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Sample records for cellular protein expression

  1. Transient expression and cellular localization of recombinant proteins in cultured insect cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heterologous protein expression systems are used for production of recombinant proteins, interpretation of cellular trafficking/localization, and for the determination of biochemical function of proteins at the sub-organismal level. Although baculovirus expression systems are increasingly used for ...

  2. Prion search and cellular prion protein expression in stranded dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guardo, G; Cocumelli, C; Meoli, R; Barbaro, K; Terracciano, G; Di Francesco, C E; Mazzariol, S; Eleni, C

    2012-01-01

    The recent description of a prion disease (PD) case in a free-ranging bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) prompted us to carry out an extensive search for the disease-associated isoform (PrPSc) of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) in the brain and in a range of lymphoid tissues from 23 striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba), 5 bottlenose dolphins and 2 Risso s dolphins (Grampus griseus) found stranded between 2007 and 2012 along the Italian coastline. Three striped dolphins and one bottlenose dolphin showed microscopic lesions of encephalitis, with no evidence of spongiform brain lesions being detected in any of the 30 free-ranging cetaceans investigated herein. Nevertheless, we could still observe a prominent PrPC immunoreactivity in the brain as well as in lymphoid tissues from these dolphins. Although immunohistochemical and Western blot investigations yielded negative results for PrPSc deposition in all tissues from the dolphins under study, the reported occurrence of a spontaneous PD case in a wild dolphin is an intriguing issue and a matter of concern for both prion biology and intra/inter-species transmissibility, as well as for cetacean conservation medicine.

  3. Cellular prion protein expression is not regulated by the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

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    Victoria Lewis

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of molecular and cellular links between Alzheimer's disease (AD and prion diseases. The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, modulates the post-translational processing of the AD amyloid precursor protein (APP, through its inhibition of the β-secretase BACE1, and oligomers of amyloid-β bind to PrP(C which may mediate amyloid-β neurotoxicity. In addition, the APP intracellular domain (AICD, which acts as a transcriptional regulator, has been reported to control the expression of PrP(C. Through the use of transgenic mice, cell culture models and manipulation of APP expression and processing, this study aimed to clarify the role of AICD in regulating PrP(C. Over-expression of the three major isoforms of human APP (APP(695, APP(751 and APP(770 in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells had no effect on the level of endogenous PrP(C. Furthermore, analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mice over-expressing either wild type or familial AD associated mutant human APP revealed unaltered PrP(C levels. Knockdown of endogenous APP expression in cells by siRNA or inhibition of γ-secretase activity also had no effect on PrP(C levels. Overall, we did not detect any significant difference in the expression of PrP(C in any of the cell or animal-based paradigms considered, indicating that the control of cellular PrP(C levels by AICD is not as straightforward as previously suggested.

  4. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  5. Adipocyte size and cellular expression of caveolar proteins analyzed by confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulstrøm, Veronica; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Vinten, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Caveolae are abundant in adipocytes and are involved in the regulation of lipid accumulation, which is the main volume determinant of these cells. We have developed and applied a confocal microscopic technique for measuring individual cellular expression of the caveolar proteins cavin-1 and caveo...

  6. Expression Profiles of Cellular Retinol-binding Protein, Type II (CRBP II in Erlang Mountainous Chickens

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    H. D. Yin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular retinol-binding protein II (CRBP II belongs to the family of cellular retinol-binding proteins and plays a major role in absorption, transport, and metabolism of vitamin A. In addition, because vitamin A is correlated with reproductive performance, we measured CRBP II mRNA abundance in erlang mountainous chickens by real-time PCR using the relative quantification method. The expression of CRBP II showed a tissue-specific pattern and egg production rate-dependent changes. The expression was very high (p<0.05 in jejunum and liver, intermediate in kidney, ovary, and oviduct, and lowest (p<0.05 in heart, hypothalamus, and pituitary. In the hypothalamus, oviduct, ovary, and pituitary, CRBP II mRNA abundance were correlated to egg production rate, which increased from 12 wk to 32 wk, peaked at 32 wk relative to the other time points, and then decreased from 32 wk to 45 wk. In contrast, the expression of CRBP II mRNA in heart, jejunum, kidney, and liver was not different at any of the ages evaluated in this study. These data may help to understand the genetic basis of vitamin A metabolism, and suggest that CRBP II may be a candidate gene to affect egg production traits in chickens.

  7. Cellular prion protein is expressed in a subset of neuroendocrine cells of the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Zuberoa; Pffeifer, Kristine; Bodegas, María E; Sesma, María P; Guembe, Laura

    2004-10-01

    Prion diseases are believed to develop from the conformational change of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) to a pathogenic isoform (PrPsc). PrPc is present in both the central nervous system and many peripheral tissues, although protein concentration is significantly lower in non-neuronal tissues. PrPc expression is essential for internalization and replication of the infectious agent. Several works have pointed to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as the principal site of entry of PrPsc, but how passage through the GI mucosa occurs is not yet known. Here we studied PrPc expression using Western blot, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry in rat GI tract. PrPc mRNA and protein were detected in corpus, antrum, duodenum, and colon. Immunoreactivity was found in scattered cells of the GI epithelium. With double immunofluorescence, these cells have been identified as neuroendocrine cells. PrPc immunostaining was found in subsets of histamine, somatostatin (Som), ghrelin, gastrin (G), and serotonin (5HT) cells in stomach. In small and large bowel, PrPc cells co-localized with subpopulations of 5HT-, Som-, G-, and peptide YY-immunolabeled cells. Our results provide evidence for a possible and important role of endocrine cells in the internalization of PrPsc from gut lumen.

  8. Cloning, expression and cellular localization of Daphnia pulex senescence-associated protein, DpSAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ajing; Kong, Ling; Zhang, Mingqing; Wu, Donglei; Wang, Danli; Zhao, Yunlong

    2014-01-25

    Daphnia (water fleas) are small crustaceans that undergo an unusual switch from asexual to sexual reproduction that is dependent on environmental conditions. In this study, a senescence-associated protein (SAP) from the common freshwater species Daphnia pulex was cloned using primers based on homologous sequences and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Real-time PCR was employed to quantify the expression of D. pulex SAP (DpSAP) in individual organisms. The role of DpSAP in the reproductive transformation was further investigated in both parthenogenetic and sexual females by using digoxin-labeled SAP RNA probes and RNA whole-mount in situ hybridization. DpSAP was more highly expressed in sexual females, indicating a role in growth and reproduction. Cellular localization studies using RNA whole-mount in situ hybridization showed specific expression in the second tentacle joints. These expression patterns suggest an important role for DpSAP in the reproductive transformation of D. pulex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnolol Affects Cellular Proliferation, Polyamine Biosynthesis and Catabolism-Linked Protein Expression and Associated Cellular Signaling Pathways in Human Prostate Cancer Cells in vitro

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    Brendan T. McKeown

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men in Canada and the United States. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development and progression of many cancers, including prostate cancer. Context and purpose of this study: This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on cellular proliferation and proliferation-linked activities of PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Results: PC3 cells exposed to magnolol at a concentration of 80 μM for 6 hours exhibited decreased protein expression of ornithine decarboxylase, a key regulator in polyamine biosynthesis, as well as affecting the expression of other proteins involved in polyamine biosynthesis and catabolism. Furthermore, protein expression of the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, a key regulatory protein associated with DNA synthesis, was significantly decreased. Finally, the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, NFκB (nuclear factor of kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and AP-1 (activator protein 1 cellular signaling pathways were assayed to determine which, if any, of these pathways magnolol exposure would alter. Protein expressions of p-JNK-1 and c-jun were significantly increased while p-p38, JNK-1/2, PI3Kp85, p-PI3Kp85, p-Akt, NFκBp65, p-IκBα and IκBα protein expressions were significantly decreased. Conclusions: These alterations further support the anti-proliferative effects of magnolol on PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggest that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  10. Cellular responses to the expression of unstable secretory proteins in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Jun-Ichi; Shiro, Daisuke; Tanaka, Mizuki; Onozaki, Yasumichi; Mizutani, Osamu; Kakizono, Dararat; Ichinose, Sakurako; Shintani, Tomoko; Gomi, Katsuya; Shintani, Takahiro

    2017-03-01

    Filamentous fungi are often used as cell factories for recombinant protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of hydrolytic enzymes. However, even using strong transcriptional promoters, yields of nonfungal proteins are generally much lower than those of fungal proteins. Recent analyses revealed that expression of certain nonfungal secretory proteins induced the unfolded protein response (UPR), suggesting that they are recognized as proteins with folding defects in filamentous fungi. More recently, however, even highly expressed endogenous secretory proteins were found to evoke the UPR. These findings raise the question of whether the unfolded or misfolded state of proteins is selectively recognized by quality control mechanisms in filamentous fungi. In this study, a fungal secretory protein (1,2-α-D-mannosidase; MsdS) with a mutation that decreases its thermostability was expressed at different levels in Aspergillus oryzae. We found that, at moderate expression levels, wild-type MsdS was secreted to the medium, while the mutant was not. In the strain with a deletion for the hrdA gene, which is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway, mutant MsdS had specifically increased levels in the intracellular fraction but was not secreted. When overexpressed, the mutant protein was secreted to the medium to a similar extent as the wild-type protein; however, the mutant underwent hyperglycosylation and induced the UPR. Deletion of α-amylase (the most abundant secretory protein in A. oryzae) alleviated the UPR induction by mutant MsdS overexpression. These findings suggest that misfolded MsdS and unfolded species of α-amylase might act synergistically for UPR induction.

  11. Systematic Characterisation of Cellular Localisation and Expression Profiles of Proteins Containing MHC Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Agnieszka; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Weinhold, Nils

    2009-01-01

    that most proteins containing MHC class I ligands were localised to the intracellular parts of the cell including the cytoplasm and nucleus. MHC class II ligand donors were, on the other hand, mostly membrane proteins. Conclusions/Significance: The results contribute to the ongoing debate concerning...... the nature of MHC ligand-containing proteins and can be used to extend the existing methods for MHC ligand predictions by including the source protein's localisation and expression profile. Improving the current methods is important in the growing quest for epitopes that can be used for vaccine or diagnostic...

  12. SELDI-TOF analysis of glioblastoma cyst fluid is an approach for assessing cellular protein expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelscher, Martin; Richter, Nina; Melle, Christian; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Schaenzer, Anne; Nestler, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In about 10% of glioblastoma patients, preoperative MRI discloses the presence of tumor cysts. Whereas the impact of cystic appearance on prognosis has been discussed extensively, only little is known about the tumor cyst fluid. In this study, we tested the feasibility of the surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF) technique to detect cyst fluid proteins. Methods: Cyst fluid was collected from 21 glioblastoma patients for SELDI-TOF analysis and compared to control cerebrospinal fluids from 15 patients with spinal stenosis. Resulting protein peaks with significant differences between groups were further described, using the molecular weight in an internet search of protein databases and publications. Two potential cyst fluid proteins, basigin and ferritin light chain, were selected for immunohistological detection in the histologic slides of the patients, metallothionein (MT) served as negative control. Results: As supposed from the results of the SELDI-TOF analysis, basigin and ferritin were detected immunohistochemically in the cyst wall, whereas MT was more equally distributed between the cyst wall and the surrounding tumor tissue. Median survival time of the patients was 20 months (range 2 to 102 months) and correlated with age, but not with expression of the three proteins. Discussion: The SELDI-TOF approach reveals a number of proteins, potentially present in glioblastoma cyst fluid. Identification of these proteins in tumor cells may help understand the pathogenetic pathways and the prognostic value of cystic changes. PMID:24225180

  13. The EHV-1 UL4 protein that tempers viral gene expression interacts with cellular transcription factors.

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    Zhang, Yunfei; Charvat, Robert A; Kim, Seong K; O'Callaghan, Dennis J

    2014-01-20

    The UL4 gene is conserved within the genome of defective interfering particles of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) that mediate persistent infection. Here, we show that the UL4 protein inhibits EHV-1 reporter gene expression by decreasing the level of transcribed mRNA. The UL4 protein did not bind any gene class of EHV-1 promoters in electromobility or chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, but directly interacted with the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II both in vitro (GST-pulldown assays) and in infected cells (coimmunoprecipitation analyses). Microarray analyses of the expression of the 78 EHV-1 genes revealed that viral late genes important for virion assembly displayed enhanced expression in cells infected with UL4-null virus as compared to wild-type or UL4-restored EHV-1. Quantitative PCR analyses showed that viral DNA replication was not retarded in cells infected with the UL4-null virus as compared to wild-type EHV-1.

  14. Secretory proteins characteristic of environmental changes in cellular signal transduction: Expression in oral fluid

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    Mednieks, M. I.; Burke, J. C.; Sivakumar, T. P.; Hand, A. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Past studies have shown that both hypo- and hyper-gravity have significant consequences on a variety of tissues and organ systems. It is not known if the effects of environmental stimuli such as altered gravity are beneficial or detrimental, and if the effects can be prevented or reversed. Animal experiments from the Space Lab and Cosmos missions indicate that events that are mediated by cyclic AMP, such as cellular responses to catecholamine and peptide hormone action, are significantly altered in a number of tissues as a consequence of space flight. A secretory cyclic AMP-receptor protein (cARP), is present in saliva, and can serve as an indicator of individual responses to physiologic and environmental stress. Animal experiments have shown that the hypergravity component of space flight is a significant stress factor. In humans, cARP levels in each individual are constant under normal conditions, but elevated after acute stress. Additionally, the levels of cARP in secreted saliva can be compared to those in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), which reflects the protein composition of serum. The ratio of cARP in saliva to that in GCF can be used as a measure of basal compared to hyper-or hypo-gravity values. An ultimate goal is to test hyper and zero G responses in human saliva to determine if cARP is a suitable index of acute and chronic stress. A miniaturized test kit for saliva collection has been designed. Samples can be collected and stored till analyses are carried out that will distinguish the effects of increased gravity from those of one and zero G. Such tests can serve as an individualized monitoring system for physiologic responses either in space or on earth. .

  15. The cellular prion protein negatively regulates phagocytosis and cytokine expression in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages.

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    Min Wang

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrP(C is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored glycoprotein on the cell surface. Previous studies have demonstrated contradictory roles for PrP(C in connection with the phagocytic ability of macrophages. In the present work, we investigated the function of PrP(C in phagocytosis and cytokine expression in bone marrow-derived macrophages infected with Escherichia coli. E. coli infection induced an increase in the PRNP mRNA level. Knockout of PrP(C promoted bacterial uptake; upregulated Rab5, Rab7, and Eea1 mRNA expression; and increased the recruitment of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 to phagosomes, suggesting enhanced microbicidal activity. Remarkably, knockout of PrP(C suppressed the proliferation of internalized bacteria and increased the expression of cytokines such as interleukin-1β. Collectively, our data reveal an important role of PrP(C as a negative regulator for phagocytosis, phagosome maturation, cytokine expression, and macrophage microbicidal activity.

  16. Tricyclic pyrone compounds prevent aggregation and reverse cellular phenotypes caused by expression of mutant huntingtin protein in striatal neurons

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    McMurray Cynthia T

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion mutation in the coding region of a novel gene. The mechanism of HD is unknown. Most data suggest that polyglutamine-mediated aggregation associated with expression of mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt contributes to the pathology. However, recent studies have identified early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Suppression of aggregation is accepted as one of the markers of successful therapeutic approaches. Previously, we demonstrated that tricyclic pyrone (TP compounds efficiently inhibited formation of amyloid-β (Aβ aggregates in cell and mouse models representing Alzheimer's Disease (AD. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether TP compounds could prevent aggregation and restore early cellular defects in primary embryonic striatal neurons from animal model representing HD. Results TP compounds effectively inhibit aggregation caused by mhtt in neurons and glial cells. Treatment with TP compounds also alleviated cholesterol accumulation and restored clathrin-independent endocytosis in HD neurons. Conclusion We have found that TP compounds not only blocked mhtt-induced aggregation, but also alleviated early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Our data suggest TP molecules may be used as lead compounds for prevention or treatment of multiple neurodegenerative diseases including HD and AD.

  17. Expression and cellular distribution of multidrug resistance-related proteins in the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Aronica; J.A. Gorter; M. Ramkema; S. Redeker; F. Ozbas-Gercer; E.A. van Vliet; G.L. Scheffer; R.J. Scheper; P. van der Valk; J.C. Baayen; D. Troost

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the cellular distribution of different multidrug resistance (MDR)-related proteins such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 and 2, and the major vault protein (MVP) in normal and sclerotic hippocampus of patients with medica

  18. Expression of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein and its association with p53 mutation in colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Zhou; Jie-Ping Yu; Hong-Xia Chen; Hong-Gang Yu; He-Sheng Luo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of cellular FLICE (Fas associated death domain-like IL-1beta-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) and its association with p53mutation in colon cancer.METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of c-FLIP and mutant p53 by using specific antibodies was performed by the standard streptavidin-peroxidase technique for 45 colon cancer tissue samples with matched normal tissues. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptional (RT)-PCR was used to measure c-FLIP mRNA levels. t-test statistical method was used in data analyses.RESULTS: c-FLIP mRNA was expressed in all colon cancer tissues and its level (0.63±0.12) was significantly higher than that in normal tissues (0.38±0.10, P<0.01). Immunohistochemically, c-FLIP protein was also expressed in all colon cancers (45/45) and 71.1% (32/45) showed an intense immunostaining, in contrast, 93.3% (42/45) of normal colonic mucosa showed positive staining and none of them immunostained intensely. The quantity of c-FLIP protein was significantly higher in cancer tissues than in normal mucosa (7.04±1.20 vs 5.21±0.86, P<0.01).Positive staining of mutant p53 protein was found in 60%(27/45) colon cancers. c-FLIP mRNA level was decreased in p53 positive group compared with p53 negative cancer tissues (0.59±0.13 vs 0.69±0.14, P<0.01), but c-FLIP protein had a significantly higher level in p53 positive cancer tissues than in negative ones (7.57±1.30 vs 6.25±1.27,P<0.01).CONCLUSION: c-FLIP is specially overexpressed in colon cancers and it might contribute to carcinogenesis of normal colonic mucosa. p53 may exert transcriptional upregulation effects on c-FLIP gene and more potent effects on promoting the degradation of c-FLIP protein.

  19. No Effect of the Transforming Growth Factor {beta}1 Promoter Polymorphism C-509T on TGFB1 Gene Expression, Protein Secretion, or Cellular Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuther, Sebastian; Metzke, Elisabeth [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Bonin, Michael [Department of Medical Genetics, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Dikomey, Ekkehard, E-mail: dikomey@uke.de [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Raabe, Annette [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To study whether the promoter polymorphism (C-509T) affects transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGFB1) expression, protein secretion, and/or cellular radiosensitivity for both human lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed with lymphocytes taken either from 124 breast cancer patients or 59 pairs of normal monozygotic twins. We used 15 normal human primary fibroblast strains as controls. The C-509T genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism or TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. The cellular radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was measured by G0/1 assay and that of fibroblasts by colony assay. The amount of extracellular TGFB1 protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TGFB1 expression was assessed via microarray analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The C-509T genotype was found not to be associated with cellular radiosensitivity, neither for lymphocytes (breast cancer patients, P=.811; healthy donors, P=.181) nor for fibroblasts (P=.589). Both TGFB1 expression and TGFB1 protein secretion showed considerable variation, which, however, did not depend on the C-509T genotype (protein secretion: P=.879; gene expression: lymphocytes, P=.134, fibroblasts, P=.605). There was also no general correlation between TGFB1 expression and cellular radiosensitivity (lymphocytes, P=.632; fibroblasts, P=.573). Conclusion: Our data indicate that any association between the SNP C-509T of TGFB1 and risk of normal tissue toxicity cannot be ascribed to a functional consequence of this SNP, either on the level of gene expression, protein secretion, or cellular radiosensitivity.

  20. Spindle assembly checkpoint protein expression correlates with cellular proliferation and shorter time to recurrence in ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrogan, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal of the gynecological malignancies, often presenting at an advanced stage. Treatment is hampered by high levels of drug resistance. The taxanes are microtubule stabilizing agents, used as first-line agents in the treatment of OC that exert their apoptotic effects through the spindle assembly checkpoint. BUB1-related protein kinase (BUBR1) and mitotic arrest deficient 2 (MAD2), essential spindle assembly checkpoint components, play a key role in response to taxanes. BUBR1, MAD2, and Ki-67 were assessed on an OC tissue microarray platform representing 72 OC tumors of varying histologic subtypes. Sixty-one of these patients received paclitaxel and platinum agents combined; 11 received platinum alone. Overall survival was available for all 72 patients, whereas recurrence-free survival (RFS) was available for 66 patients. Increased BUBR1 expression was seen in serous carcinomas, compared with other histologies (P = .03). Increased BUBR1 was significantly associated with tumors of advanced stage (P = .05). Increased MAD2 and BUBR1 expression also correlated with increased cellular proliferation (P < .0002 and P = .02, respectively). Reduced MAD2 nuclear intensity was associated with a shorter RFS (P = .03), in ovarian tumors of differing histologic subtype (n = 66). In this subgroup, for those women who received paclitaxel and platinum agents combined (n = 57), reduced MAD2 intensity also identified women with a shorter RFS (P < .007). For the entire cohort of patients, irrespective of histologic subtype or treatment, MAD2 nuclear intensity retained independent significance in a multivariate model, with tumors showing reduced nuclear MAD2 intensity identifying patients with a poorer RFS (P = .05).

  1. Differentially expressed nuclear proteins in human CCRF-CEM, HL-60, MEC-1 and Raji cells correlate with cellular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Silke; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-10-01

    The human cell lines CCRF-CEM (T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia), HL-60 (acute myeloid leukemia), MEC-1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and Raji (Burkitt's B-cell lymphoma) have been analysed for differences in their nuclear proteomes. Using 2-D DIGE, 55 nuclear proteins have been identified that are differentially expressed (p<0.025) between the four cell lines, including proteins associated with transcription, proliferation, DNA repair and apoptosis. Of these 55 proteins, 22 were over-expressed in just one cell line, and four were down-regulated in one cell line. Proteins uniquely over-expressed between myeloid and lymphoid cell lines include those that may have use as markers for diagnosis, disease progression and B-cell maturation and differentiation. Expression of various proliferation-associated nuclear proteins correlated with relative growth rates of the cell lines, giving these proteins potential diagnostic applications for distinction of chronic versus acute subtypes of haematological malignancies. Identification of these differentially expressed nuclear proteins should facilitate elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying leukocyte differentiation and transformation to leukemias and lymphomas. The nuclear expression profiles should enable classification of subtypes of leukemia, and identify potential nuclear protein targets for development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  2. ING proteins in cellular senescence.

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    Menéndez, Camino; Abad, María; Gómez-Cabello, Daniel; Moreno, Alberto; Palmero, Ignacio

    2009-05-01

    Cellular senescence is an effective anti-tumor barrier that acts by restraining the uncontrolled proliferation of cells carrying potentially oncogenic alterations. ING proteins are putative tumor suppressor proteins functionally linked to the p53 pathway and to chromatin regulation. ING proteins exert their tumor-protective action through different types of responses. Here, we review the evidence on the participation of ING proteins, mainly ING1 and ING2, in the implementation of the senescent response. The currently available data support an important role of ING proteins as regulators of senescence, in connection with the p53 pathway and chromatin organization.

  3. Linking ATM Promoter Methylation to Cell Cycle Protein Expression in Brain Tumor Patients: Cellular Molecular Triangle Correlation in ATM Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipour, P; Karami, F; Javan, Firouzeh; Mehrazin, M

    2015-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a key gene in DNA double-strand break (DSB), and therefore, most of its disabling genetic alterations play an important initiative role in many types of cancer. However, the exact role of ATM gene and its epigenetic alterations, especially promoter methylation in different grades of brain tumors, remains elusive. The current study was conducted to query possible correlations among methylation statue of ATM gene, ATM/ retinoblastoma (RB) protein expression, D1853N ATM polymorphism, telomere length (TL), and clinicopathological characteristics of various types of brain tumors. Isolated DNA from 30 fresh tissues was extracted from different types of brain tumors and two brain tissues from deceased normal healthy individuals. DNAs were treated with bisulfate sodium using DNA modification kit (Qiagen). Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP-PCR) was implicated to determine the methylation status of treated DNA templates confirmed by promoter sequencing. Besides, the ATM and RB protein levels were determined by immunofluorescence (IF) assay using monoclonal mouse antihuman against ATM, P53, and RB proteins. To achieve an interactive correlation, the methylation data were statistically analyzed by considering TL and D1853N ATM polymorphism. More than 73% of the brain tumors were methylated in ATM gene promoter. There was strong correlation between ATM promoter methylation and its protein expression (p ATM promoter and ATM protein expression with D1853N ATM polymorphism (p = 0.01). ATM protein expression was not in line with RB protein expression while it was found to be significantly correlated with ATM promoter methylation (p = 0.01). There was significant correlation between TL neither with ATM promoter methylation nor with ATM protein expression nor with D1853N polymorphism. However, TL has shown strong correlation with patient's age and tumor grade (p = 0.01). Given the important role of cell cycle checkpoint

  4. Study on connexin gene and protein expression and cellular distribution in relation to real-time proliferation of porcine granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempisty, B; Ziółkowska, A; Ciesiółka, S; Piotrowska, H; Antosik, P; Bukowska, D; Nowicki, M; Brüssow, K P; Zabel, M

    2014-01-01

    Granulosa cells (GCs) play an important role during follicle growth and development in preovulatory stage. Moreover, the proteins such as connexins are responsible for formation of protein channel between follicular-cumulus cells and oocyte. This study was aimed to investigate the role of connexin expression in porcine GCs in relation to their cellular distribution and real-time cell proliferation. In the present study, porcine GCs were isolated from the follicles of puberal gilts and then cultured in a real-time cellular analyzer (RTCA) system for 168 h. The expression levels of connexins (Cxs) Cx36, Cx37, Cx40 and Cx43 mRNA were measured by RQ-PCR analysis, and differences in the expression and distribution of Cx30, Cx31, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45 proteins were analyzed by confocal microscopic visualization. We found higher level of Cx36, Cx37, and Cx43 mRNA expression in GCs at recovery (at 0 h of in vitro culture, IVC) compared to all analyzed time periods of IVC (24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 h; Pproteins were higher before (0 h) compared to after 168 h of IVC. The expression of Cx30 and Cx43, however, did not vary between the groups. In all, the proteins were distributed throughout the cell membrane rather than in the cytoplasm both before and after IVC. After 24 h of IVC, we observed a significant increase in the proliferation of GCs (log phase). We found differences in the proliferation index between 72-96 and 96- 140 h within the same population of GCs. In conclusion, the decrease in the expression of Cx mRNAs and proteins following IVC could be associated with a breakdown in gap-junction connections (GJCs), and leads to the decreased of their activity, which may be a reason of non-functional existence of connexon in follicular granulosa cells. These data indicated that the differentiation and proliferation of GCs and lutein cells are regulated by distinct mechanisms in pigs.

  5. The Kunitz-protease inhibitor domain in amyloid precursor protein reduces cellular mitochondrial enzymes expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Li-Min; Lim, Mei-Li; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2013-08-09

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this can be contributed by aberrant metabolic enzyme function. But, the mechanism causing this enzymatic impairment is unclear. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is known to be alternatively spliced to produce three major isoforms in the brain (APP695, APP751, APP770). Both APP770 and APP751 contain the Kunitz Protease Inhibitory (KPI) domain, but the former also contain an extra OX-2 domain. APP695 on the other hand, lacks both domains. In AD, up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms has been reported. But the functional contribution of this elevation is unclear. In the present study, we have expressed and compared the effect of the non-KPI containing APP695 and the KPI-containing APP751 on mitochondrial function. We found that the KPI-containing APP751 significantly decreased the expression of three major mitochondrial metabolic enzymes; citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase (COX IV). This reduction lowers the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, COX IV activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. Overall, this study demonstrated that up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms is likely to contribute to the impairment of metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial function in AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeting the Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7 Oncogenes through Expression of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Stimulates Cellular Motility▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Monique A.; Morreale, Richard J.; Akunuru, Shailaja; Kofron, Matthew; Zheng, Yi; Wells, Susanne I.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes is essential for the initiation and maintenance of cervical cancer. The repression of both was previously shown to result in activation of their respective tumor suppressor targets, p53 and pRb, and subsequent senescence induction in cervical cancer cells. Consequently, viral oncogene suppression is a promising approach for the treatment of HPV-positive tumors. One well-established method of E6/E7 repression involves the reexpression of the viral E2 protein which is usually deleted in HPV-positive cancer cells. Here, we show that, surprisingly, bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) E2 but not RNA interference-mediated E6/E7 repression in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells stimulates cellular motility and invasion. Migration correlated with the dynamic formation of cellular protrusions and was dependent upon cell-to-cell contact. While E2-expressing migratory cells were senescent, migration was not a general feature of cellular senescence or cell cycle arrest and was specifically observed in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, E2-expressing cells not only were themselves motile but also conferred increased motility to admixed HeLa cervical cancer cells. Together, our data suggest that repression of the viral oncogenes by E2 stimulates the motility of E6/E7-targeted cells as well as adjacent nontargeted cancer cells, thus raising the possibility that E2 expression may unfavorably increase the local invasiveness of HPV-positive tumors. PMID:21835799

  7. Targeting the human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes through expression of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 protein stimulates cellular motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Monique A; Morreale, Richard J; Akunuru, Shailaja; Kofron, Matthew; Zheng, Yi; Wells, Susanne I

    2011-10-01

    Expression of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes is essential for the initiation and maintenance of cervical cancer. The repression of both was previously shown to result in activation of their respective tumor suppressor targets, p53 and pRb, and subsequent senescence induction in cervical cancer cells. Consequently, viral oncogene suppression is a promising approach for the treatment of HPV-positive tumors. One well-established method of E6/E7 repression involves the reexpression of the viral E2 protein which is usually deleted in HPV-positive cancer cells. Here, we show that, surprisingly, bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) E2 but not RNA interference-mediated E6/E7 repression in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells stimulates cellular motility and invasion. Migration correlated with the dynamic formation of cellular protrusions and was dependent upon cell-to-cell contact. While E2-expressing migratory cells were senescent, migration was not a general feature of cellular senescence or cell cycle arrest and was specifically observed in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, E2-expressing cells not only were themselves motile but also conferred increased motility to admixed HeLa cervical cancer cells. Together, our data suggest that repression of the viral oncogenes by E2 stimulates the motility of E6/E7-targeted cells as well as adjacent nontargeted cancer cells, thus raising the possibility that E2 expression may unfavorably increase the local invasiveness of HPV-positive tumors.

  8. Analyzing the Expression Level and Cellular Location of the Tip-1 Protein in Oral Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mansoursamaei

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is the sixth most common cancer in the world and accounts for approximately 4% of all cancers and 2% of all cancer death.The single most important factor in the prevention of the disease is early detection although, due to increased risk of secondary malignancy, survival remains poor with only a 25% 5 years survival. Both hereditary and environmental factors have been shown to have a productive role in this disease. For example, although chronic exposure of oral epithelium to tobacco smoke and alcohol are amongst the most important aetiological factors, it is now becoming realized that infection with high risk types of human papilloma virus (HPV are also involved as causative agent in a subset of this disease. All of these OSCC associated factors are known to promote genetic instability in the target oral epithelial cells. Work in our laboratories has indicated that the Tax interacting protein 1 (Tip-1 is also a target for the HPV 16 E6 protein may play an important role in controlling genetic instability during the oncogenic process (Hampson L., et al unpublished. So far 14 oral cancer cell lines have been grown in cell culture and RNA extracted from these. Tip-1 transcript levels were analyzed in this material by Northern blotting and competitive template quantitative PCR, which showed that Tip-1 levels were higher in some, cell lines than others (4 high, 6 moderate, 4 low level. Cell ploidy was determined by FACS analysis of propidium iodide stained cells, which showed that out of all the OSCC cell lines tested the cell line (BICR 68 had the greatest numbers of polyploid cells and also had the highest expression of Tip-1 RNA.

  9. Expression of human papilloma virus type 16 E5 protein in amelanotic melanoma cells regulates endo-cellular pH and restores tyrosinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coccia Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanin synthesis, the elective trait of melanocytes, is regulated by tyrosinase activity. In tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas this rate limiting enzyme is inactive because of acidic endo-melanosomal pH. The E5 oncogene of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 is a small transmembrane protein with a weak transforming activity and a role during the early steps of viral infections. E5 has been shown to interact with 16 kDa subunit C of the trans-membrane Vacuolar ATPase proton pump ultimately resulting in its functional suppressions. However, the cellular effects of such an interaction are still under debate. With this work we intended to explore whether the HPV16 E5 oncoprotein does indeed interact with the vacuolar ATPase proton pump once expressed in intact human cells and whether this interaction has functional consequences on cell metabolism and phenotype. Methods The expression of the HPV16-E5 oncoproteins was induced in two Tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas (the cell lines FRM and M14 by a retroviral expression construct. Modulation of the intracellular pH was measured with Acridine orange and fluorescence microscopy. Expression of tyrosinase and its activity was followed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and enzyme assay. The anchorage-independence growth and the metabolic activity of E5 expressing cells were also monitored. Results We provide evidence that in the E5 expressing cells interaction between E5 and V-ATPase determines an increase of endo-cellular pH. The cellular alkalinisation in turn leads to the post-translational activation of tyrosinase, melanin synthesis and phenotype modulation. These effects are associated with an increased activation of tyrosine analogue anti-blastic drugs. Conclusion Once expressed within intact human cells the HPV16-E5 oncoprotein does actually interact with the vacuolar V-ATPase proton pump and this interaction induces a number of functional effects. In amelanotic melanomas these

  10. Retina-specific nuclear receptor: A potential regulator of cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelium and Müller glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F; Figueroa, D J; Marmorstein, A D; Zhang, Q; Petrukhin, K; Caskey, C T; Austin, C P

    1999-12-21

    In an effort to identify nuclear receptors important in retinal disease, we screened a retina cDNA library for nuclear receptors. Here we describe the identification of a retina-specific nuclear receptor (RNR) from both human and mouse. Human RNR is a splice variant of the recently published photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor [Kobayashi, M., Takezawa, S., Hara, K., Yu, R. T., Umesono, Y., Agata, K., Taniwaki, M., Yasuda, K. & Umesono, K. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 4814-4819] whereas the mouse RNR is a mouse ortholog. Northern blot and reverse transcription-PCR analyses of human mRNA samples demonstrate that RNR is expressed exclusively in the retina, with transcripts of approximately 7.5 kb, approximately 3.0 kb, and approximately 2.3 kb by Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization with multiple probes on both primate and mouse eye sections demonstrates that RNR is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium and in Müller glial cells. By using the Gal4 chimeric receptor/reporter cotransfection system, the ligand binding domain of RNR was found to repress transcriptional activity in the absence of exogenous ligand. Gel mobility shift assays revealed that RNR can interact with the promoter of the cellular retinaldehyde binding protein gene in the presence of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and/or retinoid X receptor (RXR). These data raise the possibility that RNR acts to regulate the visual cycle through its interaction with cellular retinaldehyde binding protein and therefore may be a target for retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration.

  11. La Autoantigen Induces Ribosome Binding Protein 1 (RRBP1) Expression through Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES)-Mediated Translation during Cellular Stress Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Zhu, Ruiyu; Jin, Jian

    2016-07-20

    The function of ribosome binding protein 1 (RRBP1) is regulating the transportation and secretion of some intracellular proteins in mammalian cells. Transcription of RRBP1 is induced by various cytokines. However, few studies focused on the process of RRPB1 mRNA translation. The RRBP1 mRNA has a long 5' untranslated region that potentially formed a stable secondary structure. In this study, we show that the 5' UTR of RRBP1 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Moreover, the RRBP1 expression is induced by chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or adriamycin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and accompanied with the increased expression of La autoantigen (La), which binds to RRBP1 IRES element and facilitates translation initiation. Interestingly, we found IRES-mediated RRBP1 translation is also activated during serum-starvation condition which can induce cytoplasmic localization of La. After mapping the entire RRBP1 5' UTR, we determine the core IRES activity is located between nt-237 and -58. Furthermore, two apical GARR loops within the functional RRBP1 IRES elements may be important for La binding. These results strongly suggest an important role for IRES-dependent translation of RRBP1 mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cells during cellular stress conditions.

  12. Fluorescence-based codetection with protein markers reveals distinct cellular compartments for altered MicroRNA expression in solid tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempere, Lorenzo F; Preis, Meir; Yezefski, Todd

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput profiling experiments have linked altered expression of microRNAs (miRNA) to different types of cancer. Tumor tissues are a heterogeneous mixture of not only cancer cells, but also supportive and reactive tumor microenvironment elements. To clarify the clinical significance of alt...

  13. Sponging of Cellular Proteins by Viral RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Charley, Phillida A.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNAs accumulate to high levels during infection and interact with a variety of cellular factors including miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Although many of these interactions exist to directly modulate replication, translation and decay of viral transcripts, evidence is emerging that abundant viral RNAs may in certain cases serve as a sponge to sequester host non coding RNAs and proteins. By effectively reducing the ability of cellular RNA binding proteins to regulate host cell gene exp...

  14. Differential isotope-labeling for Leu and Val residues in a protein by E. coli cellular expression using stereo-specifically methyl labeled amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyanoiri, Yohei; Takeda, Mitsuhiro [Nagoya University, Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Okuma, Kosuke; Ono, Akira M.; Terauchi, Tsutomu [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Center for Priority Areas (Japan); Kainosho, Masatsune, E-mail: kainosho@tmu.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science (Japan)

    2013-09-21

    The {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C HMQC signals of the {sup 13}CH{sub 3} moieties of Ile, Leu, and Val residues, in an otherwise deuterated background, exhibit narrow line-widths, and thus are useful for investigating the structures and dynamics of larger proteins. This approach, named methyl TROSY, is economical as compared to laborious methods using chemically synthesized site- and stereo-specifically isotope-labeled amino acids, such as stereo-array isotope labeling amino acids, since moderately priced, commercially available isotope-labeled α-keto acid precursors can be used to prepare the necessary protein samples. The Ile δ{sub 1}-methyls can be selectively labeled, using isotope-labeled α-ketobutyrates as precursors. However, it is still difficult to prepare a residue-selectively Leu and Val labeled protein, since these residues share a common biosynthetic intermediate, α-ketoisovalerate. Another hindering drawback in using the α-ketoisovalerate precursor is the lack of stereo-selectivity for Leu and Val methyls. Here we present a differential labeling method for Leu and Val residues, using four kinds of stereo-specifically {sup 13}CH{sub 3}-labeled [U–{sup 2}H;{sup 15}N]-leucine and -valine, which can be efficiently incorporated into a protein using Escherichia coli cellular expression. The method allows the differential labeling of Leu and Val residues with any combination of stereo-specifically isotope-labeled prochiral methyls. Since relatively small amounts of labeled leucine and valine are required to prepare the NMR samples; i.e., 2 and 10 mg/100 mL of culture for leucine and valine, respectively, with sufficient isotope incorporation efficiency, this approach will be a good alternative to the precursor methods. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for 82 kDa malate synthase G.

  15. The Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 protein inhibits tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression through effects on cellular C/EBP proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, Jillian A; Robinson, Amanda R; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Kenney, Shannon C

    2010-12-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early protein, BZLF1 (Z), initiates the switch between latent and lytic infection and plays an essential role in mediating viral replication. Z also inhibits expression of the major receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF), TNFR1, thus repressing TNF cytokine signaling, but the mechanism for this effect is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Z prevents both C/EBPα- and C/EBPβ-mediated activation of the TNFR1 promoter (TNFR1p) by interacting directly with both C/EBP family members. We show that Z interacts directly with C/EBPα and C/EBPβ in vivo and that a Z mutant altered at alanine residue 204 in the bZIP domain is impaired for the ability to interact with both C/EBP proteins. Furthermore, we find that the Z(A204D) mutant is attenuated in the ability to inhibit the TNFR1p but mediates lytic viral reactivation and replication in vitro in 293 cells as well as wild-type Z. Although Z does not bind directly to the TNFR1p in EMSA studies, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies indicate that Z is complexed with this promoter in vivo. The Z(A204D) mutant has reduced interaction with the TNFR1p in vivo but is similar to wild-type Z in its ability to complex with the IL-8 promoter. Finally, we show that the effect of Z on C/EBPα- and C/EBPβ-mediated activation is promoter dependent. These results indicate that Z modulates the effects of C/EBPα and C/EBPβ in a promoter-specific manner and that in some cases (including that of the TNFR1p), Z inhibits C/EBPα- and C/EBPβ-mediated activation.

  16. Human cellular protein patterns and their link to genome DNA mapping and sequencing data: towards an integrated approach to the study of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Rasmussen, H H; Leffers, H

    1993-01-01

    two-dimensional gel protein databases will provide an integrated picture of the expression levels and properties of the thousands of protein components of organelles, pathways, and cytoskeletal systems, both under physiological and abnormal conditions, and are expected to lead to the identification...... mapping and sequence information and that offer an integrated approach to the study of gene expression. With the integrated approach offered by two-dimensional gel protein databases it is now possible to reveal phenotype-specific protein(s), to microsequence them, to search for homology with previous...... of new regulatory networks. So far, about 20% (600 out of 2,980) of the total number of proteins recorded in the human keratinocyte protein database have been identified and we are actively gathering qualitative and quantitative biological data on all resolved proteins. Given the current improvements...

  17. Protein aggregation as a mechanism of adaptive cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarikangas, Juha; Barral, Yves

    2016-11-01

    Coalescence of proteins into different types of intracellular bodies has surfaced as a widespread adaptive mechanism to re-organize cells and cellular functions in response to specific cues. These structures, composed of proteins or protein-mRNA-complexes, regulate cellular processes through modulating enzymatic activities, gene expression or shielding macromolecules from damage. Accordingly, such bodies are associated with a wide-range of processes, including meiosis, memory-encoding, host-pathogen interactions, cancer, stress responses, as well as protein quality control, DNA replication stress and aneuploidy. Importantly, these distinct coalescence responses are controlled, and in many cases regulated by chaperone proteins. While cells can tolerate and proficiently coordinate numerous distinct types of protein bodies, some of them are also intimately linked to diseases or the adverse effects of aging. Several protein bodies that differ in composition, packing, dynamics, size, and localization were originally discovered in budding yeast. Here, we provide a concise and comparative review of their nature and nomenclature.

  18. Protein S-palmitoylation in cellular differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzi M; Hang, Howard C

    2017-02-08

    Reversible protein S-palmitoylation confers spatiotemporal control of protein function by modulating protein stability, trafficking and activity, as well as protein-protein and membrane-protein associations. Enabled by technological advances, global studies revealed S-palmitoylation to be an important and pervasive posttranslational modification in eukaryotes with the potential to coordinate diverse biological processes as cells transition from one state to another. Here, we review the strategies and tools to analyze in vivo protein palmitoylation and interrogate the functions of the enzymes that put on and take off palmitate from proteins. We also highlight palmitoyl proteins and palmitoylation-related enzymes that are associated with cellular differentiation and/or tissue development in yeasts, protozoa, mammals, plants and other model eukaryotes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Protein S-palmitoylation in cellular differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzi M.

    2017-01-01

    Reversible protein S-palmitoylation confers spatiotemporal control of protein function by modulating protein stability, trafficking and activity, as well as protein–protein and membrane–protein associations. Enabled by technological advances, global studies revealed S-palmitoylation to be an important and pervasive posttranslational modification in eukaryotes with the potential to coordinate diverse biological processes as cells transition from one state to another. Here, we review the strategies and tools to analyze in vivo protein palmitoylation and interrogate the functions of the enzymes that put on and take off palmitate from proteins. We also highlight palmitoyl proteins and palmitoylation-related enzymes that are associated with cellular differentiation and/or tissue development in yeasts, protozoa, mammals, plants and other model eukaryotes. PMID:28202682

  20. Cellular strategies for regulating functional and nonfunctional protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gsponer, Jörg; Babu, M Madan

    2012-11-29

    Growing evidence suggests that aggregation-prone proteins are both harmful and functional for a cell. How do cellular systems balance the detrimental and beneficial effect of protein aggregation? We reveal that aggregation-prone proteins are subject to differential transcriptional, translational, and degradation control compared to nonaggregation-prone proteins, which leads to their decreased synthesis, low abundance, and high turnover. Genetic modulators that enhance the aggregation phenotype are enriched in genes that influence expression homeostasis. Moreover, genes encoding aggregation-prone proteins are more likely to be harmful when overexpressed. The trends are evolutionarily conserved and suggest a strategy whereby cellular mechanisms specifically modulate the availability of aggregation-prone proteins to (1) keep concentrations below the critical ones required for aggregation and (2) shift the equilibrium between the monomeric and oligomeric/aggregate form, as explained by Le Chatelier's principle. This strategy may prevent formation of undesirable aggregates and keep functional assemblies/aggregates under control.

  1. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women

    OpenAIRE

    Maningat, Patricia D.; Sen, Partha; Rijnkels, Monique; Hadsell, Darryl L.; Bray, Molly S.; Haymond, Morey W.

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained from five normal lactating women. Following 24 h of baseline milk and blood sampling, rhGH (0.1 mg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously once daily for 3 days. Gene expression changes were determine...

  2. Altering adsorbed proteins or cellular gene expression in bone-metastatic cancer cells affects PTHrP and Gli2 without altering cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Page

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The contents of this data in brief are related to the article titled “Matrix Rigidity Regulates the Transition of Tumor Cells to a Bone-Destructive Phenotype through Integrin β3 and TGF-β Receptor Type II”. In this DIB we will present our supplemental data investigating Integrin expression, attachment of cells to various adhesion molecules, and changes in gene expression in multiple cancer cell lines. Since the interactions of Integrins with adsorbed matrix proteins are thought to affect the ability of cancer cells to interact with their underlying substrates, we examined the expression of Integrin β1, β3, and β5 in response to matrix rigidity. We found that only Iβ3 increased with increasing substrate modulus. While it was shown that fibronectin greatly affects the expression of tumor-produced factors associated with bone destruction (parathyroid hormone-related protein, PTHrP, and Gli2, poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen were also analyzed as potential matrix proteins. Each of the proteins was independently adsorbed on both rigid and compliant polyurethane films which were subsequently used to culture cancer cells. Poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen all had negligible effects on PTHrP or Gli2 expression, but fibronectin was shown to have a dose dependent effect. Finally, altering the expression of Iβ3 demonstrated that it is required for tumor cells to respond to the rigidity of the matrix, but does not affect other cell growth or viability. Together these data support the data presented in our manuscript to show that the rigidity of bone drives Integrinβ3/TGF-β crosstalk, leading to increased expression of Gli2 and PTHrP.

  3. WD40 proteins propel cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnimann, Christian U; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Russell, Robert B; Müller, Christoph W

    2010-10-01

    Recent findings indicate that WD40 domains play central roles in biological processes by acting as hubs in cellular networks; however, they have been studied less intensely than other common domains, such as the kinase, PDZ or SH3 domains. As suggested by various interactome studies, they are among the most promiscuous interactors. Structural studies suggest that this property stems from their ability, as scaffolds, to interact with diverse proteins, peptides or nucleic acids using multiple surfaces or modes of interaction. A general scaffolding role is supported by the fact that no WD40 domain has been found with intrinsic enzymatic activity despite often being part of large molecular machines. We discuss the WD40 domain distributions in protein networks and structures of WD40-containing assemblies to demonstrate their versatility in mediating critical cellular functions.

  4. Expression and Cellular Distribution of Major Vault Protein: A Putative Marker for Pharmacoresistance in a Rat Model for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet van, E.A.; Aronica, E.; Redeker, S.; Gorter, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Purpose: Because drug transporters might play a role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR), we investigated the expression of a vesicular drug transporter, the major vault protein (MVP), in a rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods: By using real-time polymerase chain react

  5. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation, but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained fro...

  6. cDNA cloning, functional expression and cellular localization of rat liver mitochondrial electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Shengbing; SONG; Wei; LIN; Qishui

    2005-01-01

    A membrane-bound protein was purified from rat liver mitochondria. After being digested with V8 protease, two peptides containing identical 14 amino acid residue sequences were obtained. Using the 14 amino acid peptide derived DNA sequence as gene specific primer, the cDNA of correspondent gene 5'-terminal and 3'-terminal were obtained by RACE technique. The full-length cDNA that encoded a protein of 616 amino acids was thus cloned, which included the above mentioned peptide sequence. The full length cDNA was highly homologous to that of human ETF-QO, indicating that it may be the cDNA of rat ETF-QO. ETF-QO is an iron sulfur protein located in mitochondria inner membrane containing two kinds of redox center: FAD and [4Fe-4S] center. After comparing the sequence from the cDNA of the 616 amino acids protein with that of the mature protein of rat liver mitochondria, it was found that the N terminal 32 amino acid residues did not exist in the mature protein, indicating that the cDNA was that of ETF-Qop. When the cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with inducible vectors, the protein product was enriched in mitochondrial fraction and exhibited electron transfer activity (NBT reductase activity) of ETF-QO. Results demonstrated that the 32 amino acid peptide was a mitochondrial targeting peptide, and both FAD and iron-sulfur cluster were inserted properly into the expressed ETF-QO. ETF-QO had a high level expression in rat heart, liver and kidney. The fusion protein of GFP-ETF-QO co-localized with mitochondria in COS-7 cells.

  7. Efficient cellular solid-state NMR of membrane proteins by targeted protein labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Lindsay A. [University of Oxford, Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Division of Structural Biology, Nuffield Department of Medicine (United Kingdom); Daniëls, Mark; Cruijsen, Elwin A. W. van der; Folkers, Gert E.; Baldus, Marc, E-mail: m.baldus@uu.nl [Utrecht University, NMR Spectroscopy, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) has made significant progress towards the study of membrane proteins in their native cellular membranes. However, reduced spectroscopic sensitivity and high background signal levels can complicate these experiments. Here, we describe a method for ssNMR to specifically label a single protein by repressing endogenous protein expression with rifampicin. Our results demonstrate that treatment of E. coli with rifampicin during induction of recombinant membrane protein expression reduces background signals for different expression levels and improves sensitivity in cellular membrane samples. Further, the method reduces the amount of time and resources needed to produce membrane protein samples, enabling new strategies for studying challenging membrane proteins by ssNMR.

  8. Engineering the cellular protein secretory pathway for enhancement of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells: effects of CERT and XBP1s genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Azam; Vaziri, Behrouz; Moazzami, Reza; Nematollahi, Leila; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Kokabee, Leila; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2013-08-01

    Cell line development is the most critical and also the most time-consuming step in the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins. In this regard, a variety of vector and cell engineering strategies have been developed for generating high-producing mammalian cells; however, the cell line engineering approach seems to show various results on different recombinant protein producer cells. In order to improve the secretory capacity of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, we developed cell line engineering approaches based on the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) genes. For this purpose, CERT S132A, a mutant form of CERT that is resistant to phosphorylation, and XBP1s were overexpressed in a recombinant t-PA-producing CHO cell line. Overexpression of CERT S132A increased the specific productivity of t-PA-producing CHO cells up to 35%. In contrast, the heterologous expression of XBP1s did not affect the t-PA expression rate. Our results suggest that CERTS132A- based secretion engineering could be an effective strategy for enhancing recombinant t- PA production in CHO cells.

  9. Proteomic analysis of differential expression of cellular proteins in response to avian H9N2 virus infection of A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanliu YU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, differentially expressed proteins in A549 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line infected with H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV were investigated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Sixteen different spots between the groups (ratio>2, p<0.05 were identified with mass spectrometry identification. Proteins located in the downstream of the NF-κB and IFN transcription factor pathways were identified, e.g. ISG15. Actin and keratin were also identified, which suggesting that the cytoskeleton may plays an important role in the AIV infection of mammalian cells. These findings could provide insights into the interaction between host and influenza viruses and might provide valuable information for clarifying the pathogenesis of viral infections as well.

  10. The cell cycle regulator protein P16 and the cellular senescence of dental follicle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Hullmann, Markus; Reck, Anja; Reichert, Torsten E

    2017-08-02

    Cellular senescence is a restricting factor for regenerative therapies with somatic stem cells. We showed previously that the onset of cellular senescence inhibits the osteogenic differentiation in stem cells of the dental follicle (DFCs), although the mechanism remains elusive. Two different pathways are involved in the induction of the cellular senescence, which are driven either by the cell cycle protein P21 or by the cell cycle protein P16. In this study, we investigated the expression of cell cycle proteins in DFCs after the induction of cellular senescence. The induction of cellular senescence was proved by an increased expression of β-galactosidase and an increased population doubling time after a prolonged cell culture. Cellular senescence regulated the expression of cell cycle proteins. The expression of cell cycle protein P16 was up-regulated, which correlates with the induction of cellular senescence markers in DFCs. However, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)2 and 4 and the expression of the cell cycle protein P21 were successively decreased in DFCs. In conclusion, our data suggest that a P16-dependent pathway drives the induction of cellular senescence in DFCs.

  11. Cellular Reprogramming Employing Recombinant Sox2 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Thier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells represent an attractive option for the derivation of patient-specific pluripotent cells for cell replacement therapies as well as disease modeling. To become clinically meaningful, safe iPS cells need to be generated exhibiting no permanent genetic modifications that are caused by viral integrations of the reprogramming transgenes. Recently, various experimental strategies have been applied to accomplish transgene-free derivation of iPS cells, including the use of nonintegrating viruses, episomal expression, or excision of transgenes after reprogramming by site-specific recombinases or transposases. A straightforward approach to induce reprogramming factors is the direct delivery of either synthetic mRNA or biologically active proteins. We previously reported the generation of cell-permeant versions of Oct4 (Oct4-TAT and Sox2 (Sox2-TAT proteins and showed that Oct4-TAT is reprogramming-competent, that is, it can substitute for Oct4-encoding virus. Here, we explore conditions for enhanced Sox2-TAT protein stabilization and functional delivery into somatic cells. We show that cell-permeant Sox2 protein can be stabilized by lipid-rich albumin supplements in serum replacement or low-serum-supplemented media. Employing optimized conditions for protein delivery, we demonstrate that Sox2-TAT protein is able to substitute for viral Sox2. Sox2-piPS cells express pluripotency-associated markers and differentiate into all three germ layers.

  12. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin eLee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554 in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression – including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding and degradation steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes.

  13. Cellular Functions and Gene and Protein Expression Profiles in Endothelial Cells Derived from Moyamoya Disease-Specific iPS Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamauchi, Shuji; Shichinohe, Hideo; Uchino, Haruto; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Nakayama, Naoki; Kazumata, Ken; Osanai, Toshiya; Abumiya, Takeo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Era, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a slow, progressive steno-occlusive disease, arising in the terminal portions of the cerebral internal carotid artery. However, the functions and characteristics of the endothelial cells (ECs) in MMD are unknown. We analyzed these features using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived ECs. Methods iPSC lines were established from the peripheral blood of three patients with MMD carrying the variant RNF213 R4810K, and three healthy persons used as controls. After the endothelial differentiation of iPSCs, CD31+CD144+ cells were purified as ECs using a cell sorter. We analyzed their proliferation, angiogenesis, and responses to some angiogenic factors, namely VEGF, bFGF, TGF-β, and BMP4. The ECs were also analyzed using DNA microarray and proteomics to perform comprehensive gene and protein expression analysis. Results Angiogenesis was significantly impaired in MMD regardless of the presence of any angiogenic factor. On the contrary, endothelial proliferation was not significant between control- and MMD-derived cells. Regarding DNA microarray, pathway analysis illustrated that extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor-related genes, including integrin β3, were significantly downregulated in MMD. Proteomic analysis revealed that cytoskeleton-related proteins were downregulated and splicing regulation-related proteins were upregulated in MMD. Conclusions Downregulation of ECM receptor-related genes may be associated with impaired angiogenic activity in ECs derived from iPSCs from patients with MMD. Upregulation of splicing regulation-related proteins implied differences in splicing patterns between control and MMD ECs. PMID:27662211

  14. Distribution of cellular HSV-1 receptor expression in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathe, Richard; Haas, Juergen G

    2016-12-15

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus linked to a range of acute and chronic neurological disorders affecting distinct regions of the brain. Unusually, HSV-1 entry into cells requires the interaction of viral proteins glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) with distinct cellular receptor proteins. Several different gD and gB receptors have been identified, including TNFRSF14/HVEM and PVRL1/nectin 1 as gD receptors and PILRA, MAG, and MYH9 as gB receptors. We investigated the expression of these receptor molecules in different areas of the adult and developing human brain using online transcriptome databases. Whereas all HSV-1 receptors showed distinct expression patterns in different brain areas, the Allan Brain Atlas (ABA) reported increased expression of both gD and gB receptors in the hippocampus. Specifically, for PVRL1, TNFRFS14, and MYH9, the differential z scores for hippocampal expression, a measure of relative levels of increased expression, rose to 2.9, 2.9, and 2.5, respectively, comparable to the z score for the archetypical hippocampus-enriched mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2, z = 3.1). These data were confirmed at the Human Brain Transcriptome (HBT) database, but HBT data indicate that MAG expression is also enriched in hippocampus. The HBT database allowed the developmental pattern of expression to be investigated; we report that all HSV1 receptors markedly increase in expression levels between gestation and the postnatal/adult periods. These results suggest that differential receptor expression levels of several HSV-1 gD and gB receptors in the adult hippocampus are likely to underlie the susceptibility of this brain region to HSV-1 infection.

  15. Cellular and tissue expression of DAPIT, a phylogenetically conserved peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kontro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available DAPIT (Diabetes Associated Protein in Insulin-sensitive Tissues is a small, phylogenetically conserved, 58 amino acid peptide that was previously shown to be down-regulated at mRNA level in insulin-sensitive tissues of type 1 diabetes rats. In this study we characterize a custom made antibody against DAPIT and confirm the mitochondrial presence of DAPIT on cellular level. We also show that DAPIT is localized in lysosomes of HUVEC and HEK 293T cells. In addition, we describe the histological expression of DAPIT in several tissues of rat and man and show that it is highly expressed especially in cells with high aerobic metabolism and epithelial cells related to active transport of nutrients and ions. We propose that DAPIT, in addition to indicated subunit of mitochondrial F-ATPase, is also a subunit of lysosomal V-ATPase suggesting that it is a common component in different proton pumps.

  16. Protective anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa humoral and cellular mucosal immunity by AdC7-mediated expression of the P. aeruginosa protein OprF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Anja; Whu, Wen Zhu; Xu, Yaqin; Joh, Ju; Crystal, Ronald G; Worgall, Stefan

    2011-03-03

    Replication-deficient adenoviral (Ad) vectors are an attractive platform for a vaccine against lung infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ad vectors based on non-human serotypes have been developed to circumvent the problem of pre-existing anti-Ad immunity in humans. The present study analyzes the anti-P. aeruginosa systemic and lung mucosal immunity elicited by a non-human primate-based AdC7 vector expressing the outer membrane protein F (AdC7OprF) of P. aeruginosa. Intramuscular immunization of mice with AdC7OprF induced similar levels of serum and mucosal anti-OprF IgG and increased levels of anti-OprF IgA in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) compared to immunization with a human serotype Ad5OprF vector (p>0.05). OprF-specific INF-γ in splenic T cells stimulated with OprF-pulsed syngeneic splenic dendritic cells (DC) was similar following immunization with AdC7OprF compared to Ad5OprF (p>0.05). In contrast, OprF-specific INF-γ responses in lung T cells stimulated with either spleen or lung DC were increased following immunization with AdC7OprF compared to Ad5OprF (pmucosal immunity.

  17. Highly potent and specific GSK-3beta inhibitors that block tau phosphorylation and decrease alpha-synuclein protein expression in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozikowski, Alan P; Gaisina, Irina N; Petukhov, Pavel A; Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; King, LaShaunda T; Blond, Sylvie Y; Duka, Tetyana; Rusnak, Milan; Sidhu, Anita

    2006-02-01

    Research by Klein and co-workers suggests that the inhibition of GSK-3beta by small molecules may offer an important strategy in the treatment of a number of central nervous system (CNS) disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and bipolar disorders. Based on results from kinase-screening assays that identified a staurosporine analogue as a modest inhibitor of GSK-3beta, a series of 3-indolyl-4-indazolylmaleimides was prepared for study in both enzymatic and cell-based assays. Most strikingly, whereas we identified ligands having poor to high potency for GSK-3beta inhibition, only ligands with a Ki value of less than 8 nM, namely maleimides 18 and 22, were found to inhibit Tau phosphorylation at a GSK-3beta-specific site (Ser 396/404). Accordingly, maleimides 18 and 22 may protect neuronal cells against cell death by decreasing the level of alpha-Syn protein expression. We conclude that the GSK-3beta inhibitors described herein offer promise in defending cells against MPP+-induced neurotoxicity and that such compounds will be valuable to explore in animal models of Parkinson's disease as well as in other Tau-related neurodegenerative disease states.

  18. ABL Tyrosine Kinase Stimulates PUMA Protein Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Oon, Chet K

    2016-01-01

    ABL is an ubiquitously expressed non-receptor tyrosine kinase involved in multiple cellular functions including programmed cell death. Upon DNA damage, ABL has been shown to upregulate PUMA, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis, and causes downstream mitochondrial intrinsic apoptotic events. However, the mechanism by which ABL regulates PUMA expression remains unknown. We have shown that ABL does not change PUMA protein subcellular localization through immunofluorescence. Through protein an...

  19. Evaluation of cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 gene expression through the retinoic acid pathway by co-incubation of Blastocystis ST-1 with HT29 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen-Chieh; Song, Eing-Ju; Chang, Tsuey-Yu; Lin, Wei-Chen; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Chen, Lih-Ren; Huang, Lynn L H; Shin, Jyh-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Blastocystis is a parasitic protist with a worldwide distribution that is commonly found in patients with colon and gastrointestinal pathological symptoms. Blastocystis infection has also commonly been reported in colorectal cancer and HIV/AIDS patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. To understand the pathway networks of gene regulation and the probable mechanisms influencing functions of HT-29 host cells in response to parasite infection, we examined the expression of 163 human oncogenes and kinases in human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells co-incubated with Blastocystis by in-house cDNA microarray and PCR analysis. At least 10 genes were shown to be modified following Blastocystis co-incubation, including those with immunological, tumorigenesis, and antitumorigenesis functions. The expression of genes encoding cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was markedly upregulated and downregulated, respectively. Reverse transcriptase-PCR validated the modified transcript expression of CRABP2 and other associated genes such as retinoic acid (RA)-related nuclear-receptor (RARα). Together, our data indicate that CRABP2, RARα, and PCNA expressions are involved in RA signaling regulatory networks that affect the growth, proliferation, and inflammation of HT-29 cells.

  20. The cellular prion protein: a player in immunological quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Kolltveit Bakkebø

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive studies since the 1990s, the physiological role of the cellular prion protein (PrPC remains elusive. Here, we present a novel concept suggesting that PrPC contributes to immunological quiescence in addition to cell protection. PrPC is highly expressed in diverse organs that by multiple means are particularly protected from inflammation, such as the brain, eye, placenta, pregnant uterus and testes, while at the same time it is expressed in most cells of the lymphoreticular system. In this paradigm, PrPC serves two principal roles: to modulate the inflammatory potential of immune cells and to protect vulnerable parenchymal cells against noxious insults generated through inflammation. Here we review studies of PrPC physiology in view of this concept.

  1. Hepatic expression and cellular distribution of the glucose transporter family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumera Karim; David H Adams; Patricia F Lalor

    2012-01-01

    Glucose and other carbohydrates are transported into cells using members of a family of integral membrane glucose transporter (GLUT) molecules.To date 14 members of this family,also called the solute carrier 2A proteins have been identified which are divided on the basis of transport characteristics and sequence similarities into several families (Classes 1 to 3).The expression of these different receptor subtypes varies between different species,tissues and cellular subtypes and each has differential sensitivities to stimuli such as insulin.The liver is a contributor to metabolic carbohydrate homeostasis and is a major site for synthesis,storage and redistribution of carbohydrates.Situations in which the balance of glucose homeostasis is upset such as diabetes or the metabolic syndrome can lead metabolic disturbances that drive chronic organ damage and failure,confirming the importance of understanding the molecular regulation of hepatic glucose homeostasis.There is a considerable literature describing the expression and function of receptors that regulate glucose uptake and release by hepatocytes,the most import cells in glucose regulation and glycogen storage.However there is less appreciation of the roles of GLUTs expressed by non parenchymal cell types within the liver,all of which require carbohydrate to function.A better understanding of the detailed cellular distribution of GLUTs in human liver tissue may shed light on mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis.This review summarises the available literature on hepatocellular expression of GLUTs in health and disease and highlights areas where further investigation is required.

  2. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wallach

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc. contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner.

  3. Cellular endocytic compartment localization of expressed canine CD1 molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjærff, Mette; Keller, Stefan M.; Affolter, Verena K.

    2016-01-01

    CD1 molecules are glycoproteins present primarily on dendritic cells (DCs), which recognize and presenta variety of foreign- and self-lipid antigens to T-cells. Humans have five different CD1 isoforms that sur-vey distinct cellular compartments allowing for recognition of a large repertoire...... onlya diminished GFP expression. In conclusion, canine CD1 transfectants show distinct localization patternsthat are similar to human CD1 proteins with the exception of the canine CD1d isoform, which most likelyis non-functional. These findings imply that canine CD1 localization overall resembles human...... CD1 traf-ficking patterns. This knowledge is important for the understanding of lipid antigen-receptor immunityin the dog....

  4. Massive bowel resection upregulates the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II and apolipoprotein A-IV and alters the intestinal vitamin A status in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebiguchi, Taku; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Morii, Mayako; Watanabe, Ryo; Yoshikawa, Kiwamu; Miura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Katsuyuki; Senoo, Haruki; Yoshino, Hiroaki

    2015-03-01

    Short bowel (SB) syndrome causes the malabsorption of various nutrients. Among these, vitamin A is important for a number of physiological activities. Vitamin A is absorbed by epithelial cells of the small intestine and is discharged into the lymphatic vessels as a component of chylomicrons and is delivered to the liver. In the present study, we used a rat model of SB syndrome in order to assess its effects on the expression of genes associated with the absorption, transport and metabolism of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II (CRBP II, gene symbol Rbp2) and apolipoprotein A-IV (gene symbol Apoa4) were higher than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by RT-qPCR. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that absorptive epithelial cells stained positive for both CRBP II and lecithin retinol acyltransferase, which are both required for the effective esterification of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the retinol content in the ileum and the retinyl ester content in the jejunum were lower than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by quantitative analysis of retinol and retinyl esters by high performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that the elevated mRNA expression levels of Rbp2 and Apoa4 in the rats with SB contribute to the effective esterification and transport of vitamin A.

  5. Determining the Sub-Cellular Localization of Proteins within Caenorhabditis elegans Body Wall Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveiros, Ryan; Warner, Adam; Plastino, Lorena; Lorch, Adam; Granger, Laure; Segalat, Laurent; Moerman, Donald G.

    2011-01-01

    Determining the sub-cellular localization of a protein within a cell is often an essential step towards understanding its function. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the relatively large size of the body wall muscle cells and the exquisite organization of their sarcomeres offer an opportunity to identify the precise position of proteins within cell substructures. Our goal in this study is to generate a comprehensive “localizome” for C. elegans body wall muscle by GFP-tagging proteins expressed in muscle and determining their location within the cell. For this project, we focused on proteins that we know are expressed in muscle and are orthologs or at least homologs of human proteins. To date we have analyzed the expression of about 227 GFP-tagged proteins that show localized expression in the body wall muscle of this nematode (e.g. dense bodies, M-lines, myofilaments, mitochondria, cell membrane, nucleus or nucleolus). For most proteins analyzed in this study no prior data on sub-cellular localization was available. In addition to discrete sub-cellular localization we observe overlapping patterns of localization including the presence of a protein in the dense body and the nucleus, or the dense body and the M-lines. In total we discern more than 14 sub-cellular localization patterns within nematode body wall muscle. The localization of this large set of proteins within a muscle cell will serve as an invaluable resource in our investigation of muscle sarcomere assembly and function. PMID:21611156

  6. Distinguishing between biochemical and cellular function: Are there peptide signatures for cellular function of proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shruti; Bhattacharyya, Kausik; Bakshi, Rachit; Narang, Ankita; Brahmachari, Vani

    2017-04-01

    The genome annotation and identification of gene function depends on conserved biochemical activity. However, in the cell, proteins with the same biochemical function can participate in different cellular pathways and cannot complement one another. Similarly, two proteins of very different biochemical functions are put in the same class of cellular function; for example, the classification of a gene as an oncogene or a tumour suppressor gene is not related to its biochemical function, but is related to its cellular function. We have taken an approach to identify peptide signatures for cellular function in proteins with known biochemical function. ATPases as a test case, we classified ATPases (2360 proteins) and kinases (517 proteins) from the human genome into different cellular function categories such as transcriptional, replicative, and chromatin remodelling proteins. Using publicly available tool, MEME, we identify peptide signatures shared among the members of a given category but not between cellular functional categories; for example, no motif sharing is seen between chromatin remodelling and transporter ATPases, similarly between receptor Serine/Threonine Kinase and Receptor Tyrosine Kinase. There are motifs shared within each category with significant E value and high occurrence. This concept of signature for cellular function was applied to developmental regulators, the polycomb and trithorax proteins which led to the prediction of the role of INO80, a chromatin remodelling protein, in development. This has been experimentally validated earlier for its role in homeotic gene regulation and its interaction with regulatory complexes like the Polycomb and Trithorax complex. Proteins 2017; 85:682-693. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evolutionarily Conserved and Nonconserved Cellular Localizations and Functions of Human SIRT Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Michishita, Eriko; Park, Jean Y.; Burneskis, Jenna M.; Barrett, J. Carl; Horikawa, Izumi

    2005-01-01

    Sir2 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that extends lifespan in yeast and worms. This study examines seven human proteins homologous to Sir2 (SIRT1 through SIRT7) for cellular localization, expression profiles, protein deacetylation activity, and effects on human cell lifespan. We found that: 1) three nuclear SIRT proteins (SIRT1, SIRT6, and SIRT7) show different subnuclear localizations: SIRT6 and SIRT7 are associated with heterochromatic regions and nucleoli, respectively, where yeast...

  8. Fluorescopic evaluation of protein-lipid relations in cellular signalling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pap, E.H.W.

    1994-01-01

    IntroductionCellular communication is partly mediated through the modulation of protein activity, structure and dynamics by lipids. In contrast to the biochemical aspects of lipid signalling, relatively little is known about the physical properties of the "signal" lipids (lipids involved in cellular

  9. In vivo cellular imaging using fluorescent proteins - Methods and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Monti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and genetic engineering of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cell biology. What was previously invisible to the cell often can be made visible with the use of fluorescent proteins. With this words, Robert M. Hoffman introduces In vivo Cellular Imaging Using Fluorescent proteins, the eighteen chapters book dedicated to the description of how fluorescence proteins have changed the way to analyze cellular processes in vivo. Modern researches aim to study new and less invasive methods able to follow the behavior of different cell types in different biological contexts: for example, how cancer cells migrate or how they respond to different therapies. Also, in vivo systems can help researchers to better understand animal embryonic development so as how fluorescence proteins may be used to monitor different processes in living organisms at the molecular and cellular level.

  10. Glucose Oxidase Induces Cellular Senescence in Immortal Renal Cells through ILK by Downregulating Klotho Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Troyano-Suárez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence can be prematurely induced by oxidative stress involved in aging. In this work, we were searching for novel intermediaries in oxidative stress-induced senescence, focusing our interest on integrin-linked kinase (ILK, a scaffold protein at cell-extracellular matrix (ECM adhesion sites, and on the Klotho gene. Cultured renal cells were treated with glucose oxidase (GOx for long time periods. GOx induced senescence, increasing senescence associated β-galactosidase activity and the expression of p16. In parallel, GOx increased ILK protein expression and activity. Ectopic overexpression of ILK in cells increased p16 expression, even in the absence of GOx, whereas downregulation of ILK inhibited the increase in p16 due to oxidative stress. Additionally, GOx reduced Klotho gene expression and cells overexpressing Klotho protein did not undergo senescence after GOx addition. We demonstrated a direct link between ILK and Klotho since silencing ILK expression in cells and mice increases Klotho expression and reduces p53 and p16 expression in renal cortex. In conclusion, oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in kidney cells by increasing ILK protein expression and activity, which in turn reduces Klotho expression. We hereby present ILK as a novel downregulator of Klotho gene expression.

  11. Evolutionarily conserved and nonconserved cellular localizations and functions of human SIRT proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Eriko; Park, Jean Y; Burneskis, Jenna M; Barrett, J Carl; Horikawa, Izumi

    2005-10-01

    Sir2 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that extends lifespan in yeast and worms. This study examines seven human proteins homologous to Sir2 (SIRT1 through SIRT7) for cellular localization, expression profiles, protein deacetylation activity, and effects on human cell lifespan. We found that: 1) three nuclear SIRT proteins (SIRT1, SIRT6, and SIRT7) show different subnuclear localizations: SIRT6 and SIRT7 are associated with heterochromatic regions and nucleoli, respectively, where yeast Sir2 functions; 2) SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are localized in mitochondria, an organelle that links aging and energy metabolism; 3) cellular p53 is a major in vivo substrate of SIRT1 deacetylase, but not the other six SIRT proteins; 4) SIRT1, but not the other two nuclear SIRT proteins, shows an in vitro deacetylase activity on histone H4 and p53 peptides; and 5) overexpression of any one of the seven SIRT proteins does not extend cellular replicative lifespan in normal human fibroblasts or prostate epithelial cells. This study supports the notion that multiple human SIRT proteins have evolutionarily conserved and nonconserved functions at different cellular locations and reveals that the lifespan of normal human cells, in contrast to that of lower eukaryotes, cannot be manipulated by increased expression of a single SIRT protein.

  12. Stochastic fluctuations and distributed control of gene expression impact cellular memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Corre

    Full Text Available Despite the stochastic noise that characterizes all cellular processes the cells are able to maintain and transmit to their daughter cells the stable level of gene expression. In order to better understand this phenomenon, we investigated the temporal dynamics of gene expression variation using a double reporter gene model. We compared cell clones with transgenes coding for highly stable mRNA and fluorescent proteins with clones expressing destabilized mRNA-s and proteins. Both types of clones displayed strong heterogeneity of reporter gene expression levels. However, cells expressing stable gene products produced daughter cells with similar level of reporter proteins, while in cell clones with short mRNA and protein half-lives the epigenetic memory of the gene expression level was completely suppressed. Computer simulations also confirmed the role of mRNA and protein stability in the conservation of constant gene expression levels over several cell generations. These data indicate that the conservation of a stable phenotype in a cellular lineage may largely depend on the slow turnover of mRNA-s and proteins.

  13. Piezo proteins: regulators of mechanosensation and other cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Gracheva, Elena O; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2014-11-14

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular development, volume regulation, cellular migration, proliferation, and elongation. Mutations in human Piezo proteins have been associated with a variety of disorders including hereditary xerocytosis and several syndromes with muscular contracture as a prominent feature.

  14. Cytomegalovirus Destruction of Focal Adhesions Revealed in a High-Throughput Western Blot Analysis of Cellular Protein Expression† ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Stanton, Richard James; McSharry, Brian Patrick; Rickards, Carole Ruth; Wang, Edward Chung Yern; Tomasec, Peter; Wilkinson, Gavin William Grahame

    2007-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) systematically manages the expression of cellular functions, rather than exerting the global shutoff of host cell protein synthesis commonly observed with other herpesviruses during the lytic cycle. While microarray technology has provided remarkable insights into viral control of the cellular transcriptome, HCMV is known to encode multiple mechanisms for posttranscriptional and posttranslation regulation of cellular gene expression. High-throughput Western blotti...

  15. Novel intracellular proteins associated with cellular vitamin D action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Giana; Wood, Richard J; Mayer, Jean

    2002-07-01

    Work with vitamin D-resistant New World primates has revealed novel cellular proteins involved in vitamin D action. An "intracellular vitamin D-binding protein" functions to bind vitamin D metabolites in the cell and enhances vitamin D action. By contrast, a "vitamin D response element-binding protein" inhibits vitamin D receptor binding to the DNA and is responsible for vitamin D resistance in New World primates.

  16. PhosphoregDB: The tissue and sub-cellular distribution of mammalian protein kinases and phosphatases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Harukazu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases and protein phosphatases are the fundamental components of phosphorylation dependent protein regulatory systems. We have created a database for the protein kinase-like and phosphatase-like loci of mouse http://phosphoreg.imb.uq.edu.au that integrates protein sequence, interaction, classification and pathway information with the results of a systematic screen of their sub-cellular localization and tissue specific expression data mined from the GNF tissue atlas of mouse. Results The database lets users query where a specific kinase or phosphatase is expressed at both the tissue and sub-cellular levels. Similarly the interface allows the user to query by tissue, pathway or sub-cellular localization, to reveal which components are co-expressed or co-localized. A review of their expression reveals 30% of these components are detected in all tissues tested while 70% show some level of tissue restriction. Hierarchical clustering of the expression data reveals that expression of these genes can be used to separate the samples into tissues of related lineage, including 3 larger clusters of nervous tissue, developing embryo and cells of the immune system. By overlaying the expression, sub-cellular localization and classification data we examine correlations between class, specificity and tissue restriction and show that tyrosine kinases are more generally expressed in fewer tissues than serine/threonine kinases. Conclusion Together these data demonstrate that cell type specific systems exist to regulate protein phosphorylation and that for accurate modelling and for determination of enzyme substrate relationships the co-location of components needs to be considered.

  17. Nipah virus matrix protein: expert hacker of cellular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, Ruth E; Lee, Benhur

    2016-08-01

    Nipah virus (NiV, Henipavirus) is a highly lethal emergent zoonotic paramyxovirus responsible for repeated human outbreaks of encephalitis in South East Asia. There are no approved vaccines or treatments, thus improved understanding of NiV biology is imperative. NiV matrix protein recruits a plethora of cellular machinery to scaffold and coordinate virion budding. Intriguingly, matrix also hijacks cellular trafficking and ubiquitination pathways to facilitate transient nuclear localization. While the biological significance of matrix nuclear localization for an otherwise cytoplasmic virus remains enigmatic, the molecular details have begun to be characterized, and are conserved among matrix proteins from divergent paramyxoviruses. Matrix protein appropriation of cellular machinery will be discussed in terms of its early nuclear targeting and later role in virion assembly.

  18. Expression and cellular distribution of ubiquitin in response to injury in the developing spinal cord of Monodelphis domestica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noor, Natassya M; Møllgård, Kjeld; Wheaton, Benjamin J;

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin, an 8.5 kDa protein associated with the proteasome degradation pathway has been recently identified as differentially expressed in segment of cord caudal to site of injury in developing spinal cord. Here we describe ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in spinal cord up to pos...... changes in ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in development and response to spinal injury suggest an intricate regulatory system that modulates these responses which, when better understood, may lead to potential therapeutic targets....

  19. Lysine acetylation targets protein complexes and co-regulates major cellular functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Kumar, Chanchal; Gnad, Florian;

    2009-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of proteins and plays a key role in regulating gene expression. Technological limitations have so far prevented a global analysis of lysine acetylation's cellular roles. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify 3600...

  20. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Folate is an essential vitamin involved in a number of biological processes. High affinity folate binding proteins (FBPs) exist both as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked, membrane associated folate binding proteins and as soluble FBPs in plasma and some secretory fluids such as milk, saliva...... to bind and mediate cellular uptake of FBP. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows binding of bovine and human milk FBP to immobilized megalin, but not to low density lipoprotein receptor related protein. Binding of (125)I-labeled folate binding protein (FBP) to sections of kidney proximal tubule, known...

  1. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases.

  2. Interactions of the HSV-1 UL25 Capsid Protein with Cellular Microtubule-associated Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei GUO; Ying ZHANG; Yan-chun CHE; Wen-juan WU; Wei-zhong LI; Li-chun WANG; Yun LIAO; Long-ding LIU; Qi-han LI

    2008-01-01

    An interaction between the HSV-1 UL25 capsid protein and cellular microtubule-associated protein was found using a yeast two-hybrid screen and β-D-galactosidase activity assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy of the UL25 protein demonstrated its co-localization with cellular microtubule-associated protein in the plasma membrane. Further investigations with deletion mutants suggest that UL25 is likely to have a function in the nucleus.

  3. Insights into the physiological function of cellular prion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins V.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions have been extensively studied since they represent a new class of infectious agents in which a protein, PrPsc (prion scrapie, appears to be the sole component of the infectious particle. They are responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, which affect both humans and animals. The mechanism of disease propagation is well understood and involves the interaction of PrPsc with its cellular isoform (PrPc and subsequently abnormal structural conversion of the latter. PrPc is a glycoprotein anchored on the cell surface by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol moiety and expressed in most cell types but mainly in neurons. Prion diseases have been associated with the accumulation of the abnormally folded protein and its neurotoxic effects; however, it is not known if PrPc loss of function is an important component. New efforts are addressing this question and trying to characterize the physiological function of PrPc. At least four different mouse strains in which the PrP gene was ablated were generated and the results regarding their phenotype are controversial. Localization of PrPc on the cell membrane makes it a potential candidate for a ligand uptake, cell adhesion and recognition molecule or a membrane signaling molecule. Recent data have shown a potential role for PrPc in the metabolism of copper and moreover that this metal stimulates PrPc endocytosis. Our group has recently demonstrated that PrPc is a high affinity laminin ligand and that this interaction mediates neuronal cell adhesion and neurite extension and maintenance. Moreover, PrPc-caveolin-1 dependent coupling seems to trigger the tyrosine kinase Fyn activation. These data provide the first evidence for PrPc involvement in signal transduction.

  4. Identification of a protein that interacts with the nuclear factor-1 (NF-1) binding site in cells that do not express NF-1: comparison to NF-1, cellular distribution, and effect on transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    McQuillan, J J; Rosen, G.D.; Birkenmeier, T M; Dean, D C

    1991-01-01

    We examined expression of nuclear factor-1 (NF-1) in different cell lines. Expression was low or undetectable in T and B lymphocyte cell lines, whereas fibroblasts and other adherent cell lines generally had a relatively high level of NF-1 mRNA. In cell lines that did not express NF-1, gel retardation assays, nevertheless, indicated complexes between a protein or proteins and the NF-1 site. These complexes were less abundant than those formed with NF-1, they migrated more slowly, and they app...

  5. Recombinant protein expression in Nicotiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Davis, Keith R; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant protein pharmaceuticals are now widely used in treatment of chronic diseases, and several recombinant protein subunit vaccines are approved for human and veterinary use. With growing demand for complex protein pharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, manufacturing capacity is becoming limited. There is increasing need for safe, scalable, and economical alternatives to mammalian cell culture-based manufacturing systems, which require substantial capital investment for new manufacturing facilities. Since a seminal paper reporting immunoglobulin expression in transgenic plants was published in 1989, there have been many technological advances in plant expression systems to the present time where production of proteins in leaf tissues of nonfood crops such as Nicotiana species is considered a viable alternative. In particular, transient expression systems derived from recombinant plant viral vectors offer opportunities for rapid expression screening, construct optimization, and expression scale-up. Extraction of recombinant proteins from Nicotiana leaf tissues can be achieved by collection of secreted protein fractions, or from a total protein extract after grinding the leaves with buffer. After separation from solids, the major purification challenge is contamination with elements of the photosynthetic complex, which can be solved by application of a variety of facile and proven strategies. In conclusion, the technologies required for safe, efficient, scalable manufacture of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana leaf tissues have matured to the point where several products have already been tested in phase I clinical trials and will soon be followed by a rich pipeline of recombinant vaccines, microbicides, and therapeutic proteins.

  6. CELLULAR LOCALIZATION AND EXPRESSION OF pygo DURING DROSOPHILA DEVELOPMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINXin-da; LINXin-hua; CHENGJia-an

    2003-01-01

    Wg/Wnt signaling is a key signaling pathway in Drosophila. Many genes involved in Wingless(wg) signal transduction pathway downstream of Wg, or it'' s vertebrate Wg homologue Wnt, have been identified.Transduction of the Wg signal downstream of Wg is mediated by nuclear TCF/LEF-1, through association with Ar-madillo (Arm)/β-catenin. Pygopus (pygo) is a new identified component in this pathway . Cellular localization experiment showed that pygo was expressed specifically in the nucleus. The expression profile of pygo in embryos was examined using in situ hybridization. Although pygo expressed ubiquitously in the embryos, it expressed at relatively high level in pre-blastoderm embryos which indicate a high degree of maternally provided message, fol-lowed by a low level of ubiquitous zygotic expression. This continues into larval tissues (including wing disc, eye disc and leg disc), where pygo appears to be expressed at low level. Comparison of pygo expression levels, in the wing disc, eye disc and leg disc, showed pygo expression level in the wing disc pouch and leg disc were rela-tive higher.

  7. Analysis of Rheb in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum: Cellular localization, spatial expression and overexpression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pynskhem Bok Swer; Pooja Bhadoriya; Shweta Saran

    2014-03-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum encodes a single Rheb protein showing sequence similarity to human homologues of Rheb. The DdRheb protein shares 52% identity and 100% similarity with the human Rheb1 protein. Fluorescence of Rheb yellow fluorescent protein fusion was detected in the D. discoideum cytoplasm. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses showed that rheb is expressed at all stages of development and in prestalk cells in the multicellular structures developed. When the expression of rheb as a fusion with lacZ was driven under its own promoter, the -galactosidase activity was seen in the prestalk cells. D. discoideum overexpressing Rheb shows an increase in the size of the cell. Treatment of the overexpressing Rheb cells with rapamycin confirms its involvement in the TOR signalling pathway.

  8. Eukaryotic protein domains as functional units of cellular evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Jing; Xie, Xueying; Chen, Chen

    2009-01-01

    Modular protein domains are functional units that can be modified through the acquisition of new intrinsic activities or by the formation of novel domain combinations, thereby contributing to the evolution of proteins with new biological properties. Here, we assign proteins to groups with related...... biological processes. Evolutionary jumps are associated with a domain that coordinately acquires a new intrinsic function and enters new domain clubs, thereby providing the modified domain with access to a new cellular microenvironment. We also coordinately analyzed the covalent and noncovalent interactions...... that domains, and the proteins in which they reside, are selected during evolution through reciprocal interactions with protein domains in their local microenvironment. Based on this scheme, we propose a mechanism by which Tudor domains may have evolved to support different modes of epigenetic regulation...

  9. A Herpesvirus Protein Selectively Inhibits Cellular mRNA Nuclear Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Danyang; Kim, Yong Hoon; Xiao, Yuchen; Du, Yushen; Xie, Yafang; Lee, Kevin K; Feng, Jun; Farhat, Nisar; Zhao, Dawei; Shu, Sara; Dai, Xinghong; Chanda, Sumit K; Rana, Tariq M; Krogan, Nevan J; Sun, Ren; Wu, Ting-Ting

    2016-11-09

    Nuclear mRNA export is highly regulated to ensure accurate cellular gene expression. Viral inhibition of cellular mRNA export can enhance viral access to the cellular translation machinery and prevent anti-viral protein production but is generally thought to be nonselective. We report that ORF10 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a nuclear DNA virus, inhibits mRNA export in a transcript-selective manner to control cellular gene expression. Nuclear export inhibition by ORF10 requires an interaction with an RNA export factor, Rae1. Genome-wide analysis reveals a subset of cellular mRNAs whose nuclear export is blocked by ORF10 with the 3' UTRs of ORF10-targeted transcripts conferring sensitivity to export inhibition. The ORF10-Rae1 interaction is important for the virus to express viral genes and produce infectious virions. These results suggest that a nuclear DNA virus can selectively interfere with RNA export to restrict host gene expression for optimal replication. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Transcriptional Activity of HTLV-I Tax Influences the Expression of Marker Genes Associated with Cellular Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francene J. Lemoine

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I has been identified as the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL. HTLV-I encodes a transcriptional regulatory protein, Tax, which also functions as the viral transforming protein. Through interactions with a number of cellular transcription factors Tax can modulate cellular gene expression. Since the majority of Tax-responsive cellular genes are important regulators of cellular proliferation, the transactivating functions of Tax appear to be necessary for cellular transformation by HTLV-I. Gaining a complete understanding of the broad range of genes regulated by Tax, the temporal pattern of their expression, and their effects on cell function may identify early markers of disease progression mediated by this virus.

  11. Cellular recycling of proteins in seed dormancy alleviation and germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Oracz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Each step of the seed-to-seed cycle of plant development including seed germination is characterized by a specific set of proteins. The continual renewal and/or replacement of these biomolecules are crucial for optimal plant adaptation. As proteins are the main effectors inside the cells, their levels need to be tightly regulated. This is partially achieved by specific proteolytic pathways via multicatalytic protease complexes defined as 20S and 26S proteasomes. In plants, the 20S proteasome is responsible for degradation of carbonylated proteins, while the 26S being a part of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP is known to be involved in proteolysis of phytohormone signaling regulators. On the other hand, the role of translational control of plant development is also well documented, especially in the context of pollen tube growth and light signaling. Despite the current progress that has been made in seed biology, the sequence of cellular events that determine if the seed can germinate or not are still far from complete understanding. The role and mechanisms of regulation of proteome composition during processes occurring in the plant’s photosynthetic tissues have been well characterized since many years, but in nonphotosynthetic seeds it has emerged as a tempting research task only since the last decade. This review discusses the recent discoveries providing insights into the role of protein turnover in seed dormancy alleviation, and germination, with a focus on the control of translation and proteasomal proteolysis. The presented novel data of translatome profiling in seeds highlighted that post-transcriptional regulation of germination results from a timely regulated initiation of translation. In addition, the importance of 26S proteasome in the degradation of regulatory elements of cellular signaling and that of the 20S complex in proteolysis of specific carbonylated proteins in hormonal- and light-dependent processes occurring in seeds is

  12. A receptor for infectious and cellular prion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Martins

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Prions are an unconventional form of infectious agents composed only of protein and involved in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in humans and animals. The infectious particle is composed by PrPsc which is an isoform of a normal cellular glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored protein, PrPc, of unknown function. The two proteins differ only in conformation, PrPc is composed of 40% a helix while PrPsc has 60% ß-sheet and 20% a helix structure. The infection mechanism is trigged by interaction of PrPsc with cellular prion protein causing conversion of the latter's conformation. Therefore, the infection spreads because new PrPsc molecules are generated exponentially from the normal PrPc. The accumulation of insoluble PrPsc is probably one of the events that lead to neuronal death. Conflicting data in the literature showed that PrPc internalization is mediated either by clathrin-coated pits or by caveolae-like membranous domains. However, both pathways seem to require a third protein (a receptor or a prion-binding protein either to make the connection between the GPI-anchored molecule to clathrin or to convert PrPc into PrPsc. We have recently characterized a 66-kDa membrane receptor which binds PrPc in vitro and in vivo and mediates the neurotoxicity of a human prion peptide. Therefore, the receptor should have a role in the pathogenesis of prion-related diseases and in the normal cellular process. Further work is necessary to clarify the events triggered by the association of PrPc/PrPsc with the receptor.

  13. The 14-3-3 protein forms a molecular complex with heat shock protein Hsp60 and cellular prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Jun-ichi; Onoue, Hiroyuki; Arima, Kunimasa; Yamamura, Takashi

    2005-10-01

    The 14-3-3 protein family consists of acidic 30-kDa proteins composed of 7 isoforms expressed abundantly in neurons and glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS). The 14-3-3 protein identified in the cerebrospinal fluid provides a surrogate marker for premortem diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, although an active involvement of 14-3-3 in the pathogenesis of prion diseases remains unknown. By protein overlay and mass spectrometric analysis of protein extract of NTera2-derived differentiated neurons, we identified heat shock protein Hsp60 as a 14-3-3-interacting protein. The 14-3-3zeta and gamma isoforms interacted with Hsp60, suggesting that the interaction is not isoform-specific. Furthermore, the interaction was identified in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma, U-373MG astrocytoma, and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells. The cellular prion protein (PrPC) along with Hsp60 was coimmunoprecipitated with 14-3-3 in the human brain protein extract. By protein overlay, 14-3-3 interacted with both recombinant human Hsp60 and PrPC produced by Escherichia coli, indicating that the molecular interaction is phosphorylation-independent. The 14-3-3-binding domain was located in the N-terminal half (NTF) of Hsp60 spanning amino acid residues 27-287 and the NTF of PrPC spanning amino acid residues 23-137. By immunostaining, the 14-3-3 protein Hsp60 and PrPC were colocalized chiefly in the mitochondria of human neuronal progenitor cells in culture, and were coexpressed most prominently in neurons and reactive astrocytes in the human brain. These observations indicate that the 14-3-3 protein forms a molecular complex with Hsp60 and PrPC in the human CNS under physiological conditions and suggest that this complex might become disintegrated in the pathologic process of prion diseases.

  14. An antiviral disulfide compound blocks interaction between arenavirus Z protein and cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, C.C. [Laboratory of Virology, Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Topisirovic, I. [Institute de Recherche en Immunologie et en Cancerologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Djavani, M. [Institute of Human Virology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Borden, K.L.B. [Institute de Recherche en Immunologie et en Cancerologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Damonte, E.B. [Laboratory of Virology, Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Salvato, M.S., E-mail: msalvato@ihv.umaryland.edu [Institute of Human Virology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2010-03-19

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) forms nuclear bodies (NB) that can be redistributed by virus infection. In particular, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) influences disruption of PML NB through the interaction of PML with the arenaviral Z protein. In a previous report, we have shown that the disulfide compound NSC20625 has antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses, inducing unfolding and oligomerization of Z without affecting cellular RING-containing proteins such as the PML. Here, we further studied the effect of the zinc-finger-reactive disulfide NSC20625 on PML-Z interaction. In HepG2 cells infected with LCMV or transiently transfected with Z protein constructs, treatment with NSC20625 restored PML distribution from a diffuse-cytoplasmic pattern to punctate, discrete NB which appeared identical to NB found in control, uninfected cells. Similar results were obtained in cells transfected with a construct expressing a Z mutant in zinc-binding site 2 of the RING domain, confirming that this Z-PML interaction requires the integrity of only one zinc-binding site. Altogether, these results show that the compound NSC20625 suppressed Z-mediated PML NB disruption and may be used as a tool for designing novel antiviral strategies against arenavirus infection.

  15. Protein tyrosine nitration in cellular signal transduction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Mikkelsen, Ross B.

    2015-01-01

    How specificity and reversibility in tyrosine nitration are defined biologically in cellular systems is poorly understood. As more investigations identify proteins involved in cell regulatory pathways in which only a small fraction of that protein pool is modified by nitration to affect cell function, the mechanisms of biological specificity and reversal should come into focus. In this review experimental evidence has been summarized to suggest that tyrosine nitration is a highly selective modification and under certain physiological conditions fulfills the criteria of a physiologically relevant signal. It can be specific, reversible, occurs on a physiological time scale, and, depending on a target, can result in either activation or inhibition. PMID:20843272

  16. Identification of host cellular proteins that interact with the M protein of a highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Li, Yanwei; Dong, Hong; Wang, Li; Peng, Jinmei; An, Tongqing; Yang, Xufu; Tian, Zhijun; Cai, Xuehui

    2017-02-22

    The highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) continues to pose one of the greatest threats to the swine industry. M protein is the most conserved and important structural protein of PRRSV. However, information about the host cellular proteins that interact with M protein remains limited. Host cellular proteins that interact with the M protein of HP-PRRSV were immunoprecipitated from MARC-145 cells infected with PRRSV HuN4-F112 using the M monoclonal antibody (mAb). The differentially expressed proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. The screened proteins were used for bioinformatics analysis including Gene Ontology, the interaction network, and the enriched KEGG pathways. Some interested cellular proteins were validated to interact with M protein by CO-IP. The PRRSV HuN4-F112 infection group had 10 bands compared with the control group. The bands included 219 non-redundant cellular proteins that interact with M protein, which were identified by LC-MS/MS with high confidence. The gene ontology and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway bioinformatic analyses indicated that the identified proteins could be assigned to several different subcellular locations and functional classes. Functional analysis of the interactome profile highlighted cellular pathways associated with protein translation, infectious disease, and signal transduction. Two interested cellular proteins-nuclear factor of activated T cells 45 kDa (NF45) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-that could interact with M protein were validated by Co-IP and confocal analyses. The interactome data between PRRSV M protein and cellular proteins were identified and contribute to the understanding of the roles of M protein in the replication and pathogenesis of PRRSV. The interactome of M protein will aid studies of virus/host interactions and provide means to decrease the threat of PRRSV to the swine industry in the future.

  17. Fluorescence microscopy of single autofluorescent proteins for cellular biology

    CERN Document Server

    Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel; Lounis, Brahim

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we review the applicability of autofluorescent proteins for single-molecule imaging in biology. The photophysical characteristics of several mutants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and those of DsRed are compared and critically discussed for their use in cellular biology. The alternative use of two-photon excitation at the single-molecule level or Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy is envisaged for the study of individual autofluorescent proteins. Single-molecule experiments performed in live cells using eGFP and preferably eYFP fusion proteins are reviewed. Finally, the first use at the single-molecule level of citrine, a more photostable variant of the eYFP is reported when fused to a receptor for neurotransmitter in live cells.

  18. Direct Cellular Lysis/Protein Extraction Protocol for Soil Metaproteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Jansson, Janet [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Chavarria, Krystle L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Tom, Lauren M [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Brodie, Eoin L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel direct protocol for deep proteome characterization of microorganisms in soil. The method employs thermally assisted detergent-based cellular lysis (SDS) of soil samples, followed by TCA precipitation for proteome extraction/cleanup prior to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric characterization. This approach was developed and optimized using different soils inoculated with genome-sequenced bacteria (Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida or Gram-positive Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus). Direct soil protein extraction was compared to protein extraction from cells isolated from the soil matrix prior to lysis (indirect method). Each approach resulted in identification of greater than 500 unique proteins, with a wide range in molecular mass and functional categories. To our knowledge, this SDS-TCA approach enables the deepest proteome characterizations of microbes in soil to date, without significant biases in protein size, localization, or functional category compared to pure cultures. This protocol should provide a powerful tool for ecological studies of soil microbial communities.

  19. Direct cellular lysis/protein extraction protocol for soil metaproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourey, Karuna; Jansson, Janet; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Shah, Manesh; Chavarria, Krystle L; Tom, Lauren M; Brodie, Eoin L; Hettich, Robert L

    2010-12-03

    We present a novel direct protocol for deep proteome characterization of microorganisms in soil. The method employs thermally assisted detergent-based cellular lysis (SDS) of soil samples, followed by TCA precipitation for proteome extraction/cleanup prior to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric characterization. This approach was developed and optimized using different soils inoculated with genome-sequenced bacteria (Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida or Gram-positive Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus). Direct soil protein extraction was compared to protein extraction from cells isolated from the soil matrix prior to lysis (indirect method). Each approach resulted in identification of greater than 500 unique proteins, with a wide range in molecular mass and functional categories. To our knowledge, this SDS-TCA approach enables the deepest proteome characterizations of microbes in soil to date, without significant biases in protein size, localization, or functional category compared to pure cultures. This protocol should provide a powerful tool for ecological studies of soil microbial communities.

  20. Expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in the adult and developing mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Tuhina; Verma, Amrisha; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the retina and plays an important role in retinal neurovascular function. We have recently shown that increased expression of ACE2 and angiotensin (1-7) [Ang (1-7)], two components of the protective axis of the RAS, in the retina via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery, conferred protection against diabetes-induced retinopathy. We hypothesized that the protective molecular and cellular mechanisms of Ang (1-7) are mediated by its receptor, Mas, and the expression level and cellular localization dictate the response to Ang (1-7) and activation of subsequent protective signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by examining the expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in adult and developing mouse retinas. The cellular localization of the Mas receptor protein was determined with immunofluorescence of the eyes of adult and postnatal day 1 (P1), P5, P7, P15, and P21 mice using the Mas receptor-specific antibody, and mRNA was detected with in situ hybridization of paraffin-embedded sections. Western blotting and real-time reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR analysis were performed to determine the relative levels of the Mas protein and mRNA in adult and developing retinas, as well as in cultured retinal Müller glial and RPE cells. In the adult eye, the Mas receptor protein was abundantly present in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and photoreceptor cells; a lower level of expression was observed in endothelial cells, Müller glial cells, and other neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina. In the developing retina, Mas receptor mRNA and protein expression was detected in the inner retina at P1, and the expression levels increased with age to reach the adult level and pattern by P15. In the adult mouse retina, Mas receptor mRNA was expressed at a much higher level when compared to angiotensin II (Ang II) type I (AT1R) and type II (AT2R) receptor m

  1. Anterior gradient protein-2 is a regulator of cellular adhesion in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diptiman Chanda

    Full Text Available Anterior Gradient Protein (AGR-2 is reported to be over-expressed in many epithelial cancers and promotes metastasis. A clear-cut mechanism for its observed function(s has not been previously identified. We found significant upregulation of AGR-2 expression in a bone metastatic prostate cancer cell line, PC3, following culturing in bone marrow-conditioned medium. Substantial AGR-2 expression was also confirmed in prostate cancer tissue specimens in patients with bone lesions. By developing stable clones of PC3 cells with varying levels of AGR-2 expression, we identified that abrogation of AGR-2 significantly reduced cellular attachment to fibronectin, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin I and fibrinogen. Loss of cellular adhesion was associated with sharp decrease in the expression of α4, α5, αV, β3 and β4 integrins. Failure to undergo apoptosis following detachment is a hallmark of epithelial cancer metastasis. The AGR-2-silenced PC3 cells showed higher resistance to Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis- inducing ligand (TRAIL induced apoptosis in vitro. This observation was also supported by significantly reduced Caspase-3 expression in AGR-2-silenced PC3 cells, which is a key effector of both extrinsic and intrinsic death signaling pathways. These data suggest that AGR-2 influence prostate cancer metastasis by regulation of cellular adhesion and apoptosis.

  2. NFI-C2 temporal-spatial expression and cellular localization pattern during tooth formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamani, Ejvis; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; MacDougall, Mary

    2015-12-01

    Currently, little is known regarding critical signaling pathways during later stages of tooth development, especially those associated with root formation. Nfi-c null mice, lacking molar roots, have implicated the transcription factor NFI-C as having an essential role in root development. Previously, we identified three NFI-C isoforms expressed in dental tissues with NFI-C2 being the major transcript. However, the expression pattern of the NFI-C2 protein is not characterized. In this study we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry using isoform specific probes. We show the production of a NFI-C2 peptide antibody, its characterization, the temporal-spatial expression pattern of the NFI-C2 protein during odontogenesis and sub-cellular localization in dental cells. Moderate NFI-C2 staining, as early as bud stage, was detected mostly in the condensing dental ectomesenchyme. This staining intensified within the dental pulp at later stages culminating in high expression in the dentin producing odontoblasts. The dental epithelium showed slight staining until cytodifferentiation of enamel organ into ameloblasts and stratum intermedium. During root formation NFI-C2 expression was high in the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath and later was found in the fully developed root and its supporting tissues. NFI-C2 cellular staining was cytosolic, associated with the Golgi, and nuclear. These data suggest a broader role for NFI-C during tooth formation than limited to root and periodontal ligament development. © 2015 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  3. Expression, Solubilization, and Purification of Bacterial Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Constance J

    2016-02-02

    Bacterial integral membrane proteins play many important roles, including sensing changes in the environment, transporting molecules into and out of the cell, and in the case of commensal or pathogenic bacteria, interacting with the host organism. Working with membrane proteins in the lab can be more challenging than working with soluble proteins because of difficulties in their recombinant expression and purification. This protocol describes a standard method to express, solubilize, and purify bacterial integral membrane proteins. The recombinant protein of interest with a 6His affinity tag is expressed in E. coli. After harvesting the cultures and isolating cellular membranes, mild detergents are used to solubilize the membrane proteins. Protein-detergent complexes are then purified using IMAC column chromatography. Support protocols are included to help select a detergent for protein solubilization and for use of gel filtration chromatography for further purification.

  4. Prion protein modulates cellular iron uptake: a novel function with implications for prion disease pathogenesis.

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    Ajay Singh

    Full Text Available Converging evidence leaves little doubt that a change in the conformation of prion protein (PrP(C from a mainly alpha-helical to a beta-sheet rich PrP-scrapie (PrP(Sc form is the main event responsible for prion disease associated neurotoxicity. However, neither the mechanism of toxicity by PrP(Sc, nor the normal function of PrP(C is entirely clear. Recent reports suggest that imbalance of iron homeostasis is a common feature of prion infected cells and mouse models, implicating redox-iron in prion disease pathogenesis. In this report, we provide evidence that PrP(C mediates cellular iron uptake and transport, and mutant PrP forms alter cellular iron levels differentially. Using human neuroblastoma cells as models, we demonstrate that over-expression of PrP(C increases intra-cellular iron relative to non-transfected controls as indicated by an increase in total cellular iron, the cellular labile iron pool (LIP, and iron content of ferritin. As a result, the levels of iron uptake proteins transferrin (Tf and transferrin receptor (TfR are decreased, and expression of iron storage protein ferritin is increased. The positive effect of PrP(C on ferritin iron content is enhanced by stimulating PrP(C endocytosis, and reversed by cross-linking PrP(C on the plasma membrane. Expression of mutant PrP forms lacking the octapeptide-repeats, the membrane anchor, or carrying the pathogenic mutation PrP(102L decreases ferritin iron content significantly relative to PrP(C expressing cells, but the effect on cellular LIP and levels of Tf, TfR, and ferritin is complex, varying with the mutation. Neither PrP(C nor the mutant PrP forms influence the rate or amount of iron released into the medium, suggesting a functional role for PrP(C in cellular iron uptake and transport to ferritin, and dysfunction of PrP(C as a significant contributing factor of brain iron imbalance in prion disorders.

  5. Systems analysis of protein modification and cellular responses induced by electrophile stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Aaron T; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2010-05-18

    Biological electrophiles result from oxidative metabolism of exogenous compounds or endogenous cellular constituents, and they contribute to pathophysiologies such as toxicity and carcinogenicity. The chemical toxicology of electrophiles is dominated by covalent addition to intracellular nucleophiles. Reaction with DNA leads to the production of adducts that block replication or induce mutations. The chemistry and biology of electrophile-DNA reactions have been extensively studied, providing in many cases a detailed understanding of the relation between adduct structure and mutational consequences. By contrast, the linkage between protein modification and cellular response is poorly understood. In this Account, we describe our efforts to define the chemistry of protein modification and its biological consequences using lipid-derived alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes as model electrophiles. In our global approach, two large data sets are analyzed: one represents the identity of proteins modified over a wide range of electrophile concentrations, and the second comprises changes in gene expression observed under similar conditions. Informatics tools show theoretical connections based primarily on transcription factors hypothetically shared between the two data sets, downstream of adducted proteins and upstream of affected genes. This method highlights potential electrophile-sensitive signaling pathways and transcriptional processes for further evaluation. Peroxidation of cellular phospholipids generates a complex mixture of both membrane-bound and diffusible electrophiles. The latter include reactive species such as malondialdehyde, 4-oxononenal, and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). Enriching HNE-adducted proteins for proteomic analysis was a technical challenge, solved with click chemistry that generated biotin-tagged protein adducts. For this purpose, HNE analogues bearing terminal azide or alkyne functionalities were synthesized. Cellular lysates were first exposed to a

  6. Protein carbonylation and metal-catalyzed protein oxidation in a cellular perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rao, R S P

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can become oxidatively modified in many different ways, either by direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and protein backbone or indirectly by conjugation with oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates. While reversible oxidative modifications are thought...... to be relevant in physiological processes, irreversible oxidative modifications are known to contribute to cellular damage and disease. The most well-studied irreversible protein oxidation is carbonylation. In this work we first examine how protein carbonylation occurs via metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) in vivo...... and in vitro with an emphasis on cellular metal ion homeostasis and metal binding. We then review proteomic methods currently used for identifying carbonylated proteins and their sites of modification. Finally, we discuss the identified carbonylated proteins and the pattern of carbonylation sites in relation...

  7. Control of human adenovirus type 5 gene expression by cellular Daxx/ATRX chromatin-associated complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Bürck, Carolin; Glass, Mandy; Groitl, Peter; Wimmer, Peter; Kinkley, Sarah; Mund, Andreas; Everett, Roger D; Dobner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Death domain-associated protein (Daxx) cooperates with X-linked α-thalassaemia retardation syndrome protein (ATRX), a putative member of the sucrose non-fermentable 2 family of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling proteins, acting as the core ATPase subunit in this complex, whereas Daxx is the targeting factor, leading to histone deacetylase recruitment, H3.3 deposition and transcriptional repression of cellular promoters. Despite recent findings on the fundamental importance of chromatin modification in host-cell gene regulation, it remains unclear whether adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) transcription is regulated by cellular chromatin remodelling to allow efficient virus gene expression. Here, we focus on the repressive role of the Daxx/ATRX complex during Ad5 replication, which depends on intact protein-protein interaction, as negative regulation could be relieved with a Daxx mutant that is unable to interact with ATRX. To ensure efficient viral replication, Ad5 E1B-55K protein inhibits Daxx and targets ATRX for proteasomal degradation in cooperation with early region 4 open reading frame protein 6 and cellular components of a cullin-dependent E3-ubiquitin ligase. Our studies illustrate the importance and diversity of viral factors antagonizing Daxx/ATRX-mediated repression of viral gene expression and shed new light on the modulation of cellular chromatin remodelling factors by Ad5. We show for the first time that cellular Daxx/ATRX chromatin remodelling complexes play essential roles in Ad gene expression and illustrate the importance of early viral proteins to counteract cellular chromatin remodelling.

  8. Intrinsic structural disorder confers cellular viability on oncogenic fusion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Hegyi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations, which often generate chimeric proteins by fusing segments of two distinct genes, represent the single major genetic aberration leading to cancer. We suggest that the unifying theme of these events is a high level of intrinsic structural disorder, enabling fusion proteins to evade cellular surveillance mechanisms that eliminate misfolded proteins. Predictions in 406 translocation-related human proteins show that they are significantly enriched in disorder (43.3% vs. 20.7% in all human proteins, they have fewer Pfam domains, and their translocation breakpoints tend to avoid domain splitting. The vicinity of the breakpoint is significantly more disordered than the rest of these already highly disordered fusion proteins. In the unlikely event of domain splitting in fusion it usually spares much of the domain or splits at locations where the newly exposed hydrophobic surface area approximates that of an intact domain. The mechanisms of action of fusion proteins suggest that in most cases their structural disorder is also essential to the acquired oncogenic function, enabling the long-range structural communication of remote binding and/or catalytic elements. In this respect, there are three major mechanisms that contribute to generating an oncogenic signal: (i a phosphorylation site and a tyrosine-kinase domain are fused, and structural disorder of the intervening region enables intramolecular phosphorylation (e.g., BCR-ABL; (ii a dimerisation domain fuses with a tyrosine kinase domain and disorder enables the two subunits within the homodimer to engage in permanent intermolecular phosphorylations (e.g., TFG-ALK; (iii the fusion of a DNA-binding element to a transactivator domain results in an aberrant transcription factor that causes severe misregulation of transcription (e.g. EWS-ATF. Our findings also suggest novel strategies of intervention against the ensuing neoplastic transformations.

  9. Differentially expressed proteins on postoperative 3

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    Jialili Ainuer

    2011-04-01

    , pro-alpha-1 type 1 collagen, peroxiredoxin 1, alpha-1-antiproteinase E a-1 and MAD2L1 binding protein, etc. And some with the molecular chaperone, oxidative stress, energy metabolism, signal transduction, coupled with the tendon cell expression and protein synthesis, proliferate, differentiate and are closely related to the AT healing. The GAPDH protein was further validated through Western blotting. It was indicated that some differentially expressed proteins were involved in various metabolism pathways and may play an important role in initial healing of AT rupture. Conclusion: Differentially expressed proteins in rabbit healing AT model may contribute to 3 days healing of AT rupture through a new mechanobiological mechanism due to the application of postoperative early kinesitherapy. Key words: Achilles tendon; Rupture; GAPDH protein; Polyacrylamide gels; Mechanotransduction, cellular; Databases, protein; Muscle stretching exercises

  10. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Catrina M; Bialas, Nathan J; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Walker, Denise S; Grundy, Laura J; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R

    2016-07-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon-associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan.

  11. Ebola virion attachment and entry into human macrophages profoundly effects early cellular gene expression.

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    Victoria Wahl-Jensen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV infections are associated with high lethality in primates. ZEBOV primarily targets mononuclear phagocytes, which are activated upon infection and secrete mediators believed to trigger initial stages of pathogenesis. The characterization of the responses of target cells to ZEBOV infection may therefore not only further understanding of pathogenesis but also suggest possible points of therapeutic intervention. Gene expression profiles of primary human macrophages exposed to ZEBOV were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative PCR to gain insight into the cellular response immediately after cell entry. Significant changes in mRNA concentrations encoding for 88 cellular proteins were observed. Most of these proteins have not yet been implicated in ZEBOV infection. Some, however, are inflammatory mediators known to be elevated during the acute phase of disease in the blood of ZEBOV-infected humans. Interestingly, the cellular response occurred within the first hour of Ebola virion exposure, i.e. prior to virus gene expression. This observation supports the hypothesis that virion binding or entry mediated by the spike glycoprotein (GP(1,2 is the primary stimulus for an initial response. Indeed, ZEBOV virions, LPS, and virus-like particles consisting of only the ZEBOV matrix protein VP40 and GP(1,2 (VLP(VP40-GP triggered comparable responses in macrophages, including pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signals. In contrast, VLP(VP40 (particles lacking GP(1,2 caused an aberrant response. This suggests that GP(1,2 binding to macrophages plays an important role in the immediate cellular response.

  12. Cellular and functional specificity among ferritin-like proteins in the multicellular cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Sandh, Gustaf; Nenninger, Anja; Oliveira, Paulo; Stensjö, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Ferritin-like proteins constitute a remarkably heterogeneous protein family, including ferritins, bacterioferritins and Dps proteins. The genome of the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme encodes five ferritin-like proteins. In the present paper, we report a multidimensional characterization of these proteins. Our phylogenetic and bioinformatics analyses suggest both structural and physiological differences among the ferritin-like proteins. The expression of these five genes responded differently to hydrogen peroxide treatment, with a significantly higher rise in transcript level for Npun_F3730 as compared with the other four genes. A specific role for Npun_F3730 in the cells tolerance against hydrogen peroxide was also supported by the inactivation of Npun_F3730, Npun_R5701 and Npun_R6212; among these, only the ΔNpun_F3730 strain showed an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide compared with wild type. Analysis of promoter-GFP reporter fusions of the ferritin-like genes indicated that Npun_F3730 and Npun_R5701 were expressed in all cell types of a diazotrophic culture, while Npun_F6212 was expressed specifically in heterocysts. Our study provides the first comprehensive analysis combining functional differentiation and cellular specificity within this important group of proteins in a multicellular cyanobacterium. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Cellular functions of gamma-secretase-related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Christof; Haass, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is generated by gamma-secretase, a membrane protein complex with an unusual aspartyl protease activity consisting of the four components presenilin, nicastrin, APH-1 and PEN-2. Presenilin is considered the catalytic subunit of this complex since it represents the prototype of the new family of intramembrane-cleaving GxGD-type aspartyl proteases. Recently, five novel members of this family and a nicastrin-like protein were identified. Whereas one of the GxGD-type proteins was shown to be identical with signal peptide peptidase (SPP), the function of the others, now called SPP-like proteins (SPPLs), is not known. We therefore analyzed SPPL2b and SPPL3 and demonstrated that they localize to different subcellular compartments suggesting nonredundant functions. This was supported by different phenotypes obtained in knockdown studies in zebrafish embryos. In addition, these phenotypes could be phenocopied by ectopic expression of putative active site mutants, providing strong evidence for a proteolytic function of SPPL2b and SPPL3. We also identified and characterized the nicastrin-like protein nicalin which, together with the 130-kDa protein NOMO (Nodal modulator), forms a membrane protein complex different from gamma-secretase. We found that during zebrafish embryogenesis this complex is involved in the patterning of the axial mesendoderm, a process controlled by the Nodal signaling pathway.

  14. Hazardous effects of effluent from the chrome plating industry: 70 kDa heat shock protein expression as a marker of cellular damage in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Saxena, Daya Krishna; Chowdhuri, Debapratim Kar

    2003-01-01

    Hazardous effects of an effluent from the chrome plating industry were examined by exposing transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ) to various concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 1.0, 10.0, and 100.0 micro L/mL) of the effluent through diet. The emergence pattern of adult flies was affected, along with impaired reproductive performance at the higher dietary concentrations of the effluent. Interestingly, the effect of the effluent was more pronounced in male than in female flies. The effect of the effluent on development of adult flies was concurrent with the expression pattern of the heat shock protein 70 gene (hsp70), both in larval tissues and in the reproductive organs of adult flies. We observed a dose- and time-dependent expression of hsp70 in third instar larvae exposed for different time intervals. Absence of hsp70 expression in larvae exposed to 0.1 micro L/mL of the effluent indicated that this is the highest nontoxic concentration for Drosophila. The stress gene assay in the reproductive organs of adult flies revealed hsp70 expression in the testis of male flies only. However, trypan blue dye exclusion tests in these tissues indicate tissue damage in the male accessory gland of adult flies, which was further confirmed by ultrastructural observations. In the present study we demonstrate the utility of transgenic Drosophila as an alternative animal model for evaluating hazardous effects of the effluent from the chrome plating industry and further reveal the cytoprotective role of hsp70 and its expression as an early marker in environmental risk assessment. PMID:14644668

  15. Topology of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Cellular and Viral Proteins Determined with Split-GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seong-In; Maruri-Avidal, Liliana; Moss, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    The split green fluorescent protein (GFP) system was adapted for investigation of the topology of ER-associated proteins. A 215-amino acid fragment of GFP (S1-10) was expressed in the cytoplasm as a free protein or fused to the N-terminus of calnexin and in the ER as an intraluminal protein or fused to the C-terminus of calnexin. A 16-amino acid fragment of GFP (S11) was fused to the N- or C-terminus of the target protein. Fluorescence occurred when both GFP fragments were in the same intracellular compartment. After validation with the cellular proteins PDI and tapasin, we investigated two vaccinia virus proteins (L2 and A30.5) of unknown topology that localize to the ER and are required for assembly of the viral membrane. Our results indicated that the N- and C-termini of L2 faced the cytoplasmic and luminal sides of the ER, respectively. In contrast both the N- and C-termini of A30.5 faced the cytoplasm. The system offers advantages for quickly determining the topology of intracellular proteins: the S11 tag is similar in length to commonly used epitope tags; multiple options are available for detecting fluorescence in live or fixed cells; transfection protocols are adaptable to numerous expression systems and can enable high throughput applications.

  16. Raman microscopy of bladder cancer cells expressing green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandair, Gurjit S.; Han, Amy L.; Keller, Evan T.; Morris, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Gene engineering is a commonly used tool in cellular biology to determine changes in function or expression of downstream targets. However, the impact of genetic modulation on biochemical effects is less frequently evaluated. The aim of this study is to use Raman microscopy to assess the biochemical effects of gene silencing on T24 and UMUC-13 bladder cancer cell lines. Cellular biochemical information related to nucleic acid and lipogenic components was obtained from deconvolved Raman spectra. We show that the green fluorescence protein (GFP), the chromophore that served as a fluorescent reporter for gene silencing, could also be detected by Raman microscopy. Only the gene-silenced UMUC-13 cell lines exhibited low-to-moderate GFP fluorescence as determined by fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic studies. Moreover, we show that gene silencing and cell phenotype had a greater effect on nucleic acid and lipogenic components with minimal interference from GFP expression. Gene silencing was also found to perturb cellular protein secondary structure in which the amount of disorderd protein increased at the expense of more ordered protein. Overall, our study identified the spectral signature for cellular GFP expression and elucidated the effects of gene silencing on cancer cell biochemistry and protein secondary structure.

  17. Stimulation of Cellular Proliferation by Hepatitis B Virus X Protein

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    Charles R. Madden

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV is a known risk factor in the development of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The HBV-encoded X protein, HBx, has been investigated for properties that may explain its cancer cofactor role in transgenic mouse lines. We discuss here recent data showing that HBx is able to induce hepatocellular proliferation in vitro and in vivo. This property of HBx is predicted to sensitize hepatocytes to other HCC cofactors, including exposure to carcinogens and to other hepatitis viruses. Cellular proliferation is intimately linked to the mechanism(s by which most tumor-associated viruses transform virus-infected cells. The HBx alteration of the cell cycle provides an additional mechanism by which chronic HBV infection may contribute to HCC.

  18. A simple yeast-based strategy to identify host cellular processes targeted by bacterial effector proteins.

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    Eran Bosis

    Full Text Available Bacterial effector proteins, which are delivered into the host cell via the type III secretion system, play a key role in the pathogenicity of gram-negative bacteria by modulating various host cellular processes to the benefit of the pathogen. To identify cellular processes targeted by bacterial effectors, we developed a simple strategy that uses an array of yeast deletion strains fitted into a single 96-well plate. The array is unique in that it was optimized computationally such that despite the small number of deletion strains, it covers the majority of genes in the yeast synthetic lethal interaction network. The deletion strains in the array are screened for hypersensitivity to the expression of a bacterial effector of interest. The hypersensitive deletion strains are then analyzed for their synthetic lethal interactions to identify potential targets of the bacterial effector. We describe the identification, using this approach, of a cellular process targeted by the Xanthomonas campestris type III effector XopE2. Interestingly, we discover that XopE2 affects the yeast cell wall and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. More generally, the use of a single 96-well plate makes the screening process accessible to any laboratory and facilitates the analysis of a large number of bacterial effectors in a short period of time. It therefore provides a promising platform for studying the functions and cellular targets of bacterial effectors and other virulence proteins.

  19. Temporal dynamics of immediate early gene expression during cellular consolidation of spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Daniel N; Commins, Sean

    2017-06-01

    The consolidation of newly acquired memories on a cellular level is thought to take place in the first few hours following learning. This process is dependent on de novo protein synthesis during this time, which ultimately leads to long-term structural and functional neuronal changes and the stabilisation of a memory trace. Immediate early genes (IEGs) are rapidly expressed in neurons following learning, and previous research has suggested more than one wave of IEG expression facilitates consolidation in the hours following learning. We analysed the expression of Zif268, c-Fos and Arc protein in a number of brain regions involved in spatial learning either 90min, 4h or 8h following training in the Morris water maze task. Consistent with the role of IEGs in the earliest stages of consolidation, a single wave of expression was observed in most brain regions at 90min, however a subsequent wave of expression was not observed at 8h. In fact, Zif268 expression was observed to fall below the levels of naïve controls at this time-point in the medial prefrontal and perirhinal cortices. This may be indicative of synaptic downscaling in these regions in the hours following learning, and an important marker of the consolidation of spatial memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A cellular memory module conveys epigenetic inheritance of hedgehog expression during Drosophila wing imaginal disc development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurange, Cédric; Paro, Renato

    2002-10-15

    In Drosophila, the Trithorax-group (trxG) and Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins interact with chromosomal elements, termed Cellular Memory Modules (CMMs). By modifying chromatin, this ensures a stable heritable maintenance of the transcriptional state of developmental regulators, like the homeotic genes, that is defined embryonically. We asked whether such CMMs could also control expression of genes involved in patterning imaginal discs during larval development. Our results demonstrate that expression of the hedgehog gene, once activated, is maintained by a CMM. In addition, our experiments indicate that the switching of such CMMs to an active state during larval stages, in contrast to embryonic stages, may require specific trans-activators. Our results suggest that the patterning of cells in particular developmental fields in the imaginal discs does not only rely on external cues from morphogens, but also depends on the previous history of the cells, as the control by CMMs ensures a preformatted gene expression pattern.

  1. Integrating protein structures and precomputed genealogies in the Magnum database: Examples with cellular retinoid binding proteins

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    Bradley Michael E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When accurate models for the divergent evolution of protein sequences are integrated with complementary biological information, such as folded protein structures, analyses of the combined data often lead to new hypotheses about molecular physiology. This represents an excellent example of how bioinformatics can be used to guide experimental research. However, progress in this direction has been slowed by the lack of a publicly available resource suitable for general use. Results The precomputed Magnum database offers a solution to this problem for ca. 1,800 full-length protein families with at least one crystal structure. The Magnum deliverables include 1 multiple sequence alignments, 2 mapping of alignment sites to crystal structure sites, 3 phylogenetic trees, 4 inferred ancestral sequences at internal tree nodes, and 5 amino acid replacements along tree branches. Comprehensive evaluations revealed that the automated procedures used to construct Magnum produced accurate models of how proteins divergently evolve, or genealogies, and correctly integrated these with the structural data. To demonstrate Magnum's capabilities, we asked for amino acid replacements requiring three nucleotide substitutions, located at internal protein structure sites, and occurring on short phylogenetic tree branches. In the cellular retinoid binding protein family a site that potentially modulates ligand binding affinity was discovered. Recruitment of cellular retinol binding protein to function as a lens crystallin in the diurnal gecko afforded another opportunity to showcase the predictive value of a browsable database containing branch replacement patterns integrated with protein structures. Conclusion We integrated two areas of protein science, evolution and structure, on a large scale and created a precomputed database, known as Magnum, which is the first freely available resource of its kind. Magnum provides evolutionary and structural

  2. Integrating protein structures and precomputed genealogies in the Magnum database: Examples with cellular retinoid binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Michael E; Benner, Steven A

    2006-01-01

    Background When accurate models for the divergent evolution of protein sequences are integrated with complementary biological information, such as folded protein structures, analyses of the combined data often lead to new hypotheses about molecular physiology. This represents an excellent example of how bioinformatics can be used to guide experimental research. However, progress in this direction has been slowed by the lack of a publicly available resource suitable for general use. Results The precomputed Magnum database offers a solution to this problem for ca. 1,800 full-length protein families with at least one crystal structure. The Magnum deliverables include 1) multiple sequence alignments, 2) mapping of alignment sites to crystal structure sites, 3) phylogenetic trees, 4) inferred ancestral sequences at internal tree nodes, and 5) amino acid replacements along tree branches. Comprehensive evaluations revealed that the automated procedures used to construct Magnum produced accurate models of how proteins divergently evolve, or genealogies, and correctly integrated these with the structural data. To demonstrate Magnum's capabilities, we asked for amino acid replacements requiring three nucleotide substitutions, located at internal protein structure sites, and occurring on short phylogenetic tree branches. In the cellular retinoid binding protein family a site that potentially modulates ligand binding affinity was discovered. Recruitment of cellular retinol binding protein to function as a lens crystallin in the diurnal gecko afforded another opportunity to showcase the predictive value of a browsable database containing branch replacement patterns integrated with protein structures. Conclusion We integrated two areas of protein science, evolution and structure, on a large scale and created a precomputed database, known as Magnum, which is the first freely available resource of its kind. Magnum provides evolutionary and structural bioinformatics resources that

  3. Stem-loop binding protein is a multifaceted cellular regulator of HIV-1 replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Lynne D.; Asara, John M.; Cheruiyot, Collins K.; Lu, Huafei; Wu, Zhijin J.; Newstein, Michael C.; Dooner, Mark S.; Friedman, Jennifer; Lally, Michelle A.; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    A rare subset of HIV-1–infected individuals is able to maintain plasma viral load (VL) at low levels without antiretroviral treatment. Identifying the mechanisms underlying this atypical response to infection may lead to therapeutic advances for treating HIV-1. Here, we developed a proteomic analysis to compare peripheral blood cell proteomes in 20 HIV-1–infected individuals who maintained either high or low VL with the aim of identifying host factors that impact HIV-1 replication. We determined that the levels of multiple histone proteins were markedly decreased in cohorts of individuals with high VL. This reduction was correlated with lower levels of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which is known to control histone metabolism. Depletion of cellular SLBP increased promoter engagement with the chromatin structures of the host gene high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1) and viral long terminal repeat (LTR), which led to higher levels of HIV-1 genomic integration and proviral transcription. Further, we determined that TNF-α regulates expression of SLBP and observed that plasma TNF-α levels in HIV-1–infected individuals correlated directly with VL levels and inversely with cellular SLBP levels. Our findings identify SLBP as a potentially important cellular regulator of HIV-1, thereby establishing a link between histone metabolism, inflammation, and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27454292

  4. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that

  5. Predict drug-protein interaction in cellular networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved with many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are the most frequent targets for drug development: over 50% of all prescription drugs currently on the market are actually acting by targeting GPCRs directly or indirectly. Found in every living thing and nearly all cells, ion channels play crucial roles for many vital functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction, and central nervous system response. Their dysfunction may have significant impact to human health, and hence ion channels are deemed as "the next GPCRs". To develop GPCR-targeting or ion-channel-targeting drugs, the first important step is to identify the interactions between potential drug compounds with the two kinds of protein receptors in the cellular networking. In this minireview, we are to introduce two predictors. One is called iGPCR-Drug accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/; the other called iCDI-PseFpt at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt. The former is for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs; while the latter for that with ion channels. In both predictors, the drug compound was formulated by the two-dimensional molecular fingerprint, and the protein receptor by the pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, while the operation engine was the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. For the convenience of most experimental pharmaceutical and medical scientists, a step-bystep guide is provided on how to use each of the two web-servers to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics involved originally for their establishment.

  6. Cellular prion protein and NMDA receptor modulation: protecting against excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie A.G. Black

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well established that misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrPC into the beta-sheet-rich, aggregated scrapie conformation (PrPSc causes a variety of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, the physiological roles of PrPC are still incompletely understood. There is accumulating evidence describing the roles of PrPC in neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. Recently, we identified a functional regulation of NMDA receptors by PrPC that involves formation of a physical protein complex between these proteins. Excessive NMDA receptor activity during conditions such as ischemia mediates enhanced Ca2+ entry into cells and contributes to excitotoxic neuronal death. In addition, NMDA receptors and/or PrPC play critical roles in neuroinflammation and glial cell toxicity. Inhibition of NMDA receptor activity protects against PrPSc-induced neuronal death. Moreover, in mice lacking PrPC, infarct size is increased after focal cerebral ischemia, and absence of PrPC increases susceptibility of neurons to NMDA receptor-dependent death. Recently, PrPC was found to be a receptor for oligomeric beta-amyloid (Abeta peptides, suggesting a role for PrPC in Alzheimer’s disease. Our recent findings suggest that Abeta peptides enhance NMDA receptor current by perturbing the normal copper- and PrPC-dependent regulation of these receptors. Here, we review evidence highlighting a role for PrPC in preventing NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and inflammation. There is a need for more detailed molecular characterization of PrPC-mediated regulation of NMDA receptors, such as determining which NMDA receptor subunits mediate pathogenic effects upon loss of PrPC-mediated regulation and identifying PrPC binding site(s on the receptor. This knowledge will allow development of novel therapeutic interventions for not only TSEs, but also for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders involving dysfunction of PrPC.

  7. Poliovirus infection induces the co-localization of cellular protein SRp20 with TIA-1, a cytoplasmic stress granule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kerry D; Semler, Bert L

    2013-09-01

    Different types of environmental stress cause mammalian cells to form cytoplasmic foci, termed stress granules, which contain mRNPs that are translationally silenced. These foci are transient and dynamic, and contain components of the cellular translation machinery as well as certain mRNAs and RNA binding proteins. Stress granules are known to be induced by conditions such as hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and oxidative stress, and a number of cellular factors have been identified that are commonly associated with these foci. More recently it was discovered that poliovirus infection also induces the formation of stress granules, although these cytoplasmic foci appear to be somewhat compositionally unique. Work described here examined the punctate pattern of SRp20 (a host cell mRNA splicing protein) localization in the cytoplasm of poliovirus-infected cells, demonstrating the partial co-localization of SRp20 with the stress granule marker protein TIA-1. We determined that SRp20 does not co-localize with TIA-1, however, under conditions of oxidative stress, indicating that the close association of these two proteins during poliovirus infection is not representative of a general response to cellular stress. We confirmed that the expression of a dominant negative version of TIA-1 (TIA-1-PRD) results in the dissociation of stress granules. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of wild type TIA-1 or dominant negative TIA-1-PRD in cells during poliovirus infection does not dramatically affect viral translation. Taken together, these studies provide a new example of the unique cytoplasmic foci that form during poliovirus infection.

  8. Integrated cellular network of transcription regulations and protein-protein interactions

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    Chen Bor-Sen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the accumulation of increasing omics data, a key goal of systems biology is to construct networks at different cellular levels to investigate cellular machinery of the cell. However, there is currently no satisfactory method to construct an integrated cellular network that combines the gene regulatory network and the signaling regulatory pathway. Results In this study, we integrated different kinds of omics data and developed a systematic method to construct the integrated cellular network based on coupling dynamic models and statistical assessments. The proposed method was applied to S. cerevisiae stress responses, elucidating the stress response mechanism of the yeast. From the resulting integrated cellular network under hyperosmotic stress, the highly connected hubs which are functionally relevant to the stress response were identified. Beyond hyperosmotic stress, the integrated network under heat shock and oxidative stress were also constructed and the crosstalks of these networks were analyzed, specifying the significance of some transcription factors to serve as the decision-making devices at the center of the bow-tie structure and the crucial role for rapid adaptation scheme to respond to stress. In addition, the predictive power of the proposed method was also demonstrated. Conclusions We successfully construct the integrated cellular network which is validated by literature evidences. The integration of transcription regulations and protein-protein interactions gives more insight into the actual biological network and is more predictive than those without integration. The method is shown to be powerful and flexible and can be used under different conditions and for different species. The coupling dynamic models of the whole integrated cellular network are very useful for theoretical analyses and for further experiments in the fields of network biology and synthetic biology.

  9. Plin2 inhibits cellular glucose uptake through interactions with SNAP23, a SNARE complex protein.

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    Subramanian Senthivinayagam

    Full Text Available Although a link between excess lipid storage and aberrant glucose metabolism has been recognized for many years, little is known what role lipid storage droplets and associated proteins such as Plin2 play in managing cellular glucose levels. To address this issue, the influence of Plin2 on glucose uptake was examined using 2-NBD-Glucose and [(3H]-2-deoxyglucose to show that insulin-mediated glucose uptake was decreased 1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively in L cell fibroblasts overexpressing Plin2. Conversely, suppression of Plin2 levels by RNAi-mediated knockdown increased 2-NBD-Glucose uptake several fold in transfected L cells and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. The effect of Plin2 expression on proteins involved in glucose uptake and transport was also examined. Expression of the SNARE protein SNAP23 was increased 1.6-fold while levels of syntaxin-5 were decreased 1.7-fold in Plin2 overexpression cells with no significant changes observed in lipid droplet associated proteins Plin1 or FSP27 or with the insulin receptor, GLUT1, or VAMP4. FRET experiments revealed a close proximity of Plin2 to SNAP23 on lipid droplets to within an intramolecular distance of 51 Å. The extent of targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets was determined by co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments to show increased partitioning of SNAP23 to lipid droplets when Plin2 was overexpressed. Taken together, these results suggest that Plin2 inhibits glucose uptake by interacting with, and regulating cellular targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets. In summary, the current study for the first time provides direct evidence for the role of Plin2 in mediating cellular glucose uptake.

  10. ZRT/IRT-like Protein 14 (ZIP14) Promotes the Cellular Assimilation of Iron from Transferrin*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ningning; Gao, Junwei; Enns, Caroline A; Knutson, Mitchell D.

    2010-01-01

    ZIP14 is a transmembrane metal ion transporter that is abundantly expressed in the liver, heart, and pancreas. Previous studies of HEK 293 cells and the hepatocyte cell lines AML12 and HepG2 established that ZIP14 mediates the uptake of non-transferrin-bound iron, a form of iron that appears in the plasma during pathologic iron overload. In this study we investigated the role of ZIP14 in the cellular assimilation of iron from transferrin, the circulating plasma protein that normally delivers ...

  11. A critical role of a cellular membrane traffic protein in poliovirus RNA replication.

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    George A Belov

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Replication of many RNA viruses is accompanied by extensive remodeling of intracellular membranes. In poliovirus-infected cells, ER and Golgi stacks disappear, while new clusters of vesicle-like structures form sites for viral RNA synthesis. Virus replication is inhibited by brefeldin A (BFA, implicating some components(s of the cellular secretory pathway in virus growth. Formation of characteristic vesicles induced by expression of viral proteins was not inhibited by BFA, but they were functionally deficient. GBF1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small cellular GTPases, Arf, is responsible for the sensitivity of virus infection to BFA, and is required for virus replication. Knockdown of GBF1 expression inhibited virus replication, which was rescued by catalytically active protein with an intact N-terminal sequence. We identified a mutation in GBF1 that allows growth of poliovirus in the presence of BFA. Interaction between GBF1 and viral protein 3A determined the outcome of infection in the presence of BFA.

  12. Epigenetic Silencing of Cellular Retinol-Binding Proteins in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

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    Joseph Kwong

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant retinoid signaling in human cancers is extending from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Recently, we have demonstrated frequent epigenetic inactivation of a retinoic acid receptor (RAR, RARβ2, in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. To further explore targets contributing to aberrant retinoid signaling in NPC, the expression of cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs, cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs, RARs, and retinoid X receptors (RXRs was examined. Apart from RARβ2, transcriptional silencing of two CRBPs, CRBPI and CRBPIV, was observed in NPC cell lines and xenografts. Hypermethylation of CRBPI and CRBPIV CpG islands was found to be closely correlated with the loss of expression. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza2'-deoxycytidine, resulted in reexpression of CRBPI and CRBPIV gene expression in NPC cell lines. Both CRBPI and CRBPIV hypermethylations were also observed in 43/48 (87.8% and 26/48 (54.2% primary NPC tumors, respectively. Here, we reported for the first time that CRBPIV was transcriptionally inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in human cancer. Simultaneous methylation of CRBPI, CRBPIV, and RARβ2 was commonly found in NPC primary tumors. Our findings implied that epigenetic disruption of the CRBPs, CRBPI and CRBPIV, is important in NPC tumorigenesis and may contribute to the loss of retinoic acid responsiveness in cancer.

  13. BMP2 Regulation of CXCL12 Cellular, Temporal, and Spatial Expression is Essential During Fracture Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Timothy J; Longobardi, Lara; Willcockson, Helen; Temple, Joseph D; Tagliafierro, Lidia; Ye, Ping; Li, Tieshi; Esposito, Alessandra; Moats-Staats, Billie M; Spagnoli, Anna

    2015-11-01

    The cellular and humoral responses that orchestrate fracture healing are still elusive. Here we report that bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2)-dependent fracture healing occurs through a tight control of chemokine C-X-C motif-ligand-12 (CXCL12) cellular, spatial, and temporal expression. We found that the fracture repair process elicited an early site-specific response of CXCL12(+)-BMP2(+) endosteal cells and osteocytes that was not present in unfractured bones and gradually decreased as healing progressed. Absence of a full complement of BMP2 in mesenchyme osteoprogenitors (BMP2(cKO/+)) prevented healing and led to a dysregulated temporal and cellular upregulation of CXCL12 expression associated with a deranged angiogenic response. Healing was rescued when BMP2(cKO/+) mice were systemically treated with AMD3100, an antagonist of CXCR4 and agonist for CXCR7 both receptors for CXCL12. We further found that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), capable of delivering BMP2 at the endosteal site, restored fracture healing when transplanted into BMP2(cKO/+) mice by rectifying the CXCL12 expression pattern. Our in vitro studies showed that in isolated endosteal cells, BMP2, while inducing osteoblastic differentiation, stimulated expression of pericyte markers that was coupled with a decrease in CXCL12. Furthermore, in isolated BMP2(cKO/cKO) endosteal cells, high expression levels of CXCL12 inhibited osteoblastic differentiation that was restored by AMD3100 treatment or coculture with BMP2-expressing MSCs that led to an upregulation of pericyte markers while decreasing platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM). Taken together, our studies show that following fracture, a CXCL12(+)-BMP2(+) perivascular cell population is recruited along the endosteum, then a timely increase of BMP2 leads to downregulation of CXCL12 that is essential to determine the fate of the CXCL12(+)-BMP2(+) to osteogenesis while departing their supportive role to angiogenesis. Our findings have far

  14. Cellular proliferation rate and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 and IGFBP-3 and estradiol receptor alpha expression in the mammary gland of dairy heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, A F; Dallard, B E; Baravalle, C; Licoff, N; Formía, N; Ortega, H H; Becú-Villalobos, D; Mejia, M E; Lacau-Mengido, I M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary ductal morphogenesis during prepuberty occurs mainly in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and estradiol stimulation. Dairy heifers infected with gastrointestinal nematodes have reduced IGF-1 levels, accompanied by reduced growth rate, delayed puberty onset, and lower parenchyma-stroma relationship in their mammary glands. Immunohistochemical studies were undertaken to determine variations in cell division rate, IGF-1 system components, and estradiol receptors (ESR) during peripubertal development in the mammary glands of antiparasitic-treated and untreated Holstein heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Mammary biopsies were taken at 20, 30, 40, and 70 wk of age. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunolabeling, evident in nuclei, tended to be higher in the parenchyma of the glands from treated heifers than in those from untreated. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) type 2 and type 3 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic and was evident in stroma and parenchyma. The IGFBP2-labeled area was lower in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, a maximal expression of this protein was seen at 40 wk of age, whereas in the untreated group the labeling remained constant. No differences were observed for IGFBP3 between treatment groups or during development. Immunolabeling for α ESR (ESR1) was evident in parenchymal nuclei and was higher in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, ESR1 peaked at 30 wk of age and then decreased. These results demonstrate that the parasite burden in young heifers negatively influence mammary gland development, affecting cell division rate and parameters related to estradiol and IGF-1 signaling in the gland.

  15. Dependence of cellular activity at protein adsorbed biointerfaces with nano- to microscale dimensionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nune, C; Misra, R D K; Somani, M C; Karjalainen, L P

    2014-06-01

    Protein adsorption is one of the first-few events that occur when a biomedical device comes in contact with the physiological system. The adsorption process is subsequently followed by communication with cells and formation of tissue. Given the strong interest in nanostructured surfaces, we describe here the impact of grain structure from nanograined (NG) regime to coarse-grained (CG) regime on the self-assembly of proteins (bovine serum albumin) and consequent functional response of osteoblasts. The objective is accomplished using the innovative concept of "phase reversion" that enables a wide range of grain size (from NG to CG regime) to be obtained using an identical set of parameters, besides additional attributes of high strength/weight ratio and wear resistance. Depending on the grain structure a consistent and significant change in the adsorption characteristics of protein was observed at biointerface, such that the cell density was statistically different. The high surface coverage and leaf-like conformation of adsorbed protein on NG surface as compared to bare branch-like structure with low surface coverage on the CG surface, was beneficial in favorably modulating cellular activity (osteoblast functions: cell attachment, proliferation, actin, vinculin, and fibronectin expression). This is the first report that elucidates the impact of grain structure from NG to CG regime on cellular activity. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Interactions of the p53 protein family in cellular stress response in gastrointestinal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilgelm, Anna E; Washington, Mary K; Wei, Jinxiong; Chen, Heidi; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Zaika, Alexander I

    2010-03-01

    p53, p63, and p73 are members of the p53 protein family involved in regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation, and other critical cellular processes. Here, we investigated the contribution of the entire p53 family in chemotherapeutic drug response in gastrointestinal tumors. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed complexity and variability of expression profiles of the p53 protein family. Using colon and esophageal cancer cells, we found that the integral transcription activity of the entire p53 family, as measured by the reporter analysis, associated with response to drug treatment in studied cells. We also found that p53 and p73, as well as p63 and p73, bind simultaneously to the promoters of p53 target genes. Taken together, our results support the view that the p53 protein family functions as an interacting network of proteins and show that cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drug treatment are determined by the total activity of the entire p53 family rather than p53 alone.

  17. Association of the Cellular Apoptosis Susceptibility Protein with HBV Infection in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zang; Dong Ji; Qing Shao; Guang-de Zhou; Deng Pan; Shao-jie Xin; Jing-min Zhao; Guo-feng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Objective The cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CAS) protein plays a regulatory role in the induction of cell death in tumor cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of the expression of CAS protein with HBV infection in the development of HCC. Methods The expression level of CAS was measured with immunohistochemistry. The occurrence of HBsAg, HBeAg and HBV DNA in HCC were concurrently examined with immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively. Results The results showed that the CAS protein was detected in 86% (43/50), 70% (7/10), 15% (3/20) and none (0/20) of livers from patients with HCC, cholangiocarcinoma, cirrhosis and hepatitis, respectively. Furthermore, the level of CAS protein was higher in poorly differentiated tumors than moderately or well differentiated HCC. Interestingly, the CAS was stained significantly stronger in HBV-infected HCC than in non-HBV infected tissues (P < 0.01). Conclusions The expression of CAS is facilitated by HBV infection in HCC, suggesting that CAS might be a prognostic marker and a putative therapeutic target for HCC.

  18. Changes and significance of SIRT3 expression in cellular senescence induced by high glucose

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    Bin ZHANG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the role of the silent information regulator 3(SIRT3 in the decrepitude process of human diploid fibroblasts(WI-38 induced by high glucose.Methods The WI-38 cells [population doublings(PDs,20-32] were cultured in media containing different concentrations of glucose as follows: low glucose(3.34mmol/L,LG,normal glucose(5.56mmol/L,NG,and high glucose(25mmol/L,HG.The protein expression levels of p21,p27,catalase,MnSOD,and SIRT3 were evaluated through Western blot.The double-label immunofluorescence assay was used to detect the location and expression of SIRT3,MnSOD,and senescence-associated heterochromatin foci(SAHF in the WI-38 cells.The ROS level was determined with fluorescent probe.Results The results from the Western blot showed that the protein expression of SIRT3,catalase,and MnSOD decreased significantly in the HG group compared with the LG and NG groups(P 0.05.SIRT3 and MnSOD were highly expressed in the cytoplasm.The ROS levels in the HG group were elevated compared with those in the LG and NG groups.Conclusion SIRT3 may play an important role in cellular senescence induced by high glucose in human diploid fibroblasts.

  19. Cellular Prion Protein Promotes Regeneration of Adult Muscle Tissue ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Roberto; Massimino, Maria Lina; Sandri, Marco; Sorgato, M. Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that the conversion of the cellular prion protein, PrPC, into its anomalous conformer, PrPSc, is central to the onset of prion disease. However, both the mechanism of prion-related neurodegeneration and the physiologic role of PrPC are still unknown. The use of animal and cell models has suggested a number of putative functions for the protein, including cell signaling, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Given that skeletal muscles express significant amounts of PrPC and have been related to PrPC pathophysiology, in the present study, we used skeletal muscles to analyze whether the protein plays a role in adult morphogenesis. We employed an in vivo paradigm that allowed us to compare the regeneration of acutely damaged hind-limb tibialis anterior muscles of mice expressing, or not expressing, PrPC. Using morphometric and biochemical parameters, we provide compelling evidence that the absence of PrPC significantly slows the regeneration process compared to wild-type muscles by attenuating the stress-activated p38 pathway, and the consequent exit from the cell cycle, of myogenic precursor cells. Demonstrating the specificity of this finding, restoring PrPC expression completely rescued the muscle phenotype evidenced in the absence of PrPC. PMID:20679477

  20. Cellular and subcellular localization of Ras guanyl nucleotide-releasing protein in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, P; Vallée, A; Mechawar, N; Dower, N A; Stone, J C; Richardson, P M; Dunn, R J

    2001-01-01

    Ras guanyl nucleotide-releasing protein (RasGRP) is a recently discovered Ras guanyl nucleotide exchange factor that is expressed in selected regions of the rodent CNS, with high levels of expression in the hippocampus. Biochemical studies suggest that RasGRP can activate the Ras signal pathway in response to changes in diacylglycerol and possibly calcium. To investigate potential sites for RasGRP signaling, we have determined the cellular and subcellular localization of RasGRP protein in adult rat hippocampus, and have also examined the appearance of RasGRP mRNA and protein during hippocampal development. RasGRP immunoreactivity is predominately localized to those neurons participating in the direct cortico-hippocampo-cortical loop. In both hippocampal and entorhinal neurons, RasGRP protein appeared to be localized to both dendrites and somata, but not to axons. Electron microscopy of hippocampal pyramidal cells confirmed RasGRP immunoreactivity in neuronal cell bodies and dendrites, where it appeared to be associated with microtubules. The localization of RasGRP to dendrites suggests a role for this pathway in the regulation of dendritic function. Examination of developing hippocampal structures indicated that RasGRP mRNA and protein appear synchronously during the first 2 weeks of postnatal development as these neurons become fully mature. This result indicates that the RasGRP signal transduction pathway is not required during early hippocampal development, but is a feature of mature neurons during the later stages of development.

  1. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  2. Herpes simplex virus 1 VP22 regulates translocation of multiple viral and cellular proteins and promotes neurovirulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Michiko; Kato, Akihisa; Satoh, Yuko; Ide, Takahiro; Sagou, Ken; Kimura, Kayo; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) protein VP22, encoded by the UL49 gene, is a major virion tegument protein. In the present study, we showed that VP22 was required for efficient redistribution of viral proteins VP16, VP26, ICP0, ICP4, and ICP27 and of cellular protein Hsc-70 to the cytoplasm of infected cells. We found that two dileucine motifs in VP22, at amino acids 235 and 236 and amino acids 251 and 252, were necessary for VP22 regulation of the proper cytoplasmic localization of these viral and cellular proteins. The dileucine motifs were also required for proper cytoplasmic localization of VP22 itself and for optimal expression of viral proteins VP16, VP22, ICP0, UL41, and glycoprotein B. Interestingly, a recombinant mutant virus with alanines substituted for the dileucines at amino acids 251 and 252 had a 50% lethal dose (LD(50)) for neurovirulence in mice following intracerebral inoculation about 10(3)-fold lower than the LD(50) of the repaired virus. Furthermore, the replication and spread of this mutant virus in the brains of mice following intracerebral inoculation were significantly impaired relative to those of the repaired virus. The ability of VP22 to regulate the localization and expression of various viral and cellular proteins, as shown in this study, was correlated with an increase in viral replication and neurovirulence in the experimental murine model. Thus, HSV-1 VP22 is a significant neurovirulence factor in vivo.

  3. Ethanol cellular defense induce unfolded protein response in yeast

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    Elisabet eNavarro-Tapia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CECT10094 and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus

  4. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration

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    Jessica A. Simpkins

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling.

  5. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Jessica A.; Rickel, Kirby E.; Madeo, Marianna; Ahlers, Bethany A.; Carlisle, Gabriel B.; Nelson, Heidi J.; Cardillo, Andrew L.; Weber, Emily A.; Vitiello, Peter F.; Pearce, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling. PMID:27142334

  6. Simian virus 40 late proteins possess lytic properties that render them capable of permeabilizing cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Robert; Rusan, Nasser M; Wilbuer, Anne-Kathrin; Norkin, Leonard C; Wadsworth, Patricia; Hebert, Daniel N

    2006-07-01

    Many nonenveloped viruses have evolved an infectious cycle that culminates in the lysis or permeabilization of the host to enable viral release. How these viruses initiate the lytic event is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrated that the simian virus 40 progeny accumulated at the nuclear envelope prior to the permeabilization of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membranes at a time which corresponded with the release of the progeny. The permeabilization of these cellular membranes temporally correlated with late protein expression and was not observed upon the inhibition of their synthesis. To address whether one or more of the late proteins possessed an inherent capacity to induce membrane permeabilization, we examined the permeability of Escherichia coli that separately expressed the late proteins. VP2 and VP3, but not VP1, caused the permeabilization of bacterial membranes. Additionally, VP3 expression resulted in bacterial cell lysis. These findings demonstrate that VP3 possesses an inherent lytic property that is independent of eukaryotic signaling or cell death pathways.

  7. Cellular differentiation state modulates the mRNA export activity of SR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Valentina; McNicoll, François; Steiner, Michaela C; Richter, Florian M; Solovyeva, Anfisa; Wegener, Marius; Schwich, Oliver D; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Wittig, Ilka; Neugebauer, Karla M; Müller-McNicoll, Michaela

    2017-07-03

    SR proteins function in nuclear pre-mRNA processing, mRNA export, and translation. To investigate their cellular dynamics, we developed a quantitative assay, which detects differences in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling among seven canonical SR protein family members. As expected, SRSF2 and SRSF5 shuttle poorly in HeLa cells but surprisingly display considerable shuttling in pluripotent murine P19 cells. Combining individual-resolution cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) and mass spectrometry, we show that elevated arginine methylation of SRSF5 and lower phosphorylation levels of cobound SRSF2 enhance shuttling of SRSF5 in P19 cells by modulating protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. Moreover, SRSF5 is bound to pluripotency-specific transcripts such as Lin28a and Pou5f1/Oct4 in the cytoplasm. SRSF5 depletion reduces and overexpression increases their cytoplasmic mRNA levels, suggesting that enhanced mRNA export by SRSF5 is required for the expression of pluripotency factors. Remarkably, neural differentiation of P19 cells leads to dramatically reduced SRSF5 shuttling. Our findings indicate that posttranslational modification of SR proteins underlies the regulation of their mRNA export activities and distinguishes pluripotent from differentiated cells. © 2017 Botti et al.

  8. Active macropinocytosis induction by stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and oncogenic Ras expression potentiates cellular uptake efficacy of exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Kobayashi, Nahoko Bailey; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko

    2015-06-03

    Exosomes are approximately 100-nm vesicles that consist of a lipid bilayer of cellular membranes secreted in large quantities from various types of normal and disease-related cells. Endocytosis has been reported as a major pathway for the cellular uptake of exosomes; however, the detailed mechanisms of their cellular uptake are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate the active induction of macropinocytosis (accompanied by actin reorganisation, ruffling of plasma membrane, and engulfment of large volumes of extracellular fluid) by stimulation of cancer-related receptors and show that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor significantly enhances the cellular uptake of exosomes. We also demonstrate that oncogenic K-Ras-expressing MIA PaCa-2 cells exhibit intensive macropinocytosis that actively transports extracellular exosomes into the cells compared with wild-type K-Ras-expressing BxPC-3 cells. Furthermore, encapsulation of the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin with EGF in exosomes using our simple electroporation method produces superior cytotoxicity via the enhanced cellular uptake of exosomes. Our findings contribute to the biological, pharmaceutical, and medical research fields in terms of understanding the macropinocytosis-mediated cellular uptake of exosomes with applications for exosomal delivery systems.

  9. Influence of HFE variants and cellular iron on monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons Zachary

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms in the MHC class 1-like gene known as HFE have been proposed as genetic modifiers of neurodegenerative diseases that include neuroinflammation as part of the disease process. Variants of HFE are relatively common in the general population and are most commonly associated with iron overload, but can promote subclinical cellular iron loading even in the absence of clinically identified disease. The effects of the variants as well as the resulting cellular iron dyshomeostasis potentially impact a number of disease-associated pathways. We tested the hypothesis that the two most common HFE variants, H63D and C282Y, would affect cellular secretion of cytokines and trophic factors. Methods We screened a panel of cytokines and trophic factors using a multiplexed immunoassay in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells expressing different variants of HFE. The influence of cellular iron secretion on the potent chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 was assessed using ferric ammonium citrate and the iron chelator, desferroxamine. Additionally, an antioxidant, Trolox, and an anti-inflammatory, minocycline, were tested for their effects on MCP-1 secretion in the presence of HFE variants. Results Expression of the HFE variants altered the labile iron pool in SH-SY5Y cells. Of the panel of cytokines and trophic factors analyzed, only the release of MCP-1 was affected by the HFE variants. We further examined the relationship between iron and MCP-1 and found MCP-1 secretion tightly associated with intracellular iron status. A potential direct effect of HFE is considered because, despite having similar levels of intracellular iron, the association between HFE genotype and MCP-1 expression was different for the H63D and C282Y HFE variants. Moreover, HFE genotype was a factor in the effect of minocycline, a multifaceted antibiotic used in treating a number of neurologic conditions associated with inflammation, on MCP-1

  10. Cellular Binding of Anionic Nanoparticles is Inhibited by Serum Proteins Independent of Nanoparticle Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Candace C; Kumar, Umesh; Payne, Christine K

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticles used in biological applications encounter a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. Adsorption of these proteins on the nanoparticle surface results in the formation of a "protein corona," which can dominate the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular environment. The goal of this research was to determine how nanoparticle composition and surface modification affect the cellular binding of protein-nanoparticle complexes. We examined the cellular binding of a collection of commonly used anionic nanoparticles: quantum dots, colloidal gold nanoparticles, and low-density lipoprotein particles, in the presence and absence of extracellular proteins. These experiments have the advantage of comparing different nanoparticles under identical conditions. Using a combination of fluorescence and dark field microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectroscopy, we find that cellular binding of these anionic nanoparticles is inhibited by serum proteins independent of nanoparticle composition or surface modification. We expect these results will aid in the design of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  11. Protein synthesis patterns of Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis isolates in stage-specific forms and during cellular differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem-Izacc, S M; Jesuino, R S; Brito, W A; Pereira, M; Felipe, M S; Soares, C M

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we compared the protein synthesis patterns of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolates. The protein profiles were compared for both yeast and mycelial forms and similarity analysis among them was performed by calculating similarity matrices and grouping the isolates in dendrograms. The examined isolates exhibited highly variable cellular morphology at 36 degrees C, when typical yeast cells were expected. On the other hand, at 26 degrees C all the isolates showed mycelial morphology. The analysis of protein synthesis profiles made it possible to cluster the P. brasiliensis isolates into groups that correlated with the morphological data. Interestingly, growth at 36 degrees C strongly decreased the heterogeneity of protein synthesis patterns seen in mycelial isolates. It was possible to cluster the isolates grown at 36 degrees C in three groups based on their two-dimensional protein synthesis analysis. The similarity index observed among the mycelial isolates was lower than that obtained with yeast cells, suggesting a more homogenous gene expression pattern in the host-adapted form than in the saprobic phase.

  12. Loss of Pnn expression results in mouse early embryonic lethality and cellular apoptosis through SRSF1-mediated alternative expression of Bcl-xS and ICAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Steve; Lin, Yen-Ming; Wu, Chu-Han; Ouyang, Pin

    2012-07-01

    Pinin (Pnn), a serine/arginine-rich (SR)-related protein, has been shown to play multiple roles within eukaryotic cells including cell-cell adhesion, cell migration, regulation of gene transcription, mRNA export and alternative splicing. In this study, an attempt to generate mice homozygously deficient in Pnn failed because of early embryonic lethality. To evaluate the effects of loss of Pnn expression on cell survival, RNA interference experiments were performed in MCF-7 cells. Depletion of Pnn resulted in cellular apoptosis and nuclear condensation. In addition, nuclear speckles were disrupted, and expression levels of SR proteins were diminished. RT-PCR analysis showed that alternative splicing patterns of SRSF1 as well as of apoptosis-related genes Bcl-x and ICAD were altered, and expression levels of Bim isoforms were modulated in Pnn-depleted cells. Cellular apoptosis induced by Pnn depletion was rescued by overexpression of SRSF1, which also restored generation of Bcl-xL and functionless ICAD. Pnn expression is, therefore, essential for survival of mouse embryos and the breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7. Moreover, Pnn depletion, modulated by SRSF1, determines cellular apoptosis through activation of the expression of pro-apoptotic Bcl-xS transcripts.

  13. Cellular expression, trafficking, and function of two isoforms of human ULBP5/RAET1G.

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    Robert A Eagle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D is expressed on Natural Killer (NK cells and subsets of T cells. NKG2D contributes to anti-tumour and anti-viral immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The ligands for NKG2D in humans are diverse proteins of the MIC and ULBP/RAET families that are upregulated on the surface of virally infected cells and tumours. Two splicing variants of ULBP5/RAET1G have been cloned previously, but not extensively characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We pursue a number of approaches to characterise the expression, trafficking, and function of the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G. We show that both transcripts are frequently expressed in cell lines derived from epithelial cancers, and in primary breast cancers. The full-length transcript, RAET1G1, is predicted to encode a molecule with transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are unique amongst NKG2D ligands. Using specific anti-RAET1G1 antiserum to stain tissue microarrays we show that RAET1G1 expression is highly restricted in normal tissues. RAET1G1 was expressed at a low level in normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells in a similar pattern to MICA. Both RAET1G1 and MICA showed increased expression in the gut of patients with celiac disease. In contrast to healthy tissues the RAET1G1 antiserum stained a wide variety or different primary tumour sections. Both endogenously expressed and transfected RAET1G1 was mainly found inside the cell, with a minority of the protein reaching the cell surface. Conversely the truncated splicing variant of RAET1G2 was shown to encode a soluble molecule that could be secreted from cells. Secreted RAET1G2 was shown to downregulate NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells and hence may represent a novel tumour immune evasion strategy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that the expression patterns of ULBP5RAET1G are very similar to the well-characterised NKG2D ligand, MICA. However the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G have

  14. Splice Isoforms of Phosducin-like Protein Control the Expression of Heterotrimeric G Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xueli; Sinha, Satyabrata; Belcastro, Marycharmain; Woodard, Catherine; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan; Stoilov, Peter; Sokolov, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play an essential role in cellular signaling; however, the mechanism regulating their synthesis and assembly remains poorly understood. A line of evidence indicates that the posttranslational processing of G protein β subunits begins inside the protein-folding chamber of the chaperonin containing t-complex protein 1. This process is facilitated by the ubiquitously expressed phosducin-like protein (PhLP), which is thought to act as a CCT co-factor. Here we demonstrate that alternative splicing of the PhLP gene gives rise to a transcript encoding a truncated, short protein (PhLPs) that is broadly expressed in human tissues but absent in mice. Seeking to elucidate the function of PhLPs, we expressed this protein in the rod photoreceptors of mice and found that this manipulation caused a dramatic translational and posttranslational suppression of rod heterotrimeric G proteins. The investigation of the underlying mechanism revealed that PhLPs disrupts the folding of Gβ and the assembly of Gβ and Gγ subunits, events normally assisted by PhLP, by forming a stable and apparently inactive tertiary complex with CCT preloaded with nascent Gβ. As a result, the cellular levels of Gβ and Gγ, which depends on Gβ for stability, decline. In addition, PhLPs evokes a profound and rather specific down-regulation of the Gα transcript, leading to a complete disappearance of the protein. This study provides the first evidence of a generic mechanism, whereby the splicing of the PhLP gene could potentially and efficiently regulate the cellular levels of heterotrimeric G proteins. PMID:23888055

  15. Ribosomal protein S6 associates with alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 and mediates expression from alphavirus messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stephanie A; Berglund, Peter; Beard, Clayton W; Johnston, Robert E

    2006-08-01

    Although alphaviruses dramatically alter cellular function within hours of infection, interactions between alphaviruses and specific host cellular proteins are poorly understood. Although the alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) is an essential component of the viral replication complex, it also has critical auxiliary functions that determine the outcome of infection in the host. To gain a better understanding of nsP2 function, we sought to identify cellular proteins with which Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 interacted. We demonstrate here that nsP2 associates with ribosomal protein S6 (RpS6) and that nsP2 is present in the ribosome-containing fractions of a polysome gradient, suggesting that nsP2 associates with RpS6 in the context of the whole ribosome. This result was noteworthy, since viral replicase proteins have seldom been described in direct association with components of the ribosome. The association of RpS6 with nsP2 was detected throughout the course of infection, and neither the synthesis of the viral structural proteins nor the presence of the other nonstructural proteins was required for RpS6 interaction with nsP2. nsP1 also was associated with RpS6, but other nonstructural proteins were not. RpS6 phosphorylation was dramatically diminished within hours after infection with alphaviruses. Furthermore, a reduction in the level of RpS6 protein expression led to diminished expression from alphavirus subgenomic messages, whereas no dramatic diminution in cellular translation was observed. Taken together, these data suggest that alphaviruses alter the ribosome during infection and that this alteration may contribute to differential translation of host and viral messages.

  16. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Ying [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Science, Kunming, Yunnan 650106 (China); Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Li, Qihan, E-mail: imbcams.lq@gmail.com [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China)

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  17. The DNA-bending protein HMGB1 is a cellular cofactor of Sleeping Beauty transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Hatem; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Khare, Dheeraj; Heinemann, Udo; Ivics, Zoltán

    2003-05-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is the most active Tc1/ mariner-type transposon in vertebrates. SB contains two transposase-binding sites (DRs) at the end of each terminal inverted repeat (IR), a feature termed the IR/DR structure. We investigated the involvement of cellular proteins in the regulation of SB transposition. Here, we establish that the DNA-bending, high-mobility group protein, HMGB1 is a host-encoded cofactor of SB transposition. Transposition was severely reduced in mouse cells deficient in HMGB1. This effect was rescued by transient over-expression of HMGB1, and was partially complemented by HMGB2, but not with the HMGA1 protein. Over-expression of HMGB1 in wild-type mouse cells enhanced transposition, indicating that HMGB1 can be a limiting factor of transposition. SB transposase was found to interact with HMGB1 in vivo, suggesting that the transposase may recruit HMGB1 to transposon DNA. HMGB1 stimulated preferential binding of the transposase to the DR further from the cleavage site, and promoted bending of DNA fragments containing the transposon IR. We propose that the role of HMGB1 is to ensure that transposase-transposon complexes are first formed at the internal DRs, and subsequently to promote juxtaposition of functional sites in transposon DNA, thereby assisting the formation of synaptic complexes.

  18. Chemical Genomics Identifies the PERK-Mediated Unfolded Protein Stress Response as a Cellular Target for Influenza Virus Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Landeras-Bueno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and the economy. Therefore, a large effort has been devoted to the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs directed to viral targets, as well as to the identification of cellular targets amenable to anti-influenza virus therapy. Here we have addressed the identification of such potential cellular targets by screening collections of drugs approved for human use. We reasoned that screening with a green fluorescent protein-based recombinant replicon system would identify cellular targets involved in virus transcription/replication and/or gene expression and hence address an early stage of virus infection. By using such a strategy, we identified Montelukast (MK as an inhibitor of virus multiplication. MK inhibited virus gene expression but did not alter viral RNA synthesis in vitro or viral RNA accumulation in vivo. The low selectivity index of MK prevented its use as an antiviral, but it was sufficient to identify a new cellular pathway suitable for anti-influenza virus intervention. By deep sequencing of RNA isolated from mock- and virus-infected human cells, treated with MK or left untreated, we showed that it stimulates the PERK-mediated unfolded protein stress response. The phosphorylation of PERK was partly inhibited in virus-infected cells but stimulated in MK-treated cells. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PERK phosphorylation led to increased viral gene expression, while inhibition of PERK phosphatase reduced viral protein synthesis. These results suggest the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response as a potential cellular target to modulate influenza virus infection.

  19. Predictable tuning of protein expression in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Pedersen, Margit; Klausen, Michael Schantz

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively assessed the contribution of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence to protein expression and used the data to develop EMOPEC (Empirical Model and Oligos for Protein Expression Changes; http://emopec.biosustain.dtu.dk). EMOPEC is a free tool that makes it possible to modulate the expressi...

  20. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

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    Evgeny Bychkov

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat increases the expression of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 73-kilodalton subunit modulating cellular and viral expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Marco A; Sancho, Rocío; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein, which is essential for HIV gene expression and viral replication, is known to mediate pleiotropic effects on various cell functions. For instance, Tat protein is able to regulate the rate of transcription of host cellular genes and to interact with the signaling machinery, leading to cellular dysfunction. To study the effect that HIV-1 Tat exerts on the host cell, we identified several genes that were up- or down-regulated in tat-expressing cell lines by using the differential display method. HIV-1 Tat specifically increases the expression of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) 73-kDa subunit (CPSF3) without affecting the expression of the 160- and 100-kDa subunits of the CPSF complex. This complex comprises four subunits and has a key function in the 3'-end processing of pre-mRNAs by a coordinated interaction with other factors. CPSF3 overexpression experiments and knockdown of the endogenous CPSF3 by mRNA interference have shown that this subunit of the complex is an important regulatory protein for both viral and cellular gene expression. In addition to the known CPSF3 function in RNA polyadenylation, we also present evidence that this protein exerts transcriptional activities by repressing the mdm2 gene promoter. Thus, HIV-1-Tat up-regulation of CPSF3 could represent a novel mechanism by which this virus increases mRNA processing, causing an increase in both cell and viral gene expression.

  2. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  3. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation-Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Forest M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation-mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks.

  4. ATR controls cellular adaptation to hypoxia through positive regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, F; Britton, S; Nieto, L; Salles, B; Muller, C

    2013-09-12

    Tumor cells adaptation to severe oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) plays a major role in tumor progression. The transcription factor HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 1), whose α-subunit is stabilized under hypoxic conditions is a key component of this process. Recent studies showed that two members of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs) family, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase), regulate the hypoxic-dependent accumulation of HIF-1. These proteins initiate cellular stress responses when DNA damage occurs. In addition, it has been demonstrated that extreme hypoxia induces a replicative stress resulting in regions of single-stranded DNA at stalled replication forks and the activation of ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related protein), another member of the PIKKs family. Here, we show that even less severe hypoxia (0.1% O2) also induces activation of ATR through replicative stress. Importantly, in using either transiently silenced ATR cells, cells expressing an inactive form of ATR or cells exposed to an ATR inhibitor (CGK733), we demonstrate that hypoxic ATR activation positively regulates the key transcription factor HIF-1 independently of the checkpoint kinase Chk1. We show that ATR kinase activity regulates HIF-1α at the translational level and we find that the elements necessary for the regulation of HIF-1α translation are located within the coding region of HIF-1α mRNA. Finally, by using three independent cellular models, we clearly show that the loss of ATR expression and/or kinase activity results in the decrease of HIF-1 DNA binding under hypoxia and consequently affects protein expression levels of two HIF-1 target genes, GLUT-1 and CAIX. Taken together, our data show a new function for ATR in cellular adaptation to hypoxia through regulation of HIF-1α translation. Our work offers new prospect for cancer therapy using ATR inhibitors with the potential to decrease cellular adaptation in hypoxic

  5. Mechanistic links between cellular trade-offs, gene expression, and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiße, Andrea Y; Oyarzún, Diego A; Danos, Vincent; Swain, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular processes rarely work in isolation but continually interact with the rest of the cell. In microbes, for example, we now know that gene expression across the whole genome typically changes with growth rate. The mechanisms driving such global regulation, however, are not well understood. Here we consider three trade-offs that, because of limitations in levels of cellular energy, free ribosomes, and proteins, are faced by all living cells and we construct a mechanistic model that comprises these trade-offs. Our model couples gene expression with growth rate and growth rate with a growing population of cells. We show that the model recovers Monod's law for the growth of microbes and two other empirical relationships connecting growth rate to the mass fraction of ribosomes. Further, we can explain growth-related effects in dosage compensation by paralogs and predict host-circuit interactions in synthetic biology. Simulating competitions between strains, we find that the regulation of metabolic pathways may have evolved not to match expression of enzymes to levels of extracellular substrates in changing environments but rather to balance a trade-off between exploiting one type of nutrient over another. Although coarse-grained, the trade-offs that the model embodies are fundamental, and, as such, our modeling framework has potentially wide application, including in both biotechnology and medicine.

  6. The proteome response to amyloid protein expression in vivo.

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    Ricardo A Gomes

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding disorders such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and transthyretin amyloidosis are characterized by the formation of protein amyloid deposits. Although the nature and location of the aggregated proteins varies between different diseases, they all share similar molecular pathways of protein unfolding, aggregation and amyloid deposition. Most effects of these proteins are likely to occur at the proteome level, a virtually unexplored reality. To investigate the effects of an amyloid protein expression on the cellular proteome, we created a yeast expression system using human transthyretin (TTR as a model amyloidogenic protein. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a living test tube, to express native TTR (non-amyloidogenic and the amyloidogenic TTR variant L55P, the later forming aggregates when expressed in yeast. Differential proteome changes were quantitatively analyzed by 2D-differential in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. We show that the expression of the amyloidogenic TTR-L55P causes a metabolic shift towards energy production, increased superoxide dismutase expression as well as of several molecular chaperones involved in protein refolding. Among these chaperones, members of the HSP70 family and the peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase (PPIase were identified. The latter is highly relevant considering that it was previously found to be a TTR interacting partner in the plasma of ATTR patients but not in healthy or asymptomatic subjects. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO expression is also increased. Our findings suggest that refolding and degradation pathways are activated, causing an increased demand of energetic resources, thus the metabolic shift. Additionally, oxidative stress appears to be a consequence of the amyloidogenic process, posing an enhanced threat to cell survival.

  7. Diurnal Rhythms Result in Significant Changes in the Cellular Protein Complement in the Cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockel, Jana; Jacobs, Jon M.; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Welsh, Eric A.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2011-02-22

    Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ,30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for,5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms.

  8. Diurnal Rhythms Result in Significant Changes in the Cellular Protein Complement in the Cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Liberton, Michelle; Welsh, Eric A.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2011-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ∼30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for ∼5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms. PMID:21364985

  9. Diurnal rhythms result in significant changes in the cellular protein complement in the cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Stöckel

    Full Text Available Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ∼30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for ∼5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms.

  10. Diurnal rhythms result in significant changes in the cellular protein complement in the cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, Jana; Jacobs, Jon M; Elvitigala, Thanura R; Liberton, Michelle; Welsh, Eric A; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Gritsenko, Marina A; Nicora, Carrie D; Koppenaal, David W; Smith, Richard D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-02-22

    Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ∼30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for ∼5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms.

  11. Expression of mRNA and protein-protein interaction of the antiviral endoribonuclease RNase L in mouse spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankush; Rath, Pramod C

    2014-08-01

    The interferon-inducible, 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A)-dependent endoribonuclease, RNase L is a unique antiviral RNA-degrading enzyme involved in RNA-metabolism, translational regulation, stress-response besides its anticancer/tumor-suppressor and antibacterial functions. RNase L represents complex cellular RNA-regulations in mammalian cells but diverse functions of RNase L are not completely explained by its 2-5A-regulated endoribonuclease activity. We hypothesized that RNase L has housekeeping function(s) through interaction with cellular proteins. We investigated RNase L mRNA expression in mouse tissues by RT-PCR and its protein-protein interaction in spleen by GST-pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays followed by proteomic analysis. RNase L mRNA is constitutively and differentially expressed in nine different mouse tissues, its level is maximum in immunological tissues (spleen, thymus and lungs), moderate in reproductive tissues (testis and prostate) and low in metabolic tissues (kidney, brain, liver and heart). Cellular proteins from mouse spleen [fibronectin precursor, β-actin, troponin I, myosin heavy chain 9 (non-muscle), growth-arrest specific protein 11, clathrin light chain B, a putative uncharacterized protein (Ricken cDNA 8030451F13) isoform (CRA_d) and alanyl tRNA synthetase] were identified as cellular RNase L-interacting proteins. Thus our results suggest for more general cellular functions of RNase L through protein-protein interactions in the spleen for immune response in mammals.

  12. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hafis Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bum-Chan [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su-Hyung [Laboratory of Translational Immunology and Vaccinology, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eui-Cheol, E-mail: ecshin@kaist.ac.kr [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  13. Express your LOV: an engineered flavoprotein as a reporter for protein expression and purification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayde A Gawthorne

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe the utility of Light, Oxygen, or Voltage-sensing (LOV flavoprotein domains from plant phototropins as a reporter for protein expression and function. Specifically, we used iLOV, an enhanced and more photostable variant of LOV. A pET-based plasmid for protein expression was constructed, encoding a C terminal iLOV-octahistidine (His8-tag and a HRV 3C protease cleavage recognition site. Ten different proteins, with various sub-cellular locations, were cloned into the plasmid, creating iLOV-His8 tag fusions. To test protein expression and how iLOV could be used as a reporter, the proteins were expressed in three different cell lines, in four different culture media, at two different temperatures. To establish whether the presence of the iLOV tag could have an impact on the functionality, one of the proteins, EspG, was over-expressed and purified. EspG is an "effector" protein normally produced by enterohemorrhagic E. coli strains and "injected" into host cells via the T3SS. We tested functionality of EspG-iLOV fusion by performing functional studies of EspG in mammalian host cells. When EspG-iLOV was microinjected into the host cell, the Golgi apparatus was completely disrupted as had previously been observed for EspG.

  14. Control of Cellular Structural Networks Through Unstructured Protein Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    structural and mechanical networks in cells. The research plan seeks to determine the role of molecular­scale steric forces on the assembly, mechanics...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 01-07-2016 1-Oct-2009 30-Sep-2015 Final Report: WHITEPAPER; Research Area 8; Control of cellular structural networks ...any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggesstions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate

  15. Essential dynamics of the cellular retinol-binding protein - Evidence for ligand-induced conformational changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalten, D.M.F.; Findlay, J.B.C.; Amadei, A; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) is an intracellular retinol carrier protein belonging to a family of hydrophobic ligand-binding proteins, It transports retinol to specific locations in the cell where, for instance, it is esterified for storage, Recently solved crystallographic structures

  16. Expression of cellular genes in HPV16-immortalized and cigarette smoke condensate-transformed human endocervical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Nakao, Y; Pater, M M; Tang, S C; Pater, A

    1997-09-01

    We studied the molecular mechanism of successive multistep cervical carcinogenic progression with our previously established in vitro model system. This system was composed of primary human endocervical cells (HEN), two lines of HEN immortalized by HPV16 and their counterparts subsequently malignantly transformed by cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). The expression was examined of diverse cellular genes associated with oncogenesis and senescence, especially for cervical cancer. Consistent results were seen for the pairs of immortalized and malignantly transformed lines. Immortalization of HEN by HPV16 resulted in enhanced expression of H-ras, c-myc, B-myb, p53, p16INK4 and PCNA mRNA; enhanced expression of p16 and PCNA proteins; decreased expression of WAF1/p21/Cip1/Sid1 and fibronectin mRNA; and decreased p53 protein. On the other hand, the CSC-transformed counterparts of HPV16-immortalized cells had up-regulated levels of B-myb, p53 and WAF1 mRNA and p53 protein. Our results indicate that the differential activation or inactivation of multiple cellular genes is important for the immortalization, as well as the transformation, of human cervical cells. Further, we suggest that our in vitro model system is useful for investigating the molecular mechanism of multistep cervical carcinogenesis.

  17. Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein expression in thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Gou Young; Lim, Sung-Jig; Kim, Youn Wha

    2010-12-01

    Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) has been implicated in several fundamental signal transduction pathways that control cellular growth, differentiation, apoptosis and migration. RKIP is reduced in a variety of human carcinomas, but RKIP expression in thyroid carcinomas has not been analyzed at the protein level. In this study, we examined the immunohistochemical expression of RKIP in various subtypes of thyroid carcinoma. Immunostaining for RKIP was performed on 104 cases of primary thyroid carcinoma (40 papillary, 29 follicular, 11 medullary, 11 poorly differentiated, and 13 anaplastic carcinomas) and 26 cases of nodal metastatic tumor (17 papillary, 4 medullary, and 5 anaplastic carcinomas). Normal thyroid tissue and all cases of follicular, papillary, and medullary carcinomas showed uniform, strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for RKIP. With the exception of one case, poorly differentiated carcinomas also revealed strong RKIP expression. In contrast, RKIP expression was completely absent in all anaplastic carcinomas. The transition zone from the differentiated carcinoma component (strong RKIP expression) to the anaplastic carcinoma component (no RKIP expression) demonstrated a completely opposite pattern of RKIP immunoreactivity. This reduction of RKIP expression in anaplastic carcinoma was statistically significant (P carcinomas showed uniform, strong cytoplasmic RKIP immunoreactivity, in contrast, in metastatic anaplastic carcinomas, RKIP expression was completely absent. RKIP expression is significantly reduced in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma as compared to other subtypes of thyroid carcinoma. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the precise mechanism of RKIP action in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

  18. Salinity and temperature variations reflecting on cellular PCNA, IGF-I and II expressions, body growth and muscle cellularity of a freshwater fish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Y S; Melo, R M C; Campos-Junior, P H A; Santos, J C E; Luz, R K; Rizzo, E; Bazzoli, N

    2014-06-01

    The present study assessed the influence of salinity and temperature on body growth and on muscle cellularity of Lophiosilurus alexaxdri vitelinic larvae. Slightly salted environments negatively influenced body growth of freshwater fish larvae and we observed that those conditions notably act as an environmental influencer on muscle growth and on local expression of hypertrophia and hypeplasia markers (IGFs and PCNA). Furthermore, we could see that salinity tolerance for NaCl 4gl(-)(1) diminishes with increasing temperature, evidenced by variation in body and muscle growth, and by irregular morphology of the lateral skeletal muscle of larvae. We saw that an increase of both PCNA and autocrine IGF-II are correlated to an increase in fibre numbers and fibre diameter as the temperature increases and salinity diminishes. On the other hand, autocrine IGF-I follows the opposite way to the other biological parameters assessed, increasing as salinity increases and temperature diminishes, showing that this protein did not participate in muscle cellularity, but participating in molecular/cellular repair. Therefore, slightly salted environments may provide adverse conditions that cause some obstacles to somatic growth of this species, suggesting some osmotic expenditure with a salinity increment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Delineation of a cellular hierarchy in lung cancer reveals an oncofetal antigen expressed on tumor-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelin, Marc; Geles, Kenneth G; Follettie, Maximillian T; Yuan, Ping; Baxter, Michelle; Golas, Jonathon; DiJoseph, John F; Karnoub, Maha; Huang, Shuguang; Diesl, Veronica; Behrens, Carmen; Choe, Sung E; Rios, Carol; Gruzas, Janet; Sridharan, Latha; Dougher, Maureen; Kunz, Arthur; Hamann, Philip R; Evans, Deborah; Armellino, Douglas; Khandke, Kiran; Marquette, Kimberly; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Boghaert, Erwin R; Abraham, Robert T; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Zhou, Bin-Bing S

    2011-06-15

    Poorly differentiated tumors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been associated with shorter patient survival and shorter time to recurrence following treatment. Here, we integrate multiple experimental models with clinicopathologic analysis of patient tumors to delineate a cellular hierarchy in NSCLC. We show that the oncofetal protein 5T4 is expressed on tumor-initiating cells and associated with worse clinical outcome in NSCLC. Coexpression of 5T4 and factors involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition were observed in undifferentiated but not in differentiated tumor cells. Despite heterogeneous expression of 5T4 in NSCLC patient-derived xenografts, treatment with an anti-5T4 antibody-drug conjugate resulted in complete and sustained tumor regression. Thus, the aggressive growth of heterogeneous solid tumors can be blocked by therapeutic agents that target a subpopulation of cells near the top of the cellular hierarchy.

  20. The adaptor protein FHL2 enhances the cellular innate immune response to influenza A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhoff, Carolin; Hillesheim, Andrea; Walter, Beate M; Haasbach, Emanuel; Planz, Oliver; Ehrhardt, Christina; Ludwig, Stephan; Wixler, Viktor

    2012-07-01

    The innate immune response of influenza A virus-infected cells is predominantly mediated by type I interferon-induced proteins. Expression of the interferon β (IFNβ) itself is initiated by accumulating viral RNA and is transmitted by different signalling cascades that feed into activation of the three transcriptional elements located in the IFNβ promoter, AP-1, IRF-3 and NF-κB. FHL2 (four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 2) is an adaptor molecule that shuttles between membrane and nucleus regulating signalling cascades and gene transcription. Here we describe FHL2 as a novel regulator of influenza A virus propagation. Using mouse FHL2 wild-type, knockout and rescued cells and human epithelial cells with different expression levels of FHL2 we showed that FHL2 decreases influenza A virus propagation by regulating the intrinsic cellular antiviral immune response. On virus infection FHL2 translocates into the nucleus, potentiating the IRF-3-dependent transcription of the IFNβ gene.

  1. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically inter...

  2. Direct protein-protein interactions and substrate channeling between cellular retinoic acid binding proteins and CYP26B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cara H; Peng, Chi-Chi; Lutz, Justin D; Yeung, Catherine K; Zelter, Alex; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-08-01

    Cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABPs) bind all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) tightly. This study aimed to determine whether atRA is channeled directly to cytochrome P450 (CYP) CYP26B1 by CRABPs, and whether CRABPs interact directly with CYP26B1. atRA bound to CRABPs (holo-CRABP) was efficiently metabolized by CYP26B1. Isotope dilution experiments showed that delivery of atRA to CYP26B1 in solution was similar with or without CRABP. Holo-CRABPs had higher affinity for CYP26B1 than free atRA, but both apo-CRABPs inhibited the formation of 4-OH-RA by CYP26B1. Similar protein-protein interactions between soluble binding proteins and CYPs may be important for other lipophilic CYP substrates.

  3. The Cellular Prion Protein Controls Notch Signaling in Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Halliez, Sophie; Hirsch, Théo Z; Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Passet, Bruno; Tomkiewicz, Céline; Villa-Diaz, Ana; Torres, Juan-Maria; Launay, Jean-Marie; Béringue, Vincent; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    The prion protein is infamous for its involvement in a group of neurodegenerative diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. In the longstanding quest to decipher the physiological function of its cellular isoform, PrP(C) , the discovery of its participation to the self-renewal of hematopoietic and neural stem cells has cast a new spotlight on its potential role in stem cell biology. However, still little is known on the cellular and molecular mechanisms at play. Here, by combining in vitro and in vivo murine models of PrP(C) depletion, we establish that PrP(C) deficiency severely affects the Notch pathway, which plays a major role in neural stem cell maintenance. We document that the absence of PrP(C) in a neuroepithelial cell line or in primary neurospheres is associated with drastically reduced expression of Notch ligands and receptors, resulting in decreased levels of Notch target genes. Similar alterations of the Notch pathway are recovered in the neuroepithelium of Prnp(-/-) embryos during a developmental window encompassing neural tube closure. In addition, in line with Notch defects, our data show that the absence of PrP(C) results in altered expression of Nestin and Olig2 as well as N-cadherin distribution. We further provide evidence that PrP(C) controls the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) downstream from Notch. Finally, we unveil a negative feedback action of EGFR on both Notch and PrP(C) . As a whole, our study delineates a molecular scenario through which PrP(C) takes part to the self-renewal of neural stem and progenitor cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:754-765.

  4. TRPM4 protein expression in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Soldini, Davide; Jung, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 4 (TRPM4) messenger RNA (mRNA) has been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer (PCa) and might be a new promising tissue biomarker. We evaluated TRPM4 protein expression and correlated the expression level with bioch......BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 4 (TRPM4) messenger RNA (mRNA) has been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer (PCa) and might be a new promising tissue biomarker. We evaluated TRPM4 protein expression and correlated the expression level.......79-2.62; p = 0.01-0.03 for the two observers) when compared to patients with a lower staining intensity. CONCLUSIONS: TRPM4 protein expression is widely expressed in benign and cancerous prostate tissue, with highest staining intensities found in PCa. Overexpression of TRPM4 in PCa (combination of high...

  5. Physiological enzymology: The next frontier in understanding protein structure and function at the cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Irene; Berdis, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the study of proteins has relied heavily on characterizing the activity of a single purified protein isolated from other cellular components. This classic approach allowed scientists to unambiguously define the intrinsic kinetic and chemical properties of that protein. The ultimate hope was to extrapolate this information toward understanding how the enzyme or receptor behaves within its native cellular context. These types of detailed in vitro analyses were necessary to reduce the innate complexities of measuring the singular activity and biochemical properties of a specific enzyme without interference from other enzymes and potential competing substrates. However, recent developments in fields encompassing cell biology, molecular imaging, and chemical biology now provide the unique chemical tools and instrumentation to study protein structure, function, and regulation in their native cellular environment. These advancements provide the foundation for a new field, coined physiological enzymology, which quantifies the function and regulation of enzymes and proteins at the cellular level. In this Special Edition, we explore the area of Physiological Enzymology and Protein Function through a series of review articles that focus on the tools and techniques used to measure the cellular activity of proteins inside living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions.

  6. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simarro, Maria [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kedersha, Nancy [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A. [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Rhee, Kirsten [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Benarafa, Charaf [Theodor Kocher Institute, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Orduna, Anonio [Unidad de Investigacion, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Anderson, Paul, E-mail: panderson@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  7. Cellular retinol binding protein 1 could be a tumor suppressor gene in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Rodriguez, Mónica; Arreola, Hugo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Peralta, Raúl; Serna, Humberto; Villegas, Vanessa; Romero, Pablo; Alvarado-Hernández, Beatriz; Paniagua, Lucero; Marrero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Meraz, Marco A; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Cervical Cancer (CC) is one of the most important health problems in women. It frequently presents genetic changes at chromosome region 3q21. This region contains the Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 gene (CRBP1) which has been implicated as an important element in the development of other types of cancer. The main goal of the present work was to determine the molecular alterations of CRBP1 and its relationship to CC. Methods: To determine the molecular alterations of CRBP1 gene in CC; twenty-six CC and twenty-six healthy cervix samples were evaluated for: 1) Copy number gain by real-time PCR analysis, 2) expression levels by an immunohistochemistry assay on tissue microarray, and 3) the methylation status of the CRBP1 promoter region. Results: The increase in CRBP1 copy number was observed in 10 out of the 26 CC samples analyzed, while healthy cervices samples showed no changes in the copy number. In addition, there was a lack of expression of the CRBP1 gene in an important number of the CC samples (17/26), and the CRBP1 gene promoter was methylated in 15/26 of the CC samples. Interestingly, there was a significant association between the lack of expression of the CRBP1 gene and its methylation status. Conclusions: The data indicates that, both activating and inactivating changes in the CRBP1 gene could be significant events in the development and progression of CC, and the lack of expression of the CRBP1 protein could be related with to the development of CC. We believe that there is enough evidence to consider to CRBP1 gene as a tumor suppressor gene for CC. PMID:24040446

  8. Roadmap to cellular reprogramming--manipulating transcriptional networks with DNA, RNA, proteins and small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörsdörfer, P; Thier, M; Kadari, A; Edenhofer, F

    2013-06-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that the plasticity of mammalian somatic cells is much higher than previously assumed and that ectopic expression of transcription factors may have the potential to induce the conversion of any cell type into another. Fibroblast cells can be converted into embryonic stem cell-like cells, neural cells, cardiomyocytes, macrophage-like cells as well as blood progenitors. Additionally, the conversion of astrocytes into neurons or neural stem cells into monocytes has been demonstrated. Nowadays, in the era of systems biology, continuously growing holistic data sets are providing increasing insights into core transcriptional networks and cellular signaling pathways. This knowledge enables cell biologists to understand how cellular fate is determined and how it could be manipulated. As a consequence for biomedical applications, it might be soon possible to convert patient specific somatic cells directly into desired transplantable other cell types. The clinical value, however, of such reprogrammed cells is currently limited due to the invasiveness of methods applied to induce reprogramming factor activity. This review will focus on experimental strategies to ectopically induce cell fate modulators. We will emphasize those strategies that enable efficient and robust overexpression of transcription factors by minimal genetic alterations of the host genome. Furthermore, we will discuss procedures devoid of any genomic manipulation, such as the direct delivery of mRNA, proteins, or the use of small molecules. By this, we aim to give a comprehensive overview on state of the art techniques that harbor the potential to generate safe reprogrammed cells for clinical applications.

  9. Highly efficient enzyme encapsulation in a protein nanocage: towards enzyme catalysis in a cellular nanocompartment mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Lise; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions.The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the cloning, expression, and purification of all proteins, as well as supplementary figures and calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04181g

  10. Metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases in mesothelial cells. Cellular differentiation influences expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, B C; Santana, A; Xu, Q P; Petersen, M J; Campbell, E J; Hoidal, J R; Welgus, H G

    1993-04-01

    Mesothelial cells play a critical role in the remodeling process that follows serosal injury. Although mesothelial cells are known to synthesize a variety of extracellular matrix components including types I, III, and IV collagens, their potential to participate in matrix degradation has not been explored. We now report that human pleural and peritoneal mesothelial cells express interstitial collagenase, 72- and 92-kD gelatinases (type IV collagenases), and the counterregulatory tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP). Our initial characterization of the mesothelial cell metalloenzymes and TIMP has revealed: (a) they are likely identical to corresponding molecules secreted by other human cells; (b) they are secreted rather than stored in an intracellular pool; (c) a primary site of regulation occurs at a pretranslational level; (d) phorbol myristate acetate, via activation of protein kinase C, upregulates expression of collagenase, 92-kD gelatinase, and TIMP, but has no effect on expression of 72-kD gelatinase; and (e) lipopolysaccharide fails to upregulate the biosynthesis of either metalloproteinases or TIMP. Of particular interest is the observation that the state of cellular differentiation has a striking influence on the expression of metalloenzymes and TIMP, such that epitheloid cells display a more matrix-degradative phenotype (increased 92-kD gelatinase and decreased TIMP) than their fibroblastoid counterparts. We speculate that mesothelial cells directly participate in the extracellular matrix turnover that follows serosal injury via elaboration of metalloproteinases and TIMP. Additionally, the reactive cuboidal mesothelium which is characteristic of the early response to serosal injury may manifest a matrix-degenerative phenotype favoring normal repair rather than fibrosis.

  11. Differentially expressed cytosolic proteins in human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines correlate with lineages and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gez, Swetlana; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-09-01

    Identification of cytosolic proteins differentially expressed between types of leukemia and lymphoma may provide a molecular basis for classification and understanding their cellular properties. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry have been used to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in cytosolic extracts from four human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines: HL-60 (acute promyelocytic leukemia), MEC1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia), CCRF-CEM (T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) and Raji (B-cell Burkitt's lymphoma). A total of 247 differentially expressed proteins were identified between the four cell lines. Analysis of the data by principal component analysis identified 22 protein spots (17 different protein species) differentially expressed at more than a 95% variance level between these cell lines. Several of these proteins were differentially expressed in only one cell line: HL-60 (myeloperoxidase, phosphoprotein 32 family member A, ras related protein Rab-11B, protein disulfide-isomerase, ran-specific GTPase-activating protein, nucleophosmin and S-100 calcium binding protein A4), and Raji (ezrin). Several of these proteins were differentially expressed in two cell lines: Raji and MEC1 (C-1-tetrahydrofolate synthase, elongation factor 2, alpha- and beta-tubulin, transgelin-2 and stathmin). MEC1 and CCRF-CEM (gamma-enolase), HL-60 and CCRF-CEM (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 N). The differentially expressed proteins identified in these four cell lines correlate with cellular properties and provide insights into the molecular basis of these malignancies.

  12. Porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM): protein expression, mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Walid A; Chen, Jun; Haig, Jennifer; Antoon, Roula; Litman, Jessica; Sherman, Christopher; Derwin, Kathleen; Yeger, Herman

    2008-06-01

    Experimentally, porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM) that mimics extracellular matrix has excellent potential as a bladder substitute. Herein we investigated the spatial localization and expression of different key cellular and extracellular proteins in the ACM; furthermore, we evaluated the inherent mechanical properties of the resultant ACM prior to implantation. Using a proprietary decellularization method, the DNA contents in both ACM and normal bladder were measured; in addition we used immunohistochemistry and western blots to quantify and localize the different cellular and extracellular components, and finally the mechanical testing was performed using a uniaxial mechanical testing machine. The mean DNA content in the ACM was significantly lower in the ACM compared to the bladder. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical and western blot analyses showed that collagen I and IV were preserved in the ACM, but possibly denatured collagen III in the ACM. Furthermore, elastin, laminin and fibronectin were mildly reduced in the ACM. Although the ACM did not exhibit nucleated cells, residual cellular components (actin, myosin, vimentin and others) were still present. There was, on the other hand, no significant difference in the mean stiffness between the ACM and the bladder. Although our decellularization method is effective in removing nuclear material from the bladder while maintaining its inherent mechanical properties, further work is mandatory to determine whether these residual DNA and cellular remnants would lead to any immune reaction, or if the mechanical properties of the ACM are preserved upon implantation and cellularization.

  13. Porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM): protein expression, mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhat, Walid A [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, University of Toronto and Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8 (Canada); Chen Jun; Haig, Jennifer; Antoon, Roula; Litman, Jessica; Yeger, Herman [Department of Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8 (Canada); Sherman, Christopher [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Derwin, Kathleen [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute and Orthopaedic Research Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)], E-mail: walid.farhat@sickkids.ca

    2008-06-01

    Experimentally, porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM) that mimics extracellular matrix has excellent potential as a bladder substitute. Herein we investigated the spatial localization and expression of different key cellular and extracellular proteins in the ACM; furthermore, we evaluated the inherent mechanical properties of the resultant ACM prior to implantation. Using a proprietary decellularization method, the DNA contents in both ACM and normal bladder were measured; in addition we used immunohistochemistry and western blots to quantify and localize the different cellular and extracellular components, and finally the mechanical testing was performed using a uniaxial mechanical testing machine. The mean DNA content in the ACM was significantly lower in the ACM compared to the bladder. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical and western blot analyses showed that collagen I and IV were preserved in the ACM, but possibly denatured collagen III in the ACM. Furthermore, elastin, laminin and fibronectin were mildly reduced in the ACM. Although the ACM did not exhibit nucleated cells, residual cellular components (actin, myosin, vimentin and others) were still present. There was, on the other hand, no significant difference in the mean stiffness between the ACM and the bladder. Although our decellularization method is effective in removing nuclear material from the bladder while maintaining its inherent mechanical properties, further work is mandatory to determine whether these residual DNA and cellular remnants would lead to any immune reaction, or if the mechanical properties of the ACM are preserved upon implantation and cellularization.

  14. Characterization, sub-cellular localization and expression profiling of the isoprenylcysteine methylesterase gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wujun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isoprenylcysteine methylesterases (ICME demethylate prenylated protein in eukaryotic cell. Until now, knowledge about their molecular information, localization and expression pattern is largely unavailable in plant species. One ICME in Arabidopsis, encoded by At5g15860, has been identified recently. Over-expression of At5g15860 caused an ABA hypersensitive phenotype in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, indicating that it functions as a positive regulator of ABA signaling. Moreover, ABA induced the expression of this gene in Arabidopsis seedlings. The current study extends these findings by examining the sub-cellular localization, expression profiling, and physiological functions of ICME and two other ICME-like proteins, ICME-LIKE1 and ICME-LIKE2, which were encoded by two related genes At1g26120 and At3g02410, respectively. Results Bioinformatics investigations showed that the ICME and other two ICME-like homologs comprise a small subfamily of carboxylesterase (EC 3.1.1.1 in Arabidopsis. Sub-cellular localization of GFP tagged ICME and its homologs showed that the ICME and ICME-like proteins are intramembrane proteins predominantly localizing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi apparatus. Semi-quantitative and real-time quantitative PCR revealed that the ICME and ICME-like genes are expressed in all examined tissues, including roots, rosette leaves, cauline leaves, stems, flowers, and siliques, with differential expression levels. Within the gene family, the base transcript abundance of ICME-LIKE2 gene is very low with higher expression in reproductive organs (flowers and siliques. Time-course analysis uncovered that both ICME and ICME-like genes are up-regulated by mannitol, NaCl and ABA treatment, with ICME showing the highest level of up-regulation by these treatments. Heat stress resulted in up-regulation of the ICME gene significantly but down-regulation of the ICME-LIKE1 and ICME-LIKE2 genes. Cold and dehydration

  15. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories

  16. GCK-MODY diabetes associated with protein misfolding, cellular self-association and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, Maria; Aukrust, Ingvild; Johansson, Bente B; Molnes, Janne; Molven, Anders; Matschinsky, Franz M; Søvik, Oddmund; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2012-11-01

    GCK-MODY, dominantly inherited mild fasting hyperglycemia, has been associated with >600 different mutations in the glucokinase (GK)-encoding gene (GCK). When expressed as recombinant pancreatic proteins, some mutations result in enzymes with normal/near-normal catalytic properties. The molecular mechanism(s) of GCK-MODY due to these mutations has remained elusive. Here, we aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms for two such catalytically 'normal' GCK mutations (S263P and G264S) in the F260-L270 loop of GK. When stably overexpressed in HEK293 cells and MIN6 β-cells, the S263P- and G264S-encoded mutations generated misfolded proteins with an increased rate of degradation (S263P>G264S) by the protein quality control machinery, and a propensity to self-associate (G264S>S263P) and form dimers (SDS resistant) and aggregates (partly Triton X-100 insoluble), as determined by pulse-chase experiments and subcellular fractionation. Thus, the GCK-MODY mutations S263P and G264S lead to protein misfolding causing destabilization, cellular dimerization/aggregation and enhanced rate of degradation. In silico predicted conformational changes of the F260-L270 loop structure are considered to mediate the dimerization of both mutant proteins by a domain swapping mechanism. Thus, similar properties may represent the molecular mechanisms for additional unexplained GCK-MODY mutations, and may also contribute to the disease mechanism in other previously characterized GCK-MODY inactivating mutations.

  17. FERM family proteins and their importance in cellular movements and wound healing (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanquet, David C; Ye, Lin; Harding, Keith G; Jiang, Wen G

    2014-07-01

    Motility is a requirement for a number of biological processes, including embryonic development, neuronal development, immune responses, cancer progression and wound healing. Specific to wound healing is the migration of endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other key cellular players into the wound space. Aberrations in wound healing can result in either chronic wounds or abnormally healed wounds. The protein 4.1R, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) superfamily consists of over 40 proteins all containing a three lobed N-terminal FERM domain which binds a variety of cell-membrane associated proteins and lipids. The C-terminal ends of these proteins typically contain an actin-binding domain (ABD). These proteins therefore mediate the linkage between the cell membrane and the actin cytoskeleton, and are involved in cellular movements and migration. Certain FERM proteins have been shown to promote cancer metastasis via this very mechanism. Herein we review the effects of a number of FERM proteins on wound healing and cancer. We show how these proteins typically aid wound healing through their effects on increasing cellular migration and movements, but also typically promote metastasis in cancer. We conclude that FERM proteins play important roles in cellular migration, with markedly different outcomes in the context of cancer and wound healing.

  18. Cellular functions of gamma-secretase-related proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Haffner, Christof; Haass, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Amyloid-beta pepticle (A beta) is generated by gamma-secretase, a membrane protein complex with an unusual aspartyl protease activity consisting of the four components presenilin, nicastrin, APH-1 and PEN-2. Presenilin is considered the catalytic subunit of this complex since it represents the prototype of the new family of intramembrane-cleaving GxGD-type aspartyl proteases. Recently, five novel members of this family and a nicastrin-like protein were identified. Whereas one of the GxGD-type...

  19. A Stable HeLa Cell Line That Inducibly Expresses Poliovirus 2Apro: Effects on Cellular and Viral Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, Angel; Feduchi, Elena; Carrasco, Luis

    2000-01-01

    A HeLa cell clone (2A7d) that inducibly expresses the gene for poliovirus protease 2A (2Apro) under the control of tetracycline has been obtained. Synthesis of 2Apro induces severe morphological changes in 2A7d cells. One day after tetracycline removal, cells round up and a few hours later die. Poliovirus 2Apro cleaves both forms of initiation factor eIF4G, causing extensive inhibition of capped-mRNA translation a few hours after protease induction. Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone, a selective inhibitor of 2Apro, prevents both eIF4G cleavage and inhibition of translation but not cellular death. Expression of 2Apro still allows both the replication of poliovirus and the translation of mRNAs containing a picornavirus leader sequence, while vaccinia virus replication is drastically inhibited. Translation of transfected capped mRNA is blocked in 2A7d-On cells, while luciferase synthesis from a mRNA bearing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence is enhanced by the presence of 2Apro. Moreover, synthesis of 2Apro in 2A7d cells complements the translational defect of a poliovirus 2Apro-defective variant. These results show that poliovirus 2Apro expression mimics some phenotypical characteristics of poliovirus-infected cells, such as cell rounding, inhibition of protein synthesis and enhancement of IRES-driven translation. This cell line constitutes a useful tool to further analyze 2Apro functions, to complement poliovirus 2Apro mutants, and to test antiviral compounds. PMID:10666269

  20. Expression of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein in peripheral blood and lesion of patients with lichen planus%凋亡抑制蛋白c-FLIP在扁平苔癣患者外周血淋巴细胞和皮损中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    化红霞

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression and distribution of cellular FLICE( Fas-assoelated death domain-like interleukin-I β-converting enzyme-like)-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) in peripheral blood and lesions of lichen planus patients. Methods Peripheral blood and skin samples were obtained from 30 patients with lichen planns and 20 normal controls. Flow cytometry was used to detect intracellular c-Fl,lP in peripheral T and B lymphocytes, and immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of c-FLIP in lesionai tissue. Results Based on the pesitivity rate of c-FLIP, there was a significant increase in T iymphocytes in lichen planus compared with normal controls(6.32%±1. 17% vs 2.28%±0.54%, P 0. 05 ). The expression intensity of c-FLIP in keratinocytes was also higher in lichen planusthanthatinnormalcontrols ( 89.73%± 5.24% vs 121.58% ±7.93% ,P 0.05).c-FLTP蛋白在扁平苔癣患者皮损中的表达(89.73%±5.24%)明显高于正常人对照组(121.58%±7.93%),P<0.01.结论 凋亡抑制蛋白c-FLIP在扁平苔癣患者的外周血T细胞和皮损内明显高表达,可能参与扁平苔癣患者T细胞的增殖.

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRR isoforms in cellular signaling and trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilaver, Gönül

    2005-01-01

    Previous work has revealed the existence of two Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in mouse, PTPBR7 and PTP-SL, that were in part identical, suggesting that they originated from the same gene, termed Ptprr (1,5,6). In this thesis, I report on the characterization of the various PTPRR isoforms in neuronal

  2. Reprogramming cellular events by poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pic, Émilie; Ethier, Chantal; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Poirier, Guy G.; Gagné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). These enzymes covalently modify glutamic, aspartic and lysine amino acid side chains of acceptor proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose (ADPr) units. The poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) polymers formed alter the physico-chemical characteristics of the substrate with functional consequences on its biological activities. Recently, non-covalent binding to pADPr has emerged as a key mechanism to modulate and coordinate several intracellular pathways including the DNA damage response, protein stability and cell death. In this review, we describe the basis of non-covalent binding to pADPr that has led to the emerging concept of pADPr-responsive signaling pathways. This review emphasizes the structural elements and the modular strategies developed by pADPr-binding proteins to exert a fine-tuned control of a variety of pathways. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions are highly regulated processes, both spatially and temporally, for which at least four specialized pADPr-binding modules accommodate different pADPr structures and reprogram protein functions. In this review, we highlight the role of well-characterized and newly discovered pADPr-binding modules in a diverse set of physiological functions. PMID:23268355

  3. TAp63γ demethylation regulates protein stability and cellular distribution during neural stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria B Fonseca

    Full Text Available p63 is a close relative of the p53 tumor suppressor and transcription factor that modulates cell fate. The full-length isoform of p63, containing a transactivation (TA domain (TAp63 is an essential proapoptotic protein in neural development. The role of p63 in epithelial development is also well established; however, its precise function during neural differentiation remains largely controversial. Recently, it has been demonstrated that several conserved elements of apoptosis are also integral components of cellular differentiation; p53 directly interacts with key regulators of neurogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of p63 during mouse neural stem cell (NSC differentiation and test whether the histone H3 lysine 27-specific demethylase JMJD3 interacts with p63 to redirect NSCs to neurogenesis. Our results showed that JMJD3 and TAp63γ are coordinately regulated to establish neural-specific gene expression programs in NSCs undergoing differentiation. JMJD3 overexpression increased TAp63γ levels in a demethylase activity-dependent manner. Importantly, overexpression of TAp63γ increased β-III tubulin whereas downregulation of TAp63γ by specific p63 siRNA decreased β-III tubulin. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated direct interaction between TAp63γ and JMJD3, and modulation of TAp63γ methylation status by JMJD3-demethylase activity. Importantly, the demethylase activity of JMJD3 influenced TAp63γ protein stabilization and cellular distribution, as well as TAp63γ-regulated neurogenesis. These findings clarify the role of p63 in adult neural progenitor cells and reveal TAp63γ as a direct target for JMJD3-mediated neuronal commitment.

  4. Inhibition of thyrotropin-stimulated DNA synthesis by microinjection of inhibitors of cellular Ras and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupperman, E; Wen, W; Meinkoth, J L

    1993-08-01

    Microinjection of a dominant interfering mutant of Ras (N17 Ras) caused a significant reduction in thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH])-stimulated DNA synthesis in rat thyroid cells. A similar reduction was observed following injection of the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Coinjection of both inhibitors almost completely abolished TSH-induced DNA synthesis. In contrast to TSH, overexpression of cellular Ras protein did not stimulate the expression of a cyclic AMP response element-regulated reporter gene. Similarly, injection of N17 Ras had no effect on TSH-stimulated reporter gene expression. Moreover, overexpression of cellular Ras protein stimulated similar levels of DNA synthesis in the presence or absence of the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor. Together, these results suggest that in Wistar rat thyroid cells, a full mitogenic response to TSH requires both Ras and cyclic APK-dependent protein kinase.

  5. Analysis of genes differentially expressed during initial cellular dedifferentiation in cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU HuaGuo; TU LiLi; JIN ShuangXia; XU Li; TAN JiaFu; DENG FengLin; ZHANG XianLong

    2008-01-01

    The early phase of phytohormone induction is a vital stage of somatic embryogenesis. This phase includes a key process for acquiring cellular totipotency through cellular dedifferentiation. To unravel the molecular mechanism of cellular dedifferentiation in cotton, we constructed a cDNA library using the suppression subtractive hybridization method. A total of 286 differential cDNA clones were sequenced and identified. Among these clones, 112 unique ESTs were significantly up-regulated during the early phase of phytohormone induction, and 40.2% of the ESTs were first identified. GST was highly expressed from 6 to 24 h after induction with phytohormone treatment. PRPs were predominantly expressed and exhibited distinct expression patterns in different treatments, suggesting that they are closely related to cellular dedifferentiation in cotton. Putative GhSAMS, GhSAMDC, GhSAHH and GhACO3 involvement in SAM metabolism was identified in this library. The analysis of qRT-PCR showed that two remarkable increased expressions of the four SAM-related genes happened during the early phase of phytohormone induction, and that a highly positive correlation existed between GhSAMS and GhSAHH. The highest expression level of GhSAMS might be associated with its reentry into the cell cycle. The histological observations further showed that some cells accomplished cellular dedifferentiation and division within 72 h in 2,4-D treatment, and that cellular dedifferentiation might be regulated through two alterations in SAM-dependent transmethylation activity in cotton. In addition, the expression patterns of differential genes in different treatments disclosed the complicated interaction between 2, 4-D and kinetin.

  6. hTERT protein expression is independent of clinicopathological parameters and c-Myc protein expression in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meligonis G

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that synthesises telomeres after cell division and maintains chromosomal length and stability thus leading to cellular immortalisation. The hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit seems to be the rate-limiting determinant of telomerase and knowledge of factors controlling hTERT transcription may be useful in therapeutic strategies. The hTERT promoter contains binding sites for c-Myc and there is some experimental and in vitro evidence that c-Myc may increase hTERT expression. We previously reported no correlation between c-Myc mRNA expression and hTERT mRNA or telomerase activity in human breast cancer. This study aims to examine the correlation between hTERT expression as determined by immunohistochemistry and c-Myc expression, lymph node status, and tumour size and grade in human breast cancer. Materials and methods The immunohistochemical expression of hTERT and c-Myc was investigated in 38 malignant breast tumours. The expression of hTERT was then correlated with the lymph node status, c-Myc expression and other clinicopathological parameters of the tumours. Results hTERT expression was positive in 27 (71% of the 38 tumours. 15 (79% of 19 node positive tumours were hTERT positive compared with 11 (63% of 19 node negative tumours. The expression was higher in node positive tumours but this failed to reach statistical significance (p = 0.388. There was no significant association with tumour size, tumour grade or c-Myc expression. However, hTERT expression correlated positively with patients' age (correlation coefficient = 0.415, p = 0.0097. Conclusion hTERT protein expression is independent of lymph node status, tumour size and grade and c-Myc protein expression in human breast cancer

  7. Analysis of correlations between protein complex and protein-protein interaction and mRNA expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Lun; XUE Hong; LU Hongchao; ZHAO Yi; ZHU Xiaopeng; BU Dongbo; LING Lunjiang; CHEN Runsheng

    2003-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction is a physical interaction of two proteins in living cells. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, large-scale protein-protein interaction data have been obtained through high-throughput yeast two-hybrid systems (Y2H) and protein complex purification techniques based on mass-spectrometry. Here, we collect 11855 interactions between total 2617 proteins. Through seriate genome-wide mRNA expression data, similarity between two genes could be measured. Protein complex data can also be obtained publicly and can be translated to pair relationship that any two proteins can only exist in the same complex or not. Analysis of protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data can elucidate correlations between them. The results show that proteins that have interactions or similar expression patterns have a higher possibility to be in the same protein complex than randomized selected proteins, and proteins which have interactions and similar expression patterns are even more possible to exist in the same protein complex. The work indicates that comprehensive integration and analysis of public large-scale bioinformatical data, such as protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data, may help to uncover their relationships and common biological information underlying these data. The strategies described here may help to integrate and analyze other functional genomic and proteomic data, such as gene expression profiling, protein-localization mapping and large-scale phenotypic data, both in yeast and in other organisms.

  8. The fluorescent protein palette: tools for cellular imaging†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    This critical review provides an overview of the continually expanding family of fluorescent proteins (FPs) that have become essential tools for studies of cell biology and physiology. Here, we describe the characteristics of the genetically encoded fluorescent markers that now span the visible spectrum from deep blue to deep red. We identify some of the novel FPs that have unusual characteristics that make them useful reporters of the dynamic behaviors of proteins inside cells, and describe how many different optical methods can be combined with the FPs to provide quantitative measurements in living systems. “If wood is rubbed with the Pulmo marinus, it will have all the appearance of being on fire; so much so, indeed, that a walking-stick, thus treated, will light the way like a torch” (translation of Pliny the Elder from John Bostock, 1855). PMID:19771335

  9. Cellular Reprogramming Using Protein and Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong Jong Seo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, stem cells have been suggested as invaluable tools for cell therapy because of their self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential. Thus, scientists have developed a variety of methods to generate pluripotent stem cells, from nuclear transfer technology to direct reprogramming using defined factors, or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. Considering the ethical issues and efficiency, iPSCs are thought to be one of the most promising stem cells for cell therapy. Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated by transduction with a virus, plasmid, RNA, or protein. Herein, we provide an overview of the current technology for iPSC generation and describe protein-based transduction technology in detail.

  10. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Loucks, Catrina M.; Bialas, Nathan J.; Dekkers, Martijn; Walker, Denise S.; Grundy, Laura J.; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P. Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Michel R Leroux

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-a...

  11. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Loucks, Catrina M.; Bialas, Nathan J.; Dekkers, Martijn P. J.; Walker, Denise S.; Grundy, Laura J.; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P. Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Michel R Leroux

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-a...

  12. EDTA treatment alters protein glycosylation in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.M.; Brownstein, S.A. (Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville (USA))

    1988-03-01

    The authors have found that treatment of cells with EDTA resulted in the accumulation of lower molecular weight forms of two cell-type-specific glycoproteins. These new glycoproteins lacked a developmentally regulated glycoantigen defined by monoclonal antibody 54.2. Since EDTA dissociated the cells, the possible involvement of cell separation was tested by immobilizing cells in soft agarose. Glycoantigen expression on these proteins was found to be dependent on cAMP and high oxygen tension but not on cell contact, and was reversibly sensitive to EDTA regardless of the state of cell association. The EDTA effect was mimicked by other soluble, but not particulate, membrane impermeable chelators, could be completed by Zn{sup 2+} better than Mg{sup 2+}, and appeared to involve an intracellular mechanism. Studies with ({sup 14}C)EDTA showed that EDTA equilibrated with a cellular compartment in a temperature-dependent, Zn{sup 2+}-insensitive fashion with half-time kinetics of loading and unloading of 30-40 min. The data suggest that this step in glycosylation, which was found to be delayed 1 or more hours subsequent to protein synthesis, involves an intracellular, transition metal-ion-dependent process which can be modulated by chelators entering the cell through the endocytic pathway.

  13. The Cellular Prion Protein Prevents Copper-Induced Inhibition of P2X4 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón A. Lorca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the physiological function of the cellular prion protein (PrPC remains unknown, several evidences support the notion of its role in copper homeostasis. PrPC binds Cu2+ through a domain composed by four to five repeats of eight amino acids. Previously, we have shown that the perfusion of this domain prevents and reverses the inhibition by Cu2+ of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP-evoked currents in the P2X4 receptor subtype, highlighting a modulatory role for PrPC in synaptic transmission through regulation of Cu2+ levels. Here, we study the effect of full-length PrPC in Cu2+ inhibition of P2X4 receptor when both are coexpressed. PrPC expression does not significantly change the ATP concentration-response curve in oocytes expressing P2X4 receptors. However, the presence of PrPC reduces the inhibition by Cu2+ of the ATP-elicited currents in these oocytes, confirming our previous observations with the Cu2+ binding domain. Thus, our observations suggest a role for PrPC in modulating synaptic activity through binding of extracellular Cu2+.

  14. The Cellular Prion Protein Prevents Copper-Induced Inhibition of P2X4 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorca, Ramón A.; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Although the physiological function of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) remains unknown, several evidences support the notion of its role in copper homeostasis. PrPC binds Cu2+ through a domain composed by four to five repeats of eight amino acids. Previously, we have shown that the perfusion of this domain prevents and reverses the inhibition by Cu2+ of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-evoked currents in the P2X4 receptor subtype, highlighting a modulatory role for PrPC in synaptic transmission through regulation of Cu2+ levels. Here, we study the effect of full-length PrPC in Cu2+ inhibition of P2X4 receptor when both are coexpressed. PrPC expression does not significantly change the ATP concentration-response curve in oocytes expressing P2X4 receptors. However, the presence of PrPC reduces the inhibition by Cu2+ of the ATP-elicited currents in these oocytes, confirming our previous observations with the Cu2+ binding domain. Thus, our observations suggest a role for PrPC in modulating synaptic activity through binding of extracellular Cu2+. PMID:22114745

  15. A single-cell bioluminescence imaging system for monitoring cellular gene expression in a plant body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Kubota, Saya; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process and expression dynamics are of great interest in life science. We succeeded in monitoring cellular gene expression in a duckweed plant, Lemna gibba, using bioluminescent reporters. Using particle bombardment, epidermal and mesophyll cells were transfected with the luciferase gene (luc+) under the control of a constitutive [Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S)] and a rhythmic [Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1)] promoter. Bioluminescence images were captured using an EM-CCD (electron multiply charged couple device) camera. Luminescent spots of the transfected cells in the plant body were quantitatively measured at the single-cell level. Luminescence intensities varied over a 1,000-fold range among CaMV35S::luc+-transfected cells in the same plant body and showed a log-normal-like frequency distribution. We monitored cellular gene expression under light-dark conditions by capturing bioluminescence images every hour. Luminescence traces of ≥50 individual cells in a frond were successfully obtained in each monitoring procedure. Rhythmic and constitutive luminescence behaviors were observed in cells transfected with AtCCA1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+, respectively. Diurnal rhythms were observed in every AtCCA1::luc+-introduced cell with traceable luminescence, and slight differences were detected in their rhythmic waveforms. Thus the single-cell bioluminescence monitoring system was useful for the characterization of cellular gene expression in a plant body.

  16. Integral Membrane Protein Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Stroud, Robert M; Hays, Franklin A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic integral membrane proteins are challenging targets for crystallography or functional characterization in a purified state. Since expression is often a limiting factor when studying this difficult class of biological macromolecules, the intent of this chapter is to focus on the expression of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins (IMPs) using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae is a prime candidate for the expression of eukaryotic IMPs because it offers the convenience of using episomal expression plasmids, selection of positive transformants, posttranslational modifications, and it can properly fold and target IMPs. Here we present a generalized protocol and insights based on our collective knowledge as an aid to overcoming the challenges faced when expressing eukaryotic IMPs in S. cerevisiae.

  17. Autoantigenic proteins that bind recombinogenic sequences in Epstein-Barr virus and cellular DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    We have identified conserved autoantigenic cellular proteins that bind to G-rich sequence motifs in recombinogenic regions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA. This binding activity, called TRBP, recognizes the EBV terminal repeats, a locus responsible for interconversion of linear and circular EBV DNA. We found that TRBP also binds to EBV DNA sequences involved in deletion of EBNA2, a gene product required for immortalization. We show that TRBP binds sequences present in repetitive cellular DNA,...

  18. Biotechnology Protein Expression and Purification Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the Project Scientist Core Facility is to provide purified proteins, both recombinant and natural, to the Biotechnology Science Team Project Scientists and the NRA-Structural Biology Test Investigators. Having a core facility for this purpose obviates the need for each scientist to develop the necessary expertise and equipment for molecular biology, protein expression, and protein purification. Because of this, they are able to focus their energies as well as their funding on the crystallization and structure determination of their target proteins.

  19. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanié, Sophie; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle

    2010-03-08

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the nucleus of TNFalpha-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein.

  20. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfi Jacqueline

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myxoma virus (MYXV, a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus. Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-κB in the nucleus of TNFα-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1 were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein.

  1. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-κB in the nucleus of TNFα-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein. PMID:20211013

  2. Oxidative stress affects FET proteins localization and alternative pre-mRNA processing in cellular models of ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetoni, Francesca; Caporossi, Daniela; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2014-10-01

    FUS/TLS, EWS and TAF15 are members of the FET family of DNA and RNA binding proteins, involved in multiple steps of DNA and RNA processing and implicated in the regulation of gene expression and cell-signaling. All members of the FET family contribute to human pathologies, as they are involved in sarcoma translocations and neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in FUS/TLS, in EWSR1 and in TAF15 genescause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a fatal human neurodegenerative disease that affects primarily motor neurons and is characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons and degradation of the neuromuscular junctions.ALS-associated FET mutations cause FET protein relocalization into cytoplasmic aggregates, thus impairing their normal function. Protein aggregation has been suggested as a co-opting factor during the disease pathogenesis. Cytoplasmic mislocalization of FET proteins contributes to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates that may alter RNA processing and initiate motor neuron degeneration. Interestingly, oxidative stress, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS, triggers the accumulation of mutant FUS in cytoplasmic stress granules where it binds and sequester wild-type FUS.In order to evaluate the role of FET proteins in ALS and their involvement in the response to oxidative stress, we have developed cellular models of ALS expressing ALS-related FET mutants in neuroblastoma cell lines. Upon treatment with sodium arsenite, cells were analysed by immunofluorescence to monitor the localization of wild-type and mutated FET proteins. Furthermore, we have characterized signal transduction pathways and cell survival upon oxidative stress in our cellular models of ALS. Interestingly, we found that EWS mutant proteins display a different localization from FUS mutants and neither wild-type nor mutated EWS protein translocate into stress granules upon oxidative stress treatment. Collectively, our data provide a new link between the oxidative stress

  3. Cellular oxido-reductive proteins of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii control the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barwal Indu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidation of molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles (SNPs biosynthesis is important to control its size, shape and monodispersity. The evaluation of molecular mechanism of biosynthesis of SNPs is of prime importance for the commercialization and methodology development for controlling the shape and size (uniform distribution of SNPs. The unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was exploited as a model system to elucidate the role of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Results The C. reinhardtii cell free extract (in vitro and in vivo cells mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles reveals SNPs of size range 5 ± 1 to 15 ± 2 nm and 5 ± 1 to 35 ± 5 nm respectively. In vivo biosynthesized SNPs were localized in the peripheral cytoplasm and at one side of flagella root, the site of pathway of ATP transport and its synthesis related enzymes. This provides an evidence for the involvement of oxidoreductive proteins in biosynthesis and stabilization of SNPs. Alteration in size distribution and decrease of synthesis rate of SNPs in protein-depleted fractions confirmed the involvement of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Spectroscopic and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate the association of various proteins on C. reinhardtii mediated in vivo and in vitro biosynthesized SNPs. We have identified various cellular proteins associated with biosynthesized (in vivo and in vitro SNPs by using MALDI-MS-MS, like ATP synthase, superoxide dismutase, carbonic anhydrase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, histone etc. However, these proteins were not associated on the incubation of pre-synthesized silver nanoparticles in vitro. Conclusion Present study provides the indication of involvement of molecular machinery and various cellular proteins in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. In this report, the study is mainly focused towards understanding the role of diverse cellular protein in the synthesis and capping of silver

  4. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  5. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments.

  6. Heterologous expression of membrane proteins: choosing the appropriate host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Bernaudat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane proteins are the targets of 50% of drugs, although they only represent 1% of total cellular proteins. The first major bottleneck on the route to their functional and structural characterisation is their overexpression; and simply choosing the right system can involve many months of trial and error. This work is intended as a guide to where to start when faced with heterologous expression of a membrane protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of 20 membrane proteins, both peripheral and integral, in three prokaryotic (E. coli, L. lactis, R. sphaeroides and three eukaryotic (A. thaliana, N. benthamiana, Sf9 insect cells hosts was tested. The proteins tested were of various origins (bacteria, plants and mammals, functions (transporters, receptors, enzymes and topologies (between 0 and 13 transmembrane segments. The Gateway system was used to clone all 20 genes into appropriate vectors for the hosts to be tested. Culture conditions were optimised for each host, and specific strategies were tested, such as the use of Mistic fusions in E. coli. 17 of the 20 proteins were produced at adequate yields for functional and, in some cases, structural studies. We have formulated general recommendations to assist with choosing an appropriate system based on our observations of protein behaviour in the different hosts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Most of the methods presented here can be quite easily implemented in other laboratories. The results highlight certain factors that should be considered when selecting an expression host. The decision aide provided should help both newcomers and old-hands to select the best system for their favourite membrane protein.

  7. Heterologous expression of membrane proteins: choosing the appropriate host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaudat, Florent; Frelet-Barrand, Annie; Pochon, Nathalie; Dementin, Sébastien; Hivin, Patrick; Boutigny, Sylvain; Rioux, Jean-Baptiste; Salvi, Daniel; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Richaud, Pierre; Joyard, Jacques; Pignol, David; Sabaty, Monique; Desnos, Thierry; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Darrouzet, Elisabeth; Vernet, Thierry; Rolland, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are the targets of 50% of drugs, although they only represent 1% of total cellular proteins. The first major bottleneck on the route to their functional and structural characterisation is their overexpression; and simply choosing the right system can involve many months of trial and error. This work is intended as a guide to where to start when faced with heterologous expression of a membrane protein. The expression of 20 membrane proteins, both peripheral and integral, in three prokaryotic (E. coli, L. lactis, R. sphaeroides) and three eukaryotic (A. thaliana, N. benthamiana, Sf9 insect cells) hosts was tested. The proteins tested were of various origins (bacteria, plants and mammals), functions (transporters, receptors, enzymes) and topologies (between 0 and 13 transmembrane segments). The Gateway system was used to clone all 20 genes into appropriate vectors for the hosts to be tested. Culture conditions were optimised for each host, and specific strategies were tested, such as the use of Mistic fusions in E. coli. 17 of the 20 proteins were produced at adequate yields for functional and, in some cases, structural studies. We have formulated general recommendations to assist with choosing an appropriate system based on our observations of protein behaviour in the different hosts. Most of the methods presented here can be quite easily implemented in other laboratories. The results highlight certain factors that should be considered when selecting an expression host. The decision aide provided should help both newcomers and old-hands to select the best system for their favourite membrane protein. © 2011 Bernaudat et al.

  8. Generic framework for mining cellular automata models on protein-folding simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, N; Tischer, I

    2016-05-13

    Cellular automata model identification is an important way of building simplified simulation models. In this study, we describe a generic architectural framework to ease the development process of new metaheuristic-based algorithms for cellular automata model identification in protein-folding trajectories. Our framework was developed by a methodology based on design patterns that allow an improved experience for new algorithms development. The usefulness of the proposed framework is demonstrated by the implementation of four algorithms, able to obtain extremely precise cellular automata models of the protein-folding process with a protein contact map representation. Dynamic rules obtained by the proposed approach are discussed, and future use for the new tool is outlined.

  9. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  10. The Interaction of the Gammaherpesvirus 68 orf73 Protein with Cellular BET Proteins Affects the Activation of Cell Cycle Promoters▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, Matthias; Pliquet, Daniel; Christalla, Thomas; Frank, Ronald; Stewart, James P.; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) provides a valuable animal model for gamma-2 herpesvirus (rhadinovirus) infection and pathogenesis. The MHV-68 orf73 protein has been shown to be required for the establishment of viral latency in vivo. This study describes a novel transcriptional activation function of the MHV-68 orf73 protein and identifies the cellular bromodomain containing BET proteins Brd2/RING3, Brd3/ORFX, and BRD4 as interaction partners for the MHV-68 orf73 protein. BET protein members are known to interact with acetylated histones, and Brd2 and Brd4 have been implicated in fundamental cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation and transcriptional regulation. Using MHV-68 orf73 peptide array assays, we identified Brd2 and Brd4 interaction sites in the orf73 protein. Mutation of one binding site led to a loss of the interaction with Brd2/4 but not the retinoblastoma protein Rb, to impaired chromatin association, and to a decreased ability to activate the BET-responsive cyclin D1, D2, and E promoters. The results therefore pinpoint the binding site for Brd2/4 in a rhadinoviral orf73 protein and suggest that the recruitment of a member of the BET protein family allows the MHV-68 orf73 protein to activate the promoters of G1/S cyclins. These findings point to parallels between the transcriptional activator functions of rhadinoviral orf73 proteins and papillomavirus E2 proteins. PMID:19244327

  11. Activation of the cellular unfolded protein response by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR is a stress-induced cyto-protective mechanism elicited towards an influx of large amount of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In the present study, we evaluated if AAV manipulates the UPR pathways during its infection. We first examined the role of the three major UPR axes, namely, endoribonuclease inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1α, activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6 and PKR-like ER kinase (PERK in AAV infected cells. Total RNA from mock or AAV infected HeLa cells were used to determine the levels of 8 different ER-stress responsive transcripts from these pathways. We observed a significant up-regulation of IRE1α (up to 11 fold and PERK (up to 8 fold genes 12-48 hours after infection with self-complementary (scAAV2 but less prominent with single-stranded (ssAAV2 vectors. Further studies demonstrated that scAAV1 and scAAV6 also induce cellular UPR in vitro, with AAV1 vectors activating the PERK pathway (3 fold while AAV6 vectors induced a significant increase on all the three major UPR pathways [6-16 fold]. These data suggest that the type and strength of UPR activation is dependent on the viral capsid. We then examined if transient inhibition of UPR pathways by RNA interference has an effect on AAV transduction. siRNA mediated silencing of PERK and IRE1α had a modest effect on AAV2 and AAV6 mediated gene expression (∼1.5-2 fold in vitro. Furthermore, hepatic gene transfer of scAAV2 vectors in vivo, strongly elevated IRE1α and PERK pathways (2 and 3.5 fold, respectively. However, when animals were pre-treated with a pharmacological UPR inhibitor (metformin during scAAV2 gene transfer, the UPR signalling and its subsequent inflammatory response was attenuated concomitant to a modest 2.8 fold increase in transgene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that AAV vectors activate the cellular UPR pathways and their selective inhibition may be beneficial during AAV mediated gene transfer.

  12. Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Negatively Regulated Via Prion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Marcio Henrique Mello; Glezer, Isaias; Xavier, Andre Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Alberti Paiva; Pino, Jessica Monteiro Volejnik; Zamith, Thiago Panaro; Vieira, Taynara Fernanda; Antonio, Bruno Brito; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Martins, Vilma Regina; Lee, Kil Sun

    2016-07-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein of the plasma membrane that plays pleiotropic functions by interacting with multiple signaling complexes at the cell surface. Recently, a number of studies have reported the involvement of PrP(C) in dopamine metabolism and signaling, including its interactions with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors. However, the outcomes reported by independent studies are still debatable. Therefore in this study, we investigated the effects of PrP(C) on the TH expression during the differentiation of N2a cells with dibutyryl-cAMP, a well-known cAMP analog that activates TH transcription. Upon differentiation, TH was induced with concomitant reduction of PrP(C) at protein level, but not at mRNA level. shRNA-mediated PrP(C) reduction increased the basal level of TH at both mRNA and protein levels without dibutyryl-cAMP treatment. This phenotype was reversed by re-expression of PrP(C). PrP(C) knockdown also potentiated the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP on TH expression. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) has suppressive effects on TH expression. As a consequence, altered PrP(C) functions may affect the regulation of dopamine metabolism and related neurological disorders.

  13. Human cellular protein patterns and their link to genome DNA sequence data: usefulness of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and microsequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Rasmussen, H H; Leffers, H

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of cellular protein patterns by computer-aided 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis together with recent advances in protein sequence analysis have made possible the establishment of comprehensive 2-dimensional gel protein databases that may link protein and DNA information and that offer...... a global approach to the study of the cell. Using the integrated approach offered by 2-dimensional gel protein databases it is now possible to reveal phenotype specific protein (or proteins), to microsequence them, to search for homology with previously identified proteins, to clone the cDNAs, to assign...... partial protein sequence to genes for which the full DNA sequence and the chromosome location is known, and to study the regulatory properties and function of groups of proteins that are coordinately expressed in a given biological process. Human 2-dimensional gel protein databases are becoming...

  14. Hepatitis Bx Antigen Stimulates Expression of a Novel Cellular Gene, URG4, that Promotes Hepatocellular Growth and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lale Satiroglu Tufan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus encoded X antigen (HBxAg may contribute to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC by up-or downregulating the expression of cellular genes that promote cell growth and survival. To test this hypothesis, HBxAg-positive and-negative HepG2 cells were constructed, and the patterns of cellular gene expression compared by polymerase chain reaction select cDNA subtraction. The full-length clone of one of these upregulated genes (URG, URG4, encoded a protein of about 104 kDa. URG4 was strongly expressed in hepatitis 13-infected liver and in HCC cells, where it costained with HBxAg, and was weakly expressed in uninfected liver, suggesting URG4 was an effector of HBxAg in vivo. Overexpression of URG4 in HepG2 cells promoted hepatocellular growth and survival in tissue culture and in soft agar, and accelerated tumor development in nude mice. Hence, URG4 may be a natural effector of HBxAg that contributes importantly to multistep hepatocarcinogenesis.

  15. Cytokines, Chaperones and Neuroinflammatory Responses in Heroin-Related Death: What Can We Learn from Different Patterns of Cellular Expression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Fineschi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Heroin (3,6-diacetylmorphine has various effects on the central nervous system with several neuropathological alterations including hypoxic-ischemic brain damage from respiratory depressing effects and neuroinflammatory response. Both of these mechanisms induce the release of cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory mediators by the activation of many cell types such as leucocytes and endothelial and glial cells, especially microglia, the predominant immunocompetent cell type within the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to clarify the correlation between intravenous heroin administration in heroin related death and the neuroinflammatory response. We selected 45 cases among autopsies executed for heroin-related death (358 total cases; immunohistochemical studies and Western blotting analyses were used to investigate the expression of brain markers such as tumor necrosis factor-α, oxygen-regulated protein 150, (interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, cyclooxygenase-2, heat shock protein 70, and CD68 (MAC387. Findings demonstrated that morphine induces inflammatory response and cytokine release. In particular, oxygen-regulated protein 150, cyclooxygenase-2, heat shock protein 70, IL-6 and IL-15 cytokines were over-expressed with different patterns of cellular expression.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of cellular memory by the Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringrose, Leonie; Paro, Renato

    2004-01-01

    During the development of multicellular organisms, cells become different from one another by changing their genetic program in response to transient stimuli. Long after the stimulus is gone, "cellular memory" mechanisms enable cells to remember their chosen fate over many cell divisions. The Polycomb and Trithorax groups of proteins, respectively, work to maintain repressed or active transcription states of developmentally important genes through many rounds of cell division. Here we review current ideas on the protein and DNA components of this transcriptional memory system and how they interact dynamically with each other to orchestrate cellular memory for several hundred genes.

  17. Differential expression proteomics of human colorectal cancer based on a syngeneic cellular model for the progression of adenoma to carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Udo; Razawi, Hanieh; Hommer, Julia; Engelmann, Katja; Schwientek, Tilo; Müller, Stefan; Baldus, Stephan E; Patsos, Georgios; Corfield, Anthony P; Paraskeva, Christos; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2010-01-01

    This is the first differential expression proteomics study on a human syngeneic cellular in vitro progression model of the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence, the anchorage-dependent non-tumorigenic adenoma derived cell line AA/C1 and the derived anchorage-independent and tumorigenic carcinoma cell line AA/C1/SB10C. The study is based on quantitative 2-DE and is complemented by Western blot validation. Excluding redundancies due to proteolysis and post-translational modified isoforms of over 2000 protein spots, 13 proteins were revealed as regulated with statistical variance being within the 95th confidence level and were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting in MALDI MS. Progression-associated proteins belong to the functional complexes of anaerobic glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, steroid biosynthesis, prostaglandin biosynthesis, the regulation and maintenance of the cytoskeleton, protein biosynthesis and degradation, the regulation of apoptosis or other functions. Partial but significant overlap was revealed with previous proteomics and transcriptomics studies in colorectal carcinoma. Among upregulated proteins we identified 3-HMG-CoA synthase, protein phosphatase 1, prostaglandin E synthase 2, villin 1, annexin A1, triosephosphate isomerase, phosphoserine aminotransferase 1, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1), while glucose-regulated protein 78, cathepsin D, lamin A/C and quinolate phosphoribosyltransferase were downregulated.

  18. Using a cDNA microarray to study cellular gene expression altered by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永忠; 谢建平; 李瑶; 乐军; 陈建平; 淳于利娟; 王洪海

    2003-01-01

    Objective To examine the global effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis) infection on macrophages. Methods The gene expression profiling of macrophage U937, in response to infection with M.tuberculosis H37Ra, was monitored using a high-density cDNA microarray. Results M.tuberculosis infection caused 463 differentially expressed genes, of which 366 genes are known genes registered in the Gene Bank. These genes function in various cellular processes including intracellular signalling, cytoskeletal rearrangement, apoptosis, transcriptional regulation, cell surface receptors, cell-mediated immunity as well as a variety of cellular metabolic pathways, and may play key roles in M.tuberculosis infection and intracellular survival. Conclusions M.tuberculosis infection alters the expression of host-cell genes, and these genes will provide a foundation for understanding the infection process of M.tuberculosis. The cDNA microarray is a powerful tool for studying pathogen-host cell interaction.

  19. Proteomic analyses of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 derivatives reveal highly conserved patterns of viral and cellular proteins in infected fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyda, Sabine; Büscher, Nicole; Tenzer, Stefan; Plachter, Bodo

    2014-01-07

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) particle morphogenesis in infected cells is an orchestrated process that eventually results in the release of enveloped virions. Proteomic analysis has been employed to reveal the complexity in the protein composition of these extracellular particles. Only limited information is however available regarding the proteome of infected cells preceding the release of HCMV virions. We used quantitative mass spectrometry to address the pattern of viral and cellular proteins in cells, infected with derivatives of the AD169 laboratory strain. Our analyses revealed a remarkable conservation in the patterns of viral and of abundant cellular proteins in cells, infected for 2 hours, 2 days, or 4 days. Most viral proteins increased in abundance as the infection progressed over time. Of the proteins that were reliably detectable by mass spectrometry, only IE1 (pUL123), pTRS1, and pIRS1 were downregulated at 4 days after infection. In addition, little variation of viral proteins in the virions of the different viruses was detectable, independent of the expression of the major tegument protein pp65. Taken together these data suggest that there is little variation in the expression program of viral and cellular proteins in cells infected with related HCMVs, resulting in a conserved pattern of viral proteins ultimately associated with extracellular virions.

  20. Enhanced cellular radiosensitivity induced by cofilin-1 over-expression is associated with reduced DNA repair capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Lo, Chia-Chien; Chiang, Pei-Hsun; Chiu, Su-Jun; Tsai, Cheng-Han; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Chen, Ran-Chou; Gorbunova, Vera; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A previous report has indicated that over-expression of cofilin-1 (CFL-1), a member of the actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family, enhances cellular radiosensitivity. This study explores, the involvement of various DNA damage responses and repair systems in the enhanced cellular radiosensitivity as well as assessing the role of CFL-1 phosphorylation in radiosensitivity. Materials and Methods Human non-small lung cancer H1299 cells harboring a tet-on gene expression system were used to induce exogenous expression of wild-type CFL-1. Colony formation assays were used to determine cell survival after γ-ray exposure. DNA damage levels were determined by comet assay. DNA repair capacity was assessed by fluorescence-based DNA repair analysis and antibody detection of various repair proteins. The effects of CFL-1 phosphorylation on radiation responses were explored using two mutant CFL-1 proteins, S3D and S3A. Finally, endogenous CFL-1 phosphorylation levels were investigated using latrunculin A (LA), cytochalasin B (CB) and Y27632. Results When phosphorylatable CFL-1 was expressed, radiosensitivity was enhanced after exposure to γ-rays and this was accompanied by DNA damage. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) and p53-binding protein-1 (53BP1) foci, as well as Chk1/2 phosphorylation, were apparently suppressed, although ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase activation was apparently unaffected. In addition, two radiation induced double strand break (DSB) repair, systems, namely homologous recombination repair (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), were suppressed. Moreover, over-expression of CFL-1 S3D and CFL-1 S3A both enhanced radiosensitivity. However, enhanced radiosensitivity and reduced γ-H2AX expression were only detected in cells treated with LA which increased endogenous phospho-CFL-1, and not in cells treated with Y27632, which dephosphorylates CFL-1. Conclusion CFL-1 over-expression enhances radiosensitivity and this

  1. Role of the cellular prion protein in oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation and differentiation in the developing and adult mouse CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Bribián

    Full Text Available There are numerous studies describing the signaling mechanisms that mediate oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC proliferation and differentiation, although the contribution of the cellular prion protein (PrP(c to this process remains unclear. PrP(c is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored glycoprotein involved in diverse cellular processes during the development and maturation of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS. Here we describe how PrP(c influences oligodendrocyte proliferation in the developing and adult CNS. OPCs that lack PrP(c proliferate more vigorously at the expense of a delay in differentiation, which correlates with changes in the expression of oligodendrocyte lineage markers. In addition, numerous NG2-positive cells were observed in cortical regions of adult PrP(c knockout mice, although no significant changes in myelination can be seen, probably due to the death of surplus cells.

  2. Common and specific signatures of gene expression and protein-protein interactions in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuller, T; Atar, S; Ruppin, E; Gurevich, M; Achiron, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to understand intracellular regulatory mechanisms in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which are either common to many autoimmune diseases or specific to some of them. We incorporated large-scale data such as protein-protein interactions, gene expression and demographical information of hundreds of patients and healthy subjects, related to six autoimmune diseases with available large-scale gene expression measurements: multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). These data were analyzed concurrently by statistical and systems biology approaches tailored for this purpose. We found that chemokines such as CXCL1-3, 5, 6 and the interleukin (IL) IL8 tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In addition, the anti-apoptotic gene BCL3, interferon-γ (IFNG), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene physically interact with significantly many genes that tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In general, similar cellular processes tend to be differentially expressed in PBMC in the analyzed autoimmune diseases. Specifically, the cellular processes related to cell proliferation (for example, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, nuclear factor-κB, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, stress-activated protein kinase c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase), inflammatory response (for example, interleukins IL2 and IL6, the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the B-cell receptor), general signaling cascades (for example, mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 and TRK) and apoptosis are activated in most of the analyzed autoimmune diseases. However, our results suggest that in each of the analyzed diseases, apoptosis and chemotaxis are activated via

  3. Cellular localization of ATBF1 protein and its functional implication in breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Zhang, Chi; Zhong, Yi; Zhao, Jiyuan

    2017-08-19

    ATBF1, a large transcription factor, was normally localized in nuclei, and its mislocalization to cytoplasm was reported in multiple cancers. However, localization of ATBF1 in breast epithelial cells and its potential functions were unknown. Here, we investigated ATBF1 localization via immunofluorescence staining in different kinds of breast epithelial cells. In MCF10A cells and normal mice mammary gland tissues, ATBF1 was mainly localized in nuclei. Knockdown of ATBF1 expression in MCF10A cells by siRNA promoted cell proliferation. Moreover, ATBF1 was co-localized with chromosome during mitosis, indicating its potential function in mitosis. In an estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell line (MCF7), estrogen induced ATBF1 translocation from cytoplasm to nuclei in an ER dependent pathway. In ER-negative cells (Hs578T and MDA-MB-231), ATBF1 was co-localized with GM130 in cytoplasm, indicating ATBF1 localization was associated with protein modification in golgi body. The results were beneficial for intensive investigation of ATBF1's function with different cellular localization in breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Designing genes for successful protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Mark; Villalobos, Alan; Gustafsson, Claes; Minshull, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    DNA sequences are now far more readily available in silico than as physical DNA. De novo gene synthesis is an increasingly cost-effective method for building genetic constructs, and effectively removes the constraint of basing constructs on extant sequences. This allows scientists and engineers to experimentally test their hypotheses relating sequence to function. Molecular biologists, and now synthetic biologists, are characterizing and cataloging genetic elements with specific functions, aiming to combine them to perform complex functions. However, the most common purpose of synthetic genes is for the expression of an encoded protein. The huge number of different proteins makes it impossible to characterize and catalog each functional gene. Instead, it is necessary to abstract design principles from experimental data: data that can be generated by making predictions followed by synthesizing sequences to test those predictions. Because of the degeneracy of the genetic code, design of gene sequences to encode proteins is a high-dimensional problem, so there is no single simple formula to guarantee success. Nevertheless, there are several straightforward steps that can be taken to greatly increase the probability that a designed sequence will result in expression of the encoded protein. In this chapter, we discuss gene sequence parameters that are important for protein expression. We also describe algorithms for optimizing these parameters, and troubleshooting procedures that can be helpful when initial attempts fail. Finally, we show how many of these methods can be accomplished using the synthetic biology software tool Gene Designer.

  5. The synthesis and characterization of cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of human multidrug resistant proteins MRP1, MRP2 and human breast cancer resistant protein BCRP using membranes obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Prateek A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    CMAC (cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns) have been developed for the study of the human multidrug transporters MRP1, MRP2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The columns were constructed using the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) stationary phase and cellular membrane fragments obtained from Spodopetra frugiperda (Sf9) cells that had been stably transfected with human Mrp1, Mrp2 or Bcrp c-DNA, using a baculovirus expression system. The resulting CMAC(Sf9MRP1)...

  6. Expression of DNA-dependent protein kinase in human granulocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annahita SALLMYR; Anna MILLER; Aida GABDOULKHAKOVA; Valentina SAFRONOVA; Gunnel HENRIKSSON; Anders BREDBERG

    2004-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have been reported to completely lack of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) which is composed of Ku protein and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs, needed for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks. Promyelocytic HL-60 cells express a variant form of Ku resulting in enhanced radiation sensitivity. This raises the question if low efficiency of NHEJ, instrumental for the cellular repair of oxidative damage, is a normal characteristic of myeloid differentiation. Here we confirmed the complete lack of DNAPK in P MN protein extracts, and the expression of the truncated Ku86 variant form in HL-60. However, this degradation of DNA-PK was shown to be due to a DNA-PK-degrading protease in PMN and HL-60. In addition, by using a protease-resistant whole cell assay, both Ku86 and DNA-PKcs could be demonstrated in PMN, suggesting the previously reported absence in PMN of DNA-PK to be an artefact. The levels of Ku86 and DNA-PKcs were much reduced in PMN, as compared with that of the lymphocytes, whereas HL-60 displayed a markedly elevated DNA-PK concentration.In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of reduced, not depleted expression of DNA-PK during the mature stages of myeloid differentiation.

  7. Cellular protein quality control and the evolution of aggregates in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, K.; Meister, M.; Dugbartey, G. J.; Zijlstra, M. P.; Vinet, J.; Brunt, E. R. P.; van Leeuwen, F. W.; Rueb, U.; Kampinga, H. H.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.

    2012-01-01

    K. Seidel, M. Meister, G. J. Dugbartey, M. P. Zijlstra, J. Vinet, E. R. P. Brunt, F. W. van Leeuwen, U. Rub, H. H. Kampinga and W. F. A. den Dunnen (2012) Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology38, 548558 Cellular protein quality control and the evolution of aggregates in spinocerebellar ataxia type

  8. Probing the cellular effects of bacterial effector proteins with the Yersinia toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölke, Stefan; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) is a powerful bacterial nanomachine that is able to modify the host cellular immune defense in favor of the pathogen by injection of effector proteins. In this regard, cellular Rho GTPases such as Rac1, RhoA or Cdc42 are targeted by a large group of T3SS effectors by mimicking cellular guanine exchange factors or GTPase-activating proteins. However, functional analysis of one type of T3SS effector that is translocated by bacterial pathogens is challenging because the T3SS effector repertoire can comprise a large number of proteins with redundant or interfering functions. Therefore, we developed the Yersinia toolbox to either analyze singular effector proteins of Yersinia spp. or different bacterial species in the context of bacterial T3SS injection into cells. Here, we focus on the WxxxE guanine exchange factor mimetic proteins IpgB1, IpgB2 and Map, which activate Rac1, RhoA or Cdc42, respectively, as well as the Rho GTPase inactivators YopE (a GTPase-activating mimetic protein) and YopT (cysteine protease), to generate a toolbox module for Rho GTPase manipulation.

  9. Reaction of small heat-shock proteins to different kinds of cellular stress in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt-Kirbach, Britta; Golenhofen, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation of small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) in response to cellular stress is one mechanism to increase cell viability.We previously described that cultured rat hippocampal neurons express five of the 11 family members but only upregulate two of them (HspB1 and HspB5) at the protein level after heat stress. Since neurons have to cope with many other pathological conditions, we investigated in this study the expression of all five expressed sHsps on mRNA and protein level after sublethal sodium arsenite and oxidative and hyperosmotic stress. Under all three conditions, HspB1, HspB5, HspB6, and HspB8 but not HspB11 were consistently upregulated but showed differences in the time course of upregulation. The increase of sHsps always occurred earlier on mRNA level compared with protein levels. We conclude from our data that these four upregulated sHsps (HspB1, HspB5, HspB6, HspB8) act together in different proportions in the protection of neurons from various stress conditions.

  10. Identification of differentially expressed proteins in vitamin B 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin B 12 (cobalamin is a water-soluble vitamin generally synthesized by microorganisms. Mammals cannot synthesize this vitamin but have evolved processes for absorption, transport and cellular uptake of this vitamin. Only about 30% of vitamin B 12 , which is bound to the protein transcobalamin (TC (Holo-TC [HoloTC] enters into the cell and hence is referred to as the biologically active form of vitamin B 12 . Vitamin B 12 deficiency leads to several complex disorders, including neurological disorders and anemia. We had earlier shown that vitamin B 12 deficiency is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD in Indian population. In the current study, using a proteomics approach we identified proteins that are differentially expressed in the plasma of individuals with low HoloTC levels. Materials and Methods: We used isobaric-tagging method of relative and absolute quantitation to identify proteins that are differently expressed in individuals with low HoloTC levels when compared to those with normal HoloTC level. Results: In two replicate isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation experiments several proteins involved in lipid metabolism, blood coagulation, cholesterol metabolic process, and lipoprotein metabolic process were found to be altered in individuals having low HoloTC levels. Conclusions: Our study indicates that low HoloTc levels could be a risk factor in the development of CAD.

  11. Streamlined expressed protein ligation using split inteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Perelló, Miquel; Liu, Zhihua; Shah, Neel H; Willis, John A; Idoyaga, Juliana; Muir, Tom W

    2013-01-09

    Chemically modified proteins are invaluable tools for studying the molecular details of biological processes, and they also hold great potential as new therapeutic agents. Several methods have been developed for the site-specific modification of proteins, one of the most widely used being expressed protein ligation (EPL) in which a recombinant α-thioester is ligated to an N-terminal Cys-containing peptide. Despite the widespread use of EPL, the generation and isolation of the required recombinant protein α-thioesters remain challenging. We describe here a new method for the preparation and purification of recombinant protein α-thioesters using engineered versions of naturally split DnaE inteins. This family of autoprocessing enzymes is closely related to the inteins currently used for protein α-thioester generation, but they feature faster kinetics and are split into two inactive polypeptides that need to associate to become active. Taking advantage of the strong affinity between the two split intein fragments, we devised a streamlined procedure for the purification and generation of protein α-thioesters from cell lysates and applied this strategy for the semisynthesis of a variety of proteins including an acetylated histone and a site-specifically modified monoclonal antibody.

  12. A meta-analysis to evaluate the cellular processes regulated by the interactome of endogenous and over-expressed estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Joana; Amado, Francisco M; Vitorino, Rui; Helguero, Luisa A

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the proteins complexes that regulate ERα subcellular localization and activity is still an open question in breast cancer biology. Identification of such complexes will help understand development of endocrine resistance in ER+ breast cancer. Mass spectrometry (MS) has allowed comprehensive analysis of the ERα interactome. We have compared six published works analyzing the ERα interactome of MCF-7 and HeLa cells in order to identify a shared or different pathway-related fingerprint. Overall, 806 ERα interacting proteins were identified. The cellular processes were differentially represented according to the ERα purification methodology, indicating that the methodologies used are complementary. While in MCF-7 cells, the interactome of endogenous and over-expressed ERα essentially represents the same biological processes and cellular components, the proteins identified were not over-lapping; thus, suggesting that the biological response may differ as the regulatory/participating proteins in these complexes are different. Interestingly, biological processes uniquely associated to ERα over-expressed in HeLa cell line included L-serine biosynthetic process, cellular amino acid biosynthetic process and cell redox homeostasis. In summary, all the approaches analyzed in this meta-analysis are valid and complementary; in particular, for those cases where the processes occur at low frequency with normal ERα levels, and can be identified when the receptor is over-expressed. However special effort should be put into validating these findings in cells expressing physiological ERα levels.

  13. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli.

  14. Decreased PARP and procaspase-2 protein levels are associated with cellular drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Amy; den Boer, Monique L; Kazemier, Karin M; Beverloo, H Berna; von Bergh, Anne R M; Janka-Schaub, Gritta E; Pieters, Rob

    2005-09-01

    Drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with impaired ability to induce apoptosis. To elucidate causes of apoptotic defects, we studied the protein expression of Apaf-1, procaspases-2, -3, -6, -7, -8, -10, and poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in cells from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; n = 43) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 10). PARP expression was present in all B-lineage samples, but absent in 4 of 15 T-lineage ALL samples and 3 of 10 AML cases, which was not caused by genomic deletions. PARP expression was a median 7-fold lower in T-lineage ALL (P < .001) and 10-fold lower in AML (P < .001) compared with B-lineage ALL. PARP expression was 4-fold lower in prednisolone, vincristine and L-asparaginase (PVA)-resistant compared with PVA-sensitive ALL patients (P < .001). Procaspase-2 expression was 3-fold lower in T-lineage ALL (P = .022) and AML (P = .014) compared with B-lineage ALL. In addition, procaspase-2 expression was 2-fold lower in PVA-resistant compared to PVA-sensitive ALL patients (P = .042). No relation between apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1), procaspases-3, -6, -7, -8, -10, and drug resistance was found. In conclusion, low baseline expression of PARP and procaspase-2 is related to cellular drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  15. Protein turnover and cellular autophagy in growing and growth-inhibited 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulos, T.; Pfeifer, U. (Univ. of Wuerzburg (West Germany))

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between growth, protein degradation, and cellular autophagy was tested in growing and in growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers. For the biochemical evaluation of DNA and protein metabolism, growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers with high cell density and growing 3T3 cell monolayers with low cell density were labeled simultaneously with ({sup 14}C)thymidine and ({sup 3}H)leucine. The evaluation of the DNA turnover and additional ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography showed that 24 to 5% of 3T3 cells continue to replicate even in the growth-inhibited state, where no accumulation of protein and DNA can be observed. Cell loss, therefore, has to be assumed to compensate for the ongoing cell proliferation. When the data of protein turnover were corrected for cell loss, it was found that the rate constant of protein synthesis in nongrowing monolayers was reduced to half the value found in growing monolayers. Simultaneously, the rate constant of protein degradation in nongrowing monolayers was increased to about 1.5-fold the value of growing monolayers. These data are in agreement with the assumption that cellular autophagy represents a major pathway of regulating protein degradation in 3T3 cells and that the regulation of autophagic protein degradation is of relevance for the transition from a growing to a nongrowing state.

  16. Active Degradation Explains the Distribution of Nuclear Proteins during Cellular Senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Giampieri

    Full Text Available The amount of cellular proteins is a crucial parameter that is known to vary between cells as a function of the replicative passages, and can be important during physiological aging. The process of protein degradation is known to be performed by a series of enzymatic reactions, ranging from an initial step of protein ubiquitination to their final fragmentation by the proteasome. In this paper we propose a stochastic dynamical model of nuclear proteins concentration resulting from a balance between a constant production of proteins and their degradation by a cooperative enzymatic reaction. The predictions of this model are compared with experimental data obtained by fluorescence measurements of the amount of nuclear proteins in murine tail fibroblast (MTF undergoing cellular senescence. Our model provides a three-parameter stationary distribution that is in good agreement with the experimental data even during the transition to the senescent state, where the nuclear protein concentration changes abruptly. The estimation of three parameters (cooperativity, saturation threshold, and maximal velocity of the reaction, and their evolution during replicative passages shows that only the maximal velocity varies significantly. Based on our modeling we speculate the reduction of functionality of the protein degradation mechanism as a possible competitive inhibition of the proteasome.

  17. Active Degradation Explains the Distribution of Nuclear Proteins during Cellular Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, Enrico; De Cecco, Marco; Remondini, Daniel; Sedivy, John; Castellani, Gastone

    2015-01-01

    The amount of cellular proteins is a crucial parameter that is known to vary between cells as a function of the replicative passages, and can be important during physiological aging. The process of protein degradation is known to be performed by a series of enzymatic reactions, ranging from an initial step of protein ubiquitination to their final fragmentation by the proteasome. In this paper we propose a stochastic dynamical model of nuclear proteins concentration resulting from a balance between a constant production of proteins and their degradation by a cooperative enzymatic reaction. The predictions of this model are compared with experimental data obtained by fluorescence measurements of the amount of nuclear proteins in murine tail fibroblast (MTF) undergoing cellular senescence. Our model provides a three-parameter stationary distribution that is in good agreement with the experimental data even during the transition to the senescent state, where the nuclear protein concentration changes abruptly. The estimation of three parameters (cooperativity, saturation threshold, and maximal velocity of the reaction), and their evolution during replicative passages shows that only the maximal velocity varies significantly. Based on our modeling we speculate the reduction of functionality of the protein degradation mechanism as a possible competitive inhibition of the proteasome.

  18. Identification of differentially expressed proteins and phosphorylated proteins in rice seedlings in response to strigolactone treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyu Chen

    Full Text Available Strigolactones (SLs are recently identified plant hormones that inhibit shoot branching and control various aspects of plant growth, development and interaction with parasites. Previous studies have shown that plant D10 protein is a carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase that functions in SL biosynthesis. In this work, we used an allelic SL-deficient d10 mutant XJC of rice (Oryza sativa L. spp. indica to investigate proteins that were responsive to SL treatment. When grown in darkness, d10 mutant seedlings exhibited elongated mesocotyl that could be rescued by exogenous application of SLs. Soluble protein extracts were prepared from d10 mutant seedlings grown in darkness in the presence of GR24, a synthetic SL analog. Soluble proteins were separated on two-dimensional gels and subjected to proteomic analysis. Proteins that were expressed differentially and phosphoproteins whose phosphorylation status changed in response to GR24 treatment were identified. Eight proteins were found to be induced or down-regulated by GR24, and a different set of 8 phosphoproteins were shown to change their phosphorylation intensities in the dark-grown d10 seedlings in response to GR24 treatment. Analysis of these proteins revealed that they are important enzymes of the carbohydrate and amino acid metabolic pathways and key components of the cellular energy generation machinery. These proteins may represent potential targets of the SL signaling pathway. This study provides new insight into the complex and negative regulatory mechanism by which SLs control shoot branching and plant development.

  19. Anchoring secreted proteins in endoplasmic reticulum by plant oleosin: the example of vitamin B12 cellular sequestration by transcobalamin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Pons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oleosin is a plant protein localized to lipid droplets and endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells. Our idea was to use it to target functional secretory proteins of interest to the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum of mammalian cells, through expressing oleosin-containing chimeras. We have designed this approach to create cellular models deficient in vitamin B12 (cobalamin because of the known problematics associated to the obtainment of effective vitamin B12 deficient cell models. This was achieved by the overexpression of transcobalamin inside cells through anchoring to oleosin. METHODOLOGY: chimera gene constructs including transcobalamin-oleosin (TC-O, green fluorescent protein-transcobalamin-oleosin (GFP-TC-O and oleosin-transcobalamin (O-TC were inserted into pAcSG2 and pCDNA3 vectors for expression in sf9 insect cells, Caco2 (colon carcinoma, NIE-115 (mouse neuroblastoma, HEK (human embryonic kidney, COS-7 (Green Monkey SV40-transfected kidney fibroblasts and CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells. The subcellular localization, the changes in vitamin B12 binding activity and the metabolic consequences were investigated in both Caco2 and NIE-115 cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: vitamin B12 binding was dramatically higher in TC-O than that in O-TC and wild type (WT. The expression of GFP-TC-O was observed in all cell lines and found to be co-localized with an ER-targeted red fluorescent protein and calreticulin of the endoplasmic reticulum in Caco2 and COS-7 cells. The overexpression of TC-O led to B12 deficiency, evidenced by impaired conversion of cyano-cobalamin to ado-cobalamin and methyl-cobalamin, decreased methionine synthase activity and reduced S-adenosyl methionine to S-adenosyl homocysteine ratio, as well as increases in homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: the heterologous expression of TC-O in mammalian cells can be used as an effective strategy for investigating the cellular

  20. C-reactive protein inhibits survivin expression via Akt/mTOR pathway downregulation by PTEN expression in cardiac myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Seob Lee

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is one of the most important biomarkers for arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have shown that CRP affects cell cycle and inflammatory process in cardiac myocytes. Survivin is also involved in cardiac myocytes replication and apoptosis. Reduction of survivin expression is associated with less favorable cardiac remodeling in animal models. However, the effect of CRP on survivin expression and its cellular mechanism has not yet been studied. We demonstrated that treatment of CRP resulted in a significant decrease of survivin protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner in cardiac myocytes. The upstream signaling proteins of survivin, such as Akt, mTOR and p70S6K, were also downregulated by CRP treatment. In addition, CRP increased the protein and mRNA levels of PTEN. The siRNA transfection or specific inhibitor treatment for PTEN restored the CRP-induced downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway and survivin protein expression. Moreover, pretreatment with a specific p53 inhibitor decreased the CRP-induced PTEN expression. ERK-specific inhibitor also blocked the p53 phosphorylation and PTEN expression induced by CRP. Our study provides a novel insight into CRP-induced downregulation of survivin protein expression in cardiac myocytes through mechanisms that involved in downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway by expression of PTEN.

  1. Gene synthesis, expression in Escherichia coli, purification and characterization of the recombinant bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Højrup, P; Kristiansen, K

    1991-01-01

    -initiation codon were chosen to allow efficient expression in Escherichia coli as well as in yeast. The synthetic gene was inserted into the expression vector pKK223-3 and expressed in E. coli. In maximally induced cultures, recombinant ACBP constitutes 12-15% of total cellular protein. A fraction highly enriched...

  2. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doorbar, John, E-mail: jdoorba@nimr.mrc.ac.uk

    2013-10-15

    }E4, these kinases regulate one of the E1{sup ∧}E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4. - Highlights: • E4 gene products have a modular structure, and are expressed from the E1{sup ∧}E4 spliced mRNA. • E4 proteins are modified during epithelial differentiation by phosphorylation and proteolysis. • The E4 proteins contribute to genome amplification-efficiency and virus synthesis. • E4 proteins are abundantly expressed and may facilitate efficient virus release and transmission. • High-risk E4 proteins are deposited as amyloid fibres and can be used as infection biomarkers.

  3. Engineering genes for predictable protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Claes; Minshull, Jeremy; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Ness, Jon; Villalobos, Alan; Welch, Mark

    2012-05-01

    The DNA sequence used to encode a polypeptide can have dramatic effects on its expression. Lack of readily available tools has until recently inhibited meaningful experimental investigation of this phenomenon. Advances in synthetic biology and the application of modern engineering approaches now provide the tools for systematic analysis of the sequence variables affecting heterologous expression of recombinant proteins. We here discuss how these new tools are being applied and how they circumvent the constraints of previous approaches, highlighting some of the surprising and promising results emerging from the developing field of gene engineering.

  4. Dynamic changes in protein functional linkage networks revealed by integration with gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhada R Hegde

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Response of cells to changing environmental conditions is governed by the dynamics of intricate biomolecular interactions. It may be reasonable to assume, proteins being the dominant macromolecules that carry out routine cellular functions, that understanding the dynamics of protein:protein interactions might yield useful insights into the cellular responses. The large-scale protein interaction data sets are, however, unable to capture the changes in the profile of protein:protein interactions. In order to understand how these interactions change dynamically, we have constructed conditional protein linkages for Escherichia coli by integrating functional linkages and gene expression information. As a case study, we have chosen to analyze UV exposure in wild-type and SOS deficient E. coli at 20 minutes post irradiation. The conditional networks exhibit similar topological properties. Although the global topological properties of the networks are similar, many subtle local changes are observed, which are suggestive of the cellular response to the perturbations. Some such changes correspond to differences in the path lengths among the nodes of carbohydrate metabolism correlating with its loss in efficiency in the UV treated cells. Similarly, expression of hubs under unique conditions reflects the importance of these genes. Various centrality measures applied to the networks indicate increased importance for replication, repair, and other stress proteins for the cells under UV treatment, as anticipated. We thus propose a novel approach for studying an organism at the systems level by integrating genome-wide functional linkages and the gene expression data.

  5. Searching for cellular partners of hantaviral nonstructural protein NSs: Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library and analysis of cellular interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomas Rönnberg

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae are negative-strand RNA viruses with a tripartite genome. The small (S segment encodes the nucleocapsid protein and, in some hantaviruses, also the nonstructural protein (NSs. The aim of this study was to find potential cellular partners for the hantaviral NSs protein. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library was performed followed by a search for potential NSs protein counterparts via analyzing a cellular interactome. The resulting interaction network was shown to form logical, clustered structures. Furthermore, several potential binding partners for the NSs protein, for instance ACBD3, were identified and, to prove the principle, interaction between NSs and ACBD3 proteins was demonstrated biochemically.

  6. Searching for cellular partners of hantaviral nonstructural protein NSs: Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library and analysis of cellular interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Tuomas; Jääskeläinen, Kirsi; Blot, Guillaume; Parviainen, Ville; Vaheri, Antti; Renkonen, Risto; Bouloy, Michele; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae) are negative-strand RNA viruses with a tripartite genome. The small (S) segment encodes the nucleocapsid protein and, in some hantaviruses, also the nonstructural protein (NSs). The aim of this study was to find potential cellular partners for the hantaviral NSs protein. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening of mouse cDNA library was performed followed by a search for potential NSs protein counterparts via analyzing a cellular interactome. The resulting interaction network was shown to form logical, clustered structures. Furthermore, several potential binding partners for the NSs protein, for instance ACBD3, were identified and, to prove the principle, interaction between NSs and ACBD3 proteins was demonstrated biochemically.

  7. Murine hyperglycemic vasculopathy and cardiomyopathy: whole-genome gene expression analysis predicts cellular targets and regulatory networks influenced by mannose binding lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhui eZou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia, in the absence of type 1 or 2 diabetes, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have previously demonstrated a central role for mannose binding lectin (MBL-mediated cardiac dysfunction in acute hyperglycemic mice. In this study, we applied whole genome microarray data analysis to investigate MBL’s role in systematic gene expression changes. The data predict possible intracellular events taking place in multiple cellular compartments such as enhanced insulin signaling pathway sensitivity, promoted mitochondrial respiratory function, improved cellular energy expenditure and protein quality control, improved cytoskeleton structure and facilitated intracellular trafficking, all of which may contribute to the organismal health of MBL null mice against acute hyperglycemia. Our data show a tight association between gene expression profile and tissue function which might be a very useful tool in predicting cellular targets and regulatory networks connected with in vivo observations, providing clues for further mechanistic studies.

  8. Two outer membrane proteins contribute to cellular fitness in Caulobacter crescentus by preventing intracellular S-layer protein accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, K Wesley; Park, Dan M; Yung, Mimi C; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Smit, John; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-09-23

    Surface layers, or S-layers, are two-dimensional protein arrays that form the outermost layer of many bacteria and archaea. They serve several functions including physical protection of the cell from environmental threats. The high abundance of S-layer proteins necessitates a highly efficient export mechanism to transport S-layer protein from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior. Caulobacter crescentus is unique in that it has two homologous, seemingly redundant outer membrane proteins, RsaFa and RsaFb, that, together with other components, form a type I protein translocation pathway for S-layer export. These proteins have homology to E. coli TolC, the outer membrane channel of multidrug efflux pumps. Here we provide evidence that, unlike TolC, RsaFa and RsaFb are not involved in either the maintenance of membrane stability or the active export of antimicrobial compounds. Rather, RsaFa and RsaFb are required to prevent intracellular accumulation and aggregation of the S-layer protein RsaA; deletion of RsaFa and RsaFb led to a general growth defect and lowered cellular fitness. Using Western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, and RNA-seq, we show that loss of both RsaFa and RsaFb led to accumulation of insoluble RsaA in the cytoplasm, which in turn caused upregulation of a number of genes involved in protein mis-folding and degradation pathways. These findings provide new insight into the requirement for RsaFa and RsaFb in cellular fitness and tolerance to antimicrobial agents and further our understanding of the S-layer export mechanism on both the transcriptional and translational levels in C. crescentus IMPORTANCE: Decreased growth rate and reduced cell fitness are common side effects of protein production in overexpression systems. Inclusion bodies typically form inside the cell largely due to lack of sufficient export machinery to transport the overexpressed proteins to the extracellular environment. This phenomenon can conceivably also occur in natural

  9. Expression Analysis of Cellular Mir-29a and mir-29b in HIV Positive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Kaleji (MSc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Various cellular factors affect the process of HIV activity. One of these cellular factors are structures known as microRN that are expected to be involved in controlling HIV replication and infectivity. The expression of one or a set of them may represent the patient's clinical conditions. In this study, the expression of miR-29a and miR-29b involved in regulating viral genes’ expression was evaluated in three HIV-positive groups and a healthy control group. Later, the expression level of these microRNAs was compared between the cases and controls. Methods: Total RNA extraction was performed on the collected samples using RNx-plus kit and then the microRNA expression levels were evaluated using Relative Real-time PCR. The obtained data was entered into SPSS 22 and Graphpad softwares and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Man-Whitney tests. P-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistical significance level. Results: The expression level of miR-29a was reduced in patients under treatment and drug-resistant patients ( P ≤ 0.05 . All three HIV-positive groups including people without drug treatment, patients under treatment and drug-resistant patients showed reduced miR-29b expression level compared to control group (P ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: the decreased expression of miR-29a and miR-29b in patients under treatment and drug-resistant patients indicates an increased viral replication and reduced CD4 cell count. It may be possible to predict the progression of the disease by miRNA measurement or control viral replication using these mir-RNAs that requires further studies.

  10. Protein kinase Cmu plays an essential role in hypertonicity-induced heat shock protein 70 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yun Sook; Lee, Jae Seon; Huang, Tai Qin; Seo, Jeong Sun

    2008-12-31

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), which evidences important functions as a molecular chaperone and anti-apoptotic molecule, is substantially induced in cells exposed to a variety of stresses, including hypertonic stress, heavy metals, heat shock, and oxidative stress, and prevents cellular damage under these conditions. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the induction of HSP70 in response to hypertonicity has been characterized to a far lesser extent. In this study, we have investigated the cellular signaling pathway of HSP70 induction under hypertonic conditions. Initially, we applied a variety of kinase inhibitors to NIH3T3 cells that had been exposed to hypertonicity. The induction of HSP70 was suppressed specifically by treatment with protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (Gö6976 and GF109203X). As hypertonicity dramatically increased the phosphorylation of PKCmu, we then evaluated the role of PKCmu in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression and cell viability. The depletion of PKCmu with siRNA or the inhibition of PKCmu activity with inhibitors resulted in a reduction in HSP70 induction and cell viability. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP), a transcription factor for hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression, was translocated rapidly into the nucleus and was modified gradually in the nucleus under hypertonic conditions. When we administered treatment with PKC inhibitors, the mobility shift of TonEBP was affected in the nucleus. However, PKCmu evidenced no subcellular co-localization with TonEBP during hypertonic exposure. From our results, we have concluded that PKCmu performs a critical function in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 induction, and finally cellular protection, via the indirect regulation of TonEBP modification.

  11. Involvement of the interferon-regulated antiviral proteins PKR and RNase L in reovirus-induced shutoff of cellular translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer A; Schmechel, Stephen C; Williams, Bryan R G; Silverman, Robert H; Schiff, Leslie A

    2005-02-01

    Cellular translation is inhibited following infection with most strains of reovirus, but the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. The extent of host shutoff varies in a strain-dependent manner; infection with the majority of strains leads to strong host shutoff, while infection with strain Dearing results in minimal inhibition of cellular translation. A genetic study with reassortant viruses and subsequent biochemical analyses led to the hypothesis that the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, PKR, is responsible for reovirus-induced host shutoff. To directly determine whether PKR is responsible for reovirus-induced host shutoff, we used a panel of reovirus strains and mouse embryo fibroblasts derived from knockout mice. This approach revealed that PKR contributes to but is not wholly responsible for reovirus-induced host shutoff. Studies with cells lacking RNase L, the endoribonuclease component of the interferon-regulated 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase-RNase L system, demonstrated that RNase L also down-regulates cellular protein synthesis in reovirus-infected cells. In many viral systems, PKR and RNase L have well-characterized antiviral functions. An analysis of reovirus replication in cells lacking these molecules indicated that, while they contributed to host shutoff, neither PKR nor RNase L exerted an antiviral effect on reovirus growth. In fact, some strains of reovirus replicated more efficiently in the presence of PKR and RNase L than in their absence. Data presented in this report illustrate that the inhibition of cellular translation following reovirus infection is complex and involves multiple interferon-regulated gene products. In addition, our results suggest that reovirus has evolved effective mechanisms to avoid the actions of the interferon-stimulated antiviral pathways that include PKR and RNase L and may even benefit from their expression.

  12. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  13. The involvement of XPC protein in the cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan WANG; Alan DOMBKOWSKI; Lynn CHUANG; Xiao Xin S XU

    2004-01-01

    Recognition of DNA damage is a critical step for DNA damage-mediated cellular response. XPC is an important DNA damage recognition protein involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). We have studied the XPC protein in cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response. Comparison of the microarray data from both normal and XPCdefective human fibroblasts identified 861 XPC-responsive genes in the cisplatin treatment (with minimum fold change≥1.5).The cell cycle and cell proliferation-related genes are the most affected genes by the XPC defect in the treatment. Many other cellular function genes, especially the DNA repair and signal transduction-related genes, were also affected by the XPC defect in the treatment. To validate the microarray data, the transcription levels of some microarray-identified genes were also determined by an RT-PCR based real time PCR assay. The real time PCR results are consistent with the microarray data for most of the tested genes, indicating the reliability of the microarray data. To further validate the microarray data, the cisplatin treatment-mediated caspase-3 activation was also determined. The Western blot hybridization results indicate that the XPC defect greatly attenuates the cisplatin treatment-mediated Caspase-3 activation. We elucidated the role of p53 protein in the XPC protein DNA damage recognition-mediated signaling process. The XPC defect reduces the cisplatin treatment-mediated p53 response. These results suggest that the XPC protein plays an important role in the cisplatin treatment-mediated cellular response. It may also suggest a possible mechanism of cancer cell drug resistance.

  14. Efficient isolation and elution of cellular proteins using aptamer-mediated protein precipitation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiseok; Lee, SeungJin; Ryu, Sungho; Han, Dongil

    2014-05-23

    Protein precipitation is one of the most widely used methods for antigen detection and purification in biological research. We developed a reproducible aptamer-mediated magnetic protein precipitation method that is able to efficiently capture, purify and isolate the target proteins. We discovered DNA aptamers having individually high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human insulin receptor (INSR). Using aptamers and magnetic beads, we showed it is highly efficient technique to enrich endogenous proteins complex and is applicable to identify physiologically relevant protein-protein interactions with minimized nonspecific binding of proteins. The results presented here indicate that aptamers would be applicable as a useful and cost-effective tool to identify the presence of the particular target protein with their specific protein partners.

  15. Immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus vectors expressing Norwalk virus capsid protein in the presence or absence of VP2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Chen, Shun; Jiang, Xi; Green, Kim Y; Samal, Siba K

    2015-10-01

    Noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Development of an effective vaccine is required for reducing their outbreaks. In order to develop a GI norovirus vaccine, Newcastle disease virus vectors, rLaSota and modified rBC, were used to express VP1 protein of Norwalk virus. Co-expression of VP1 and VP2 proteins by Newcastle disease virus vectors resulted in enhanced expression of Norwalk virus VP1 protein and self-assembly of VP1 protein into virus-like particles. Furthermore, the Norwalk virus-specific IgG response induced in mice by Newcastle disease virus vectors was similar to that induced by baculovirus-expressed virus-like particles in mice. However, the modified rBC vector in the presence of VP2 protein induced significantly higher levels of cellular and mucosal immune responses than those induced by baculovirus-expressed VLPs. These results indicate that Newcastle disease virus has great potential for developing a live Norwalk virus vaccine by inducing humoral, cellular and mucosal immune responses in humans.

  16. Evolutionary Computational Method of Facial Expression Analysis for Content-based Video Retrieval using 2-Dimensional Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Geetha, P

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, Deterministic Cellular Automata (DCA) based video shot classification and retrieval is proposed. The deterministic 2D Cellular automata model captures the human facial expressions, both spontaneous and posed. The determinism stems from the fact that the facial muscle actions are standardized by the encodings of Facial Action Coding System (FACS) and Action Units (AUs). Based on these encodings, we generate the set of evolutionary update rules of the DCA for each facial expression. We consider a Person-Independent Facial Expression Space (PIFES) to analyze the facial expressions based on Partitioned 2D-Cellular Automata which capture the dynamics of facial expressions and classify the shots based on it. Target video shot is retrieved by comparing the similar expression is obtained for the query frame's face with respect to the key faces expressions in the database video. Consecutive key face expressions in the database that are highly similar to the query frame's face, then the key faces are use...

  17. Proteome analyses of cellular proteins in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus treated with rhodomyrtone, a novel antibiotic candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wipawadee Sianglum

    Full Text Available The ethanolic extract from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf exhibited good antibacterial activities against both methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and S. aureus ATCC 29213. Its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values ranged from 31.25-62.5 µg/ml, and the minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC was 250 µg/ml. Rhodomyrtone, an acylphloroglucinol derivative, was 62.5-125 times more potent at inhibiting the bacteria than the ethanolic extract, the MIC and MBC values were 0.5 µg/ml and 2 µg/ml, respectively. To provide insights into antibacterial mechanisms involved, the effects of rhodomyrtone on cellular protein expression of MRSA have been investigated using proteomic approaches. Proteome analyses revealed that rhodomyrtone at subinhibitory concentration (0.174 µg/ml affected the expression of several major functional classes of whole cell proteins in MRSA. The identified proteins involve in cell wall biosynthesis and cell division, protein degradation, stress response and oxidative stress, cell surface antigen and virulence factor, and various metabolic pathways such as amino acid, carbohydrate, energy, lipid, and nucleotide metabolism. Transmission electron micrographs confirmed the effects of rhodomyrtone on morphological and ultrastructural alterations in the treated bacterial cells. Biological processes in cell wall biosynthesis and cell division were interrupted. Prominent changes including alterations in cell wall, abnormal septum formation, cellular disintegration, and cell lysis were observed. Unusual size and shape of staphylococcal cells were obviously noted in the treated MRSA. These pioneer findings on proteomic profiling and phenotypic features of rhodomyrtone-treated MRSA may resolve its antimicrobial mechanisms which could lead to the development of a new effective regimen for the treatment of MRSA infections.

  18. Changes in Cellular mRNA Stability, Splicing, and Polyadenylation through HuR Protein Sequestration by a Cytoplasmic RNA Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Barnhart

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of RNA viruses on the posttranscriptional regulation of cellular gene expression is unclear. Sindbis virus causes a dramatic relocalization of the cellular HuR protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in infected cells. This is to the result of the expression of large amounts of viral RNAs that contain high-affinity HuR binding sites in their 3′ UTRs effectively serving as a sponge for the HuR protein. Sequestration of HuR by Sindbis virus is associated with destabilization of cellular mRNAs that normally bind HuR and rely on it to regulate their expression. Furthermore, significant changes can be observed in nuclear alternative polyadenylation and splicing events on cellular pre-mRNAs as a result of sequestration of HuR protein by the 3′ UTR of transcripts of this cytoplasmic RNA virus. These studies suggest a molecular mechanism of virus-host interaction that probably has a significant impact on virus replication, cytopathology, and pathogenesis.

  19. Cellular immune response of humans to the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio M. Rodrigues

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available The cellular immune response to the circumsporozoite (CS protein of plasmodium vivax of individuals from malaria-endemic areas of Brazil was studied. We examined the in vitro proliferative response of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of 22 individuals when stimulated with a CS recombinant protein (rPvCS-2 and two other synthetic peptides based on the sequenceof the P. vivax CS protein. Seven of the individuals from malaria-endemic area displayed an antigen specific in vitro proliferative responseto the recombinant protein PvCS-2 and one out of 6, proliferative response to the peptide 308-320. In contrast, none of the individuals displayed a proliferative reponse when stimulated with the D/A peptide which represent some of the repeated units present in this CS protein. Our study, therefore, provides evidence for the presence, withinthe major surface antigen of P. vivax sporozoites, of epitopes capble to induce proliferation of human PBMC.

  20. Expression Differentiation Is Constrained to Low-Expression Proteins over Ecological Timescales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margres, Mark J; Wray, Kenneth P; Seavy, Margaret; McGivern, James J; Herrera, Nathanael D; Rokyta, Darin R

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression level is one of the strongest predictors of protein sequence evolutionary rate, with high-expression protein sequences evolving at slower rates than low-expression protein sequences largely because of constraints on protein folding and function. Expression evolutionary rates also have been shown to be negatively correlated with expression level across human and mouse orthologs over relatively long divergence times (i.e., ∼100 million years). Long-term evolutionary patterns, however, often cannot be extrapolated to microevolutionary processes (and vice versa), and whether this relationship holds for traits evolving under directional selection within a single species over ecological timescales (i.e., protein is predicted to be a tradeoff between the benefit of its function and the costs of its expression. Selection should drive the expression level of all proteins close to values that maximize fitness, particularly for high-expression proteins because of the increased energetic cost of production. Therefore, stabilizing selection may reduce the amount of standing expression variation for high-expression proteins, and in combination with physiological constraints that may place an upper bound on the range of beneficial expression variation, these constraints could severely limit the availability of beneficial expression variants. To determine whether rapid-expression evolution was restricted to low-expression proteins owing to these constraints on highly expressed proteins over ecological timescales, we compared venom protein expression levels across mainland and island populations for three species of pit vipers. We detected significant differentiation in protein expression levels in two of the three species and found that rapid-expression differentiation was restricted to low-expression proteins. Our results suggest that various constraints on high-expression proteins reduce the availability of beneficial expression variants relative to low-expression

  1. Cdc42 Effector Protein 2 (XCEP2 is required for normal gastrulation and contributes to cellular adhesion in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Richard W

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rho GTPases and their downstream effector proteins regulate a diverse array of cellular processes during embryonic development, including reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture, cell adhesion, and transcription. Changes in the activation state of Rho GTPases are converted into changes in cellular behavior by a diversity of effector proteins, which are activated in response to changes in the GTP binding state of Rho GTPases. In this study we characterize the expression and function of one such effector, XCEP2, that is present during gastrulation stages in Xenopus laevis. Results In a search for genes whose expression is regulated during early stages of embryonic development in Xenopus laevis, a gene encoding a Rho GTPase effector protein (Xenopus Cdc42 effector protein 2, or XCEP2 was isolated, and found to be highly homologous, but not identical, to a Xenopus sequence previously submitted to the Genbank database. These two gene sequences are likely pseudoalleles. XCEP2 mRNA is expressed at constant levels until mid- to late- gastrula stages, and then strongly down-regulated at late gastrula/early neurula stages. Injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed at one or both pseudoalleles resulted in a significant delay in blastopore closure and interfered with normal embryonic elongation, suggesting a role for XCEP2 in regulating gastrulation movements. The morpholino antisense effect could be rescued by co-injection with a morpholino-insensitive version of the XCEP2 mRNA. Antisense morpholino oligonucleotides were found to have no effect on mesodermal induction, suggesting that the observed effects were due to changes in the behavior of involuting cells, rather than alterations in their identity. XCEP2 antisense morpholino oligonucleotides were also observed to cause complete disaggregation of cells composing animal cap explants, suggesting a specific role of XCEP2 in maintenance or regulation of cell

  2. Predominant Expression of Hybrid N-Glycans Has Distinct Cellular Roles Relative to Complex and Oligomannose N-Glycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kristen Hall

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation modulates growth, maintenance, and stress signaling processes. Consequently, altered N-glycosylation is associated with reduced fitness and disease. Therefore, expanding our understanding of N-glycans in altering biological processes is of utmost interest. Herein, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/caspase9 (CRISPR/Cas9 technology was employed to engineer a glycosylation mutant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell line, K16, which expresses predominantly hybrid type N-glycans. This newly engineered cell line enabled us to compare N-glycan effects on cellular properties of hybrid type N-glycans, to the well-established Pro−5 and Lec1 cell lines, which express complex and oligomannose types of N-glycans, respectively. Lectin binding studies revealed the predominant N-glycan expressed in K16 is hybrid type. Cell dissociation and migration assays demonstrated the greatest strength of cell–cell adhesion and fastest migratory rates for oligomannose N-glycans, and these properties decreased as oligomannose type were converted to hybrid type, and further decreased upon conversion to complex type. Next, we examined the roles of three general types of N-glycans on ectopic expression of E-cadherin, a cell–cell adhesion protein. Microscopy revealed more functional E-cadherin at the cell–cell border when N-glycans were oligomannose and these levels decreased as the oligomannose N-glycans were processed to hybrid and then to complex. Thus, we provide evidence that all three general types of N-glycans impact plasma membrane architecture and cellular properties.

  3. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskar,; Kumari, Neeti [Division of Biochemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace, PO Box 173, Lucknow (India); Goyal, Neena, E-mail: neenacdri@yahoo.com [Division of Biochemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace, PO Box 173, Lucknow (India)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1{gamma} gene from L. donovani. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCP1{gamma} is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1{gamma}), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1{gamma} of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1{gamma}), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1{gamma} revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1{gamma}. However, leishmanial TCP1{gamma} represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1{gamma} as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1{gamma} was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1{gamma} with actin suggests

  4. Encapsulated Cellular Implants for Recombinant Protein Delivery and Therapeutic Modulation of the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Lathuilière

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ex vivo gene therapy using retrievable encapsulated cellular implants is an effective strategy for the local and/or chronic delivery of therapeutic proteins. In particular, it is considered an innovative approach to modulate the activity of the immune system. Two recently proposed therapeutic schemes using genetically engineered encapsulated cells are discussed here: the chronic administration of monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization against neurodegenerative diseases and the local delivery of a cytokine as an adjuvant for anti-cancer vaccines.

  5. Complexity of Gene Expression Evolution after Duplication: Protein Dosage Rebalancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor B. Rogozin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing debates about functional importance of gene duplications have been recently intensified by a heated discussion of the “ortholog conjecture” (OC. Under the OC, which is central to functional annotation of genomes, orthologous genes are functionally more similar than paralogous genes at the same level of sequence divergence. However, a recent study challenged the OC by reporting a greater functional similarity, in terms of gene ontology (GO annotations and expression profiles, among within-species paralogs compared to orthologs. These findings were taken to indicate that functional similarity of homologous genes is primarily determined by the cellular context of the genes, rather than evolutionary history. Subsequent studies suggested that the OC appears to be generally valid when applied to mammalian evolution but the complete picture of evolution of gene expression also has to incorporate lineage-specific aspects of paralogy. The observed complexity of gene expression evolution after duplication can be explained through selection for gene dosage effect combined with the duplication-degeneration-complementation model. This paper discusses expression divergence of recent duplications occurring before functional divergence of proteins encoded by duplicate genes.

  6. Microfluidic chips for protein differential expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Jenny M; Dawoud, Abdulilah A; Lazar, Iulia M

    2009-04-01

    Biomarker discovery and screening using novel proteomic technologies is an area that is attracting increased attention in the biomedical community. Early detection of abnormal physiological conditions will be highly beneficial for diagnosing various diseases and increasing survivability rates. Clearly, progress in this area will depend on the development of fast, reliable, and highly sensitive and specific sample bioanalysis methods. Microfluidics has emerged as a technology that could become essential in proteomics research as it enables the integration of all sample preparation, separation, and detection steps, with the added benefit of enhanced sample throughput. The combination of these advantages with the sensitivity and capability of MS detection to deliver precise structural information makes microfluidics-MS a very competitive technology for biomarker discovery. The integration of LC microchip devices with MS detection, and specifically their applicability to biomarker screening applications in MCF-7 breast cancer cellular extracts is reported in this manuscript. Loading approximately 0.1-1 microg of crude protein extract tryptic digest on the chip has typically resulted in the reliable identification of approximately 40-100 proteins. The potential of an LC-ESI-MS chip for comparative proteomic analysis of isotopically labeled MCF-7 breast cancer cell extracts is explored for the first time.

  7. The effect of blood protein adsorption on cellular uptake of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allouni, Zouhir E; Gjerdet, Nils R; Cimpan, Mihaela R; Høl, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto nanoparticles (NPs) in biological fluids has emerged as an important factor when testing biological responses to NPs, as this may influence both uptake and subsequent toxicity. The aim of the present study was to quantify the adsorption of proteins onto TiO2 NPs and to test the influence on cellular uptake. The surface composition of the particles was characterized by thermal analysis and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption of three blood proteins, ie, human serum albumin (HSA), γ-globulins (Glbs), and fibrinogen (Fib), onto three types of anatase NPs of different sizes was quantified for each protein. The concentration of the adsorbed protein was measured by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry using the Bradford method. The degree of cellular uptake was quantified by inductivity coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, and visualized by an ultra-high resolution imaging system. The proteins were adsorbed onto all of the anatase NPs. The quantity adsorbed increased with time and was higher for the smaller particles. Fib and Glbs showed the highest affinity to TiO2 NPs, while the lowest was seen for HSA. The adsorption of proteins affected the surface charge and the hydrodynamic diameter of the NPs in cell culture medium. The degree of particle uptake was highest in protein-free medium and in the presence HSA, followed by culture medium supplemented with Glbs, and lowest in the presence of Fib. The results indicate that the uptake of anatase NPs by fibroblasts is influenced by the identity of the adsorbed protein.

  8. Prion protein expression regulates embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Miranda

    Full Text Available Cellular prion protein (PRNP is a glycoprotein involved in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs. Although the physiological function of PRNP is largely unknown, its key role in prion infection has been extensively documented. This study examines the functionality of PRNP during the course of embryoid body (EB differentiation in mouse Prnp-null (KO and WT embryonic stem cell (ESC lines. The first feature observed was a new population of EBs that only appeared in the KO line after 5 days of differentiation. These EBs were characterized by their expression of several primordial germ cell (PGC markers until Day 13. In a comparative mRNA expression analysis of genes playing an important developmental role during ESC differentiation to EBs, Prnp was found to participate in the transcription of a key pluripotency marker such as Nanog. A clear switching off of this gene on Day 5 was observed in the KO line as opposed to the WT line, in which maximum Prnp and Nanog mRNA levels appeared at this time. Using a specific antibody against PRNP to block PRNP pathways, reduced Nanog expression was confirmed in the WT line. In addition, antibody-mediated inhibition of ITGB5 (integrin αvβ5 in the KO line rescued the low expression of Nanog on Day 5, suggesting the regulation of Nanog transcription by Prnp via this Itgb5. mRNA expression analysis of the PRNP-related proteins PRND (Doppel and SPRN (Shadoo, whose PRNP function is known to be redundant, revealed their incapacity to compensate for the absence of PRNP during early ESC differentiation. Our findings provide strong evidence for a relationship between Prnp and several key pluripotency genes and attribute Prnp a crucial role in regulating self-renewal/differentiation status of ESC, confirming the participation of PRNP during early embryogenesis.

  9. Protein extraction and 2-DE of water- and lipid-soluble proteins from bovine pericardium, a low-cellularity tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Leigh G; Choe, Leila; Lee, Kelvin H; Reardon, Kenneth F; Orton, E Christopher

    2008-11-01

    Bovine pericardium (BP) is an important biomaterial used in the production of glutaraldehyde-fixed heart valves and tissue-engineering applications. The ability to perform proteomic analysis on BP is useful for a range of studies, including investigation of immune rejection after implantation. However, proteomic analysis of fibrous tissues such as BP is challenging due to their relative low-cellularity and abundance of extracellular matrix. A variety of methods for tissue treatment, protein extraction, and fractionation were investigated with the aim of producing high-quality 2-DE gels for both water- and lipid-soluble BP proteins. Extraction of water-soluble proteins with 3-(benzyldimethylammonio)-propanesulfonate followed by n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside extraction and ethanol precipitation for lipid-soluble proteins provided the best combination of yield, spot number, and resolution on 2-DE gels (Protocol E2). ESI-quadrupole/ion trap or MALDI-TOF/TOF MS protein identifications were performed to confirm bovine origin and appropriate subcellular prefractionation of resolved proteins. Twenty-five unique, predominantly cytoplasmic bovine proteins were identified from the water-soluble fraction. Thirty-two unique, predominantly membrane bovine proteins were identified from the lipid-soluble fraction. These results demonstrated that the final protocol produced high-quality proteomic data from this important tissue for both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins.

  10. The expression of S100P increases and promotes cellular proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin in endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Luyan; Chen, Shuqin; Jiang, Hongye; Huang, Jiaming; Jin, Wenyan; Yao, Shuzhong

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that S100P has a significant role in cancer, and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer and normal endometrium tissues was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we reduced the expression of S100P in HEC-1A and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines by siRNA transfection. Based on the reduced S100P mRNA expression, we measured the effects of S100P on cellular proliferation by the cell-counting kit-8. Nuclear β-catenin protein level was detected by western blotting. Cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA expression regulated by β-catenin was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We found that the expression of S100P mRNA and protein increased in endometrial cancer tissues compared with the normal endometrium. Local S100P expression progressively increased from pathologic differenciation grade 1 to 3. After reducing the S100P expression, the cellular proliferation ability, nuclear β-catenin protein level, cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA levels reduced. It indicated that S100P could promote cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer significantly increased and is associated with pathologic differenciation grade. S100P may promote endometrial cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin.

  11. Benzo[a]pyrene treatment leads to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Chunlan; Wu Wei [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Li Haiyan [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Huzhou Maternity and Child Care Hospital, Huzhou, Zhejiang 313000 (China); Zhang Guanglin [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J. [Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Zhu Xinqiang, E-mail: zhuxq@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: gastate@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a potent pro-carcinogen generated from the combustion of fossil fuel and cigarette smoke. Previously, using a proteomic approach, we have shown that BaP can induce changes in the expression of many cellular proteins, including transcription regulators. In the present study, using a similar approach, we examined the nuclear protein response to BaP in HeLa cells and found that BaP treatment caused expression changes in many nuclear proteins. Twenty-four of these proteins were successfully identified, several of which are involved in the alternative splicing of mRNA, DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The changed expression levels were further confirmed by immunoblot analysis using specific antibodies for two proteins, Lamin A and mitotic checkpoint protein Bub3. The nuclear localization of these two proteins was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. To determine whether alternative splicing was activated following BaP treatment, we examined Fas and CD44, two genes previously shown to be targets of alternative splicing in respond to DNA damage. While no significant activation of alternative splicing was observed for Fas, CD44 splicing variants were found after BaP treatment. Together, these data show that DNA damage induces dramatic changes in nuclear protein expression, and that alternative splicing might be involved in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  12. Identification of SNPs in Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 and Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 3 Genes and Their Associations with Laying Performance Traits in Erlang Mountainous Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available CRBP1 (cellular retinol binding protein 1 and CRBP3 (cellular retinol binding protein 3, are important components of the retinoid signaling pathway and take part in vitamin A absorption, transport and metabolism. Based on the role of vitamin A in chicken laying performance, we investigated the polymorphism of CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes in 349 chickens using single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing methods. Only one polymorphism was identified in the third intron of CRBP1, two polymorphisms were detected in CRBP3; they were located in the second intron and the third intron respectively. The association studies between these three SNPs and laying performance traits were performed in Erlang mountainous chicken. Notably, the SNP g.14604G>T of CRBP1 was shown to be significantly associated with body weight at first egg (BWFE, age at first egg (AFE, weight at first egg (WFE and total number of eggs with 300 age (EN. The CRBP3 polymorphism g.934C>G was associated with AFE, and the g.1324A>G was associated with AFE and BWFE, but none of these polymorphisms were associated with egg quality traits. Haplotype combinations constructed on these two SNPs of CRBP3 gene were associated with BWFE and AFE. In particular, diplotype H2H2 had positive effect on AFE, BWFE, EN, and average egg-laying interval. We herein describe for the first time basic research on the polymorphism of chicken CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes that is predictive of genetic potential for laying performance in chicken.

  13. Engineered mutations in fibrillin-1 leading to Marfan syndrome act at the protein, cellular and organismal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyer, Karina A; Reinhardt, Dieter P

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are the major components of microfibrils in the extracellular matrix of elastic and non-elastic tissues. They are multi-domain proteins, containing primarily calcium binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domains and 8-cysteine/transforming growth factor-beta binding protein-like (TB) domains. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene give rise to Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder with clinical complications in the cardiovascular, skeletal, ocular and other organ systems. Here, we review the consequences of engineered Marfan syndrome mutations in fibrillin-1 at the protein, cellular and organismal levels. Representative point mutations associated with Marfan syndrome in affected individuals have been introduced and analyzed in recombinant fibrillin-1 fragments. Those mutations affect fibrillin-1 on a structural and functional level. Mutations which impair folding of cbEGF domains can affect protein trafficking. Protein folding disrupted by some mutations can lead to defective secretion in mutant fibrillin-1 fragments, whereas fragments with other Marfan mutations are secreted normally. Many Marfan mutations render fibrillin-1 more susceptible to proteolysis. There is also evidence that some mutations affect heparin binding. Few mutations have been further analyzed in mouse models. An extensively studied mouse model of Marfan syndrome expresses mouse fibrillin-1 with a missense mutation (p.C1039G). The mice display similar characteristics to human patients with Marfan syndrome. Overall, the analyses of engineered mutations leading to Marfan syndrome provide important insights into the pathogenic molecular mechanisms exerted by mutated fibrillin-1.

  14. EXPRESSED PROTEIN LIGATION. A NEW TOOL FOR THE BIOSYNTHESIS OF CYCLIC POLYPEPTIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, R; Camarero, J A

    2004-11-11

    The present paper reviews the use of expressed protein ligation for the biosynthesis of backbone cyclic polypeptides. This general method allows the in vivo and in vitro biosynthesis of cyclic polypeptides using recombinant DNA expression techniques. Biosynthetic access to backbone cyclic peptides opens the possibility to generate cell-based combinatorial libraries that can be screened inside living cells for their ability to attenuate or inhibit cellular processes.

  15. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhaohua, E-mail: ztang@jsd.claremont.edu [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Lin, Ren-Jang [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony [Genome Damage and Stability Center, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  16. Molecular modeling of the conformational dynamics of the cellular prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Charles; Colling, Ian; Bartz, Jason; Soto, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    Prions are infectious agents responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a type of fatal neurodegenerative disease in mammals. Prions propagate biological information by conversion of the non-pathological version of the prion protein to the infectious conformation, PrPSc. A wealth of knowledge has shed light on the nature and mechanism of prion protein conversion. In spite of the significance of this problem, we are far from fully understanding the conformational dynamics of the cellular isoform. To remedy this situation we employ multiple biomolecular modeling techniques such as docking and molecular dynamics simulations to map the free energy landscape and determine what specific regions of the prion protein are most conductive to binding. The overall goal is to characterize the conformational dynamics of the cell form of the prion protein, PrPc, to gain insight into inhibition pathways against misfolding. NE EPSCoR FIRST Award to Patricia Soto.

  17. HIV-1 TAR miRNA protects against apoptosis by altering cellular gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiri Eti

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference is a gene regulatory mechanism that employs small RNA molecules such as microRNA. Previous work has shown that HIV-1 produces TAR viral microRNA. Here we describe the effects of the HIV-1 TAR derived microRNA on cellular gene expression. Results Using a variation of standard techniques we have cloned and sequenced both the 5' and 3' arms of the TAR miRNA. We show that expression of the TAR microRNA protects infected cells from apoptosis and acts by down-regulating cellular genes involved in apoptosis. Specifically, the microRNA down-regulates ERCC1 and IER3, protecting the cell from apoptosis. Comparison to our cloned sequence reveals possible target sites for the TAR miRNA as well. Conclusion The TAR microRNA is expressed in all stages of the viral life cycle, can be detected in latently infected cells, and represents a mechanism wherein the virus extends the life of the infected cell for the purpose of increasing viral replication.

  18. An ectromelia virus profilin homolog interacts with cellular tropomyosin and viral A-type inclusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Robert D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profilins are critical to cytoskeletal dynamics in eukaryotes; however, little is known about their viral counterparts. In this study, a poxviral profilin homolog, ectromelia virus strain Moscow gene 141 (ECTV-PH, was investigated by a variety of experimental and bioinformatics techniques to characterize its interactions with cellular and viral proteins. Results Profilin-like proteins are encoded by all orthopoxviruses sequenced to date, and share over 90% amino acid (aa identity. Sequence comparisons show highest similarity to mammalian type 1 profilins; however, a conserved 3 aa deletion in mammalian type 3 and poxviral profilins suggests that these homologs may be more closely related. Structural analysis shows that ECTV-PH can be successfully modelled onto both the profilin 1 crystal structure and profilin 3 homology model, though few of the surface residues thought to be required for binding actin, poly(L-proline, and PIP2 are conserved. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry identified two proteins that interact with ECTV-PH within infected cells: alpha-tropomyosin, a 38 kDa cellular actin-binding protein, and the 84 kDa product of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve (VACV-WR 148, which is the truncated VACV counterpart of the orthopoxvirus A-type inclusion (ATI protein. Western and far-western blots demonstrated that the interaction with alpha-tropomyosin is direct, and immunofluorescence experiments suggest that ECTV-PH and alpha-tropomyosin may colocalize to structures that resemble actin tails and cellular protrusions. Sequence comparisons of the poxviral ATI proteins show that although full-length orthologs are only present in cowpox and ectromelia viruses, an ~ 700 aa truncated ATI protein is conserved in over 90% of sequenced orthopoxviruses. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that ECTV-PH localizes to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies formed by both truncated and full-length versions of the viral ATI protein

  19. How is mRNA expression predictive for protein expression? A correlation study on human circulating monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanfang Guo; Yuan Chen; Hui Jiang; Lijun Tan; Jingyun Xie; Xuezhen Zhu; Songping Liang; Hongwen Deng; Peng Xiao; Shufeng Lei; Feiyan Deng; Gary Guishan Xiao; Yaozhong Liu; Xiangding Chen; Liming Li; Shan Wu

    2008-01-01

    A key assumption in studying mRNA expression is that it is informative in the prediction of protein expression. However,only limited studies have explored the mRNA-protein expression correlation in yeast or human tissues and the results have been relatively inconsistent. We carried out correlation analyses on mRNA-protein expressions in freshly isolated human circulating monocytes from 30 unrelated women. The expressed proteins for 71 genes were quantified and identified by 2-D electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. The corresponding mRNA expressions were quantified by Affymetrix gene chips. Significant correlation (r=0.235, P<0.0001) was observed for the whole dataset including all studied genes and all samples. The correlations varied in different biological categories of gene ontology. For example, the highest correlation was achieved for genes of the extracellular region in terms of cellular component (r=0.643, P<0.0001) and the lowest correlation was obtained for genes of regulation (r=0.099, P=0.213) in terms of biological process. In the genome, half of the samples showed significant positive correlation for the 71 genes and significant correlation was found between the average mRNA and the average protein expression levels in all samples (r=0.296, P<0.01). However, at the study group level, only five studied genes had significant positive correlation across all the samples. Our results showed an overall positive correlation between mRNA and protein expression levels.However, the moderate and varied correlations suggest that mRNA expression might be sometimes useful, but certainly far from perfect, in predicting protein expression levels.

  20. Schisandrin B protects PC12 cells by decreasing the expression of amyloid precursor protein and vacuolar protein sorting 35

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingmin Yan; Shanping Mao; Huimin Dong; Baohui Liu; Qian Zhang; Gaofeng Pan; Zhiping Fu

    2012-01-01

    PC12 cell injury was induced using 20 μM amyloid β-protein 25-35 to establish a model of Alzheimer's disease.The cells were then treated with 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B.Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assays and Hoechst 33342 staining results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the survival rate of PC12 cells injured by amyloid β-protein 25-35 gradually increased and the rate of apoptosis gradually decreased.Reverse transcription-PCR, immunocytochemical staining and western blot results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the mRNA and protein expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein were gradually decreased.Vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein showed a consistent trend for change.These findings suggest that 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B antagonizes the cellular injury induced by amyloid β-protein 25-35 in a dose-dependent manner.This may be caused by decreasing the expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein.PC12 cell injury was induced using 20 μM amyloid β-protein 25-35 to establish a model of Alzheimer's disease.The cells were then treated with 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B.Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assays and Hoechst 33342 staining results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the survival rate of PC12 cells injured by amyloid β-protein 25-35 gradually increased and the rate of apoptosis gradually decreased.Reverse transcription-PCR, immunocytochemical staining and western blot results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the mRNA and protein expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein were gradually decreased.Vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein showed a consistent trend for change.These findings suggest that 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B antagonizes the cellular injury induced by amyloid β-protein 25

  1. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  2. Annexin A2: Its Molecular Regulation and Cellular Expression in Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Annexin A2 (ANXA2 orchestrates multiple biologic processes and clinical associations, especially in cancer progression. The structure of ANXA2 affects its cellular localization and function. However, posttranslational modification and protease-mediated N-terminal cleavage also play critical roles in regulating ANXA2. ANXA2 expression levels vary among different types of cancers. With some cancers, ANXA2 can be used for the detection and diagnosis of cancer and for monitoring cancer progression. ANXA2 is also required for drug-resistance. This review discusses the feasibility of ANXA2 which is active in cancer development and can be a therapeutic target in cancer management.

  3. Functional domains and sub-cellular distribution of the Hedgehog transducing protein Smoothened in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y; Nystedt, S; Shivdasani, A A; Strutt, H; Thomas, C; Ingham, P W

    2004-06-01

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway is deployed repeatedly during normal animal development and its inappropriate activity is associated with various tumours in human. The serpentine protein Smoothened (Smo) is essential for cells to respond to the Hedeghog (Hh) signal; oncogenic forms of Smo have been isolated from human basal cell carcinomas. Despite similarities with ligand binding G-protein coupled receptors, the molecular basis of Smo activity and its regulation remains unclear. In non-responding cells, Smo is suppressed by the activity of another multipass membrane spanning protein Ptc, which acts as the Hh receptor. In Drosophila, binding of Hh to Ptc has been shown to cause an accumulation of phosphorylated Smo protein and a concomitant stabilisation of the activated form of the Ci transcription factor. Here, we identify domains essential for Smo activity and investigate the sub-cellular distribution of the wild type protein in vivo. We find that deletion of the amino terminus and the juxtamembrane region of the carboxy terminus of the protein result in the loss of normal Smo activity. Using Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and horseradish peroxidase fusion proteins we show that Smo accumulates in the plasma membrane of cells in which Ptc activity is abrogated by Hh but is targeted to the degradative pathway in cells where Ptc is active. We further demonstrate that Smo accumulation is likely to be a cause, rather than a consequence, of Hh signal transduction.

  4. Cellular RNA binding proteins NS1-BP and hnRNP K regulate influenza A virus RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Ling; Chiou, Ni-Ting; Kuss, Sharon; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Lynch, Kristen W; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major human pathogen with a genome comprised of eight single-strand, negative-sense, RNA segments. Two viral RNA segments, NS1 and M, undergo alternative splicing and yield several proteins including NS1, NS2, M1 and M2 proteins. However, the mechanisms or players involved in splicing of these viral RNA segments have not been fully studied. Here, by investigating the interacting partners and function of the cellular protein NS1-binding protein (NS1-BP), we revealed novel players in the splicing of the M1 segment. Using a proteomics approach, we identified a complex of RNA binding proteins containing NS1-BP and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), among which are hnRNPs involved in host pre-mRNA splicing. We found that low levels of NS1-BP specifically impaired proper alternative splicing of the viral M1 mRNA segment to yield the M2 mRNA without affecting splicing of mRNA3, M4, or the NS mRNA segments. Further biochemical analysis by formaldehyde and UV cross-linking demonstrated that NS1-BP did not interact directly with viral M1 mRNA but its interacting partners, hnRNPs A1, K, L, and M, directly bound M1 mRNA. Among these hnRNPs, we identified hnRNP K as a major mediator of M1 mRNA splicing. The M1 mRNA segment generates the matrix protein M1 and the M2 ion channel, which are essential proteins involved in viral trafficking, release into the cytoplasm, and budding. Thus, reduction of NS1-BP and/or hnRNP K levels altered M2/M1 mRNA and protein ratios, decreasing M2 levels and inhibiting virus replication. Thus, NS1-BP-hnRNPK complex is a key mediator of influenza A virus gene expression.

  5. GIM3E: Condition-specific Models of Cellular Metabolism Developed from Metabolomics and Expression Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Brian; Ebrahim, Ali; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernard O.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

    2013-11-15

    Motivation: Genome-scale metabolic models have been used extensively to investigate alterations in cellular metabolism. The accuracy of these models to represent cellular metabolism in specific conditions has been improved by constraining the model with omics data sources. However, few practical methods for integrating metabolomics data with other omics data sources into genome-scale models of metabolism have been reported. Results: GIMMME (Gene Inactivation Moderated by Metabolism, Metabolomics, and Expression) is an algorithm that enables the development of condition-specific models based on an objective function, transcriptomics, and intracellular metabolomics data. GIMMME establishes metabolite utilization requirements with metabolomics data, uses model-paired transcriptomics data to find experimentally supported solutions, and also provides calculations of the turnover (production / consumption) flux of metabolites. GIMMME was employed to investigate the effects of integrating additional omics datasets to create increasingly constrained solution spaces of Salmonella Typhimurium metabolism during growth in both rich and virulence media. This integration proved to be informative and resulted in a requirement of additional active reactions (12 in each case) or metabolites (26 or 29, respectively). The addition of constraints from transcriptomics also impacted the allowed solution space, and the cellular metabolites with turnover fluxes that were necessarily altered by the change in conditions increased from 118 to 271 of 1397. Availability: GIMMME has been implemented in Python and requires a COBRApy 0.2.x. The algorithm and sample data described here are freely available at: http://opencobra.sourceforge.net/

  6. Potential for cellular stress response to hepatic factor VIII expression from AAV vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Zolotukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A and B are coagulation disorders resulting from the loss of functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII or factor IX proteins, respectively. Gene therapy for hemophilia with adeno-associated virus vectors has shown efficacy in hemophilia B patients. Although hemophilia A patients are more prevalent, the development of therapeutic adeno-associated virus vectors has been impeded by the size of the F8 cDNA and impaired secretion of FVIII protein. Further, it has been reported that over-expression of the FVIII protein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates the unfolded protein response pathway both in vitro and in hepatocytes in vivo, presumably due to retention of misfolded FVIII protein within the endoplasmic reticulum. Engineering of the F8 transgene, including removal of the B domain (BDD-FVIII and codon optimization, now allows for the generation of adeno-associated virus vectors capable of expressing therapeutic levels of FVIII. Here we sought to determine if the risks of inducing the unfolded protein response in murine hepatocytes extend to adeno-associated virus gene transfer. Although our data show a mild activation of unfolded protein response markers following F8 gene delivery at a certain vector dose in C57BL/6 mice, it was not augmented upon further elevated dosing, did not induce liver pathology or apoptosis, and did not impact FVIII immunogenicity.

  7. Potential for cellular stress response to hepatic factor VIII expression from AAV vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotukhin, Irene; Markusic, David M; Palaschak, Brett; Hoffman, Brad E; Srikanthan, Meera A; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are coagulation disorders resulting from the loss of functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX proteins, respectively. Gene therapy for hemophilia with adeno-associated virus vectors has shown efficacy in hemophilia B patients. Although hemophilia A patients are more prevalent, the development of therapeutic adeno-associated virus vectors has been impeded by the size of the F8 cDNA and impaired secretion of FVIII protein. Further, it has been reported that over-expression of the FVIII protein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates the unfolded protein response pathway both in vitro and in hepatocytes in vivo, presumably due to retention of misfolded FVIII protein within the endoplasmic reticulum. Engineering of the F8 transgene, including removal of the B domain (BDD-FVIII) and codon optimization, now allows for the generation of adeno-associated virus vectors capable of expressing therapeutic levels of FVIII. Here we sought to determine if the risks of inducing the unfolded protein response in murine hepatocytes extend to adeno-associated virus gene transfer. Although our data show a mild activation of unfolded protein response markers following F8 gene delivery at a certain vector dose in C57BL/6 mice, it was not augmented upon further elevated dosing, did not induce liver pathology or apoptosis, and did not impact FVIII immunogenicity. PMID:27738644

  8. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-01

    the E1^E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4. © 2013 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of protein pre-coating on the protein corona composition and nanoparticle cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshafiee, Vahid; Kim, Raehyun; Park, Soyun; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are functionalized with targeting ligands to enable selectively delivering drugs to desired locations in the body. When these functionalized NPs enter the blood stream, plasma proteins bind to their surfaces, forming a protein corona that affects NP uptake and targeting efficiency. To address this problem, new strategies for directing the formation of a protein corona that has targeting capabilities are emerging. Here, we have investigated the feasibility of directing corona composition to promote targeted NP uptake by specific types of cells. We used the well-characterized process of opsonin-induced phagocytosis by macrophages as a simplified model of corona-mediated NP uptake by a desired cell type. We demonstrate that pre-coating silica NPs with gamma-globulins (γ-globulins) produced a protein corona that was enriched with opsonins, such as immunoglobulins. Although immunoglobulins are ligands that bind to receptors on macrophages and elicit phagocytois, the opsonin-rich protein corona did not increase NP uptake by macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Immunolabeling experiments indicated that the binding of opsonins to their target cell surface receptors was impeded by other proteins in the corona. Thus, corona-mediated NP targeting strategies must optimize both the recruitment of the desired plasma proteins as well as their accessibility and orientation in the corona layer.

  10. Validation of vacuum-based refrigerated system for biobanking tissue preservation: analysis of cellular morphology, protein stability, and RNA quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condelli, Valentina; Lettini, Giacomo; Patitucci, Giuseppe; D'Auria, Fiorella; D'Amico, Michele; Vita, Giulia; Musto, Pellegrino; Cuomo, Carmela; Landriscina, Matteo

    2014-02-01

    Biobanks of fresh, unfixed human normal and malignant tissues represent a valuable source for gene expression analysis in translational cancer research and molecular pathology. However, the success of molecular and cellular analysis in both clinical and translational research is strongly dependent on the collection, handling, storage, and quality control of fresh human tissue samples. The aim of this study was to evaluate an innovative vacuum-based refrigerated system, as a logistically feasible technology to increase the collection of tissue specimens, preserving the integrity of cellular and molecular components. We tested randomly-selected tissues stored under vacuum at 4°C by using endpoints important for research and diagnosis, including tissue morphology, epitope stability, and RNA integrity. Gene expression was evaluated by qualitative and quantitative RT analysis of selected housekeeping and tissue-specific genes. Tissue morphology and overall protein stability were generally well preserved, being compromised only in gallbladder tissue. By contrast, phosphoprotein and RNA analysis demonstrated a time-dependent degree of degradation, with progressive loss of stability from 24 to 72 hours. However, this reduction in RNA quality did not represent a limitation for successful expression analysis of selected genes. Indeed, a comparative qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that RNA extracted from tissues stored under vacuum is suitable for gene expression profiling, but requires highly sensitive technologies, such as quantitative RT-PCR. These data suggest that the refrigerated vacuum-based system represents a suitable and feasible technology for routine transport of fresh specimens from surgery to biobanks, thus increasing the opportunity to collect biospecimens.

  11. CD24 expression causes the acquisition of multiple cellular properties associated with tumor growth and metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann, P; Cremers, N; Kroese, F; Orend, G; Chiquet-Ehrismann, R; Uede, T; Yagita, H; Sleeman, JP

    2005-01-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein CD24 functions as an adhesion molecule for P-selectin and L1 and plays a role in B-cell development and neurogenesis. Over the last few years, a large body of literature has also implicated CD24 expression in tumorigenesis and progression. H

  12. Expression pattern of protein kinase C δ during mouse embryogenesis

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    Carracedo Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The members of the protein kinase C (PKC family consist of serine/threonine kinases classified according to their regulatory domain. Those that belong to the novel PKC subfamily, such as PKCδ, are dependent on diacylglycerol but not Calcium when considering their catalytic activity. Although several studies have shown the importance of PKCδ in different cellular events in health and disease, the overall in vivo distribution of this PKC isoform during development is still lacking. Through Lac Z and antibody staining procedures, we show here the in vivo expression of PKCδ during mouse embryogenesis. Results Ganglia were the domains with most prominent expression of PKCδ in most of the stages analysed, although PKCδ could also be detected in heart and somites at earlier stages, and cartilage primordium and skin among other sites in older embryos. Conclusions The strong expression of PKCδ in ganglia during murine development shown in this study suggests a significant role of this isoform as well as redundancy with other PKCs within the nervous system, since PKCδ deficient mice develop normally.

  13. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-01

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  14. Expression and cellular localization of the voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ3 in the rodent retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Sargoy, Allison; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rodriguez, Allen; Liu, Janelle; Cuenca, Nicolás; Brecha, Nicholas

    2015-07-01

    High-voltage-activated calcium channels are hetero-oligomeric protein complexes that mediate multiple cellular processes, including the influx of extracellular Ca(2+), neurotransmitter release, gene transcription, and synaptic plasticity. These channels consist of a primary α(1) pore-forming subunit, which is associated with an extracellular α(2)δ subunit and an intracellular β auxiliary subunit, which alter the gating properties and trafficking of the calcium channel. The cellular localization of the α(2)δ(3) subunit in the mouse and rat retina is unknown. In this study using RT-PCR, a single band at ∼ 305 bp corresponding to the predicted size of the α(2)δ(3) subunit fragment was found in mouse and rat retina and brain homogenates. Western blotting of rodent retina and brain homogenates showed a single 123-kDa band. Immunohistochemistry with an affinity-purified antibody to the α(2)δ(3) subunit revealed immunoreactive cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer and inner nuclear layer and immunoreactive processes in the inner plexiform layer and the outer plexiform layer. α(2)δ(3) immunoreactivity was localized to multiple cell types, including ganglion, amacrine, and bipolar cells and photoreceptors, but not horizontal cells. The expression of the α(2)δ(3) calcium channel subunit to multiple cell types suggests that this subunit participates widely in Ca-channel-mediated signaling in the retina.

  15. BRD4 Phosphorylation Regulates HPV E2-Mediated Viral Transcription, Origin Replication, and Cellular MMP-9 Expression

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    Shwu-Yuan Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification can modulate protein conformation and alter binding partner recruitment within gene regulatory regions. Here, we report that bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4, a transcription co-factor and chromatin regulator, uses a phosphorylation-induced switch mechanism to recruit E2 protein encoded by cancer-associated human papillomavirus (HPV to viral early gene and cellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 promoters. Enhanced MMP-9 expression, induced upon keratinocyte differentiation, occurs via BRD4-dependent recruitment of active AP-1 and NF-κB to their target sequences. This is triggered by replacement of AP-1 family members JunB and JunD by c-Jun and by re-localization of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. In addition, BRD4 phosphorylation is critical for E2- and origin-dependent HPV DNA replication. A class of phospho-BRD4-targeting compounds, distinct from the BET bromodomain inhibitors, effectively blocks BRD4 phosphorylation-specific functions in transcription and factor recruitment.

  16. Identification of Dynamic Changes in Proteins Associated with the Cellular Cytoskeleton after Exposure to Okadaic Acid

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    Peter Roepstorff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of cells to the diarrhetic shellfish poison, okadaic acid, leads to a dramatic reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture and loss of cell-cell contact. When cells are exposed to high concentrations of okadaic acid (100–500 nM, the morphological rearrangement is followed by apoptotic cell death. Okadaic acid inhibits the broad acting Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which results in hyperphosphorylation of a large number of proteins. Some of these hyperphosphorylated proteins are most likely key players in the reorganization of the cell morphology induced by okadaic acid. We wanted to identify these phosphoproteins and searched for them in the cellular lipid rafts, which have been found to contain proteins that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. By using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture cells treated with okadaic acid (400 nM could be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules and cell adhesion structures. A large number of these okadaic acid-regulated proteins have previously also been shown to be similarly regulated prior to cell proliferation and migration. Our results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment.

  17. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare differential domains from orthologous surface proteins induce distinct cellular immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Fernanda Munhoz Dos Anjos; Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2016-07-15

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare are two genetically close species found in the swine respiratory tract. Despite their similarities, while M. hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, M. flocculare is a commensal bacterium. Genomic and transcriptional comparative analyses so far failed to explain the difference in pathogenicity between these two species. We then hypothesized that such difference might be, at least in part, explained by amino acid sequence and immunological or functional differences between ortholog surface proteins. In line with that, it was verified that approximately 85% of the ortholog surface proteins from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and M. flocculare present one or more differential domains. To experimentally assess possible immunological implications of this kind of difference, the extracellular differential domains from one pair of orthologous surface proteins (MHP7448_0612, from M. hyopneumoniae, and MF_00357, from M. flocculare) were expressed in E. coli and used to immunize mice. The recombinant polypeptides (rMHP61267-169 and rMF35767-196, respectively) induced distinct cellular immune responses. While, rMHP61267-169 induced both Th1 and Th2 responses, rMF35767-196 induced just an early pro-inflammatory response. These results indicate that immunological properties determined by differential domains in orthologous surface protein might play a role in pathogenicity, contributing to elicit specific and differential immune responses against each species.

  18. Cellular localization of Y-box binding protein 1 in brain tissue of rats, macaques, and humans

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    Horn Anja

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 is considered to be one of the key regulators of transcription and translation. However, so far only limited knowledge exists regarding its cellular distribution in the adult brain. Results Analysis of YB-1 immunolabelling as well as double-labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN in rat brain tissue revealed a predominant neuronal expression in the dentate gyrus, the cornu ammonis pyramidal cell layer, layer III of the piriform cortex as well as throughout all layers of the parahippocampal cortex. In the hilus of the hippocampus single neurons expressed YB-1. The neuronal expression pattern was comparable in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex of adult macaques and humans. Double-labelling of YB-1 with the endothelial cell marker Glut-1, the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein, and the astrocytic marker GFAP did not indicate a co-localization. Following status epilepticus in rats, no induction of YB-1 occurred in brain capillary endothelial cells and neurons. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrates that YB-1 is predominantly expressed in neurons in the adult brain of rats, macaques and humans. Lack of a co-localization with Glut-1 and P-glycoprotein argues against a direct role of YB-1 in the regulation of blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein.

  19. Cellular expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor in the human antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V C; Sagot, M A; Wong, H; Buchan, A M

    2000-03-15

    The localization of the neurokinin 1 receptor in rat and guinea pig gastrointestinal tract has been extensively studied but not in human tissues. The present study used antibodies to characterize the cellular expression of neurokinin 1 receptors in human antrum. Cryostat sections (40-80 microm) were immunostained for the neurokinin 1 receptor double labeled with substance P, von Willebrand's factor, c-kit, fibronectin, S-100, serotonin, gastrin and somatostatin. Neurokinin 1 receptor-immunoreactivity was observed on neurons within the myenteric and submucosal plexuses surrounded by substance P-immunoreactive fibers and on von Willebrand's factor-immunoreactive endothelial cells lining blood vessels throughout the antral wall. c-Kit-immunoreactive interstitial cells of Cajal and gastrin cells were co-stained by the monoclonal neurokinin 1 receptor antibody. Finally, there was no evidence for the presence of the neurokinin 1 receptor on fibroblasts, Schwann, somatostatin, serotonin or smooth muscle cells. This study clearly demonstrates an expanded cellular expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor in the human antrum.

  20. Exploring Cellular Interactions of Liposomes Using Protein Corona Fingerprints and Physicochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Arafeh; Palchetti, Sara; Pozzi, Daniela; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Caracciolo, Giulio; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-03-22

    To control liposomes fate and transport upon contact with biofluids, it is essential to consider several parameters affecting the synthetic and biological identity of liposomes, as well as liposome-protein corona (PC) aspects. As a powerful tool in this data mining adventure, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approach is used to correlate physicochemical properties of liposomes and their PC fingerprints to multiple quantified biological responses. In the present study, the relationship between cellular interactions of a set of structurally diverse liposomal formulations and their physicochemical and PC properties has been investigated via linear and nonlinear QSAR models. Significant parameters affecting cellular uptake and cell viability of liposomes in two important cancer cell lines (PC3 and HeLa) have been identified. The developed QSARs have the capacity to be implemented in advanced targeted delivery of liposomal drugs.

  1. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein in Small Intestine IDENTIFICATION, ISOLATION, AND EVIDENCE FOR ITS ROLE IN CELLULAR FATTY ACID TRANSPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockner, Robert K.; Manning, Joan A.

    1974-01-01

    A soluble fatty acid-binding protein (FABP), mol wt ∼ 12,000 is present in intestinal mucosa and other tissues that utilize fatty acids, including liver, myocardium, adipose, and kidney. This protein binds long chain fatty acids both in vivo and in vitro. FABP was isolated from rat intestine by gel filtration and isoelectric focusing. It showed a reaction of complete immunochemical identity with proteins in the 12,000 mol wt fatty acid-binding fractions of liver, myocardium, and adipose tissue supernates. (The presence of immunochemically nonidentical 12,000 mol wt FABP in these tissues is not excluded.) By quantitative radial immunodiffusion, supernatant FABP concentration in mucosa from proximal and middle thirds of jejuno-ileum significantly exceeded that in distal third, duodenum, and liver, expressed as micrograms per milligram soluble protein, micrograms per gram DNA, and micrograms per gram tissue. FABP concentration in villi was approximately three times greater than in crypts. Small quantities of FABP were present in washed nuclei-cell membrane, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions. However, the amount of FABP solubilized per milligram membrane protein was similar for all particulate fractions, and total membrane-associated FABP was only about 16% of supernatant FABP. Intestinal FABP concentration was significantly greater in animals maintained on high fat diets than on low fat; saturated and unsaturated fat diets did not differ greatly in this regard. The preponderance of FABP in villi from proximal and middle intestine, its ability to bind fatty acids in vivo as well as in vitro, and its response to changes in dietary fat intake support the concept that this protein participates in cellular fatty acid transport during fat absorption. Identical or closely related 12,000 mol wt proteins may serve similar functions in other tissues. Images PMID:4211161

  2. The complex regulation of HIC (Human I-mfa domain containing protein) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss-Sklan, Ella; Levitzki, Alexander; Naveh-Many, Tally

    2009-07-07

    Human I-mfa domain containing protein (HIC) differentially regulates transcription from viral promoters. HIC affects the Wnt pathway, the JNK/SAPK pathway and the activity of positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb). Studies exploring HIC function in mammalian cells used ectopically expressed HIC due to undetected endogenous HIC protein. HIC mRNA contains exceptionally long 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) compared to the average length of mRNA UTRs. Here we show that HIC protein is subject to strict repression at multiple levels. The HIC mRNA UTRs reduce the expression of HIC or of a reporter protein: The HIC 3'-UTR decreases both HIC and reporter mRNA levels, whereas upstream open reading frames located in the 5'-UTR repress the translation of HIC or of the reporter protein. In addition, ectopically expressed HIC protein is degraded by the proteasome, with a half-life of approximately 1 h, suggesting that upon activation, HIC expression in cells may be transient. The strict regulation of HIC expression at the levels of mRNA stability, translation efficiency and protein stability suggests that expression of the HIC protein and its involvement in the various pathways is required only under specific cellular conditions.

  3. The complex regulation of HIC (Human I-mfa domain containing protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Reiss-Sklan

    Full Text Available Human I-mfa domain containing protein (HIC differentially regulates transcription from viral promoters. HIC affects the Wnt pathway, the JNK/SAPK pathway and the activity of positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb. Studies exploring HIC function in mammalian cells used ectopically expressed HIC due to undetected endogenous HIC protein. HIC mRNA contains exceptionally long 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs compared to the average length of mRNA UTRs. Here we show that HIC protein is subject to strict repression at multiple levels. The HIC mRNA UTRs reduce the expression of HIC or of a reporter protein: The HIC 3'-UTR decreases both HIC and reporter mRNA levels, whereas upstream open reading frames located in the 5'-UTR repress the translation of HIC or of the reporter protein. In addition, ectopically expressed HIC protein is degraded by the proteasome, with a half-life of approximately 1 h, suggesting that upon activation, HIC expression in cells may be transient. The strict regulation of HIC expression at the levels of mRNA stability, translation efficiency and protein stability suggests that expression of the HIC protein and its involvement in the various pathways is required only under specific cellular conditions.

  4. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  5. DNA demethylation upregulated Nrf2 expression in Alzheimer's disease cellular model

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    Huimin eCao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is an important transcription factor in the defense against oxidative stress. Cumulative evidence has shown that oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Previous animal and clinical studies had observed decreased expression of Nrf2 in AD. However, the underlying regulation mechanisms of Nrf2 in AD remain unclear. Here, we used the DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza to test whether Nrf2 expression was regulated by methylation in N2a cells characterizing by expressing human Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (N2a/APPswe. We found 5-Aza treatment increased Nrf2 at both mRNA and protein levels via down-regulating the expression of Dnmts and DNA demethylation. In addition, 5-Aza mediated upregulation of Nrf2 expression was concomitant with increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and higher expression of Nrf2 downstream target gene NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductas (NQO1. Our study showed that DNA demethylation promoted the Nrf2 cell signaling pathway, which may enhance the antioxidant system against AD development.

  6. A novel method for increasing the expression level of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aijun; Clapper, Jonathan; Guderian, Jeffery A; Foy, Teresa M; Fanger, Gary R; Retter, Marc W; Skeiky, Yasir A W

    2003-07-01

    Expression of recombinant proteins is an important step towards elucidating the functions of many genes discovered through genomic sequencing projects. It is also critical for validating gene targets and for developing effective therapies for many diseases. Here we describe a novel method to express recombinant proteins that are extremely difficult to produce otherwise. The increased protein expression level is achieved by using a fusion partner, MTB32-C, which is the carboxyl terminal fragment of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen, MTB32 (Rv0125). By fusing MTB32-C to the N-termini of target genes, we have demonstrated significant enhancement of recombinant protein expression level in Escherichia coli. The inclusion of a 6xHis tag and the 128-amino acid of MTB32-C will add 13.5 kDa to the fusion molecule. Comparison of the mRNA levels of the fusion and non-fusion proteins indicated that the increased fusion protein expression may be regulated at translational or post-translational steps. There are many potential applications for the generated fusion proteins. For example, MTB32-C fusion proteins have been used successfully as immunogens to generate both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies have been used to characterize cellular localization of the proteins and to validate gene targets at protein level. In addition, these antibodies may be useful in diagnostic and therapeutic applications for many diseases. If desired, the MTB32-C portion in the fusion protein can be removed after protein expression, making it possible to study protein structure and function as well as to screen for potential drugs. Thus, this novel fusion expression system has become a powerful tool for many applications.

  7. Divalent metals stabilize cellular prion proteins and alter the rate of proteinase-K dependent limited proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The key biochemical event in the pathogenesis of prion diseases is the conversion of normal cellular prion proteins (PrP**c) to the proteinase K (PK) resistant, abnormal form (PrP**sc); however, the cellular mechanisms underlying the conversion remain enigmatic. Binding of divalent ca...

  8. Two Outer Membrane Proteins Contribute to Caulobacter crescentus Cellular Fitness by Preventing Intracellular S-Layer Protein Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overton, K. Wesley; Park, Dan M.; Yung, Mimi C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Smit, John; Jiao, Yongqin; Parales, R. E.

    2016-09-23

    ABSTRACT

    Surface layers, or S-layers, are two-dimensional protein arrays that form the outermost layer of many bacteria and archaea. They serve several functions, including physical protection of the cell from environmental threats. The high abundance of S-layer proteins necessitates a highly efficient export mechanism to transport the S-layer protein from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior.Caulobacter crescentusis unique in that it has two homologous, seemingly redundant outer membrane proteins, RsaFaand RsaFb, which together with other components form a type I protein translocation pathway for S-layer export. These proteins have homology toEscherichia coliTolC, the outer membrane channel of multidrug efflux pumps. Here we provide evidence that, unlike TolC, RsaFaand RsaFbare not involved in either the maintenance of membrane stability or the active export of antimicrobial compounds. Rather, RsaFaand RsaFbare required to prevent intracellular accumulation and aggregation of the S-layer protein RsaA; deletion of RsaFaand RsaFbled to a general growth defect and lowered cellular fitness. Using Western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that loss of both RsaFaand RsaFbled to accumulation of insoluble RsaA in the cytoplasm, which in turn caused upregulation of a number of genes involved in protein misfolding and degradation pathways. These findings provide new insight into the requirement for RsaFaand RsaFbin cellular fitness and tolerance to antimicrobial agents and further our understanding of the S-layer export mechanism on both the transcriptional and translational levels in

  9. Modification of an acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate disruption method for cellular protein extraction from neuropathogenic Clostridium botulinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) disruption method was used for the extraction of cellular proteins from neurotoxigenic Clostridium botulinum. The amount of protein extracted per gram of dry weight and the protein profile as revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was comparabl...

  10. Functions of the cellular prion protein, the end of Moore's law, and Ockham's razor theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, José A; Gavín, Rosalina

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery the cellular prion protein (encoded by the Prnp gene) has been associated with a large number of functions. The proposed functions rank from basic cellular processes such as cell cycle and survival to neural functions such as behavior and neuroprotection, following a pattern similar to that of Moore's law for electronics. In addition, particular interest is increasing in the participation of Prnp in neurodegeneration. However, in recent years a redefinition of these functions has begun, since examples of previously attributed functions were increasingly re-associated with other proteins. Most of these functions are linked to so-called "Prnp-flanking genes" that are close to the genomic locus of Prnp and which are present in the genome of some Prnp mouse models. In addition, their role in neuroprotection against convulsive insults has been confirmed in recent studies. Lastly, in recent years a large number of models indicating the participation of different domains of the protein in apoptosis have been uncovered. However, after more than 10 years of molecular dissection our view is that the simplest mechanistic model in PrP(C)-mediated cell death should be considered, as Ockham's razor theory suggested.

  11. Expression weighted cell type enrichments reveal genetic and cellular nature of major brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Gerald Skene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment (EWCE method that uses single cell transcriptomes to generate the probability distribution associated with a gene list having an average level of expression within a cell type. Following validation, we applied EWCE to human genetic data from cases of epilepsy, Schizophrenia, Autism, Intellectual Disability, Alzheimer’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis and anxiety disorders. Genetic susceptibility primarily affected microglia in Alzheimer’s and Multiple Sclerosis; was shared between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in Autism and Schizophrenia; while intellectual disabilities and epilepsy were attributable to a range of cell-types, with the strongest enrichment in interneurons. We hypothesised that the primary cell type pathology could trigger secondary changes in other cell types and these could be detected by applying EWCE to transcriptome data from diseased tissue. In Autism, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease we find evidence of pathological changes in all of the major brain cell types. These findings give novel insight into the cellular origins and progression in common brain disorders. The methods can be applied to any tissue and disorder and have applications in validating mouse models.

  12. Cellular Stress Response Gene Expression During Upper and Lower Body High Intensity Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanowicz, Andrzej; Sawczyn, Stanisław; Niespodziński, Bartłomiej; Mieszkowski, Jan; Kochanowicz, Kazimierz

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to compare the effect of upper and lower body high-intensity exercise on chosen genes expression in athletes and non-athletes. Method Fourteen elite male artistic gymnasts (EAG) aged 20.6 ± 3.3 years and 14 physically active men (PAM) aged 19.9 ± 1.0 years performed lower and upper body 30 s Wingate Tests. Blood samples were collected before, 5 and 30 minutes after each effort to assess gene expression via PCR. Results Significantly higher mechanical parameters after lower body exercise was observed in both groups, for relative power (8.7 ± 1.2 W/kg in gymnasts, 7.2 ± 1.2 W/kg in controls, p = 0.01) and mean power (6.7 ± 0.7 W/kg in gymnasts, 5.4 ± 0.8 W/kg in controls, p = 0.01). No differences in lower versus upper body gene expression were detected for all tested genes as well as between gymnasts and physical active man. For IL-6 m-RNA time-dependent effect was observed. Conclusions Because of no significant differences in expression of genes associated with cellular stress response the similar adaptive effect to exercise may be obtained so by lower and upper body exercise. PMID:28141870

  13. Large-scale analysis of expression signatures reveals hidden links among diverse cellular processes

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    Ge Steven X

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cells must respond to various perturbations using their limited available gene repertoires. In order to study how cells coordinate various responses, we conducted a comprehensive comparison of 1,186 gene expression signatures (gene lists associated with various genetic and chemical perturbations. Results We identified 7,419 statistically significant overlaps between various published gene lists. Most (80% of the overlaps can be represented by a highly connected network, a "molecular signature map," that highlights the correlation of various expression signatures. By dissecting this network, we identified sub-networks that define clusters of gene sets related to common biological processes (cell cycle, immune response, etc. Examination of these sub-networks has confirmed relationships among various pathways and also generated new hypotheses. For example, our result suggests that glutamine deficiency might suppress cellular growth by inhibiting the MYC pathway. Interestingly, we also observed 1,369 significant overlaps between a set of genes upregulated by factor X and a set of genes downregulated by factor Y, suggesting a repressive interaction between X and Y factors. Conclusions Our results suggest that molecular-level responses to diverse chemical and genetic perturbations are heavily interconnected in a modular fashion. Also, shared molecular pathways can be identified by comparing newly defined gene expression signatures with databases of previously published gene expression signatures.

  14. Expression of SET Protein in the Ovaries of Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

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    Xu Boqun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We previously found that expression of SET gene was up-regulated in polycystic ovaries by using microarray. It suggested that SET may be an attractive candidate regulator involved in the pathophysiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. In this study, expression and cellular localization of SET protein were investigated in human polycystic and normal ovaries. Method. Ovarian tissues, six normal ovaries and six polycystic ovaries, were collected during transsexual operation and surgical treatment with the signed consent form. The cellular localization of SET protein was observed by immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of SET protein were analyzed by Western Blot. Result. SET protein was expressed predominantly in the theca cells and oocytes of human ovarian follicles in both PCOS ovarian tissues and normal ovarian tissues. The level of SET protein expression in polycystic ovaries was triple higher than that in normal ovaries (P<0.05. Conclusion. SET was overexpressed in polycystic ovaries more than that in normal ovaries. Combined with its localization in theca cells, SET may participate in regulating ovarian androgen biosynthesis and the pathophysiology of hyperandrogenism in PCOS.

  15. Profiling cellular protein complexes by proximity ligation with dual tag microarray readout.

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    Maria Hammond

    Full Text Available Patterns of protein interactions provide important insights in basic biology, and their analysis plays an increasing role in drug development and diagnostics of disease. We have established a scalable technique to compare two biological samples for the levels of all pairwise interactions among a set of targeted protein molecules. The technique is a combination of the proximity ligation assay with readout via dual tag microarrays. In the proximity ligation assay protein identities are encoded as DNA sequences by attaching DNA oligonucleotides to antibodies directed against the proteins of interest. Upon binding by pairs of antibodies to proteins present in the same molecular complexes, ligation reactions give rise to reporter DNA molecules that contain the combined sequence information from the two DNA strands. The ligation reactions also serve to incorporate a sample barcode in the reporter molecules to allow for direct comparison between pairs of samples. The samples are evaluated using a dual tag microarray where information is decoded, revealing which pairs of tags that have become joined. As a proof-of-concept we demonstrate that this approach can be used to detect a set of five proteins and their pairwise interactions both in cellular lysates and in fixed tissue culture cells. This paper provides a general strategy to analyze the extent of any pairwise interactions in large sets of molecules by decoding reporter DNA strands that identify the interacting molecules.

  16. Localization and steroid regulation of prostaglandin E2 receptor protein expression in ovine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Thomas; Levine, Brian A; Nathanielsz, Peter W

    2006-04-01

    Although prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been identified as a central mediator of the cervical ripening process, the mechanisms responsible for PGE2 ripening are still poorly understood, partly because of the lack of information concerning the precise cellular localization and regulation of PGE2 (EP) receptors in the cervix. To provide new insights into the mechanisms of cervical ripening, we used indirect immunofluorescence to localize cervical EP receptor protein expression in ovariectomized ewes and examined the effect of administration of progesterone or estradiol. EP receptors were widely distributed in cervical blood vessels, epithelium of the cervical canal, circular and longitudinal muscles, and stroma. Estradiol replacement decreased EP1 and EP3 receptor protein in blood vessel media (by 23 and 31% respectively, P EP1 receptor protein expression in the longitudinal muscle layer (by 27%, P EP1 and EP3 receptor protein expression was also reduced by estradiol (by 29 and 20% respectively, P EP receptor protein expression. The arterial changes would favor PGE2-induced vasodilatation, subsequent edema and leukocyte infiltration during the cervical ripening process whereas the muscular alterations would facilitate smooth muscle relaxation and cervical dilatation. Furthermore, estradiol provoked perinuclear localization of EP3 receptor protein in the longitudinal muscle layer. This latter result suggests that cellular EP receptor localization is regulated by estradiol and that PGE2 may also control smooth muscle contraction and regulate ovine cervical dilatation in an intracrine manner via EP3 receptors.

  17. Cellular Localization and Regulation of Expression of the PLET1 Gene in Porcine Placenta

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    Liu Teng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The placenta expressed transcript 1 (PLET1 gene, which is expressed in placentas of pigs and mice, has been found to have a potential role in trophoblast cell fate decision in mice. Results of this study showed that the porcine PLET1 mRNA and protein were expressed exclusively in trophoblast cells on Days 15, 26, 50, and 95 of gestation (gestation length in the pig is 114 days, indicating that the PLET1 could be a useful marker for porcine trophoblast cells. Additionally, PLET1 protein was found to be redistributed from cytoplasm to the apical side of trophoblast cells as gestation progresses, which suggests a role of PLET1 in the establishment of a stable trophoblast and endometrial epithelial layers. In addition, two transcripts that differ in the 3′ UTR length but encode identical protein were identified to be generated by the alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA, and the expression of PLET1-L transcript was significantly upregulated in porcine placentas as gestation progresses. Furthermore, we demonstrated the interaction between the miR-365-3p and PLET1 gene using luciferase assay system. Our findings imply an important role of PLET1 in the placental development in pigs.

  18. Cellular Localization and Regulation of Expression of the PLET1 Gene in Porcine Placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Liu; Hong, Linjun; Liu, Ruize; Chen, Ran; Li, Xinyun; Yu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The placenta expressed transcript 1 (PLET1) gene, which is expressed in placentas of pigs and mice, has been found to have a potential role in trophoblast cell fate decision in mice. Results of this study showed that the porcine PLET1 mRNA and protein were expressed exclusively in trophoblast cells on Days 15, 26, 50, and 95 of gestation (gestation length in the pig is 114 days), indicating that the PLET1 could be a useful marker for porcine trophoblast cells. Additionally, PLET1 protein was found to be redistributed from cytoplasm to the apical side of trophoblast cells as gestation progresses, which suggests a role of PLET1 in the establishment of a stable trophoblast and endometrial epithelial layers. In addition, two transcripts that differ in the 3′ UTR length but encode identical protein were identified to be generated by the alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA), and the expression of PLET1-L transcript was significantly upregulated in porcine placentas as gestation progresses. Furthermore, we demonstrated the interaction between the miR-365-3p and PLET1 gene using luciferase assay system. Our findings imply an important role of PLET1 in the placental development in pigs. PMID:27941613

  19. Engineering Escherichia coli for Functional Expression of Membrane Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Franz Y; Poolman, Bert

    2015-01-01

    A major bottleneck in the characterization of membrane proteins is low yield of functional protein in recombinant expression. Microorganisms are widely used for recombinant protein production, because of ease of cultivation and high protein yield. However, the target proteins do not always obtain th

  20. Identification, expression pattern, cellular location and potential role of the caveolin-1 gene from Artemia sinica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejie; Yao, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Cheng; Chu, Bing; Liu, Yan; Mei, Yanli; Wu, Yang; Zou, Xiangyang; Hou, Lin

    2014-05-01

    Caveolins are integral membrane proteins that serve as scaffolds to recruit numerous signaling molecules. Caveolins play an important role in membrane trafficking, signal transduction, substrate transport and endocytosis in differentiated cells. In this study, a caveolin-1 gene from Artemia sinica (As-cav-1) was successfully cloned for the first time. The full-length cDNA of As-cav-1 comprises 974 bp, with a 675 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a polypeptide of 224 amino acids with a caveolin scaffolding domain (CSD) and two transmembrane domains. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the putative As-CAV-1 protein sequence was relatively conserved across species, especially in the CSD domain. Real-time PCR revealed high levels of the As-cav-1 transcript at 0h of embryo development. Furthermore, As-cav-1 transcripts were highly upregulated under high salinity (200‰) and low temperature stresses (15°C). To further characterize As-cav-1, recombinant pET30a-cav-1 protein was expressed using a prokaryotic expression system. The recombinant protein comprised 290 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 32kDa, and a predicted isoelectric point of 5.6. Western blotting of the expression levels of As-CAV-1 during different embryo development stages revealed that As-CAV-1 levels decreased gradually during development stages from 0 h to 40 h, and increased at 3d. Furthermore, western blotting showed that As-CAV-1 was upregulated to its highest expression level by low temperature stress (15°C) and high salinity. Confocal laser microscopy analysis, using antibodies generated against the recombinant As-CAV-1 protein, showed that As-CAV-1 was mostly located in the cell membrane. Our results suggested that As-cav-1 plays a vital role in protecting embryos from high salt damage and low temperature stress, especially during post-diapause embryonic development.

  1. Cellular Cholesterol Regulates Ubiquitination and Degradation of the Cholesterol Export Proteins ABCA1 and ABCG1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Victar; Kim, Mi-Jurng; Gelissen, Ingrid C.; Brown, Andrew J.; Sandoval, Cecilia; Hallab, Jeannette C.; Kockx, Maaike; Traini, Mathew; Jessup, Wendy; Kritharides, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of cholesterol in post-translational control of ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein expression. Using CHO cell lines stably expressing human ABCA1 or ABCG1, we observed that the abundance of these proteins is increased by cell cholesterol loading. The response to increased cholesterol is rapid, is independent of transcription, and appears to be specific for these membrane proteins. The effect is mediated through cholesterol-dependent inhibition of transporter protein degradation. Cell cholesterol loading similarly regulates degradation of endogenously expressed ABCA1 and ABCG1 in human THP-1 macrophages. Turnover of ABCA1 and ABCG1 is strongly inhibited by proteasomal inhibitors and is unresponsive to inhibitors of lysosomal proteolysis. Furthermore, cell cholesterol loading inhibits ubiquitination of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Our findings provide evidence for a rapid, cholesterol-dependent, post-translational control of ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein levels, mediated through a specific and sterol-sensitive mechanism for suppression of transporter protein ubiquitination, which in turn decreases proteasomal degradation. This provides a mechanism for acute fine-tuning of cholesterol transporter activity in response to fluctuations in cell cholesterol levels, in addition to the longer term cholesterol-dependent transcriptional regulation of these genes. PMID:24500716

  2. Expression and cellular localization of the transcription factor NeuroD1 in the developing and adult rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Analía E; Benitez, Sergio G; Farias Altamirano, Luz E; Savastano, Luis E; Patterson, Sean I; Muñoz, Estela M

    2015-05-01

    Circadian rhythms govern many aspects of mammalian physiology. The daily pattern of melatonin synthesis and secretion is one of the classic examples of circadian oscillations. It is mediated by a class of neuroendocrine cells known as pinealocytes which are not yet fully defined. An established method to evaluate functional and cytological characters is through the expression of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators. NeuroD1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in the specification and maintenance of both endocrine and neuronal phenotypes. We have previously described developmental and adult regulation of NeuroD1 mRNA in the rodent pineal gland. However, the transcript levels were not influenced by the elimination of sympathetic input, suggesting that any rhythmicity of NeuroD1 might be found downstream of transcription. Here, we describe NeuroD1 protein expression and cellular localization in the rat pineal gland during development and the daily cycle. In embryonic and perinatal stages, protein expression follows the mRNA pattern and is predominantly nuclear. Thereafter, NeuroD1 is mostly found in pinealocyte nuclei in the early part of the night and in cytoplasm during the day, a rhythm maintained into adulthood. Additionally, nocturnal nuclear NeuroD1 levels are reduced after sympathetic disruption, an effect mimicked by the in vivo administration of α- and β-adrenoceptor blockers. NeuroD1 phosphorylation at two sites, Ser(274) and Ser(336) , associates with nuclear localization in pinealocytes. These data suggest that NeuroD1 influences pineal phenotype both during development and adulthood, in an autonomic and phosphorylation-dependent manner.

  3. Characterization and sub-cellular localization of GalNAc-binding proteins isolated from human hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yaogang; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Hanjie; Zhang, Jiaxu; Sun, Xiu-Xuan; Chen, Wentian; Bian, Huijie; Li, Zheng

    2015-12-25

    Although the expression levels of total GalNAc-binding proteins (GNBPs) were up-regulated significantly in human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated with transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1), yet little is known about the precise types, distribution and sub-cellular localization of the GNBPs in HSCs. Here, 264 GNBPs from the activated HSCs and 257 GNBPs from the quiescent HSCs were identified and annotated. A total of 46 GNBPs were estimated to be significantly up-regulated and 40 GNBPs were estimated to be significantly down-regulated in the activated HSCs. For example, the GNBPs (i.e. BTF3, COX17, and ATP5A1) responsible for the regulation of protein binding were up-regulated, and those (i.e. FAM114A1, ENO3, and TKT) responsible for the regulation of protein binding were down-regulated in the activated HSCs. The motifs of the isolated GNBPs showed that Proline residue had the maximum preference in consensus sequences. The western blotting showed the expression levels of COX17, and PRMT1 were significantly up-regulated, while, the expression level of CLIC1(B5) was down-regulated in the activated HSCs and liver cirrhosis tissues. Moreover, the GNBPs were sub-localized in the Golgi apparatus of HSCs. In conclusion, the precision alteration of the GNBPs referred to pathological changes in liver fibrosis/cirrhosis may provide useful information to find new molecular mechanism of HSC activation and discover the biomarkers for diagnosis of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis as well as development of new anti-fibrotic strategies.

  4. Schisandrin B protects PC12 cells by decreasing the expression of amyloid precursor protein and vacuolar protein sorting 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingmin; Mao, Shanping; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Qian; Pan, Gaofeng; Fu, Zhiping

    2012-03-25

    PC12 cell injury was induced using 20 μM amyloid β-protein 25-35 to establish a model of Alzheimer's disease. The cells were then treated with 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assays and Hoechst 33342 staining results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the survival rate of PC12 cells injured by amyloid β-protein 25-35 gradually increased and the rate of apoptosis gradually decreased. Reverse transcription-PCR, immunocytochemical staining and western blot results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the mRNA and protein expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein were gradually decreased. Vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein showed a consistent trend for change. These findings suggest that 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B antagonizes the cellular injury induced by amyloid β-protein 25-35 in a dose-dependent manner. This may be caused by decreasing the expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein.

  5. Prokaryotic expression and purification of fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane protein 3 C-terminal domain proteins in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Cai; Jing Yang; He Huang; Fang Li; Ganqiu Wu; Jing Yang; Xuegang Luo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have suggested that fibronectin leucine-rich transmembrane protein 3 (FLRT3) is related to injury and regeneration of the nervous system. However, the expression and biological characteristics of these proteins remain poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To obtain FLRT3 C-terminal gene fragments, to effectively express and purify the target proteins.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study of cellular and molecular biology was performed at the laboratory of Histology and Embryology in Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University between October 2007 and June 2008.MATERIALS: Three Sprague Dawley adult rats were used to extract total RNA from rat brains. The pGEX4T3 and Escherichia coli (E. Coli) JM109 were purchased from Promega. E. Coil BL21 was provided by Novagen.METHODS: FLRT3 protein coding C-terminal DNA fragments, at a length of 786 bp, were amplified using RT-PCR technique from rat total RNA. The amplified products were cloned into the expression vector pGEX4T3. A recombinant expression vector was then constructed and introduced into E. Coli BL21. IsopropyI-D-thiogalactopyranoside was applied to induce expression of recombinant GST fusion proteins, followed by isolation, purification, and renaturation of inclusion bodies that comprised recombinant proteins. Finally, the purified recombinant protein was obtained.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Determination of FLRT3 C-terminal DNA sequence; expression of target proteins was assayed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis; purified recombinant protein was identified with Western blot methods.RESULTS: FLRT3 protein coding C-terminal DNA fragments, at a length of 786 bp, were successfully harvested through RT-PCR amplification, and were then cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX4T3. The results of the sequence were consistent with the known gene sequence. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that there was a specific protein band in the recombinant GST fusion proteins at a relative molecular mass

  6. Multiple cellular proteins interact with LEDGF/p75 through a conserved unstructured consensus motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesina, Petr; Čermáková, Kateřina; Hořejší, Magdalena; Procházková, Kateřina; Fábry, Milan; Sharma, Subhalakshmi; Christ, Frauke; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; De Rijck, Jan; Veverka, Václav; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2015-08-06

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is an epigenetic reader and attractive therapeutic target involved in HIV integration and the development of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL1) fusion-driven leukaemia. Besides HIV integrase and the MLL1-menin complex, LEDGF/p75 interacts with various cellular proteins via its integrase binding domain (IBD). Here we present structural characterization of IBD interactions with transcriptional repressor JPO2 and domesticated transposase PogZ, and show that the PogZ interaction is nearly identical to the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with MLL1. The interaction with the IBD is maintained by an intrinsically disordered IBD-binding motif (IBM) common to all known cellular partners of LEDGF/p75. In addition, based on IBM conservation, we identify and validate IWS1 as a novel LEDGF/p75 interaction partner. Our results also reveal how HIV integrase efficiently displaces cellular binding partners from LEDGF/p75. Finally, the similar binding modes of LEDGF/p75 interaction partners represent a new challenge for the development of selective interaction inhibitors.

  7. Rapamycin reverses cellular phenotypes and enhances mutant protein clearance in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kan; Graziotto, John J; Blair, Cecilia D; Mazzulli, Joseph R; Erdos, Michael R; Krainc, Dimitri; Collins, Francis S

    2011-06-29

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a lethal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging. HGPS is most commonly caused by a de novo single-nucleotide substitution in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) that partially activates a cryptic splice donor site in exon 11, producing an abnormal lamin A protein termed progerin. Accumulation of progerin in dividing cells adversely affects the integrity of the nuclear scaffold and leads to nuclear blebbing in cultured cells. Progerin is also produced in normal cells, increasing in abundance as senescence approaches. Here, we report the effect of rapamycin, a macrolide antibiotic that has been implicated in slowing cellular and organismal aging, on the cellular phenotypes of HGPS fibroblasts. Treatment with rapamycin abolished nuclear blebbing, delayed the onset of cellular senescence, and enhanced the degradation of progerin in HGPS cells. Rapamycin also decreased the formation of insoluble progerin aggregates and induced clearance through autophagic mechanisms in normal fibroblasts. Our findings suggest an additional mechanism for the beneficial effects of rapamycin on longevity and encourage the hypothesis that rapamycin treatment could provide clinical benefit for children with HGPS.

  8. Recombinant Expression Screening of P. aeruginosa Bacterial Inner Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery Constance J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmembrane proteins (TM proteins make up 25% of all proteins and play key roles in many diseases and normal physiological processes. However, much less is known about their structures and molecular mechanisms than for soluble proteins. Problems in expression, solubilization, purification, and crystallization cause bottlenecks in the characterization of TM proteins. This project addressed the need for improved methods for obtaining sufficient amounts of TM proteins for determining their structures and molecular mechanisms. Results Plasmid clones were obtained that encode eighty-seven transmembrane proteins with varying physical characteristics, for example, the number of predicted transmembrane helices, molecular weight, and grand average hydrophobicity (GRAVY. All the target proteins were from P. aeruginosa, a gram negative bacterial opportunistic pathogen that causes serious lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis. The relative expression levels of the transmembrane proteins were measured under several culture growth conditions. The use of E. coli strains, a T7 promoter, and a 6-histidine C-terminal affinity tag resulted in the expression of 61 out of 87 test proteins (70%. In this study, proteins with a higher grand average hydrophobicity and more transmembrane helices were expressed less well than less hydrophobic proteins with fewer transmembrane helices. Conclusions In this study, factors related to overall hydrophobicity and the number of predicted transmembrane helices correlated with the relative expression levels of the target proteins. Identifying physical characteristics that correlate with protein expression might aid in selecting the "low hanging fruit", or proteins that can be expressed to sufficient levels using an E. coli expression system. The use of other expression strategies or host species might be needed for sufficient levels of expression of transmembrane proteins with other physical

  9. Differential protein expression in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to nano and ionic Ag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Tânia; Pereira, Catarina G.; Cardoso, Cátia; Bebianno, Maria João, E-mail: mbebian@ualg.pt

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: •Different protein expression profiles between tissues and Ag forms. •Ag NPs and Ag{sup +} presented different mechanisms of toxic action. •Ag NPs toxicity is mediated by oxidative stress-induced cell signalling cascades. •New biomarkers for Ag NPs were proposed, i.e. MVP, ras partial and precol-P. -- Abstract: Ag NPs are one of the most commonly used NPs in nanotechnology whose environmental impacts are to date unknown and the information about bioavailability, mechanisms of biological uptake and toxic implications in organisms is scarce. So, the main objective of this study was to investigate differences in protein expression profiles in gills and digestive gland of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to Ag NPs and Ag{sup +} (10 μg L{sup −1}) for a period of 15 days. Protein expression profiles of exposed gills and digestive glands were compared to those of control mussels using two–dimensional electrophoresis to discriminate differentially expressed proteins. Different patterns of protein expression were obtained for exposed mussels, dependent not only on the different redox requirements of each tissue but also to the Ag form used. Unique sets of differentially expressed proteins were affected by each silver form in addition to proteins that were affected by both Ag NPs and Ag{sup +}. Fifteen of these proteins were subsequently identified by MALDI–TOF–TOF and database search. Ag NPs affected similar cellular pathways as Ag{sup +}, with common response mechanisms in cytoskeleton and cell structure (catchin, myosin heavy chain), stress response (heat shock protein 70), oxidative stress (glutathione s-transferase), transcriptional regulation (nuclear receptor subfamily 1G), adhesion and mobility (precollagen-P) and energy metabolism (ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2). Exposure to Ag NPs altered the expression of two proteins associated with stress response (major vault protein and ras partial) and one

  10. Multiplex assay for live-cell monitoring of cellular fates of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Merezhko

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β precursor protein (APP plays a central role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. APP has a short half-life and undergoes complex proteolytic processing that is highly responsive to various stimuli such as changes in cellular lipid or energy homeostasis. Cellular trafficking of APP is controlled by its large protein interactome, including dozens of cytosolic adaptor proteins, and also by interactions with lipids. Currently, cellular regulation of APP is mostly studied based on appearance of APP-derived proteolytic fragments to conditioned media and cellular extracts. Here, we have developed a novel live-cell assay system based on several indirect measures that reflect altered APP trafficking and processing in cells. Protein-fragment complementation assay technology for detection of APP-BACE1 protein-protein interaction forms the core of the new assay. In a multiplex form, the assay can measure four endpoints: total cellular APP level, total secreted sAPP level in media, APP-BACE1 interaction in cells and in exosomes released by the cells. Functional validation of the assay with pharmacological and genetic tools revealed distinct patterns of cellular fates of APP, with immediate mechanistic implications. This new technology will facilitate functional genomics studies of late-onset Alzheimer's disease, drug discovery efforts targeting APP and characterization of the physiological functions of APP and its proteolytic fragments.

  11. A guide to transient expression of membrane proteins in HEK-293 cells for functional characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Ooi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293 cells are commonly used as host for the heterologous expression of membrane proteins not least because they have a high transfection efficiency and faithfully translate and process proteins. In addition, their cell size, morphology and division rate, and low expression of native channels are traits that are particularly attractive for current-voltage measurements. Nevertheless, the heterologous expression of complex membrane proteins such as receptors and ion channels for biological characterization and in particular for single-cell applications such as electrophysiology remains a challenge. Expression of functional proteins depends largely on careful step-by-step optimization that includes the design of expression vectors with suitable identification tags, as well as the selection of transfection methods and detection parameters appropriate for the application. Here, we use the heterologous expression of a plant potassium, K+ channel, the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K+ channel, AtGORK (At5G37500 in HEK-293 cells as an example, to evaluate commonly used transfection reagents and fluorescent detection methods, and provide a detailed methodology for optimized transient transfection and expression of membrane proteins for in vivo studies in general and for single-cell applications in particular. This optimized protocol will facilitate the physiological and cellular characterization of complex membrane proteins.

  12. A Guide to Transient Expression of Membrane Proteins in HEK-293 Cells for Functional Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Esau, Luke; Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad; Gehring, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells are commonly used as host for the heterologous expression of membrane proteins not least because they have a high transfection efficiency and faithfully translate and process proteins. In addition, their cell size, morphology and division rate, and low expression of native channels are traits that are particularly attractive for current-voltage measurements. Nevertheless, the heterologous expression of complex membrane proteins such as receptors and ion channels for biological characterization and in particular for single-cell applications such as electrophysiology remains a challenge. Expression of functional proteins depends largely on careful step-by-step optimization that includes the design of expression vectors with suitable identification tags, as well as the selection of transfection methods and detection parameters appropriate for the application. Here, we use the heterologous expression of a plant potassium channel, the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K(+) channel, AtGORK (At5G37500) in HEK-293 cells as an example, to evaluate commonly used transfection reagents and fluorescent detection methods, and provide a detailed methodology for optimized transient transfection and expression of membrane proteins for in vivo studies in general and for single-cell applications in particular. This optimized protocol will facilitate the physiological and cellular characterization of complex membrane proteins.

  13. A Guide to Transient Expression of Membrane Proteins in HEK-293 Cells for Functional Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Amanda Siok Lee

    2016-07-19

    The human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells are commonly used as host for the heterologous expression of membrane proteins not least because they have a high transfection efficiency and faithfully translate and process proteins. In addition, their cell size, morphology and division rate, and low expression of native channels are traits that are particularly attractive for current-voltage measurements. Nevertheless, the heterologous expression of complex membrane proteins such as receptors and ion channels for biological characterization and in particular for single-cell applications such as electrophysiology remains a challenge. Expression of functional proteins depends largely on careful step-by-step optimization that includes the design of expression vectors with suitable identification tags, as well as the selection of transfection methods and detection parameters appropriate for the application. Here, we use the heterologous expression of a plant potassium channel, the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K+ channel, AtGORK (At5G37500) in HEK-293 cells as an example, to evaluate commonly used transfection reagents and fluorescent detection methods, and provide a detailed methodology for optimized transient transfection and expression of membrane proteins for in vivo studies in general and for single-cell applications in particular. This optimized protocol will facilitate the physiological and cellular characterization of complex membrane proteins.

  14. Extra-cellular matrix proteins induce matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 activity and increase airway smooth muscle contraction in asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha K Rogers

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling describes the histopathological changes leading to fixed airway obstruction in patients with asthma and includes extra-cellular matrix (ECM deposition. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 is present in remodelled airways but its relationship with ECM proteins and the resulting functional consequences are unknown. We used airway smooth muscle cells (ASM and bronchial biopsies from control donors and patients with asthma to examine the regulation of MMP-1 by ECM in ASM cells and the effect of MMP-1 on ASM contraction. Collagen-I and tenascin-C induced MMP-1 protein expression, which for tenascin-C, was greater in asthma derived ASM cells. Tenascin-C induced MMP-1 expression was dependent on ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK activation and attenuated by function blocking antibodies against the β1 and β3 integrin subunits. Tenascin-C and MMP-1 were not expressed in normal airways but co-localised in the ASM bundles and reticular basement membrane of patients with asthma. Further, ECM from asthma derived ASM cells stimulated MMP-1 expression to a greater degree than ECM from normal ASM. Bradykinin induced contraction of ASM cells seeded in 3D collagen gels was reduced by the MMP inhibitor ilomastat and by siRNA knockdown of MMP-1. In summary, the induction of MMP-1 in ASM cells by tenascin-C occurs in part via integrin mediated MAPK signalling. MMP-1 and tenascin-C are co-localised in the smooth muscle bundles of patients with asthma where this interaction may contribute to enhanced airway contraction. Our findings suggest that ECM changes in airway remodelling via MMP-1 could contribute to an environment promoting greater airway narrowing in response to broncho-constrictor stimuli and worsening asthma symptoms.

  15. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  16. Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase is critical for cellular uptake of vitamin A from serum retinol-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amengual, Jaume; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; von Lintig, Johannes

    2012-07-13

    Vitamin A (all-trans-retinol) must be adequately distributed within the mammalian body to produce visual chromophore in the eyes and all-trans-retinoic acid in other tissues. Vitamin A is transported in the blood bound to retinol-binding protein (holo-RBP), and its target cells express an RBP receptor encoded by the Stra6 (stimulated by retinoic acid 6) gene. Here we show in mice that cellular uptake of vitamin A from holo-RBP depends on functional coupling of STRA6 with intracellular lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT). Thus, vitamin A uptake from recombinant holo-RBP exhibited by wild type mice was impaired in Lrat(-/-) mice. We further provide evidence that vitamin A uptake is regulated by all-trans-retinoic acid in non-ocular tissues of mice. When in excess, vitamin A was rapidly taken up and converted to its inert ester form in peripheral tissues, such as lung, whereas in vitamin A deficiency, ocular retinoid uptake was favored. Finally, we show that the drug fenretinide, used clinically to presumably lower blood RBP levels and thus decrease circulating retinol, targets the functional coupling of STRA6 and LRAT to increase cellular vitamin A uptake in peripheral tissues. These studies provide mechanistic insights into how vitamin A is distributed to peripheral tissues in a regulated manner and identify LRAT as a critical component of this process.

  17. MYMIV-AC2, a geminiviral RNAi suppressor protein, has potential to increase the transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Jamilur; Karjee, Sumona; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Gene silencing is one of the limiting factors for transgene expression in plants. But the plant viruses have learnt to suppress gene silencing by encoding the protein(s), called RNA silencing suppressor(s) (RSS). Hence, these proteins could be used to overcome the limitation for transgene expression. The RNAi suppressors, namely HC-Pro and P19, have been shown to enhance the transgene expression but other RSS proteins have not been screened for similar role. Moreover, none of RSSs from the DNA viruses are known for enhancing the expression of transgenes. The Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus within the family of Geminiviridae encodes an RSS called the AC2 protein. Here, we used AC2 to elevate the expression of the transgenes. Upon introduction of MYMIV-AC2 in the silenced GFP transgenic tobacco lines, by either genetic hybridisation or transgenesis, the GFP expression was enhanced several fold in F1 and T0 lines. The GFP-siRNA levels were much reduced in F1 and T0 lines compared with those of the initial parental silenced lines. The enhanced GFP expression was also observed at the cellular level. This approach was also successful in enhancing the expression of another transgene, namely topoisomeraseII.

  18. Expression of the SET protein in testes of mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Dai; Shan Liu; Li Shao; Chao Gao; Li Gao; Jia-Yin Liu; Yu-Gui Cui

    2014-01-01

    SET is a multifunctional protein involved in regulating many biological processes of the cell cycle. It is also a regulator of steroidogenesis in the ovary. However, the expression of SET protein in testis, and its function, still remains ambiguous. In this study, we observed the expression of SET in the testes of mice at different developmental stages, and have discussed its potential function in regulating spermatogenesis and androgen production. Forty‑eight male mice at different developmental stages(1week old as the infancy group; 4weeks old as the prepubertal group; 12weeks old as the adult group; over12months old as the ageing group) were used. Cellular location of SET protein in the testes was observed by immuno‑histochemistry. Expression levels of Set mRNA and SET protein were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. SET protein was expressed in spermatogonial cells and spermatocytes; the highest level was mainly in haploid and tetraploid cells of the prepubertal and adult groups, and Leydig cells of the adult and ageing groups. There was a low expression in Sertoli cells. Expression of Set mRNA in the prepubertal group was signiifcantly higher than that in the adult group(P<0.05), while expression of SET protein was at the highest level in the adult group(P<0.05).SET protein is mainly expressed in spermatogonial cells and spermatocytes, and poorly expressed in Sertoli cells, suggesting that it is involved in spermatogenesis. Expression of SET protein in Leydig cells suggests a possible role in steroidogenesis.

  19. Time-dependent changes in protein expression in rainbow trout muscle following hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Tune; Jokumsen, Alfred; Højrup, Peter

    2012-01-01

    and 24h respectively, after which muscle samples were taken. The successful investigation of numerous proteins in a single study was achieved by selectively separating the sarcoplasmic proteins using 2-DE. In total 46 protein spots were identified as changing in abundance in response to hypoxia using one......-way ANOVA and multivariate data analysis. Proteins of interest were subsequently identified by MS/MS following tryptic digestion. The observed regulation following hypoxia in skeletal muscle was determined to be time specific, as only a limited number of proteins were regulated in response to more than one...... time point. The cellular response to hypoxia included regulation of proteins involved in maintaining iron homeostasis, energy levels and muscle structure. In conclusion, this proteome-based study presents a comprehensive investigation of the expression profiles of numerous proteins at four different...

  20. Redox Modulation of Cellular Signaling and Metabolism Through Reversible Oxidation of Methionine Sensors in Calcium Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-01-17

    Adaptive responses associated with environmental stressors are critical to cell survival. These involve the modulation of central signaling protein functions through site-specific and enzymatically reversible oxidative modifications of methionines to coordinate cellular metabolism, energy utilization, and calcium signaling. Under conditions when cellular redox and antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, the selective oxidation of critical methionines within selected protein sensors functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, these functional changes within protein sensors take advantage of the helix-breaking character of methionine sulfoxide. Thus, depending on either the ecological niche of the organism or the cellular milieu of different organ systems, cellular metabolism can be fine-tuned to maintain optimal function in the face of variable amounts of collateral oxidative damage. The sensitivity of several calcium regulatory proteins to oxidative modification provides cellular sensors that link oxidative stress to cellular response and recovery. Calmodulin (CaM) is one such critical calcium regulatory protein, which is functionally sensitive to methionine oxidation. Helix destabilization resulting from the oxidation of either Met{sup 144} or Met{sup 145} results in the nonproductive association between CaM and target proteins. The ability of oxidized CaM to stabilize its target proteins in an inhibited state with an affinity similar to that of native (unoxidized) CaM permits this central regulatory protein to function as a cellular rheostat that down-regulates energy metabolism in response to oxidative stress. Likewise, oxidation of a methionine within a critical switch region of the regulatory protein phospholamban is expected to destabilize the phosphorylationdependent helix formation necessary for the release of enzyme inhibition, resulting in a down-regulation of the Ca-ATPase in

  1. Cellular phenotype-dependent and -independent effects of vitamin C on the renewal and gene expression of mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Ming Kuo

    Full Text Available Vitamin C has been shown to delay the cellular senescence and was considered a candidate for chemoprevention and cancer therapy. To understand the reported contrasting roles of vitamin C: growth-promoting in the primary cells and growth-inhibiting in cancer cells, primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF and their isogenic spontaneously immortalized fibroblasts with unlimited cell division potential were used as the model pair. We used microarray gene expression profiling to show that the immortalized MEF possess human cancer gene expression fingerprints including a pattern of up-regulation of inflammatory response-related genes. Using the MEF model, we found that a physiological treatment level of vitamin C (10(-5 M, but not other unrelated antioxidants, enhanced cell growth. The growth-promoting effect was associated with a pattern of enhanced expression of cell cycle- and cell division-related genes in both primary and immortalized cells. In the immortalized MEF, physiological treatment levels of vitamin C also enhanced the expression of immortalization-associated genes including a down-regulation of genes in the extracellular matrix functional category. In contrast, confocal immunofluorescence imaging of the primary MEF suggested an increase in collagen IV protein upon vitamin C treatment. Similar to the cancer cells, the growth-inhibitory effect of the redox-active form of vitamin C was preferentially observed in immortalized MEF. All effects of vitamin C required its intracellular presence since the transporter-deficient SVCT2-/- MEF did not respond to vitamin C. SVCT2-/- MEF divided and became immortalized readily indicating little dependence on vitamin C for the cell division. Immortalized SVCT2-/- MEF required higher concentration of vitamin C for the growth inhibition compared to the immortalized wildtype MEF suggesting an intracellular vitamin C toxicity. The relevance of our observation in aging and human cancer prevention was

  2. Widely predicting specific protein functions based on protein-protein interaction data and gene expression profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Lei; LI Xia; GUO Zheng; ZHU MingZhu; LI YanHui; RAO ShaoQi

    2007-01-01

    GESTs (gene expression similarity and taxonomy similarity), a gene functional prediction approach previously proposed by us, is based on gene expression similarity and concept similarity of functional classes defined in Gene Ontology (GO). In this paper, we extend this method to protein-protein interaction data by introducing several methods to filter the neighbors in protein interaction networks for a protein of unknown function(s). Unlike other conventional methods, the proposed approach automatically selects the most appropriate functional classes as specific as possible during the learning process, and calls on genes annotated to nearby classes to support the predictions to some small-sized specific classes in GO. Based on the yeast protein-protein interaction information from MIPS and a dataset of gene expression profiles, we assess the performances of our approach for predicting protein functions to "biology process" by three measures particularly designed for functional classes organized in GO. Results show that our method is powerful for widely predicting gene functions with very specific functional terms. Based on the GO database published in December 2004, we predict some proteins whose functions were unknown at that time, and some of the predictions have been confirmed by the new SGD annotation data published in April, 2006.

  3. Widely predicting specific protein functions based on protein-protein interaction data and gene expression profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    GESTs (gene expression similarity and taxonomy similarity), a gene functional prediction approach previously proposed by us, is based on gene expression similarity and concept similarity of functional classes defined in Gene Ontology (GO). In this paper, we extend this method to protein-protein interac-tion data by introducing several methods to filter the neighbors in protein interaction networks for a protein of unknown function(s). Unlike other conventional methods, the proposed approach automati-cally selects the most appropriate functional classes as specific as possible during the learning proc-ess, and calls on genes annotated to nearby classes to support the predictions to some small-sized specific classes in GO. Based on the yeast protein-protein interaction information from MIPS and a dataset of gene expression profiles, we assess the performances of our approach for predicting protein functions to “biology process” by three measures particularly designed for functional classes organ-ized in GO. Results show that our method is powerful for widely predicting gene functions with very specific functional terms. Based on the GO database published in December 2004, we predict some proteins whose functions were unknown at that time, and some of the predictions have been confirmed by the new SGD annotation data published in April, 2006.

  4. Analysis of tanshinone IIA induced cellular apoptosis in leukemia cells by genome-wide expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA is a diterpene quinone extracted from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, a Chinese traditional herb. Although previous studies have reported the anti-tumor effects of Tan IIA on various human cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The current study was undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms of Tan IIA's apoptotic effects on leukemia cells in vitro. Methods The cytotoxicity of Tan IIA on different types of leukemia cell lines was evaluated by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2,5]-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay on cells treated without or with Tan IIA at different concentrations for different time periods. Cellular apoptosis progression with and without Tan IIA treatment was analyzed by Annexin V and Caspase 3 assays. Gene expression profiling was used to identify the genes regulated after Tan IIA treatment and those differentially expressed among the five cell lines. Confirmation of these expression regulations was carried out using real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA. The antagonizing effect of a PXR inhibitor L-SFN on Tan IIA treatment was tested using Colony Forming Unit Assay. Results Our results revealed that Tan IIA had different cytotoxic activities on five types of leukemia cells, with the highest toxicity on U-937 cells. Tan IIA inhibited the growth of U-937 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Annexin V and Caspase-3 assays showed that Tan IIA induced apoptosis in U-937 cells. Using gene expression profiling, 366 genes were found to be significantly regulated after Tan IIA treatment and differentially expressed among the five cell lines. Among these genes, CCL2 was highly expressed in untreated U-937 cells and down-regulated significantly after Tan IIA treatment in a dose-dependent manner. RT-qPCR analyses validated the expression regulation of 80% of genes. Addition of L- sulforaphane (L-SFN, an inhibitor of Pregnane × receptor (PXR significantly

  5. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha expression in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standiford, T J; Rolfe, M W; Kunkel, S L; Lynch, J P; Burdick, M D; Gilbert, A R; Orringer, M B; Whyte, R I; Strieter, R M

    1993-09-01

    Mononuclear phagocyte (M phi) recruitment and activation is a hallmark of a number of chronic inflammatory diseases of the lung, including sarcoidosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We hypothesized that macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1 alpha), a peptide with leukocyte activating and chemotactic properties, may play an important role in mediating many of the cellular changes that occur in sarcoidosis and IPF. In initial experiments, we demonstrated that human rMIP-1 alpha exerted chemotactic activities toward both polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, and these activities were inhibited by treatment with rabbit anti-human MIP-1 alpha antiserum. In support of the potential role of MIP-1 alpha in interstitial lung disease, we detected MIP-1 alpha in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of 22/23 patients with sarcoidosis (mean 443 +/- 76 pg/ml) and 9/9 patients with IPF (mean 427 +/- 81 pg/ml), whereas detectable MIP-1 alpha was found in only 1/7 healthy subjects (mean 64 +/- 64 pg/ml). In addition, we found a 2.5- and 1.8-fold increase in monocyte chemotactic activity in BALF obtained from patients with sarcoidosis and IPF respectively, as compared to healthy subjects, and this monocyte chemotactic activity, but not neutrophil chemotactic activity, was reduced by approximately 22% when bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from sarcoidosis and IPF patients were preincubated with rabbit antihuman MIP-1 alpha antibodies. To determine the cellular source(s) of MIP-1 alpha within the lung, we performed immunohistochemical analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage cell pellets, transbronchial biopsies, and open lung biopsies obtained from patients with IPF and sarcoidosis. Substantial expression of cell-associated MIP-1 alpha was detected in M phi, including both alveolar AM phi and interstitial M phi. In addition, interstitial fibroblasts within biopsies obtained from sarcoid and IPF patients also expressed immunoreactive MIP-1 alpha. Minimal to no detectable MIP-1

  6. Discovery of cellular proteins required for the early steps of HCV infection using integrative genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hoon Park

    Full Text Available Successful viral infection requires intimate communication between virus and host cell, a process that absolutely requires various host proteins. However, current efforts to discover novel host proteins as therapeutic targets for viral infection are difficult. Here, we developed an integrative-genomics approach to predict human genes involved in the early steps of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. By integrating HCV and human protein associations, co-expression data, and tight junction-tetraspanin web specific networks, we identified host proteins required for the early steps in HCV infection. Moreover, we validated the roles of newly identified proteins in HCV infection by knocking down their expression using small interfering RNAs. Specifically, a novel host factor CD63 was shown to directly interact with HCV E2 protein. We further demonstrated that an antibody against CD63 blocked HCV infection, indicating that CD63 may serve as a new therapeutic target for HCV-related diseases. The candidate gene list provides a source for identification of new therapeutic targets.

  7. Discovery of Cellular Proteins Required for the Early Steps of HCV Infection Using Integrative Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jae-Seong; Kwon, Oh Sung; Kim, Sanguk; Jang, Sung Key

    2013-01-01

    Successful viral infection requires intimate communication between virus and host cell, a process that absolutely requires various host proteins. However, current efforts to discover novel host proteins as therapeutic targets for viral infection are difficult. Here, we developed an integrative-genomics approach to predict human genes involved in the early steps of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. By integrating HCV and human protein associations, co-expression data, and tight junction-tetraspanin web specific networks, we identified host proteins required for the early steps in HCV infection. Moreover, we validated the roles of newly identified proteins in HCV infection by knocking down their expression using small interfering RNAs. Specifically, a novel host factor CD63 was shown to directly interact with HCV E2 protein. We further demonstrated that an antibody against CD63 blocked HCV infection, indicating that CD63 may serve as a new therapeutic target for HCV-related diseases. The candidate gene list provides a source for identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:23593195

  8. A β-barrel outer membrane protein facilitates cellular uptake of polychlorophenols in Cupriavidus necator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchik, Sara Mae; Schaeffer, Scott M.; Hasenoehrl, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    The tcpRXABCYD operon of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 is involved in the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP). All of the gene products except TcpY have assigned functions in TCP metabolism. Sequence comparison identified TcpY as a member of COG4313, a group of hypothetical proteins. TcpY has a signal peptide, indicating it is a membrane or secreted protein. Secondary structure and topology analysis indicated TcpY as a β-barrel outer membrane protein, similar to the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein FadL that transports hydrophobic long-chain fatty acids. Constitutive expression of tcpY in two C. necator strains rendered the cells more sensitive to TCP and other polychlorophenols. Further, C. necator JMP134 expressing cloned tcpY transported more TCP into the cell than a control with the cloning vector. Thus, TcpY is an outer membrane protein that facilitates the passing of polychlorophenols across the outer membrane of C. necator. Similarly, other COG4313 proteins are possibly outer membrane transporters of hydrophobic aromatic compounds. PMID:19937267

  9. A beta-barrel outer membrane protein facilitates cellular uptake of polychlorophenols in Cupriavidus necator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchik, Sara Mae; Schaeffer, Scott M; Hasenoehrl, Shelley; Xun, Luying

    2010-06-01

    The tcpRXABCYD operon of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 is involved in the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP). All of the gene products except TcpY have assigned functions in TCP metabolism. Sequence comparison identified TcpY as a member of COG4313, a group of hypothetical proteins. TcpY has a signal peptide, indicating it is a membrane or secreted protein. Secondary structure and topology analysis indicated TcpY as a beta-barrel outer membrane protein, similar to the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein FadL that transports hydrophobic long-chain fatty acids. Constitutive expression of tcpY in two C. necator strains rendered the cells more sensitive to TCP and other polychlorophenols. Further, C. necator JMP134 expressing cloned tcpY transported more TCP into the cell than a control with the cloning vector. Thus, TcpY is an outer membrane protein that facilitates the passing of polychlorophenols across the outer membrane of C. necator. Similarly, other COG4313 proteins are possibly outer membrane transporters of hydrophobic aromatic compounds.

  10. Mechanistic studies for the role of cellular nucleic-acid-binding protein (CNBP) in regulation of c-myc transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siqi; Su, Lijuan; Qiu, Jun; Xiao, Nannan; Lin, Jing; Tan, Jia-Heng; Ou, Tian-Miao; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Li, Ding

    2013-10-01

    Guanine-rich sequence of c-myc nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 is known to fold in G-quadruplex and subsequently serves as a transcriptional silencer. Cellular nucleic-acid-binding protein (CNBP), a highly conserved zinc-finger protein with multiple biological functions, could bind to c-myc NHE III1 region, specifically to the single strand G-rich sequence. In the present study, a variety of methods, including cloning, expression and purification of protein, EMSA, CD, FRET, Ch-IP, RNA interference, luciferase reporter assay, SPR, co-immunoprecipitation, and co-transfection, were applied to investigate the mechanism for the role of CNBP in regulating c-myc transcription. We found that human CNBP specifically bound to the G-rich sequence of c-myc NHE III1 region both in vitro and in cellulo, and subsequently promoted the formation of G-quadruplex. CNBP could induce a transient decrease followed by an increase in c-myc transcription in vivo. The interaction of CNBP with NM23-H2 was responsible for the increase of c-myc transcription. Based on above experimental results, a new mechanism, involving G-quadruplex related CNBP/NM23-H2 interaction, for the regulation of c-myc transcription was proposed. These findings indicated that the regulation of c-myc transcription through NHE III1 region might be governed by mechanisms involving complex protein-protein interactions, and suggested a new possibility of CNBP as a potential anti-cancer target based on CNBP's biological function in c-myc transcription. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cellular phenotype impacts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral protein R subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrucci Adriano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr is a virion-associated regulatory protein that functions at several points within the viral life cycle and has been shown to accumulate primarily in the nucleus and at the nuclear envelope. However, most studies have investigated Vpr localization employing cell types irrelevant to HIV-1 pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of how cellular phenotype might impact HIV-1 Vpr intracellular localization, Vpr localization was examined in several cell lines representing major cellular targets for HIV-1 infection within the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and central nervous system (CNS. Results Utilizing a green fluorescent protein-tagged Vpr, we detected Vpr mainly in foci inside the nucleus, at the nuclear envelope, and around the nucleoli, with dispersed accumulation in the cytoplasm of human endothelial kidney 293T cells. No differences were observed in Vpr localization pattern with respect to either the location of the tag (N- or C-terminus or the presence of other viral proteins. Subsequently, the Vpr localization pattern was explored in two primary HIV-1 target cells within the peripheral blood: the CD4+ T lymphocyte (represented by the Jurkat CD4+ T-cell line and the monocyte-macrophage (represented by the U-937 cell line. Vpr was found primarily in speckles within the cytoplasm of the Jurkat T cells, whereas it accumulated predominantly intranuclearly in U-937 monocytic cells. These patterns differ from that observed in a bone marrow progenitor cell line (TF-1, wherein Vpr localized mainly at the nuclear envelope with some intranuclear punctuate staining. Within the CNS, we examined two astroglioma cell lines and found that Vpr displayed a perinuclear and cytoplasmic distribution. Conclusions The results suggest that the pattern of Vpr localization depends on cellular phenotype, probably owing to interactions between Vpr and cell type-specific host

  12. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  13. Strain engineering for improved expression of recombinant proteins in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Tomohiro; Skretas, Georgios; Georgiou, George

    2011-05-14

    Protein expression in Escherichia coli represents the most facile approach for the preparation of non-glycosylated proteins for analytical and preparative purposes. So far, the optimization of recombinant expression has largely remained a matter of trial and error and has relied upon varying parameters, such as expression vector, media composition, growth temperature and chaperone co-expression. Recently several new approaches for the genome-scale engineering of E. coli to enhance recombinant protein expression have been developed. These methodologies now enable the generation of optimized E. coli expression strains in a manner analogous to metabolic engineering for the synthesis of low-molecular-weight compounds. In this review, we provide an overview of strain engineering approaches useful for enhancing the expression of hard-to-produce proteins, including heterologous membrane proteins.

  14. HSP86 and HSP84 exhibit cellular specificity of expression and co-precipitate with an HSP70 family member in the murine testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppi, C. M.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This study extends to the protein level our previous observations, which had established the stage and cellular specificity of expression of hsp86 and hsp84 in the murine testis in the absence of exogenous stress. Immunoblot analysis was used to demonstrate that HSP86 protein was present throughout testicular development and that its levels increased with the appearance of differentiating germ cells. HSP86 was most abundant in the germ cell population and was present at significantly lower levels in the somatic cells. By contrast, the HSP84 protein was detected in the somatic cells of the testis rather than in germ cells. The steady-state levels of HSP86 and HSP84 paralleled the pattern of the expression of their respective mRNAs, suggesting that regulation at the level of translation was not a major mechanism controlling hsp90 gene expression in testicular cells. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that a 70-kDa protein coprecipitated with the HSP86/HSP84 proteins in testicular homogenates. This protein was identified as an HSP70 family member by immunoblot analysis, suggesting that HSP70 and HSP90 family members interact in testicular cells.

  15. Negative Regulation of STAT3 Protein-mediated Cellular Respiration by SIRT1 Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro;

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is regulated by the deacetylase SIRT1. However, whether the newly described nongenomic actions of STAT3 toward mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are dependent on SIRT1 is unclear....... In this study, Sirt1 gene knock-out murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells were used to delineate the role of SIRT1 in the regulation of STAT3 mitochondrial function. Here, we show that STAT3 mRNA and protein levels and the accumulation of serine-phosphorylated STAT3 in mitochondria were increased...... significantly in Sirt1-KO cells as compared with wild-type MEFs. Various mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters, such as the oxygen consumption rate in cell cultures, enzyme activities of the electron transport chain complexes in isolated mitochondria, and production of ATP and lactate, indicated that Sirt1-KO...

  16. Click chemistry for the conservation of cellular structures and fluorescent proteins: ClickOx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löschberger, Anna; Niehörster, Thomas; Sauer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide, are known to cause structural damage not only in living, but also in fixed, cells. Copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click chemistry) is known to produce ROS. Therefore, fluorescence imaging of cellular structures, such as the actin cytoskeleton, remains challenging when combined with click chemistry protocols. In addition, the production of ROS substantially weakens the fluorescence signal of fluorescent proteins. This led us to develop ClickOx, which is a new click chemistry protocol for improved conservation of the actin structure and better conservation of the fluorescence signal of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins. Herein we demonstrate that efficient oxygen removal by addition of an enzymatic oxygen scavenger system (ClickOx) considerably reduces ROS-associated damage during labeling of nascent DNA with ATTO 488 azide by Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. Standard confocal and super-resolution fluorescence images of phalloidin-labeled actin filaments and GFP/yellow fluorescent protein-labeled cells verify the conservation of the cytoskeleton microstructure and fluorescence intensity, respectively. Thus, ClickOx can be used advantageously for structure preservation in conventional and most notably in super-resolution microscopy methods.

  17. The Intracellular Destiny of the Protein Corona: A Study on its Cellular Internalization and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, Filippo; Garry, David; Monopoli, Marco P; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2016-11-22

    It has been well established that the early stages of nanoparticle-cell interactions are governed, at least in part, by the layer of proteins and other biomolecules adsorbed and slowly exchanged with the surrounding biological media (biomolecular corona). Subsequent to membrane interactions, nanoparticles are typically internalized into the cell and trafficked along defined pathways such as, in many cases, the endolysosomal pathway. Indeed, if the original corona is partially retained on the nanoparticle surface, the biomolecules in this layer may play an important role in determining subsequent cellular processing. In this work, using a combination of organelle separation and fluorescence labeling of the initial extracellular corona, we clarify its intracellular evolution as nanoparticles travel within the cell. We show that specific proteins present in the original protein corona are retained on the nanoparticles until they accumulate in lysosomes, and, once there, they are degraded. We also report on how different bare surfaces (amino and carboxyl modified) affect the details of this evolution. One overarching discovery is that the same serum proteins can exhibit different intracellular processing when carried inside cells by nanoparticles, as components of their corona, compared to what is observed when they are transported freely from the extracellular medium.

  18. GCK-MODY diabetes as a protein misfolding disease: the mutation R275C promotes protein misfolding, self-association and cellular degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, Maria; Aukrust, Ingvild; Molnes, Janne; Solheim, Marie H; Johansson, Bente B; Sagen, Jørn V; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Søvik, Oddmund; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål R; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2014-01-25

    GCK-MODY, dominantly inherited mild hyperglycemia, is associated with more than 600 mutations in the glucokinase gene. Different molecular mechanisms have been shown to explain GCK-MODY. Here, we report a Pakistani family harboring the glucokinase mutation c.823C>T (p.R275C). The recombinant and in cellulo expressed mutant pancreatic enzyme revealed slightly increased enzyme activity (kcat) and normal affinity for α-D-glucose, and resistance to limited proteolysis by trypsin comparable with wild-type. When stably expressed in HEK293 cells and MIN6 β-cells (at different levels), the mutant protein appeared misfolded and unstable with a propensity to form dimers and aggregates. Its degradation rate was increased, involving the lysosomal and proteasomal quality control systems. On mutation, a hydrogen bond between the R275 side-chain and the carbonyl oxygen of D267 is broken, destabilizing the F260-L271 loop structure and the protein. This promotes the formation of dimers/aggregates and suggests that an increased cellular degradation is the molecular mechanism by which R275C causes GCK-MODY.

  19. Enhancing Protein Expression in HEK-293 Cells by Lowering Culture Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Yen; Huang, Zhen; Wen, Wei; Wu, Andrew; Wang, Congzhou; Niu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Animal cells and cell lines, such as HEK-293 cells, are commonly cultured at 37°C. These cells are often used to express recombinant proteins. Having a higher expression level or a higher protein yield is generally desirable. As we demonstrate in this study, dropping culture temperature to 33°C, but not lower, 24 hours after transient transfection in HEK-293S cells will give rise to ~1.5-fold higher expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. By following the time course of the GFP-expressing cells growing at 37°C and 33°C from 24 hours after transfection (including 19 hours recovery at 37°C in the normal growth medium), we found that a mild hypothermia (i.e., 33°C) reduces the growth rate of HEK-293S cells, while increasing cellular productivity of recombinant proteins. As a result, green cells remain undivided in a longer period of time. Not surprisingly, the property of a recombinant protein expressed in the cells grown at 33°C is unaffected, as shown by the use of AMPA receptors. We further demonstrate with the use of PC12 cells that this method may be especially useful when a recombinant protein is difficult to express using a chemical-based, transient transfection method. PMID:25893827

  20. Proliferating Cellular Nuclear Antigen Expression as a Marker of Perivascular Macrophages in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kenneth; Schwartz, Annette; Corey, Sarah; Orandle, Marlene; Kennedy, William; Thompson, Brendon; Alvarez, Xavier; Brown, Charlie; Gartner, Suzanne; Lackner, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Brain perivascular macrophages are a major target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques and HIV infection in humans. Perivascular macrophages are distinct from parenchymal microglia in their location, morphology, expression of myeloid markers, and turnover in the CNS. In contrast to parenchymal microglia, perivascular macrophages are continuously repopulated by blood monocytes, which undergo maturation to macrophages on entering the central nervous system (CNS). We studied differences in monocyte/macrophages in vivo that might account for preferential infection of perivascular macrophages by SIV. In situ hybridization for SIV and proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry demonstrated that SIV-infected and PCNA-positive cells were predominantly found in perivascular cuffs of viremic animals and in histopathological lesions that characterize SIV encephalitis (SIVE) in animals with AIDS. Multilabel techniques including double-label immunohistochemistry and combined in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed numerous infected perivascular macrophages that were PCNA-positive. Outside the CNS, SIV-infected, PCNA-expressing macrophage subpopulations were found in the small intestine and lung of animals with AIDS. While PCNA is used as a marker of cell proliferation it is also strongly expressed in non-dividing cells undergoing DNA synthesis and repair. Therefore, more specific markers for cell proliferation including Ki-67, topoisomerase IIα, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation were used which indicated that PCNA-positive cells within SIVE lesions were not proliferating. These observations are consistent with perivascular macrophages as terminally differentiated, non-dividing cells and underscores biological differences that could potentially define mechanisms of preferential, productive infection of perivascular macrophages in the rhesus macaque model of neuroAIDS. These studies

  1. Classification, expression pattern and comparative analysis of sugarcane expressed sequences tags (ESTs encoding glycine-rich proteins (GRPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusaro Adriana

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the isolation of the first glycine-rich proteins (GRPs in plants a wealth of new GRPs have been identified. The highly specific but diverse expression pattern of grp genes, taken together with the distinct sub-cellular localization of some GRP groups, clearly indicate that these proteins are involved in several independent physiological processes. Notwithstanding the absence of a clear definition of the role of GRPs in plant cells, studies conducted with these proteins have provided new and interesting insights into the molecular biology and cell biology of plants. Complexly regulated promoters and distinct mechanisms for the regulation of gene expression have been demonstrated and new protein targeting pathways, as well as the exportation of GRPs from different cell types have been discovered. These data show that GRPs can be useful as markers and/or models to understand distinct aspects of plant biology. In this paper, the structural and functional features of these proteins in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. are summarized. Since this is the first description of GRPs in sugarcane, special emphasis has been given to the expression pattern of these GRP genes by studying their abundance and prevalence in the different cDNA-libraries of the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST project . The comparison of sugarcane GRPs with GRPs from other species is also discussed.

  2. Immunohistochemical examination of the INK4 and Cip inhibitors in the rat neonatal cerebellum: cellular localization and the impact of protein calorie malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, G E; Haines, G K; Koch, A; Lee, E J; Zhou, J n; Pestell, R

    2000-02-01

    Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) has been linked to the inhibition of cellular proliferation and the induction of differentiation. Based on structure function analysis, two distinct families of CDKIs, the INK4 and the Cip/Kip family have been identified. The INK4 family member p16(Ink4), and the Cip/Kip protein p27(Kip1) have been implicated in normal development of the CNS and cerebellum. Recent studies have suggested a functional inter-dependence between the CKI and the abundance of cyclin D1 in orchestrating growth factor-induced cellular proliferation. The neonatal rat cerebellum undergoes proliferative growth and differentiation, localized to distinct topographical regions and cell types. The cell type and the temporal profile of CKI expression during postnatal cerebellar development had not been described. The current studies determined the specific cerebellar cell types in which the CKIs were expressed during post natal development by co-staining for cell-type specific markers. p16(Ink4a) and p27(Kip1) immunostaining was identified in both neurons and glial cells, increasing progressively between postnatal days 6 to 13 into adulthood. By contrast, neuronal and glial cell p21(Cip1) staining was prominent at days 6-11 and decreased thereafter. Cyclin D1 was expressed in the proliferating external granular cells, with occassional staining in the molecular, and internal granular layers. Dual immunostaining demonstrated cyclin D1 within cells expressing CKI (p16(Ink4a), p21(Cip1),p27(Kip1)). Cerebellar cellular growth arrest, induced by protein-calorie malnutrition, inhibited cyclin D1 protein levels without affecting CKI immunostaining suggesting CKI do not mediate the developmental arrest. These results demonstrate that the CKIs are induced by differentiation cues in specific cell types with distinct kinetics in the developing cerebellum in vivo.

  3. Cellular IAP proteins and LUBAC differentially regulate necrosome-associated RIP1 ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almagro, M C; Goncharov, T; Newton, K; Vucic, D

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is a caspase-independent regulated type of cell death that relies on receptor-interacting protein kinases RIP1 (receptor-interacting protein kinases 1) and RIP3. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-stimulated assembly of the TNFR1 (TNF receptor 1)-associated signaling complex leads to the recruitment of RIP1, whose ubiquitination is mediated by the cellular inhibitors of apoptosis (c-IAPs). Translocation of RIP1 to the cytoplasm and association of RIP1 with the necrosome is believed to correlate with deubiquitination of RIP1. However, we found that RIP1 is ubiquitinated with K63 and linear polyubiquitin chains during TNFα, IAP antagonist BV6 and caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk-induced necroptotic signaling. Furthermore, ubiquitinated RIP1 is associated with the necrosome, and RIP1 ubiquitination in the necrosome coincides with RIP3 phosphorylation. Both cellular IAPs and LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex) modulate RIP1 ubiquitination in IAP antagonist-treated necrotic cells, but they use different mechanisms. c-IAP1 regulates RIP1 recruitment to the necrosome without directly affecting RIP1 ubiquitination, whereas HOIP and HOIL1 mediate linear ubiquitination of RIP1 in the necrosome, but are not essential for necrosome formation. Knockdown of the E3 ligase c-IAP1 decreased RIP1 ubiquitination, necrosome assembly and necroptosis induced by TNFα, BV6 and zVAD-fmk. c-IAP1 deficiency likely decreases necroptotic cell death through the activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway and consequent c-IAP2 upregulation. The ability to upregulate c-IAP2 could determine whether c-IAP1 absence will have a positive or negative impact on TNFα-induced necroptotic cell death and necrosome formation. Collectively, these results reveal unexpected complexity of the roles of IAP proteins, IAP antagonists and LUBAC in the regulation of necrosome assembly. PMID:26111062

  4. Quantitative MS-based enzymology of caspases reveals distinct protein substrate specificities, hierarchies, and cellular roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Olivier; Zhuang, Min; Wiita, Arun P; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Knudsen, Giselle M; Craik, Charles S; Wells, James A

    2016-04-05

    Proteases constitute the largest enzyme family, yet their biological roles are obscured by our rudimentary understanding of their cellular substrates. There are 12 human caspases that play crucial roles in inflammation and cell differentiation and drive the terminal stages of cell death. Recent N-terminomics technologies have begun to enumerate the diverse substrates individual caspases can cleave in complex cell lysates. It is clear that many caspases have shared substrates; however, few data exist about the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/KM) of these substrates, which is critical to understanding their true substrate preferences. In this study, we use quantitative MS to determine the catalytic efficiencies for hundreds of natural protease substrates in cellular lysate for two understudied members: caspase-2 and caspase-6. Most substrates are new, and the cleavage rates vary up to 500-fold. We compare the cleavage rates for common substrates with those found for caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-8, involved in apoptosis. There is little correlation in catalytic efficiencies among the five caspases, suggesting each has a unique set of preferred substrates, and thus more specialized roles than previously understood. We synthesized peptide substrates on the basis of protein cleavage sites and found similar catalytic efficiencies between the protein and peptide substrates. These data suggest the rates of proteolysis are dominated more by local primary sequence, and less by the tertiary protein fold. Our studies highlight that global quantitative rate analysis for posttranslational modification enzymes in complex milieus for native substrates is critical to better define their functions and relative sequence of events.

  5. Bioinformatic Analysis of Differential Protein Expression in Calu-3 Cells Exposed to Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials are widely produced and used in industry, medicine and scientific research. To examine the impact of exposure to nanoparticles on human health, the human airway epithelial cell line, Calu-3, was used to evaluate changes in the cellular proteome that could account for alterations in cellular function of airway epithelia after 24 hexposure to 10 μg/mL and 100 ng/mLof two common carbon nanoparticles, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT, MWCNT. After exposure to the nanoparticles, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQMS was used to study the differential protein expression. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA was used to conduct a bioinformaticanalysis of proteins identified in LFQMS. Interestingly, after exposure to ahigh concentration (10 mg/mL; 0.4 mg/cm2 of MWCNT or SWCNT, only 8 and 13 proteins, respectively, exhibited changes in abundance. In contrast, the abundance of hundreds of proteins was altered in response to a low concentration (100 ng/mL; 4 ng/cm2 of either CNT. Of the 281 and 282 proteins that were significantly altered in response to MWCNT or SWCNT respectively, 231 proteins were the same. Bioinformatic analyses found that the proteins in common to both nanotubes occurred within the cellular functions of cell death and survival, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular assembly and organization, cellular growth and proliferation, infectious disease, molecular transport and protein synthesis. The majority of the protein changes represent a decrease in amount suggesting a general stress response to protect cells. The STRING database was used to analyze the various functional protein networks. Interestingly, some proteins like cadherin 1 (CDH1, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1, junction plakoglobin (JUP, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (PYCARD, appear in several functional categories and tend to be in the center of the networks. This

  6. Strain engineering for improved expression of recombinant proteins in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Skretas Georgios; Makino Tomohiro; Georgiou George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Protein expression in Escherichia coli represents the most facile approach for the preparation of non-glycosylated proteins for analytical and preparative purposes. So far, the optimization of recombinant expression has largely remained a matter of trial and error and has relied upon varying parameters, such as expression vector, media composition, growth temperature and chaperone co-expression. Recently several new approaches for the genome-scale engineering of E. coli to enhance re...

  7. BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to altered expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet E Feilotter

    Full Text Available The assessment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequences to identify pathogenic mutations associated with inherited breast/ovarian cancer syndrome has provided a method to identify high-risk individuals, allowing them to seek preventative treatments and strategies. However, the current test is expensive, and cannot differentiate between pathogenic variants and those that may be benign. Focusing only on one of the two BRCA partners, we have developed a biological assay for haploinsufficiency of BRCA1. Using a series of EBV-transformed cell lines, we explored gene expression patterns in cells that were BRCA1 wildtype compared to those that carried (heterozygous BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. We identified a subset of 43 genes whose combined expression pattern is a sensitive predictor of BRCA1 status. The gene set was disproportionately made up of genes involved in cellular differentiation, lending credence to the hypothesis that single copy loss of BRCA1 function may impact differentiation, rendering cells more susceptible to undergoing malignant processes.

  8. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

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    Yue Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins.

  9. A cellular protein specifically binds to the 3'-terminal sequences of hepatitis C virus intermediate negative-strand RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王巍; 邓庆丽; 黄开红; 段朝晖; 邵静; 黄志清; 黄志明

    2003-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the mechanism of the cellular proteins involved in the process of replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) negative-strand RNA.MethodsUltraviolet (UV) cross-linking was used to identify the cellular proteins that would bind to the 3'-end of HCV negative-strand RNA. Competition experimentwas used to confirm the specificity of this binding, in which excess nonhomologous protein and RNA transcripts were used as competitors. The required binding sequence was determined by mapping, then the binding site was predicted through secondary structure analysis.ResultsA cellular protein of 45 kD (p45) was found to bind specifically to the 3'-endof HCV negative-strand RNA by UV cross-linking. nhomologous proteins and RNA transcripts could not compete out this binding, whereas the unlabeled 3'-endof HCV negative-strand RNA could. Mapping of the protein-binding site suggested that the 3'-end 131-278nt of HCV negative-strand RNA was the possible protein-binding region. Analysis of RNA secondary structure presumed that the potential binding site was located at 194-GAAAGAAC-201. ConclusionThe cellular protein p45 could specifically bind to the secondary structure of the 3'-end of HCV intermediate negative-strand RNA, and may play an important role in HCV RNA replication.

  10. TRIM32 protein modulates type I interferon induction and cellular antiviral response by targeting MITA/STING protein for K63-linked ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Hu, Ming-Ming; Wang, Yan-Yi; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2012-08-17

    Viral infection activates several transcription factors including NF-κB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and innate antiviral response. MITA (also called STING) is a critical adaptor protein that links virus-sensing receptors to IRF3 activation upon infection by both RNA and DNA pathogens. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 32 (TRIM32) ubiquitinated MITA and dramatically enhanced MITA-mediated induction of IFN-β. Overexpression of TRIM32 potentiated virus-triggered IFNB1 expression and cellular antiviral response. Consistently, knockdown of TRIM32 had opposite effects. TRIM32 interacted with MITA, and was located at the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. TRIM32 targeted MITA for K63-linked ubiquitination at K20/150/224/236 through its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, which promoted the interaction of MITA with TBK1. These findings suggest that TRIM32 is an important regulatory protein for innate immunity against both RNA and DNA viruses by targeting MITA for K63-linked ubiquitination and downstream activation.

  11. Expression and structural analysis of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Eifler, Nora

    2006-01-01

    1.1 Membrane Proteins Between one quarter and one third of all genes in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms code for integral membrane proteins (IMPs) (Essen, 2002). These proteins are essential parts of biological membranes and confer various functions, such as energy conversion, transport, biosynthesis of lipids, signal transduction, or cell recognition. The enormous economical potential of membrane proteins is highlighted by the family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPC...

  12. A new cellular model of pathological TDP-43: The neurotoxicity of stably expressed CTF25 of TDP-43 depends on the proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Duan, W; Guo, Y; Li, Z; Han, H; Zhang, S; Yuan, P; Li, C

    2014-12-05

    The C-terminal fragments-25(CTF25) of TDP-43 is a fragment of TAR DNA-binding protein 43kDa (TDP-43), which is involved in RNA metabolism, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal development and stress granules. Not until recently did evidence suggest that CTF25 might play an important role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis. However, mechanical details on CTF25 causing motor neuron degeneration still remain unknown. To study the toxicity of CTF25 of TDP-43, we established a cellular model stably expressing CTF25 of TDP-43. Herein, we found that stably expressed CTF25 could induce significant oxidative stress and was mainly degraded by the proteasome pathway in cells. Furthermore, the neurotoxicity of CTF25 of TDP-43 was dependent on proteasome activity. In addition, electron microscopy showed mitochondrial swelling and cristae dilation in cells expressing CTF25 and that CTF25 aggregates were characterized by filamentous bundles and electron dense granular material. In conclusion, the new cellular model mimics classical toxic TDP-43 cellular model and interestingly the toxicity of CTF25 is dependent on the proteasome.

  13. Expression of cellular components in granulomatous inflammatory response in Piaractus mesopotamicus model.

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    Wilson Gómez Manrique

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to describe and characterize the cellular components during the evolution of chronic granulomatous inflammation in the teleost fish pacus (P. mesopotamicus induced by Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG, using S-100, iNOS and cytokeratin antibodies. 50 fish (120±5.0 g were anesthetized and 45 inoculated with 20 μL (40 mg/mL (2.0 x 10(6 CFU/mg and five inoculated with saline (0,65% into muscle tissue in the laterodorsal region. To evaluate the inflammatory process, nine fish inoculated with BCG and one control were sampled in five periods: 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st and 33rd days post-inoculation (DPI. Immunohistochemical examination showed that the marking with anti-S-100 protein and anti-iNOS antibodies was weak, with a diffuse pattern, between the third and seventh DPI. From the 14th to the 33rd day, the marking became stronger and marked the cytoplasm of the macrophages. Positivity for cytokeratin was initially observed in the 14th DPI, and the stronger immunostaining in the 33rd day, period in which the epithelioid cells were more evident and the granuloma was fully formed. Also after the 14th day, a certain degree of cellular organization was observed, due to the arrangement of the macrophages around the inoculated material, with little evidence of edema. The arrangement of the macrophages around the inoculum, the fibroblasts, the lymphocytes and, in most cases, the presence of melanomacrophages formed the granuloma and kept the inoculum isolated in the 33rd DPI. The present study suggested that the granulomatous experimental model using teleost fish P. mesopotamicus presented a similar response to those observed in mammals, confirming its importance for studies of chronic inflammatory reaction.

  14. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kokoro [Fujifilm Corporation, Analysis Technology Center (Japan); Kojima, Chojiro, E-mail: kojima@protein.osaka-u.ac.j [Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Graduate School of Biological Sciences (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis.

  15. Tissue expression of Squamous Cellular Carcinoma Antigen (SCCA is inversely correlated to tumor size in HCC

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    Mangia Anita

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to investigate squamous cellular carcinoma antigen (SCCA in serum and in tumoral and paired peritumoral tissues. We studied 27 patients with liver cirrhosis (LC and 55 with HCC: 20 with a single nodule 3 cm or multifocal (l-HCC. Methods Serum SCCA was measured by the ELISA kit, and in frozen tissues by immunohistochemistry, quantified with appropriate imaging analysis software and expressed in square microns. Continuous variables are reported as means and 95% confidence intervals. Comparisons between independent groups were performed with a generalized linear model and Tukey grouping. Pearson's correlation coefficients were determined to evaluate relations between markers. Qualitative variables were summarized as count and percentage. Statistical significance was set at p-value Results Serum SCCA values in LC patients were 0.41 (0.31–0.55 ng/ml and statistically different from both HCC groups: 1.6 (1.0–2.6 ng/ml in s-HCC, 2.2 (1.28–2.74 ng/ml in l-HCC. SCCA in hepatic tissue was 263.8 (176.6–394.01 μm2 in LC patients, statistically different from values in s-HCC: 1163.2 (863.6–1566.8 μm2 and l-HCC: 625.8 (534.5–732.6. All pairwise comparisons between groups yielded statistically significant differences. Tumoral SCCA resulted linearly related with nodule size, showing a statistically significant inverse relation between the two variables (b = -0.099, p = 0.024. Conclusion There was no statistically significant correlation between tissue and serum levels of SCCA. The significantly stronger expression of SCCA in smaller compared to larger HCC could be important for early HCC detection. However, the increased expression in peritumoral tissue could affect the significance of serological detection.

  16. Molecular and cellular approaches for the detection of protein-protein interactions: latest techniques and current limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Sylvie; Ehrhardt, David W; Loqué, Dominique; Chen, Jin; Rhee, Seung Y; Frommer, Wolf B

    2008-02-01

    Homotypic and heterotypic protein interactions are crucial for all levels of cellular function, including architecture, regulation, metabolism, and signaling. Therefore, protein interaction maps represent essential components of post-genomic toolkits needed for understanding biological processes at a systems level. Over the past decade, a wide variety of methods have been developed to detect, analyze, and quantify protein interactions, including surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, NMR, yeast two-hybrid screens, peptide tagging combined with mass spectrometry and fluorescence-based technologies. Fluorescence techniques range from co-localization of tags, which may be limited by the optical resolution of the microscope, to fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based methods that have molecular resolution and can also report on the dynamics and localization of the interactions within a cell. Proteins interact via highly evolved complementary surfaces with affinities that can vary over many orders of magnitude. Some of the techniques described in this review, such as surface plasmon resonance, provide detailed information on physical properties of these interactions, while others, such as two-hybrid techniques and mass spectrometry, are amenable to high-throughput analysis using robotics. In addition to providing an overview of these methods, this review emphasizes techniques that can be applied to determine interactions involving membrane proteins, including the split ubiquitin system and fluorescence-based technologies for characterizing hits obtained with high-throughput approaches. Mass spectrometry-based methods are covered by a review by Miernyk and Thelen (2008; this issue, pp. 597-609). In addition, we discuss the use of interaction data to construct interaction networks and as the basis for the exciting possibility of using to predict interaction surfaces.

  17. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy induces misfolding of alleged prion-resistant species cellular prion protein without altering its pathobiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Enric; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Pintado, Belén; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Fondevila, Dolors; Torres, Juan María; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2013-05-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions were responsible for an unforeseen epizootic in cattle which had a vast social, economic, and public health impact. This was primarily because BSE prions were found to be transmissible to humans. Other species were also susceptible to BSE either by natural infection (e.g., felids, caprids) or in experimental settings (e.g., sheep, mice). However, certain species closely related to humans, such as canids and leporids, were apparently resistant to BSE. In vitro prion amplification techniques (saPMCA) were used to successfully misfold the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) of these allegedly resistant species into a BSE-type prion protein. The biochemical and biological properties of the new prions generated in vitro after seeding rabbit and dog brain homogenates with classical BSE were studied. Pathobiological features of the resultant prion strains were determined after their inoculation into transgenic mice expressing bovine and human PrP(C). Strain characteristics of the in vitro-adapted rabbit and dog BSE agent remained invariable with respect to the original cattle BSE prion, suggesting that the naturally low susceptibility of rabbits and dogs to prion infections should not alter their zoonotic potential if these animals became infected with BSE. This study provides a sound basis for risk assessment regarding prion diseases in purportedly resistant species.

  18. Signal transduction in neurons: effects of cellular prion protein on fyn kinase and ERK1/2 kinase

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    Tomasi Vittorio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that cellular prion protein (PrPc co-localizes with caveolin-1 and participates to signal transduction events by recruiting Fyn kinase. As PrPc is a secreted protein anchored to the outer surface membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor (secPrP and caveolin-1 is located in the inner leaflet of plasma membrane, there is a problem of how the two proteins can physically interact each other and transduce signals. Results By using the GST-fusion proteins system we observed that PrPc strongly interacts with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain and with a caveolin-1 hydrophilic C-terminal region, but not with the caveolin-1 N-terminal region. In vitro binding experiments were also performed to define the site(s of PrPc interacting with cav-1. The results are consistent with a participation of PrPc octapeptide repeats motif in the binding to caveolin-1 scaffolding domain. The caveolar localization of PrPc was ascertained by co-immunoprecipitation, by co-localization after flotation in density gradients and by confocal microscopy analysis of PrPc and caveolin-1 distributions in a neuronal cell line (GN11 expressing caveolin-1 at high levels. Conclusions We observed that, after antibody-mediated cross-linking or copper treatment, PrPc was internalized probably into caveolae. We propose that following translocation from rafts to caveolae or caveolae-like domains, secPrP could interact with caveolin-1 and induce signal transduction events.

  19. Signal transduction in neurons: effects of cellular prion protein on fyn kinase and ERK1/2 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Vittorio

    2010-12-16

    It has been reported that cellular prion protein (PrPc) co-localizes with caveolin-1 and participates to signal transduction events by recruiting Fyn kinase. As PrPc is a secreted protein anchored to the outer surface membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (secPrP) and caveolin-1 is located in the inner leaflet of plasma membrane, there is a problem of how the two proteins can physically interact each other and transduce signals. By using the GST-fusion proteins system we observed that PrPc strongly interacts with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain and with a caveolin-1 hydrophilic C-terminal region, but not with the caveolin-1 N-terminal region. In vitro binding experiments were also performed to define the site(s) of PrPc interacting with cav-1. The results are consistent with a participation of PrPc octapeptide repeats motif in the binding to caveolin-1 scaffolding domain. The caveolar localization of PrPc was ascertained by co-immunoprecipitation, by co-localization after flotation in density gradients and by confocal microscopy analysis of PrPc and caveolin-1 distributions in a neuronal cell line (GN11) expressing caveolin-1 at high levels. We observed that, after antibody-mediated cross-linking or copper treatment, PrPc was internalized probably into caveolae. We propose that following translocation from rafts to caveolae or caveolae-like domains, secPrP could interact with caveolin-1 and induce signal transduction events.

  20. Quantitation of the Noncovalent Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein, Type 1 Complex Through Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Yu, Jianshi; Kane, Maureen A.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a valuable tool in probing noncovalent protein-ligand interactions in a sample-efficient way, yet the quantitative application potential of native MS has not been fully explored. Cellular retinol binding protein, type I (CrbpI) chaperones retinol and retinal in the cell, protecting them from nonspecific oxidation and delivering them to biosynthesis enzymes where the bound (holo-) and unbound (apo-) forms of CrbpI exert distinct biological functions. Using nanoelectrospray, we developed a native MS assay for probing apo- and holo-CrbpI abundance to facilitate exploring their biological functions in retinoid metabolism and signaling. The methods were developed on two platforms, an Orbitrap-based Thermo Exactive and a Q-IMS-TOF-based Waters Synapt G2S, where similar ion behaviors under optimized conditions were observed. Overall, our results suggested that within the working range ( 1-10 μM), gas-phase ions in the native state linearly correspond to solution concentration and relative ion intensities of the apo- and holo-protein ions can linearly respond to the solution ratios, suggesting native MS is a viable tool for relative quantitation in this system.

  1. Combinatorial effects of continuous protein synthesis, ERK-signaling, and reactive oxygen species on induction of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takauji, Yuki; En, Atsuki; Miki, Kensuke; Ayusawa, Dai; Fujii, Michihiko

    2016-07-15

    Mammalian cells, when treated with sub-lethal doses of genotoxic stresses, slow down DNA synthesis but continue protein synthesis. Thus, these cells show an accumulation of proteins and undergo unbalanced growth. In the previous studies, we have shown that HeLa cells treated with excess thymidine or camptothecin undergo unbalanced growth, and prolonged unbalanced growth causes induction of cellular senescence, which is suppressed by restriction of protein synthesis or inhibition of ERK-signaling. In this study, we found that restriction of protein synthesis, inhibition of ERK-signaling, and elimination of reactive oxygen species showed a combinatorial effect on suppression of cellular senescence induced by excess thymidine or camptothecin. Of these, restriction of protein synthesis most effectively suppressed cellular senescence. Importantly, a similar combinatorial effect was observed in replicative senescence in normal human diploid fibroblasts. Our findings suggested that various stresses were cumulatively involved in cellular senescence, and suppression of cellular senescence was improved by combining the treatments that reduce the stresses.

  2. Cloning and expression of special F protein from human liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Ye Liu; Xin-Da Yu; Chun-Juan Song; Wei Lu; Jian-Dong Zhang; Xin-Rong Shi; Ying Duan; Ju Zhang

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To clone human liver special F protein and to express it in a prokaryotic system.METHODS:Total RNA was isolated from human liver tissue and first-strand cDNA was reverse transcribed using the PCR reverse primer. Following this,cDNA of the F protein was ligated into the clone vector pUCm-T. The segment of F protein's cDNA was subcloned into the expression vector pET-15b and transformed into E coli BL21 (DEB) pLyss. Isopropy-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was then used to induce expression of the target protein.RESULTS:The cDNA clone of human liver special F protein (1134bp) was successfully produced,with the cDNA sequence being published in Gene-bank:DQ188836. We confirmed the expression of F protein by Western blot with a molecular weight of 43 kDa. The expressed protein accounted for 40% of the total protein extracted.CONCLUSION:F protein expresses cDNA clone in a proKaryotic system,which offers a relatively simple way of producing sufficient quantities of F protein and contributes to understanding the principal biological functions of this protein.

  3. Boost protein expression through co-expression of LEA-like peptide in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ikeno

    Full Text Available The boost protein expression has been done successfully by simple co-expression with a late embryogenesis abundant (LEA-like peptide in Escherichia coli. Frequently, overexpression of a recombinant protein fails to provide an adequate yield. In the study, we developed a simple and efficient system for overexpressing transgenic proteins in bacteria by co-expression with an LEA-like peptide. The design of this peptide was based on part of the primary structure of an LEA protein that is known hydrophilic protein to suppress aggregation of other protein molecules. In our system, the expression of the target protein was increased remarkably by co-expression with an LEA-like peptide consisting of only 11 amino acid residues. This could provide a practical method for producing recombinant proteins efficiently.

  4. Effects of UVB-induced oxidative stress on protein expression and specific protein oxidation in normal human epithelial keratinocytes: a proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Marco Federico

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UVB component of solar ultraviolet irradiation is one of the major risk factors for the development of skin cancer in humans. UVB exposure elicits an increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are responsible for oxidative damage to proteins, DNA, RNA and lipids. In order to examine the biological impact of UVB irradiation on skin cells, we used a parallel proteomics approach to analyze the protein expression profile and to identify oxidatively modified proteins in normal human epithelial keratinocytes. Results The expression levels of fifteen proteins - involved in maintaining the cytoskeleton integrity, removal of damaged proteins and heat shock response - were differentially regulated in UVB-exposed cells, indicating that an appropriate response is developed in order to counteract/neutralize the toxic effects of UVB-raised ROS. On the other side, the redox proteomics approach revealed that seven proteins - involved in cellular adhesion, cell-cell interaction and protein folding - were selectively oxidized. Conclusions Despite a wide and well orchestrated cellular response, a relevant oxidation of specific proteins concomitantly occurs in UVB-irradiated human epithelial Keratinocytes. These modified (i.e. likely dysfunctional proteins might result in cell homeostasis impairment and therefore eventually promote cellular degeneration, senescence or carcinogenesis.

  5. The eukaryotic Pso2/Snm1/Artemis proteins and their function as genomic and cellular caretakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bonatto

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs represent a major threat to the genomic stability of eukaryotic cells. DNA repair mechanisms such as non-homologous end joining (NHEJ are responsible for the maintenance of eukaryotic genomes. Dysfunction of one or more of the many protein complexes that function in NHEJ can lead to sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, apoptosis, genomic instability, and severe combined immunodeficiency. One protein, Pso2p, was shown to participate in the repair of DSBs induced by DNA inter-strand cross-linking (ICL agents such as cisplatin, nitrogen mustard or photo-activated bi-functional psoralens. The molecular function of Pso2p in DNA repair is unknown, but yeast and mammalian cell line mutants for PSO2 show the same cellular responses as strains with defects in NHEJ, e.g., sensitivity to ICLs and apoptosis. The Pso2p human homologue Artemis participates in V(DJ recombination. Mutations in Artemis induce a variety of immunological deficiencies, a predisposition to lymphomas, and an increase in chromosomal aberrations. In order to better understand the role of Pso2p in the repair of DSBs generated as repair intermediates of ICLs, an in silico approach was used to characterize the catalytic domain of Pso2p, which led to identification of novel Pso2p homologues in other organisms. Moreover, we found the catalytic core of Pso2p fused to different domains. In plants, a specific ATP-dependent DNA ligase I contains the catalytic core of Pso2p, constituting a new DNA ligase family, which was named LIG6. The possible functions of Pso2p/Artemis/Lig6p in NHEJ and V(DJ recombination and in other cellular metabolic reactions are discussed.

  6. Expression of potein complexes using multiple E. coli protein co-expression systems: a benchmarking study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busso, D.; Peleg, Y.; Folkers, G.E.; Celie, P.H.N.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) remains the most commonly used host for recombinant protein expression. It is well known that a variety of experimental factors influence the protein production level as well as the solubility profile of over-expressed proteins. This becomes increasingly important for opti

  7. Inhibition of host protein synthesis and degradation of cellular mRNAs during infection by influenza and herpes simplex virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inglis, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    Cloned DNA copies of two cellular genes were used to monitor, by blot hybridization, the stability of particular cell mRNAs after infection by influenza virus and herpes virus. The results indicated that the inhibition of host cell protein synthesis that accompanied infection by each virus could be explained by a reduction in the amounts of cellular mRN As in the cytoplasm, and they suggested that this decrease was due to virus-mediated mRNA degradation.

  8. Analysis of HPV-16 early gene regulationin cellular differentiation, includingcharacterisation of the possiblerole of CPEB proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christina Neigaard

    cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPEs) situated in the distal part of the messengers. These CPE sequences bind the CPE-binding protein CPEB. In this study, the mRNA levels of the 4 CPEBs in primary keratinocytes, in 8 different cell lines, and in both normal and cancer genital tissues have been analysed....... Huge variations among both the different cell types and the 4 CPEBs were observed. Interestingly, in ovarian cancer we found downregulated mRNA levels of CPEB1, a protein that previously has been suggested to be a tumor suppressor protein. We also found a tendency for the CPEB3 mRNA to be downregulated...... E6/E7 expression. HPV-16 preferably infects the proliferating cells of the continually renewing stratified epithelium lining the genital tract. These proliferating cells will differentiate as they are pushed upwards in the epithelium by newly produced daughter cells. The virus life cycle is tightly...

  9. SUMO fusion technology for enhanced protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panavas, Tadas; Sanders, Carsten; Butt, Tauseef R

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the reversible attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein is a post-translational modification that has been demonstrated to play an important role in various cellular processes. Moreover, it has been found that SUMO as an N-terminal fusion partner enhances functional protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems, based upon significantly improved protein stability and solubility. Following the expression and purification of the fusion protein, the SUMO-tag can be cleaved by specific (SUMO) proteases via their endopeptidase activity in vitro to generate the desired N-terminus of the released protein partner. In addition to its physiological relevance in eukaryotes, SUMO can, thus, be used as a powerful biotechnological tool for protein expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell systems.In this chapter, we will describe the construction of a fusion protein with the SUMO-tag, its expression in Escherichia coli, and its purification followed by the removal of the SUMO-tag by a SUMO-specific protease in vitro.

  10. 麻杏石甘汤对腺病毒感染的HELF细胞因子蛋白表达影响的实验研究%Experimental Research of the Impacts of Maxing Shigan Tang on the Protein Expression of HELF Cellular Factors in Adenoviral Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文革; 徐华; 邓英贤; 王喆

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the impacts of the medicated serum of maxing shigan tang on the protein expressions of transformation growth factor - β1 ( TGF - β1 ), platelet - derived growth factor - BB ( PDGF - BB )and tumor necrosis factor - α( TNF - α )in human embryo lung fibroblasts( HELF )after the infection of adenovirus type 3. Methods The adenovirus type 3 was used to attack the in vitro cultured HELF. The medicated serum of maxing shigan tang was prepared and worked on the cells. A normal cell group,a virus control group and a Ribavirin group were set up separately. The enzyme - linked immunosorbent assay ( ELISA )was adopted to detect the protein expressions of TGF -β1, PDGF - BB and TNF - α in the cells of each group and the comparison was made. Results The protein expressions of TGF - β1 , PDGF - BB and TNF - α in the virus control group were stronger apparently than those in the normal cell group( P < 0. 01 ). The protein expressions of TGF - β1 ,PDGF - BB and TNF - α of HELF after the attack of adenovirus type 3 were reduced significantly in the medicated serum group( P < 0. 01 ). Conclusion Maxing shigan tang down - regulates the protein expressions of TGF - β1 ,PDGF - BB and TNF - α of HELF after the infection of adenovirus type 3, which is probably one of the mechanisms of its efficacy on viral pneumonia.%目的 探讨麻杏石甘汤含药血清对3型腺病毒感染的人胚肺成纤维细胞(HELF)之转化生长因子-β1(TGF-β1)、血小板衍生生长因子-BB(PDGF-BB)、肿瘤坏死因子-α(TNF-α)蛋白表达的影响.方法 以3型腺病毒攻击体外培养的HELF,制备麻杏石甘汤含药血清,作用于该细胞,另设正常细胞组,病毒对照组,利巴韦林组,采用酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA法)检测不同组细胞TGF-β1、PDGF-BB、TNF-α的蛋白表达,并进行比较.结果 病毒对照组较正常细胞组之TGF-β1、PDGF-BB、TNF-α蛋白表达均明显增强(P<0.01),含药血清组可显著降低3

  11. An inhibitory interaction between viral and cellular proteins underlies the resistance of tomato to nonadapted tobamoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Naito, Satoshi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2009-05-26

    Any individual virus can infect only a limited range of hosts, and most plant species are "nonhosts" to a given virus; i.e., all members of the species are insusceptible to the virus. In nonhost plants, the factors that control virus resistance are not genetically tractable, and how the host range of a virus is determined remains poorly understood. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a nonhost species for Tobacco mild green mosaic virus (TMGMV) and Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), members of the genus Tobamovirus. Previously, we identified Tm-1, a resistance gene of tomato to another tobamovirus, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), and found that Tm-1 binds to ToMV replication proteins to inhibit RNA replication. Tm-1 is derived from a wild tomato species, S. habrochaites, and ToMV-susceptible tomato cultivars have the allelic gene tm-1. The tm-1 protein can neither bind to ToMV replication proteins nor inhibit ToMV multiplication. Here, we show that transgenic tobacco plants expressing tm-1 exhibit resistance to TMGMV and PMMoV. The tm-1 protein bound to the replication proteins of TMGMV and PMMoV and inhibited their RNA replication in vitro. In one of the tm-1-expressing tobacco plants, a tm-1-insensitive TMGMV mutant emerged. In tomato protoplasts, this mutant TMGMV multiplied as efficiently as ToMV. However, in tomato plants, the mutant TMGMV multiplied with lower efficiency compared to ToMV and caused systemic necrosis. These results suggest that an inhibitory interaction between the replication proteins and tm-1 underlies a multilayered resistance mechanism to TMGMV in tomato.

  12. 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase activity and subunit expression in exercise-trained human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Nis; Mustard, Kirsty J.W.; Graham, Drew A.

    2002-01-01

    5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been proposed to be a pivotal factor in cellular responses to both acute exercise and exercise training. To investigate whether protein levels and gene expression of catalytic (alpha(1), alpha(2)) and regulatory (beta(1), beta(2), gamma(1), gamma(2), gam...... muscle has increased alpha(1)-AMPK protein levels and blunted AMPK activation during exercise.......5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been proposed to be a pivotal factor in cellular responses to both acute exercise and exercise training. To investigate whether protein levels and gene expression of catalytic (alpha(1), alpha(2)) and regulatory (beta(1), beta(2), gamma(1), gamma(2), gamma......(3)) AMPK subunits and exercise-induced AMPK activity are influenced by exercise training status, muscle biopsies were obtained from seven endurance exercise-trained and seven sedentary young healthy men. The alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-AMPK mRNA contents in trained subjects were both 117 +/- 2...

  13. Multiple, but Concerted Cellular Activities of the Human Protein Hap46/BAG-1M and Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Gehring

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The closely related human and murine proteins Hap46/BAG-1M and BAG-1, respectively, were discovered more than a decade ago by molecular cloning techniques. These and the larger isoform Hap50/BAG-1L, as well as shorter isoforms, have the ability to interact with a seemingly unlimited array of proteins of completely unrelated structures. This problem was partially resolved when it was realized that molecular chaperones of the hsp70 heat shock protein family are major primary association partners, binding being mediated by the carboxy terminal BAG-domain and the ATP-binding domain of hsp70 chaperones. The latter, in turn, can associate with an almost unlimited variety of proteins through their substrate-binding domains, so that ternary complexes may result. The protein folding activity of hsp70 chaperones is affected by interactions with Hap46/BAG-1M or isoforms. However, there also exist several proteins which bind to Hap46/BAG-1M and isoforms independent of hsp70 mediation. Moreover, Hap46/BAG-1M and Hap50/BAG-1L, but not the shorter isoforms, can bind to DNA in a sequence-independent manner by making use of positively charged regions close to their amino terminal ends. This is the molecular basis for their effects on transcription which are of major physiological relevance, as discussed here in terms of a model. The related proteins Hap50/BAG-1L and Hap46/BAG-1M may thus serve as molecular links between such diverse bioactivities as regulation of gene expression and protein quality control. These activities are coordinated and synergize in helping cells to cope with conditions of external stress. Moreover, they recently became markers for the aggressiveness of several cancer types.

  14. Potential toxic effect of trifloxystrobin on cellular microstructure, mRNA expression and antioxidant enzymes in Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Feng; Liu, Lei; Gong, Yu-Xin; Zhu, Bin; Liu, Guang-Lu; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of trifloxystrobin that one strobilurin used widely in the world as an effective fungicidal agent to control Asian soybean rust on aquatic unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris. We determined the potential toxic effect of trifloxystrobin on C. vulgaris, and found median inhibition concentration (IC(50)) value 255.58 (95% confidence interval, 207.81-330.29)μgL(-1). In addition, the algal cells were obviously depressed or shrunk at different concentrations by electron microscopy. In the study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay showed changes in transcript abundances of three photosynthetic genes, psaB, psbC, and rbcL, and one energy gene, ATPs. The results showed that trifloxystrobin reduced the transcript abundances of the three genes and enhanced expression of ATPs after 48 and 96 h. The lowest abundances of psaB, psbC and rbcL transcripts in response to trifloxystrobin exposure were 58%, 79% and 60% of those of the control, respectively. For the potential toxic influences, trifloxystrobin could decrease the soluble protein and total antioxidant contents (T-AOC), and increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activity with a gradual concentration-response relationship. Overall, the present study demonstrated that trifloxystrobin could affect the activities of antioxidant enzymes, disrupts photosynthesis in C. vulgaris, and damage cellular structure.

  15. Antisense expression of a rice cellular apoptosis susceptibility gene (OsCAS) alters the height of transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chunxiao; HE Chaozu

    2007-01-01

    Cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CAS) gene plays important roles in mitosis, development and export of importin αfrom the nucleus, but its function in plant is unknown. In this study, a rice CAS ortholog (OsCAS), which encodes a predicted protein of 983 amino acids with 62% similarity to human CAS, was identified. DNA gel blot analysis revealed a single copy of OsCAS in the rice genome. A 973 bp fragment at the 3' end of OsCAS cDNA was cloned from rice cDNA library and transferred into rice in the antisense direction under the control of CaMV 35S promoter via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, 105 transgenic lines were obtained. Expression of OsCAS was suppressed in the antisense transgenic lines as revealed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The antisense transgenic lines showed dwarf phenotypes. The results indicated that OsCAS was involved in culm development of rice.

  16. A highly efficient pipeline for protein expression in Leishmania tarentolae using infrared fluorescence protein as marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller-Roeber Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania tarentolae, a unicellular eukaryotic protozoan, has been established as a novel host for recombinant protein production in recent years. Current protocols for protein expression in Leishmania are, however, time consuming and require extensive lab work in order to identify well-expressing cell lines. Here we established an alternative protein expression work-flow that employs recently engineered infrared fluorescence protein (IFP as a suitable and easy-to-handle reporter protein for recombinant protein expression in Leishmania. As model proteins we tested three proteins from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, including a NAC and a type-B ARR transcription factor. Results IFP and IFP fusion proteins were expressed in Leishmania and rapidly detected in cells by deconvolution microscopy and in culture by infrared imaging of 96-well microtiter plates using small cell culture volumes (2 μL - 100 μL. Motility, shape and growth of Leishmania cells were not impaired by intracellular accumulation of IFP. In-cell detection of IFP and IFP fusion proteins was straightforward already at the beginning of the expression pipeline and thus allowed early pre-selection of well-expressing Leishmania clones. Furthermore, IFP fusion proteins retained infrared fluorescence after electrophoresis in denaturing SDS-polyacrylamide gels, allowing direct in-gel detection without the need to disassemble cast protein gels. Thus, parameters for scaling up protein production and streamlining purification routes can be easily optimized when employing IFP as reporter. Conclusions Using IFP as biosensor we devised a protocol for rapid and convenient protein expression in Leishmania tarentolae. Our expression pipeline is superior to previously established methods in that it significantly reduces the hands-on-time and work load required for identifying well-expressing clones, refining protein production parameters and establishing purification protocols

  17. Mechanisms of Nrf2/Keap1-Dependent Phase II Cytoprotective and Detoxifying Gene Expression and Potential Cellular Targets of Chemopreventive Isothiocyanates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswa Nath Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isothiocyanates (ITCs are abundantly found in cruciferous vegetables. Epidemiological studies suggest that chronic consumption of cruciferous vegetables can lower the overall risk of cancer. Natural ITCs are key chemopreventive ingredients of cruciferous vegetables, and one of the prime chemopreventive mechanisms of natural isothiocyanates is the induction of Nrf2/ARE-dependent gene expression that plays a critical role in cellular defense against electrophiles and reactive oxygen species. In the present review, we first discuss the underlying mechanisms how natural ITCs affect the intracellular signaling kinase cascades to regulate the Keap1/Nrf2 activities, thereby inducing phase II cytoprotective and detoxifying enzymes. We also discuss the potential cellular protein targets to which natural ITCs are directly conjugated and how these events aid in the chemopreventive effects of natural ITCs. Finally, we discuss the posttranslational modifications of Keap1 and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of Nrf2 in response to electrophiles and oxidants.

  18. A stable HeLa cell line that inducibly expresses poliovirus 2A(pro): effects on cellular and viral gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-03-01

    A HeLa cell clone (2A7d) that inducibly expresses the gene for poliovirus protease 2A (2A(pro)) under the control of tetracycline has been obtained. Synthesis of 2A(pro) induces severe morphological changes in 2A7d cells. One day after tetracycline removal, cells round up and a few hours later die. Poliovirus 2A(pro) cleaves both forms of initiation factor eIF4G, causing extensive inhibition of capped-mRNA translation a few hours after protease induction. Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone, a selective inhibitor of 2A(pro), prevents both eIF4G cleavage and inhibition of translation but not cellular death. Expression of 2A(pro) still allows both the replication of poliovirus and the translation of mRNAs containing a picornavirus leader sequence, while vaccinia virus replication is drastically inhibited. Translation of transfected capped mRNA is blocked in 2A7d-On cells, while luciferase synthesis from a mRNA bearing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence is enhanced by the presence of 2A(pro). Moreover, synthesis of 2A(pro) in 2A7d cells complements the translational defect of a poliovirus 2A(pro)-defective variant. These results show that poliovirus 2A(pro) expression mimics some phenotypical characteristics of poliovirus-infected cells, such as cell rounding, inhibition of protein synthesis and enhancement of IRES-driven translation. This cell line constitutes a useful tool to further analyze 2A(pro) functions, to complement poliovirus 2A(pro) mutants, and to test antiviral compounds.

  19. Protease resistance of infectious prions is suppressed by removal of a single atom in the cellular prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornemann, Simone; Herrmann, Uli Simon; Zhu, Caihong; Dametto, Paolo; Li, Bei; Laferriere, Florent; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Pelczar, Pawel; Schwarz, Petra; Rushing, Elisabeth Jane; Wüthrich, Kurt; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to proteolytic digestion has long been considered a defining trait of prions in tissues of organisms suffering from transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Detection of proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrPSc) still represents the diagnostic gold standard for prion diseases in humans, sheep and cattle. However, it has become increasingly apparent that the accumulation of PrPSc does not always accompany prion infections: high titers of prion infectivity can be reached also in the absence of protease resistant PrPSc. Here, we describe a structural basis for the phenomenon of protease-sensitive prion infectivity. We studied the effect on proteinase K (PK) resistance of the amino acid substitution Y169F, which removes a single oxygen atom from the β2–α2 loop of the cellular prion protein (PrPC). When infected with RML or the 263K strain of prions, transgenic mice lacking wild-type (wt) PrPC but expressing MoPrP169F generated prion infectivity at levels comparable to wt mice. The newly generated MoPrP169F prions were biologically indistinguishable from those recovered from prion-infected wt mice, and elicited similar pathologies in vivo. Surprisingly, MoPrP169F prions showed greatly reduced PK resistance and density gradient analyses showed a significant reduction in high-density aggregates. Passage of MoPrP169F prions into mice expressing wt MoPrP led to full recovery of protease resistance, indicating that no strain shift had taken place. We conclude that a subtle structural variation in the β2–α2 loop of PrPC affects the sensitivity of PrPSc to protease but does not impact prion replication and infectivity. With these findings a specific structural feature of PrPC can be linked to a physicochemical property of the corresponding PrPSc. PMID:28207746

  20. Adult Drosophila melanogaster evolved for antibacterial defense invest in infection-induced expression of both humoral and cellular immunity genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGraw Elizabeth A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the transcription of innate immunity genes in response to bacterial infection has been well-characterised in the Drosophila model, we recently demonstrated the capacity for such transcription to evolve in flies selected for improved antibacterial defense. Here we use this experimental system to examine how insects invest in constitutive versus infection-induced transcription of immunity genes. These two strategies carry with them different consequences with respect to energetic and pleiotropic costs and may be more or less effective in improving defense depending on whether the genes contribute to humoral or cellular aspects of immunity. Findings Contrary to expectation we show that selection preferentially increased the infection-induced expression of both cellular and humoral immunity genes. Given their functional roles, infection induced increases in expression were expected for the humoral genes, while increases in constitutive expression were expected for the cellular genes. We also report a restricted ability to improve transcription of immunity genes that is on the order of 2-3 fold regardless of total transcription level of the gene. Conclusions The evolved increases in infection-induced expression of the cellular genes may result from specific cross talk with humoral pathways or from generalised strategies for enhancing immunity gene transcription. A failure to see improvements in constitutive expression of the cellular genes suggests either that increases might come at too great a cost or that patterns of expression in adults are decoupled from the larval phase where increases would be most effective. The similarity in fold change increase across all immunity genes may suggest a shared mechanism for the evolution of increased transcription in small, discrete units such as duplication of cis-regulatory elements.

  1. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S.; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-bjergaard, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial...

  2. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial...

  3. Purification and Immunity Analysis of Recombinant 6His- HPT Protein Expressed in E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI-CHEN YANG; ZHEN ZHU; XIAO-GUANG YANG

    2003-01-01

    Objective To obtain HPT protein (Hygromycin B Phosphotransferase), a kind of plantselective maker gene product expressed from E. coli and to prepare the polyclonal antibody (pAbs)against it. Methods HPT cDNA fragment was obtained by PCR and was inserted into theprokaryotic expressing vector pBV222. Then the constructed recombinant plasmid pBV222-HPT wastransfered into E. coli DH5α for HPT expression. The recombinant expressing system was confirmedby restriction endonuclease digestion, DNA sequencing and protein expression. E. coli cells were lysedby sonication and detergent dissolution. After cell membrane was extracted, the inclusion bodies weredenatured by 8 mol/L Urea and purified with metal chelate affinity chromatography on Ni-NTAagarose under denaturing condition. The purified 6His-HPT was characterized by SDS-PAGE, andused to immunize rabbit. The titer and specificity of antisera were detected by ELISA and Westernblot respecitively. Results Analysis of DNA sequence and restricted enzymes showed that thesequence of PBV222-HPT plasmid was correct. The amount of recombinant HPT expressed in E. coliaccounted for 30% of total cellular proteins. From 1 liter of fermentative bacteria about 22 milligramsof pure recombinant HPT was isolated with purity above 95%. The recombinant HPT protein couldproduce high titer antiserum in rabbits and show good immunity activity. Western blot showedspecific binding reaction between the antiserum to the purified 6His-HPT protein and their expressedproducts (plants protein and bacterial protein). Conclusion HPT protein can be expressed andpurified from E. coli by a relatively simple method, which has high immunity activity.

  4. Expression of Helicobacter pylori Hsp60 protein and its immunogenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Bai; Liang-Ren Li; Ji-De Wang; Ye Chen; Jian-Feng Jin; Zhao-Shan Zhang; Dian-Yuan Zhou; Ya-Li Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To express Hsp60 protein of H pylori by a constructed vector and to evaluate its immunogenicity.METHODS: Hsp60 DNA was amplified by PCR and inserted into the prokaryotie expression vector pET-22b (+), which was transformed into BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain to express recombinant protein. Immunogenicity of expressed Hsp60 protein was evaluated with animal experiments.RESULTS: DNA sequence analysis showed Hsp60 DNA was the same as GenBank's research. Hsp60 recombinant protein accounted for 27.2 % of the total bacterial protein,and could be recognized by the serum from H pylori infected patients and Balb/c mice immunized with Hsp60 itself.CONCLUSION: Hsp60 recombinant protein might become a potential vaccine for controlling and treating H pylori infection.

  5. Evaluation of somatic embryos of alfalfa for recombinant protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guohua; Grbic, Vojislava; Ma, Shengwu; Tian, Lining

    2015-02-01

    Somatic embryos of alfalfa can accumulate higher levels of recombinant proteins comparing to vegetative organs. Somatic embryos may be explored as a new system for new protein production for plants. Plants have been explored via genetic engineering as an inexpensive system for recombinant protein production. However, protein expression levels in vegetative tissues have been low, which limits the commercial utilization of plant expression systems. Somatic embryos resemble zygotic embryos in many aspects and may accumulate higher levels of proteins as true seed. In this study, somatic embryo of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was investigated for the expression of recombinant proteins. Three heterologous genes, including the standard scientific reporter uid that codes for β-glucuronidase and two genes of interest: ctb coding for cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), and hIL-13 coding for human interleukin 13, were independently introduced into alfalfa via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Somatic embryos were subsequently induced from transgenic plants carrying these genes. Somatic embryos accumulated approximately twofold more recombinant proteins than vegetative organs including roots, stems, and leaves. The recombinant proteins of CTB and hIL-13 accumulated up to 0.15 and 0.18 % of total soluble protein in alfalfa somatic embryos, respectively. The recombinant proteins expressed in somatic embryos also exhibited biological activities. As somatic embryos can be induced in many plant species and their production can be scaled up via different avenues, somatic embryos may be developed as an efficient expression system for recombinant protein production.

  6. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP, a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Reuten

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST, SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome, which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems.

  7. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype. PMID:27229535

  8. Single-cell expression analyses during cellular reprogramming reveal an early stochastic and a late hierarchic phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buganim, Y.; Faddah, D.A.; Cheng, A.W.; Itskovich, E.; Markoulaki, S.; Ganz, K.; Klemm, S.L.; van Oudenaarden, A.; Jaenisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    During cellular reprogramming, only a small fraction of cells become induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Previous analyses of gene expression during reprogramming were based on populations of cells, impeding single-cell level identification of reprogramming events. We utilized two gene

  9. Enhanced expression of the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein by a recombinant vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J P; Hampson, I N; Heinrich, H W; Mackett, M; Arrand, J R

    1989-05-01

    The complete coding sequence of the Epstein-Barr virus strain B95-8 latent membrane protein (LMP) was cloned using a Raji cell cDNA library and genomic B95-8 DNA. The clone was characterized by sequencing and then used to make a recombinant vaccinia virus. This virus (VLMP) was shown to express a relatively high level of LMP in an authentic fashion. Antisera raised in rabbits against VLMP were shown to react with B95-8 LMP as well as cross-reacting with a 50K cellular protein.

  10. The Dengue Virus NS5 Protein Intrudes in the Cellular Spliceosome and Modulates Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Priya; Pozzi, Berta; Gebhard, Leopoldo G.; Mammi, Pablo; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Andino, Raul; Krogan, Nevan; Srebrow, Anabella; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus NS5 protein plays multiple functions in the cytoplasm of infected cells, enabling viral RNA replication and counteracting host antiviral responses. Here, we demonstrate a novel function of NS5 in the nucleus where it interferes with cellular splicing. Using global proteomic analysis of infected cells together with functional studies, we found that NS5 binds spliceosome complexes and modulates endogenous splicing as well as minigene-derived alternative splicing patterns. In particular, we show that NS5 alone, or in the context of viral infection, interacts with core components of the U5 snRNP particle, CD2BP2 and DDX23, alters the inclusion/exclusion ratio of alternative splicing events, and changes mRNA isoform abundance of known antiviral factors. Interestingly, a genome wide transcriptome analysis, using recently developed bioinformatics tools, revealed an increase of intron retention upon dengue virus infection, and viral replication was improved by silencing specific U5 components. Different mechanistic studies indicate that binding of NS5 to the spliceosome reduces the efficiency of pre-mRNA processing, independently of NS5 enzymatic activities. We propose that NS5 binding to U5 snRNP proteins hijacks the splicing machinery resulting in a less restrictive environment for viral replication. PMID:27575636

  11. Electrochemical aptasensor of cellular prion protein based on modified polypyrrole with redox dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miodek, A; Castillo, G; Hianik, T; Korri-Youssoufi, H

    2014-06-15

    This work consists of the development of an electrochemical aptasensor based on polyprrole modified with redox dendrimers, able to detect human cellular prions PrP(C) with high sensitivity. The gold surface was modified by conductive polypyrrole film coupled to polyamidoamine dendrimers of fourth generation (PAMAM G4) and ferrocenyl group as redox marker. The aptamers were immobilized on the surface via biotin/streptavidin chemistry. Electrochemical signal was detected by ferrocenyl group incorporated between dendrimers and aptamers layers. We demonstrated that the interaction between aptamer and prion protein led to variation in electrochemical signal of the ferrocenyl group. The kinetics parameters (diffusion coefficient D and heterogeneous constant transfer ket) calculated from electrochemical signals demonstrate that the variation in redox signal results from the lower diffusion process of ions during redox reaction after prion interaction due to bulk effect of larger protein. The association of redox dendrimers with conducting polypyrrole leads to high sensitivity of PrP(C) determination with detection limit of 0.8 pM, which is three orders of magnitude lower, compared to flat ferrocene-functionalized polypyrrole. Detection of PrP(C) in spiked blood plasma has been achieved and demonstrated a recovery up to 90%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biopolymer stochastic moments. I. Modeling human rhinovirus cellular recognition with protein surface electrostatic moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Uriarte, Eugenio

    2005-04-05

    Stochastic moments may be applied as molecular descriptors in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies for small molecules (H. González-Dìaz et al., Journal of Molecular Modeling, 2002, Vol. 8, pp. 237-245; 2003, Vol. 9, pp. 395-407). However, applications in the field of biopolymers are less known. Recently, the MARCH-INSIDE approach has been generalized to encode structural features of proteins and other biopolymers (H. González-Dáaz et al., Bioinformatics, 2003, Vol. 19, pp. 2079-2087; Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 2004, Vol. 14, pp. 4691-4695; Polymers, 2004, Vol. 45, pp. 3845-3853; Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, 2005, Vol. 13, pp. 323-331). The present article attempts to extend this research by introducing for the first time stochastic moments for a surface road map of viral proteins. These moments are afterward used to seek a model that predicts the cellular receptor for human rhinoviruses. The model correctly classified 100% of 10 viruses binding to low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and 88.9% of 9 viruses binding to the intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) receptors in training. The same results have been obtained in four cross-validation experiments using a resubstitution technique. The present model favorably compares, in terms of complexity, with other previously reported based on entropy considerations, and offers a quantitative basis for the visual rule previously reported by Vlasak et al.

  13. Application of elastin-mimetic recombinant proteins in chemotherapeutics delivery, cellular engineering, and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Won Bae

    2013-01-01

    With the remarkable increase in the fields of biomedical engineering and regenerative medicine, biomaterial design has become an indispensable approach for developing the biocompatible carriers for drug or gene cargo and extracellular matrix (ECM) for cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. Native ECM materials derived from animal tissues were believed to be the best choices for tissue engineering. However, possible pathogen contamination by cellular remnants from foreign animal tissues is an unavoidable issue that has limited the use of native ECM for human benefit. Some synthetic polymers have been used as alternative materials for manufacturing native ECM because of the biodegradability and ease of large-scale production of the polymers. However, the inherent polydispersity of the polymers causes batch-to-batch variation in polymer composition and possible cytotoxic interactions between chemical matrices and neighboring cells or tissues have not yet been fully resolved. Elastin-like proteins (ELPs) are genetically engineered biopolymers modeled after the naturally occurring tropoelastin and have emerged as promising materials for biomedical applications because they are biocompatible, non-immunogenic and biodegradable, and their composition, mechanical stiffness and even fate within the cell can be controlled at the gene level. This commentary highlights the recent progresses in the development of the ELP-based recombinant proteins that are being increasingly used for the delivery of chemotherapeutics and to provide a cell-friendly ECM environment.

  14. The Dengue Virus NS5 Protein Intrudes in the Cellular Spliceosome and Modulates Splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico A De Maio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus NS5 protein plays multiple functions in the cytoplasm of infected cells, enabling viral RNA replication and counteracting host antiviral responses. Here, we demonstrate a novel function of NS5 in the nucleus where it interferes with cellular splicing. Using global proteomic analysis of infected cells together with functional studies, we found that NS5 binds spliceosome complexes and modulates endogenous splicing as well as minigene-derived alternative splicing patterns. In particular, we show that NS5 alone, or in the context of viral infection, interacts with core components of the U5 snRNP particle, CD2BP2 and DDX23, alters the inclusion/exclusion ratio of alternative splicing events, and changes mRNA isoform abundance of known antiviral factors. Interestingly, a genome wide transcriptome analysis, using recently developed bioinformatics tools, revealed an increase of intron retention upon dengue virus infection, and viral replication was improved by silencing specific U5 components. Different mechanistic studies indicate that binding of NS5 to the spliceosome reduces the efficiency of pre-mRNA processing, independently of NS5 enzymatic activities. We propose that NS5 binding to U5 snRNP proteins hijacks the splicing machinery resulting in a less restrictive environment for viral replication.

  15. Plant Antifreeze Proteins and Their Expression Regulatory Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Yuan-zhen; Lin Shan-zhi; Zhang Zhi-yi; Zhang Wei; Liu Wen-feng

    2005-01-01

    Low temperature is one of the major limiting environmental factors which constitutes the growth, development,productivity and distribution of plants. Over the past several years, the proteins and genes associated with freezing resistance of plants have been widely studied. The recent progress of domestic and foreign research on plant antifreeze proteins and the identification and characterization of plant antifreeze protein genes, especially on expression regulatory mechanism of plant antifreeze proteins are reviewed in this paper. Finally, some unsolved problems and the trend of research in physiological functions and gene expression regulatory mechanism of plant antifreeze proteins are discussed.

  16. Photoperiodic regulation of cellular retinol binding protein, CRBP1 [corrected] and nestin in tanycytes of the third ventricle ependymal layer of the Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Perry; Ivanova, Elena; Graham, E Scott; Ross, Alexander W; Wilson, Dana; Plé, Helene; Mercer, Julian G; Ebling, Francis J; Schuhler, Sandrine; Dupré, Sandrine M; Loudon, Andrew; Morgan, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Tanycytes in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle act both as a barrier and a communication gateway between the cerebrospinal fluid, brain and portal blood supply to the pituitary gland. However, the range, importance and mechanisms involved in the function of tanycytes remain to be explored. In this study, we have utilized a photoperiodic animal to examine the expression of three unrelated gene sequences in relation to photoperiod-induced changes in seasonal physiology and behaviour. We demonstrate that cellular retinol binding protein [corrected] (CRBP1), a retinoic acid transport protein, GPR50, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor and nestin, an intermediate filament protein, are down-regulated in short-day photoperiods. The distribution of the three sequences is very similar, with expression located in cells with tanycyte morphology in the region of the ependymal layer where tanycytes are located. Furthermore, CRBP1 expression in the ependymal layer is shown to be independent of a circadian clock and altered testosterone levels associated with testicular regression in short photo-period. Pinealectomy of Siberian hamsters demonstrates CRBP1 expression is likely to be dependent on melatonin output from the pineal gland. This provides evidence that tanycytes are seasonally responsive cells and are likely to be an important part of the mechanism to facilitate seasonal physiology and behaviour in the Siberian hamster.

  17. Cytosolic Hsp70/Hsc70 protein expression in lymphocytes exposed to low gamma-ray dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzanares A, E.; Vega C, H.R.; Letechipia de Leon, C. [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares, UAZ, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)]. E-mail: emanz@cantera.reduaz.mx; Guzman E, L.J. [Unidad Academica de Biologia Experimental, Guadalupe, Zacatecas (Mexico); Garcia T, M. [LIBRA, Centro I and D, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid 47011 (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low gamma ray intensity upon Hsp70 expression in human Iymphocytes. The heat shock proteins (Hsp) family, are a group of proteins present in all living organism, therefore there are highly conserved and are related to adaptation and evolution. At cellular level these proteins acts as chaperones correcting denatured proteins. When a stress agent, such heavy metals, UV, heat, etc. is affecting a cell a response to this aggression is triggered only through over expression of Hsp. Several studies has been carried out in which the cellular effect are observed, mostly of these studies uses large doses, but very few studies are related with low doses. Blood of healthy volunteers was obtained and the Iymphocytes were isolated by ficoll- histopaque gradient. Experimental lots were irradiated in a {sup 137} Cs gamma-ray. Hsp70 expression was found since 0.5 c Gy, indicating a threshold to very low doses of gamma rays. (Author)

  18. Pathology-Dependent Effects Linked to Small Heat Shock Proteins Expression: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-P. Arrigo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins (small Hsps are stress-induced molecular chaperones that act as holdases towards polypeptides that have lost their folding in stress conditions or consequently of mutations in their coding sequence. A cellular protection against the deleterious effects mediated by damaged proteins is thus provided to cells. These chaperones are also highly expressed in response to protein conformational and inflammatory diseases and cancer pathologies. Through specific and reversible modifications in their phospho-oligomeric organization, small Hsps can chaperone appropriate client proteins in order to provide cells with resistance to different types of injuries or pathological conditions. By helping cells to better cope with their pathological status, their expression can be either beneficial, such as in diseases characterized by pathological cell degeneration, or deleterious when they are required for tumor cell survival. Moreover, small Hsps are actively released by cells and can act as immunogenic molecules that have dual effects depending on the pathology. The cellular consequences linked to their expression levels and relationships with other Hsps as well as therapeutic strategies are discussed in view of their dynamic structural organization required to interact with specific client polypeptides.

  19. CO-EXPRESSIONS OF SURVIVIN GENE,BCL-2 AND BAX PROTEINS IN OVARIAN CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林蓓; 张淑兰; 赵长清

    2004-01-01

    Objective To characterize the cellular properties of ovarian cancer, we examined the correlation between the expression of apoptosis-related gene survivin and those of Bcl-2 and Bar proteins. Methods Expressions of survivin mRNA, and Bcl-2 and Bax proteins in 35 cases of ovarian carcinoma, 10 cases of borderline carcinoma, 10 cases of benign tumors and 10 cases of normal tissue were evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry SABC method, respectively. Results Expression of survivin gene was detected in a significantly greater proportion in ovarian carcinoma and borderline carcinoma than those in benign tumors and normal tissues. Although there was no relationship between expression of survivin gene and FIGO stage, histologic grade, pathological type and lymphatic metastasis, expressions of Bcl-2 and Bar proteins were positively and negatively correlated with that of survivin gene, respectively. Conclusion Survivin may play an important role in pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma, with a synergistic role of apoptosis-related gene Bcl-2protein and an antagonistic role of Bax protein in formation and progression of ovarian carcinoma.

  20. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luciana O; Garcia, Cristiana B; Matos-Silva, Flavia A; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2014-02-28

    SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene