGnRH-II-elicited, but not sGnRH-induced, effects on total GH. These results indicate that PI3K differentially modulates long-term basal and GnRH-stimulated hormone release, and total hormone availability, in a time-, cell-type-, and GnRH isoform-selective manner. PMID:24681225

  1. DNA damage induction and/or repair as mammalian cell biomarker for the prediction of cellular radiation response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.

    DNA damage and its repair processes are key factors in cancer induction and also in the treatment of malignancies. Cancer prevention during extended space missions becomes a topic of great importance for space radiobiology. The knowledge of individual responsiveness would allow the protection strategy to be tailored optimally in each case. Radiobiological analysis of cultured cells derived from tissue explants from individuals has shown that measurement of the surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) may be used to predict the individual responsiveness. However, clonogenic assays are timeconsuming, thus alternative assays for the determination of radiore-sponse are being sought. For that reason CHO cell strains having different repair capacities were used for examining whether DNA strand break repair is a suitable experimental design to allow predictive statements. Cellular survival (CFA assay) and DNA strand breaks (total DNA strand breaks: FADU technique; DSBs: non-denaturing elution) were determined in parallel immediately after irradiation as well as after a 24 hour recovery period according to dose. There were no correlations between the dose-response curves of the initial level of DNA strand breaks and parameters that describe clonogenic survival curves (SF2). A good correlation exists between intrinsic cellular radioresistance and the extent of residual DNA strand breaks.

  2. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found. PMID:25291810

  3. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  4. Cellular Homeostasis and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Aging and longevity are controlled by a multiplicity of molecular and cellular signaling events that interface with environmental factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Modulation of these pathways to extend life span, including insulin-like signaling and the response to dietary restriction, identified the cellular machineries and networks of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and stress resistance pathways as critical players in the aging process. A decline of proteostasis capacity during aging leads to dysfunction of specific cell types and tissues, rendering the organism susceptible to a range of chronic diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of two reviews addressing our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying aging in model organisms and humans. PMID:27050288

  5. Radiobiological impact of dose calculation algorithms on biologically optimized IMRT lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) vs. Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms in combined dose-volume and biological optimized IMRT plans of SBRT treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Twenty eight patients with NSCLC previously treated SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse (V11) with combined dose-volume and biological optimization IMRT sliding window technique. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 60 Gy with 12 Gy per fraction. The plans were initially optimized using AAA algorithm, and then were recomputed using AXB using the same MUs and MLC files to compare with the dose distribution of the original plans and assess the radiobiological as well as dosimetric impact of the two different dose algorithms. The Poisson Linear-Quadatric (PLQ) and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) models were used for estimating the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), respectively. The influence of the model parameter uncertainties on the TCP differences and the NTCP differences between AAA and AXB plans were studied by applying different sets of published model parameters. Patients were grouped into peripheral and centrally-located tumors to evaluate the impact of tumor location. PTV dose was lower in the re-calculated AXB plans, as compared to AAA plans. The median differences of PTV(D95%) were 1.7 Gy (range: 0.3, 6.5 Gy) and 1.0 Gy (range: 0.6, 4.4 Gy) for peripheral tumors and centrally-located tumors, respectively. The median differences of PTV(mean) were 0.4 Gy (range: 0.0, 1.9 Gy) and 0.9 Gy (range: 0.0, 4.3 Gy) for peripheral tumors and centrally-located tumors, respectively. TCP was also found lower in AXB-recalculated plans compared with the AAA plans. The median (range) of the TCP differences for 30 month local control were 1.6 % (0.3 %, 5.8 %) for peripheral tumors and 1.3 % (0.5 %, 3.4 %) for centrally located tumors. The lower TCP

  6. 3H-thymidine (3HTdR) incorporated into DNA; Dosimetric and radiobiological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium can be selectively incorporated into DNA in vivo by administration of tritiated thymidine (3HTdR), and this labelled precursor is used widely and effectively in investigations on the mechanism of DNA synthesis, in studies on the kinetics of cell proliferation, and for the purpose of selective cell destruction. It is important, of course, to be aware of the threshold for toxicity of the isotope used in this manner. In addition, the unique dosimetric features involved present theoretical and practical problems, the solutions of which will shed light on mechanisms of radiobiology effect. The highly selective irradiation of the nucleus of those cells which incorporated 3HTdR at the time of DNA synthesis constitutes not only partial-body irradiation, but partial-cell irradiation, and homogeneity of exposure can be defined only in terms of subcellular dimensions. The toxicity of 3HTdR and the associated problems have been reviewed extensively. The object of the present paper is to: (a) evaluate from data in the literature and from data to be presented, whether observed effects from intranuclear 3H can be accounted for on the basis of calculated absorbed dose in rads to the cell nucleus, or, alternatively, whether additional factors deriving from the presence of the 3H in the DNA molecule must be invoked. In the latter case the biological effects would not be generally predictable on the basis of absorbed dose; and (b) to discuss the implications of the findings with respect to radiobiology and radiation protection. The conclusion is reached that while data are as yet inadequate for firm evaluation, biological effects of 3HTdR are those predictable on the basis of the average absorbed dose to the nucleus. The applicability of the absorbed dose concept can be evaluated satisfactorily only if adequate comparisons of the effect of incorporated 3HTdR can be made with a suitable standard external radiation such as X-rays, or possibly with the same isotope (3H

  7. Radiobiological investigations at tumor cell lines by exploiting aspects of chronological dose administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Ulmer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Using 31P-NMR spectroscopy the chronological behavior of the ATP-metabolism of the tumor spheroids C3H-MA, 9L-Gliome and the mono-layer L1210 has been analyzed via increase and decrease of the β-peak. The goal of this study is to elaborate an optimal fractionation scheme with regard to the irradiation of tumor spheroids and possibly to human tumors.  Methods: The NMR-spectroscopy has been carried out by the FID technique (free induction decay, and the intensity of the β-peak provides a measure of the survival fraction S after radiation exposure with 30 kV X-rays. The linear-quadratic model has to be generalized in order to be valid for irradiation beyond the shoulder. Results and Conclusion: All three cell lines show characteristic periods, and a homeostatic control cannot be recognized. Essential components of these periods are circadian (i.e. one day, circa-semiseptan (i.e. 3.5 days and circa-septan (i.e. one week. The determination of the survival fractions provides an optimum exploitation of radiation damages, when the ATP-concentration assumes a maximum value. This optimum is reached, when all three cycles exhibit an ATP maximum, which is only possible by accounting for the circa-septan rhythm.--------------------------------------Cite this article as: Ulmer W. Radiobiological investigations at tumor cell lines by exploiting aspects of chronological dose administration. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(3:020312. DOI:10.14319/ijcto.0203.12 

  8. Functional and histological assessment of the radiobiology of normal rat lung in BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the radiobiology and sensitivity of the normal rat lung to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiation. Rat thorax irradiations were carried out with x-rays or with neutrons in the presence or absence of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Lung damage were assessed functionally with breathing rate measurement up to 180 days after irradiation and then histologically. Breathing rates 20% (∼3 σ) above the control group (sham-irradiated rats) mean were considered as positive responses to lung radiation damage. Though most responding animals demonstrated radiation induced pneumonitis (≤110 days) as well as pulmonary fibrosis (>110 days), some animals receiving neutrons plus BPA showed only the latter. The breathing rate dose response data were fit using probit analysis. The ED50 values measured for x-rays, neutron beam only, and neutrons plus BPA were 11.5±0.4 Gy, 9.2±0.5 Gy, and 6.7±0.4 Gy, respectively. The biological weighting factors for the neutron beam (n+γ), the thermal neutron dose component, and the 10B dose component were determined to be 1.2±0.1, 2.2±0.4, and 2.3±0.3, respectively. The histological dose response curves were linear. Consistent with the functional assay, the weighting factors measured histologically were 1.2±0.1 for the thermal neutron beam and 1.9±0.2 for the 10B dose component. (author)

  9. Wireless Cellular Mobile Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zalud

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article is briefly reviewed the history of wireless cellularmobile communications, examined the progress in current secondgeneration (2G cellular standards and discussed their migration to thethird generation (3G. The European 2G cellular standard GSM and itsevolution phases GPRS and EDGE are described somewhat in detail. Thethird generation standard UMTS taking up on GSM/GPRS core network andequipped with a new advanced access network on the basis of codedivision multiple access (CDMA is investigated too. A sketch of theperspective of mobile communication beyond 3G concludes this article.

  10. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than hundred years after the discovery of X-rays different kinds of ionizing radiation are ubiquitous in medicine, applied to clinical diagnostics and cancer treatment as well. Irrespective of their nature, the widespread application of radiation implies its precise dosimetric characterization and detailed knowledge of the radiobiological effects induced in cancerous and normal tissue. Starting with in vitro cell irradiation experiments, which define basic parameters for the subsequent tissue and animal studies, the whole multi-stage process is completed by clinical trials that translate the results of fundamental research into clinical application. In this context, the present dissertation focuses on the establishment of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at unconventional, but clinical relevant radiation qualities. In the first part of the present work the energy dependent biological effectiveness of photons was studied examining low-energy X-rays (≤ 50 keV), as used for mammography, and high-energy photons (≥ 20 MeV) as proposed for future radiotherapy. Cell irradiation experiments have been performed at conventional X-ray tubes providing low-energy photons and 200 kV reference radiation as well. In parallel, unconventional quasi-monochromatic channeling X-rays and high-energy bremsstrahlung available at the radiation source ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf were considered for radiobiological experimentation. For their precise dosimetric characterization dosimeters based on the thermally stimulated emission of exoelectrons and on radiochromic films were evaluated, whereas just the latter was found to be suitable for the determination of absolute doses and spatial dose distributions at cell position. Standard ionization chambers were deployed for the online control of cell irradiation experiments. Radiobiological effects were analyzed in human mammary epithelial cells on different subcellular levels revealing an increasing amount

  11. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyreuther, Elke

    2010-09-10

    More than hundred years after the discovery of X-rays different kinds of ionizing radiation are ubiquitous in medicine, applied to clinical diagnostics and cancer treatment as well. Irrespective of their nature, the widespread application of radiation implies its precise dosimetric characterization and detailed knowledge of the radiobiological effects induced in cancerous and normal tissue. Starting with in vitro cell irradiation experiments, which define basic parameters for the subsequent tissue and animal studies, the whole multi-stage process is completed by clinical trials that translate the results of fundamental research into clinical application. In this context, the present dissertation focuses on the establishment of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at unconventional, but clinical relevant radiation qualities. In the first part of the present work the energy dependent biological effectiveness of photons was studied examining low-energy X-rays (≤ 50 keV), as used for mammography, and high-energy photons (≥ 20 MeV) as proposed for future radiotherapy. Cell irradiation experiments have been performed at conventional X-ray tubes providing low-energy photons and 200 kV reference radiation as well. In parallel, unconventional quasi-monochromatic channeling X-rays and high-energy bremsstrahlung available at the radiation source ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf were considered for radiobiological experimentation. For their precise dosimetric characterization dosimeters based on the thermally stimulated emission of exoelectrons and on radiochromic films were evaluated, whereas just the latter was found to be suitable for the determination of absolute doses and spatial dose distributions at cell position. Standard ionization chambers were deployed for the online control of cell irradiation experiments. Radiobiological effects were analyzed in human mammary epithelial cells on different subcellular levels revealing an increasing amount

  12. 77 FR 71194 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...). The product areas covered by this guidance are cellular therapy, gene therapy, therapeutic vaccination... Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy Products,'' dated November 2012. The draft guidance document...

  13. Quantitative radiobiology: a method of in vivo study of germ cells exposed to gamma and neutron radiation, descriptive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique of quantitative analysis of in vivo cell survival of the germ cells of male rats was developed from the gonadal weight loss observed after irradiation. This technique - both global and functional - of quantifiying a cellular damage has several advantages: cell survival is completely studied in vivo; the dose range investigated is large; the results can be extended to man. The cell survival after γ and neutron exposure thus determined was investigated in the light of four cell survival theories: LEA's target theory; KELLERER and ROSSI's theory of dual action, CHADWICKS and LEENHOUT's molecular theory, and DELATTRE's general theory of transformation systems. The experimental results were well described by each theory. It was therefore concluded that the fundamental oneness of these theories should make it possible to include them all in a strict conceptual frame

  14. Translating partitioned cellular automata into classical type cellular automata

    OpenAIRE

    Poupet, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Partitioned cellular automata are a variant of cellular automata that was defined in order to make it very simple to create complex automata having strong properties such as number conservation and reversibility (which are often difficult to obtain on cellular automata). In this article we show how a partitioned cellular automaton can be translated into a regular cellular automaton in such a way that these properties are conserved.

  15. High value of the radiobiological parameter Dq correlates to expression of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in a panel of small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Krarup, M; Nørgaard, P; Damstrup, L; Spang-Thomsen, M; Poulsen, H S

    1998-01-01

    Our panel of SCLC cell lines have previously been examined for their radiobiological characteristics and sensitivity to treatment with TGF beta 1. In this study we examined the possible correlations between radiobiological parameters and the expression of the TGF beta type II receptor (TGF beta...... role for the repair of radiation induced DNA damage in SCLC....

  16. Automation of the particle dosimetry and the dose application for radiobiological experiments at a vertical proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Moertel, H; Eyrich, W; Fritsch, M; Distel, L

    2002-01-01

    A facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been setup at the Tandem accelerator at Erlangen. This energy region is optimal to investigate the biological effects of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg region under physiological conditions. A new automated data acquisition system for dosimetry and monitoring based on a personal computer was developed and optimized for this setup. A specially designed sample holder offers possibilities of cooling or changing of atmosphere during irradiation. First irradiations of biological samples have shown the functionality of the setup.

  17. Automation of the particle dosimetry and the dose application for radiobiological experiments at a vertical proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörtel, H.; Georgi, J.; Eyrich, W.; Fritsch, M.; Distel, L.

    2002-08-01

    A facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been setup at the Tandem accelerator at Erlangen. This energy region is optimal to investigate the biological effects of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg region under physiological conditions. A new automated data acquisition system for dosimetry and monitoring based on a personal computer was developed and optimized for this setup. A specially designed sample holder offers possibilities of cooling or changing of atmosphere during irradiation. First irradiations of biological samples have shown the functionality of the setup.

  18. Mode of Action of Mycotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycotoxins are a structurally disparate group of toxic chemicals. There only common link is that they are all produced by fungi. It is therefore not surprising that their biochemical mechanisms of action are as diverse as their taxonomic origins. The study of biochemical and cellular mechanisms o...

  19. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  20. Radioactivity of cellular concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural radioactivity of cellular concrete is discussed. Some data on the concentrations of 40K, 226Ra and 232Th in building materials in Poland are given. The results of dose rates measurements in living quarters as well as outside are presented. (A.S.)

  1. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  2. General aspects of the cellular response to low- and high-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological studies have shown for some time that the effects of ionising radiation on cells are mainly explained by modification of the DNA. Numerous studies over the past 50 years have accumulated clear evidence of the cause-effect relationship between damage to DNA and the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of ionising radiation. However, the path from irradiation of the cells to the induction of biological effects comprises several complex steps. The first step involves interactions between the radiation and the cellular environment. These consist of physical and chemical reactions which produce ions, excited molecules and radical species. Excitations and ionisations are complete in about 10-15 s, and are followed by a chemical thermal equilibrium of the species produced within 10-12 s. These species then diffuse from their site of production and provoke alterations to a variety of cellular components. This damage is detected by cellular surveillance systems, which in turn activate signalling cascades, gene transcription and enzyme recruitment, which participate in the cellular response. In most cases, cell cycle arrest occurs, allowing, according to the biological relevance of the DNA damage, either a process of DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). The accuracy of the DNA repair which is performed depends on the complexity of the DNA lesion and on the DNA repair machinery fidelity itself. Improper DNA repair can lead to mutation, chromosome aberration, genetic instability, oncogenic transformation and, ultimately, cell death. (orig.)

  3. A modular approach for assessing the effect of radiation environments on man in operational systems. The radiobiological vulnerability of man during task performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    A modular approach for assessing the affects of radiation environments on man in operational systems has been developed. The feasibility of the model has been proved and the practicality has been assessed. It has been applied to one operational system to date and information obtained has been submitted to systems analysts and mission planners for the assessment of man's vulnerability and impact on systems survivability. In addition, the model has been developed so that the radiobiological data can be input to a sophisticated man-machine interface model to properly relate the radiobiological stress with other mission stresses including the effects of a degraded system.

  4. Comparison of cytogenetic effects in bone marrow of mice after the flight on the biosatellite "BION-M1" and the ground-based radiobiological experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkina, Olga; Vorozhtsova, Svetlana; Ivanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    During space flight, the astronauts are exposed to radiation exposure at low doses with low dose rates, so one of the actual areas of Radiobiology is research of action of ionizing radiation in low and ultra-low doses. Violation of the chromosome apparatus of living biosystems, ranging from viruses and bacteria to humans, is the most reliable evidence of exposure to ionizing radiation. In this regard, the study of cytogenetic damage in the cells of humans and animals is central to space radiobiology (Fedorenko B.S., 2006). In experiment "BION - M1" by anaphase method was determined level of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of tibia of mice. Flight duration biosatellite "BION - M1" (Sychev V.N. et al., 2014) was 30 days in Earth orbit. Euthanasia of experimental animals was carried out after 12 hours from the moment of landing satellite by method of cervical dislocation. The level of chromosomal aberrations in vivarium-housed control mice was 1,75 ± 0,6% and 1,8 ± 0,45%, while the mitotic index 1,46 ± 0,09% and 1,53 ± 0,05%. The content of animals in the experiment with onboard equipment led to some increase in aberrant mitosis (2,3 ± 0,4%) and reduction of the mitotic index (1,37 ± 0,02%). In the flight experiment "BION-M1" was a statistically significant increase in level of chromosome aberrations (29,7 ± 4,18%) and a decrease in the mitotic index (0,74 ± 0,07%). According to VA Shurshakova (2014), the radiation dose to mice ranged from 32 to 72 mGy and relate to a range of small doses (ICRP, 2012). In this connection we conducted a series of experiments in the ground conditions, the aim of which was the study of earliest effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in mice irradiated with low doses of γ-irradiation of 10 to 200 mGy in the first 24 hours after exposure, i.e. within the first post-radiation exposure cell cycle. Studies were carried out on adult female mice outbred ICR (CD-1) - SPF category at the age of 4-4.5 months with an average

  5. Alpha Particle Emitter Radiolabeled Antibody for Metastatic Cancer: What Can We Learn from Heavy Ion Beam Radiobiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Song

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-particle emitter labeled monoclonal antibodies are being actively developed for treatment of metastatic cancer due to the high linear energy transfer (LET and the resulting greater biological efficacy of alpha-emitters. Our knowledge of high LET particle radiobiology derives primarily from accelerated heavy ion beam studies. In heavy ion beam therapy of loco-regional tumors, the modulation of steep transition to very high LET peak as the particle approaches the end of its track (known as the Bragg peak enables greater delivery of biologically potent radiation to the deep seated tumors while sparing normal tissues surrounding the tumor with the relatively low LET track segment part of the heavy ion beam. Moreover, fractionation of the heavy ion beam can further enhance the peak-to-plateau relative biological effectiveness (RBE ratio. In contrast, internally delivered alpha particle radiopharmaceutical therapy lack the control of Bragg peak energy deposition and the dose rate is determined by the administered activity, alpha-emitter half-life and biological kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. The therapeutic ratio of tumor to normal tissue is mainly achieved by tumor specific targeting of the carrier antibody. In this brief overview, we review the radiobiology of high LET radiations learned from ion beam studies and identify the features that are also applicable for the development of alpha-emitter labeled antibodies. The molecular mechanisms underlying DNA double strand break repair response to high LET radiation are also discussed.

  6. Radiobiological evaluation of forward and inverse IMRT using different fractionations for head and neck tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capela Miguel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To quantify the radiobiological advantages obtained by an Improved Forward Planning technique (IFP and two IMRT techniques using different fractionation schemes for the irradiation of head and neck tumours. The conventional radiation therapy technique (CONVT was used here as a benchmark. Methods Seven patients with head and neck tumours were selected for this retrospective planning study. The PTV1 included the primary tumour, PTV2 the high risk lymph nodes and PTV3 the low risk lymph nodes. Except for the conventional technique where a maximum dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed to the PTV1, 70.2 Gy, 59.4 Gy and 50.4 Gy were prescribed respectively to PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3. Except for IMRT2, all techniques were delivered by three sequential phases. The IFP technique used five to seven directions with a total of 15 to 21 beams. The IMRT techniques used five to nine directions and around 80 segments. The first, IMRT1, was prescribed with the conventional fractionation scheme of 1.8 Gy per fraction delivered in 39 fractions by three treatment phases. The second, IMRT2, simultaneously irradiated the PTV2 and PTV3 with 59.4 Gy and 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, respectively, while the PTV1 was boosted with six subsequent fractions of 1.8 Gy. Tissue response was calculated using the relative seriality model and the Poisson Linear-Quadratic-Time model to simulate repopulation in the primary tumour. Results The average probability of total tumour control increased from 38% with CONVT to 80% with IFP, to 85% with IMRT1 and 89% with IMRT2. The shorter treatment time and larger dose per fraction obtained with IMRT2 resulted in an 11% increase in the probability of control in the PTV1 with respect to IFP and 7% relatively to IMRT1 (p Conclusions A significant improvement in treatment outcome was obtained with IMRT compared to conventional radiation therapy. The practical and biological advantages of IMRT2, employing a shorter treatment time, may

  7. Comparison of the radiobiological effects of Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and conventional Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNCT is an experimental radiotherapeutic modality that uses the capacity of the isotope 10B to capture thermal neutrons leading to the production of 4He and 7Li, particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). The aim was to evaluate and compare in vitro the mechanisms of response to the radiation arising of BNCT and conventional gamma therapy. We measured the survival cell fraction as a function of the total physical dose and analyzed the expression of p27/Kip1 and p53 by Western blotting in cells of colon cancer (ARO81-1). Exponentially growing cells were distributed into the following groups: 1) BPA (10 ppm 10B) + neutrons; 2) BOPP (10 ppm 10B) + neutrons; 3) neutrons alone; 4) gamma-rays. A control group without irradiation for each treatment was added. The cells were irradiated in the thermal neutron beam of the RA-3 (flux= 7.5 109 n/cm2 sec) or with 60Co (1Gy/min) during different times in order to obtain total physical dose between 1-5 Gy (±10 %). A decrease in the survival fraction as a function of the physical dose was observed for all the treatments. We also observed that neutrons and neutrons + BOPP did not differ significantly and that BPA was the more effective compound. Protein extracts of irradiated cells (3Gy) were isolated to 24 h and 48 h post radiation exposure. The irradiation with neutrons in presence of 10BPA or 10BOPP produced an increase of p53 at 24 h maintain until 48 h. On the contrary, in the groups irradiated with neutrons alone or gamma the peak was observed at 48 hr. The level of expression of p27/Kip1 showed a reduction of this protein in all the groups irradiated with neutrons (neutrons alone or neutrons plus boron compound), being more marked at 24 h. These preliminary results suggest different radiobiological response for high and low let radiation. Future studies will permit establish the role of cell cycle in the tumor radio sensibility to BNCT. (author)

  8. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  9. Electromagnetic cellular interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, J. S.; Farhadi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2011), 223-246. ISSN 0079-6107. [36th International Congress of Physiological Sciences (IUPS2009). Kyoto, 27.07.2009-01.08.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP102/10/P454 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : bioelectric phenomena * cellular biophysics Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.203, year: 2011

  10. Magnetic Cellular Switches

    OpenAIRE

    Overby, Darryl R.; Alenghat, Francis J.; Montoya-Zavala, Martín; Bei, HuCheng; Oh, Philmo; Karavitis, John; Ingber, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of magnetic cellular switches to enable magnetic control of intracellular functions in living mammalian cells, including receptor signal transduction and gene transcription. Our approach takes advantage of the mechanosensitivity of adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) induction and downstream transcription controlled by the cAMP regulatory element (CRE) to engineer gene constructs that optically report gene expression in living cells. We activate transcri...

  11. The brittleness model of complex system based on cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN De-ming; JIN Hong-zhang; LI Qi; WU Hong-mei

    2004-01-01

    Now the research on the complex system is a hot spot. Brittleness is one of the basic characteristics of a complex system. In a complex system, after one of subsystems is struck to be collapsed, the whole system will collapse. Meanwhile, cellular automata is a discrete dynamic system. When the rule is given, the cellular automata could be defined. Then it can imitate the complex action. Cellular automata is used to simulate the brittleness action in this study. Entropy was used to analyze the action and get the rule. Then,three normal brittleness models were given. The result shows that the brittleness of complex system is existent and in addition some important behavior mode of complex system brittleness has been achieved.

  12. Molecular and cellular level of action of digitalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlemagne, D

    1993-04-01

    The pharmacological receptor of cardiac glycosides is the Na+/K(+)-ATPase which consists of a catalytic alpha (M(r) = 112,000) and glycosylated beta (M(r) = 35,000) subunit. The enzyme is responsible for the vectorial transport across the sarcolemma of three Na+ ions outward and two K+ ions inward against their electrochemical gradient. Specific inhibition of the Na+ pump by digitalis induces a positive inotropic effect by increasing the intracellular Na+ concentration which in turn induces an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration by the Na+/Ca2+ exchange and an increase in the Ca2+ pool of the sarcoplasmic reticulum; toxic effects are observed at higher doses of cardiac glycosides leading to spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Three isoforms of the alpha catalytic subunit have been identified by molecular cloning. They share a high homology in the deduced amino acid sequence with eight transmembrane domains. The ouabain binding domain is located on the extracellular side and ouabain sensitivity depends mainly on the two residues at the border of the first extracellular domain. The isoforms differed by their ouabain sensitivity, are expressed in a tissue-specific and hormonally-regulated manner. Moreover, expression of the isoforms and their ouabain sensitivity vary from species to species with an alpha 1 isoform of very low affinity being the major isoform (80%) in the adult rat heart and an alpha 1 isoform of high affinity representing 50% of total alpha mRNA abundance in the human heart. Therefore the effect of digitalis on the heart depends mainly on the isoform which is expressed and on the regulation of their expression according to age, hormonal influence and pathology. PMID:7684015

  13. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p+), the overall probability of injury (pI), the overall probability of control/benefit (pB), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D¯¯). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D¯¯ diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p+ index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of pB are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of pI are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (DB¯¯) for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities are 64.0, 60.9, and 60.8 Gy

  14. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komisopoulos, Georgios [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: mavroidis@uthscsa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C. [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup ¯¯}). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup ¯¯} diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup ¯¯}) for the

  15. Cellular therapy in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreemanta K. Parida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB. We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs, as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy.

  16. Cellular therapy in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Shreemanta K; Madansein, Rajhmun; Singh, Nalini; Padayatchi, Nesri; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs), as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy. PMID:25809753

  17. Quantum cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porod, Wolfgang; Lent, Craig S.; Bernstein, Gary H.

    1994-06-01

    The Notre Dame group has developed a new paradigm for ultra-dense and ultra-fast information processing in nanoelectronic systems. These Quantum Cellular Automata (QCA's) are the first concrete proposal for a technology based on arrays of coupled quantum dots. The basic building block of these cellular arrays is the Notre Dame Logic Cell, as it has been called in the literature. The phenomenon of Coulomb exclusion, which is a synergistic interplay of quantum confinement and Coulomb interaction, leads to a bistable behavior of each cell which makes possible their use in large-scale cellular arrays. The physical interaction between neighboring cells has been exploited to implement logic functions. New functionality may be achieved in this fashion, and the Notre Dame group invented a versatile majority logic gate. In a series of papers, the feasibility of QCA wires, wire crossing, inverters, and Boolean logic gates was demonstrated. A major finding is that all logic functions may be integrated in a hierarchial fashion which allows the design of complicated QCA structures. The most complicated system which was simulated to date is a one-bit full adder consisting of some 200 cells. In addition to exploring these new concepts, efforts are under way to physically realize such structures both in semiconductor and metal systems. Extensive modeling work of semiconductor quantum dot structures has helped identify optimum design parameters for QCA experimental implementations.

  18. Toxicological and radiobiological investigations using tissue cultures: Substitute and supplement for animal experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments are carried out on cell cultures with the aim of researching the biochemistry, sub-cellular distribution and toxicity of radio-nuclides and heavy metals. Investigations with the advanced tissue culture system of the multi-cellular spheroids are used to obtain reliable data on radiation tolerance and the origin of cancers in specific tissue conditions. In particular, there are reports on the results of chelate formation for treating cadmium poisoning and for the decorporation of radio-nuclides (Pu poisoning) and on radiation biology examination of Xeroderma Pigmentosum and the histology of cells of carcinoma of the cervix and hepatozytes. (DG)

  19. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  20. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July - September 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  1. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  3. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  4. Clinical radiobiology of glioblastoma multiforme. Estimation of tumor control probability from various radiotherapy fractionation schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Radiotherapy, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Negrar, Verona (Italy); Simeon, Vittorio [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Laboratory of Preclinical and Translational Research, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Tini, Paolo; Pirtoli, Luigi [University of Siena and Tuscany Tumor Institute, Unit of Radiation Oncology, Department of Medicine Surgery and Neurological Sciences, Siena (Italy); Chiumento, Costanza [Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Radiotherapy, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Napoli (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to estimate a radiobiological set of parameters from the available clinical data on glioblastoma (GB). A number of clinical trial outcomes from patients affected by GB and treated with surgery and adjuvant radiochemotherapy were analyzed to estimate a set of radiobiological parameters for a tumor control probability (TCP) model. The analytical/graphical method employed to fit the clinical data allowed us to estimate the intrinsic tumor radiosensitivity (α), repair capability (b), and repopulation doubling time (T{sub d}) in a first phase, and subsequently the number of clonogens (N) and kick-off time for accelerated proliferation (T{sub k}). The results were used to formulate a hypothesis for a scheduleexpected to significantly improve local control. The 95 % confidence intervals (CI{sub 95} {sub %}) of all parameters are also discussed. The pooled analysis employed to estimate the parameters summarizes the data of 559 patients, while the studies selected to verify the results summarize data of 104 patients. The best estimates and the CI{sub 95} {sub %} are α = 0.12 Gy{sup -1} (0.10-0.14), b = 0.015 Gy{sup -2} (0.013-0.020), α/b = 8 Gy (5.0-10.8), T{sub d} = 15.4 days (13.2-19.5), N = 1 . 10{sup 4} (1.2 . 10{sup 3} - 1 . 10{sup 5}), and T{sub k} = 37 days (29-46). The dose required to offset the repopulation occurring after 1 day (D{sub prolif}) and starting after T{sub k} was estimated as 0.30 Gy/day (0.22-0.39). The analysis confirms a high value for the α/b ratio. Moreover, a high intrinsic radiosensitivity together with a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation and moderate repopulation kinetics were found. The results indicate a substantial independence of the duration of the overall treatment and an improvement in the treatment effectiveness by increasing the total dose without increasing the dose fraction. (orig.) [German] Schaetzung eines strahlenbiologischen Parametersatzes auf der Grundlage klinischer Daten bei

  5. Radioprotective action of endoneous and exogenous natural compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In last years at the Radiobiology Division of our Institute several studies have been performed to determine the radioprotective capacity of some natural products from microbial, vegetal or endogenous origin. This substances have been chosen for some of their specific biological characteristics, among them: immunoestimulating (bacillus of Calmette-Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum), anti-inflammatory (Cordia verbanacea), anti-carcinogenic and anti-oxidant ones (α-tocopherol). Assays were performed using albino mice previously injected intraperitoneally with those agents and then irradiated with lethal doses of sup(60)Co gamma radiation. Survival and body weight curves after irradiation have been studied during 30 days comparing to normal controls. Depending on the specific properties of tested substances the induction of splenomegalia and the behavior of peritoneal cellularity were concomitantly analyzed. (author)

  6. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 16; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 16. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, M.; Dahm-Daphi, J.; Dikomey, E.; Petersen, C.; Rodemann, H.P.; Zips, D. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    The following topics were dealt with: DNA repair as therapeutical target in radiation therapy, biological imaging and tumor microenvironment, molecular factors of radiation therapy, molecular factors and modulation of the radiation reaction of normal tissues, experimental tumor therapy, EGFR inhibition, the endothel cell as primary target of radiation therapy, molecular and cellular foundations of the radiation biology of protons and ions. (HSI)

  7. Radiobiological study of the radioprotective activity of a natural Iranian compound, ''Shir-Khecht''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After reviewing the primary mechanisms of the action of ionizing radiation, the possible mechanisms of the action of radioprotective substances, the various chemical structures having a protective effect and the methods for studying chemical radioprotection, the author presents the results he has obtained with natural Iranian product: ''Shir-Khecht''. Tests with this product at lethal and sublethal doses have been carried out on the rat using various means of introduction. The effect of radiation, both with and without protection, has been studied using histological and biochemical methods. The product examined has, in effect, a protective action; it is, furthermore, non-toxic and active when taken orally. (author)

  8. Illuminating cellular physiology: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2007-01-01

    Bioluminescent methods are gaining more and more attention among scientists due to their sensitivity, selectivity and simplicity; coupled with the fact that the bioluminescence can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. Since the discovery of bioluminescence in the 19th century, enzymes involved in the bioluminescent process have been isolated and cloned. The bioluminescent reactions in several different organisms have also been fully characterized and used as reporters in a wide variety of biochemical assays. From the 1990s it became clear that bioluminescence can be detected and quantified directly from inside a living cell. This gave rise to numerous possibilities for the in vivo monitoring of intracellular processes non-invasively using bioluminescent molecules as reporters. This review describes recent developments in the area of bioluminescent imaging for cell biology. Newly developed imaging methods allow transcriptional/translational regulation, signal transduction, protein-protein interaction, oncogenic transformation, cell and protein trafficking, and target drug action to be monitored in vivo in real-time with high temporal and spatial resolution; thus providing researchers with priceless information on cellular functions. Advantages and limitations of these novel bioluminescent methods are discussed and possible future developments identified. PMID:17725230

  9. 2. International conference. Radiobiological consequences of nuclear accidents; Russian-Norwegian Satellite Symposium on nuclear accidents, radioecology and health. Abstracts. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials on radiobiological effect of ionizing radiation under emergency situations are presented. The radiation contamination of environmental media after the Chernobyl NPP accident (ground, earth and water ecological systems), effect of external and internal irradiation on the inhabitants of the region are estimated. Time characteristic of radiation risk of originating tumors and genetic injuries is given

  10. Proceedings of the 6rd Radiobiological conference with international participation dedicated to 20th anniversary of nuclear accident in Chernobyl, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientific conference deals with problems in radiobiology, photobiology and radio-environmental sciences. Some papers deal with the historical aspects development of reactor accidents (Chernobyl NPP and NPP A-1 Jaslovske Bohunice) as well as history of nuclear sciences in former Czechoslovakia. Proceedings contain forty-seven papers

  11. Nongenomic actions of thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul J; Goglia, Fernando; Leonard, Jack L

    2016-02-01

    The nongenomic actions of thyroid hormone begin at receptors in the plasma membrane, mitochondria or cytoplasm. These receptors can share structural homologies with nuclear thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) that mediate transcriptional actions of T3, or have no homologies with TR, such as the plasma membrane receptor on integrin αvβ3. Nongenomic actions initiated at the plasma membrane by T4 via integrin αvβ3 can induce gene expression that affects angiogenesis and cell proliferation, therefore, both nongenomic and genomic effects can overlap in the nucleus. In the cytoplasm, a truncated TRα isoform mediates T4-dependent regulation of intracellular microfilament organization, contributing to cell and tissue structure. p30 TRα1 is another shortened TR isoform found at the plasma membrane that binds T3 and mediates nongenomic hormonal effects in bone cells. T3 and 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine are important to the complex nongenomic regulation of cellular respiration in mitochondria. Thus, nongenomic actions expand the repertoire of cellular events controlled by thyroid hormone and can modulate TR-dependent nuclear events. Here, we review the experimental approaches required to define nongenomic actions of the hormone, enumerate the known nongenomic effects of the hormone and their molecular basis, and discuss the possible physiological or pathophysiological consequences of these actions. PMID:26668118

  12. Quantum features of natural cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cellular automata can show well known features of quantum mechanics, such as a linear rule according to which they evolve and which resembles a discretized version of the Schrödinger equation. This includes corresponding conservation laws. The class of “natural” Hamiltonian cellular automata is based exclusively on integer-valued variables and couplings and their dynamics derives from an Action Principle. They can be mapped reversibly to continuum models by applying Sampling Theory. Thus, “deformed” quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale l are obtained, which for l → 0 reproduce familiar continuum results. We have recently demonstrated that such automata can form “multipartite” systems consistently with the tensor product structures of nonrelativistic many-body quantum mechanics, while interacting and maintaining the linear evolution. Consequently, the Superposition Principle fully applies for such primitive discrete deterministic automata and their composites and can produce the essential quantum effects of interference and entanglement.

  13. Quantum features of natural cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cellular automata can show well known features of quantum mechanics, such as a linear rule according to which they evolve and which resembles a discretized version of the Schroedinger equation. This includes corresponding conservation laws. The class of "natural" Hamiltonian cellular automata is based exclusively on integer-valued variables and couplings and their dynamics derives from an Action Principle. They can be mapped reversibly to continuum models by applying Sampling Theory. Thus, "deformed" quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale $l$ are obtained, which for $l\\rightarrow 0$ reproduce familiar continuum results. We have recently demonstrated that such automata can form "multipartite" systems consistently with the tensor product structures of nonrelativistic many-body quantum mechanics, while interacting and maintaining the linear evolution. Consequently, the Superposition Principle fully applies for such primitive discrete deterministic automata and their composites and can produce...

  14. Failover in cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2010-01-01

    A cellular automata (CA) configuration is constructed that exhibits emergent failover. The configuration is based on standard Game of Life rules. Gliders and glider-guns form the core messaging structure in the configuration. The blinker is represented as the basic computational unit, and it is shown how it can be recreated in case of a failure. Stateless failover using primary-backup mechanism is demonstrated. The details of the CA components used in the configuration and its working are described, and a simulation of the complete configuration is also presented.

  15. Cellular-scale hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Faivre, Magalie; Horton, Renita; Smistrup, Kristian; Best-Popescu, Catherine A; Stone, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    Microfluidic tools are providing many new insights into the chemical, physical and physicochemical responses of cells. Both suspension-level and single-cell measurements have been studied. We review our studies of these kinds of problems for red blood cells with particular focus on the shapes of ...... mechanical effects on suspended cells can be studied systematically in small devices, and how these features can be exploited to develop methods for characterizing physicochemical responses and possibly for the diagnosis of cellular-scale changes to environmental factors....

  16. Cellular mechanics and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  17. Radiolabelled Cellular Blood Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the abstracts of the 5th International Symposion on Radiolabelling of Cellular Blood Elements to be held in Vienna, Austria, September 10-14, 1989. The Meeting is the fifth in a series of meetings designed to discuss the basics and clinical application of radiolabelling techniques. In these days, beside the search for new labelling agents and extending the knowledge in clinical use, the use of monoclonal antibodies is a big new challenge. All reviewed contributions that have been accepted for presentation are contained in this volume. (authors) 58 of them are of INIS scope

  18. Mitochondria and ionizing radiation: their inter relationship toward cellular dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contemporary theory of radiobiology posit that cellular damage during an event of radiation exposure is mediated through DNA damage/repair signaling processes along with secondary mechanisms induced by free radical generation. Nevertheless, up-coming experimental data suggests that this speculative framework is not enough for unfolding extranuclear radiation effects, particularly the response of mitochondria, key organelles for maintaining cellular function. Therefore, the present study aims at understanding ionizing radiation induced cellular damage and the associated mitochondrial structure/functional changes, using normal human fibroblast cells as an experimental model. Cells were exposed to X-rays (using Faxitron CP 160; dose rate 1 Gray (Gy)/min, fitted with 0.5 mm Al filter). Changes in the mitochondrial structure/mass were investigated by fluorescence microscopy and fluorimetry using MiTotracker red/nonyl-acridine orange dyes. Functional changes were measured by comparative measurement of cytosolic/mitochondrial ROS release using DCFH2DA/MiToSOX dye, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) using Rhodamine 123, activity of respiratory complexes, ATP synthesis and DNA damage using long amplicon (LA) PCR. Results obtained showed that exposure to X-rays led to mitochondrial fragmentation, concomitantly increasing the mitochondrial mass. Elevated cytosolic ROS levels were correlated with increased mitochondrial superoxide levels in case of X-ray treated cells indicating increased oxidative stress accompanied by depletion in MMP and activity of respiratory enzyme complexes followed by lowering of ATP levels. LA-PCR data showed time dependent decrease in the amplification of 8.9 kb region of mitochondrial DNA and 13.5 kb region of beta-globin nuclear gene segment indicating ROS precedes mtDNA damage exhibiting the deleterious nature of X-ray which may be considered as a key causative factor for mitochondrial dysfunction. Also, the role of DRP1 (dynamin

  19. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy part II: current practice and new horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This course is designed for residents in radiation oncology, preparing for their boards. It includes the physics and chemistry of the absorption of radiation, a description of the biological systems used to obtain a quantitative relationship between dose and biological effect, as well as a review of the basic principles in radiation biology that have been established. The multifraction regimens used in conventional radiotherapy were developed empirically, but can be understood in terms of radiobiological principles. Dividing the dose into many fractions reduces biological effectiveness due to repair of sublethal damage; this occurs in both tumors and normal tissues. Fractionation allows re-oxygenation to occur in tumors and so increases the effectiveness of a given total dose. Fractionation also leads to sensitization by reassortment of cycling tumor cells into radiosensitive phases of the cycle. Laboratory research also provides a rationale for modifications of existing fractionation protocols. The dose response relationship for late responding tissues is more 'curved' than for acute or early effects. Consequently the use of multiple fractions allows a greater separation of early and late effects in normal tissues. This has led to the introduction of hyperfractionation and accelerated treatment. Both involve two treatments per day (BID) but based on quite different rationales. The limitation of protraction is cell proliferation in the tumor, which may be accelerated as the tumor shrinks. Measurements of cell kinetics can identify fast growing tumors that may benefit from accelerated treatment. Hypoxia was early identified as a cause of resistance to cell killing x-rays. This led to development of electron affinic compounds as radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells. The new trend is the development of bioreductive drugs that are specifically cytotoxic to hypoxic cells i.e. hypoxic cytotoxins, but which still need to be combined with radiation. Fast neutrons

  20. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part II: Current practice and new horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This course is designed for residents in radiation oncology, preparing for their boards. The principles described in Part I are used to explain current practices in radiation oncology and as a basis for new initiatives. The multifraction regimens used in conventional radiotherapy were developed empirically, but can be understood in terms of radiobiological principles. Dividing the dose into many fractions reduces biological effectiveness due to repair of sublethal damage; this occurs in both tumors and normal tissues. Fractionation allows re-oxygenation to occur in tumors and so increases the effectiveness of a given total dose. Fractionation also leads to sensitization by reassortment of cycling tumor cells into radiosensitive phases of the cycle. Laboratory research also provides a rationale for modifications of existing fractionation protocols. The dose response relationship for late responding tissues is more 'curved' than for acute or early effects. Consequently the use of multiple fractions allows a greater separation of early and late effects in normal tissues. This has led to the introduction of hyperfractionation and accelerated treatment. Both involve two treatments per day (BID) but based on quite different rationales. The limitation of protraction is cell proliferation in the tumor, which may be accelerated as the tumor shrinks. Measurements of cell kinetics can identify fast growing tumors that may benefit from accelerated treatment. Hypoxia was early identified as a cause of resistance to cell killing by x-rays. This led to the development of electron affinic compounds as radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells. The new trend is the development of bioreductive drugs that are specifically cytotoxic to hypoxic cells i.e. hypoxic cytotoxins, but which still need to be combined with radiation. Fast neutrons were initially introduced, too, in an attempt to overcome the perceived problems of hypoxia, but clinical trials now are based on the premise

  1. Radiobiological evaluation of forward and inverse IMRT using different fractionations for head and neck tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To quantify the radiobiological advantages obtained by an Improved Forward Planning technique (IFP) and two IMRT techniques using different fractionation schemes for the irradiation of head and neck tumours. The conventional radiation therapy technique (CONVT) was used here as a benchmark. Seven patients with head and neck tumours were selected for this retrospective planning study. The PTV1 included the primary tumour, PTV2 the high risk lymph nodes and PTV3 the low risk lymph nodes. Except for the conventional technique where a maximum dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed to the PTV1, 70.2 Gy, 59.4 Gy and 50.4 Gy were prescribed respectively to PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3. Except for IMRT2, all techniques were delivered by three sequential phases. The IFP technique used five to seven directions with a total of 15 to 21 beams. The IMRT techniques used five to nine directions and around 80 segments. The first, IMRT1, was prescribed with the conventional fractionation scheme of 1.8 Gy per fraction delivered in 39 fractions by three treatment phases. The second, IMRT2, simultaneously irradiated the PTV2 and PTV3 with 59.4 Gy and 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, respectively, while the PTV1 was boosted with six subsequent fractions of 1.8 Gy. Tissue response was calculated using the relative seriality model and the Poisson Linear-Quadratic-Time model to simulate repopulation in the primary tumour. The average probability of total tumour control increased from 38% with CONVT to 80% with IFP, to 85% with IMRT1 and 89% with IMRT2. The shorter treatment time and larger dose per fraction obtained with IMRT2 resulted in an 11% increase in the probability of control in the PTV1 with respect to IFP and 7% relatively to IMRT1 (p < 0.05). The average probability of total patient complications was reduced from 80% with CONVT to 61% with IFP and 31% with IMRT. The corresponding probability of complications in the ipsilateral parotid was 63%, 42% and 20%; in the contralateral parotid it was 50%, 20

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  4. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  6. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  7. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April-June 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  8. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  9. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  10. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  11. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  12. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  13. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  14. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  15. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Contribution to some radiobiological aspects of the investigation of radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiosensitizing effect of metronidazole (Entizol, Polfa, Poland) was tested on an experimental model of ischaemized bone marrow. The changes of bone marrow cellularity were recorded after whole-body irradiation of rats protected with abdomen compression during irradiation. With an increasing dose of irradiation proportional and significant decrease of nuclear elements in bone marrow occurred the third day after irradiation. Metronidazole administered to unprotected rats (without compression) did not show any effect. The abdomen compression led to a pronounced radioprotection but metronidazole administration reduced this effect significantly. Ischaemization of the lower half of rat body produced on the level of bone marrow cellularity the protection corresponding to DRF (dose reduction factor) = 1.96 the third day after irradiation. DRF value decreased to 1.52 by metronidazole application which corresponds to ER (enhancement ratio) = 1.29. (author)

  18. DOE life-span radiation effects studies in experimental animals at University of Utah Division of Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiobiology Laboratory at the University of Utah compared the long-term biological effects of 226Ra and 239Pu in adult beagles. The program includes the investigation of other radionuclides. More recently, groups of juvenile and aged beagles were added to the study to investigate the influence of age at exposure. These studies involved single intravenous injection of radionuclides to small groups of beagles, in graded doses from levels at which no effects were expected up to levels where a 100% incidence of bone tumors was sometimes found. Some of the principal effects were bone tumors, fractures, and other skeletal alterations observed radiographically and histologically; emphasis was placed on the detection of precancerous changes, hematological changes, and changes related to aging. Emphasis was also placed on metabolic and autoradiographic studies necessary for good radiation dosimetry

  19. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of non-malignant disorders. Part I: physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Berthold [Hospital Weiden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Weiden (Germany); Block, Andreas [Hospital Dortmund, Institute for Medical Radiation Physics and Radiation Protection, Dortmund (Germany); Schaefer, Ulrich [Lippe Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Lemgo (Germany); Bert, Christoph; Mueller, Reinhold [University Hospitals Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Jung, Horst [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Roedel, Franz [University Hospital Goethe-University, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD)

    2015-09-15

    Synopsis of the introductory paragraph of the DEGRO consensus S2e-guideline recommendations for the radiotherapy of benign disorders, including physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk. This work is based on the S2e-guideline recommendations published November 14, 2013. The basic principles of radiation physics and treatment delivery, evaluation of putative underlying radiobiological mechanisms, and the assessment of genetic and cancer risk following low-dose irradiation will be presented. Radiation therapy of benign diseases is performed according to similar physical principles as those governing treatment of malignant diseases in radiation oncology, using the same techniques and workflows. These methods comprise usage of orthovoltage X-ray units, gamma irradiation facilities, linear accelerators (LINACs), and brachytherapy. Experimental in vitro and in vivo models recently confirmed the clinically observed anti-inflammatory effect of low-dose X-irradiation, and implicated a multitude of radiobiological mechanisms. These include modulation of different immunological pathways, as well as the activities of endothelial cells, mono- and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and macrophages. The use of effective dose for radiogenic risk assessment and the corresponding tumor incidence rate of 5.5 %/Sv are currently controversially discussed. Some authors argue that the risk of radiation-induced cancers should be estimated on the basis of epidemiological data. However, such data are rarely available at present and associated with high variability. Current radiobiological studies clearly demonstrate a therapeutic effectiveness of radiation therapy used to treat benign diseases and implicate various molecular mechanisms. Radiogenic risks should be taken into account when applying radiation treatment for benign diseases. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassung des einfuehrenden Kapitels der DEGRO-S2e-Leitlinie zur Strahlentherapie gutartiger Erkrankungen

  20. Three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD) with 124I PET for 131I therapy of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine therapy of thyroid cancer was the first and remains among the most successful radiopharmaceutical (RPT) treatments of cancer although its clinical use is based on imprecise dosimetry. The positron emitting radioiodine, 124I, in combination with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has made it possible to measure the spatial distribution of radioiodine in tumors and normal organs at high resolution and sensitivity. The CT component of PET/CT has made it simpler to match the activity distribution to the corresponding anatomy. These developments have facilitated patient-specific dosimetry (PSD), utilizing software packages such as three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD), which can account for individual patient differences in pharmacokinetics and anatomy. We highlight specific examples of such calculations and discuss the potential impact of 124I PET/CT on thyroid cancer therapy. (orig.)

  1. A very thin havar film vacuum window for heavy ions to perform radiobiology studies at the BNL Tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy ion beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will be made available for radiobiology studies on cell cultures. Beam energy losses need to be minimized both in the vacuum window and in the air in order to achieve the ranges required for the cells to be studied. This is particularly challenging for ions heavier than iron. The design is presented of a 0.4-inch diameter Havar film window that will satisfy these requirements. Films as thin as 80 microinches were successfully pressure tested. The final thickness to be used may be slightly larger to help in achieving pin hole free windows. We discuss design considerations and present pressure and vacuum test results as well as tests with heavy ion beams.

  2. Integrated cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C.

    The generation of new three-dimensional (3D) matrices that enable integration of biomolecular components and whole cells into device architectures, without adversely altering their morphology or activity, continues to be an expanding and challenging field of research. This research is driven by the promise that encapsulated biomolecules and cells can significantly impact areas as diverse as biocatalysis, controlled delivery of therapeutics, environmental and industrial process monitoring, early warning of warfare agents, bioelectronics, photonics, smart prosthetics, advanced physiological sensors, portable medical diagnostic devices, and tissue/organ replacement. This work focuses on the development of a fundamental understanding of the biochemical and nanomaterial mechanisms that govern the cell directed assembly and integration process. It was shown that this integration process relies on the ability of cells to actively develop a pH gradient in response to evaporation induced osmotic stress, which catalyzes silica condensation within a thin 3D volume surrounding the cells, creating a functional bio/nano interface. The mechanism responsible for introducing functional foreign membrane-bound proteins via proteoliposome addition to the silica-lipid-cell matrix was also determined. Utilizing this new understanding, 3D cellular immobilization capabilities were extended using sol-gel matrices endowed with glycerol, trehalose, and media components. The effects of these additives, and the metabolic phase of encapsulated S. cerivisiase cells, on long-term viability and the rate of inducible gene expression was studied. This enabled the entrapment of cells within a novel microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical detection of a single analyte, significantly improving confidence in the biosensor output. As a complementary approach, multiphoton protein lithography was utilized to engineer 3D protein matrices in which to

  3. Radiobiological parameters of four glioblastoma compared to four other histological types of human tumor xenografts in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant tumor of the central nervous system with aggressive biological behavior and a fatal clinical outcome. Several radiobiological parameters might contribute to these poor results. In this study, we investigated seventeen biological parameters of four GBM xenografts and compared the results with four other histological types of human tumor xenografts in nude mice. Methods and Materials: Most of the xenografts retained the individual histological features of their original tumor types. Four GBM xenografts (U87, HP555, MMC1 and HGL21), two squamous cell carcinomas (SCC21 and FaDu), one soft tissue sarcoma (STS26T), and colon cancer (HCT15) xenografts were used. The tumors were implanted in the hindleg of 5-6 Gy WBI nude mice. The following parameters were investigated for most of the xenografts: fractionated TCD50 (the dose of radiation which controls 50% of the tumors) using 30 fractions in 15 days. The parameters pO2, IFP (interstitial fluid pressure), Tpot, SF2 (plastic and Courtenay), PE (plating efficiency), D0, GSH, TCD50 single dose in oxic and hypoxic conditions, the rate of metastasis in SCID mice, VDT (volume doubling time), spontaneous apoptosis, induced apoptosis after 30 and 60 Gy and p53 over-expression. Results: Using the t-test, there was a significantly less spontaneous apoptosis in GBM xenografts when compared with the other histological types. However, no significant difference was found between both groups of xenografts in the remaining biological parameters investigated. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that, with the exception of spontaneous apoptosis, no significant difference was found in fifteen biological parameters between GBM xenografts and the other histological types implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The data suggests that the classical radiobiological parameters cannot explain the poor response of GBM to radiation. Supported by NCI Grant CA13311

  4. Multiuser Cellular Network

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Modern radio communication is faced with a problem about how to distribute restricted frequency to users in a certain space. Since our task is to minimize the number of repeaters, a natural idea is enlarging coverage area. However, coverage has restrictions. First, service area has to be divided economically as repeater's coverage is limited. In this paper, our fundamental method is to adopt seamless cellular network division. Second, underlying physics content in frequency distribution problem is interference between two close frequencies. Consequently, we choose a proper frequency width of 0.1MHz and a relevantly reliable setting to apply one frequency several times. We make a few general assumptions to simplify real situation. For instance, immobile users yield to homogenous distribution; repeaters can receive and transmit information in any given frequency in duplex operation; coverage is mainly decided by antenna height. Two models are built up to solve 1000 users and 10000 users situations respectively....

  5. Modeling and cellular studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing the applicability of mathematical models with carefully designed experiments is a powerful tool in the investigations of the effects of ionizing radiation on cells. The modeling and cellular studies complement each other, for modeling provides guidance for designing critical experiments which must provide definitive results, while the experiments themselves provide new input to the model. Based on previous experimental results the model for the accumulation of damage in Chlamydomonas reinhardi has been extended to include various multiple two-event combinations. Split dose survival experiments have shown that models tested to date predict most but not all the observed behavior. Stationary-phase mammalian cells, required for tests of other aspects of the model, have been shown to be at different points in the cell cycle depending on how they were forced to stop proliferating. These cultures also demonstrate different capacities for repair of sublethal radiation damage

  6. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds......, and pharmaceuticals. However, making cells into efficient factories is challenging because cells have evolved robust metabolic networks with hard-wired, tightly regulated lines of communication between molecular pathways that resist efforts to divert resources. Here, we will review the current status and challenges...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  7. Corrective actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variety of corrective actions which have been attempted at many radioactive waste disposal sites points to less than ideal performance by present-day standards at many closed and presently-operating sites. In humid regions, most of the problems have encompassed some kind of water intrusion into the buried waste. In arid regions, the problems have centered on trench subsidence and intrusion by plant roots and animals. It is overwhelmingly apparent that any protective barrier for the buried waste, whether for water or biological intrusion, will depend on stable support from the underlying burial trenches. Trench subsidence must be halted, prevented, or circumscribed in some manner to assure this necessary long-term support. Final corrective actions will differ considerably from site to site, depending on unique geological, pedological, and meteorological environments. In the meantime, many of the shorter-term corrective actions described in this chapter can be implemented as immediate needs dictate

  8. p53-dependent radiobiological responses to internalised indium-111 in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The p53 tumour suppressor protein plays a pivotal role in the response of mammalian cells to DNA damage. It regulates cell cycle progression, apoptosis and DNA repair mechanisms and is therefore likely to influence response to targeted radionuclide therapy. This study investigated the role of p53 in the cellular response to the Auger-emitting radionuclide indium-111. Methods: Two stable clones of a HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line, differing only in p53 status due to RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 expression, were incubated for 1 h with [111In]-oxinate (0–10 MBq/ml). Radiopharmaceutical uptake into HT1080 cells was measured in situ using a non-contact phosphorimager method. Cellular sensitivity and DNA damage were measured by, respectively, clonogenic survival analysis and the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. Results: Mean uptake of [111In]-oxinate in HT1080 cells was unaffected by p53 status, reaching a maximum of 9 Bq/cell. [111In]-oxinate-induced cytotoxicity was also identical in both clones, as measured by IC50 (0.68 MBq/ml). However the formation of DNA damage, measured immediately after treatment with [111In]-oxinate, was found to be up to 2.5-fold higher in the p53-deficient HT1080 clone. Conclusions: The increased DNA damage induced in p53-deficient HT1080 cells suggests an early deficiency in the repair of DNA damage during the treatment period. However, the similarity in cellular sensitivity, irrespective of p53 status, suggests that reduced p53 leads to a concomitant reduction in p53-dependent cytotoxicity despite the persistence of DNA damage. The results may provide insight into how tumours that differ in p53 status respond to therapeutic radionuclides.

  9. Elucidation of the new generation fluorescent protein tdTomato for space related radiobiological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    Astronauts in space are exposed to a potentially harmful radiation field, which does not exist in its quality and quantity on earth. Radiation exposure in space can lead to delayed or acute health effects. A successful long-term space mission requires better risk estimation and development of appropriate countermeasures, therefore study of the cellular radiation response is necessary. Ionizing radiation can provoke active cellular responses (cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis or other forms of cell type). Exposure to ionizing radiation also activates various signaling pathways in human cells. In the cellular radiation-response, two pivotal signal transduction pathways have to be comprehensively studied i.e. the p53-pathway and NF-κB-pathway. Discovery of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized biological research by making it possible to carry out functional studies in living cells and understanding complex signaling pathways. Previously the green fluorescent proteins EGFP and d2EGFP were used for signaling pathway studies. In this work the new red fluorescent protein tdTomato will be used for comprehensive investigation of NF-κB and other transcription factor activation after exposure of human cells to ionizing radiation (X-rays, heavy ions; space conditions). tdTomato has many advantages over EGFP because of its high fluorescence signals and a better signal/noise ratio in human cells. The previously constructed reporter system with d2EGFP was used to evaluate NF-kB activation after exposure to heavy ion particles of different biological effectiveness. The sensitivity threshold of this system was determined to be 2 particle traversals per cell nucleus. In the current study a more sensitive reporter assay will be constructed using a GAL4-VP16 turbo system that comprises a receptor plasmid and a reporter plasmid. This reporter assay will be designed and constructed with tdTomato and evaluation will be done with different molecular techniques.

  10. Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton-Brkich, Katie Lynn; Shumbera, Kristen; Beran, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Defined as "any systemic inquiry conducted by teachers... for the purpose of gathering information about how their particular schools operate, how they teach, and how their students learn" (Mertler, 2009), "action research" is empowering and professional research done by teachers to inform and improves their own practices. Although there are many…

  11. China's Actions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ China's National Development and Reform Commission publicized the country's policies and actions for addressing climate change in a report released on November 26,2009.The report highlighted China's efforts in cutting greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 by: (1)Rigorously checking the blind expansion of its energy-and pollution-intensive industries.

  12. The State of Cellular Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Youngbin

    2003-01-01

    Cellular probe technology is one of several potentially promising technologies for obtaining accurate travel time information. In 1996, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) mandated E911 requirements that cellular location be provided when 911 emergency calls come in to emergency management authorities. The E911 requirements allow 50 -300 meters from the emergency call location, depending on the type of cellular phone technology used and whether handset-based or network-based solutions...

  13. Never-ageing cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ogrunc, Müge; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence was historically discovered as a form of cellular ageing of in vitro cultured cells. It has been under the spotlight following the evidence of oncogene-induced senescence in vivo and its role as a potent tumour suppressor mechanism. Presently, a PubMed search using keywords ‘cellular senescence and cancer’ reveals 8398 number of references (by April 2011) showing that while our knowledge of senescence keeps expanding, the complexity of the phenomenon keeps us – researchers...

  14. Active Cellular Nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  15. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  16. Research in theoretical radiobiology and radiological physics: Final technical report, May 1, 1986-December 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work carried out under this Grant included continuation of experimental research in radiation biophysics that was previously initiated, as well as extensive theoretical efforts primarily devoted to the further development of the Theory of Dual Radiation Action. Documents for international and national organizations were prepared or evaluated. Attendance at a number of international and national meetings and scientific correspondence were also in part supported by this grant. 14 refs

  17. New insights into the cellular response to radiation using microbeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkard, Melvyn; Prise, Kevin; Schettino, Giuseppe; Shao, Chunlin; Gilchrist, Stuart; Vojnovic, Boris

    2005-04-01

    Micro-irradiation techniques continue to be highly relevant to a number of radiobiological studies, due to their ability to deliver precise doses of radiation to selected individual cells (or sub-cellular targets) in vitro. The Gray cancer institute (GCI) ion microbeam uses a 1 μm diameter bore glass capillary to vertically collimate protons, or helium ions accelerated by a 4 MV Van de Graaff. Using 3He2+ ions, 99% of cells are targeted with an accuracy of ±2 μm, and with a particle counting accuracy >99%. Using automated cell finding and irradiation procedures, up to 10,000 cells per hour can be individually irradiated. Microbeams are now being used to study a number of novel 'non-targeted' responses that do not follow the standard radiation model based on direct DNA damage and are now known to occur when living cells and tissues are irradiated. One such response is the so-called 'bystander effect' where unirradiated cells are damaged through signalling pathways initiated by a nearby irradiated cell. This effect predominates at low doses and profoundly challenges our understanding of environmental radiation risk. Furthermore, we now have evidence that simple molecules (such as nitric oxide) are involved in the signalling process, such that it may be possible to chemically influence the bystander response. If so, then this could eventually lead to improvements in the treatment of cancer by radiotherapy. Other studies have shown that the bystander effect is induced with equal effectiveness if either the nucleus or the cytoplasm of a cell is targeted.

  18. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  19. Radiobiology goes 3D: How ECM and cell morphology impact on cell survival after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Translational research is essential to find new therapeutic approaches to improve cancer patient survival. Despite extensive efforts in preclinical studies, many novel therapies fail to turn out to be translational from bench to beside. Therefore, new models better reflecting the conditions in vivo are needed to generate results, which transfer reliably into the clinic. The use of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models has provided new emerging insights into the understanding of cellular behavior upon cancer therapies. Interestingly, cells cultured in a 3D extracellular matrix are more radio- and chemoresistant than cells grown under conventional 2D conditions. In this review, we summarize and discuss underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon including integrin-mediated cell-matrix interactions, cell shape, nuclear organization and chromatin structure. Identifying the molecular differences between 2D and 3D cultured cells will offer the opportunity to improve our research and widen our therapeutic possibilities against cancer.

  20. Direct evaluation of radiobiological parameters from clinical data in the case of ion beam therapy: an alternative approach to the relative biological effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) concept is commonly used in treatment planning for ion beam therapy. Whether models based on in vitro/in vivo RBE data can be used to predict human response to treatments is an open issue. In this work an alternative method, based on an effective radiobiological parameterization directly derived from clinical data, is presented. The method has been applied to the analysis of prostate cancer trials with protons and carbon ions. Prostate cancer trials with proton and carbon ion beams reporting 5 year-local control (LC5) and grade 2 (G2) or higher genitourinary toxicity rates (TOX) were selected from literature to test the method. Treatment simulations were performed on a representative subset of patients to produce dose and linear energy transfer distribution, which were used as explicative physical variables for the radiobiological modelling. Two models were taken into consideration: the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) and a linear model (LM). The radiobiological parameters of the LM and MKM were obtained by coupling them with the tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability models to fit the LC5 and TOX data through likelihood maximization. The model ranking was based on the Akaike information criterion. Results showed large confidence intervals due to the limited variety of available treatment schedules. RBE values, such as RBE = 1.1 for protons in the treated volume, were derived as a by-product of the method, showing a consistency with current approaches. Carbon ion RBE values were also derived, showing lower values than those assumed for the original treatment planning in the target region, whereas higher values were found in the bladder. Most importantly, this work shows the possibility to infer the radiobiological parametrization for proton and carbon ion treatment directly from clinical data. (paper)

  1. Safety-Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Docket No. 50-170

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 1 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The reactor facility is located in Montgomery County, Maryland. This supplement reports on the status of the licensee's emergency plan that had not been reviewed at the time the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0882) was published

  2. SU-E-T-399: Determination of the Radiobiological Parameters That Describe the Dose-Response Relations of Xerostomia and Disgeusia From Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate the radiobiological parameters that describe the doseresponse relations of xerostomia and disgeusia from head and neck cancer radiotherapy. To identify the organs that are best correlated with the manifestation of those clinical endpoints. Finally, to evaluate the goodnessof- fit by comparing the model predictions against the actual clinical results. Methods: In this study, 349 head and neck cancer patients were included. For each patient the dose volume histograms (DVH) of parotids (separate and combined), mandible, submandibular glands (separate and combined) and salivary glands were calculated. The follow-up of those patients was recorded at different times after the completion of the treatment (7 weeks, 3, 7, 12, 18 and 24 months). Acute and late xerostomia and acute disgeusia were the clinical endpoints examined. A maximum likelihood fitting was performed to calculate the best estimates of the parameters used by the relative seriality model. The statistical methods of the error distribution, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the Pearson's test and the Akaike's information criterion were utilized to assess the goodness-of-fit and the agreement between the pattern of the radiobiological predictions with that of the clinical records. Results: The estimated values of the radiobiological parameters of salivary glands are D50 = 25.2 Gy, γ = 0.52, s = 0.001. The statistical analysis confirmed the clinical validity of those parameters (area under the ROC curve = 0.65 and AIC = 38.3). Conclusion: The analysis proved that the treatment outcome pattern of the patient material can be reproduced by the relative seriality model and the estimated radiobiological parameters. Salivary glands were found to have strong volume dependence (low relative seriality). Diminishing the biologically effective uniform dose to salivary glands below 30 Gy may significantly reduce the risk of complications to the patients irradiated for

  3. SU-E-T-399: Determination of the Radiobiological Parameters That Describe the Dose-Response Relations of Xerostomia and Disgeusia From Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, P; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas Health Science Center, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Peixoto Xavier, C [University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Costa Ferreira, B [University of Aveiro, Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Khouri, L; Carmo Lopes, M do [IPOCFG, EPE, Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate the radiobiological parameters that describe the doseresponse relations of xerostomia and disgeusia from head and neck cancer radiotherapy. To identify the organs that are best correlated with the manifestation of those clinical endpoints. Finally, to evaluate the goodnessof- fit by comparing the model predictions against the actual clinical results. Methods: In this study, 349 head and neck cancer patients were included. For each patient the dose volume histograms (DVH) of parotids (separate and combined), mandible, submandibular glands (separate and combined) and salivary glands were calculated. The follow-up of those patients was recorded at different times after the completion of the treatment (7 weeks, 3, 7, 12, 18 and 24 months). Acute and late xerostomia and acute disgeusia were the clinical endpoints examined. A maximum likelihood fitting was performed to calculate the best estimates of the parameters used by the relative seriality model. The statistical methods of the error distribution, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the Pearson's test and the Akaike's information criterion were utilized to assess the goodness-of-fit and the agreement between the pattern of the radiobiological predictions with that of the clinical records. Results: The estimated values of the radiobiological parameters of salivary glands are D50 = 25.2 Gy, γ = 0.52, s = 0.001. The statistical analysis confirmed the clinical validity of those parameters (area under the ROC curve = 0.65 and AIC = 38.3). Conclusion: The analysis proved that the treatment outcome pattern of the patient material can be reproduced by the relative seriality model and the estimated radiobiological parameters. Salivary glands were found to have strong volume dependence (low relative seriality). Diminishing the biologically effective uniform dose to salivary glands below 30 Gy may significantly reduce the risk of complications to the patients irradiated for

  4. Radiobiology of the skin: review of some effects on epidermis and hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant doses of ionizing radiation produce an acute skin reaction characterized by erythema, epilation, and dry or moist desquamation with or without erosions. These early acute changes are dose-dependent and reflect damage to the germinative cells of the epidermis and to the cutaneous vasculature. Studies in the pig, for example, have shown that the degenerative phase of cell loss (2-3 weeks) results from reproductive failure in germinative cells and a sharp reduction in the proliferation rate of basal cell ''survivors.'' D0 values for epidermal cells in different species generally range from 100-140 rads. Cell maturation and ascension rates in the suprabasilar layers are largely unaffected. A regenerative phase of cell replacement, characterized by sharply increased cell replication rates, occurs from the 3rd to 5th postradiation weeks. The postregenerative phase of hyperplasia reflects a temporary overshoot of cell density above control levels; a subsequent decrease in hyperplasia indicates feedback control of cellular proliferation. Postradiation changes in the highly proliferative anagen hair matrix cell populations result in hair dysplasia, slowed growth rates, impaired metabolic processes, and alopecia. Dosages of 700-800 rads or more induce some degree of permanent hair loss. G0 telogen matrix cells are 2-3 times more radioresistant than proliferating anagen matrix cells, but may ''store'' radiation damage for prolonged periods. Altered matrix cell uptake of amino acids, the incidence of dysplasia, and the degree of alopecia occurring after irradiation have all been used as quantitative biological end-points for the general study of cellular radiation effects, as well as studies on the enhancement of or protection against radiation damage provided by certain pharmacologic or physical agents

  5. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  6. Radioembolization of hepatocarcinoma with 90Y glass microspheres: development of an individualized treatment planning strategy based on dosimetry and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to optimize the dosimetric approach and to review the absorbed doses delivered, taking into account radiobiology, in order to identify the optimal methodology for an individualized treatment planning strategy based on 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. We performed retrospective dosimetry of the standard TheraSphere registered treatment on 52 intermediate (n = 17) and advanced (i.e. portal vein thrombosis, n = 35) hepatocarcinoma patients with tumour burden < 50 % and without obstruction of the main portal vein trunk. Response was monitored with the densitometric radiological criterion (European Association for the Study of the Liver) and treatment-related liver decompensation was defined ad hoc with a time cut-off of 6 months. Adverse events clearly attributable to disease progression or other causes were not attributed to treatment. Voxel dosimetry was performed with the local deposition method on 99mTc-MAA SPECT images. The reconstruction protocol was optimized. Concordance of 99mTc-MAA and 90Y bremsstrahlung microsphere biodistributions was studied in 35 sequential patients. Two segmentation methods were used, based on SPECT alone (home-made code) or on coregistered SPECT/CT images (IMALYTICS trademark by Philips). STRATOS trademark absorbed dose calculation was validated for 90Y with a single time point. Radiobiology was used introducing other dosimetric variables besides the mean absorbed dose D: equivalent uniform dose (EUD), biologically effective dose averaged over voxel values (BEDave) and equivalent uniform biologically effective dose (EUBED). Two sets of radiobiological parameters, the first derived from microsphere irradiation and the second from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), were used. A total of 16 possible methodologies were compared. Tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were derived. The area under the curve (AUC

  7. Proceedings of 6th International Microbeam Workshop/12th L.H. Gray Workshop Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology

  8. Use of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory to Conduct Charged Particle Radiobiology Studies Relevant to Ion Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Kathryn D; Blakely, Eleanor A; Story, Michael D; Lowenstein, Derek I

    2016-06-01

    Although clinical studies with carbon ions have been conducted successfully in Japan and Europe, the limited radiobiological information about charged particles that are heavier than protons remains a significant impediment to exploiting the full potential of particle therapy. There is growing interest in the U.S. to build a cancer treatment facility that utilizes charged particles heavier than protons. Therefore, it is essential that additional radiobiological knowledge be obtained using state-of-the-art technologies and biological models and end points relevant to clinical outcome. Currently, most such ion radiotherapy-related research is being conducted outside the U.S. This article addresses the substantial contributions to that research that are possible at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which is the only facility in the U.S. at this time where heavy-ion radiobiology research with the ion species and energies of interest for therapy can be done. Here, we briefly discuss the relevant facilities at NSRL and how selected charged particle biology research gaps could be addressed using those facilities. PMID:27195609

  9. Estimation of a Self-Consistent Set of Radiobiological Parameters From Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola (Italy)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A method to estimate intrinsic radiosensitivity (α), fractionation sensitivity (α/β), repopulation doubling time, number of clonogens, and kick-off time for accelerated repopulation of prostate cancer has been developed. Based on the generalized linear-quadratic model and without assuming the isoeffective hypothesis, the potential applications of the method were investigated using the clinical outcome of biochemical relapse-free survival recently reviewed in the literature. The strengths and limitations of the method, regarding the fitted parameters and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), are also discussed. Results: Our best estimate of α/β is 2.96 Gy (95% CI 2.41-3.53 Gy). The corresponding α value is 0.16 Gy{sup −1} (95% CI 0.14-0.18 Gy{sup −1}), which is compatible with a realistic number of clonogens: 6.5 × 10{sup 6} (95% CI 1.5 × 10{sup 6}-2.1 × 10{sup 7}). The estimated cell doubling time is 5.1 days (95% CI 4.2-7.2 days), very low if compared with that reported in the literature. This corresponds to the dose required to offset the repopulation occurring in 1 day of 0.52 Gy/d (95% CI 0.32-0.68 Gy/d). However, a long kick-off time of 31 days (95% CI 22-41 days) from the start of radiation therapy was found. Conclusion: The proposed analytic/graphic method has allowed the fitting of clinical data, providing a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer. With our analysis we confirm a low value for α/β with a correspondingly high value of intrinsic radiosensitivity, a realistic average number of clonogens, a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation, and a surprisingly fast repopulation that suggests the involvement of subpopulations of specifically tumorigenic stem cells during continuing radiation therapy.

  10. Weighting factors Q and WR for photon-, electron- and neutron radiations in their relationship with radiobiological and epidemiological source data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For photon and electron radiations, radiobiological low-dose RBE values, with 250 kV X-rays as the reference radiation, can vary from 0.5 up to 3.5 in dependence upon mean LET. On the other hand epidemiological risk data for the sparsely ionizing radiations are subjected to considerable methodical limitations of accuracy, so that a trend with LET is not detectable. This justifies the strong simplification consisting in the recommendation of Q=1 and wR=1 for all sparsely ionizing radiations, and 250 kV X-rays have to be regarded as representative. In individual cases of radiation risk estimate, radiation quality dependent risk factors should however be employed as far as available even for the photon and electron radiations. The risk data obtained in the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Life Span Study are valid for a very wide photon spectrum whose mean LET value approximates that for 60Co gamma radiation. For neutron radiation with energies below 1 MeV (fission spectra) the low-dose radiobiological RBE values referred to 250 kV X-rays are found around 20, but vary from 30 to 80 when referred to 60Co gamma radiation. For reference radiation with strong curvature of the dose effect curves, there are however considerable methodical problems which limit the accuracy of initial slope determination. Since epidemiological risk factors for the neutron radiation are still lacking, experimental RBE values for tumor induction in laboratory animals have served instead as the data base for the recommendations of Q values up to 30 and neutron wR values up to 20. In comparing these with the constant setting of Q=1 and wR=1 for the manifold of photon and electron radiations, one should consider that this manifold is approximately represented by 250 kV X-rays. Accordingly, the system of Q and wR values corresponds to our present knowledge, but should also be seen in the light of the still existing methodical imperfection. (orig.)

  11. Estimation of a Self-Consistent Set of Radiobiological Parameters From Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A method to estimate intrinsic radiosensitivity (α), fractionation sensitivity (α/β), repopulation doubling time, number of clonogens, and kick-off time for accelerated repopulation of prostate cancer has been developed. Based on the generalized linear-quadratic model and without assuming the isoeffective hypothesis, the potential applications of the method were investigated using the clinical outcome of biochemical relapse-free survival recently reviewed in the literature. The strengths and limitations of the method, regarding the fitted parameters and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), are also discussed. Results: Our best estimate of α/β is 2.96 Gy (95% CI 2.41-3.53 Gy). The corresponding α value is 0.16 Gy−1 (95% CI 0.14-0.18 Gy−1), which is compatible with a realistic number of clonogens: 6.5 × 106 (95% CI 1.5 × 106-2.1 × 107). The estimated cell doubling time is 5.1 days (95% CI 4.2-7.2 days), very low if compared with that reported in the literature. This corresponds to the dose required to offset the repopulation occurring in 1 day of 0.52 Gy/d (95% CI 0.32-0.68 Gy/d). However, a long kick-off time of 31 days (95% CI 22-41 days) from the start of radiation therapy was found. Conclusion: The proposed analytic/graphic method has allowed the fitting of clinical data, providing a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer. With our analysis we confirm a low value for α/β with a correspondingly high value of intrinsic radiosensitivity, a realistic average number of clonogens, a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation, and a surprisingly fast repopulation that suggests the involvement of subpopulations of specifically tumorigenic stem cells during continuing radiation therapy

  12. Radiobiological characteristics of the medical 1000 MeV proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a narrow proton beam with an energy of 1000 MeV was studied by means of the survival test in a phantom behind 7 g/cm2 of mouse material in the haploid prototrophic strain of yeast cells and by the response of canine cerebral tissue in the area of the central ray and at the edge of the range of action. Following the survival test the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) after the action of primary protons and of secondary particles on yeast cells was estimated for the depth with approximately 1 related to the therapeutic X radiation. The damaging radiation effect to yeast cells was found to be limited to a distance of 60 mm which nearly corresponds to the 0.1 - 0.2% isodose with a dose of 10,000 Gy in the middle. The effect on the brain consists of circumscript necroses in the area of radiation focussing and of a narrow about 1 mm wide area of perifocal changes. The neighbouring cerebral structures are widely intact. Reasons are given for the possible use of a proton beam for stereotactical interventions using the rotational couvergent-beam irradiation technique. (author)

  13. Actual problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kaupov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides review of cellular technologies used incardiology, describes types of cellular preparations depending onsources of cells and types of compounding cells. The generalmechanisms of therapies with stem cells applications are described.Use of cellular preparations for treatment of cardiovascular diseasesand is improvement of the forecast at patients with heartinsufficiency of various genesis is considered as alternative topractice with organ transplantations. Efforts of biotechnologicallaboratories are directed on search of optimum population of cellsfor application in cardiology and studying of mechanisms andfactors regulating function of cardiac stem cells.

  14. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with 137Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u-1 in the dose range of 5- 40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality. (authors)

  15. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecchia, I; Dini, V; Ricci-Vitiani, L; Biffoni, M; Balduzzi, M; Fratini, E; Belli, M; Campa, A; Esposito, G; Cirrone, G; Romano, F; Stancampiano, C; Pelacchi, F; Pallini, R; Tabocchini, M A

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with (137)Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u(-1) in the dose range of 5-40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality. PMID:25969527

  16. The Radiobiological Basis for Improvements in Radiotherapy and Low Dose Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hei, Tom K

    2009-12-09

    Overall Goal: This conference grant was proposed to organize and host an international conference at Columbia University in New York to critically assess the cellular and molecular signaling events and tissue response following radiation damage. The conference would also serve as a venue to play tribute to the more than forty years contributions made by Professor Eric J. Hall to the radiation biology field. The goals of the meeting were to examine tumor hypoxia and sensitizer development; recent advances made in clinical radiotherapy; addressed several low dose phenomena, including genomic instability and bystander effects that are important in radiation risk assessment. Study and Results: The symposium was held on October 13th and 14th, 2008 at the Alfred Lerner Hall in the Morningside campus of Columbia University. The symposium, entitled “From Beans to Genes: A Forty Year Odyssey in Radiation Biology” was attended by more than 120 faculty, scientists, clinicians, fellows and students. The symposium, spanned over a day and a half, covered four scientific themes. These included tumor hypoxia and radiosensitizers; low dose radiation response; radiation biology in the practice of radiotherapy, and radiation hazard in space and genetic predisposition to cancer. The program of the symposium is as follow:

  17. Micro-fluidic module for blood cell separation for gene expression radiobiological assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in molecular techniques have improved discovery of biomarkers associated with radiation exposure. Gene expression techniques have been demonstrated as effective tools for biodosimetry, and different assay platforms with different chemistries are now available. One of the main challenges is to integrate the sample preparation processing of these assays into micro-fluidic platforms to be fully automated for point-of-care medical countermeasures in the case of a radiological event. Most of these assays follow the same workflow processing that comprises first the collection of blood samples followed by cellular and molecular sample preparation. The sample preparation is based on the specific reagents of the assay system and depends also on the different subsets of cells population and the type of biomarkers of interest. In this article, the authors present a module for isolation of white blood cells from peripheral blood as a prerequisite for automation of gene expression assays on a micro-fluidic cartridge. For each sample condition, the gene expression platform can be adapted to suit the requirements of the selected assay chemistry (authors)

  18. Radiobiological responses for two cell lines following continuous low dose-rate (CLDR) and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The iso-effective irradiation of continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) irradiation was compared with that of various schedules of pulsed dose rate (PDR) irradiation for cells of two established human lines, T-47D and NHIK 3025. Complete single-dose response curves were obtained for determination of parameters α and β by fitting of the linear quadratic formula. Sublethal damage repair constants μ and T1/2 were determined by split-dose recovery experiments. On basis of the acquired parameters of each cell type the relative effectiveness of the two regimens of irradiation (CLDR and PDR) was calculated by use of Fowler's radiobiological model for iso-effect irradiation for repeated fractions of dose delivered at medium dose rates. For both cell types the predicted and observed relative effectiveness was compared at low and high iso-effect levels. The results indicate that the effect of PDR irradiation predicted by Fowler's model is equal to that of CLDR irradiation for both small and large doses with T-47D cells. With NHIK 3025 cells PDR irradiation induces a larger effect than predicted by the model for small doses, while it induces the predicted effect for high doses. The underlying cause of this difference is unclear, but cell-cycle parameters, like G2-accumulation is tested and found to be the same for the two cell lines

  19. Current (1984) status of the study of 226Ra and 228Ra in humans at the Center for Human Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Human Radiobiology has identified 5784 persons by name and type of exposure to 226Ra and 228Ra. Included are 4863 dial painters (mostly women) and non-laboratory employees of the radium dial industry, 410 laboratory workers, 399 persons who received radium for supposed therapeutic effects, and 112 in other categories. Body contents of radium have been measured in 1916 of the dial workers and about one-half of the subjects in the other groups. Bone sarcomas, carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoids, and deterioration of skeletal tissue are still the only effects unequivocally attributable to internal radium. Excess leukemias have not been observed and other malignancies, if in excess, appear more likely to be related to external gamma radiation or radon than to internal radium. Positive correlations with radium burdens have been found for the incidence of benign exostoses among subjects exposed to radium before age 18 and for shortened latency of ocular cataracts. 27 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  20. A radiobiology-based inverse treatment planning method for optimisation of permanent l-125 prostate implants in focal brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Annette; Mears, Christopher; Betts, John M.; Reynolds, Hayley M.; Tack, Guido; Leo, Kevin; Williams, Scott; Ebert, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment plans for ten patients, initially treated with a conventional approach to low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR, 145 Gy to entire prostate), were compared with plans for the same patients created with an inverse-optimisation planning process utilising a biologically-based objective. The ‘biological optimisation’ considered a non-uniform distribution of tumour cell density through the prostate based on known and expected locations of the tumour. Using dose planning-objectives derived from our previous biological-model validation study, the volume of the urethra receiving 125% of the conventional prescription (145 Gy) was reduced from a median value of 64% to less than 8% whilst maintaining high values of TCP. On average, the number of planned seeds was reduced from 85 to less than 75. The robustness of plans to random seed displacements needs to be carefully considered when using contemporary seed placement techniques. We conclude that an inverse planning approach to LDR treatments, based on a biological objective, has the potential to maintain high rates of tumour control whilst minimising dose to healthy tissue. In future, the radiobiological model will be informed using multi-parametric MRI to provide a personalised medicine approach.

  1. AAPM protocol for 40-300 kV x-ray beam dosimetry in radiotherapy and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) presents a new protocol, developed by the Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 61, for reference dosimetry of low- and medium-energy x rays for radiotherapy and radiobiology (40 kV≤tube potential≤300 kV). It is based on ionization chambers calibrated in air in terms of air kerma. If the point of interest is at or close to the surface, one unified approach over the entire energy range shall be used to determine absorbed dose to water at the surface of a water phantom based on an in-air measurement (the 'in-air' method). If the point of interest is at a depth, an in-water measurement at a depth of 2 cm shall be used for tube potentials ≥100 kV (the 'in-phantom' method). The in-phantom method is not recommended for tube potentials <100 kV. Guidelines are provided to determine the dose at other points in water and the dose at the surface of other biological materials of interest. The protocol is based on an up-to-date data set of basic dosimetry parameters, which produce consistent dose values for the two methods recommended. Estimates of uncertainties on the final dose values are also presented

  2. Feasibility study on the use of polyallyldiglycol-carbonate cell dishes in TUNEL assay for alpha particle radiobiological experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. F.; Yum, E. H. W.; Wan, C. K.; Fong, W. F.; Yu, K. N.

    2007-08-01

    In the present work, we have studied the feasibility of a method based on polyallyldiglycol-carbonate (PADC) films to investigate the effects of alpha particles on HeLa cervix cancer cells. Thin PADC films with thickness of about 20 μm were prepared from commercially available CR-39 films by chemical etching to fabricate custom-made petri dishes for cell culture, which could accurately record alpha particle hit positions. A special method involving "base tracks" for aligning the images of cell nuclei and alpha particle hits has been proposed, so that alpha particle transversals of cell nuclei can be visually counted. Radiobiological experiments were carried out to induce DNA damages, with the TdT-mediated d UTP Nick- End Labeling (TUNEL) fluorescence method employed to detect DNA strand breaks. The staining results were investigated by flow cytometer. The preliminary results showed that more strand breaks occurred in cells hit by alpha particles with lower energies. Moreover, large TUNEL positive signals were obtained even with small percentages of cells irradiated and TUNEL signals were also obtained from non-targeted cells. These provided evidence for the bystander effect.

  3. Feasibility study on the use of polyallyldiglycol-carbonate cell dishes in TUNEL assay for alpha particle radiobiological experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, K.F. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Yum, E.H.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Wan, C.K. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2007-08-15

    In the present work, we have studied the feasibility of a method based on polyallyldiglycol-carbonate (PADC) films to investigate the effects of alpha particles on HeLa cervix cancer cells. Thin PADC films with thickness of about 20 {mu}m were prepared from commercially available CR-39 films by chemical etching to fabricate custom-made petri dishes for cell culture, which could accurately record alpha particle hit positions. A special method involving 'base tracks' for aligning the images of cell nuclei and alpha particle hits has been proposed, so that alpha particle transversals of cell nuclei can be visually counted. Radiobiological experiments were carried out to induce DNA damages, with the TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) fluorescence method employed to detect DNA strand breaks. The staining results were investigated by flow cytometer. The preliminary results showed that more strand breaks occurred in cells hit by alpha particles with lower energies. Moreover, large TUNEL positive signals were obtained even with small percentages of cells irradiated and TUNEL signals were also obtained from non-targeted cells. These provided evidence for the bystander effect.

  4. Monte Carlo application based on GEANT4 toolkit to simulate a laser–plasma electron beam line for radiobiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, D., E-mail: debora.lamia@ibfm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology IBFM CNR – LATO, Cefalù (Italy); Russo, G., E-mail: giorgio.russo@ibfm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology IBFM CNR – LATO, Cefalù (Italy); Casarino, C.; Gagliano, L.; Candiano, G.C. [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology IBFM CNR – LATO, Cefalù (Italy); Labate, L. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory (ILIL) – National Institute of Optics INO CNR, Pisa (Italy); National Institute for Nuclear Physics INFN, Pisa Section and Frascati National Laboratories LNF (Italy); Baffigi, F.; Fulgentini, L.; Giulietti, A.; Koester, P.; Palla, D. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory (ILIL) – National Institute of Optics INO CNR, Pisa (Italy); Gizzi, L.A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory (ILIL) – National Institute of Optics INO CNR, Pisa (Italy); National Institute for Nuclear Physics INFN, Pisa Section and Frascati National Laboratories LNF (Italy); Gilardi, M.C. [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology IBFM CNR, Segrate (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2015-06-21

    We report on the development of a Monte Carlo application, based on the GEANT4 toolkit, for the characterization and optimization of electron beams for clinical applications produced by a laser-driven plasma source. The GEANT4 application is conceived so as to represent in the most general way the physical and geometrical features of a typical laser-driven accelerator. It is designed to provide standard dosimetric figures such as percentage dose depth curves, two-dimensional dose distributions and 3D dose profiles at different positions both inside and outside the interaction chamber. The application was validated by comparing its predictions to experimental measurements carried out on a real laser-driven accelerator. The work is aimed at optimizing the source, by using this novel application, for radiobiological studies and, in perspective, for medical applications. - Highlights: • Development of a Monte Carlo application based on GEANT4 toolkit. • Experimental measurements carried out with a laser-driven acceleration system. • Validation of Geant4 application comparing experimental data with the simulated ones. • Dosimetric characterization of the acceleration system.

  5. Monte Carlo application based on GEANT4 toolkit to simulate a laser–plasma electron beam line for radiobiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the development of a Monte Carlo application, based on the GEANT4 toolkit, for the characterization and optimization of electron beams for clinical applications produced by a laser-driven plasma source. The GEANT4 application is conceived so as to represent in the most general way the physical and geometrical features of a typical laser-driven accelerator. It is designed to provide standard dosimetric figures such as percentage dose depth curves, two-dimensional dose distributions and 3D dose profiles at different positions both inside and outside the interaction chamber. The application was validated by comparing its predictions to experimental measurements carried out on a real laser-driven accelerator. The work is aimed at optimizing the source, by using this novel application, for radiobiological studies and, in perspective, for medical applications. - Highlights: • Development of a Monte Carlo application based on GEANT4 toolkit. • Experimental measurements carried out with a laser-driven acceleration system. • Validation of Geant4 application comparing experimental data with the simulated ones. • Dosimetric characterization of the acceleration system

  6. Current (1984) status of the study of 226Ra and 228Ra in humans at the Center for Human Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Human Radiobiology has identified 5784 persons by name and type of exposure to 226Ra and 228Ra. Included are 4863 dial painters (mostly women) and non-laboratory employees of the radium dial industry, 410 laboratory workers, 399 persons who received radium for supposed therapeutic effects, and 112 in other categories. Body contents of radium have been measured in 1916 of the dial workers and about one-half of the subjects in the other groups. Bone sarcomas, carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoids, and deterioration of skeletal tissue are still the only effects unequivocally attributable to internal radium. Excess leukemias have not been observed and other malignancies, if in excess, appear more likely to be related to external gamma radiation or radon than to internal radium. Positive correlations with radium burdens have been found for the incidence of benign exostoses among subjects exposed to radium before age 18 and for shortened latency of ocular cataracts. 26 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  7. Radiobiological analysis of region with higher radiation background. The effect of the background on the isomorphism of some enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to establish the the time when the prolong impact of slightly increased radiation background get over the compensator mechanisms of living systems. The object of investigation was the ecosystem of the Bay of Wromos (Black Sea, BG) and its surroundings where the flotation slack from an uranium mine was disposed. radioactivity. The following radiobiological picture of the site is obtained according to measurements performed: the alpha-activity of the beach sands is higher than one of the slack and is different in plants; the beta-activity is higher compared to controls in all samples investigated; the gamma spectra show high concentration of the members of U-238 and Th-232 series. The biological effect provoked by this heightened radiation background is studied by means of the isoenzymes as indicators of changes on molecular level. The isoenzyme spectra of lactate dehydrogenase and butyrol dehydrogenase is studied by vertical electrophoresis. The following species are tested: Tettigonia candata charp, Galliptumus italicus, Grillus campestris and Lumbicus terrestrial. An increase in activity and quantity of enzymes as well as changes of their isoenzyme spectra is observed. Calliptumus italicus could be used as a bio indicator of contamination, as it show better separation of the LDH and BDH-isoforms of LDH and BDH, and is more wide-spread. The increase in activity and quantity of some isoenzyme fractions in the conditions of this experiment is one of the possible mechanisms for increase in radioresistance of the living systems. 3 tabs., 2 figs., 8 refs

  8. Radiobiological long-term accumulation of environmental alpha radioactivity in extracted human teeth and animal bones in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the radiobiological analysis of natural alpha emitters in extracted human teeth and animal bones from Malaysia was estimated. The microdistributions of alpha particles in tooth and bone samples were measured using CR-39 alpha-particle track detectors. The lowest and highest alpha emission rates in teeth in the Kedah and Perak states were 0.0080 ± 0.0005 mBq cm−2 and 0.061 ± 0.008 mBq cm−2, whereas those of bones in the Perlis and Kedah states were 0.0140 ± 0.0001 mBq cm−2 and 0.7700 ± 0.0282 mBq cm−2, respectively. The average alpha emission rate in male teeth was 0.0209 ± 0.0008 mBq cm−2, whereas that of female teeth was 0.0199 ± 0.0010 mBq cm−2. The alpha emission rate in teeth is higher in smokers (0.0228 ± 0.0008 mBq cm−2) than in non-smokers (0.0179 ± 0.0008 mBq cm−2). Such difference was found statistically significant (p < 0.01). - Highlights: • Alpha emission rates in teeth from smokers slightly higher than non-smokers. • Difference between alpha rates in male and female tooth not statistically significant. • Alpha particles have the same effect at any age. • Difference between alpha rates in bones was statistically significant

  9. Ex-RadTM (ON 01210) - a novel radioprotectant with a unique mechanism of action : physico-chemical characterization, distribution and efficacy in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most elusive goal in radiobiology has been the development of an orally active drug that can mitigate the effects of ionizing radiation in cells and tissues. Onconova has discovered a potentially orally acting compound that exhibit protein kinase inhibitory properties capable of augmenting cellular response to radiation induced damage, and thought to interfere with biological targets at either cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis or DNA damage repair. The objective of the current studies were to determine the physico-chemical properties of the drug, drug distribution in rodents, and the efficacy in mice

  10. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis. (paper)

  11. Cellular mechanisms during vascular development

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system is an essential organ in vertebrate animals and provides the organism with enough oxygen and nutrients. It is composed of an interconnected network of blood vessels, which form using a number of different morphogenetic mechanisms. Angiogenesis describes the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting vessels. A number of molecular pathways have been shown to be essential during angiogenesis. However, cellular architecture of blood vessels as well as cellular mechanisms...

  12. Predictive Modelling of Cellular Load

    OpenAIRE

    Carolan, Emmett; McLoone, Seamus; Farrell, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the temporal dynamics of cellular load in four Irish regions. Large scale underutilisation of network resources is identified both at the regional level and at the level of individual cells. Cellular load is modeled and prediction intervals are generated. These prediction intervals are used to put an upper bound on usage in a particular cell at a particular time. Opportunities for improvements in network utilization by incorporating these upper bounds on usage are identifie...

  13. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    OpenAIRE

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the...

  14. Application of radiobiological techniques in studying antioxidant mechanisms: evaluation of their radioprotective, antioxidative and antiviral activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the medical field, the oxidation phenomenon is the source of several pathologies (diabetes, cystic fibrosis, cancers,...). The natural oxidants are used as food preserving and skin ageing moderators. Several plant extracts with antioxidant activity were studied, this important antioxidant activity is probably due to their richness of compounds: polyphenols, phenolic acids, tocopherols, carotenoids, flavonoids,... Many techniques for evaluation and reactional mechanism study of the antioxidative activity are used. After selection, extraction, fractionation, activity screening, chemical analyses of molecules contained in the best active extracts, biological properties research of isolated redox pharmacophore, we have : - determined the structure of active products by spectroscopy and chromatography; - studied the antioxidative properties by EPR and spin trapping of the obtained extracts and molecules. The results of this first part of our work consists in evaluating the antioxidative degree of a great number of natural active principles, extracted from moroccan plants and pur obtained products. The second part consists in studying the action mechanisms using the LDL labelling (F. M.)

  15. A Mean Field Game Approach to Scheduling in Cellular Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Manjrekar, Mayank; Ramaswamy, Vinod; Shakkottai, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    We study auction-theoretic scheduling in cellular networks using the idea of mean field equilibrium (MFE). Here, agents model their opponents through a distribution over their action spaces and play the best response. The system is at an MFE if this action is itself a sample drawn from the assumed distribution. In our setting, the agents are smart phone apps that generate service requests, experience waiting costs, and bid for service from base stations. We show that if we conduct a second-pr...

  16. Investigation of molecular mechanisms in photodynamic action and radiobiology with nanosecond flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis. Progress report, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossweiner, L.I.

    1977-06-01

    Laser flash photolysis investigations on aromatic amino acids and proteins have demonstrated that monophotonic electron ejection is the major initial act, leading to e/sup -//sub aq/ and the corresponding aromatic radicals, followed by back reactions limited by available e/sup -//sub aq/ scavengers. Results with ribonuclease A, lysozyme and carboxypeptidase A have led to information about the relationship of the photoionization efficiency of aromatic residues to the microenvironment. Measurements on the decay kinetics of photoelectrons have shown that the lifetimes and their dependence on scavenger concentrations and dose are inconsistent with homogeneous reactions. A new theory is proposed in which the photoelectron diffuses through the medium as a quasi-free particle, where original pair-recombination competes with scavenging and pair-pair interactions. This theory is in good agreement with laser flash photolysis studies on I/sup -/, FE(CN)/sub 6//sup 4 -/, tryptophan and tyrosine and consistent with earlier photochemical scavenging measurements. The general analysis of radition sensitivity has been extended to suspensions of large biological targets, such as vesicles, viruses and cells, particularly where the radical diffusion length is smaller than or comparable to the collision radius. The development is exemplified with new work on inactivation of T7 bacteriophag by 25 MeV electrons and photodynamic inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Detailed studies on yeast have shown that the sensitivity to singlet oxygen attack depends on the temperature and the culture growth phase. Spin label ESR measurements indicate that he conditions of low photosensitivity parallel low membrane fluidity.

  17. Investigation of molecular mechanisms in photodynamic action and radiobiology with nanosecond flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis. Progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossweiner, L.I.

    1976-03-01

    Flash photolysis studies have shown that exposed tyrosyl or tryptophyl residues of enzymes are photoionized at approximately the same quantum efficiency as the aqueous amino acids. Comparisons with permanent damage indicate that this primary process contributes to inactivation when a photolyzed aromatic residue is essential or is located adjacent to a catalytic, non-chromoporic residue. Studies on sensitization by the phototherapeutic drug, 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), show the triplet state can lead to singlet oxygen generation and that weak binding to poly (dA-dT) suppresses this process. 8-MOP was found to be potent sensitizer of yeast photoinactivation with negligible post-irradiation recovery. Spinlable ESR measurements made on yeast cells after photodynamic treatment show that the membrane damage generated by the penetrating dye Toluidine Blue 0 is more extensive than the external dye, Eosin Y. In related ionizing radiation studies, it was found that 8-MOP is an anoxic radiosensitizer of T7 phage, attributed to enhancement of crosslinks; that complexing of eosin to lysozyme sensitizes the enzyme to oxidizing radicals; that the reactions of Br/sub 2//sup -/ and (CNS)/sub 2//sup -/ with tryptophan generate the same initial radical as uv-excited photoionization.

  18. The investigation of molecular mechanisms in photodynamic action and radiobiology with nanosecond flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis: Final report for period April 1, 1972-June 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser flash was employed to investigate initial photolysis mechanisms in enzymes and constituent aromatic amino acids. The key role of photoionization and solvated electron generation was demonstrated. The photochemistry of furocoumarins employed for phototherapy of skin diseases was investigated, emphasizing the production and subsequent reactions of singlet molecular oxygen. The photochemistry of porphyrins employed for photodynamic therapy of malignant tumors was studied, emphasizing photosensitization of model membranes, liposomes and resealed red blood cell membranes. Photosensitization in light-scattering media was investigated in a tissue model, consisting of polystyrene microspheres in an aqueous dye solution and analyzed with the diffusion approximation to radiative transfer. The diffusion approximation was employed to develop a dosimetry model for photodynamic therapy

  19. Hierarchical Cellular Structures in High-Capacity Cellular Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, R K; Agrawal, N K

    2011-01-01

    In the prevailing cellular environment, it is important to provide the resources for the fluctuating traffic demand exactly in the place and at the time where and when they are needed. In this paper, we explored the ability of hierarchical cellular structures with inter layer reuse to increase the capacity of mobile communication network by applying total frequency hopping (T-FH) and adaptive frequency allocation (AFA) as a strategy to reuse the macro and micro cell resources without frequency planning in indoor pico cells [11]. The practical aspects for designing macro- micro cellular overlays in the existing big urban areas are also explained [4]. Femto cells are inducted in macro / micro / pico cells hierarchical structure to achieve the required QoS cost effectively.

  20. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ivey, Jill W.; Eduardo L. Latouche; Sano, Michael B.; John H. Rossmeisl; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pu...

  1. Ubiquitin Metabolism Affects Cellular Response to Volatile Anesthetics in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfe, Darren; Reiner, Thomas; Keeley, Jessica L.; Pizzini, Mark; Keil, Ralph L.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of action of volatile anesthetics, we are studying mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have altered sensitivity to isoflurane, a widely used clinical anesthetic. Several lines of evidence from these studies implicate a role for ubiquitin metabolism in cellular response to volatile anesthetics: (i) mutations in the ZZZ1 gene render cells resistant to isoflurane, and the ZZZ1 gene is identical to BUL1 (binds ubiquitin ligase), which appears to be invo...

  2. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  3. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetish Ranjan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequency reuse at a smaller distance. Maximizing the number of times each channel can be reused in a given geographical area is the key to an efficient cellular system design. During the past three decades, the world has seen significant changes in telecommunications industry. There have been some remarkable aspects to the rapid growth in wireless communications, as seen by the large expansion in mobile systems. This paper focuses on “Past, Present & Future of Cellular Telephony” and some light has been thrown upon the technologies of the cellular systems, namely 1G, 2G, 2.5G, 3G and future generations like 4G and 5G systems as well.

  4. Determination of the accuracy for targeted irradiations of cellular substructures at SNAKE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last 10 years the ion microbeam SNAKE, installed at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator, has been successfully used for radiobiological experiments by utilizing pattern irradiation without targeting single cells. Now for targeted irradiation of cellular substructures a precise irradiation device was added to the live cell irradiation setup at SNAKE. It combines a sub-micrometer single ion irradiation facility with a high resolution optical fluorescence microscope. Most systematic errors can be reduced or avoided by using the same light path in the microscope for beam spot verification as well as for and target recognition. In addition online observation of the induced cellular responses is possible. The optical microscope and the beam delivering system are controlled by an in-house developed software which integrates the open-source image analysis software, CellProfiler, for semi-automatic target recognition. In this work the targeting accuracy was determined by irradiation of a cross pattern with 55 MeV carbon ions on nucleoli in U2OS and HeLa cells stably expressing a GFP-tagged repair protein MDC1. For target recognition, nuclei were stained with Draq5 and nucleoli were stained with Syto80 or Syto83. The damage response was determined by live-cell imaging of MDC1-GFP accumulation directly after irradiation. No systematic displacement and a random distribution of about 0.7 μm (SD) in x-direction and 0.8 μm (SD) in y-direction were observed. An independent analysis after immunofluorescence staining of the DNA damage marker yH2AX yielded similar results. With this performance a target with a size similar to that of nucleoli (i.e. a diameter of about 3 μm) is hit with a probability of more than 80%, which enables the investigation of the radiation response of cellular subcompartments after targeted ion irradiation in the future

  5. Determination of the accuracy for targeted irradiations of cellular substructures at SNAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebenwirth, C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, C. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Drexler, S.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich (Germany); Girst, S.; Reindl, J. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Walsh, D.W.M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Friedl, A.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich (Germany); and others

    2015-04-01

    In the last 10 years the ion microbeam SNAKE, installed at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator, has been successfully used for radiobiological experiments by utilizing pattern irradiation without targeting single cells. Now for targeted irradiation of cellular substructures a precise irradiation device was added to the live cell irradiation setup at SNAKE. It combines a sub-micrometer single ion irradiation facility with a high resolution optical fluorescence microscope. Most systematic errors can be reduced or avoided by using the same light path in the microscope for beam spot verification as well as for and target recognition. In addition online observation of the induced cellular responses is possible. The optical microscope and the beam delivering system are controlled by an in-house developed software which integrates the open-source image analysis software, CellProfiler, for semi-automatic target recognition. In this work the targeting accuracy was determined by irradiation of a cross pattern with 55 MeV carbon ions on nucleoli in U2OS and HeLa cells stably expressing a GFP-tagged repair protein MDC1. For target recognition, nuclei were stained with Draq5 and nucleoli were stained with Syto80 or Syto83. The damage response was determined by live-cell imaging of MDC1-GFP accumulation directly after irradiation. No systematic displacement and a random distribution of about 0.7 μm (SD) in x-direction and 0.8 μm (SD) in y-direction were observed. An independent analysis after immunofluorescence staining of the DNA damage marker yH2AX yielded similar results. With this performance a target with a size similar to that of nucleoli (i.e. a diameter of about 3 μm) is hit with a probability of more than 80%, which enables the investigation of the radiation response of cellular subcompartments after targeted ion irradiation in the future.

  6. Radiobiological risk estimates of adverse events and secondary cancer for proton and photon radiation therapy of pediatric medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, N. Patrik (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Inst., Faculty of Sciences, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)), e-mail: brodin.patrik@gmail.com; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Aznar, Marianne C.; Vogelius, Ivan R. (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)); Kiil-Berthelsen, Anne (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Diagnostic Investigations, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)); Nilsson, Per; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas (Dept. of Oncology, Skaane Univ. Hospital and Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)); Lannering, Birgitta (Dept. of Paediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden))

    2011-08-15

    Introduction. The aim of this model study was to estimate and compare the risk of radiation-induced adverse late effects in pediatric patients with medulloblastoma (MB) treated with either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT), inversely-optimized arc therapy (RapidArc (RA)) or spot-scanned intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The aim was also to find dose-volume toxicity parameters relevant to children undergoing RT to be used in the inverse planning of RA and IMPT, and to use in the risk estimations. Material and methods. Treatment plans were created for all three techniques on 10 pediatric patients that have been treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) at our institution in 2007-2009. Plans were generated for two prescription CSI doses, 23.4 Gy and 36 Gy. Risk estimates were based on childhood cancer survivor data when available and secondary cancer (SC) risks were estimated as a function of age at exposure and attained age according to the organ-equivalent dose (OED) concept. Results. Estimates of SC risk was higher for the RA plans and differentiable from the estimates for 3D CRT at attained ages above 40 years. The risk of developing heart failure, hearing loss, hypothyroidism and xerostomia was highest for the 3D CRT plans. The risks of all adverse effects were estimated as lowest for the IMPT plans, even when including secondary neutron (SN) irradiation with high values of the neutron radiation weighting factors (WR{sub neutron}). Conclusions. When comparing RA and 3D CRT treatment for pediatric MB it is a matter of comparing higher SC risk against higher risks of non-cancer adverse events. Considering time until onset of the different complications is necessary to fully assess patient benefit in such a comparison. The IMPT plans, including SN dose contribution, compared favorably to the photon techniques in terms of all radiobiological risk estimates

  7. In vitro and in vivo studies on radiobiological effects of prolonged fraction delivery time in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Xiong, Xiao-Peng; Hu, Chao-Su; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Zhu, Guo-Pei; Ying, Hong-Mei

    2013-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, when used in the clinic, prolongs fraction delivery time. Here we investigated both the in vivoand in vitroradiobiological effects on the A549 cell line, including the effect of different delivery times with the same dose on A549 tumor growth in nude mice. The in vitroeffects were studied with clonogenic assays, using linear-quadratic and incomplete repair models to fit the dose-survival curves. Fractionated irradiation of different doses was given at one fraction per day, simulating a clinical dose-time-fractionation pattern. The longer the interval between the exposures, the more cells survived. To investigate the in vivoeffect, we used sixty-four nude mice implanted with A549 cells in the back legs, randomly assigned into eight groups. A 15 Gy radiation dose was divided into different subfractions. The maximum and minimum tumor diameters were recorded to determine tumor growth. Tumor growth was delayed for groups with prolonged delivery time (40 min) compared to the group receiving a single dose of 15 Gy (P< 0.05), and tumors with a 20 min delivery time had delayed growth compared to those with a 40 min delivery time [20' (7.5 Gy × 2 F) vs 40' (7.5 Gy × 2 F), P= 0.035; 20' (3 Gy × 5 F) vs 40' (3 Gy × 5 F); P= 0.054; 20' (1.67 Gy × 9 F) vs 40' (1.67 Gy × 9 F), P= 0.028]. A prolonged delivery time decreased the radiobiological effects, so we strongly recommend keeping the delivery time as short as possible. PMID:23090953

  8. Cloned human bone marrow stromal lines demonstrate varied radiobiologic properties with respect to x-ray survival in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresh cultures of uncloned human bone marrow adherent stromal cells demonstrate increased radiation resistance at low dose rate (5cGy/min), D/sub o/ 146 cGy, n bar 2.0, compared to 200 cGy/min, D/sub o/ 99, n bar 1.03). (rho<0.05). Permanent clonal bone marrow stromal lines derived from human bone marrow stroma are designated KM101 and KM102. The irradiation survival curves of these cell lines at 5 cGy/min and 200 cGy/min were tested in vitro. Cell line KM102 demonstrated a D/sub o/ of 104 cGy and an extrapolation number of 1.9 at 200 cGy/min. At 5 cGy/min, the D/sub o/ was 211 cGy and the extrapolation number was 1.7. The D/sub o/ was significantly decreased at 200 cGy/min (rho<0.05). In contrast, cell line KM101 demonstrated a D/sub o/ of 165 cGy and an n bar of 1.5 cGy/min and this was not significantly altered at higher dose rate, with D/sub o/ of 156 cGy and extrapolation number of 1.4 at 200 rad/min. All cell lines at each target point were negative for Factor VIII, alkaline phosphatase, nonspecific esterase, lysozyme, and markers for T and B lymphocytes, and were positive for fibronectin, confirming their fibroblast reticular cell origin. These data indicate significant radiobiologic differences between stromal lines derived from the same human marrow in vitro

  9. Novel Materials for Cellular Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi

    The monitoring of cellular behavior is useful for the advancement of biomedical diagnostics, drug development and the understanding of a cell as the main unit of the human body. Micro- and nanotechnology allow for the creation of functional devices that enhance the study of cellular dynamics by...... modifications for electrochemical nanosensors for the detection of analytes released from cells. Two type of materials were investigated, each pertaining to the two different aspects of such devices: peptide nanostructures were studied for the creation of cellular sensing substrates that mimic in vivo surfaces...... and that offer advantages of functionalization, and conducting polymers were used as electrochemical sensor surface modifications for increasing the sensitivity towards relevant analytes, with focus on the detection of dopamine released from cells via exocytosis. Vertical peptide nanowires were...

  10. Cellular-based preemption system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Aaron D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cellular-based preemption system that uses existing cellular infrastructure to transmit preemption related data to allow safe passage of emergency vehicles through one or more intersections. A cellular unit in an emergency vehicle is used to generate position reports that are transmitted to the one or more intersections during an emergency response. Based on this position data, the one or more intersections calculate an estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the emergency vehicle, and transmit preemption commands to traffic signals at the intersections based on the calculated ETA. Additional techniques may be used for refining the position reports, ETA calculations, and the like. Such techniques include, without limitation, statistical preemption, map-matching, dead-reckoning, augmented navigation, and/or preemption optimization techniques, all of which are described in further detail in the above-referenced patent applications.

  11. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  12. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  13. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  14. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    OpenAIRE

    Preetish Ranjan; Prabhat Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequen...

  15. The radiogram including CT, nuclear medicine, ultrasonography, NMR imaging, thermography, digital radiography, radiobiology, radiation protection, the revised X-Ray Ordinance. 3. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After chapters dealing with radiation physics, with the equipment and all technical aspects, the book presents a full survey of radiographic methods and examination techniques, one complete chapter discusses the mammography in particular, whereas the following chapters deal with CT, contrast media, ultrasonography, NMR imaging, and nuclear medical diagnostics. Dosimetry, radiobiology and radiation exposure of man, radiation protection and the relevant legal provisions, - the X-Ray Ordinance and the Ordinance on Protection Against Harmful Effects of Ionizing Radiation -, as well as medical aspects of radiation effects are the subjects of the last chapters. (MG) With 170 figs., 43 tabs

  16. Cellular-signaling pathways unveil the carcinogenic potential of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Giel; van de Water, Bob; Schoonen, Willem; Vrieling, Harry

    2013-06-01

    Most of the current in vitro carcinogenicity assays assess the potential carcinogenic properties of chemicals through the detection of inflicted DNA damage or subsequent chromosome damage and gene mutations. Unfortunately, these assays generally do not provide mechanistic insight into the reactive properties of a chemical. Upon chemical-induced damage of biomolecules, molecular sensors will activate general and damage-specific cellular response pathways that provide protection against the (geno)toxic and potential carcinogenic properties of chemicals. These cellular defense mechanisms include activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA repair systems and induction of apoptosis or necrosis. Visualization of activated cellular-signaling pathways forms a powerful means to readily detect the genotoxic potential of chemical compounds and simultaneously gain insight into their reactive properties. Over the past years, various in vitro reporter assays have been developed that monitor activation of general and more specific cellular-signaling pathways, including the GreenScreen HC and ToxTracker assays. In this review we provide a perspective on how we can exploit activation of cellular signaling pathways to shed light on the mode of action of the chemical exposure and to develop sophisticated mechanism-based in vitro assays for cancer risk assessment. PMID:23339022

  17. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M;

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  18. Cellular signalling properties in microcircuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Wallén, Peter; Svirskis, Gytis; Hounsgaard, Jørn

    2005-01-01

    Molecules and cells are the signalling elements in microcircuits. Recent studies have uncovered bewildering diversity in postsynaptic signalling properties in all areas of the vertebrate nervous system. Major effort is now being invested in establishing the specialized signalling properties at th...... cellular and molecular levels in microcircuits in specific brain regions. This review is part of the TINS Microcircuits Special Feature....

  19. Quantum Cloning by Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ariano, G. M.; Macchiavello, C.; M. Rossi

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a quantum cellular automaton that achieves approximate phase-covariant cloning of qubits. The automaton is optimized for 1-to-2N economical cloning. The use of the automaton for cloning allows us to exploit different foliations for improving the performance with given resources.

  20. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van Jan-Kees

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handli

  1. [Photodynamic modulation of cellular functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Jiang, Hong-Ning; Cui, Zong-Jie

    2016-08-25

    Photodynamic action, due to the rather limited lifetime (1 μs) and effective reactive distance of singlet oxygen (lysosomes or endoplasmic reticulum can modulate photodynamically subcellular functions and fine-tune protein activity by targeted photooxidation. With the newly emerged active illumination technique, simultaneous photodynamic action localized at multiple sites is now possible, and the contribution of subcellular regions to the whole cell or individual cells to a cell cluster could be quantitated. Photodynamic action with protein photosensitiser will be a powerful tool for nano-manipulation in cell physiology research. PMID:27546513

  2. Development of a tool computer to compensate for interruptions of treatment and radiobiological comparisons Tr in external radiotherapy; Desarrollo de una herramienta informatica para la compensacion de interrupciones de tratamiento y comparaciones radiobiologicas en radioterapia externa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos Pacho, J. A.; Sena Espinel, E.; Verde Velasco, J. M.; Garcia Repiso, S.; Perez Alvarez, M. E.; Delgado Apaaricio, J. M.; Martin Rincon, C.; Saez Beltran, M.; Gomez Gonzalez, N.; Cons Perez, N.

    2013-07-01

    Outages unscheduled in the course of external beam radiation treatments, and the loss of probability of tumour control (TCP), which make it necessary to have a tool that allows the adjustment of the compensation of the absorbed dose required to keep the biological effect on the tumor, controlling the possible impact on the organ at risk. In order to perform this radiobiological quickly setting has been developed a software application that also allows comparison of treatments with different subdivisions from the point of view of radiobiological. (Author)

  3. Theoretical models and simulation codes to investigate bystander effects and cellular communication at low doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, F.; Alloni, D.; Facoetti, A.; Mairani, A.; Nano, R.; Ottolenghi, A.

    Astronauts in space are continuously exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays During the last ten years the effects of low radiation doses have been widely re-discussed following a large number of observations on the so-called non targeted effects in particular bystander effects The latter consist of induction of cytogenetic damage in cells not directly traversed by radiation most likely as a response to molecular messengers released by directly irradiated cells Bystander effects which are observed both for lethal endpoints e g clonogenic inactivation and apoptosis and for non-lethal ones e g mutations and neoplastic transformation tend to show non-linear dose responses This might have significant consequences in terms of low-dose risk which is generally calculated on the basis of the Linear No Threshold hypothesis Although the mechanisms underlying bystander effects are still largely unknown it is now clear that two types of cellular communication i e via gap junctions and or release of molecular messengers into the extracellular environment play a fundamental role Theoretical models and simulation codes can be of help in elucidating such mechanisms In the present paper we will review different available modelling approaches including one that is being developed at the University of Pavia The focus will be on the different assumptions adopted by the various authors and on the implications of such assumptions in terms of non-targeted radiobiological damage and more generally low-dose

  4. Cellular radiosensitivity of small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the radiobiological characteristics of a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines by use of a clonogenic assay. In addition, we tested whether comparable results could be obtained by employing a growth extrapolation method based on the...

  5. Consequences of anorectal cancer atlas implementation in the cooperative group setting: Radiobiologic analysis of a prospective randomized in silico target delineation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to ascertain the subsequent radiobiological impact of using a consensus guideline target volume delineation atlas. Materials and methods: Using a representative case and target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed IMRT rectal cancer clinical trial, gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical/planning target volumes (CTV/PTV) were contoured by 13 physician observers (Phase 1). The observers were then randomly assigned to follow (atlas) or not-follow (control) a consensus guideline/atlas for anorectal cancers, and instructed to re-contour the same case (Phase 2). Results: The atlas group was found to have increased tumor control probability (TCP) after the atlas intervention for both the CTV (p < 0.0001) and PTV1 (p = 0.0011) with decreasing normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for small intestine, while the control group did not. Additionally, the atlas group had reduced variance in TCP for all target volumes and reduced variance in NTCP for the bowel. In Phase 2, the atlas group had increased TCP relative to the control for CTV (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Visual atlas and consensus treatment guideline usage in the development of rectal cancer IMRT treatment plans reduced the inter-observer radiobiological variation, with clinically relevant TCP alteration for CTV and PTV volumes

  6. Transformation of Physical DVHs to Radiobiologically Equivalent Ones in Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Analyzing Dosimetric and Clinical Parameters: A Practical Approach for Routine Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi Thrapsanioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to transform DVHs from physical to radiobiological ones as well as to evaluate their reliability by correlations of dosimetric and clinical parameters for 50 patients with prostate cancer and 50 patients with breast cancer, who were submitted to Hypofractionated Radiotherapy. Methods and Materials. To achieve this transformation, we used both the linear-quadratic model (LQ model and the Niemierko model. The outcome of radiobiological DVHs was correlated with acute toxicity score according to EORTC/RTOG criteria. Results. Concerning the prostate radiotherapy, there was a significant correlation between RTOG acute rectal toxicity and ( and ( dosimetric parameters, calculated for  Gy. Moreover, concerning the breast radiotherapy there was a significant correlation between RTOG skin toxicity and dosimetric parameter, calculated for both  Gy ( and  Gy (. The new tool seems reliable and user-friendly. Conclusions. Our proposed model seems user-friendly. Its reliability in terms of agreement with the presented acute radiation induced toxicity was satisfactory. However, more patients are needed to extract safe conclusions.

  7. Radiobiology for eye plaque brachytherapy and evaluation of implant duration and radionuclide choice using an objective function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagne, Nolan L.; Leonard, Kara L.; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    %-35% BED benefit over {sup 125}I, whereas {sup 131}Cs produced a 3%-7% BED detriment, independent of P, T, and plaque size. Additionally, corresponding organ at risk physical doses were lowest using {sup 103}Pd in all circumstances. Conclusions: The results suggest that shorter implant durations may correlate with more favorable outcomes compared to 7 day implants when treating small or medium intraocular lesions. The data also indicate that implant duration may be safely reduced if the prescription physical dose is likewise diminished and that {sup 103}Pd offers a substantial radiobiological benefit over {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs irrespective of plaque position, implant duration, and tumor size.

  8. Radiobiological Characterization of Two Photon-Beam Energies 6 and 15 MV used in Radiotherapy From Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this study is to perform radiobiological characterization of two different photon beam energies, 6 MV and 15 MV, from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Two end-points, namely cell survival and micronucleus induction were used for the characterization. Chinese hamster V 79 lung fibroblast cell line to prepare cell culture and to perform the innervate experiments. chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell, this result is in complete agreement with expected 11 pairs of chromosomes representing the genome of this species. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beam energies, 6 and 15 MV respectively. Different dose rates were used for the two beam energies, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 7.0 Gy. Cells were counted immediately after irradiation and re seeded, the seeded number of cells was calculated to the dose rate used. Another set of unirradiated cells treated the same as the experimental set was used as a control group. The plating efficiency (PE) was calculated for the control group, then cells were incubated at 37oC for 6 days to construct the survival curve, five samples were counted per dose and the mean was calculated. The two survival curves are similar for photon beam energies (6 and 15 MV) and the surviving fraction was decreased with dose rate. The two curves showed similar values of α and β parameters, this result is expected for the same radiation type (X-ray). For the micronuclei assay three samples for each dose were seeded and incubated at 37oC for 24 hours then Cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis phase of the mitosis. The micronuclei number was counted and plotted with dose. A significant positive correlation was found between dose and micronuclei frequency (P=0.00), moreover, the micronuclei frequency is relatively higher with 15 MV compared with 6 MV energy. This indicates the presence

  9. Cellular solidification of transparent monotectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulker, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding how liquid phase particles are engulfed or pushed during freezing of a monotectic is addressed. The additional complication is that the solid-liquid interface is nonplanar due to constitutional undercooling. Some evidence of particle pushing where the particles are the liquid phase of the montectic was already observed. Cellular freezing of the succinonitrile-glycerol system also occurred. Only a few compositions were tested at that time. The starting materials were not especially pure so that cellular interface observed was likely due to the presence of unkown impurities, the major portion of which was water. Topics addressed include: the effort of modeling the particle pushing process using the computer, establishing an apparatus for the determination of phase diagrams, and the measurement of the temperature gradients with a specimen which will solidify on the temperature gradient microscope stage.

  10. Cellular ceramics in combustion environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuessel, Alexander; Boettge, Daniela; Adler, Joerg; Marschallek, Felix; Michaelis, Alexander [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Cellular materials have become increasingly interesting for applications in combustion environments. Improvements like high power efficiency and low emissions are the main targets of technological development in combustion processes. However, despite scientific and technical success in developing new or improved burner concepts over recent years, a lot of problems remain to be solved in the field of materials science: due to the high power density of the burners the materials are subjected to high loads in terms of thermal shock, temperature and corrosion, especially in so-called porous burner technology. This article shows some examples of research and development strategies and results in developing improved cellular ceramics. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Designing Underwater Cellular Networks Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejman Khadivi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Oceanographic data collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, disaster prevention, assisted navigation and tactical surveillance are some of the applications of underwater networks. Underwater networks should send the gathered information to other users or an offshore station via a base station in the sea. Since the available bandwidth in underwater is severely limited, frequency reuse and cellular networks concepts are very important. In this paper, after driving the ratio of signal to interference for underwater acoustic channels, the constraints for the cell radius are determined. One of the important results of this work is that, for special parameters like bandwidth, it may be impossible to provide the required signal to interference ratio and bandwidth for the network users. Furthermore, in this paper, number of supportable users, per-user bandwidth, and the user capacity for a cellular underwater network are determined.

  12. Stochastic Nature in Cellular Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 刘圣君; 王祺; 晏世伟; 耿轶钊; SAKATA Fumihiko; GAO Xing-Fa

    2011-01-01

    The importance of stochasticity in cellular processes is increasingly recognized in both theoretical and experimental studies. General features of stochasticity in gene regulation and expression are briefly reviewed in this article, which include the main experimental phenomena, classification, quantization and regulation of noises. The correlation and transmission of noise in cascade networks are analyzed further and the stochastic simulation methods that can capture effects of intrinsic and extrinsic noise are described.

  13. Xtoys cellular automata on xwindows

    CERN Document Server

    Creutz, M

    1995-01-01

    Xtoys is a collection of xwindow programs for demonstrating simulations of various statistical models. Included are xising, for the two dimensional Ising model, xpotts, for the q-state Potts model, xautomalab, for a fairly general class of totalistic cellular automata, xsand, for the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfield model of self organized criticality, and xfires, a simple forest fire simulation. The programs should compile on any machine supporting xwindows.

  14. Cellular reactions to patterned biointerfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Vera Antonie

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is to study cellular reactions to topographically, mechanically and biochemically tunable polymeric biomaterials. Different aspects of in vitro cell-biomaterial interactions were systematically studied with the murine fibroblast cell line NIH L929 and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Besides a general cytocompatibility assessment of the applied materials and the quantification of cell adhesion per se, cell morphological changes (e.g. cell spreading) and intr...

  15. Signal processing in cellular clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Forger, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    Many biochemical events within a cell need to be timed properly to occur at specific times of day, after other events have happened within the cell or in response to environmental signals. The cellular biochemical feedback loops that time these events have already received much recent attention in the experimental and modeling communities. Here, we show how ideas from signal processing can be applied to understand the function of these clocks. Consider two signals from the network s(t) and r(...

  16. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handling set-up times as well as transfer and process batch size information of multiple products that flow through the system. It is assumed that two sets of discrete material handling devices are used fo...

  17. Cellular Dynamics of RNA Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Chengqi; Pan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research have identified over 100 types of ribonucleosides that are post-transcriptionally modified. Many modified nucleosides are conserved in bacteria, archeae and eukaryotes, while some modified nucleosides are unique to each branch of life. However, the cellular and functional dynamics of RNA modifications remains largely unexplored, mostly due to the lack of functional hypotheses and experimental methods for quantification and large scale analysis. Just as many well characteri...

  18. Cellular Dynamics of RNA Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chengqi; Pan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Decades of research have identified over 100 types of ribonucleosides that are post-transcriptionally modified. Many modified nucleosides are conserved in bacteria, archeae and eukaryotes, while some modified nucleosides are unique to each branch of life. However, the cellular and functional dynamics of RNA modifications remains largely unexplored, mostly due to the lack of functional hypotheses and experimental methods for quantification and large scale analysis. Just as many well characterized protein and DNA modifications, many RNA modifications are not essential for life. Instead, increasingly more evidence indicates that RNA modifications can play regulatory roles in cells, especially in response to stress conditions. In this Account, we review some known examples of RNA modifications that are dynamically controlled in cells and introduce some contemporary technologies and methods that enhance the studies of cellular dynamics of RNA modifications. Examples of RNA modifications discussed in this Account include (Figure 1): (1) 4-thio uridine (s4U) which can act as a cellular sensor of near UV-light; (2) queuosine (Q) which is a potential biomarker for malignancy; (3) N6-methyl adenine (m6A) which is the prevalent modification in eukaryotic mRNAs; and (4) pseudouridine (ψ) which are inducible by nutrient deprivation. Two recent technical advances that stimulated the studies of cellular dynamics of modified ribonucleosides are also described. First, a genome-wide method combines primer extension and microarray to study N1-methyl adenine (m1A) hypomodification in human tRNA. Second, a quantitative mass spectrometric method investigates dynamic changes of a wide range of tRNA modifications under stress conditions in yeast. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms that control dynamic regulation of RNA modifications, and hypotheses for discovering potential RNA de-modification enzymes. We conclude the Account by highlighting the need to develop new

  19. CELLULAR FETAL MICROCHIMERISM IN PREECLAMPSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Gammill, Hilary S; Aydelotte, Tessa M.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Nkwopara, Evangelyn C.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown elevated concentrations of free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid and erythroblasts in maternal circulation in preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. Pluripotent and immunocompetent fetal cells also transfer to the maternal circulation during pregnancy, but whether concentrations of fetal mononuclear cells also differed in preeclampsia was unknown. We sought to quantify cellular fetal microchimerism in maternal circulation in women with preeclampsia and healthy con...

  20. The Origins of Cellular Life

    OpenAIRE

    Schrum, Jason P.; Zhu, Ting F.; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the origin of cellular life on Earth requires the discovery of plausible pathways for the transition from complex prebiotic chemistry to simple biology, defined as the emergence of chemical assemblies capable of Darwinian evolution. We have proposed that a simple primitive cell, or protocell, would consist of two key components: a protocell membrane that defines a spatially localized compartment, and an informational polymer that allows for the replication and inheritance of fun...