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Sample records for cellular phenotypes caused

  1. [Plasticity of the cellular phenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chneiweiss, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The tragical consequences of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs in 1945 were to lead to the discovery of hematopoietic stem cells and their phenotypic plasticity, in response to environmental factors. These concepts were much later extended to the founding cells of other tissues. In the following collection of articles, the mechanisms underlying this plasticity, at the frontiers of developmental biology and oncology, are illustrated in the case of various cell types of neural origin and of some tumours. PMID:21501574

  2. Lysosomal Storage Causes Cellular Dysfunction in Mucolipidosis II Skin Fibroblasts*

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    Otomo, Takanobu; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Ozono, Keiichi; Sakai, Norio

    2011-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (ML-II) is a fatal inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of GlcNAc-phosphotransferase, which plays a role in generating the mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker on lysosomal enzymes. In ML-II, many lysosomal acid hydrolases are mistargeted out of cells, and lysosomes become filled with undigested substrates, which explains inclusion cell disease as an alternative name for this disease. In this study, we revealed various cellular phenotypes in ML-II skin fibroblasts. We quantitated phospholipid and cholesterol within cells and showed ∼2-fold accumulation in ML-II as compared with normal cells. Lysosomal pH of ML-II cells was higher than that of normal cells (5.29 ± 0.08 versus 4.79 ± 0.10, p < 0.001). The proliferated lysosomes in ML-II cells were accumulated ∼3-fold in amount as compared with normal cells. Intracellular logistics including endocytosis and mannose 6-phosphate receptor recycling were impaired in ML-II cells. To confirm whether these ML-II cellular phenotypes derive from deficient lysosomal acid hydrolases within lysosomes, we performed supplementation of lysosomal enzymes using a partially purified total enzyme mixture, which was derived from the conditioned culture medium of normal skin fibroblasts after NH4Cl treatment. This supplementation corrected all of the previously described ML-II phenotypes. In addition, the autophagic and mitochondrial impairment that we have previously reported improved, and inclusion bodies disappeared on electron micrography following total lysosomal enzyme supplementation. Our results indicate that various cellular phenotypes in ML-II are caused by the deficiency of many lysosomal enzymes and massive accumulation of undigested substrates. PMID:21846724

  3. Survival of Phenotypic Information during Cellular Growth Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J Christian J

    2016-08-19

    Phenotypic memory can predispose cells to physiological outcomes, contribute to heterogeneity in cellular populations, and allow computation of environmental features, such as nutrient gradients. In bacteria and synthetic circuits in general, memory can often be set by protein concentrations: because of the relative stability of proteins, the degradation rate is often dominated by the growth rate, and inheritance is a significant factor. Cells can then be primed to respond to events that recur with frequencies faster than the time to eliminate proteins. Protein memory can be extended if cells reach extremely low growth rates or no growth. Here we characterize the necessary time scales for different quantities of protein memory, measured as relative entropy (Kullback-Leibler divergence), for a variety of cellular growth arrest transition dynamics. We identify a critical manifold in relative protein degradation/growth arrest time scales where information is, in principle, preserved indefinitely because proteins are trapped at a concentration determined by the competing time scales as long as nongrowth-mediated protein degradation is negligible. We next asked what characteristics of growth arrest dynamics and initial protein distributions best preserve or eliminate information about previous environments. We identified that sharp growth arrest transitions with skewed initial protein distributions optimize flexibility, with information preservation and minimal cost of residual protein. As a result, a nearly memoryless regime, corresponding to a form of bet-hedging, may be an optimal strategy for storage of information by protein concentrations in growth-arrested cells. PMID:26910476

  4. Lysosomal Dysfunction Caused by Cellular Accumulation of Silica Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Irene; Lopez-Hernandez, Tania; Gao, Qi; Puchkov, Dmytro; Jabs, Sabrina; Nordmeyer, Daniel; Schmudde, Madlen; Rühl, Eckart; Graf, Christina M; Haucke, Volker

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used as components of drugs or cosmetics and hold great promise for biomedicine, yet their effects on cell physiology remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that clathrin-independent dynamin 2-mediated caveolar uptake of surface-functionalized silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) impairs cell viability due to lysosomal dysfunction. We show that internalized SiNPs accumulate in lysosomes resulting in inhibition of autophagy-mediated protein turnover and impaired degradation of internalized epidermal growth factor, whereas endosomal recycling proceeds unperturbed. This phenotype is caused by perturbed delivery of cargo via autophagosomes and late endosomes to SiNP-filled cathepsin B/L-containing lysosomes rather than elevated lysosomal pH or altered mTOR activity. Given the importance of autophagy and lysosomal protein degradation for cellular proteostasis and clearance of aggregated proteins, these results raise the question of beneficial use of NPs in biomedicine and beyond. PMID:27226546

  5. From cellular characteristics to disease diagnosis: uncovering phenotypes with supercells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Candia

    Full Text Available Cell heterogeneity and the inherent complexity due to the interplay of multiple molecular processes within the cell pose difficult challenges for current single-cell biology. We introduce an approach that identifies a disease phenotype from multiparameter single-cell measurements, which is based on the concept of "supercell statistics", a single-cell-based averaging procedure followed by a machine learning classification scheme. We are able to assess the optimal tradeoff between the number of single cells averaged and the number of measurements needed to capture phenotypic differences between healthy and diseased patients, as well as between different diseases that are difficult to diagnose otherwise. We apply our approach to two kinds of single-cell datasets, addressing the diagnosis of a premature aging disorder using images of cell nuclei, as well as the phenotypes of two non-infectious uveitides (the ocular manifestations of Behçet's disease and sarcoidosis based on multicolor flow cytometry. In the former case, one nuclear shape measurement taken over a group of 30 cells is sufficient to classify samples as healthy or diseased, in agreement with usual laboratory practice. In the latter, our method is able to identify a minimal set of 5 markers that accurately predict Behçet's disease and sarcoidosis. This is the first time that a quantitative phenotypic distinction between these two diseases has been achieved. To obtain this clear phenotypic signature, about one hundred CD8(+ T cells need to be measured. Although the molecular markers identified have been reported to be important players in autoimmune disorders, this is the first report pointing out that CD8(+ T cells can be used to distinguish two systemic inflammatory diseases. Beyond these specific cases, the approach proposed here is applicable to datasets generated by other kinds of state-of-the-art and forthcoming single-cell technologies, such as multidimensional mass cytometry

  6. An Integrated Framework to Model Cellular Phenotype as a Component of Biochemical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gormley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of regulatory molecules in signaling pathways is critical for understanding cellular behavior. Given the complexity of the transcriptional gene network, the relationship between molecular expression and phenotype is difficult to determine using reductionist experimental methods. Computational models provide the means to characterize regulatory mechanisms and predict phenotype in the context of gene networks. Integrating gene expression data with phenotypic data in transcriptional network models enables systematic identification of critical molecules in a biological network. We developed an approach based on fuzzy logic to model cell budding in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using time series expression microarray data of the cell cycle. Cell budding is a phenotype of viable cells undergoing division. Predicted interactions between gene expression and phenotype reflected known biological relationships. Dynamic simulation analysis reproduced the behavior of the yeast cell cycle and accurately identified genes and interactions which are essential for cell viability.

  7. Impaired Cellular Bioenergetics Causes Mitochondrial Calcium Handling Defects in MT-ND5 Mutant Cybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchen, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause mitochondrial disease, a group of metabolic disorders that affect both children and adults. Interestingly, individual mtDNA mutations can cause very different clinical symptoms, however the factors that determine these phenotypes remain obscure. Defects in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation can disrupt cell signaling pathways, which may shape these disease phenotypes. In particular, mitochondria participate closely in cellular calcium signaling, with profound impact on cell function. Here, we examined the effects of a homoplasmic m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 on cellular calcium handling using transmitochondrial cybrids (ND5 mutant cybrids). We found that the oxidation of NADH and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were significantly reduced in ND5 mutant cybrids. These metabolic defects were associated with a significant decrease in calcium uptake by ND5 mutant mitochondria in response to a calcium transient. Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose did not affect cytosolic calcium levels in control cybrids, but caused an increase in cytosolic calcium in ND5 mutant cybrids. This suggests that glycolytically-generated ATP is required not only to maintain Δψm in ND5 mutant mitochondria but is also critical for regulating cellular calcium homeostasis. We conclude that the m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 causes defects in both mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial calcium sequestration. This disruption of mitochondrial calcium handling, which leads to defects in cellular calcium homeostasis, may be an important contributor to mitochondrial disease pathogenesis. PMID:27110715

  8. Prostate Biopsy Sampling Causes Hematogenous Dissemination of Epithelial Cellular Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Ladjevardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent of epithelial cellular material (ECM occurring in venous blood samples after diagnostic core needle biopsy (CNB was studied in 23 patients with CNB diagnosed prostate cancer without provable metastases and 15 patients without cancer. The data show a significant increase of ECM in the peripheral blood sampled 20 seconds or 30 minutes after the last of 10 CNB procedures compared to the number of ECM detectable in the blood samples taken before the performance of CNB. The data indicate that diagnostic CNB of prostate cancer causes an extensive tissue trauma with a potential risk of cancer cell dissemination.

  9. A celiac cellular phenotype, with altered LPP sub-cellular distribution, is inducible in controls by the toxic gliadin peptide P31-43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin Nanayakkara

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides P31-43 and P57-68 induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. Alterations in the cell shape and actin cytoskeleton are present in celiac enterocytes, and gliadin peptides induce actin rearrangements in both the CD mucosa and cell lines. Cell shape is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, sites of membrane attachment to the extracellular matrix. The locus of the human Lipoma Preferred Partner (LPP gene was identified as strongly associated with CD using genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The LPP protein plays an important role in focal adhesion architecture and acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a constitutive alteration of the cell shape and the cytoskeleton, involving LPP, occurs in a cell compartment far from the main inflammation site in CD fibroblasts from skin explants. We analyzed the cell shape, actin organization, focal adhesion number, focal adhesion proteins, LPP sub-cellular distribution and adhesion to fibronectin of fibroblasts obtained from CD patients on a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD and controls, without and with treatment with A-gliadin peptide P31-43. We observed a "CD cellular phenotype" in these fibroblasts, characterized by an altered cell shape and actin organization, increased number of focal adhesions, and altered intracellular LPP protein distribution. The treatment of controls fibroblasts with gliadin peptide P31-43 mimics the CD cellular phenotype regarding the cell shape, adhesion capacity, focal adhesion number and LPP sub-cellular distribution, suggesting a close association between these alterations and CD pathogenesis.

  10. The exocyst protein Sec10 interacts with Polycystin-2 and knockdown causes PKD-phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Fogelgren

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is characterized by formation of renal cysts that destroy the kidney. Mutations in PKD1 and PKD2, encoding polycystins-1 and -2, cause ADPKD. Polycystins are thought to function in primary cilia, but it is not well understood how these and other proteins are targeted to cilia. Here, we provide the first genetic and biochemical link between polycystins and the exocyst, a highly-conserved eight-protein membrane trafficking complex. We show that knockdown of exocyst component Sec10 yields cellular phenotypes associated with ADPKD, including loss of flow-generated calcium increases, hyperproliferation, and abnormal activation of MAPK. Sec10 knockdown in zebrafish phenocopies many aspects of polycystin-2 knockdown-including curly tail up, left-right patterning defects, glomerular expansion, and MAPK activation-suggesting that the exocyst is required for pkd2 function in vivo. We observe a synergistic genetic interaction between zebrafish sec10 and pkd2 for many of these cilia-related phenotypes. Importantly, we demonstrate a biochemical interaction between Sec10 and the ciliary proteins polycystin-2, IFT88, and IFT20 and co-localization of the exocyst and polycystin-2 at the primary cilium. Our work supports a model in which the exocyst is required for the ciliary localization of polycystin-2, thus allowing for polycystin-2 function in cellular processes.

  11. The exocyst protein Sec10 interacts with Polycystin-2 and knockdown causes PKD-phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelgren, Ben; Lin, Shin-Yi; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Jaffe, Kimberly M; Park, Kwon Moo; Reichert, Ryan J; Bell, P Darwin; Burdine, Rebecca D; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2011-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by formation of renal cysts that destroy the kidney. Mutations in PKD1 and PKD2, encoding polycystins-1 and -2, cause ADPKD. Polycystins are thought to function in primary cilia, but it is not well understood how these and other proteins are targeted to cilia. Here, we provide the first genetic and biochemical link between polycystins and the exocyst, a highly-conserved eight-protein membrane trafficking complex. We show that knockdown of exocyst component Sec10 yields cellular phenotypes associated with ADPKD, including loss of flow-generated calcium increases, hyperproliferation, and abnormal activation of MAPK. Sec10 knockdown in zebrafish phenocopies many aspects of polycystin-2 knockdown-including curly tail up, left-right patterning defects, glomerular expansion, and MAPK activation-suggesting that the exocyst is required for pkd2 function in vivo. We observe a synergistic genetic interaction between zebrafish sec10 and pkd2 for many of these cilia-related phenotypes. Importantly, we demonstrate a biochemical interaction between Sec10 and the ciliary proteins polycystin-2, IFT88, and IFT20 and co-localization of the exocyst and polycystin-2 at the primary cilium. Our work supports a model in which the exocyst is required for the ciliary localization of polycystin-2, thus allowing for polycystin-2 function in cellular processes.

  12. Phenotypic research on senile osteoporosis caused by SIRT6 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Mao; Cui, Di-Xin; Xu, Ruo-Shi; Zhou, Ya-Chuan; Zheng, Li-Wei; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious public bone metabolic disease. However, the mechanisms underlying bone loss combined with ageing, which is known as senile osteoporosis, remains unknown. Here we show the detailed phenotype of this disease caused by SIRT6 knock out (KO) in mice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to reveal that SIRT6 is expressed in both bone marrow stroma cells and bone-related cells in both mouse and human models, which suggests that SIRT6 is an important regulator in bone metabolism. SIRT6-KO mice exhibit a significant decrease in body weight and remarkable dwarfism. The skeleton of the SIRT6-KO mouse is deficient in cartilage and mineralized bone tissue. Moreover, the osteocalcin concentration in blood is lower, which suggests that bone mass is markedly lost. Besides, the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b) concentration is much higher, which suggests that bone resorption is overactive. Both trabecular and cortical bones exhibit severe osteopenia, and the bone mineral density is decreased. Moreover, double-labelling analysis shows that bone formation is much slower. To determine whether SIRT6 directly regulates bone metabolism, we cultured primary bone marrow stromal cells for osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis separately to avoid indirect interference in vivo responses such as inflammation. Taken together, these results show that SIRT6 can directly regulate osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, resulting in attenuation in mineralization. Furthermore, SIRT6 can directly regulate osteoclast differentiation and results in a higher number of small osteoclasts, which may be related to overactive bone resorption. PMID:27357320

  13. Phenotypic programming as a distal cause of resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhof, Esther

    2015-01-01

    During early childhood, individuals with high sensitivity to early programming adjust their phenotype in a way that is expected to be adaptive in their later environment. These adaptations are hypothesized to result in resilience in environments that match the early environment. As appraisal style i

  14. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: Are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit;

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims: The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important...... conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions: The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between...... populations may facilitate ecotypic differentiation in the future cannot be excluded. These results thus indicate that invasive clonal aquatic plants adapt to new introduced areas by phenotypic plasticity. Inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were important in controlling plant size of E. canadensis...

  15. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit; Clayton, John S.; Brix, Hans; Sorrell, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important. Here the primary adaptive strategy in three non-native, clonally reproducing macrophytes (Egeria densa, Elodea canadensis and Lagarosiphon major) in New Zealand freshwaters were examined and an attempt was made to link observed differences in plant morphology to local variation in habitat conditions. Methods Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity of these same populations was also quantified. Key Results For all three species, greater variation in plant characteristics was found before they were grown in standardized conditions. Moreover, field populations displayed remarkably little genetic variation and there was little interaction between habitat conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between populations may facilitate ecotypic differentiation in the future cannot be excluded. These results thus indicate that invasive clonal aquatic plants adapt to new introduced areas by phenotypic plasticity. Inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were important in controlling plant size of E. canadensis and L. major, but no other relationships between plant characteristics and habitat conditions were apparent. This implies that within-species differences in plant size can be explained

  16. Truncating mutations in APP cause a distinct neurological phenotype.

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    Klein, Steven; Goldman, Alexander; Lee, Hane; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Bhakta, Viraj; Nelson, Stanley F; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2016-09-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) gene have been implicated in early onset Alzheimer disease. These mutations alter protein structure to favor the pathologic production of Aβ. We report that homozygous nonsense mutations in APP are associated with decreased somatic growth, microcephaly, hypotonia, developmental delay, thinning of the corpus callosum, and seizures. We compare the phenotype of this case to those reported in mouse models and demonstrate multiple similarities, strengthening the role of amyloid precursor protein in normal brain function and development. Ann Neurol 2016;80:456-460. PMID:27422356

  17. Fluorosis Caused Cellular Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress of Rat Kidneys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yang; WANG Jin-cheng; XU Hui; DU Zhen-wu; ZHANG Gui-zhen; SELIM Hamid Abdu; LI Guang-sheng

    2013-01-01

    As the strongest electronegative element,fluorine can stimulate the production of superoxide radicals in cells.In view of the important roles of kidneys in bone metabolism,the authors analyzed the quantitative pathomorphological characteristics of renal damage and the potential cellular apoptosis and oxidative stress mechanisms in rats treated with excessive fluoride.Wistar rats were exposed to 50 mg F-(110.5 mg NaF)/L,100 mg F-(221.0 mg NaF)/Land 150 mg F (331.5 mg NaF)/L in drinking water for 70 and 140 d,respectively.Microscope with image analysis was used to quantitate pathomorphological changes in renal tissues of the rats.Reactive oxygen species(ROS),the cell cycle and apoptosis of renal cells were measured by flow cytometry and TUNEL technique(terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling),respectively.The ion concentrations in serum and renal functional parameters were detected by automatic biochemical analyzer.Quantitative analysis results demonstrate the expanded Bowman's space of glomerulus and obvious dilatation of renal tubule.TUNEL technique revealed that NBT/BCIP (nitro blue tetrazoliurn/5-bromo-4-chloro-3′-indolylphosphate,p-toluidine salt)-staining positive apoptotic cells selectively located in medullocortical junction areas.The data suggest that renal damage in chronic fluorostic rats is associated with the cellular apoptosis and oxidative stress.

  18. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Mishra, Anurag [Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Krynetskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: ekrynets@temple.edu [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  19. Cellular responses to Rhipicephalus microplus infestations in pre-sensitised cattle with differing phenotypes of infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marufu, Munyaradzi C; Dzama, Kennedy; Chimonyo, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The blue tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, threatens cattle production in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Delayed skin hypersensitivity reactions are thought to cause Nguni cattle to be more resistant to R. microplus than Bonsmara cattle yet the cellular mechanisms responsible for these differences have not been classified. Tick counts and inflammatory cell infiltrates in skin biopsies from feeding sites of adult R. microplus ticks were determined in 9-month-old Nguni and Bonsmara heifers to determine the cellular mechanisms responsible for tick immunity. Nguni heifers (1.7 ± 0.03) had lower (P tick counts than the Bonsmaras (2.0 ± 0.03). Parasitized sites in Nguni heifers had higher counts of basophils, mast and mononuclear cells than those in the Bonsmara heifers. Conversely, parasitized sites in Nguni heifers had lower neutrophil and eosinophil counts than those in the Bonsmara heifers. Tick count was negatively correlated with basophil and mast cell counts and positively correlated with eosinophil counts in both breeds. In the Bonsmara breed, tick count was positively correlated with mononuclear cell counts. Cellular responses to adult R. microplus infestations were different and correlated with differences in tick resistance in Nguni and Bonsmara cattle breeds. It is essential to further characterise the molecular composition of the inflammatory infiltrate elicited by adult R. microplus infestation to fully comprehend immunity to ticks in cattle. PMID:24057115

  20. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Aslaug; Rye, Inga H; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-

  1. Phenotypic characterization of the bone marrow stem cells used in regenerative cellular therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regenerative medicine is a novel therapeutic method with broad potential for the treatment of various illnesses, based on the use of bone marrow (BM) stem cells, whose phenotypic characterization is limited. The paper deals with the expression of different cell membrane markers in mononuclear BM cells from 14 patients who underwent autologous cell therapy, obtained by medullary puncture and mobilization to peripheral blood, with the purpose of characterizing the different types of cells present in that heterogeneous cellular population and identifying the adhesion molecules involved in their adhesion. A greater presence was observed of adherent stem cells from the marrow stroma in mononuclear cells obtained directly from the BM; a larger population of CD90+cells in mononuclear cells from CD34-/CD45-peripheral blood with a high expression of molecules CD44 and CD62L, which suggests a greater presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in mobilized cells from the marrow stroma. The higher levels of CD34+cells in peripheral blood stem cells with a low expression of molecules CD117-and DR-suggests the presence of hematopoietic stem cells, hemangioblasts and progenitor endothelial cells mobilized to peripheral circulation. It was found that mononuclear cells from both the BM and peripheral blood show a high presence of stem cells with expression of adhesion molecule CD44 (MMC marker), probably involved in their migration, settling and differentiation

  2. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution

  3. miR-196a Ameliorates Cytotoxicity and Cellular Phenotype in Transgenic Huntington's Disease Monkey Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkanjanawan, Tanut; Carter, Richard L; Prucha, Melinda S; Yang, Jinjing; Parnpai, Rangsun; Chan, Anthony W S

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) tract that leads to motor, cognitive and psychiatric impairment. Currently there is no cure for HD. A transgenic HD nonhuman primate (HD-NHP) model was developed with progressive development of clinical and pathological features similar to human HD, which suggested the potential preclinical application of the HD-NHP model. Elevated expression of miR-196a was observed in both HD-NHP and human HD brains. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were ameliorated by the overexpression of miR-196a in HD-NHP neural progenitor cells (HD-NPCs) and differentiated neural cells (HD-NCs). The expression of apoptosis related gene was also down regulated. Mitochondrial morphology and activity were improved as indicated by mitotracker staining and the upregulation of CBP and PGC-1α in HD-NPCs overexpressing miR-196a. Here we demonstrated the amelioration of HD cellular phenotypes in HD-NPCs and HD-NCs overexpressing miR-196a. Our results also suggested the regulatory role of miR-196a in HD pathogenesis that may hold the key for understanding molecular regulation in HD and developing novel therapeutics. PMID:27631085

  4. miR-196a Ameliorates Cytotoxicity and Cellular Phenotype in Transgenic Huntington’s Disease Monkey Neural Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard L.; Prucha, Melinda S.; Yang, Jinjing; Parnpai, Rangsun; Chan, Anthony W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) tract that leads to motor, cognitive and psychiatric impairment. Currently there is no cure for HD. A transgenic HD nonhuman primate (HD-NHP) model was developed with progressive development of clinical and pathological features similar to human HD, which suggested the potential preclinical application of the HD-NHP model. Elevated expression of miR-196a was observed in both HD-NHP and human HD brains. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were ameliorated by the overexpression of miR-196a in HD-NHP neural progenitor cells (HD-NPCs) and differentiated neural cells (HD-NCs). The expression of apoptosis related gene was also down regulated. Mitochondrial morphology and activity were improved as indicated by mitotracker staining and the upregulation of CBP and PGC-1α in HD-NPCs overexpressing miR-196a. Here we demonstrated the amelioration of HD cellular phenotypes in HD-NPCs and HD-NCs overexpressing miR-196a. Our results also suggested the regulatory role of miR-196a in HD pathogenesis that may hold the key for understanding molecular regulation in HD and developing novel therapeutics. PMID:27631085

  5. Soft X-ray tomography of phenotypic switching and the cellular response to antifungal peptoids in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, Maho; McDermott, Gerry; Wetzler, Modi; Le Gros, Mark A.; Myllys, Markko; Knoechel, Christian; Barron, Annelise E.; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2009-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans can undergo phenotypic switching between a benign, unicellular phenotype and an invasive, multicellular form that causes candidiasis. Increasingly, strains of Candida are becoming resistant to antifungal drugs, making the treatment of candidiasis difficult, especially in immunocompromised or critically ill patients. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop new drugs that circumvent fungal drug-resistance mechanisms. In this work we used sof...

  6. Ectopic expression of DLK1 protein in skeletal muscle of padumnal heterozygotes causes the callipyge phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Erica; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Schroder, Henrik Daa;

    2004-01-01

    profile causes the callipyge muscular hypertrophy has remained unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the callipyge phenotype is perfectly correlated with ectopic expression of DLK1 protein in hypertrophied muscle of +(MAT)/CLPG(PAT) sheep. We demonstrate the causality of this association by inducing...

  7. Induction of vascular endothelial phenotype and cellular proliferation from human cord blood stem cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Brian; Z-M Wan, Jim; Abley, Doris; Akabutu, John

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that stem cells derived from adult hematopoietic tissues are capable of trans-differentiation into non-hematopoietic cells, and that the culture in microgravity ( μg) may modulate the proliferation and differentiation. We investigated the application of μg to human umbilical cord blood stem cells (CBSC) in the induction of vascular endothelial phenotype expression and cellular proliferation. CD34+ mononuclear cells were isolated from waste human umbilical cord blood samples and cultured in simulated μg for 14 days. The cells were seeded in rotary wall vessels (RWV) with or without microcarrier beads (MCB) and vascular endothelial growth factor was added during culture. Controls consisted of culture in 1 G. The cell cultures in RWV were examined by inverted microscopy. Cell counts, endothelial cell and leukocyte markers performed by flow-cytometry and FACS scan were assayed at days 1, 4, 7 and at the termination of the experiments. Culture in RWV revealed significantly increased cellular proliferation with three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like aggregates. At day 4, CD34+ cells cultured in RWV bioreactor without MCB developed vascular tubular assemblies and exhibited endothelial phenotypic markers. These data suggest that CD34+ human umbilical cord blood progenitors are capable of trans-differentiation into vascular endothelial cell phenotype and assemble into 3D tissue structures. Culture of CBSC in simulated μg may be potentially beneficial in the fields of stem cell biology and somatic cell therapy.

  8. Molecular definition of a region of chromosome 21 that causes features of the Down syndrome phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Korenberg, Julie R; Kawashima, Hiroko; Pulst, Stefan-M.; Ikeuchi, T; Ogasawara, N; Yamamoto, K.; Schonberg, Steven A.; West, Ruth; Allen, Leland; Magenis, Ellen; Ikawa, K; Taniguchi, N; Epstein, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of mental retardation and heart disease. Although it is usually caused by the presence of an extra chromosome 21, a subset of the diagnostic features may be caused by the presence of only band 21q22. We now present evidence that significantly narrows the chromosomal region responsible for several of the phenotypic features of DS. We report a molecular and cytogenetic analysis of a three-generation family containing four individuals with clinical DS as manif...

  9. Functional adaptation and phenotypic plasticity at the cellular and whole plant level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karl J Niklas

    2009-10-01

    The ability to adaptively alter morphological, anatomical, or physiological functional traits to local environmental variations using external environmental cues is especially well expressed by all terrestrial and most aquatic plants. A ubiquitous cue eliciting these plastic phenotypic responses is mechanical perturbation (MP), which can evoke dramatic differences in the size, shape, or mechanical properties of conspecifics. Current thinking posits that MP is part of a very ancient ``stress-perception response system” that involves receptors located at the cell membrane/cell wall interface capable of responding to a broad spectrum of stress-inducing factors. This hypothesis is explored here from the perspective of cell wall evolution and the control of cell wall architecture by unicellular and multicellular plants. Among the conclusions that emerge from this exploration is the perspective that the plant cell is phenotypically plastic.

  10. Phenotypic Switching in Cryptococcus neoformans Results in Changes in Cellular Morphology and Glucuronoxylomannan Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, Bettina C.; Goldman, David L.; Cherniak, Robert; Ju, Rujin; Casadevall, Arturo

    1999-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans strains exhibit variability in their capsular polysaccharide, cell morphology, karyotype, and virulence, but the relationship between these variables is poorly understood. A hypovirulent C. neoformans 24067A isolate, which usually produces smooth (SM) colony types, was found to undergo phenotypic switching and to produce wrinkled (WR) and pseudohyphal (PH) colony types at frequencies of approximately 10−4 to 10−5 when plated on Sabouraud agar. Cells from these colony t...

  11. Cardiac hypertrophy, arrhythmogenicity and the new myocardial phenotype. II. The cellular adaptational process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swynghedauw, B; Chevalier, B; Charlemagne, D; Mansier, P; Carré, F

    1997-07-01

    Ventricular fibrosis is not the only structural determinant of arrhythmias in left ventricular hypertrophy. In an experimental model of compensatory cardiac hypertrophy (CCH) the degree of cardiac hypertrophy is also independently linked to ventricular arrhythmias. Cardiac hypertrophy reflects the level of adaptation, and matches the adaptational modifications of the myocardial phenotype. We suggest that these modifications have detrimental aspects. The increased action potential (AP) and QT duration and the prolonged calcium transient both favour spontaneous calcium oscillations, and both are potentially arrhythmogenic and linked to phenotypic changes in membrane proteins. To date, only two ionic currents have been studied in detail: Ito is depressed (likely the main determinant in AP durations), and If, the pacemaker current, is induced in the overloaded ventricular myocytes. In rat CCH, the two components of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, namely Ca(2+)-ATPase and ryanodine receptors, are down-regulated in parallel. Nevertheless, while the inward calcium current is unchanged, the functionally linked duo composed of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanged and (Na+, K+)-ATPase, is less active. Such an imbalance may explain the prolonged calcium transient. The changes in heart rate variability provide information about the state of the autonomic nervous system and has prognostic value even in CCH. Transgenic studies have demonstrated that the myocardial adrenergic and muscarinic receptor content is also a determining factor. During CCH, several phenotypic membrane changes participate in the slowing of contraction velocity and are thus adaptational. They also have a detrimental counterpart and, together with fibrosis, favour arrhythmias. PMID:9302342

  12. [Para-Bombay phenotype caused by combined heterozygote of two bases deletion on fut1 alleles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kan-Rong; Tao, Shu-Dan; Lan, Xiao-Fei; Hong, Xiao-Zhen; Xu, Xian-Guo; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Lü, Hang-Jun; Yan, Li-Xing

    2011-02-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the molecular basis of a para-Bombay phenotype for screening and identification of rare blood group. ABO and H phenotypes of the proband were identified by serological techniques. The exon 6 to exon 7 of ABO gene and full coding region of α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (fut1) gene of the proband were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of the amplified fragments. The haplotype of compound heterozygote of fut1 was also identified by cloning sequencing. The results indicated that a rare para-Bombay phenotype was confirmed by serological techniques. Two deletion or insertion variant sites near nucleotide 547 and 880 were detected in fut1 gene. The results of cloning sequence showed that one haplotype of fut1 gene was two bases deletion at 547-552 (AGAGAG→AGAG), and another one was two bases deletion at position 880-882 (TTT→T). Both two variants caused a reading frame shift and a premature stop codon. It is concluded that a rare para-Bombay phenotype is found and confirmed in blood donor population. The molecular basis of this individual is compound heterozygote of two bases deletion on fut1 gene which weaken the activity of α-1, 2-fucosyltransferase.

  13. Characterization of broadly pleiotropic phenotypes caused by an hfq insertion mutation in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, H C; Leung, H C; Winkler, M E

    1994-07-01

    The region immediately downstream from the miaA tRNA modification gene at 94.8 min contains the hfq gene and the hflA region, which are important in the bacteriophage Q beta and lambda life cycles. The roles of these genes in bacteria remain largely unknown. We report here the characterization of two chromosomal hfq insertion mutations. An omega (omega) cassette insertion near the end of hfq resulted in phenotypes only slightly different from the parent, although transcript mapping demonstrated that the insertion was completely polar on hflX expression. In contrast, an equally polar omega cassette insertion near the beginning of hfq caused pronounced pleiotropic phenotypes, including decreased growth rates and yields, decreased negative supercoiling of plasmids in stationary phase, increased cell size, osmosensitivity, increased oxidation of carbon sources, increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light, and suppression of bgl activation by hns mutations. hfq::omega mutant phenotypes were distinct from those caused by omega insertions early in the miaA tRNA modification gene. On the other hand, both hfq insertions interfered with lambda phage plaque formation, probably by means of polarity at the hflA region. Together, these results show that hfq function plays a fundamental role in Escherichia coli physiology and that hfq and the hflA-region are in the amiB-mutL-miaA-hfq-hflX superoperon. PMID:7984093

  14. An EMT-driven alternative splicing program occurs in human breast cancer and modulates cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M Shapiro

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA-Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT-dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell-cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT-associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT-associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT-associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT-associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT-dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT-associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT-associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression.

  15. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome): Six unique arylsulfatase B gene alleles causing variable disease phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isbrandt, D.; Arlt, G.; Figura, K. von; Peters, C.; Brooks, D.A.; Hopwood, J.J.

    1994-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ASB), also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase. Multiple clinical phenotypes of this autosomal recessively inherited disease have been described. Recent isolation and characterization of the human ASB gene facilitated the analysis of molecular defects underlying the different phenotypes. Conditions for PCR amplification of the entire open reading frame from genomic DNA and for subsequent direct automated DNA sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments were established. Besides two polymorphisms described elsewhere that cause methionine-for-valine substitutions in the arylsulfatase B gene, six new mutations in six patients were detected: four point mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions, a 1-bp deletion, and a 1-bp insertion. The point mutations were two G-to-A and two T-to-C transitions. The G-to-A transitions cause an arginine-for-glycine substitution at residue 144 in a homoallelic patient with a severe disease phenotype and a tyrosine-for-cysteine substitution at residue 521 in a potentially heteroallelic patient with the severe form of the disease. The T-to-C transitions cause an arginine-for-cysteine substitution at amino acid residue 192 in a homoallelic patient with mild symptoms and a proline-for-leucine substitution at amino acid 321 in a homoallelic patient with the intermediate form. The insertion between nucleotides T1284 and G1285 resulted in a loss of the 100 C-terminal amino acids of the wild-type protein and in the deletion of nucleotide C1577 in a 39-amino-acid C-terminal extension of the ASB polypeptide. Both mutations were detected in homoallelic patients with the severe form of the disease. Expression of mutant cDNAs encoding the four amino acid substitutions and the deletion resulted in reduction of both ASB protein levels and arylsulfatase enzyme activity. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  16. CAV3 mutations causing exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis: Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalco, Renata Siciliani; Gardiner, Alice R; Pitceathly, Robert D S; Hilton-Jones, David; Schapira, Anthony H; Turner, Chris; Parton, Matt; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Manzur, Adnan Y; Childs, Anne-Marie; Feng, Lucy; Murphy, Elaine; Lamont, Phillipa J; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Wallefeld, William; Davis, Mark R; Laing, Nigel G; Holton, Janice L; Fialho, Doreen; Bushby, Kate; Hanna, Michael G; Phadke, Rahul; Jungbluth, Heinz; Houlden, Henry; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is often due to a combination of environmental trigger(s) and genetic predisposition; however, the underlying genetic cause remains elusive in many cases. Mutations in CAV3 lead to various neuromuscular phenotypes with partial overlap, including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD1C), rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy and isolated hyperCKemia. Here we present a series of eight patients from seven families presenting with exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis caused by mutations in CAV3 diagnosed by next generation sequencing (NGS) (n = 6). Symptoms included myalgia (n = 7), exercise intolerance (n = 7) and episodes of rhabdomyolysis (n = 2). Percussion-induced rapid muscle contractions (PIRCs) were seen in five out of six patients examined. A previously reported heterozygous mutation in CAV3 (p.T78M) and three novel variants (p.V14I, p.F41S, p.F54V) were identified. Caveolin-3 immunolabeling in muscle was normal in 3/4 patients; however, immunoblotting showed more than 50% reduction of caveolin-3 in five patients compared with controls. This case series demonstrates that exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis may be caused by CAV3 mutations and broadens the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies. In our series, immunoblotting was a more sensitive method to detect reduced caveolin-3 levels than immunohistochemistry in skeletal muscle. Patients presenting with muscle pain, exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis should be routinely tested for PIRCs as this may be an important clinical clue for caveolinopathies, even in the absence of other "typical" features. The use of NGS may expand current knowledge concerning inherited diseases, and unexpected/atypical phenotypes may be attributed to well-known human disease genes. PMID:27312022

  17. A novel mutation in the AGXT gene causing primary hyperoxaluria type I: genotype–phenotype correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAOUSSEN M’DIMEGH; CÉCILE AQUAVIVA- BOURDAIN; ASMA OMEZZINE; IBTIHEL M’BAREK; GENEVIÉVE SOUCHE; DORSAF ZELLAMA; KAMEL ABIDI; ABDELATTIF ACHOUR; TAHAR GARGAH; SAOUSSEN ABROUG; ALI BOUSLAMA

    2016-09-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by inherited mutations in the AGXT gene encoding liver peroxisomal alanine : glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which is deficient or mistargeted to mitochon-dria. PH1 shows considerable phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. The incidence and severity of PH1 varies in different geographic regions. DNA samples of the affected members from two unrelated Tunisian families were tested by amplifying and sequencing each of the AGXT exons and intron–exon junctions. We identified a novel frameshift mutation in the AGXT gene, the c.406_410dupACTGC resulting in a truncated protein (p.Gln137Hisfs*19). It is found in homozygous state in two nonconsanguineous unrelated families from Tunisia. These molecular findings provide genotype/phenotype correlations in the intrafamilial phenotypic and permit accurate carrier detection, and prenatal diagnosis. The novel p.G ln137Hisfs*19 mutation detected in our study extend the spectrum of knownAGXT gene mutations in Tunisia.

  18. Neurofibromatosis-like phenotype in Drosophila caused by lack of glucosylceramide extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Katja; Jung, Anita; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    , controlled by the glycosyltransferase Egghead (Egh). Here we discovered that loss of Egh causes overgrowth of peripheral nerves and attraction of immune cells to the nerves. This phenotype is reminiscent of the human disorder neurofibromatosis type 1, which is characterized by disfiguring nerve sheath tumors...... with mast cell infiltration, increased cancer risk, and learning deficits. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is due to a reduction of the tumor suppressor neurofibromin, a negative regulator of the small GTPase Ras. Enhanced Ras signaling promotes glial growth through activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3...

  19. Cytotoxic and phenotypic effects of uranium and lead on osteoblastic cellular models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is involved in the evaluation of bio-hazard associated with the use of uranium in nuclear activities and industrial research. The uranium, known in the literature as potentially carcinogenic or toxic for reproduction, can become a public health problem with the views of the various possibilities of human infections (military of the Gulf War, Finnish populations exposed to drinking water contaminated by example). The skeleton represents the organ of long-term storage of uranium and can be a target of its toxicity. Lead sharing this way of fixing in the bone matrix and have the same adverse effects on bone formation. The osteoblasts, cells responsible in bone formation, are specific targets of these two metals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute toxicity of speciation controlled uranium and lead on osteoblasts culture. The intracellular accumulation, distribution and speciation were then studied to explain the observed toxicity. A cell death and phenotypic disorder were highlighted. The speciation is seen as crucial in biological effects of these metals. The most toxic species of both metals have been identified. The accumulation or cell distribution could not alone explain the impact of speciation on the toxicity observed. However, a phenomenon of intracellular precipitation of uranium and lead has been stressed and could be involved in a detoxification mechanism. (author)

  20. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis disease-causing strains in Argentina, 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Sorhouet-Pereira

    Full Text Available Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of 133 isolates of Neisseria meningitidis obtained from meningococcal disease cases in Argentina during 2010 were performed by the National Reference Laboratory as part of a project coordinated by the PAHO within the SIREVA II network. Serogroup, serotype, serosubtype and MLST characterization were performed. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration to penicillin, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, rifampin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were determined and interpreted according to CLSI guidelines. Almost 49% of isolates were W135, and two serotype:serosubtype combinations, W135:2a:P1.5,2:ST-11 and W135:2a:P1.2:ST-11 accounted for 78% of all W135 isolates. Serogroup B accounted for 42.1% of isolates, and was both phenotypically and genotypically diverse. Serogroup C isolates represented 5.3% of the dataset, and one isolate belonging to the ST-198 complex was non-groupable. Isolates belonged mainly to the ST-11 complex (48% and to a lesser extent to the ST-865 (18%, ST-32 (9,8% and the ST-35 complexes (9%. Intermediate resistance to penicillin and ampicillin was detected in 35.4% and 33.1% of isolates respectively. Two W135:2a:P1.5,2:ST-11:ST-11 isolates presented resistance to ciprofloxacin associated with a mutation in the QRDR of gyrA gene Thr91-Ile. These data show serogroup W135 was the first cause of disease in Argentina in 2010, and was strongly associated with the W135:2a:P1.5,2:ST-11 epidemic clone. Serogroup B was the second cause of disease and isolates belonging to this serogroup were phenotypically and genotypically diverse. The presence of isolates with intermediate resistance to penicillin and the presence of fluorquinolone-resistant isolates highlight the necessity and importance of maintaining and strengthening National Surveillance Programs.

  1. Causes of variation in biotic interaction strength and phenotypic selection along an altitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquida, Eduardo T; Benkman, Craig W

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the causes of variation in biotic interaction strength and phenotypic selection remains one of the outstanding goals of evolutionary ecology. Here we examine the variation in strength of interactions between two seed predators, common crossbills (Loxia curvirostra) and European red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris), and mountain pine (Pinus uncinata) at and below tree limit in the Pyrenees, and how this translates into phenotypic selection. Seed predation by crossbills increased whereas seed predation by squirrels decreased with increasing elevation and as the canopy became more open. Overall, seed predation by crossbills averaged about twice that by squirrels, and the intensity of selection exerted by crossbills averaged between 2.6 and 7.5 times greater than by squirrels. The higher levels of seed predation by crossbills than squirrels were related to the relatively open nature of most of the forests, and the higher intensity of selection exerted by crossbills resulted from their higher levels of seed predation. However, most of the differences in selection intensity between crossbills and squirrels were the result of habitat features having a greater effect on the foraging behavior of squirrels than of crossbills, causing selection to be much lower for squirrels than for crossbills. PMID:24593660

  2. Production of a Marfan cellular phenotype by expressing a mutant human fibrillin allele on a normal human or murine genetic background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldadah, Z.A.; Dietz, H.C. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Brenn, T. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Marfan Syndrome (MFS) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue caused by defects in fibrillin (FBN1), a 350 kD glycoprotein and principal component of the extracellular microfibril. Previous correlations of mutant transcript level and disease severity suggested a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis. To address this hypothesis we assembled an expression construct containing the mutant allele from a patient with severe MFS. This mutation causes skipping of FBN1 exon 2 and a frame shift, leading to a premature termination codon in exon 4. The predicted peptide would thus consist of 55 wild type and 45 missense amino acids. The construct was stably transfected into cultured human and mouse fibroblasts, and several clonal cell populations were established. Human and mouse cells expressing the truncated peptide exhibited markedly diminished fibrillin deposition and disorganized microfibrillar architecture by immunofluorescence. Pulse-chase analysis of these cells demonstrated normal levels of fibrillin synthesis but substantially decreased fibrillin deposition into the extracellular matrix. These data illustrate that expression of a mutant FBN1 allele, on a background of two normal alleles, is sufficient to disrupt normal fibrillin aggregation and reproduce the MFS cellular phenotype. This provides confirmation of a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis and may offer mutant allele knockout as a strategy for gene therapy. In addition, these data underscore the importance of the FBN1 amino-terminus in normal multimer formation and suggest that expression of the human extreme 5{prime} FBN1 coding sequence may be sufficient, in isolation, to produce an animal model of MFS. Indeed, transgenic mice harboring this mutant allele have been produced, and phenotype analysis is currently in progress.

  3. [Evaluation of Cellular Effects Caused by Lunar Regolith Simulant Including Fine Particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masanori; Miki, Takeo; Honma, Yoshiyuki; Aoki, Shigeru; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has announced a plan to establish a manned colony on the surface of the moon, and our country, Japan, has declared its participation. The surface of the moon is covered with soil called lunar regolith, which includes fine particles. It is possible that humans will inhale lunar regolith if it is brought into the spaceship. Therefore, an evaluation of the pulmonary effects caused by lunar regolith is important for exploration of the moon. In the present study, we examine the cellular effects of lunar regolith simulant, whose components are similar to those of lunar regolith. We focused on the chemical component and particle size in particular. The regolith simulant was fractionated to effects of fine regolith simulant whose primary particle size is 5.10 μm. These regolith simulants were applied to human lung carcinoma A549 cells at concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/ml. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and immune response were examined after 24 h exposure. Cell membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of Interleukin-8 (IL-8) were observed at the concentration of 1.0 mg/ml. The cellular effects of the regolith simulant at the concentration of 0.1 mg/ml were small, as compared with crystalline silica as a positive control. Secretion of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was observed at the concentration of 1.0 mg/ml, but induction of gene expression was not observed at 24 h after exposure. Induction of cellular oxidative stress was small. Although the cellular effects tended to be stronger in the effects of lunar regolith simulant such as cell membrane damage, induction of oxidative stress and proinflammatory effect.

  4. The mannose receptor LY75 (DEC205/CD205) modulates cellular phenotype and metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-03-22

    The molecular basis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) dissemination is still poorly understood. Previously, we identified the mannose receptor LY75 gene as hypomethylated in high-grade (HG) serous EOC tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. LY75 represents endocytic receptor expressed on dendritic cells and so far, has been primarily studied for its role in antigen processing and presentation. Here we demonstrate that LY75 is overexpressed in advanced EOC and that LY75 suppression induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in EOC cell lines with mesenchymal morphology (SKOV3 and TOV112), accompanied by reduction of their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and enhanced tumor cell colonization and metastatic growth in vivo. LY75 knockdown in SKOV3 cells also resulted in predominant upregulation of functional pathways implicated in cell proliferation and metabolism, while pathways associated with cell signaling and adhesion, complement activation and immune response were mostly suppressed. Moreover, LY75 suppression had an opposite effect on EOC cell lines with epithelial phenotype (A2780s and OV2008), by directing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with reduced capacity for in vivo EOC cell colonization, as similar/identical signaling pathways were reversely regulated, when compared to mesenchymal LY75 knockdown EOC cells.To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene displaying such pleiotropic effects in sustaining the cellular phenotype of EOC cells and points to novel functions of this receptor in modulating EOC dissemination. Our data also support previous findings regarding the superior capacity of epithelial cancer cells in metastatic colonization of distant sites, compared to cancer cells with mesenchymal-like morphology. PMID:26871602

  5. The mannose receptor LY75 (DEC205/CD205) modulates cellular phenotype and metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-03-22

    The molecular basis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) dissemination is still poorly understood. Previously, we identified the mannose receptor LY75 gene as hypomethylated in high-grade (HG) serous EOC tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. LY75 represents endocytic receptor expressed on dendritic cells and so far, has been primarily studied for its role in antigen processing and presentation. Here we demonstrate that LY75 is overexpressed in advanced EOC and that LY75 suppression induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in EOC cell lines with mesenchymal morphology (SKOV3 and TOV112), accompanied by reduction of their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and enhanced tumor cell colonization and metastatic growth in vivo. LY75 knockdown in SKOV3 cells also resulted in predominant upregulation of functional pathways implicated in cell proliferation and metabolism, while pathways associated with cell signaling and adhesion, complement activation and immune response were mostly suppressed. Moreover, LY75 suppression had an opposite effect on EOC cell lines with epithelial phenotype (A2780s and OV2008), by directing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with reduced capacity for in vivo EOC cell colonization, as similar/identical signaling pathways were reversely regulated, when compared to mesenchymal LY75 knockdown EOC cells.To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene displaying such pleiotropic effects in sustaining the cellular phenotype of EOC cells and points to novel functions of this receptor in modulating EOC dissemination. Our data also support previous findings regarding the superior capacity of epithelial cancer cells in metastatic colonization of distant sites, compared to cancer cells with mesenchymal-like morphology.

  6. Molecular and phenotypic characteristics of seven novel mutations causing branched-chain organic acidurias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojiljkovic, M; Klaassen, K; Djordjevic, M; Sarajlija, A; Brasil, S; Kecman, B; Grkovic, S; Kostic, J; Rodriguez-Pombo, P; Desviat, L R; Pavlovic, S; Perez, B

    2016-09-01

    Specific mitochondrial enzymatic deficiencies in the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids cause methylmalonic aciduria (MMA), propionic acidemia (PA) and maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). Disease-causing mutations were identified in nine unrelated branched-chain organic acidurias (BCOA) patients. We detected eight previously described mutations: p.Asn219Tyr, p.Arg369His p.Val553Glyfs*17 in MUT, p.Thr198Serfs*6 in MMAA, p.Ile144_Leu181del in PCCB, p.Gly288Valfs*11, p.Tyr438Asn in BCKDHA and p.Ala137Val in BCKDHB gene. Interestingly, we identified seven novel genetic variants: p.Leu549Pro, p.Glu564*, p.Leu641Pro in MUT, p.Tyr206Cys in PCCB, p.His194Arg, p.Val298Met in BCKDHA and p.Glu286_Met290del in BCKDHB gene. In silico and/or eukaryotic expression studies confirmed pathogenic effect of all novel genetic variants. Aberrant enzymes p.Leu549Pro MUT, p.Leu641Pro MUT and p.Tyr206Cys PCCB did not show residual activity in activity assays. In addition, activity of MUT enzymes was not rescued in the presence of vitamin B12 precursor in vitro which was in accordance with non-responsiveness or partial responsiveness of patients to vitamin B12 therapy. Our study brings the first molecular genetic data and detailed phenotypic characteristics for MMA, PA and MSUD patients for Serbia and the whole South-Eastern European region. Therefore, our study contributes to the better understanding of molecular landscape of BCOA in Europe and to general knowledge on genotype-phenotype correlation for these rare diseases. PMID:26830710

  7. A cytochrome P450 phenotyping cocktail causing unexpected adverse reactions in female volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Damkier, Per; Hougaard Christensen, Mette Marie;

    2013-01-01

    A four-drug cytochrome P450 (CYP) phenotyping cocktail was developed to rapidly and safely determine CYP2D6, CYP2C19, CYP2C9 and CYP1A2 enzyme activity and phenotype.......A four-drug cytochrome P450 (CYP) phenotyping cocktail was developed to rapidly and safely determine CYP2D6, CYP2C19, CYP2C9 and CYP1A2 enzyme activity and phenotype....

  8. A single point-mutation within the melanophilin gene causes the lavender plumage colour dilution phenotype in the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tixier-Boichard Michèle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lavender phenotype in the chicken causes the dilution of both black (eumelanin and red/brown (phaeomelanin pigments. Defects in three genes involved in intracellular melanosomal transport, previously described in mammals, give rise to similar diluted pigmentation phenotypes as those seen in lavender chickens. Results We have used a candidate-gene approach based on an expectation of homology with mammals to isolate a gene involved in pigmentation in chicken. Comparative sequence analysis of candidate genes in the chicken identified a strong association between a mutation in the MLPH gene and the diluted pigmentation phenotype. This mutation results in the amino acid change R35W, at a site also associated with similar phenotypes in mice, humans and cats. Conclusion This is the first time that an avian species with a mutation in the MLPH gene has been reported.

  9. Gastric Composite Tumor of Alpha Fetoprotein-Producing Carcinoma/Hepatoid Adenocarcinoma and Endocrine Carcinoma with Reference to Cellular Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-fetoprotein-producing carcinoma (AFPC/hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC and neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC are uncommon in the stomach. Composite tumors consisting of these carcinomas and their histologic phenotypes are not well known. Between 2002 and 2007, to estimate the prevalence of composite tumors consisting of tubular adenocarcinoma, AFPC/HAC and NEC, we reviewed specimens obtained from 294 consecutive patients treated surgically for gastric cancer. We examined histological phenotype of tumors of AFPC or NEC containing the composite tumor by evaluating immunohistochemical expressions of MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6, CDX2, and SOX2. Immunohistochemically, AFPC/HAC dominantly showed the intestinal or mixed phenotype, and NEC frequently showed the gastric phenotype. In the composite tumor, the tubular and hepatoid components showed the gastric phenotype, and the neuroendocrine component showed the mixed type. The unique composite tumor predominantly showed the gastric phenotype, and the hepatoid and neuroendocrine components were considered to be differentiated from the tubular component.

  10. Biallelic Mutations in TMEM126B Cause Severe Complex I Deficiency with a Variable Clinical Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Charlotte L; Compton, Alison G; Formosa, Luke E; Strecker, Valentina; Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Smet, Joél; Stouffs, Katrien; Diakumis, Peter; Ciara, Elżbieta; Cassiman, David; Romain, Nadine; Yarham, John W; He, Langping; De Paepe, Boel; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Seneca, Sara; Feichtinger, René G; Płoski, Rafal; Rokicki, Dariusz; Pronicka, Ewa; Haller, Ronald G; Van Hove, Johan L K; Bahlo, Melanie; Mayr, Johannes A; Van Coster, Rudy; Prokisch, Holger; Wittig, Ilka; Ryan, Michael T; Thorburn, David R; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most common biochemical phenotype observed in individuals with mitochondrial disease. With 44 structural subunits and over 10 assembly factors, it is unsurprising that complex I deficiency is associated with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies including custom, targeted gene panels or unbiased whole-exome sequencing (WES) are hugely powerful in identifying the underlying genetic defect in a clinical diagnostic setting, yet many individuals remain without a genetic diagnosis. These individuals might harbor mutations in poorly understood or uncharacterized genes, and their diagnosis relies upon characterization of these orphan genes. Complexome profiling recently identified TMEM126B as a component of the mitochondrial complex I assembly complex alongside proteins ACAD9, ECSIT, NDUFAF1, and TIMMDC1. Here, we describe the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in six cases of mitochondrial disease from four unrelated families affected by biallelic (c.635G>T [p.Gly212Val] and/or c.401delA [p.Asn134Ilefs(∗)2]) TMEM126B variants. We provide functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of these TMEM126B variants, including evidence of founder effects for both variants, and establish defects within this gene as a cause of complex I deficiency in association with either pure myopathy in adulthood or, in one individual, a severe multisystem presentation (chronic renal failure and cardiomyopathy) in infancy. Functional experimentation including viral rescue and complexome profiling of subject cell lines has confirmed TMEM126B as the tenth complex I assembly factor associated with human disease and validates the importance of both genome-wide sequencing and proteomic approaches in characterizing disease-associated genes whose physiological roles have been previously undetermined.

  11. Biallelic Mutations in TMEM126B Cause Severe Complex I Deficiency with a Variable Clinical Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Charlotte L; Compton, Alison G; Formosa, Luke E; Strecker, Valentina; Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Smet, Joél; Stouffs, Katrien; Diakumis, Peter; Ciara, Elżbieta; Cassiman, David; Romain, Nadine; Yarham, John W; He, Langping; De Paepe, Boel; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Seneca, Sara; Feichtinger, René G; Płoski, Rafal; Rokicki, Dariusz; Pronicka, Ewa; Haller, Ronald G; Van Hove, Johan L K; Bahlo, Melanie; Mayr, Johannes A; Van Coster, Rudy; Prokisch, Holger; Wittig, Ilka; Ryan, Michael T; Thorburn, David R; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most common biochemical phenotype observed in individuals with mitochondrial disease. With 44 structural subunits and over 10 assembly factors, it is unsurprising that complex I deficiency is associated with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies including custom, targeted gene panels or unbiased whole-exome sequencing (WES) are hugely powerful in identifying the underlying genetic defect in a clinical diagnostic setting, yet many individuals remain without a genetic diagnosis. These individuals might harbor mutations in poorly understood or uncharacterized genes, and their diagnosis relies upon characterization of these orphan genes. Complexome profiling recently identified TMEM126B as a component of the mitochondrial complex I assembly complex alongside proteins ACAD9, ECSIT, NDUFAF1, and TIMMDC1. Here, we describe the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in six cases of mitochondrial disease from four unrelated families affected by biallelic (c.635G>T [p.Gly212Val] and/or c.401delA [p.Asn134Ilefs(∗)2]) TMEM126B variants. We provide functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of these TMEM126B variants, including evidence of founder effects for both variants, and establish defects within this gene as a cause of complex I deficiency in association with either pure myopathy in adulthood or, in one individual, a severe multisystem presentation (chronic renal failure and cardiomyopathy) in infancy. Functional experimentation including viral rescue and complexome profiling of subject cell lines has confirmed TMEM126B as the tenth complex I assembly factor associated with human disease and validates the importance of both genome-wide sequencing and proteomic approaches in characterizing disease-associated genes whose physiological roles have been previously undetermined. PMID:27374774

  12. Histamine Transmission Modulates the Phenotype of Murine Narcolepsy Caused by Orexin Neuron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianini, Stefano; Silvani, Alessandro; Berteotti, Chiara; Lo Martire, Viviana; Cohen, Gary; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is associated with loss of orexin neurons, sleep-wake derangements, cataplexy, and a wide spectrum of alterations in other physiological functions, including energy balance, cardiovascular, and respiratory control. It is unclear which narcolepsy signs are directly related to the lack of orexin neurons or are instead modulated by dysfunction of other neurotransmitter systems physiologically controlled by orexin neurons, such as the histamine system. To address this question, we tested whether some of narcolepsy signs would be detected in mice lacking histamine signaling (HDC-KO). Moreover, we studied double-mutant mice lacking both histamine signaling and orexin neurons (DM) to evaluate whether the absence of histamine signaling would modulate narcolepsy symptoms produced by orexin deficiency. Mice were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram and a telemetric arterial pressure transducer. Sleep attacks fragmenting wakefulness, cataplexy, excess rapid-eye-movement sleep (R) during the activity period, and enhanced increase of arterial pressure during R, which are hallmarks of narcolepsy in mice, did not occur in HDC-KO, whereas they were observed in DM mice. Thus, these narcolepsy signs are neither caused nor abrogated by the absence of histamine. Conversely, the lack of histamine produced obesity in HDC-KO and to a greater extent also in DM. Moreover, the regularity of breath duration during R was significantly increased in either HDC-KO or DM relative to that in congenic wild-type mice. Defects of histamine transmission may thus modulate the metabolic and respiratory phenotype of murine narcolepsy.

  13. Histamine Transmission Modulates the Phenotype of Murine Narcolepsy Caused by Orexin Neuron Deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bastianini

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy type 1 is associated with loss of orexin neurons, sleep-wake derangements, cataplexy, and a wide spectrum of alterations in other physiological functions, including energy balance, cardiovascular, and respiratory control. It is unclear which narcolepsy signs are directly related to the lack of orexin neurons or are instead modulated by dysfunction of other neurotransmitter systems physiologically controlled by orexin neurons, such as the histamine system. To address this question, we tested whether some of narcolepsy signs would be detected in mice lacking histamine signaling (HDC-KO. Moreover, we studied double-mutant mice lacking both histamine signaling and orexin neurons (DM to evaluate whether the absence of histamine signaling would modulate narcolepsy symptoms produced by orexin deficiency. Mice were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram and a telemetric arterial pressure transducer. Sleep attacks fragmenting wakefulness, cataplexy, excess rapid-eye-movement sleep (R during the activity period, and enhanced increase of arterial pressure during R, which are hallmarks of narcolepsy in mice, did not occur in HDC-KO, whereas they were observed in DM mice. Thus, these narcolepsy signs are neither caused nor abrogated by the absence of histamine. Conversely, the lack of histamine produced obesity in HDC-KO and to a greater extent also in DM. Moreover, the regularity of breath duration during R was significantly increased in either HDC-KO or DM relative to that in congenic wild-type mice. Defects of histamine transmission may thus modulate the metabolic and respiratory phenotype of murine narcolepsy.

  14. Exome sequencing identified mutations in CASK and MYBPC3 as the cause of a complex dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Eyal; Tzur, Shay; Bormans, Concetta; Behar, Doron M

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing for clinical applications is now an integral part of medical genetics practice. Though most studies are performed in order to establish diagnoses in individuals with rare and clinically unrecognizable disorders, due to the constantly decreasing costs and commercial availability, whole-exome sequencing has gradually become the initial tool to study patients with clinically recognized disorders when more than one gene is responsible for the phenotype or in complex phenotypes, when variants in more than one gene can be the cause for the disease. Here we report a patient presenting with a complex phenotype consisting of severe, adult-onset, dilated cardiomyopathy, hearing loss and developmental delay, in which exome sequencing revealed two genetic variants that are inherited from a healthy mother: a novel missense variant in the CASK gene, mutations in which cause a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations, and a second variant, in MYBPC3, that is associated with hereditary cardiomyopathy. We conclude that although the potential for co-occurrence of rare diseases is higher when analyzing undefined phenotypes in consanguineous families, it should also be given consideration in the genetic evaluation of complex phenotypes in non-consanguineous families. PMID:27173948

  15. A novel mutation at the JK locus causing Jknull phenotype in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG; Yan

    2005-01-01

    [1]Olivès, B., Mattei, M. G., Huet, M. et al., Kidd blood group and urea transport of human erythrocytes are carried by the same pro-tein, J. Biol. Chem., 1995, 270(26): 15607―15610.[2]Sands, J. M., Timmer, R. T., Gunn, R. B., Urea transporters in kidney and erythrocytes, Am. J. Physiol.,1997, 273: F321―F339.[3]Heaton, D. C., McLoughlin, K., Jk(a-b-) red blood cells resist urea lysis, Transfusion, 1982, 22(1): 70―71.[4]Sands, J. M., Gargus, J. J., Frohlich, O. et al., Urinary concentrating ability in patients with Jk(a-b-) blood type who lack carrier-mediated urea transport, J. Am. Soc. Nephrol., 1992, 2(12): 1689―1696.[5]Nidal, M., Irshaid, N. I., Eicher, H. H. et al., Novel alleles at the JK blood group locus explain the absence of the erythrocyte urea transporter in European families, Br. J. Heaematol., 2002, 116(2): 445―453.[6]Okubo, Y., Yamaguchi, H., Nagao, N. et al., Heterogeneity of the pheno type JK(a-,b-) found in Japanese, Transfusion, 1986, 26(3): 237―239.[7]Olives, B., Merriman, M., Bailly, P. et al., The molecular basis of the Kidd blood group polymorphism and its lack of association with type 1 diabetes susceptibility, Hum. Mol. Genet., 1997, 6(7): 1017―1020.[8]Fr(o)hlich, O., Macey, R. I., Edwards-Moulds, J. et al., Urea transport deficiency in Jk(ab) erythrocytes, Am. J. Physiol., 1991, 260: C778―C783.[9]Irshaid, N. M., Hustinx, H., Olsson, M. L., A novel molecular basis of the JK(a-b-) phenotype in a Swiss family, Vox. Sanguinis, 2000, 78(suppl 1): O019.[10]Lucien, N., Chiaroni, J., Cartron, J. P. et al., Partial deletion in the JK locus causing a Jk(null ) phenotype, Blood, 2002, 99(3): 1079―1081.[11]Yang, B., Verkman, A. S., Analysis of double knockout mice lacking aquaporin-1 and urea transporter UT-B: Evidence for UT-B facilitated water transport in erythrocytes, J. Biol. Chem., 2002, 277(39): 36782―36786.[12]Van Hoek, A. N., Verkman, A. S., Functional reconstitution of the isolated erythrocyte water channel CHIP28, J

  16. Phenotypic plasticity in Drosophila pigmentation caused by temperature sensitivity of a chromatin regulator network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Gibert

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a genotype to produce contrasting phenotypes in different environments. Although many examples have been described, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood. In particular, it is not clear how phenotypic plasticity is related to buffering, the maintenance of a constant phenotype against genetic or environmental variation. We investigate here the genetic basis of a particularly well described plastic phenotype: the abdominal pigmentation in female Drosophila melanogaster. Cold temperature induces a dark pigmentation, in particular in posterior segments, while higher temperature has the opposite effect. We show that the homeotic gene Abdominal-B (Abd-B has a major role in the plasticity of pigmentation in the abdomen. Abd-B plays opposite roles on melanin production through the regulation of several pigmentation enzymes. This makes the control of pigmentation very unstable in the posterior abdomen, and we show that the relative spatio-temporal expression of limiting pigmentation enzymes in this region of the body is thermosensitive. Temperature acts on melanin production by modulating a chromatin regulator network, interacting genetically with the transcription factor bric-à-brac (bab, a target of Abd-B and Hsp83, encoding the chaperone Hsp90. Genetic disruption of this chromatin regulator network increases the effect of temperature and the instability of the pigmentation pattern in the posterior abdomen. Colocalizations on polytene chromosomes suggest that BAB and these chromatin regulators cooperate in the regulation of many targets, including several pigmentation enzymes. We show that they are also involved in sex comb development in males and that genetic destabilization of this network is also strongly modulated by temperature for this phenotype. Thus, we propose that phenotypic plasticity of pigmentation is a side effect reflecting a global impact of temperature on epigenetic mechanisms

  17. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mortier, Geert; Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal; Rosenberg, Thomas; Beemer, Frits A; Leroy, Jules G; Bendix, Laila; Björck, Erik; Bonduelle, Dr.; Boute, Odile; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; De Die-Smulders, Christine E.M.; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Dollfus, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation in COL2A1. In 188 probands with the clinical diagnosis of Stickler syndrome, the COL2A1 gene was analyzed by either a mutation scanning technique or bidirectional fluorescent DNA sequencing. The effec...

  18. Biochemical and structural analysis of missense mutations in N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase causing mucopolysaccharidosis IVA phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukegawa, K; Nakamura, H; Kato, Z; Tomatsu, S; Montaño, A M; Fukao, T; Toietta, G; Tortora, P; Orii, T; Kondo, N

    2000-05-22

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; OMIM#253000), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of N -acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), has variable clinical phenotypes. To date we have identified 65 missense mutations in the GALNS gene from MPS IVA patients, but the correlation between genotype and phenotype has remained unclear. We studied 17 missense mutations using biochemical approaches and 32 missense mutations, using structural analyses. Fifteen missense mutations and two newly engineered active site mutations (C79S, C79T) were characterized by transient expression analysis. Mutant proteins, except for C79S and C79T, were destabilized and detected as insoluble precursor forms while the C79S and C79T mutants were of a soluble mature size. Mutants found in the severe phenotype had no activity. Mutants found in the mild phenotype had a considerable residual activity (1.3-13.3% of wild-type GALNS activity). Sulfatases, including GALNS, are members of a highly conserved gene family sharing an extensive sequence homology. Thus, a tertiary structural model of human GALNS was constructed from the X-ray crystal structure of N -acetylgalacto-samine-4-sulfatase and arylsulfatase A, using homology modeling, and 32 missense mutations were investigated. Consequently, we propose that there are at least three different reasons for the severe phenotype: (i) destruction of the hydrophobic core or modification of the packing; (ii) removal of a salt bridge to destabilize the entire conformation; (iii) modification of the active site. In contrast, mild mutations were mostly located on the surface of the GALNS protein. These studies shed further light on the genotype-phenotype correlation of MPS IVA and structure-function relationship in the sulfatase family. PMID:10814710

  19. Phenotypic plasticity and longevity in plants and animals: cause and effect?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renee M Borges

    2009-10-01

    Immobile plants and immobile modular animals outlive unitary animals. This paper discusses competing but not necessarily mutually exclusive theories to explain this extreme longevity, especially from the perspective of phenotypic plasticity. Stem cell immortality, vascular autonomy, and epicormic branching are some important features of the phenotypic plasticity of plants that contribute to their longevity. Monocarpy versus polycarpy can also influence the kind of senescent processes experienced by plants. How density-dependent phenomena affecting the establishment of juveniles in these immobile organisms can influence the evolution of senescence, and consequently longevity, is reviewed and discussed. Whether climate change scenarios will favour long-lived or short-lived organisms, with their attendant levels of plasticity, is also presented.

  20. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause the familial hemiplegic migraine phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.M.; Thomsen, L.L.; Olesen, J.;

    2008-01-01

    .58). Headache severity and intensity were not different between the groups. Conclusions: Familial hemiplegic migraine ( FHM) patients do not show hypersensitivity of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-cyclic adenosine 3 ', 5 '-monophosphate pathway, as characteristically seen in migraine patients......Objective: The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a migraine trigger that plays a crucial role in migraine pathophysiology, and CGRP antagonism is efficient in the treatment of migraine attacks. Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a dominantly inherited subtype of migraine...... with aura associated with several gene mutations. FHM shares many phenotypical similarities with common types of migraine, indicating common neurobiological pathways. We tested the hypothesis that the FHM genotype confers a CGRP hypersensitive phenotype. Methods: We included 9 FHM patients with known...

  1. Phenotype-Optimized Sequence Ensembles Substantially Improve Prediction of Disease-Causing Mutation in Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Masica, David L.; Sosnay, Patrick R.; Cutting, Garry R; Karchin, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation is associated with a phenotypic spectrum that includes cystic fibrosis (CF). The disease liability of some common CFTR mutations is known, but rare mutations are seen in too few patients to categorize unequivocally, making genetic diagnosis difficult. Computational methods can predict the impact of mutation, but prediction specificity is often below that required for clinical utility. Here, we present a novel supervised learn...

  2. Cellular burdens and biological effects on tissue level caused by inhaled radon progenies

    CERN Document Server

    Madas, Balázs G; Farkas, Árpád; Szőke, István

    2014-01-01

    In the case of radon exposure, the spatial distribution of deposited radioactive particles is highly inhomogeneous in the central airways. The objective of this research is to investigate the consequences of this heterogeneity regarding cellular burdens in the bronchial epithelium and to study the possible biological effects on tissue level. Applying a computational fluid dynamics program, the deposition distribution of inhaled radon daughters has been determined in a bronchial airway model for 23 minutes of work in the New Mexico uranium mine corresponding to 0.0129 WLM exposure. A numerical epithelium model based on experimental data has been utilized in order to quantify cellular hits and doses. Finally, a carcinogenesis model considering cell death induced cell cycle shortening has been applied to assess the biological responses. Computations present, that cellular dose may reach 1.5 Gy, which is several orders of magnitude higher than tissue dose. The results are in agreement with the histological findin...

  3. A mutation in the rice chalcone isomerase gene causes the golden hull and internode 1 phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lilan; Qian, Qian; Tang, Ding; Wang, Kejian; Li, Ming; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2012-07-01

    The biosynthesis of flavonoids, important secondary plant metabolites, has been investigated extensively, but few mutants of genes in this pathway have been identified in rice (Oryza sativa). The rice gold hull and internode (gh) mutants exhibit a reddish-brown pigmentation in the hull and internode and their phenotype has long been used as a morphological marker trait for breeding and genetic study. Here, we characterized that the gh1 mutant was a mutant of the rice chalcone isomerase gene (OsCHI). The result showed that gh1 had a Dasheng retrotransposon inserted in the 5′ UTR of the OsCHI gene, which resulted in the complete loss of OsCHI expression. gh1 exhibited golden pigmentation in hulls and internodes once the panicles were exposed to light. The total flavonoid content in gh1 hulls was increased threefold compared to wild type. Consistent with the gh1 phenotype, OsCHI transcripts were expressed in most tissues of rice and most abundantly in internodes. It was also expressed at high levels in panicles before heading, distributed mainly in lemmas and paleae, but its expression decreased substantially after the panicles emerged from the sheath. OsCHI encodes a protein functionally and structurally conserved to chalcone isomerases in other species. Our findings demonstrated that the OsCHI gene was indispensable for flux of the flavonoid pathway in rice. PMID:22286805

  4. Severe congenital lipodystrophy and a progeroid appearance: Mutation in the penultimate exon of FBN1 causing a recognizable phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Hida, Mariko; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2013-12-01

    Recently, three marfanoid patients with congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance were reported. Although their phenotype was distinct from that of classic Marfan syndrome, they all had a truncating mutation in the penultimate exon, i.e., exon 64, of FBN1, the causative gene for Marfan syndrome. These patients might represent a new entity, but the exact phenotypic and genotypic spectrum remains unknown. Here, we report on a girl born prematurely who exhibited severe congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance. The patient exhibited a characteristic growth pattern consisting of an accelerated growth in height with a discrepant poor weight gain. She had a characteristic facial appearance with craniosynostosis. A mutation analysis identified c.8175_8182del8bp, p.Arg2726Glufs*9 in exon 64 of the FBN1 gene. A review of similar, recently reported patients revealed that the cardinal features of these patients include (1) congenital lipodystrophy, (2) premature birth with an accelerated linear growth disproportionate to the weight gain, and (3) a progeroid appearance with distinct facial features. Lines of molecular evidence suggested that this new progeroid syndrome represents a neomorphic phenotype caused by truncated transcripts with an extremely charged protein motif that escapes from nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, altering FBN1-TGF beta signaling, rather than representing the severe end of the hypomorphic phenotype of the FBN1-TGF beta disorder spectrum. We propose that this marfanoid entity comprised of congenital lipodystrophy, a neonatal progeroid appearance, and a peculiar growth profile and caused by rare mutations in the penultimate exon of FBN1, be newly referred to as marfanoid-progeroid syndrome. PMID:24039054

  5. Severe congenital lipodystrophy and a progeroid appearance: Mutation in the penultimate exon of FBN1 causing a recognizable phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Hida, Mariko; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2013-12-01

    Recently, three marfanoid patients with congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance were reported. Although their phenotype was distinct from that of classic Marfan syndrome, they all had a truncating mutation in the penultimate exon, i.e., exon 64, of FBN1, the causative gene for Marfan syndrome. These patients might represent a new entity, but the exact phenotypic and genotypic spectrum remains unknown. Here, we report on a girl born prematurely who exhibited severe congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance. The patient exhibited a characteristic growth pattern consisting of an accelerated growth in height with a discrepant poor weight gain. She had a characteristic facial appearance with craniosynostosis. A mutation analysis identified c.8175_8182del8bp, p.Arg2726Glufs*9 in exon 64 of the FBN1 gene. A review of similar, recently reported patients revealed that the cardinal features of these patients include (1) congenital lipodystrophy, (2) premature birth with an accelerated linear growth disproportionate to the weight gain, and (3) a progeroid appearance with distinct facial features. Lines of molecular evidence suggested that this new progeroid syndrome represents a neomorphic phenotype caused by truncated transcripts with an extremely charged protein motif that escapes from nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, altering FBN1-TGF beta signaling, rather than representing the severe end of the hypomorphic phenotype of the FBN1-TGF beta disorder spectrum. We propose that this marfanoid entity comprised of congenital lipodystrophy, a neonatal progeroid appearance, and a peculiar growth profile and caused by rare mutations in the penultimate exon of FBN1, be newly referred to as marfanoid-progeroid syndrome.

  6. Cell fusion induced by ERVWE1 or measles virus causes cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Chuprin, Anna; Gal, Hilah; BIRON-SHENTAL, Tal; Biran, Anat; Amiel, Aliza; Rozenblatt, Shmuel; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence limits proliferation of potentially detrimental cells, preventing tumorigenesis and restricting tissue damage. However, the function of senescence in nonpathological conditions is unknown. Here, Krizhanovsky and colleagues discover a new pathway to activate senescence cell fusion. The authors find that fusion-induced senescence occurs during embryonic development in the placenta. A counterpart of this process is also observed after infection by the measles virus. The resul...

  7. Dystrophin insufficiency causes a Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a dystrophin deficiency while Becker MD is caused by a dystrophin insufficiency or expression of a partially functional dystrophin protein. Deficiencies in existing mouse and dog models necessitate the development of a novel large animal model. Our pu...

  8. Polymorphic changes of cell phenotype caused by elevated expression of an exogenous NEU proto-oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakhovsky, A M; Resnikov, M; Zaichuk, T; Tugusheva, M V; Butenko, Z A; Prassolov, V S

    1990-03-01

    The NEU proto-oncogene encodes a 185,000 dalton transmembrane glycoprotein with extensive homology to epidermal growth factor receptor. In the current study the effect of exogenous NEU expression on phenotype and growth properties of cells established lines was examined. The replication defective retroviruses were used to express constitutively NEU cDNA in the Rat-1, NIH3T3 and Balb/c3T3 cells. In spite of the practically similar NEU mRNA and protein content in infected cells only in Balb/c3T3 cells, high NEU expression ultimately led to oncogenic transformation. The Rat-1 cells were practically insensitive to oncogenic action of NEU. Subpopulation divergency with respect to NEU-dependent transformation was also revealed in infected NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest the existence of unknown host-specific factor(s) determining the response of cells to NEU overexpression.

  9. Phospholamban overexpression in mice causes a centronuclear myopathy-like phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Val A. Fajardo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Centronuclear myopathy (CNM is a congenital myopathy that is histopathologically characterized by centrally located nuclei, central aggregation of oxidative activity, and type I fiber predominance and hypotrophy. Here, we obtained commercially available mice overexpressing phospholamban (PlnOE, a well-known inhibitor of sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs, in their slow-twitch type I skeletal muscle fibers to determine the effects on SERCA function. As expected with a 6- to 7-fold overexpression of phospholamban, SERCA dysfunction was evident in PlnOE muscles, with marked reductions in rates of Ca2+ uptake, maximal ATPase activity and the apparent affinity of SERCA for Ca2+. However, our most significant discovery was that the soleus and gluteus minimus muscles from the PlnOE mice displayed overt signs of myopathy: they histopathologically resembled human CNM, with centrally located nuclei, central aggregation of oxidative activity, type I fiber predominance and hypotrophy, progressive fibrosis and muscle weakness. This phenotype is associated with significant upregulation of muscle sarcolipin and dynamin 2, increased Ca2+-activated proteolysis, oxidative stress and protein nitrosylation. Moreover, in our assessment of muscle biopsies from three human CNM patients, we found a significant 53% reduction in SERCA activity and increases in both total and monomeric PLN content compared with five healthy subjects, thereby justifying future studies with more CNM patients. Altogether, our results suggest that the commercially available PlnOE mouse phenotypically resembles human CNM and could be used as a model to test potential mechanisms and therapeutic strategies. To date, there is no cure for CNM and our results suggest that targeting SERCA function, which has already been shown to be an effective therapeutic target for murine muscular dystrophy and human cardiomyopathy, might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to combat CNM.

  10. Wine intake, ABO phenotype, and risk of ischemic heart disease and all-cause mortality: the Copenhagen Male Study-a 16-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suadicani, P.; Hein, H.O.; Gyntelberg, F.

    2008-01-01

    were ABO phenotypes, alcohol intake (wine, beer, and spirits), tobacco smoking history, leisure-time, physical activity, social class, and age. During 16 years, 1985-1986 to end of 2001, 197 subjects (6.5%) died due to IHD, and 1,204 (39.8%) from all causes. Among non-O phenotypes (A, B, and AB...... among middle-aged and elderly men may depend on ABO phenotypes. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  11. Phenotypic Characterization of the Komeda Miniature Rat Ishikawa, an Animal Model of Dwarfism Caused by a Mutation in Prkg2

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuchida, Atsuko; Yokoi, Norihide; Namae, Misako; Fuse, Masanori; Masuyama, Taku; Sasaki, Masashi; Kawazu, Shoji; Komeda, Kajuro

    2008-01-01

    The Komeda miniature rat Ishikawa (KMI) is a spontaneous animal model of dwarfism caused by a mutation in Prkg2, which encodes cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII). This strain has been maintained as a segregating inbred strain for the mutated allele mri. In this study, we characterized the phenotype of the KMI strain, particularly growth traits, craniofacial measurements, and organ weights. The homozygous mutant (mri/mri) animals were approximately 70% to 80% of the size of normal, ...

  12. Molecular Phylogeny of the Psittacid Herpesviruses Causing Pacheco's Disease: Correlation of Genotype with Phenotypic Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K.; Kaleta, Erhard F.; Phalen, David N

    2003-01-01

    Fragments of 419 bp of the UL16 open reading frame from 73 psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs) from the United States and Europe were sequenced. All viruses caused Pacheco's disease, and serotypes of the European isolates were known. A phylogenetic tree derived from these sequences demonstrated that the PsHVs that cause Pacheco's disease comprised four major genotypes, with each genotype including between two and four variants. With the exception of two viruses, the serotypes of the virus isolate...

  13. Genetic and structural analyses suggest that a novel SPG3A mutation causes severe phenotypes of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Suqin; ZHOU Yan; LI Xunhua; Labu; HUANG Shuang; HUANG Weijun; ZHOU Chunlong; liu; WANG Yiming

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a group of neurodegenerative diseases. The genotypes and phenotypes of HSP are extremely heterogenous. SPG3A is one of the identified genes underlying HSP, and codes for a GTPase, atlastin. Mutations in SPG3A are currently believed to be associated with early onset and mild phenotypes. And most structural predictions could not detect gross changes in the mutant protein. However, in a severely affected HSP family we have identified a novel SPG3A mutation, c.1228G>A (p.G410R), in a Tibetan kindred. The mutation occurred at the highly conserved nucleotide and co-segregated with the disease, and was absent in the control subjects. Structural predictions showed that the Tibetan mutation occurred at the linking part between the guanylate-binding protein domain (GB, the ball region) and the transmembrane helices (TM, the rod region) at the start point of an α-helix, which may disrupt the helix, and cause changes in the overall structure of the transmembrane region of the molecule. Our results indicate that severe phenotypes can also arise from SPG3A mutations and the linking part of the guanylate-binding protein domain and the transmembrane helices might be crucial in determining the severity of the disease. This paper not only presents the first SPG3A mutational report from the Chinese population, but also provides potential evidence for a possible correlation between the severity of the phenotypes of HSP with the extension of the changes in the protein structures of atlastin.

  14. Cellular compartments cause multistability and allow cells to process more information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, Heather A; Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten;

    2013-01-01

    outcomes for cellular-decision making. We combine different mathematical techniques to provide a heuristic procedure to determine if a system has the capacity for multiple steady states, and find conditions that ensure that multiple steady states cannot occur. Notably, we find that introducing species...... is capable of multistationarity (multiple response states), and is thus directly linked to the amount of information that the signaling molecules can represent in the nucleus. Multistationarity provides a mechanism for switching between different response states in cell signaling systems and enables multiple...

  15. Experimentally induced diabetes causes glial activation, glutamate toxicity and cellular damage leading to changes in motor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti eNagayach

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Behavioural impairments are the most empirical consequence of diabetes mellitus documented in both humans and animal models, but the underlying causes are still poorly understood. As the cerebellum plays a major role in coordination and execution of the motor functions, we investigated the possible involvement of glial activation, cellular degeneration and glutamate transportation in the cerebellum of rats, rendered diabetic by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 45mg/ kg body weight; intraperitoneally. Motor function alterations were studied using Rotarod test (motor coordination and grip strength (muscle activity at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th week post diabetic confirmation. Scenario of glial (astroglia and microglia activation, cell death and glutamate transportation was gauged using immunohistochemistry, histological study and image analysis. Cellular degeneration was clearly demarcated in the diabetic cerebellum. Glial cells were showing sequential and marked activation following diabetes in terms of both morphology and cell number. Bergmann glial cells were hypertrophied and distorted. Active caspase-3 positive apoptotic cells were profoundly present in all three cerebellar layers. Reduced co-labelling of GLT-1 and GFAP revealed the altered glutamate transportation in cerebellum following diabetes. These results, exclusively derived from histology, immunohistochemistry and cellular quantification, provide first insight over the associative reciprocity between the glial activation, cellular degeneration and reduced glutamate transportation, which presumably lead to the behavioural alterations following STZ-induced diabetes.

  16. Bmp2 deletion causes an amelogenesis imperfecta phenotype via regulating enamel gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Feng, Junsheng; Wang, Feng; Li, Wentong; Gao, Qingping; Chen, Zhuo; Shoff, Lisa; Donly, Kevin J; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; Chun, Yong Hee Patricia; Harris, Stephen E; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo.

  17. Chronic hepcidin induction causes hyposideremia and alters the pattern of cellular iron accumulation in hemochromatotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viatte, Lydie; Nicolas, Gaël; Lou, Dan-Qing; Bennoun, Myriam; Lesbordes-Brion, Jeanne-Claire; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Schönig, Kai; Bujard, Hermann; Kahn, Axel; Andrews, Nancy C; Vaulont, Sophie

    2006-04-01

    We report the generation of a tetracycline-regulated (Tet ON) transgenic mouse model for acute and chronic expression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin in the liver. We demonstrate that short-term and long-term tetracycline-dependent activation of hepcidin in adult mice leads to hypoferremia and iron-limited erythropoiesis, respectively. This clearly establishes the key role of hepcidin in regulating the extracellular iron concentration. We previously demonstrated that, when expressed early in fetal development, constitutive transgenic hepcidin expression prevented iron accumulation in an Hfe-/- mouse model of hemochromatosis. We now explore the effect of chronic hepcidin expression in adult Hfe-/- mice that have already developed liver iron overload. We demonstrate that induction of chronic hepcidin expression in 2-month-old Hfe-/- mice alters their pattern of cellular iron accumulation, leading to increased iron in tissue macrophages and duodenal cells but less iron in hepatocytes. These hepcidin-induced changes in the pattern of cellular iron accumulation are associated with decreased expression of the iron exporter ferroportin in macrophages but no detectable alteration of ferroportin expression in the hepatocytes. We speculate that this change in iron homeostasis could offer a therapeutic advantage by protecting against damage to parenchymal cells. PMID:16339398

  18. Application of an Image Cytometry Protocol for Cellular and Mitochondrial Phenotyping on Fibroblasts from Patients with Inherited Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Guerra, Paula; Lund, Martin; Corydon, T J;

    2015-01-01

    on a parallel one. We analysed HDFs from healthy individuals after treatment with various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for different intervals, to mimic the physiological effects of oxidative stress. Our results show that cell number, viability, TRS and MMP decreased, while MSL increased both...... one. HDFs from both patients displayed increased MSL without H2O2 treatment. Treatment with H2O2 revealed significant differences in MMP and MSL between HDFs from the mild and the severe patient. Our results establish the capacity of our protocol for fast analysis of cellular and mitochondrial...

  19. Phenotypes of hypertriglyceridemia caused by excess very-low-density lipoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sniderman, A.D.; Tremblay, A.; Graaf, J. de; Couture, P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the composition of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles and the proportion of VLDL to total apolipoprotein B (apoB) particles in patients with hypertriglyceridemia caused by excess VLDL. METHODS: Subjects were selected from 2023 consecutive patients attending the

  20. p.L18P: a novel IDUA mutation that causes a distinct attenuated phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis type I patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualim, G; Ribeiro, M G; da Fonseca, G G G; Szlago, M; Schenone, A; Lemes, A; Rojas, M V M; Matte, U; Giugliani, R

    2015-10-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase (IDUA) which leads to a wide spectrum of clinical severity. Here, we describe the case of four male patients who present the previously undescribed p.L18P mutation. Patient 1 (p.L18P/p.L18P) presents, despite multiple joint contractures, an attenuated phenotype. Patient 2 (p.L18P/p.W402X) was diagnosed at 4 years of age with bone dysplasia, coarse facies, limited mobility, claw hands and underwent bilateral carpal tunnel surgery at 6 years of age. Patients 3 and 4 (both p.L18P/p.L18P) are brothers. Patient 3 was diagnosed at 4 years of age, when presented claw hands, lower limb and shoulder pain, restricted articular movement and bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient 4 was diagnosed at 17 months of age when presented lower limb pain at night, respiratory allergy and repeated upper airways infections. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that p.L18P mutation reduces the signal peptide to 25 amino acids and alters its secondary structure. In conclusion, we report a new IDUA variant that alters the structure of the signal peptide, which likely impairs transport to lysosomes. Moreover, it leads to a distinct attenuated phenotype with mainly bone and cartilage symptoms, without visceromegalies, heart disease, or cognitive impairment. PMID:25256405

  1. Novel frameshift mutation in the CACNA1A gene causing a mixed phenotype of episodic ataxia and familiar hemiplegic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, S; Ossig, C; Wienecke, M; Beyer, A; von der Hagen, M; Storch, A; Smitka, M

    2015-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, MIM#108500) is the most common form of EA and an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder characterized by paroxysmal episodes of ataxia. The disease causative gene CACNA1A encodes for the alpha 1A subunit of the voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel. We report on a family with a novel mutation in the CACNA1A gene. The clinical symptoms within the family varied from the typical clinical presentation of EA2 with dysarthria, gait ataxia and oculomotor symptoms to migraine and dystonia. A novel nonsense mutation of the CACNA1A gene was identified in all affected family members and is most likely the disease causing molecular defect. The pharmacological treatment with acetazolamide (AAA) was successful in three family members so far. Treatment with AAA led to a reduction of migraine attacks and an improvement of the dystonia. This relationship confirmed the hypothesis that this novel mutation results in a heterogeneous phenotype and confutes the coincidence with common migraine. Dystonia is potentially included as a further part of the phenotype spectrum of CACNA1A gene mutations.

  2. Cellular analysis of the phenotypic correction of the genetically controlled low immune response to the polyproline determinant by macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SJL mice are high responders to the polyproline region of poly(Tyr,Glu)-polyPro-polyLys, (T,G)-Pro-L and of poly(Phe,Glu)-polyPro-polyLys, (Phe,G)-Pro-L, whereas DBA/l mice are the low responders to this moiety. The low responsiveness of DBA/l mice to polyproline could be enhanced by immunization with (T,G)-Pro-L 4 days after stimulation of peritoneal cells by thioglycolate. The same effect was observed when DBA/l mice were immunized with 107 syngeneic peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) preincubated in vitro with the immunogen. Similar treatments of SJL mice did not enhance the high response to polyproline, nor did it enhance low responses to other synthetic polypeptides tested. The enhancing effect of PEC on immunocompetent cells was established by transferring graded numbers of spleen cells together with 107 PEC into irradiated syngeneic DBA/l recipients. The effective cell type in the PEC was found to be the macrophage as the same results were observed with the adherent-cell population. Furthermore, the effect was not abolished after in vitro irradiation of PEC with 5000 R or by anti-theta treatment. In vivo irradiation of the PEC donors 2 days before the cells were harvested also did not influence the phenotypic correction of the low responsiveness. Transfer experiments in which graded inocula of either marrow cells or thymocytes from DBA/l donors were transferred into syngeneic recipients in the presence of an excess of the complementary cell type together with PEC indicated that the enhancing effect was reflected in the bone-marrow-cell population only

  3. ACE genotype, phenotype and all-cause mortality in different cohorts of patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Louise H; Sejling, Anne-Sophie; Lajer, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Carrying the D-allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism and high ACE activity are prognostic factors in diabetic nephropathy, which predicts mortality in type 1 diabetes. We studied the association between the ACE D-allele and ACE phenotype and long-term all-cause...... mortality in three single-institution outpatient cohorts. METHODS: Genotype-based analyses were performed in 269 patients from Hillerød Hospital (HIH) (follow-up: 12 years) and in 439 patients with diabetic nephropathy and 437 patients with persistent normoalbuminuria from the Steno Diabetes Center (SDC.......0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-16)), but not in the SDC cohorts. At HIH, serum ACE activity was associated with excess mortality (HR=1.04 (95% CI 1.0-1.1 per unit increase)), but in the SDC cohort plasma ACE concentration was not. CONCLUSION: In unselected patients with type 1 diabetes, carrying...

  4. Cellular phenotype-dependent and -independent effects of vitamin C on the renewal and gene expression of mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Ming Kuo

    Full Text Available Vitamin C has been shown to delay the cellular senescence and was considered a candidate for chemoprevention and cancer therapy. To understand the reported contrasting roles of vitamin C: growth-promoting in the primary cells and growth-inhibiting in cancer cells, primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF and their isogenic spontaneously immortalized fibroblasts with unlimited cell division potential were used as the model pair. We used microarray gene expression profiling to show that the immortalized MEF possess human cancer gene expression fingerprints including a pattern of up-regulation of inflammatory response-related genes. Using the MEF model, we found that a physiological treatment level of vitamin C (10(-5 M, but not other unrelated antioxidants, enhanced cell growth. The growth-promoting effect was associated with a pattern of enhanced expression of cell cycle- and cell division-related genes in both primary and immortalized cells. In the immortalized MEF, physiological treatment levels of vitamin C also enhanced the expression of immortalization-associated genes including a down-regulation of genes in the extracellular matrix functional category. In contrast, confocal immunofluorescence imaging of the primary MEF suggested an increase in collagen IV protein upon vitamin C treatment. Similar to the cancer cells, the growth-inhibitory effect of the redox-active form of vitamin C was preferentially observed in immortalized MEF. All effects of vitamin C required its intracellular presence since the transporter-deficient SVCT2-/- MEF did not respond to vitamin C. SVCT2-/- MEF divided and became immortalized readily indicating little dependence on vitamin C for the cell division. Immortalized SVCT2-/- MEF required higher concentration of vitamin C for the growth inhibition compared to the immortalized wildtype MEF suggesting an intracellular vitamin C toxicity. The relevance of our observation in aging and human cancer prevention was

  5. Cellular Structural Changes in Candida albicans Caused by the Hydroalcoholic Extract from Sapindus saponaria L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinobu-Mesquita, Cristiane S; Bonfim-Mendonça, Patricia S; Moreira, Amanda L; Ferreira, Izabel C P; Donatti, Lucelia; Fiorini, Adriana; Svidzinski, Terezinha I E

    2015-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a disease caused by the abnormal growth of yeast-like fungi in the mucosa of the female genital tract. Candida albicans is the principal etiological agent involved in VVC, but reports have shown an increase in the prevalence of Candida non-C. albicans (CNCA) cases, which complicates VVC treatment because CNCA does not respond well to antifungal therapy. Our group has reported the in vitro antifungal activity of extracts from Sapindus saponaria L. The present study used scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to further evaluate the antifungal activity of hydroalcoholic extract from S. saponaria (HE) against yeast obtained from VVC and structural changes induced by HE. We observed the antifungal activity of HE against 125 vaginal yeasts that belonged to four different species of the Candida genus and S. cerevisae. The results suggest that saponins that are present in HE act on the cell wall or membrane of yeast at the first moments after contact, causing damage to these structures and cell lysis. PMID:26007191

  6. Highly prevalent LIPH founder mutations causing autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis in Japan and the genotype/phenotype correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Tanahashi

    Full Text Available Mutations in LIPH cause of autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH, and the 2 missense mutations c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser and c.742C>A (p.His248Asn are considered prevalent founder mutations for ARWH in the Japanese population. To reveal genotype/phenotype correlations in ARWH cases in Japan and the haplotypes in 14 Japanese patients from 14 unrelated Japanese families. 13 patients had woolly hair, and 1 patient had complete baldness since birth. An LIPH mutation search revealed homozygous c.736T>A mutations in 10 of the patients. Compound heterozygous c.736T>A and c.742C>A mutations were found in 3 of the patients, and homozygous c.742C>A mutation in 1 patient. The phenotype of mild hypotrichosis with woolly hair was restricted to the patients with the homozygous c.736T>A mutation. The severe phenotype of complete baldness was seen in only 1 patient with homozygous c.742C>A. Haplotype analysis revealed that the alleles containing the LIPH c.736T>A mutation had a haplotype identical to that reported previously, although 4 alleles out of 5 chromosomes containing the LIPH c.742C>A mutation had a different haplotype from the previously reported founder allele. These alleles with c.742C>A are thought to be the third founder LIPH mutation causing ARWH. To accurately determine the prevalence of the founder mutations, we investigated allele frequencies of those mutations in 819 Japanese controls. Heterozygous c.736T>A mutations were found in 13 controls (allele frequency: 0.0079; carrier rate: 0.016, and heterozygous c.742C>A mutations were found in 2 controls (allele frequency: 0.0012; carrier rate: 0.0024. In conclusion, this study confirms the more accurate allele frequencies of the pathogenic founder mutations of LIPH and shows that there is a third founder mutation in Japan. In addition, the present findings suggest that the mutation patterns of LIPH might be associated with hypotrichosis severity in ARWH.

  7. Human RON receptor tyrosine kinase induces complete epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition but causes cellular senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RON receptor tyrosine kinase is a member of the MET proto-oncogene family and is important for cell proliferation, differentiation, and cancer development. Here, we created a series of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell clones that express different levels of RON, and have investigated their biological properties. While low levels of RON correlated with little morphological change in MDCK cells, high levels of RON expression constitutively led to morphological scattering or complete and stabilized epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Unexpectedly, MDCK clones expressing higher levels of RON exhibited retarded proliferation and senescence, despite increased motility and invasiveness. RON was constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated in MDCK cells expressing high levels of RON and undergoing EMT, and the MAPK signaling pathway was activated. This study reveals for the first time that RON alone is sufficient to induce complete and stabilized EMT in MDCK cells, and overexpression of RON does not cause cell transformation but rather induces cell cycle arrest and senescence, leading to impaired cell proliferation

  8. Phenotypic and genetic consequences of protein damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Krisko

    Full Text Available Although the genome contains all the information necessary for maintenance and perpetuation of life, it is the proteome that repairs, duplicates and expresses the genome and actually performs most cellular functions. Here we reveal strong phenotypes of physiological oxidative proteome damage at the functional and genomic levels. Genome-wide mutations rates and biosynthetic capacity were monitored in real time, in single Escherichia coli cells with identical levels of reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage, but with different levels of irreversible oxidative proteome damage (carbonylation. Increased protein carbonylation correlates with a mutator phenotype, whereas reducing it below wild type level produces an anti-mutator phenotype identifying proteome damage as the leading cause of spontaneous mutations. Proteome oxidation elevates also UV-light induced mutagenesis and impairs cellular biosynthesis. In conclusion, protein damage reduces the efficacy and precision of vital cellular processes resulting in high mutation rates and functional degeneracy akin to cellular aging.

  9. 1031-1034delTAAC (Leu125Stop: a novel familial UBE3A mutation causing Angelman syndrome in two siblings showing distinct phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Molfetta Greice Andreotti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 50 mutations in the UBE3A gene (E6-AP ubiquitin protein ligase gene have been found in Angelman syndrome patients with no deletion, no uniparental disomy, and no imprinting defect. Case Presentation We here describe a novel UBE3A frameshift mutation in two siblings who have inherited it from their asymptomatic mother. Despite carrying the same UBE3A mutation, the proband shows a more severe phenotype whereas his sister shows a milder phenotype presenting the typical AS features. Conclusions We hypothesized that the mutation Leu125Stop causes both severe and milder phenotypes. Potential mechanisms include: i maybe the proband has an additional problem (genetic or environmental besides the UBE3A mutation; ii since the two siblings have different fathers, the UBE3A mutation is interacting with a different genetic variant in the proband that, by itself, does not cause problems but in combination with the UBE3A mutation causes the severe phenotype; iii this UBE3A mutation alone can cause either typical AS or the severe clinical picture seen in the proband.

  10. Analysis of large phenotypic variability of EEC and SHFM4 syndromes caused by K193E mutation of the TP63 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Wei

    Full Text Available EEC (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting; OMIM 604292 is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder resulting mainly from pathogenic mutations of the DNA-binding domain (DBD of the TP63 gene. In this study, we showed that K193E mutation in nine affected individuals of a four-generation kindred with a large degree of phenotypic variability causes four different syndromes or TP63-related disorders: EEC, Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia (EE, isolated ectodermal dysplasia, and isolated Split Hand/Foot Malformation type 4 (SHFM4. Genotype-phenotype and DBD structural modeling analysis showed that the K193-located loop L2-A is associated with R280 through hydrogen bonding interactions, while R280 mutations also often cause large phenotypic variability of EEC and SHFM4. Thus, we speculate that K193 and several other DBD mutation-associated syndromes may share similar pathogenic mechanisms, particularly in the case of the same mutation with different phenotypes. Our study and others also suggest that the phenotypic variability of EEC is attributed, at least partially, to genetic and/or epigenetic modifiers.

  11. Alzheimer disease-like clinical phenotype in a family with FTDP-17 caused by a MAPT R406W mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S.G.; Holm, I.E.; Schwartz, M.;

    2008-01-01

    We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre-symptomatic an......We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre...

  12. SETD5 loss-of-function mutation as a likely cause of a familial syndromic intellectual disability with variable phenotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Brzezinska, Monika; Kot, Justyna; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Walczak, Anna; Stawiński, Piotr; Werner, Bożena; Płoski, Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Loss-of-function de novo mutations in the SETD5 gene, encoding a putative methyltransferase, are an important cause of moderate/severe intellectual disability as evidenced by the results of sequencing large patient cohorts. We present the first familial case of a SETD5 mutation contributing to a phenotype of congenital heart defects and dysmorphic features, with variable expression, in two siblings and their father. Interestingly, the father demonstrated only mild intellectual impairment. Family based exome sequencing combined to careful parental phenotyping may reveal a more complex clinical picture in newly recognized syndromes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27375234

  13. Gamma-H2AX upregulation caused by Wip1 deficiency increases depression-related cellular senescence in hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Wen-Yue; Hu, Wei-Yan; Yang, Lu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei-Yuan; Yang, Ya-Shu; Liu, Si-Cheng; Zhang, Feng-Lan; Mei, Rong; Xing, Da; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The PP2C family member Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1) critically regulates DNA damage response (DDR) under stressful situations. In the present study, we investigated whether Wip1 expression was involved in the regulation of DDR-induced and depression-related cellular senescence in mouse hippocampus. We found that Wip1 gene knockout (KO) mice showed aberrant elevation of hippocampal cellular senescence and of γ-H2AX activity, which is known as a biomarker of DDR and cellular senescence, indicating that the lack of Wip1-mediated γ-H2AX dephosphorylation facilitates cellular senescence in hippocampus. Administration of the antidepressant fluoxetine had no significant effects on the increased depression-like behaviors, enriched cellular senescence, and aberrantly upregulated hippocampal γ-H2AX activity in Wip1 KO mice. After wildtype C57BL/6 mice were exposed to the procedure of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), cellular senescence and γ-H2AX activity in hippocampus were also elevated, accompanied by the suppression of Wip1 expression in hippocampus when compared to the control group without CUMS experience. These CUMS-induced symptoms were effectively prevented following fluoxetine administration in wildtype C57BL/6 mice, with the normalization of depression-like behaviors. Our data demonstrate that Wip1-mediated γ-H2AX dephosphorylation may play an important role in the occurrence of depression-related cellular senescence. PMID:27686532

  14. De novo heterozygous mutations in SMC3 cause a range of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-overlapping phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Deardorff, Matthew A; Ansari, Morad;

    2015-01-01

    craniofacial appearance, a milder prenatal growth retardation that worsens in childhood, few congenital heart defects, and an absence of limb deficiencies. While most mutations are unique, two unrelated affected individuals shared the same mutation but presented with different phenotypes. This work confirms...

  15. Manipulation of DET1 expression in tomato results in photomorphogenic phenotypes caused by post-transcriptional gene silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davuluri, Ganga Rao; van Tuinen, Ageeth; Mustilli, Anna Chiara; Manfredonia, Alessandro; Newman, Robert; Burgess, Diane; Brummell, David A.; King, Stephen R.; Palys, Joe; Uhlig, John; Pennings, Henk M. J.; Bowler, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Summary The tomato HIGH PIGMENT-2 gene encodes an orthologue of the Arabidopsis nuclear protein DE-ETIOLATED 1 (DET1). From genetic analyses it has been proposed that DET1 is a negative regulator of light signal transduction, and recent results indicate that it may control light-regulated gene expression at the level of chromatin remodelling. To gain further understanding about the function of DET1 during plant development, we generated a range of overexpression constructs and introduced them into tomato. Unexpectedly, we only observed phenotypes characteristic of DET1 inactivation, i.e. hyper-responsiveness to light. Molecular analysis indicated in all cases that these phenotypes were a result of suppression of endogenous DET1 expression, due to post-transcriptional gene silencing. DET1 silencing was often lethal when it occurred at relatively early stages of plant development, whereas light hyper-responsive phenotypes were obtained when silencing occurred later on. The appearance of phenotypes correlated with the generation of siRNAs but not DNA hypermethylation, and was most efficient when using constructs with mutations in the DET1 coding sequence or with constructs containing only the 3′-terminal portion of the gene. These results indicate an important function for DET1 throughout plant development and demonstrate that silencing of DET1 in fruits results in increased carotenoids, which may have biotechnological potential. PMID:15469492

  16. An increase in galectin-3 causes cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ-induced signal transduction and growth inhibition in gastric cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Po-Chun; Chen, Chia-Ling; Shan, Yan-Shen; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β facilitates interferon (IFN)-γ signaling by inhibiting Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase (SHP) 2. Mutated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) cause AKT activation and GSK-3β inactivation to induce SHP2-activated cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ in human gastric cancer AGS cells. This study investigated the potential role of galectin-3, which acts upstream of AKT/GSK-3β/SHP2, in gastric cancer cells. Increasing or decreasing galectin-3 altered IFN-γ signaling. Following cisplatin-induced galectin-3 upregulation, surviving cells showed cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ. Galectin-3 induced IFN-γ resistance independent of its extracellular β-galactoside-binding activity. Galectin-3 expression was not regulated by PI3K activation or by a decrease in PTEN. Increased galectin-3 may cause GSK-3β inactivation and SHP2 activation by promoting PDK1-induced AKT phosphorylation at a threonine residue. Overexpression of AKT, inactive GSK-3βR96A, SHP2, or active SHP2D61A caused cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ in IFN-γ-sensitive MKN45 cells. IFN-γ-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in AGS cells were observed until galectin-3 expression was downregulated. These results demonstrate that an increase in galectin-3 facilitates AKT/GSK-3β/SHP2 signaling, causing cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ. PMID:26934444

  17. Exosomal Proteome Profiling: A Potential Multi-Marker Cellular Phenotyping Tool to Characterize Hypoxia-Induced Radiation Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefani N. Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation and drug resistance are significant challenges in the treatment of locally advanced, recurrent and metastatic breast cancer that contribute to mortality. Clinically, radiotherapy requires oxygen to generate cytotoxic free radicals that cause DNA damage and allow that damage to become fixed in the genome rather than repaired. However, approximately 40% of all breast cancers have hypoxic tumor microenvironments that render cancer cells significantly more resistant to irradiation. Hypoxic stimuli trigger changes in the cell death/survival pathway that lead to increased cellular radiation resistance. As a result, the development of noninvasive strategies to assess tumor hypoxia in breast cancer has recently received considerable attention. Exosomes are secreted nanovesicles that have roles in paracrine signaling during breast tumor progression, including tumor-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and immunosuppression. The recent development of protocols to isolate and purify exosomes, as well as advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have facilitated the comprehensive analysis of exosome content and function. Using these tools, studies have demonstrated that the proteome profiles of tumor-derived exosomes are indicative of the oxygenation status of patient tumors. They have also demonstrated that exosome signaling pathways are potentially targetable drivers of hypoxia-dependent intercellular signaling during tumorigenesis. This article provides an overview of how proteomic tools can be effectively used to characterize exosomes and elucidate fundamental signaling pathways and survival mechanisms underlying hypoxia-mediated radiation resistance in breast cancer.

  18. Analysis of Large Phenotypic Variability of EEC and SHFM4 Syndromes Caused by K193E Mutation of the TP63 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Jianhua Wei; Yang Xue; Lian Wu; Jie Ma; Xiuli Yi; Junrui Zhang; Bin Lu; Chunying Li; Dashuang Shi; Songtao Shi; Xinghua Feng; Tao Cai

    2012-01-01

    EEC (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting; OMIM 604292) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder resulting mainly from pathogenic mutations of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the TP63 gene. In this study, we showed that K193E mutation in nine affected individuals of a four-generation kindred with a large degree of phenotypic variability causes four different syndromes or TP63-related disorders: EEC, Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia (EE), isolated ectodermal dysplasia, and isol...

  19. Fast forward genetics to identify mutations causing a high light tolerant phenotype in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by whole-genome-sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Schierenbeck, Lisa; Ries, David; Rogge, Kristin; Grewe, Sabrina; Weisshaar, Bernd; Kruse, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Background: High light tolerance of microalgae is a desired phenotype for efficient cultivation in large scale production systems under fluctuating outdoor conditions. Outdoor cultivation requires the use of either wild-type or non-GMO derived mutant strains due to safety concerns. The identification and molecular characterization of such mutants derived from untagged forward genetics approaches was limited previously by the tedious and time-consuming methods involving techniques such as ...

  20. Loss of MeCP2 in cholinergic neurons causes part of RTT-like phenotypes via α7 receptor in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Cao, Shu-Xia; Sun, Peng; He, Hai-Yang; Yang, Ci-Hang; Chen, Xiao-Juan; Shen, Chen-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Zhong; Berg, Darwin K; Duan, Shumin; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), an autism spectrum disorder characterized by impaired social interactions, motor abnormalities, cognitive defects and a high risk of epilepsy. Here, we showed that conditional deletion of Mecp2 in cholinergic neurons caused part of RTT-like phenotypes, which could be rescued by re-expressing Mecp2 in the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons rather than in the caudate putamen of conditional knockout (Chat-Mecp2(-/y)) mice. We found that choline acetyltransferase expression was decreased in the BF and that α7 nicotine acetylcholine receptor signaling was strongly impaired in the hippocampus of Chat-Mecp2(-/y) mice, which is sufficient to produce neuronal hyperexcitation and increase seizure susceptibility. Application of PNU282987 or nicotine in the hippocampus rescued these phenotypes in Chat-Mecp2(-/y) mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that MeCP2 is critical for normal function of cholinergic neurons and dysfunction of cholinergic neurons can contribute to numerous neuropsychiatric phenotypes. PMID:27103432

  1. Increased protein stability of CDKN1C causes a gain-of-function phenotype in patients with IMAGe syndrome.

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    Naoki Hamajima

    Full Text Available Mutations in the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA-binding domain of the CDKN1C gene were recently identified in patients with IMAGe syndrome. However, loss of PCNA binding and suppression of CDKN1C monoubiquitination by IMAGe-associated mutations hardly explain the reduced-growth phenotype characteristic of IMAGe syndrome. We demonstrate here that IMAGe-associated mutations in the CDKN1C gene dramatically increased the protein stability. We identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.815T>G (p.Ile272Ser, in the CDKN1C gene in three siblings manifesting clinical symptoms associated with IMAGe syndrome and their mother (unaffected carrier. PCNA binding to CDKN1C was disrupted in the case of p.Ile272Ser, and for two other IMAGe-associated mutations, p.Asp274Asn and p.Phe276Val. Intriguingly, the IMAGe-associated mutant CDKN1C proteins were fairly stable even in the presence of cycloheximide, whereas the wild-type protein was almost completely degraded via the proteasome pathway, as shown by the lack of degradation with addition of a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. These results thus suggested that the reduced-growth phenotype of IMAGe syndrome derives from CDKN1C gain-of-function due to IMAGe-associated mutations driving increased protein stability.

  2. Junctophilin 3 (JPH3) expansion mutations causing Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2) are common in South African patients with African ancestry and a Huntington disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Amanda; Mitchell, Claire; Essop, Fahmida; Tager, Susan; Temlett, James; Stevanin, Giovanni; Ross, Christopher; Rudnicki, Dobrila; Margolis, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by abnormal movements, cognitive decline, and psychiatric symptoms, caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene on chromosome 4p. A CAG/CTG repeat expansion in the junctophilin-3 (JPH3) gene on chromosome 16q24.2 causes a Huntington disease-like phenotype (HDL2). All patients to date with HDL2 have some African ancestry. The present study aimed to characterize the genetic basis of the Huntington disease phenotype in South Africans and to investigate the possible origin of the JPH3 mutation. In a sample of unrelated South African individuals referred for diagnostic HD testing, 62% (106/171) of white patients compared to only 36% (47/130) of black patients had an expansion in HTT. However, 15% (20/130) of black South African patients and no white patients (0/171) had an expansion in JPH3, confirming the diagnosis of Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2). Individuals with HDL2 share many clinical features with individuals with HD and are clinically indistinguishable in many cases, although the average age of onset and diagnosis in HDL2 is 5 years later than HD and individual clinical features may be more prominent. HDL2 mutations contribute significantly to the HD phenotype in South Africans with African ancestry. JPH3 haplotype studies in 31 families, mainly from South Africa and North America, provide evidence for a founder mutation and support a common African origin for all HDL2 patients. Molecular testing in individuals with an HD phenotype and African ancestry should include testing routinely for JPH3 mutations.

  3. Cellular hyper-excitability caused by mutations that alter the activation process of voltage-gated sodium channels

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    Mohamed-Yassine eAMAROUCH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav are widely expressed as macro-molecular complexes in both excitable and non-excitable tissues. In excitable tissues, the upstroke of the action potential is the result of the passage of a large and rapid influx of sodium ions through these channels. NaV dysfunction has been associated with an increasingly wide range of neurological, muscular and cardiac disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recently identified sodium channel mutations that are linked to hyper-excitability phenotypes and associated with the alteration of the activation process of voltage gated sodium channels. Indeed, several clinical manifestations that demonstrate an alteration of tissue excitability were recently shown to be strongly associated with the presence of mutations that affect the activation process of the voltage-gated sodium channels. These emerging genotype-phenotype correlations have expanded the clinical spectrum of sodium channelopathies to include disorders which feature a hyper-excitability phenotype that may or may not be associated with a cardiomyopathy. The p.I141V mutation in SCN4A and SCN5A, as well as its homologous p.I136V mutation in SCN9A, are interesting examples of mutations that have been linked to inherited hyperexcitability myotonia, exercise-induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and erythromelalgia, respectively. Regardless of which sodium channel isoform is investigated, the substitution of the isoleucine to valine in the locus 141 induces similar modifications in the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated sodium channels by shifting the voltage-dependence of steady state activation towards more negative potentials.

  4. Uncovering genomic causes of co-morbidity in epilepsy: gene-driven phenotypic characterization of rare microdeletions.

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    Dalia Kasperavičiūtė

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with epilepsy often suffer from other important conditions. The existence of such co-morbidities is frequently not recognized and their relationship with epilepsy usually remains unexplained. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe three patients with common, sporadic, non-syndromic epilepsies in whom large genomic microdeletions were found during a study of genetic susceptibility to epilepsy. We performed detailed gene-driven clinical investigations in each patient. Disruption of the function of genes in the deleted regions can explain co-morbidities in these patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Co-morbidities in patients with epilepsy can be part of a genomic abnormality even in the absence of (known congenital malformations or intellectual disabilities. Gene-driven phenotype examination can also reveal clinically significant unsuspected condition.

  5. Novel Hypomorphic Alleles of the Mouse Tyrosinase Gene Induced by CRISPR-Cas9 Nucleases Cause Non-Albino Pigmentation Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitet, Evan R.; Turner, Ashley N.; Johnson, Larry W.; Kennedy, Daniel; Downs, Ethan R.; Hymel, Katherine M.; Gross, Alecia K.; Kesterson, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding tyrosinase (Tyr) cause oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1) in humans. Alleles of the Tyr gene have been useful in studying pigment biology and coat color formation. Over 100 different Tyr alleles have been reported in mice, of which ≈24% are spontaneous mutations, ≈60% are radiation-induced, and the remaining alleles were obtained by chemical mutagenesis and gene targeting. Therefore, most mutations were random and could not be predicted a priori. Using the CRISPR-Cas9 system, we targeted two distinct regions of exon 1 to induce pigmentation changes and used an in vivo visual phenotype along with heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA) as readouts of CRISPR-Cas9 activity. Most of the mutant alleles result in complete loss of tyrosinase activity leading to an albino phenotype. In this study, we describe two novel in-frame deletion alleles of Tyr, dhoosara (Sanskrit for gray) and chandana (Sanskrit for sandalwood). These alleles are hypomorphic and show lighter pigmentation phenotypes of the body and eyes. This study demonstrates the utility of CRISPR-Cas9 system in generating domain-specific in-frame deletions and helps gain further insights into structure-function of Tyr gene. PMID:27224051

  6. [Using atomic force microscopy to analyze morphological changes and mechanical properties caused by cellular exposure to low doses of pesticides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Abbate, N; Lasalvia, M; Perna, G; D'Antonio, P; Quartucci, G; Gallo, C; Capozzi, V

    2012-01-01

    A commercial pesticide is usually composed of active ingredients and formulants. Among the active ingredients, Deltamethrin is a pyrethroid chemical widely used for synthesizing pesticides products which are very effective in damaging the central nervous system of pests. In this work, we analyze, by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), cellular morphological changes induced by exposure to a Deltamethrin-based commercial pesticide (Decaflow). AFM microscopy, in addition to the well-known characterization of the cellular topography, has the ability to monitor interesting biomechanical parameters of the surface as roughness and elastic modulus. In particular, we exposed normal human keratinocytes for 24 hours at different solutions of Decaflow, well below the threshold of cytotoxicity. The AFM images of exposed cells show alterations of surface cell shape. Moreover exposed cells are characterized by an increase of the value of membrane roughness. The mechanical properties of cells are also modified after Decaflow exposure, as confirmed by a decrease of the elasticity modulus with increasing the concentration of pesticide.

  7. Mesenchymal progenitor cells differentiate into an endothelial phenotype, enhance vascular density and improve heart function in a rat cellular cardiomyoplasty model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SDAVANI; NMERSIN; BROYER; BKANTELIP; JPKANTELIP

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Cellular cardiomyoplasty is promising for improving postinfarcted cardiac function. Over the past decade, a variety of cell types have been proposed including mononuclear bone marrow cells. The latter contains different lineages including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The aim of this study was to analyse the differentiation pathways of engrafted syngenic mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) obtained in culture from bone marrow

  8. Sublethal Concentrations of Antibiotics Cause Shift to Anaerobic Metabolism in Listeria monocytogenes and Induce Phenotypes Linked to Antibiotic Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Fromberg, Arvid; Ng, Yin;

    2016-01-01

    antibiotic concentrations would affect the bacterial physiology and induce antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that each of the four antibiotics tested caused an antibiotic-specific gene expression pattern related to mode-of-action of the particular antibiotic. All four antibiotics...... caused the same changes in expression of several metabolic genes indicating a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and higher ethanol production. A mutant in the bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase encoded by Imo1634 did not have altered antibiotic tolerance. However, a mutant...... in Imo1179 (eutE) encoding an aldehyde oxidoreductase where rerouting caused increased ethanol production was tolerant to three of four antibiotics tested. This shift in metabolism could be a survival strategy in response to antibiotics to avoid generation of ROS production from respiration by oxidation...

  9. Zea mays Taxilin protein negatively regulates opaque-2 transcriptional activity by causing a change in its sub-cellular distribution.

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    Nan Zhang

    Full Text Available Zea mays (maize Opaque-2 (ZmO2 protein is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates the expression of major storage proteins (22-kD zeins and other important genes during maize seed development. ZmO2 is subject to functional regulation through protein-protein interactions. To unveil the potential regulatory network associated with ZmO2, a protein-protein interaction study was carried out using the truncated version of ZmO2 (O2-2 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a maize seed cDNA library. A protein with homology to Taxilin was found to have stable interaction with ZmO2 in yeast and was designated as ZmTaxilin. Sequence analysis indicated that ZmTaxilin has a long coiled-coil domain containing three conserved zipper motifs. Each of the three zipper motifs is individually able to interact with ZmO2 in yeast. A GST pull-down assay demonstrated the interaction between GST-fused ZmTaxilin and ZmO2 extracted from developing maize seeds. Using onion epidermal cells as in vivo assay system, we found that ZmTaxilin could change the sub-cellular distribution of ZmO2. We also demonstrated that this change significantly repressed the transcriptional activity of ZmO2 on the 22-kD zein promoter. Our study suggests that a Taxilin-mediated change in sub-cellular distribution of ZmO2 may have important functional consequences for ZmO2 activity.

  10. Targeting sub-cellular localization through the Polo-Box Domain: non-ATP competitive Inhibitors recapitulate a PLK1 phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Campbell; Estes, Kara; Baxter, Merissa; Yang, Zhengguan; Farag, Doaa Boshra; Johnston, Paul; Lazo, John S.; Wang, Jianjun; Wyatt, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    The polo-box domain (PBD) has critical roles in the mitotic functions of PLK1. The REPLACE strategy to develop inhibitors of protein-protein interactions has identified alternatives for the N-terminal tripeptide of a Cdc25C substrate. In addition, a peptide structure activity relationship described key determinants and novel information useful for drug design. Fragment ligated inhibitory peptides (FLIPs) were generated with comparable affinity to peptide PBD inhibitors and possessed anti-proliferative phenotypes in cells consistent with the observed decrease in PLK1 centrosomal localization. These FLIPs demonstrated evidence of enhanced PLK1 inhibition in cells relative to peptides and induced monopolar and multipolar spindles, which stands in contrast to previously reported small molecule PBD inhibitors that display phenotypes only partially representative of PLK1 knockdown. Progress obtained applying REPLACE validates this approach for identifying fragment alternatives for determinants of the Cdc25C binding motif and extends its applicability of the strategy for discovering protein-protein interaction inhibitors. In addition, the described PBD inhibitors retain high specificity for PLK1 over PLK3 and therefore show promise as isotype selective, non-ATP competitive kinase inhibitors that provide new impetus for the development of PLK1 selective anti-tumor therapeutics. PMID:22848093

  11. Reduced-representation Phosphosignatures Measured by Quantitative Targeted MS Capture Cellular States and Enable Large-scale Comparison of Drug-induced Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelin, Jennifer G; Patel, Jinal; Lu, Xiaodong; Feeney, Caitlin M; Fagbami, Lola; Creech, Amanda L; Hu, Roger; Lam, Daniel; Davison, Desiree; Pino, Lindsay; Qiao, Jana W; Kuhn, Eric; Officer, Adam; Li, Jianxue; Abbatiello, Susan; Subramanian, Aravind; Sidman, Richard; Snyder, Evan; Carr, Steven A; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2016-05-01

    Profiling post-translational modifications represents an alternative dimension to gene expression data in characterizing cellular processes. Many cellular responses to drugs are mediated by changes in cellular phosphosignaling. We sought to develop a common platform on which phosphosignaling responses could be profiled across thousands of samples, and created a targeted MS assay that profiles a reduced-representation set of phosphopeptides that we show to be strong indicators of responses to chemical perturbagens.To develop the assay, we investigated the coordinate regulation of phosphosites in samples derived from three cell lines treated with 26 different bioactive small molecules. Phosphopeptide analytes were selected from these discovery studies by clustering and picking 1 to 2 proxy members from each cluster. A quantitative, targeted parallel reaction monitoring assay was developed to directly measure 96 reduced-representation probes. Sample processing for proteolytic digestion, protein quantification, peptide desalting, and phosphopeptide enrichment have been fully automated, making possible the simultaneous processing of 96 samples in only 3 days, with a plate phosphopeptide enrichment variance of 12%. This highly reproducible process allowed ∼95% of the reduced-representation phosphopeptide probes to be detected in ∼200 samples.The performance of the assay was evaluated by measuring the probes in new samples generated under treatment conditions from discovery experiments, recapitulating the observations of deeper experiments using a fraction of the analytical effort. We measured these probes in new experiments varying the treatments, cell types, and timepoints to demonstrate generalizability. We demonstrated that the assay is sensitive to disruptions in common signaling pathways (e.g. MAPK, PI3K/mTOR, and CDK). The high-throughput, reduced-representation phosphoproteomics assay provides a platform for the comparison of perturbations across a range of

  12. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

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    Kim Nuytens

    Full Text Available Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism.

  13. Homozygosity for the V377I mutation in mevalonate kinase causes distinct clinical phenotypes in two sibs with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Laurent; Alsaleh, Ghada; Georgel, Philippe; Carapito, Raphael; Waterham, Hans R; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Bahram, Siamak; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive auto-inflammatory disorder characterised by recurring episodes of fever associated with multiple non-specific inflammatory symptoms and caused by mutations in the MVK gene. The phenotypic spectrum is wide and depends mostly on the nature of the mutations. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is a relatively mild presentation and predominantly associated with a c.1129G>A (p.V377I) mutation in the MVK gene. We report cases of two sisters homozygous for this mutation but exhibiting distinct (symptomatic vs asymptomatic) phenotypes. Methods Patient history was obtained; physical and clinical examination and laboratory tests were performed; lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was quantified. Results Low MVK enzymatic activity is not necessarily associated with inflammatory symptoms. Increased inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to LPS is associated with symptomatic MVK deficiency. Conclusions Individuals who are homozygous for the common p.V377I mutation in the MVK gene may not display the characteristic inflammatory episodes diagnostic of MKD and thus may be lost for correct and timely diagnosis. PMID:26977311

  14. Mutation of a family 8 glycosyltransferase gene alters cell wall carbohydrate composition and causes a humidity-sensitive semi-sterile dwarf phenotype in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Nga T; Long, Debbie; Kiang, Sophie; Coupland, George; Shoue, Douglas A; Carpita, Nicholas C; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2003-11-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains about 400 genes coding for glycosyltransferases, many of which are predicted to be involved in the synthesis and remodelling of cell wall components. We describe the isolation of a transposon-tagged mutant, parvus, which under low humidity conditions exhibits a severely dwarfed growth phenotype and failure of anther dehiscence resulting in semi-sterility. All aspects of the mutant phenotype were partially rescued by growth under high-humidity conditions, but not by the application of growth hormones or jasmonic acid. The mutation is caused by insertion of a maize Dissociation (Ds) element in a gene coding for a putative Golgi-localized glycosyltransferase belonging to family 8. Members of this family, originally identified on the basis of similarity to bacterial lipooligosaccharide glycosyltransferases, include enzymes known to be involved in the synthesis of bacterial and plant cell walls. Cell-wall carbohydrate analyses of the parvus mutant indicated reduced levels of rhamnogalacturonan I branching and alterations in the abundance of some xyloglucan linkages that may, however, be indirect consequences of the mutation. PMID:15010604

  15. Cellular correlates of enhanced anxiety caused by acute treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa eRavinder

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are used extensively in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. The therapeutic benefits of SSRIs typically require several weeks of continuous treatment. Intriguingly, according to clinical reports, symptoms of anxiety may actually increase during the early stages of treatment although more prolonged treatment alleviates affective symptoms. Consistent with earlier studies that have used animal models to capture this paradoxical effect of SSRIs, we find that rats exhibit enhanced anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus-maze one hour after a single injection of the SSRI fluoxetine. Next we investigated the potential neural substrates underlying the acute anxiogenic effects by analyzing the morphological and physiological impact of acute fluoxetine treatment on principal neurons of the basolateral amygdala (BLA, a brain area that plays a pivotal role in fear and anxiety. Although earlier studies have shown that behavioral or genetic perturbations that are anxiogenic for rodents also increase dendritic spine-density in the BLA, we find that a single injection of fluoxetine does not cause spinogenesis on proximal apical dendritic segments on BLA principal neurons an hour later. However, at the same time point when a single dose of fluoxetine caused enhanced anxiety, it also enhanced action potential firing in BLA neurons in ex vivo slices. Consistent with this finding, in vitro bath application of fluoxetine caused higher spiking frequency and this increase in excitability was correlated with an increase in the input resistance of these neurons. Our results suggest that enhanced excitability of amygdala neurons may contribute to the increase in anxiety-like behavior observed following acute fluoxetine treatment.

  16. Copper and Zinc Interactions with Cellular Prion Proteins Change Solubility of Full-Length Glycosylated Isoforms and Induce the Occurrence of Heterogeneous Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brim, Svetlana; Groschup, Martin H.; Kuczius, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized biochemically by protein aggregation of infectious prion isoforms (PrPSc), which result from the conformational conversion of physiological prion proteins (PrPC). PrPC are variable post-translationally modified glycoproteins, which exist as full length and as aminoterminally truncated glycosylated proteins and which exhibit differential detergent solubility. This implicates the presence of heterogeneous phenotypes, which overlap as protein complexes at the same molecular masses. Although the biological function of PrPC is still enigmatic, evidence reveals that PrPC exhibits metal-binding properties, which result in structural changes and decreased solubility. In this study, we analyzed the yield of PrPC metal binding affiliated with low solubility and changes in protein banding patterns. By implementing a high-speed centrifugation step, the interaction of zinc ions with PrPC was shown to generate large quantities of proteins with low solubility, consisting mainly of full-length glycosylated PrPC; whereas unglycosylated PrPC remained in the supernatants as well as truncated glycosylated proteins which lack of octarepeat sequence necessary for metal binding. This effect was considerably lower when PrPC interacted with copper ions; the presence of other metals tested exhibited no effect under these conditions. The binding of zinc and copper to PrPC demonstrated differentially soluble protein yields within distinct PrPC subtypes. PrPC–Zn2+-interaction may provide a means to differentiate glycosylated and unglycosylated subtypes and offers detailed analysis of metal-bound and metal-free protein conversion assays. PMID:27093554

  17. Transient in utero disruption of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator causes phenotypic changes in Alveolar Type II cells in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larson Janet E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanicosensory mechanisms regulate cell differentiation during lung organogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR was integral to stretch-induced growth and development and that transient expression of antisense-CFTR (ASCFTR had negative effects on lung structure and function. In this study, we examined adult alveolar type II (ATII cell phenotype after transient knock down of CFTR by adenovirus-directed in utero expression of ASCFTR in the fetal lung. Results In comparison to (reporter gene-treated Controls, ASCFTR-treated adult rat lungs showed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC levels in the large but not in the small aggregates of alveolar surfactant. The lung mRNA levels for SP-A and SP-B were lower in the ASCFTR rats. The basal PC secretion in ATII cells was similar in the two groups. However, compared to Control ATII cells, the cells in ASCFTR group showed higher PC secretion with ATP or phorbol myristate acetate. The cell PC pool was also larger in the ASCFTR group. Thus, the increased surfactant secretion in ATII cells could cause higher PC levels in large aggregates of surfactant. In freshly isolated ATII cells, the expression of surfactant proteins was unchanged, suggesting that the lungs of ASCFTR rats contained fewer ATII cells. Gene array analysis of RNA of freshly isolated ATII cells from these lungs showed altered expression of several genes including elevated expression of two calcium-related genes, Ca2+-ATPase and calcium-calmodulin kinase kinase1 (CaMkk1, which was confirmed by real-time PCR. Western blot analysis showed increased expression of calmodulin kinase I, which is activated following phosphorylation by CaMkk1. Although increased expression of calcium regulating genes would argue in favor of Ca2+-dependent mechanisms increasing surfactant secretion, we cannot exclude contribution of alternate mechanisms because of other phenotypic

  18. Overexpression of AtDREB1A causes a severe dwarf phenotype by decreasing endogenous gibberellin levels in soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haicui Suo

    Full Text Available Gibberellic acids (GAs are plant hormones that play fundamental roles in plant growth and developmental processes. Previous studies have demonstrated that three key enzymes of GA20ox, GA3ox, and GA2ox are involved in GA biosynthesis. In this study, the Arabidopsis DREB1A gene driven by the CaMV 35S promoter was introduced into soybean plants by Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. The results showed that the transgenic soybean plants exhibited a typical phenotype of GA-deficient mutants, such as severe dwarfism, small and dark-green leaves, and late flowering compared to those of the non-transgenic plants. The dwarfism phenotype was rescued by the application of exogenous GA(3 once a week for three weeks with the concentrations of 144 µM or three times in one week with the concentrations of 60 µM. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the transcription levels of the GA synthase genes were higher in the transgenic soybean plants than those in controls, whereas GA-deactivated genes except GmGA2ox4 showed lower levels of expression. The transcript level of GmGA2ox4 encoding the only deactivation enzyme using C(20-GAs as the substrates in soybean was dramatically enhanced in transgenic plants compared to that of wide type. Furthermore, the contents of endogenous bioactive GAs were significantly decreased in transgenic plants than those of wide type. The results suggested that AtDREB1A could cause dwarfism mediated by GA biosynthesis pathway in soybean.

  19. The alpha-galactosidase A p.Arg118Cys variant does not cause a Fabry disease phenotype: data from individual patients and family studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana; Ortiz, Alberto; Germain, Dominique P.; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Gomes, António Caldeira; Camprecios, Marta; Fenollar-Cortés, Maria; Gallegos-Villalobos, Ángel; Garcia, Diego; García-Robles, José Antonio; Egido, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Herrero, José Antonio; Mas, Sebastián; Oancea, Raluca; Péres, Paloma; Salazar-Martín, Luis Manuel; Solera-Garcia, Jesús; Alves, Helena; Garman, Scott C.; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lysosomal α-galactosidase A (α-Gal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked glycosphingolipidosis caused by pathogenic mutations affecting the GLA gene. The early-onset, multi-systemic FD classical phenotype is associated with absent or severe enzyme deficiency, as measured by in vitro assays, but patients with higher levels of residual α-Gal activity may have later-onset, more organ-restricted clinical presentations. A change in the codon 118 of the wild-type α-Gal sequence, replacing basic arginine by a potentially sulfhydryl-binding cysteine residue – GLA p.(Arg118Cys) –, has been recurrently described in large FD screening studies of high-risk patients. Although the Cys118 allele is associated with high residual α-Gal activity in vitro, it has been classified as a pathogenic mutation, mainly on the basis of theoretical arguments about the chemistry of the cysteine residue. However its pathogenicity has never been convincingly demonstrated by pathology criteria. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical and histopathology data obtained from 22 individuals of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry carrying the Cys118 allele, including 3 homozygous females. Cases were identified either on the differential diagnosis of possible FD manifestations and on case-finding studies (n=11; 4 males), or on unbiased cascade screening of probands’ close relatives (n=11; 3 males). Overall, those data strongly suggest that the GLA p.(Arg118Cys) variant does not segregate with FD clinical phenotypes in a Mendelian fashion, but might be a modulator of the multifactorial risk of cerebrovascular disease, since the allelic frequency in stroke patients was 0.0087 (p=0.0185 vs the general population). The Cys118 allelic frequency in healthy Portuguese adults (n=696) has been estimated as 0.001, therefore not qualifying for “rare” condition. PMID:25468652

  20. RESEARCH PROGRESS OF CELLULAR SENESCENCE AND SENESCENT SECRETARY PHENOTYPE IN INTERVERTEBRAL DISC DEGENERATION%细胞老化及老化表型改变在椎间盘退行性变中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锋; 郑陈静美; 吴小涛

    2012-01-01

    Objective To summarize the role of cellular senescence and senescent secretary phenotype in the intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Methods Relevant articles that discussed the roles of cellular senescence in the IVD degeneration were extensively reviewed, and retrospective and comprehensive analysis was performed. The senescent phenomenon during IVD degeneration, senescent secretary phenotype of the disc cells, senescent pathways within the IVD microenvironment, as well as the anti-senescent approaches for IVD regeneration were systematically reviewed. Results During aging and degeneration, IVD cells gradually and/or prematurely undergo senescence by activating p53-p21-retinoblastoma (RB) or pl6INK4A-RB senescent pathways. The accumulation of senescent cells not only decreases the self-renewal ability of IVD, but also deteriorates the disc microenvironment by producing more inflammatory cytokines and matrix degrading enzymes. More specific senescent biomarkers are required to fully understand the phenotype change of senescent disc cells during IVD degeneration. Molecular analysis of the senescent disc cells and their intracellular signaling pathways are needed to get a safer and more efficient anti-senescence strategy for IVD regeneration. Conclusion Cellular senescence is an important mechanism by which IVD cells decrease viabil ity and degenerate biological behaviors, which provide a new thinking to understand the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration.%目的 综述细胞老化及老化表型改变在椎间盘退行性变中的研究进展. 方法 查阅椎间盘退行性变领域细胞老化相关的国内外文献并回顾分析,综述椎间盘细胞的老化现象、老化表型改变、老化信号激活与椎间盘退行性变的相互关系,评价抗老化治疗对椎间盘退行性变的修复作用. 结果 随着机体衰老与椎间盘退行性变,椎间盘细胞通过选择性地激活p53-p21-视网膜母细胞瘤(retinoblastoma,RB)或p16INK4A-RB信号

  1. Cellular pharmacokinetics and intracellular activity of the novel peptide deformylase inhibitor GSK1322322 against Staphylococcus aureus laboratory and clinical strains with various resistance phenotypes: studies with human THP-1 monocytes and J774 murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrusson, Frédéric; Butler, Deborah; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2015-09-01

    GSK1322322 is a peptide deformylase inhibitor active against Staphylococcus aureus strains resistant to currently marketed antibiotics. Our aim was to assess the activity of GSK1322322 against intracellular S. aureus using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model and, in parallel, to examine its cellular pharmacokinetics and intracellular disposition. For intracellular activity analysis, we used an established model of human THP-1 monocytes and tested one fully susceptible S. aureus strain (ATCC 25923) and 8 clinical strains with resistance to oxacillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, macrolides, clindamycin, linezolid, or moxifloxacin. Uptake, accumulation, release, and subcellular distribution (cell fractionation) of [(14)C]GSK1322322 were examined in uninfected murine J774 macrophages and uninfected and infected THP-1 monocytes. GSK1322322 demonstrated a uniform activity against the intracellular forms of all S. aureus strains tested, disregarding their resistance phenotypes, with a maximal relative efficacy (E max) of a 0.5 to 1 log10 CFU decrease compared to the original inoculum within 24 h and a static concentration (C s) close to its MIC in broth. Influx and efflux were very fast (gemfibrozil and verapamil. GSK1322322 was recovered in the cell-soluble fraction and was dissociated from the main subcellular organelles and from bacteria (in infected cells). The results of this study show that GSK1322322, as a typical novel deformylase inhibitor, may act against intracellular forms of S. aureus. They also suggest that GSK1322322 has the ability to freely diffuse into and out of eukaryotic cells as well as within subcellular compartments. PMID:26169402

  2. Leaf Rolling and Stem Fasciation in Grass Pea (Lathyrus sativus L. Mutant Are Mediated through Glutathione-Dependent Cellular and Metabolic Changes and Associated with a Metabolic Diversion through Cysteine during Phenotypic Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibyendu Talukdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Lathyrus sativus L. mutant isolated in ethylmethane sulfonate-treated M2 progeny of mother variety BioL-212 and designated as rlfL-1 was characterized by inwardly rolled-leaf and stem and bud fasciations. The mutant exhibited karyomorphological peculiarities in both mitosis and meiosis with origin of aneuploidy. The mitosis was vigorous with high frequency of divisional cells and their quick turnover presumably steered cell proliferations. Significant transcriptional upregulations of cysteine and glutathione synthesis and concomitant stimulations of glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense helped rlfL-1 mutant to maintain balanced reactive oxygen species (ROS metabolisms, as deduced by ROS-imaging study. Glutathione synthesis was shut down in buthionine sulfoximine- (BSO- treated mother plant and mutant, and leaf-rolling and stems/buds fasciations in the mutant were reversed, accompanied by normalization of mitotic cell division process. Antioxidant defense was downregulated under low glutathione-redox but cysteine-desulfurations and photorespiratory glycolate oxidase transcripts were markedly overexpressed, preventing cysteine overaccumulation but resulted in excess H2O2 in BSO-treated mutant. This led to oxidative damage in proliferating cells, manifested by severe necrosis in rolled-leaf and fasciated stems. Results indicated vital role of glutathione in maintaining abnormal proliferations in plant organs, and its deficiency triggered phenotypic reversal through metabolic diversions of cysteine and concomitant cellular and metabolic modulations.

  3. Substitution of arginine-839 by cysteine or histidine in the androgen receptor causes different receptor phenotypes in cultured cells and coordinate degrees of clinical androgen resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Beitel, L K; Kazemi-Esfarjani, P; Kaufman, M; Lumbroso, R; DiGeorge, A M; Killinger, D W; Trifiro, M A; Pinsky, L.

    1994-01-01

    We aim to correlate point mutations in the androgen receptor gene with receptor phenotypes and with clinical phenotypes of androgen resistance. In two families, the external genitalia were predominantly female at birth, and sex-of-rearing has been female. Their androgen receptor mutation changed arginine-839 to histidine. In a third family, the external genitalia were predominantly male at birth, and sex-of-rearing has been male: their codon 839 has mutated to cysteine. In genital skin fibrob...

  4. A novel splice variant in the N-propeptide of COL5A1 causes an EDS phenotype with severe kyphoscoliosis and eye involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Symoens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is a heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility and soft tissue fragility. The classic subtype of EDS is caused by mutations in one of the type V collagen genes (COL5A1 and COL5A2. Most mutations affect the type V collagen helical domain and lead to a diminished or structurally abnormal type V collagen protein. Remarkably, only two mutations were reported to affect the extended, highly conserved N-propeptide domain, which plays an important role in the regulation of the heterotypic collagen fibril diameter. We identified a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide mutation, resulting in an unusual but severe classic EDS phenotype and a remarkable splicing outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide acceptor-splice site mutation (IVS6-2A>G, NM_000093.3_c.925-2A>G in a patient with cutaneous features of EDS, severe progressive scoliosis and eye involvement. Two mutant transcripts were identified, one with an exon 7 skip and one in which exon 7 and the upstream exon 6 are deleted. Both transcripts are expressed and secreted into the extracellular matrix, where they can participate in and perturb collagen fibrillogenesis, as illustrated by the presence of dermal collagen cauliflowers. Determination of the order of intron removal and computational analysis showed that simultaneous skipping of exons 6 and 7 is due to the combined effect of delayed splicing of intron 7, altered pre-mRNA secondary structure, low splice site strength and possibly disturbed binding of splicing factors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide acceptor-splice site mutation in intron 6, which not only affects splicing of the adjacent exon 7, but also causes a splicing error of the upstream exon 6. Our findings add further insights into the COL5A1 splicing order and show for the first time that a single COL5A1 acceptor-splice site

  5. Phenotypic, metabolic, and molecular genetic characterization of six patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by novel mutations in the CYP11B1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy-Hoang; Eiden-Plach, Antje; Hannemann, Frank; Malunowicz, Ewa M; Hartmann, Michaela F; Wudy, Stefan A; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of steroidogenesis. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency (11β-OHD) due to mutations in the CYP11B1 gene is the second most common form of CAH. In this study, 6 patients suffering from CAH were diagnosed with 11β-OHD using urinary GC-MS steroid metabolomics analysis. The molecular basis of the disorder was investigated by molecular genetic analysis of the CYP11B1 gene, functional characterization of splicing and missense mutations, and analysis of the missense mutations in a computer model of CYP11B1. All patients presented with abnormal clinical signs of hyperandrogenism. Their urinary steroid metabolomes were characterized by excessive excretion rates of metabolites of 11-deoxycortisol as well as metabolites of 11-deoxycorticosterone, and allowed definite diagnosis. Patient 1 carries compound heterozygous mutations consisting of a novel nonsense mutation p.Q102X (c.304C>T) in exon 2 and the known missense mutation p.T318R (c.953C>G) in exon 5. Two siblings (patient 2 and 3) were compound heterozygous carriers of a known splicing mutation c.1200+1G>A in intron 7 and a known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. Minigene experiments demonstrated that the c.1200+1G>A mutation caused abnormal pre-mRNA splicing (intron retention). Two further siblings (patient 4 and 5) were compound heterozygous carriers of a novel missense mutation p.R332G (c.994C>G) in exon 6 and the known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. A CYP11B1 activity study in COS-1 cells showed that only 11% of the enzyme activity remained in the variant p.R332G. Patient 6 carried a so far not described homozygous deletion g.2470_5320del of 2850 bp corresponding to a loss of the CYP11B1 exons 3-8. The breakpoints of the deletion are embedded into two typical 6 base pair repeats (GCTTCT) upstream and downstream of the gene. Experiments analyzing the influence of mutations on splicing and on enzyme

  6. Systems biology analysis merging phenotype, metabolomic and genomic data identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and cellular maintenance processes as major contributors to genetic variability in bovine feed efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Philipp; Reverter, Antonio; Weikard, Rosemarie; Suhre, Karsten; Hammon, Harald M; Albrecht, Elke; Kuehn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1) genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) I442M (rs109570900) and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) Q204X (rs110344317) loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily energy intake as

  7. 溶酶体内胱氨酸可促进细胞凋亡并导致胱氨酸贮积症的表型发生%Lysosomal cystine augments apoptosis and causes the phenotype in cystinosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jess G. THOENE

    2005-01-01

    SUMMARY Nephropathic cystinosis is a lethal inborn error of metabolism that destroys kidney function by age 10 years. It is characterized by lysosomal cystine accumulation. How the cystine causes the phenotype is an open question. We propose that during apoptosis, permeablized lysosomes permit cystine to reach the cytosol where mixed disulfide formation occurs, augmenting apoptosis by interaction with a variety of pro-apoptotic proteins.

  8. The expanding phenotype of MELAS caused by the m.3291T > C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilland, E; Rupar, C A; Prasad, Asuri N; Tay, K Y; Downie, A; Prasad, C

    2016-03-01

    m.3291T > C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene has been infrequently encountered in association with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), however remains poorly characterized from a clinical perspective. In the following report we describe in detail the phenotypic features, long term follow up (> 7 years) and management in a Caucasian family with MELAS due to the m.3291T > C mutation and review the literature on m.3291T > C mutation. The clinical phenotype in the proposita included overlapping features of MELAS, MERRF (Myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fiber syndrome), MNGIE (Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy), KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome) and CPEO (Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia).

  9. The expanding phenotype of MELAS caused by the m.3291T>C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Keilland

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available m.3291T>C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene has been infrequently encountered in association with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS, however remains poorly characterized from a clinical perspective. In the following report we describe in detail the phenotypic features, long term follow up (>7 years and management in a Caucasian family with MELAS due to the m.3291T>C mutation and review the literature on m.3291T>C mutation. The clinical phenotype in the proposita included overlapping features of MELAS, MERRF (Myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fiber syndrome, MNGIE (Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy, KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome and CPEO (Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

  10. Axotomy-induced neurotrophic withdrawal causes the loss of phenotypic differentiation and downregulation of NGF signalling, but not death of septal cholinergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inestrosa Nibaldo C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Septal cholinergic neurons account for most of the cholinergic innervations of the hippocampus, playing a key role in the regulation of hippocampal synaptic activity. Disruption of the septo-hippocampal pathway by an experimental transection of the fimbria-fornix drastically reduces the target-derived trophic support received by cholinergic septal neurons, mainly nerve growth factor (NGF from the hippocampus. Axotomy of cholinergic neurons induces a reduction in the number of neurons positive for cholinergic markers in the medial septum. In several studies, the reduction of cholinergic markers has been interpreted as analogous to the neurodegeneration of cholinergic cells, ruling out the possibility that neurons lose their cholinergic phenotype without dying. Understanding the mechanism of cholinergic neurodegeneration after axotomy is relevant, since this paradigm has been extensively explored as an animal model of the cholinergic impairment observed in neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease. The principal aim of this study was to evaluate, using modern quantitative confocal microscopy, neurodegenerative changes in septal cholinergic neurons after axotomy and to assess their response to delayed infusion of NGF in rats. Results We found that there is a slow reduction of cholinergic cells labeled by ChAT and p75 after axotomy. However, this phenomenon is not accompanied by neurodegenerative changes or by a decrease in total neuronal number in the medial septum. Although the remaining axotomized-neurons appear healthy, they are unable to respond to delayed NGF infusion. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that at 3 weeks, axotomized cholinergic neurons lose their cholinergic phenotype without dying and down-regulate their NGF-receptors, precluding the possibility of a response to NGF. Therefore, the physiological role of NGF in the adult septal cholinergic system is to support phenotypic differentiation and not survival

  11. NEFL N98S mutation: another cause of dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with heterogeneous early-onset phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciano, José; Peeters, Kristien; García, Antonio; López-Alburquerque, Tomás; Gallardo, Elena; Hernández-Fabián, Arantxa; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; De Vriendt, Els; Infante, Jon; Jordanova, Albena

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a pedigree with NEFL N98S mutation associated with a dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (DI-CMT) and heterogeneous early-onset phenotype. The pedigree comprised two patients, the proband and her son, aged 38 and 5 years. The proband, evaluated at age 31, showed delayed motor milestones that, as of the second decade, evolved into severe phenotype consisting of sensorimotor neuropathy, pes cavus, clawing hands, gait and kinetic cerebellar ataxia, nystagmus and dysarthria, she being wheelchair bound. By then, a working diagnosis of sporadic early onset cerebellar ataxia with peripheral neuropathy was established. Screening of mutations associated with SCA and autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias was negative. Her son showed a mild phenotype characterized by delayed motor milestones, and lower-limb hypotonia and areflexia. Electrophysiology in both patients showed nerve conduction slowing in the intermediate range, both in proximal and distal nerve segments, but where compound muscle action potentials exhibited severe attenuation there was conduction slowing down to the demyelinating range. In the proband, cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebellar atrophy, electromyography disclosed active denervation in tibialis anterior, and MRI of lower-limb musculature demonstrated widespread and distally accentuated muscle fatty atrophy; furthermore, on water sensitive MRI sequences there was edema of calf muscles. We conclude that the NEFL N98S mutation is associated with a DI-CMT phenotype characterized by early-onset sensorimotor neuropathy delaying motor milestones, which may evolve into a severe and complex clinical picture including cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26645395

  12. NEFL N98S mutation: another cause of dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with heterogeneous early-onset phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciano, José; Peeters, Kristien; García, Antonio; López-Alburquerque, Tomás; Gallardo, Elena; Hernández-Fabián, Arantxa; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; De Vriendt, Els; Infante, Jon; Jordanova, Albena

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a pedigree with NEFL N98S mutation associated with a dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (DI-CMT) and heterogeneous early-onset phenotype. The pedigree comprised two patients, the proband and her son, aged 38 and 5 years. The proband, evaluated at age 31, showed delayed motor milestones that, as of the second decade, evolved into severe phenotype consisting of sensorimotor neuropathy, pes cavus, clawing hands, gait and kinetic cerebellar ataxia, nystagmus and dysarthria, she being wheelchair bound. By then, a working diagnosis of sporadic early onset cerebellar ataxia with peripheral neuropathy was established. Screening of mutations associated with SCA and autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias was negative. Her son showed a mild phenotype characterized by delayed motor milestones, and lower-limb hypotonia and areflexia. Electrophysiology in both patients showed nerve conduction slowing in the intermediate range, both in proximal and distal nerve segments, but where compound muscle action potentials exhibited severe attenuation there was conduction slowing down to the demyelinating range. In the proband, cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebellar atrophy, electromyography disclosed active denervation in tibialis anterior, and MRI of lower-limb musculature demonstrated widespread and distally accentuated muscle fatty atrophy; furthermore, on water sensitive MRI sequences there was edema of calf muscles. We conclude that the NEFL N98S mutation is associated with a DI-CMT phenotype characterized by early-onset sensorimotor neuropathy delaying motor milestones, which may evolve into a severe and complex clinical picture including cerebellar ataxia.

  13. Two novel heterozygous mutations of EVC2 cause a mild phenotype of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenjing; Han, Dong; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Hongshan; Feng, Hailan

    2011-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, chondroectodermal dysplasia; OMIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia with associated multisystem involvement. The syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, and abnormal teeth. Congenital heart defects occur in 50-60% of cases. In this study, we report EvC in a 6-year-old Chinese girl with hypodontia and polydactyly, mild short stature, and abnormalities of the knee joints. No signs of short ribs, narrow thorax, or congenital heart defects were found in this patient. The EvC phenotype shares some similarity with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyer; OMIM 193530), an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by mild short stature, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, and dysplastic teeth. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 are associated with both EvC syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis, but the two conditions differ in the severity of the phenotype and their pattern of inheritance. In this study, two novel heterozygous EVC2 mutations, IVS5-2A > G and c.2653C > T (Arg885X), were identified in the patient. The IVS5-2A > G mutation was inherited from the patient's mother and the c.2653C > T from her father. Her parents have no phenotypic symptoms similar to those of the patient. These findings extend the mutation spectrum of this malformation syndrome and provide the possibility of prenatal diagnosis for future offspring in this family.

  14. Hypermorphic mutation of the voltage-gated sodium channel encoding gene Scn10a causes a dramatic stimulus-dependent neurobehavioral phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Blasius, Amanda L.; Dubin, Adrienne E.; Petrus, Matt J.; Lim, Byung-Kwan; Narezkina, Anna; Criado, José R.; Wills, Derek N.; Xia, Yu; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Ehlers, Cindy; Knowlton, Kirk U.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Beutler, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.8 is known to function in the transmission of pain signals induced by cold, heat, and mechanical stimuli. Sequence variants of human Nav1.8 have been linked to altered cardiac conduction. We identified an allele of Scn10a encoding the α-subunit of Nav1.8 among mice homozygous for N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutations. The allele creates a dominant neurobehavioral phenotype termed Possum, characterized by transient whole-body tonic immobility induced by ...

  15. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  16. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  17. Distinct Phenotypes Caused by Mutation of MSH2 in Trypanosome Insect and Mammalian Life Cycle Forms Are Associated with Parasite Adaptation to Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Grazielle-Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair mechanisms are crucial for maintenance of the genome in all organisms, including parasites where successful infection is dependent both on genomic stability and sequence variation. MSH2 is an early acting, central component of the Mismatch Repair (MMR pathway, which is responsible for the recognition and correction of base mismatches that occur during DNA replication and recombination. In addition, recent evidence suggests that MSH2 might also play an important, but poorly understood, role in responding to oxidative damage in both African and American trypanosomes.To investigate the involvement of MMR in the oxidative stress response, null mutants of MSH2 were generated in Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms and in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote forms. Unexpectedly, the MSH2 null mutants showed increased resistance to H2O2 exposure when compared with wild type cells, a phenotype distinct from the previously observed increased sensitivity of T. brucei bloodstream forms MSH2 mutants. Complementation studies indicated that the increased oxidative resistance of procyclic T. brucei was due to adaptation to MSH2 loss. In both parasites, loss of MSH2 was shown to result in increased tolerance to alkylation by MNNG and increased accumulation of 8-oxo-guanine in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, indicating impaired MMR. In T. cruzi, loss of MSH2 also increases the parasite capacity to survive within host macrophages.Taken together, these results indicate MSH2 displays conserved, dual roles in MMR and in the response to oxidative stress. Loss of the latter function results in life cycle dependent differences in phenotypic outcomes in T. brucei MSH2 mutants, most likely because of the greater burden of oxidative stress in the insect stage of the parasite.

  18. Genome sequencing of the Trichoderma reesei QM9136 mutant identifies a truncation of the transcriptional regulator XYR1 as the cause for its cellulase-negative phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichius, Alexander; Bidard, Frederique; Buchholz, Franziska; Le Crom, Stphane; Martin, Joel X.; Schackwitz, Wendy; Austerlitz, Tina; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Baker, Scott E.; Margeot, Antoine; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2015-12-01

    Background: Trichoderma reesei is the main industrial source of cellulases and hemicellulases required for the hydrolysis of biomass to simple sugars, which can then be used in the production of biofuels and biorefineries. The highly productive strains in use today were generated by classical mutagenesis. As byproducts of this procedure, mutants were generated that turned out to be unable to produce cellulases. In order to identify the mutations responsible for this inability, we sequenced the genome of one of these strains, QM9136, and compared it to that of its progenitor T. reesei QM6a. Results: In QM9136, we detected a surprisingly low number of mutagenic events in the promoter and coding regions of genes, i.e. only eight indels and six single nucleotide variants. One of these indels led to a frame-shift in the Zn2Cys6 transcription factor XYR1, the general regulator of cellulase and xylanase expression, and resulted in its C-terminal truncation by 140 amino acids. Retransformation of strain QM9136 with the wild-type xyr1 allele fully recovered the ability to produce cellulases, and is thus the reason for the cellulase-negative phenotype. Introduction of an engineered xyr1 allele containing the truncating point mutation into the moderate producer T. reesei QM9414 rendered this strain also cellulase-negative. The correspondingly truncated XYR1 protein was still able to enter the nucleus, but failed to be expressed over the basal constitutive level. Conclusion: The missing 140 C-terminal amino acids of XYR1 are therefore responsible for its previously observed auto-regulation which is essential for cellulases to be expressed. Our data present a working example of the use of genome sequencing leading to a functional explanation of the QM9136 cellulase-negative phenotype.

  19. Hypomethylation of the H19 gene causes not only Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) but also isolated asymmetry or an SRS-like phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliek, J.; Terhal, P.; Bogaard, M.J. van den; Maas, S.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Salieb-Beugelaar, G.; Simon, M.; Letteboer, T.; Smagt, J. van der; Kroes, H.Y.; Mannens, M.

    2006-01-01

    The H19 differentially methylated region (DMR) controls the allele-specific expression of both the imprinted H19 tumor-suppressor gene and the IGF2 growth factor. Hypermethylation of this DMR--and subsequently of the H19 promoter region--is a major cause of the clinical features of gigantism and/or

  20. SM22{alpha}-induced activation of p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang Gi [Department of Biology, School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun Wie, E-mail: ewcho@kribb.re.kr [Daejeon-KRIBB-FHCRC Cooperation Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Gyu, E-mail: igkim@kaeri.re.kr [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression elevates p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. {yields} SM22{alpha}-induced MT-1G activates p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22{alpha}) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22{alpha} overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22{alpha} overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 {mu}g/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} induction or p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22{alpha} overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22{alpha} modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22{alpha} are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  1. Jinx, an MCMV susceptibility phenotype caused by disruption of Unc13d: a mouse model of type 3 familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Crozat, Karine; Hoebe, Kasper; Ugolini, Sophie; Hong, Nancy A.; Janssen, Edith; Rutschmann, Sophie; Mudd, Suzanne; Sovath, Sosathya; Vivier, Eric; Beutler, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) susceptibility often results from defects of natural killer (NK) cell function. Here we describe Jinx, an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea–induced MCMV susceptibility mutation that permits unchecked proliferation of the virus, causing death. In Jinx homozygotes, activated NK cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) fail to degranulate, although they retain the ability to produce cytokines, and cytokine levels are markedly elevated in the blood of infected mutant mice. Jinx w...

  2. Epigenetics in heart failure phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is a leading clinical and public problem posing a higher risk of morbidity and mortality in different populations. HF appears to be in both phenotypic forms: HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although both HF phenotypes can be distinguished through clinical features, co-morbidity status, prediction score, and treatment, the clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF and HFpEF are similar. In this context, investigation of various molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to the development and progression of both HF phenotypes is very important. There is emerging evidence that epigenetic regulation may have a clue in the pathogenesis of HF. This review represents current available evidence regarding the implication of epigenetic modifications in the development of different HF phenotypes and perspectives of epigenetic-based therapies of HF. PMID:27335803

  3. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung H Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks.

  4. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant -glutamyl cycle enzymes, -glutamyl cysteine synthetase and 5-oxoprolinase: the cause of cellular ATP depletion in nephrotic cystinosis?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhilesh Kumar; Anand Kumar Bachhawat

    2010-03-01

    Cystinosis, an inherited disease caused by a defect in the lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS), is characterized by renal proximal tubular dysfunction. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion appears to be a key event in the pathophysiology of the disease, even though the manner in which ATP depletion occurs is still a puzzle. We present a model that explains how a futile cycle that is generated between two ATP-utilizing enzymes of the -glutamyl cycle leads to ATP depletion. The enzyme -glutamyl cysteine synthetase (-GCS), in the absence of cysteine, forms 5-oxoproline (instead of the normal substrate, -glutamyl cysteine) and the 5-oxoproline is converted into glutamate by the ATP-dependant enzyme, 5-oxoprolinase. Thus, in cysteine-limiting conditions, glutamate is cycled back into glutamate via 5-oxoproline at the cost of two ATP molecules without production of glutathione and is the cause of the decreased levels of glutathione synthesis, as well as the ATP depletion observed in these cells. The model is also compatible with the differences seen in the human patients and the mouse model of cystinosis, where renal failure is not observed.

  5. Cellular Telephone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨周

    1996-01-01

    Cellular phones, used in automobiles, airliners, and passenger trains, are basically low-power radiotelephones. Calls go through radio transmitters that are located within small geographical units called cells. Because each cell’s signals are too weak to interfere with those of other cells operating on the same fre-

  6. Genomic Phenotyping by Barcode Sequencing Broadly Distinguishes between Alkylating Agents, Oxidizing Agents, and Non-Genotoxic Agents, and Reveals a Role for Aromatic Amino Acids in Cellular Recovery after Quinone Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, J. Peter; Quirós Pesudo, Laia; McRee, Siobhan K.; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Carmichael, Paul; Samson, Leona D.

    2013-01-01

    Toxicity screening of compounds provides a means to identify compounds harmful for human health and the environment. Here, we further develop the technique of genomic phenotyping to improve throughput while maintaining specificity. We exposed cells to eight different compounds that rely on different modes of action: four genotoxic alkylating (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), N,N′-bis(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitroso-urea (BCNU), N-ethylnitrosourea (ENU)), two oxidizing (2-methylnaphthalene-1,4-dione (menadione, MEN), benzene-1,4-diol (hydroquinone, HYQ)), and two non-genotoxic (methyl carbamate (MC) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)) compounds. A library of S. cerevisiae 4,852 deletion strains, each identifiable by a unique genetic ‘barcode’, were grown in competition; at different time points the ratio between the strains was assessed by quantitative high throughput ‘barcode’ sequencing. The method was validated by comparison to previous genomic phenotyping studies and 90% of the strains identified as MMS-sensitive here were also identified as MMS-sensitive in a much lower throughput solid agar screen. The data provide profiles of proteins and pathways needed for recovery after both genotoxic and non-genotoxic compounds. In addition, a novel role for aromatic amino acids in the recovery after treatment with oxidizing agents was suggested. The role of aromatic acids was further validated; the quinone subgroup of oxidizing agents were extremely toxic in cells where tryptophan biosynthesis was compromised. PMID:24040048

  7. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from pathology to phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Emily K; Park, Susanna B; Hughes, Richard A C; Pollard, John D; Armati, Patricia J; Barnett, Michael H; Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory neuropathy, classically characterised by a slowly progressive onset and symmetrical, sensorimotor involvement. However, there are many phenotypic variants, suggesting that CIDP may not be a discrete disease entity but rather a spectrum of related conditions. While the abiding theory of CIDP pathogenesis is that cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves, the relative contributions of T cell and autoantibody responses remain largely undefined. In animal models of spontaneous inflammatory neuropathy, T cell responses to defined myelin antigens are responsible. In other human inflammatory neuropathies, there is evidence of antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin or nodal antigens. In this review, the roles of the cellular and humoral immune systems in the pathogenesis of CIDP will be discussed. In time, it is anticipated that delineation of clinical phenotypes and the underlying disease mechanisms might help guide diagnostic and individualised treatment strategies for CIDP.

  8. Cellular senescence as the causal nexus of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naina eBhatia-Dey

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We present cellular senescence as the ultimate driver of the aging process, as a causal nexus that bridges microscopic subcellular damage with the phenotypic, macroscopic effect of aging. It is important to understand how the various types of subcellular damage correlated with the aging process lead to the larger, visible effects of anatomical aging. While it has always been assumed that subcellular damage (cause results in macroscopic aging (effect, the bridging link between the two has been hard to define. Here, we propose that this bridge, which we term the causal nexus, is in fact cellular senescence. The subcellular damage itself does not directly cause the visible signs of aging, but rather, as the damage accumulates and reaches a critical mass, cells cease to proliferate and acquire the deleterious senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP which then leads to the macroscopic consequences of tissue breakdown to create the physiologically aged phenotype. Thus senescence is a precondition for anatomical aging, and this explains why aging is a gradual process that remains largely invisible during most of its progression. The subcellular damage includes shortening of telomeres, damage to mitochondria, aneuploidy and DNA double-strand breaks triggered by various genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Damage pathways acting in isolation or in concert converge at the causal nexus of cellular senescence. In each species some types of damage can be more causative than in others and operate at a variable pace; for example, telomere erosion appears to be a primary cause in human cells, whereas activation of tumor suppressor genes is more causative in rodents. Such species-specific mechanisms indicate that despite different initial causes, most of aging is traced to a single convergent causal nexus: senescence. The exception is in some invertebrate species that escape senescence, and in nondividing cells such as neurons, where

  9. Live 4D optical coherence tomography for early embryonic mouse cardiac phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Andrew L.; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Studying embryonic mouse development is important for our understanding of normal human embryogenesis and the underlying causes of congenital defects. Our research focuses on imaging early development in the mouse embryo to specifically understand cardiovascular development using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We have previously developed imaging approaches that combine static embryo culture, OCT imaging and advanced image processing to visualize the whole live mouse embryos and obtain 4D (3D+time) cardiodynamic datasets with cellular resolution. Here, we present the study of using 4D OCT for dynamic imaging of early embryonic heart in live mouse embryos to assess mutant cardiac phenotypes during development, including a cardiac looping defect. Our results indicate that the live 4D OCT imaging approach is an efficient phenotyping tool that can reveal structural and functional cardiac defects at very early stages. Further studies integrating live embryonic cardiodynamic phenotyping with molecular and genetic approaches in mouse mutants will help to elucidate the underlying signaling defects.

  10. Characterizing heterogeneous cellular responses to perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Michael D; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2008-12-01

    Cellular populations have been widely observed to respond heterogeneously to perturbation. However, interpreting the observed heterogeneity is an extremely challenging problem because of the complexity of possible cellular phenotypes, the large dimension of potential perturbations, and the lack of methods for separating meaningful biological information from noise. Here, we develop an image-based approach to characterize cellular phenotypes based on patterns of signaling marker colocalization. Heterogeneous cellular populations are characterized as mixtures of phenotypically distinct subpopulations, and responses to perturbations are summarized succinctly as probabilistic redistributions of these mixtures. We apply our method to characterize the heterogeneous responses of cancer cells to a panel of drugs. We find that cells treated with drugs of (dis-)similar mechanism exhibit (dis-)similar patterns of heterogeneity. Despite the observed phenotypic diversity of cells observed within our data, low-complexity models of heterogeneity were sufficient to distinguish most classes of drug mechanism. Our approach offers a computational framework for assessing the complexity of cellular heterogeneity, investigating the degree to which perturbations induce redistributions of a limited, but nontrivial, repertoire of underlying states and revealing functional significance contained within distinct patterns of heterogeneous responses.

  11. Efficient α, β-motif finder for identification of phenotype-related functional modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Matthew C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial communities in their natural environments exhibit phenotypes that can directly cause particular diseases, convert biomass or wastewater to energy, or degrade various environmental contaminants. Understanding how these communities realize specific phenotypic traits (e.g., carbon fixation, hydrogen production is critical for addressing health, bioremediation, or bioenergy problems. Results In this paper, we describe a graph-theoretical method for in silico prediction of the cellular subsystems that are related to the expression of a target phenotype. The proposed (α, β-motif finder approach allows for identification of these phenotype-related subsystems that, in addition to metabolic subsystems, could include their regulators, sensors, transporters, and even uncharacterized proteins. By comparing dozens of genome-scale networks of functionally associated proteins, our method efficiently identifies those statistically significant functional modules that are in at least α networks of phenotype-expressing organisms but appear in no more than β networks of organisms that do not exhibit the target phenotype. It has been shown via various experiments that the enumerated modules are indeed related to phenotype-expression when tested with different target phenotypes like hydrogen production, motility, aerobic respiration, and acid-tolerance. Conclusion Thus, we have proposed a methodology that can identify potential statistically significant phenotype-related functional modules. The functional module is modeled as an (α, β-clique, where α and β are two criteria introduced in this work. We also propose a novel network model, called the two-typed, divided network. The new network model and the criteria make the problem tractable even while very large networks are being compared. The code can be downloaded from http://www.freescience.org/cs/ABClique/

  12. 医院感染金黄色葡萄球菌耐药表型与耐药基因研究%Drug resistance phenotypes and drug resistance genes in Staphylococcus aureus causing nosocomial infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志军; 曹海燕; 刘延媛; 刘春来

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the drug resistance phenotypes and drug resistance genes in Staphylococcus au‐reus causing nosocomial infections so as to provide guidance for clinical prevention and treatment of the nosocomial infections .METHODS From Jan 2011 to Jan 2013 ,totally 120 strains of S .aureus were isolated from the submitted specimens that were obtained from the patients with nosocomial infections .According to the standard operation procedures of clinical laboratory standard institute ,the drug resistance phenotypes and drug resistance genes in the S .aureus strains were analyzed by using polymerase‐chain‐reaction (PCR) .RESULTS The drug resistance rates of the S .aureus strains to penicillin ,erythromycin ,gentamicin ,clindamycin ,tetracycline ,and ciprofloxacin were 100 .00% ,98 .83% ,80 .00% ,76 .67% ,76 .67% ,and 75 .83% ,respectively ;the strains were highly susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid .Among the different drug resistance phenotypes of S .aureus ,the drug resistance rate of the type Ⅵ S .aureus was the highest (97 .50% ) , followed by the type Ⅴ (67 .50% ) and the type Ⅳ(60 .00% ) .Among the S .aureus strains harboring different drug resistance genes ,the drug resistance rate of the S .aureus strains harboring mecA was the highest (98 .83% ) ,and the drug resistance of the drug resistance genes in the S .aureus strains was in accordance with the drug resistance of the S .aureus strains .CONCLUSION The S .aureus strains causing nosocomial infections are highly resistant to most of the antibiotics and highly susceptible to vancomycin .The type Ⅵ ,type Ⅴ ,and type Ⅳ are the major drug resistance phenotypes;the tetK and mecA are the predominant drug resistance genes .%目的:研究医院感染耐药金黄色葡萄球菌的耐药表型及耐药基因,以期为临床防治医院感染提供参考。方法选取2011年1月-2013年1月医院感染患者送检标本中分离的120株金黄色葡萄球菌,根据美国临床实验

  13. Transposon mutations in the 5' end of glnD, the gene for a nitrogen regulatory sensor, that suppress the osmosensitive phenotype caused by otsBA lesions in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøndervik, Anne; Torgersen, Haakon R; Botnmark, Hans K; Strøm, Arne R

    2006-06-01

    GlnD of Escherichia coli is a bifunctional signal-transducing enzyme (102.4 kDa) which uridylylates the allosteric regulatory protein PII and deuridylylates PII-UMP in response to growth with nitrogen excess or limitation, respectively. GlnD catalyzes these reactions in response to high or low levels of cytoplasmic glutamine, respectively, and indirectly directs the expression of nitrogen-regulated genes, e.g., the glnK-amtB operon. We report that chromosomal mini-Tn10 insertions situated after nucleotide number 997 or 1075 of glnD partially suppressed the osmosensitive phenotype of DeltaotsBA or otsA::Tn10 mutations (defective osmoregulatory trehalose synthesis). Strains carrying these glnD::mini-Tn10 mutations either completely repressed the expression of trp::(glnKp-lacZ) or induced this reporter system to nearly 60% of the wild-type glnD level in response to nitrogen availability, an essentially normal response. This was in contrast to the much-studied glnD99::Tn10 mutation, which carries its insertion in the 3' end of the gene, causes a complete repression of glnKp-lacZ expression under all growth conditions, and also confers leaky glutamine auxotrophy. When expressed from the Pm promoter in plasmid constructs, the present glnD mutations produced proteins with an apparent mass of 39 or 42 kDa. These proteins were deduced to comprise 344 or 370 N-terminal residues, respectively, harboring the known nucleotidyltransferase domain of GlnD, plus a common C-terminal addition of 12 residues encoded by IS10. They lacked three other domains of GlnD. Apparently, the transferase domain by itself enabled the cells to catalyze the uridylylation reaction and direct nitrogen-regulated gene expression. Our data indicate that there exists a link between osmotic stress and the nitrogen response. PMID:16740928

  14. Genotype versus phenotype in families with androgen insensitivity syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehmer, ALM; Bruggenwirth, H; Van Assendelft, C; Otten, BJ; Verleun-Mooijman, MCT; Niermeijer, MF; Brunner, HG; Rouwe, CW; Waelkens, JJ; Oostdijk, W; Kleijer, WJ; Van der Kwast, TH; De Vroede, MA; Drop, SLS

    2001-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome encompasses a wide range of phenotypes, which are caused by numerous different mutations in the AR gene. Detailed information on the genotype/ phenotype relationship in androgen insensitivity syndrome is important for sex assignment, treatment of androgen insensitivit

  15. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates...

  16. Cellular Signaling Pathways and Their Clinical Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ceren Sumer-Turanligil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling pathways have important roles in cellular growth, differentiation, inflammatory response and apoptosis and in regulation of cellular responses under various chemical stimulators. Different proteins which belong to these pathways may be exposed to loss-of-function or gain-of-function mutations; this may lead to many clinical phenotypes including primarily cancer. In this review information about basic working principles of these pathways and diseases related to them are included. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(3.000: 180-191

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes: the future of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, MeiLan K; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M;

    2010-01-01

    (s) to guide the development of therapy where possible. It follows that any proposed phenotype, whether defined by symptoms, radiography, physiology, or cellular or molecular fingerprint will require an iterative validation process in which "candidate" phenotypes are identified before their relevance...

  18. Integrated cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C.

    integrate cells and direct their behaviors. This process permits, for the first time, the selection and in situ isolation of a single target cell from a population of cells with mixed phenotypes, and the subsequent monitoring of its behavior, and that of its progeny, under well defined conditions. These techniques promise a new means to integrate biomolecules with nanostructures and macroscale systems, and to manipulate cellular behavior at the individual cell level, having significant implications towards development of practical and robust integrated cellular systems.

  19. Chromosomal phenotypes and submicroscopic abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devriendt Koen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The finding, during the last decade, that several common, clinically delineated syndromes are caused by submicroscopic deletions or, more rarely, by duplications, has provided a powerful tool in the annotation of the human genome. Since most microdeletion/microduplication syndromes are defined by a common deleted/duplicated region, abnormal dosage of genes located within these regions can explain the phenotypic similarities among individuals with a specific syndrome. As such, they provide a unique resource towards the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes such as congenital heart defects, mental and growth retardation and abnormal behaviour. In addition, the study of phenotypic differences in individuals with the same microdeletion syndrome may also become a treasury for the identification of modifying factors for complex phenotypes. The molecular analysis of these chromosomal anomalies has led to a growing understanding of their mechanisms of origin. Novel tools to uncover additional submicroscopic chromosomal anomalies at a higher resolution and higher speed, as well as the novel tools at hand for deciphering the modifying factors and epistatic interactors, are 'on the doorstep' and will, besides their obvious diagnostic role, play a pivotal role in the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes.

  20. Microglia phenotype diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olah, M.; Biber, K.; Vinet, J.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Microglia, the tissue macrophages of the brain, have under healthy conditions a resting phenotype that is characterized by a ramified morphology. With their fine processes microglia are continuously scanning their environment. Upon any homeostatic disturbance microglia rapidly change their phenotype

  1. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  2. Cellular and Phenotypic Characterization of Canine Osteosarcoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie E. Legare, Jamie Bush, Amanda K. Ashley, Taka Kato, William H. Hanneman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine and human osteosarcoma (OSA have many similarities, with the majority of reported cases occurring in the appendicular skeleton, gender predominance noted, high rate of metastasis at the time of presentation, and a lack of known etiology for this devastating disease. Due to poor understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying OSA, we have characterized seven different OSA canine cell lines: Abrams, D17, Grey, Hughes, Ingles, Jarques, and Marisco and compared them to U2, a human OSA cell line, for the following parameters: morphology, growth, contact inhibition, migrational tendencies, alkaline phosphatase staining, heterologous tumor growth, double-strand DNA breaks, and oxidative damage. All results demonstrated the positive characteristics of the Abrams cell line for use in future studies of OSA. Of particular interest, the robust growth of a subcutaneous tumor and rapid pulmonary metastasis of the Abrams cell line in an immunocompromised mouse shows incredible potential for the future use of Abrams as a canine OSA model. Further investigations utilizing a canine cell model of OSA, such as Abrams, will be invaluable to understanding the molecular events underlying OSA, pharmaceutical inhibition of metastasis, and eventual prevention of this devastating disease.

  3. The thorny path linking cellular senescence to organismalaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Christopher K.; Mian, Saira; Campisi, Judith

    2005-08-09

    Half a century is fast approaching since Hayflick and colleagues formally described the limited ability of normal human cells to proliferate in culture (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961). This finding--that normal somatic cells, in contrast to cancer cells, cannot divide indefinitely--challenged the prevailing idea that cells from mortal multicellular organisms were intrinsically ''immortal'' (Carrell, 1912). It also spawned two hypotheses, essential elements of which persist today. The first held that the restricted proliferation of normal cells, now termed cellular senescence, suppresses cancer (Hayflick, 1965; Sager, 1991; Campisi, 2001). The second hypothesis, as explained in the article by Lorenzini et al., suggested that the limited proliferation of cells in culture recapitulated aspects of organismal aging (Hayflick, 1965; Martin, 1993). How well have these hypotheses weathered the ensuing decades? Before answering this question, we first consider current insights into the causes and consequences of cellular senescence. Like Lorenzini et al., we limit our discussion to mammals. We also focus on fibroblasts, the cell type studied by Lorenzini et al., but consider other types as well. We suggest that replicative capacity in culture is not a straightforward assessment, and that it correlates poorly with both longevity and body mass. We speculate this is due to the malleable and variable nature of replicative capacity, which renders it an indirect metric of qualitative and quantitative differences among cells to undergo senescence, a response that directly alters cellular phenotype and might indirectly alter tissue structure and function.

  4. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  5. Phenotypic Heterogeneity Affects Stenotrophomonas maltophilia K279a Colony Morphotypes and β-Lactamase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abda, Ebrahim M; Krysciak, Dagmar; Krohn-Molt, Ines; Mamat, Uwe; Schmeisser, Christel; Förstner, Konrad U; Schaible, Ulrich E; Kohl, Thomas A; Nieman, Stefan; Streit, Wolfgang R

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity at the cellular level in response to various stresses, e.g., antibiotic treatment has been reported for a number of bacteria. In a clonal population, cell-to-cell variation may result in phenotypic heterogeneity that is a mechanism to survive changing environments including antibiotic therapy. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has been frequently isolated from cystic fibrosis patients, can cause numerous infections in other organs and tissues, and is difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistances. S. maltophilia K279a produces the L1 and L2 β-lactamases in response to β-lactam treatment. Here we report that the patient isolate S. maltophilia K279a diverges into cellular subpopulations with distinct but reversible morphotypes of small and big colonies when challenged with ampicillin. This observation is consistent with the formation of elongated chains of bacteria during exponential growth phase and the occurrence of mainly rod-shaped cells in liquid media. RNA-seq analysis of small versus big colonies revealed differential regulation of at least seven genes among the colony morphotypes. Among those, bla L1 and bla L2 were transcriptionally the most strongly upregulated genes. Promoter fusions of bla L1 and bla L2 genes indicated that expression of both genes is also subject to high levels of phenotypic heterogeneous expression on a single cell level. Additionally, the comE homolog was found to be differentially expressed in homogenously versus heterogeneously bla L2 expressing cells as identified by RNA-seq analysis. Overexpression of comE in S. maltophilia K279a reduced the level of cells that were in a bla L2-ON mode to 1% or lower. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that S. maltophilia K279a populations develop phenotypic heterogeneity in an ampicillin challenged model. This cellular variability is triggered by regulation networks including bla L1, bla L2, and comE. PMID:26696982

  6. A knock-in model of human epilepsy in Drosophila reveals a novel cellular mechanism associated with heat-induced seizure

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Lei; Gilligan, Jeff; Staber, Cynthia; Schutte, Ryan J; Nguyen, Vivian; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Reenan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Over 40 missense mutations in the human SCN1A sodium channel gene are linked to an epilepsy syndrome termed genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Inheritance of GEFS+ is dominant but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report knock-in of a GEFS+ SCN1A mutation (K1270T) into the Drosophila sodium channel gene, para, causes a semi-dominant temperature-induced seizure phenotype. Electrophysiological studies of GABAergic interneurons in the brains o...

  7. Covert Genetic Selections to Optimize Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Di; Townsley, Elizabeth; Tartakoff, Alan Michael

    2007-01-01

    In many high complexity systems (cells, organisms, institutions, societies, economies, etc.), it is unclear which components should be regulated to affect overall performance. To identify and prioritize molecular targets which impact cellular phenotypes, we have developed a selection procedure (“SPI”–single promoting/inhibiting target identification) which monitors the abundance of ectopic cDNAs. We have used this approach to identify growth regulators. For this purpose, complex pools of S. c...

  8. Navigating the Phenotype Frontier: The Monarch Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Julie A; Köhler, Sebastian; Washington, Nicole L; Balhoff, James P; Borromeo, Charles; Brush, Matthew; Carbon, Seth; Conlin, Tom; Dunn, Nathan; Engelstad, Mark; Foster, Erin; Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Jacobsen, Julius O B; Keith, Daniel; Laraway, Bryan; Xuan, Jeremy Nguyen; Shefchek, Kent; Vasilevsky, Nicole A; Yuan, Zhou; Lewis, Suzanna E; Hochheiser, Harry; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Robinson, Peter N; Mungall, Christopher J; Haendel, Melissa A

    2016-08-01

    The principles of genetics apply across the entire tree of life. At the cellular level we share biological mechanisms with species from which we diverged millions, even billions of years ago. We can exploit this common ancestry to learn about health and disease, by analyzing DNA and protein sequences, but also through the observable outcomes of genetic differences, i.e. phenotypes. To solve challenging disease problems we need to unify the heterogeneous data that relates genomics to disease traits. Without a big-picture view of phenotypic data, many questions in genetics are difficult or impossible to answer. The Monarch Initiative (https://monarchinitiative.org) provides tools for genotype-phenotype analysis, genomic diagnostics, and precision medicine across broad areas of disease. PMID:27516611

  9. Covert genetic selections to optimize phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wu

    Full Text Available In many high complexity systems (cells, organisms, institutions, societies, economies, etc., it is unclear which components should be regulated to affect overall performance. To identify and prioritize molecular targets which impact cellular phenotypes, we have developed a selection procedure ("SPI"-single promoting/inhibiting target identification which monitors the abundance of ectopic cDNAs. We have used this approach to identify growth regulators. For this purpose, complex pools of S. cerevisiae cDNA transformants were established and we quantitated the evolution of the spectrum of cDNAs which was initially present. These data emphasized the importance of translation initiation and ER-Golgi traffic for growth. SPI provides functional insight into the stability of cellular phenotypes under circumstances in which established genetic approaches cannot be implemented. It provides a functional "synthetic genetic signature" for each state of the cell (i.e. genotype and environment by surveying complex genetic libraries, and does not require specialized arrays of cDNAs/shRNAs, deletion strains, direct assessment of clonal growth or even a conditional phenotype. Moreover, it establishes a hierarchy of importance of those targets which can contribute, either positively or negatively, to modify the prevailing phenotype. Extensions of these proof-of-principle experiments to other cell types should provide a novel and powerful approach to analyze multiple aspects of the basic biology of yeast and animal cells as well as clinically-relevant issues.

  10. Phenotype definition in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R

    2006-05-01

    Phenotype definition consists of the use of epidemiologic, biological, molecular, or computational methods to systematically select features of a disorder that might result from distinct genetic influences. By carefully defining the target phenotype, or dividing the sample by phenotypic characteristics, we can hope to narrow the range of genes that influence risk for the trait in the study population, thereby increasing the likelihood of finding them. In this article, fundamental issues that arise in phenotyping in epilepsy and other disorders are reviewed, and factors complicating genotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation are addressed, focusing on epidemiologic studies. With this foundation in place, the epilepsy subtypes and clinical features that appear to have a genetic basis are described, and the epidemiologic studies that have provided evidence for the heritability of these phenotypic characteristics, supporting their use in future genetic investigations, are reviewed. Finally, several molecular approaches to phenotype definition are discussed, in which the molecular defect, rather than the clinical phenotype, is used as a starting point.

  11. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of sexual differentiation in the mammalian nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forger, Nancy G; Strahan, J Alex; Castillo-Ruiz, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscientists are likely to discover new sex differences in the coming years, spurred by the National Institutes of Health initiative to include both sexes in preclinical studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying sex differences in the mammalian nervous system, based primarily on work in rodents. Cellular mechanisms examined include neurogenesis, migration, the differentiation of neurochemical and morphological cell phenotype, and cell death. At the molecular level we discuss evolving roles for epigenetics, sex chromosome complement, the immune system, and newly identified cell signaling pathways. We review recent findings on the role of the environment, as well as genome-wide studies with some surprising results, causing us to re-think often-used models of sexual differentiation. We end by pointing to future directions, including an increased awareness of the important contributions of tissues outside of the nervous system to sexual differentiation of the brain. PMID:26790970

  12. Whole-Organism Cellular Pathology: A Systems Approach to Phenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K C; Katz, S R; Lin, A Y; Xin, X; Ding, Y

    2016-01-01

    Phenotype is defined as the state of an organism resulting from interactions between genes, environment, disease, molecular mechanisms, and chance. The purpose of the emerging field of phenomics is to systematically determine and measure phenotypes across biology for the sake of understanding. Phenotypes can affect more than one cell type and life stage, so ideal phenotyping would include the state of every cell type within the context of both tissue architecture and the whole organism at each life stage. In medicine, high-resolution anatomic assessment of phenotype is obtained from histology. Histology's interpretative power, codified by Virchow as cellular pathology, is derived from its ability to discern diagnostic and characteristic cellular changes in diseased tissues. Cellular pathology is observed in every major human disease and relies on the ability of histology to detect cellular change in any cell type due to unbiased pan-cellular staining, even in optically opaque tissues. Our laboratory has shown that histology is far more sensitive than stereomicroscopy for detecting phenotypes in zebrafish mutants. Those studies have also shown that more complete sampling, greater consistency in sample orientation, and the inclusion of phenotypes extending over longer length scales would provide greater coverage of common phenotypes. We are developing technical approaches to achieve an ideal detection of cellular pathology using an improved form of X-ray microtomography that retains the strengths and addresses the weaknesses of histology as a screening tool. We are using zebrafish as a vertebrate model based on the overlaps between zebrafish and mammalian tissue architecture, and a body size small enough to allow whole-organism, volumetric imaging at cellular resolution. Automation of whole-organism phenotyping would greatly increase the value of phenomics. Potential societal benefits would include reduction in the cost of drug development, a reduction in the

  13. 骨髓间充质干细胞静脉输注对猕猴细胞免疫功能的影响%Effects on cellular immunity caused by intravenous infusion of allogenic rhesus mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范传波; 王朝晖; 王磊; 胡锴勋; 刘丽辉; 孙琪云; 边莉; 乌庆超

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价猕猴间充质干细胞( MSC)静脉异体输注后对细胞免疫功能的影响。方法分离培养MSC;不做其他处理,将异体MSC静脉输注给受者猴,通过定期监测外周血象、混合淋巴细胞反应( MLR)、T细胞亚群来判断MSC输注后受者细胞免疫功能的变化。结果成功培养了猕猴的MSC。异体MSC输注后,受者无明显毒性反应、排异表现及血象变化。可以在一定时间内(2周左右)抑制受者T细胞在MLR中的增殖活性,受者猴A2、A3及A4输注MSC的数量分别为4.0×105/kg、1.0×106/kg、2.0×106/kg,在输注后第14天时,MLR的相对反应值(RR)与输注前比较均明显降低,分别从(46.0±2.6)%、( 40.9±2.3)%、(48.3±2.0)%降至(40.4±1.73)%、(33.0±2.1)%、(39.0±1.0)%(F=1O.19,P=0.023;F=2.593,P= 0.013;F= 28.431,P=0.003),输注后第30天时RR均恢复到输注前水平;统计结果显示,抑制程度(△RR)与输注MSC数量呈正相关(F=27.413,P=0.038)。A4是输注MSC数量最多的受者,输注后第14天开始,外周血CD3+、CD3+ CD4+、CD3+CD8+细胞的百分比与输注前相比有所降低,在输注后第30天左右恢复至输注前水平。结论单纯体内输注异体MSC,可以在一定时间内抑制受者T细胞的免疫活性;免疫抑制程度与输注MSC数量呈正相关。MSC特殊的免疫学特性使其具有深远的临床应用价值。%Objective To study the changes of cellular immunity caused by intravenous infusion of allogenic rhesus mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Methods MSCs were isolated and cultured. Then the immunomodulatory effects after MSCs infusion were evaluated by means of peripheral blood counts, mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and analysis of lymphocytic subgroup. Results MSCs of rehsus were successfully cultivated. No acute toxicities or GVHD were observed in recipients. No obvious changes of peripheral blood counts were present. Recipients A2, A3, A4 were administered with

  14. The GARP complex is required for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Florian; Petit, Constance; Kory, Nora; Christiano, Romain; Hannibal-Bach, Hans-Kristian; Graham, Morven; Liu, Xinran; Ejsing, Christer S; Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are abundant membrane components and important signaling molecules in eukaryotic cells. Their levels and localization are tightly regulated. However, the mechanisms underlying this regulation remain largely unknown. In this study, we identify the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, which functions in endosome-to-Golgi retrograde vesicular transport, as a critical player in sphingolipid homeostasis. GARP deficiency leads to accumulation of sphingolipid synthesis intermediates, changes in sterol distribution, and lysosomal dysfunction. A GARP complex mutation analogous to a VPS53 allele causing progressive cerebello-cerebral atrophy type 2 (PCCA2) in humans exhibits similar, albeit weaker, phenotypes in yeast, providing mechanistic insights into disease pathogenesis. Inhibition of the first step of de novo sphingolipid synthesis is sufficient to mitigate many of the phenotypes of GARP-deficient yeast or mammalian cells. Together, these data show that GARP is essential for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis and suggest a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCCA2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08712.001 PMID:26357016

  15. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Marissa J; White, Thomas A; Evans, Glenda; Tonne, Jason M; Verzosa, Grace C; Stout, Michael B; Mazula, Daniel L; Palmer, Allyson K; Baker, Darren J; Jensen, Michael D; Torbenson, Michael S; Miller, Jordan D; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tchkonia, Tamara; van Deursen, Jan M; Kirkland, James L; LeBrasseur, Nathan K

    2016-06-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise prevents premature senescent cell accumulation and systemic metabolic dysfunction induced by a fast-food diet (FFD). Using transgenic mice that express EGFP in response to activation of the senescence-associated p16(INK4a) promoter, we demonstrate that FFD consumption causes deleterious changes in body weight and composition as well as in measures of physical, cardiac, and metabolic health. The harmful effects of the FFD were associated with dramatic increases in several markers of senescence, including p16, EGFP, senescence-associated β-galactosidase, and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) specifically in visceral adipose tissue. We show that exercise prevents the accumulation of senescent cells and the expression of the SASP while nullifying the damaging effects of the FFD on parameters of health. We also demonstrate that exercise initiated after long-term FFD feeding reduces senescent phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue while attenuating physical impairments, suggesting that exercise may provide restorative benefit by mitigating accrued senescent burden. These findings highlight a novel mechanism by which exercise mediates its beneficial effects and reinforces the effect of modifiable lifestyle choices on health span. PMID:26983960

  16. Additive dominant effect of a SOX10 mutation underlies a complex phenotype of PCWH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yukiko; Inoue, Naoko; Inoue, Yukiko U; Nakamura, Shoko; Matsuda, Yoshiki; Inagaki, Masumi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Asami, Junko; Terakawa, Youhei W; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Goto, Yu-ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro; Inoue, Takayoshi; Inoue, Ken

    2015-08-01

    Distinct classes of SOX10 mutations result in peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease, collectively known as PCWH. Meanwhile, SOX10 haploinsufficiency caused by allelic loss-of-function mutations leads to a milder non-neurological disorder, Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease. The cellular pathogenesis of more complex PCWH phenotypes in vivo has not been thoroughly understood. To determine the pathogenesis of PCWH, we have established a transgenic mouse model. A known PCWH-causing SOX10 mutation, c.1400del12, was introduced into mouse Sox10-expressing cells by means of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. By crossing the multiple transgenic lines, we examined the effects produced by various copy numbers of the mutant transgene. Within the nervous systems, transgenic mice revealed a delay in the incorporation of Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve and the terminal differentiation of oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord. Transgenic mice also showed defects in melanocytes presenting as neurosensory deafness and abnormal skin pigmentation, and a loss of the enteric nervous system. Phenotypes in each lineage were more severe in mice carrying higher copy numbers, suggesting a gene dosage effect for mutant SOX10. By uncoupling the effects of gain-of-function and haploinsufficiency in vivo, we have demonstrated that the effect of a PCWH-causing SOX10 mutation is solely pathogenic in each SOX10-expressing cellular lineage in a dosage-dependent manner. In both the peripheral and central nervous systems, the primary consequence of SOX10 mutations is hypomyelination. The complex neurological phenotypes in PCWH patients likely result from a combination of haploinsufficiency and additive dominant effect. PMID:25959061

  17. A mathematical model of cancer cells with phenotypic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The phenotypic plasticity of cancer cells is recently becoming a cutting-edge research area in cancer, which challenges the cellular hierarchy proposed by the conventional cancer stem cell theory. In this study, we establish a mathematical model for describing the phenotypic plasticity of cancer cells, based on which we try to find some salient features that can characterize the dynamic behavior of the phenotypic plasticity especially in comparison to the hierarchical model of cancer cells. Methods: We model cancer as population dynamics composed of different phenotypes of cancer cells. In this model, not only can cancer cells divide (symmetrically and asymmetrically and die, but they can also convert into other cellular phenotypes. According to the Law of Mass Action, the cellular processes can be captured by a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs. On one hand, we can analyze the long-term stability of the model by applying qualitative method of ODEs. On the other hand, we are also concerned about the short-term behavior of the model by studying its transient dynamics. Meanwhile, we validate our model to the cell-state dynamics in published experimental data.Results: Our results show that the phenotypic plasticity plays important roles in both stabilizing the distribution of different phenotypic mixture and maintaining the cancer stem cells proportion. In particular, the phenotypic plasticity model shows decided advantages over the hierarchical model in predicting the phenotypic equilibrium and cancer stem cells’ overshoot reported in previous biological experiments in cancer cell lines.Conclusion: Since the validity of the phenotypic plasticity paradigm and the conventional cancer stem cell theory is still debated in experimental biology, it is worthy of theoretically searching for good indicators to distinguish the two models through quantitative methods. According to our study, the phenotypic equilibrium and overshoot

  18. Hormones and phenotypic plasticity: Implications for the evolution of integrated adaptive phenotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sean C.LEMA; Jun KITANO

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that taxa exhibit genetic variation in phenotypic plasticity,but many questions remain unanswered about how divergent plastic responses evolve under dissimilar ecological conditions.Hormones are signaling molecules that act as proximate mediators of phenotype expression by regulating a variety of cellular,physiological,and behavioral responses.Hormones not only change cellular and physiological states but also influence gene expression directly or indirectly,thereby linking environmental conditions to phenotypic development.Studying how hormonal pathways respond to environmental variation and how those responses differ between individuals,populations,and species can expand our understanding of the evolution of phenotypic plasticity.Here,we explore the ways that the study of hormone signaling is providing new insights into the underlying proximate bases for individual,population or species variation in plasticity.Using several studies as exemplars,we examine how a 'norm of reaction' approach can be used in investigations of hormone-mediated plasticity to inform the following:1) how environmental cues affect the component hormones,receptors and enzymes that comprise any endocrine signaling pathway,2) how genetic and epigenetic variation in endocrine-associated genes can generate variation in plasticity among these diverse components,and 3) how phenotypes mediated by the same hormone can be coupled and decoupled via independent plastic responses of signaling components across target tissues.Future studies that apply approaches such as reaction norms and network modeling to questions concerning how hormones link environmental stimuli to ecologically-relevant phenotypic responses should help unravel how phenotypic plasticity evolves.

  19. Hormones and phenotypic plasticity: Implications for the evolution of integrated adaptive phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C. LEMA, Jun KITANO

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that taxa exhibit genetic variation in phenotypic plasticity, but many questions remain unanswered about how divergent plastic responses evolve under dissimilar ecological conditions. Hormones are signaling molecules that act as proximate mediators of phenotype expression by regulating a variety of cellular, physiological, and behavioral responses. Hormones not only change cellular and physiological states but also influence gene expression directly or indirectly, thereby linking environmental conditions to phenotypic development. Studying how hormonal pathways respond to environmental variation and how those responses differ between individuals, populations, and species can expand our understanding of the evolution of phenotypic plasticity. Here, we explore the ways that the study of hormone signaling is providing new insights into the underlying proximate bases for individual, population or species variation in plasticity. Using several studies as exemplars, we examine how a ‘norm of reaction’ approach can be used in investigations of hormone-mediated plasticity to inform the following: 1 how environmental cues affect the component hormones, receptors and enzymes that comprise any endocrine signaling pathway, 2 how genetic and epigenetic variation in endocrine-associated genes can generate variation in plasticity among these diverse components, and 3 how phenotypes mediated by the same hormone can be coupled and decoupled via independent plastic responses of signaling components across target tissues. Future studies that apply approaches such as reaction norms and network modeling to questions concerning how hormones link environmental stimuli to ecologically-relevant phenotypic responses should help unravel how phenotypic plasticity evolves [Current Zoology 59 (4: 506–525, 2013].

  20. Cellular host responses to gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Najbauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a 'network' with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a 'pair-wise' manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b high-generation xenografts (fifth passage had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with 'glomerulus-like' microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  1. Metabolic, Immune, Epigenetic, Endocrine and Phenotypic Abnormalities Found in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease May Be Caused by Congenital and/or Acquired Chronic Cerebral Toxoplasmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandota, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    "Toxoplasma gondii" is a protozoan parasite that infects about a third of human population. It is generally believed that in immunocompetent hosts, the parasite infection takes usually asymptomatic course and induces self-limiting disease, but in immunocompromised individuals may cause significant morbidity and mortality. "T. gondii" uses sulfated…

  2. Phenotypic characterization of Leishmania spp. causing cutaneous leishmaniasis in the lower Amazon region, western Pará state, Brazil, reveals a putative hybrid parasite, Leishmania (Viannia guyanensis × Leishmania (Viannia shawi shawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennings Yara Lins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We phenotypically characterized 43 leishmanial parasites from cutaneous leishmaniasis by isoenzyme electrophoresis and the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (23 McAbs. Identifications revealed 11 (25.6% strains of Leishmania (V. braziliensis, 4 (9.3% of L. (V. shawi shawi, 7 (16.3% of L. (V. shawi santarensis, 6 (13.9% of L. (V. guyanensis and L. (V. lainsoni, 2 (4.7% of L. (L. amazonensis, and 7 (16.3% of a putative hybrid parasite, L. (V. guyanensis/L. (V. shawi shawi. McAbs detected three different serodemes of L. (V. braziliensis: I-7, II-1, and III-3 strains. Among the strains of L. (V. shawi we identified two populations: one (7 strains expressing the B19 epitope that was previously considered to be species-specific for L. (V. guyanensis. We have given this population sub-specific rank, naming it L. (V. s. santarensis. The other one (4 strains did not express the B19 epitope like the L. (V. shawi reference strain, which we now designate as L. (V. s. shawi. For the first time in the eastern Brazilian Amazon we register a putative hybrid parasite (7 strains, L. (V. guyanensis/L. (V. s. shawi, characterized by a new 6PGDH three-band profile at the level of L. (V. guyanensis. Its PGM profile, however, was very similar to that of L. (V. s. shawi. These results suggest that the lower Amazon region – western Pará state, Brazil, represents a biome where L. (V. guyanensis and L. (V. s. shawi exchange genetic information.

  3. Three Medicago MtFUL genes have distinct and overlapping expression patterns during vegetative and reproductive development and 35S:MtFULb accelerates flowering and causes a terminal flower phenotype in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauren eJaudal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The timing of the transition to flowering is carefully controlled by plants in order to optimise sexual reproduction and the ensuing production of seeds, grains and fruits. The genetic networks that regulate floral induction are best characterised in the temperate eudicot Arabidopsis in which the florigen gene FT plays a major role in promoting the transition to flowering. Legumes are an important plant group, but less is known about the regulation of their flowering time. In the model legume Medicago truncatula (Medicago, a temperate annual plant like Arabidopsis, flowering is induced by prolonged cold (vernalisation followed by long day lengths (LD. Recent molecular-genetic experiments have revealed that a FT-like gene, MtFTa1, is a central regulator of flowering time in Medicago. Here, we characterize the three Medicago FRUITFULL (FUL MADS transcription factors, MtFULa, MtFULb and MtFULc using phylogenetic analyses, gene expression profiling through developmental time courses, and functional analyses in transgenic plants. MtFULa and MtFULb have similarity in sequence and expression profiles under inductive environmental conditions during both vegetative and reproductive development while MtFULc is only up regulated in the apex after flowering in LD conditions. Sustained up regulation of MtFULs requires functional MtFTa1 but their transcript levels are not affected during cold treatment. Overexpression of MtFULa and MtFULb promotes flowering in transgenic Arabidopsis plants with an additional terminal flower phenotype on some 35S:MtFULb plants. An increase in transcript levels of the MtFULs was also observed in Medicago plants overexpressing MtFTa1. Our results suggest that the MtFULs are targets of MtFTa1. Overall, this work highlights the conserved functions of FUL-like genes in promoting flowering and other roles in plant development and thus contributes to our understanding of the genetic control of the flowering process in Medicago.

  4. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  5. Variation in the Vitreous Phenotype of Stickler Syndrome Can Be Caused by Different Amino Acid Substitutions in the X Position of the Type II Collagen Gly-X-Y Triple Helix

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Allan J; Baguley, David M.; Yates, John R W; Lane, Carol; Nicol, Mary; Harper, Peter S; Scott, John D.; Snead, Martin P

    2000-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by arthropathy, midline clefting, hearing loss, midfacial hypoplasia, myopia, and retinal detachment. These features are highly variable both between and within families. Mutations causing the disorder have been found in the COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes. Premature termination codons in COL2A1 that result in haploinsufficiency of type II collagen are a common finding. These produce a characteristic congenital “membranous” anomaly o...

  6. Modelling cellular behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  7. Cellular phenotype conversion and relative mechanism of human mesenchymal stem cells cocultured indirectly with human sweat gland cells: a preliminary study%与人汗腺细胞共培养的人骨髓间充质干细胞表型转化及相关机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾赤宇; 欧阳云淑; 付小兵

    2010-01-01

    Objective To observe the cellular phenotype conversion of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cocultured indirectly with heat-shocked human sweat gland cells (SGCs) in vitro and explore the relative mechanism. Methods MSCs and SGCs were isolated and amplified in vitro. First,primary confluent cultures of SGCs were heat-shocked at 47℃. Then, the supernatants were collected immediately and 24 hours before applied to the third generation of MSCs. After seven days, the MSCs expressing CK7, CK18 and CEA were examined by two-step immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry and compared with the control group. Results MSCs treated with the supernatants of SGCs proliferated slowly, with no obvious morphological changes during seven days. Two-step immunocytochemistry demonstrated positive staining of CK7 and CEA in some cells. Additionally, the positive rate of CK7 and CEA was 5.76% and 2.01% by flow cytometry, much higher than that of the control sample, which was only 1.12% and 0.51% respectively (P < 0.01 ). Conclusions There are some signal moleculars in the supernatants of heat-shocked SGCs, which benefits the transdifferentiation of MSCs.%目的 研究人骨髓间充质干细胞(mesenchymal stem cells,MSCs)与经热休克处理的人汗腺细胞(sweat gland cells,SGCs)体外间接共培养状态下的细胞表型转化及相关机制.方法 体外分别分离扩增人MSCs及SGCs,原代SGCs生长融合后于47℃热休克,收集即刻和24 h后的上清加入第3代MSCs,7 d后分别以二步免疫细胞化学法和流式细胞术检测MSCs表达细胞角蛋白7(CK7)、CK18和癌胚抗原(CEA)的情况并与对照组比较.结果 加入SGCs上清后MSCs生长减慢,7 d内无明显形态改变;二步免疫细胞化学法显示部分细胞CK7和CEA染色刚性;流式细胞术显示,诱导组细胞CK7和CEA阳性率分别为5.76%和2.01%,对照组为1.12%和0.51%,两者差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 SGCs热损伤释放后某些信号物质,可诱导MSCs横向分化.

  8. Reversible quantum cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Schumacher, B

    2004-01-01

    We define quantum cellular automata as infinite quantum lattice systems with discrete time dynamics, such that the time step commutes with lattice translations and has strictly finite propagation speed. In contrast to earlier definitions this allows us to give an explicit characterization of all local rules generating such automata. The same local rules also generate the global time step for automata with periodic boundary conditions. Our main structure theorem asserts that any quantum cellular automaton is structurally reversible, i.e., that it can be obtained by applying two blockwise unitary operations in a generalized Margolus partitioning scheme. This implies that, in contrast to the classical case, the inverse of a nearest neighbor quantum cellular automaton is again a nearest neighbor automaton. We present several construction methods for quantum cellular automata, based on unitaries commuting with their translates, on the quantization of (arbitrary) reversible classical cellular automata, on quantum c...

  9. Phenotype Presentation of Hypophosphatemic Rickets in Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Nielsen, Signe S; Brusgaard, Klaus; Rasmussen, Lars M;

    2010-01-01

    Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is a group of rare disorders caused by excessive renal phosphate wasting. The purpose of this cross-sectional study of 38 HR patients was to characterize the phenotype of adult HR patients. Moreover, skeletal and endodontic severity scores were defined to assess...

  10. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  11. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  12. COPD: Definition and Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J.

    2014-01-01

    particles or gases. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity in individual patients. The evolution of this definition and the diagnostic criteria currently in use are discussed. COPD is increasingly divided in subgroups or phenotypes based on specific features and association...

  13. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  14. Describing the phenotype in Rett syndrome using a population database

    OpenAIRE

    Colvin, L; Fyfe, S.; Leonard, S.; Schiavello, T; ELLAWAY, C; N de Klerk; Christodoulou, J.; Msall, M; Leonard, H

    2003-01-01

    Background: Mutations in the MECP2 gene have been recently identified as the cause of Rett syndrome, prompting research into genotype-phenotype relations. However, despite these genetic advances there has been little descriptive epidemiology of the full range of phenotypes.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes autophagy and apoptosis leading to cellular redistribution of the autoantigens Ro/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA) and La/SSB in salivary gland epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiougiannis, S; Tenta, R; Skopouli, F N

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in minor salivary glands, to investigate the interplay between ER stress-induced autophagy and apoptosis in human salivary gland (HSG) cells and to test the effect of ER stress-induced apoptosis on the cellular redistribution of the two major Sjögren's syndrome (SS) autoantigens Ro/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA) and La/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen B (SSB). Minor salivary gland biopsies from SS patients and sicca controls were examined by immunohistochemistry for the expression of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein/binding immunoglobulin protein (GRP78/BiP) as an indicator of unfolded protein response (UPR). HSG cells were treated with thapsigargin (TG) and cell viability, autophagy and apoptosis were assessed. Immunoblot was applied to detect the conversion of LC3I to LC3II and the protein levels of GRP78/BiP and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1). Apoptosis was evaluated by a single-stranded DNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ro/SSA and La/SSB localization was visualized using immunofluorescence. GRP78/BiP was expressed by acinar and ductal epithelial cells in salivary glands of patients and sicca controls. TG treatment induced autophagy, as indicated by enhanced protein expression of LC3II. The protein levels of UPR marker XBP-1 were increased after TG treatment, while GRP78/BiP levels were decreased. TG treatment resulted in induction of HSG apoptosis. Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantigens were localized predominantly to the cytoplasm in resting cells, while they were redistributed to cell membrane and blebs in the apoptotic cells. In conclusion, ER stress is activated in minor salivary gland epithelial cells from SS patients and controls. ER stress-induced apoptosis in HSG cells leads to cell surface and apoptotic blebs relocalization of Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantigens.

  16. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  17. Cellular Cardiomyoplasty: Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Chachques, J. (J.); Acar, C; J. Herreros; Trainini, J. (Jorge); Prosper, F.; D’Attellis, N. (N.); Fabiani, J. N.; Carpentier, A

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration can be induced with the implantation of a variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types. More than 150 patients have been treated with cellular cardiomyoplasty worldwide, 18 patients have been treated by our group. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit postischemic remodelling, and restore regional myocardial contractility. Techniques for skeletal myoblasts culture and ex vivo expansion using auto...

  18. Changes in nuclear phenotypes following cold shock in Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone L Garcia

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear phenotypes of Malpighian tubule epithelial cells of 5th instar male nymphs of the blood-sucking insect Panstrongylus megistus were studied immediately after a short (1 h cold shock at 0ºC, and 10 and 30 days later. The objective was to compare the responses to a cold shock with those known to occur after hyperthermia in order to provide insight into the cellular effect of cold in this species. Nuclei which usually exhibited a conspicuous Y chromosome chromocenter were the most frequent phenotype in control and treated specimens. Phenotypes in which the heterochromatin was unravelled, or in which there was nuclear fusion or cell death were more abundant in the shocked specimens. Most of the changes detected have also been found in heat-shocked nymphs, except for nuclear fusion which generates giant nuclei and which appeared to be less effective or necessary than that elicited after heat shock. Since other studies showed that a short cold shock does not affect the survival of more than 14% of 5th instar nymphs of P. megistus with domestic habit and can induce tolerance to a prolonged cold shock, heat shock proteins proteins are probably the best candidates for effective protection of the cells and the insects from drastic damage caused by low temperature shocks.

  19. Ectopic expression of foxtail millet zip-like gene,SiPf40,in transgenic rice plants causes a pleiotropic phenotype affecting tillering,vascular distribution and root development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Plant architecture determines grain production in rice(Oryza sativa) and is affected by important agronomic traits such as tillering,plant height,and panicle morphology.Many key genes involved in controlling the initiation and outgrowth of axillary buds,the elongation of stems,and the architecture of inflorescences have been isolated and analyzed.Previous studies have shown that SiPf40,which was identified from a foxtail millet(Setaria italica) immature seed cDNA library,causes extra branches and tillers in SiPf40-transgenic tobacco and foxtail millet,respectively.To reconfirm its function,we generated transgenic rice plants overexpressing SiPf40 under the control of the ubiquitin promoter.SiPf40-overexpressing transgenic plants have a greater tillering number and a wider tiller angle than wild-type plants.Their root architecture is modified by the promotion of lateral root development,and the distribution of xylem and phloem in the vascular bundle is affected.Analysis of hormone levels showed that the ratios of indole-3-acetic acid/zeatin(IAA/ZR) and IAA/gibberellic acid(IAA/GA) decreased in SiPf40-transgenic plants compared with wild-type plants.These findings strongly suggest that SiPf40 plays an important role in plant architecture.

  20. Analysis of Pena Shokeir phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J G

    1986-09-01

    At this point in time, we recognize that "Pena Shokeir" is not a diagnosis or a specific syndrome but rather a description of a phenotype produced by fetal akinesia or decreased in utero movement. In its "full blown" form, it is characterized by polyhydramnios, intrauterine growth retardation, pulmonary hypoplasia, craniofacial and limb anomalies, congenital contractures, short umbilical cord, and lethality. From the cases thus far reported, we would anticipate that the phenotype is present in a very heterogeneous group of disorders--heterogeneous both with regard to the specific anomalies present and with regard to the causes (which must include many environmental agents and multiple genetic forms). One challenge for the future is to better describe and delineate specific entities. In the meantime, we would do well to use the terms "Pena Shokeir phenotype" or "fetal akinesia/hypokinesia sequence," which do not imply a single entity. There are many practical aspects of recognizing this phenotype. The presence of any one of the cardinal signs of the fetal akinesia/hypokinesia sequence should alert the physician to look for the other associated anomalies, since specific treatment may be indicated, and catch-up or compensatory growth may occur, if given a chance. The ability to provide prenatal diagnosis and perhaps prenatal treatment in the future may allow us to alter dramatically the natural history of some cases. In others, we need to establish when treatment is possible and when it gives no benefit. Perhaps the most important insight gained from the study of the fetal akinesia sequence is the reaffirmation of the concept that function is an integral part of normal development. Specific structures do not develop in isolation but are part of a carefully timed and integrated system. The "use" of a structure in utero is necessary for its continuing and normal development. The old adage "use it or lose it" seems to apply just as appropriately to prenatal normal

  1. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  2. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  3. Intra familial phenotypical variations in adrenoleukodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosalakkal Jayaprakash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD is an X-linked recessively inherited peroxisomal disorder, characterized by progressive white-matter demyelination of the central nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency. It has a wide phenotypical variability ranging from symptomatic childhood cerebral form to the asymptomatic with biochemical defects only; sometimes within the same family. We report a family of three siblings diagnosed with ALD confirmed with the mutations in ABCD1 gene having phenotypical variability ranging from pure adrenal insufficiency to progressive neurodegeneration in the same family. The mother was identified as the carrier and maternal uncle was diagnosed with Adrenomyeloneuropathy. We discuss the variable presentation in our family and the possible causes of phenotypical variability.

  4. Cellular and molecular aspects of plant adaptation to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla

    2016-07-01

    Elucidation of the range and mechanisms of the biological effects of microgravity is one of the urgent fundamental tasks of space and gravitational biology. The absence of forbidding on plant growth and development in orbital flight allows studying different aspects of plant adaptation to this factor that is directly connected with development of the technologies of bioregenerative life-support systems. Microgravity belongs to the environmental factors which cause adaptive reactions at the cellular and molecular levels in the range of physiological responses in the framework of genetically determined program of ontogenesis. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part in reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and molecular levels in real and simulated microgravity is considered. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in the cell organelle functional load. The maintenance of the plasmalemma fluidity at the certain level, an activation of both the antioxidant system and expression of HSP genes, especially HSP70, under increasing reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation intensity and alteration in protein homeostasis, are a strategic paradigm of rapid (primary) cell adaptation to microgravity. In this sense, biological membranes, especially plasmalemma, and their properties and functions may be considered as the most sensitive indicators of the influence of gravity or altered gravity on a cell. The plasmalemma lipid bilayer is a border between the cell internal content and environment, so it is a mediator

  5. Cellular and molecular aspects of plant adaptation to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla

    2016-07-01

    Elucidation of the range and mechanisms of the biological effects of microgravity is one of the urgent fundamental tasks of space and gravitational biology. The absence of forbidding on plant growth and development in orbital flight allows studying different aspects of plant adaptation to this factor that is directly connected with development of the technologies of bioregenerative life-support systems. Microgravity belongs to the environmental factors which cause adaptive reactions at the cellular and molecular levels in the range of physiological responses in the framework of genetically determined program of ontogenesis. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part in reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and molecular levels in real and simulated microgravity is considered. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in the cell organelle functional load. The maintenance of the plasmalemma fluidity at the certain level, an activation of both the antioxidant system and expression of HSP genes, especially HSP70, under increasing reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation intensity and alteration in protein homeostasis, are a strategic paradigm of rapid (primary) cell adaptation to microgravity. In this sense, biological membranes, especially plasmalemma, and their properties and functions may be considered as the most sensitive indicators of the influence of gravity or altered gravity on a cell. The plasmalemma lipid bilayer is a border between the cell internal content and environment, so it is a mediator

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes: the future of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, MeiLan K; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M;

    2010-01-01

    , propose the following variation on this definition: "a single or combination of disease attributes that describe differences between individuals with COPD as they relate to clinically meaningful outcomes (symptoms, exacerbations, response to therapy, rate of disease progression, or death)." This more......(s) to guide the development of therapy where possible. It follows that any proposed phenotype, whether defined by symptoms, radiography, physiology, or cellular or molecular fingerprint will require an iterative validation process in which "candidate" phenotypes are identified before their relevance...... to clinical outcome is determined. Although this schema represents an ideal construct, we acknowledge any phenotype may be etiologically heterogeneous and that any one individual may manifest multiple phenotypes. We have much yet to learn, but establishing a common language for future research will facilitate...

  7. Modified apolipoprotein (apo) A-I by artificial sweetener causes severe premature cellular senescence and atherosclerosis with impairment of functional and structural properties of apoA-I in lipid-free and lipid-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Wookju; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2011-05-01

    Long-term consumption of artificial sweeteners (AS) has been the recent focus of safety concerns. However, the potential risk of the AS in cardiovascular disease and lipoprotein metabolism has not been investigated sufficiently. We compared the influence of AS (aspartame, acesulfame K, and saccharin) and fructose in terms of functional and structural correlations of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which have atheroprotective effects. Long-term treatment of apoA-I with the sweetener at physiological concentration (3 mM for 168 h) resulted in loss of antioxidant and phospholipid binding activities with modification of secondary structure. The AS treated apoA-I exhibited proteolytic cleavage to produce 26 kDa-fragment. They showed pro-atherogenic properties in acetylated LDL phagocytosis of macrophages. Each sweetener alone or sweetener-treated apoA-I caused accelerated senescence in human dermal fibroblasts. These results suggest that long-term consumption of AS might accelerate atherosclerosis and senescence via impairment of function and structure of apoA-I and HDL. PMID:21533907

  8. Host shutoff is a conserved phenotype of gammaherpesvirus infection and is orchestrated exclusively from the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, Sergio; Richner, Justin M; Clyde, Karen; Lee, Yeon J; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2009-09-01

    Lytic infection with the two human gammaherpesviruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), leads to significant depletion of the cellular transcriptome. This host shutoff phenotype is driven by the conserved herpesviral alkaline exonuclease, termed SOX in KSHV and BGLF5 in EBV, which in gammaherpesviruses has evolved the genetically separable ability to target cellular mRNA. We now show that host shutoff is also a prominent consequence of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection, which is widely used as a model system to study pathogenesis of these viruses in vivo. The effector of MHV68-induced host shutoff is its SOX homolog, here termed muSOX. There is remarkable functional conservation of muSOX host shutoff activities with those of KSHV SOX, including the recently described ability of SOX to induce mRNA hyperadenylation in the nucleus as well as cause nuclear relocalization of the poly(A) binding protein. SOX and muSOX localize to both the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected cells. Using spatially restricted variants of these proteins, we go on to demonstrate that all known host shutoff-related activities of SOX and muSOX are orchestrated exclusively from the cytoplasm. These results have important mechanistic implications for how SOX and muSOX target nascent cellular transcripts in the nucleus. Furthermore, our findings establish MHV68 as a new, genetically tractable model to study host shutoff.

  9. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  10. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  11. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  12. Network motifs that stabilize the hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Jia, Dongya; Tripathi, Satyendra; Hanash, Samir; Mani, Sendurai; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and its reverse - MET - are hallmarks of cancer metastasis. While transitioning between E and M phenotypes, cells can also attain a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M) phenotype that enables collective cell migration as a cluster of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs). These clusters can form 50-times more tumors than individually migrating CTCs, underlining their importance in metastasis. However, this hybrid E/M phenotype has been hypothesized to be only a transient one that is attained en route EMT. Here, via mathematically modeling, we identify certain `phenotypic stability factors' that couple with the core three-way decision-making circuit (miR-200/ZEB) and can maintain or stabilize the hybrid E/M phenotype. Further, we show experimentally that this phenotype can be maintained stably at a single-cell level, and knockdown of these factors impairs collective cell migration. We also show that these factors enable the association of hybrid E/M with high stemness or tumor-initiating potential. Finally, based on these factors, we deduce specific network motifs that can maintain the E/M phenotype. Our framework can be used to elucidate the effect of other players in regulating cellular plasticity during metastasis. This work was supported by NSF PHY-1427654 (Center for Theoretical Biological Physics) and the CPRIT Scholar in Cancer Research of the State of Texas at Rice University.

  13. Actinic reticuloid idiopathic photodermatosis with cellular sensitivity to near ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botcherby, P.K.; Marimo, B.; Giannelli, F. (Guy' s Hospital Medical School, London (UK)); Magnus, I.A. (Institute of Dermatology, London (UK))

    1984-05-01

    Long wavelength UV radiations (320-400 nm) cause persistent inhibition of RNA synthesis and marked cytopathic changes in fibroblasts from patients with actinic reticuloid (AR) but not in those from patients with Bloom syndrome or xeroderma pigmentosum. Furthermore, the AR cells show abnormal DNA fragmentation when they are irradiated at temperatures compatible with enzyme activity. Germicidal UVR (ca. 95% 254 nm) stimulates DNA repair synthesis and inhibits DNA replication to a normal extent in the AR cells. Thus, actinic reticuloid, a severe photodermatosis, characterised by skin sensitivity to UV-B, UV-A and part of the visible spectrum and infiltrates reminiscent of mycosis fungoides, is a human disease with in vitro cellular sensitivity to UV-A and is also the first to be reported. A hypothesis is advanced that inefficient cellular neutralisation of free radicals may explain the cellular phenotype of actinic reticuloid and contribute to the establishment of a vicious circle that would favour the chronic clinical course and persistent lympho-histiocytic skin infiltrates characteristic of the disease.

  14. Keeping the senescence secretome under control: Molecular reins on the senescence-associated secretory phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaquin, Nicolas; Martinez, Aurélie; Rodier, Francis

    2016-09-01

    Cellular senescence is historically associated with cancer suppression and aging. Recently, the reach of the senescence genetic program has been extended to include the ability of senescent cells to actively participate in tissue remodelling during many physiological processes, including placental biology, embryonic patterning, wound healing, and tissue stress responses caused by cancer therapy. Besides growth arrest, a significant feature of senescent cells is their ability to modify their immediate microenvironment using a senescence-associated (SA) secretome, commonly termed the SA secretory phenotype (SASP). Among others, the SASP contains growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular proteases that modulate the majority of both the beneficial and detrimental microenvironmental phenotypes caused by senescent cells. The SASP is thus becoming an obvious pharmaceutical target to manipulate SA effects. Herein, we review known signalling pathways underlying the SASP, including the DNA damage response (DDR), stress kinases, inflammasome, alarmin, inflammation- and cell survival-related transcription factors, miRNAs, RNA stability, autophagy, chromatin components, and metabolic regulators. We also describe the SASP as a temporally regulated dynamic sub-program of senescence that can be divided into a rapid DDR-associated phase, an early self-amplification phase, and a late "mature" phase, the late phase currently being the most widely studied SASP signature. Finally, we discuss how deciphering the signalling pathways regulating the SASP reveal targets that can be manipulated to harness the SA effects to benefit therapies for cancer and other age-related pathologies. PMID:27235851

  15. Cellular Response to Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bo; YAN Shi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    To explore the nonlinear activities of the cellular signaling system composed of one transcriptional arm and one protein-interaction arm, we use an irradiation-response module to study the dynamics of stochastic interactions.It is shown that the oscillatory behavior could be described in a unified way when the radiation-derived signal and noise are incorporated.

  16. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  17. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Hardavella, Georgia; George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer ...

  18. Identifying cancer-causing noncoding RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Sage, Carlos Karel

    2008-01-01

    To circumvent the dependency on prediction models, we developed a microRNA-screen-based assay to establish links between cellular phenotypes and microRNAs (miRNAs). To this end, a miRNA expression library (miR-Lib) was built consisting of 300 annotated miRNAs and around 100 candidate miRNAs. These m

  19. 双碱基缺失型等位基因复合杂合导致的类孟买型个体1例%Para-Bombay Phenotype Caused by Combined Heterozygote of Two Bases Deletion on futl Alleles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马开荣; 陶苏丹; 蓝小飞; 洪小珍; 许先国; 朱发明; 吕杭军; 严力行

    2011-01-01

    本研究探索1例类孟买型血型的分子机制,为稀有血型的筛选和鉴定提供理论基咄.以血型血清学方法鉴定该个体红细胞的ABO和H表型,利用聚合酶链反应扩增类孟买表型个体的abo基因第6、7外显子和al,2岩藻糖基转移酶基因(futl)编码区,并对PCR产物直接测序分析.对纯化的futl扩增产物进行TOPO克隆和测序,对2处变异位点进行单倍体序列分析.结果表明:血清学分析确认该个体为罕见的类孟买表型;直接测序发现先证者futl基因第547位和880位附近存在碱基缺失或播入变异;TOPO克隆测序法证实,futl基因1条单倍体存在第547-552位两碱基AG缺失,另1条单倍体存在880-882位两碱基TT缺失.这2种变异均导致移码突变,并提前形成终止密码.结论:在献血人群中发现1例罕见的类孟买表型,其分子机制为双碱基缺失型futl等位基因复合杂合所致的al,2岩藻糖基转移酶活性减弱.%This study was purposed to investigate the molecular basis of a para-Bombay phenotype for screening and identification of rare blood group. ABO and H phenotypes of the proband were identified by serological techniques. The exon 6 to exon 7 of ABO gene and full coding region of α-1, 2-fucosyltransferase ( fut1 ) gene of the proband were analyzed by polyrnerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of the amplified fragments. The haplotype of compound heterozygote of fut1 was also identified by cloning sequencing. The results indicated that a rare para-Bombay phenotype was confirmed by serological techniques. Two deletion or insertion variant sites near nucleotide 547 and 880 were detected in fut1 gene. The results of cloning sequence showed that one haplotype of fut1 gene was two bases deletion at 547 - 552 (AGAGAG→AGAG), and another one was two bases deletion at position 880 - 882 (TTT→T). Both two variants caused a reading frame shift and a premature stop codon. It is concluded that a rare para

  20. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  1. Mechanistic phenotypes: an aggregative phenotyping strategy to identify disease mechanisms using GWAS data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Mosley

    Full Text Available A single mutation can alter cellular and global homeostatic mechanisms and give rise to multiple clinical diseases. We hypothesized that these disease mechanisms could be identified using low minor allele frequency (MAF<0.1 non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs associated with "mechanistic phenotypes", comprised of collections of related diagnoses. We studied two mechanistic phenotypes: (1 thrombosis, evaluated in a population of 1,655 African Americans; and (2 four groupings of cancer diagnoses, evaluated in 3,009 white European Americans. We tested associations between nsSNPs represented on GWAS platforms and mechanistic phenotypes ascertained from electronic medical records (EMRs, and sought enrichment in functional ontologies across the top-ranked associations. We used a two-step analytic approach whereby nsSNPs were first sorted by the strength of their association with a phenotype. We tested associations using two reverse genetic models and standard additive and recessive models. In the second step, we employed a hypothesis-free ontological enrichment analysis using the sorted nsSNPs to identify functional mechanisms underlying the diagnoses comprising the mechanistic phenotypes. The thrombosis phenotype was solely associated with ontologies related to blood coagulation (Fisher's p = 0.0001, FDR p = 0.03, driven by the F5, P2RY12 and F2RL2 genes. For the cancer phenotypes, the reverse genetics models were enriched in DNA repair functions (p = 2×10-5, FDR p = 0.03 (POLG/FANCI, SLX4/FANCP, XRCC1, BRCA1, FANCA, CHD1L while the additive model showed enrichment related to chromatid segregation (p = 4×10-6, FDR p = 0.005 (KIF25, PINX1. We were able to replicate nsSNP associations for POLG/FANCI, BRCA1, FANCA and CHD1L in independent data sets. Mechanism-oriented phenotyping using collections of EMR-derived diagnoses can elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms.

  2. Magnetic Cellular Switches

    OpenAIRE

    Overby, Darryl R.; Alenghat, Francis J.; Montoya-Zavala, Martín; Bei, HuCheng; Oh, Philmo; Karavitis, John; Ingber, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of magnetic cellular switches to enable magnetic control of intracellular functions in living mammalian cells, including receptor signal transduction and gene transcription. Our approach takes advantage of the mechanosensitivity of adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) induction and downstream transcription controlled by the cAMP regulatory element (CRE) to engineer gene constructs that optically report gene expression in living cells. We activate transcri...

  3. Cellular therapy in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreemanta K. Parida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB. We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs, as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy.

  4. Colorectal Cancer "Methylator Phenotype": Fact or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Anacleto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that human colorectal tumors can be classified into two groups: one in which methylation is rare, and another with methylation of several loci associated with a "CpG island methylated phenotype (CIMP," characterized by preferential proximal location in the colon, but otherwise poorly defined. There is considerable overlap between this putative methylator phenotype and the well-known mutator phenotype associated with microsatellite instability (MSI. We have examined hypermethylation of the promoter region of five genes (DAPK, MGMT, hMLH1, p16INK4a, and p14ARF in 106 primary colorectal cancers. A graph depicting the frequency of methylated loci in the series of tumors showed a continuous, monotonically decreasing distribution quite different from the previously claimed discontinuity. We observed a significant association between the presence of three or more methylated loci and the proximal location of the tumors. However, if we remove from analysis the tumors with hMLH1 methylation or those with MSI, the significance vanishes, suggesting that the association between multiple methylations and proximal location was indirect due to the correlation with MSI. Thus, our data do not support the independent existence of the so-called methylator phenotype and suggest that it rather may represent a statistical artifact caused by confounding of associations.

  5. Cellular Kinetics of Perivascular MSC Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. W. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs and MSC-like multipotent stem/progenitor cells have been widely investigated for regenerative medicine and deemed promising in clinical applications. In order to further improve MSC-based stem cell therapeutics, it is important to understand the cellular kinetics and functional roles of MSCs in the dynamic regenerative processes. However, due to the heterogeneous nature of typical MSC cultures, their native identity and anatomical localization in the body have remained unclear, making it difficult to decipher the existence of distinct cell subsets within the MSC entity. Recent studies have shown that several blood-vessel-derived precursor cell populations, purified by flow cytometry from multiple human organs, give rise to bona fide MSCs, suggesting that the vasculature serves as a systemic reservoir of MSC-like stem/progenitor cells. Using individually purified MSC-like precursor cell subsets, we and other researchers have been able to investigate the differential phenotypes and regenerative capacities of these contributing cellular constituents in the MSC pool. In this review, we will discuss the identification and characterization of perivascular MSC precursors, including pericytes and adventitial cells, and focus on their cellular kinetics: cell adhesion, migration, engraftment, homing, and intercellular cross-talk during tissue repair and regeneration.

  6. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  7. Physiological determinants and impacts of the adipocyte phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Tchernof, A; Richard, D.

    2015-01-01

    The properties of adipose tissues accumulating in various compartments and ectopic sites around the body represent critical determinants of the relationship between obesity and metabolic disease. The increasingly recognized plasticity of the adipose cell phenotype led to many articles on the cellular characteristics and origins on brown, white and also of ‘beige' or ‘brite' adipocytes in recent years. This overview is a summary of manuscripts that were prepared by speakers at the 16th Interna...

  8. Effect of Surface Modification and Macrophage Phenotype on Particle Internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daniel [Iowa State University; Phan, Ngoc [Iowa State University; Isely, Christopher [Iowa State University; Bruene, Lucas [Iowa State University; Bratlie, Kaitlin M [Ames Laboratory

    2014-11-10

    Material properties play a key role in the cellular internalization of polymeric particles. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of material characteristics such as water contact angle, zeta potential, melting temperature, and alternative activation of complement on particle internalization for pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic, and naïve macrophages by using biopolymers (~600 nm), functionalized with 13 different molecules. Understanding how material parameters influence particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes is important for targeted delivery to specific cell populations. Here, we demonstrate that material parameters affect the alternative pathway of complement activation as well as particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes. Here, we show that the quantitative structure–activity relationship method (QSAR) previously used to predict physiochemical properties of materials can be applied to targeting different macrophage phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that targeted drug delivery to macrophages could be achieved by exploiting material parameters.

  9. Matrix and cell phenotype differences in Dupuytren's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beuge, Marike M; Ten Dam, Evert-Jan P M; Werker, Paul M N; Bank, Ruud A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dupuytren's disease is a fibroproliferative disease of the hand and fingers, which usually manifests as two different phenotypes within the same patient. The disease first causes a nodule in the palm of the hand, while later, a cord develops, causing contracture of the fingers. RESULTS:

  10. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation.......Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...

  11. Multiplex cytological profiling assay to measure diverse cellular states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun M Gustafsdottir

    Full Text Available Computational methods for image-based profiling are under active development, but their success hinges on assays that can capture a wide range of phenotypes. We have developed a multiplex cytological profiling assay that "paints the cell" with as many fluorescent markers as possible without compromising our ability to extract rich, quantitative profiles in high throughput. The assay detects seven major cellular components. In a pilot screen of bioactive compounds, the assay detected a range of cellular phenotypes and it clustered compounds with similar annotated protein targets or chemical structure based on cytological profiles. The results demonstrate that the assay captures subtle patterns in the combination of morphological labels, thereby detecting the effects of chemical compounds even though their targets are not stained directly. This image-based assay provides an unbiased approach to characterize compound- and disease-associated cell states to support future probe discovery.

  12. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Akinori Nakamura

    2015-01-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM) is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sometime...

  13. Stability of the hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Mooney, Steven M.; Celiktas, Muge; Hanash, Samir M.; Mani, Sendurai A.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and its reverse – Mesenchymal to Epithelial Transition (MET) – are hallmarks of cellular plasticity during embryonic development and cancer metastasis. During EMT, epithelial cells lose cell-cell adhesion and gain migratory and invasive traits either partially or completely, leading to a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (hybrid E/M) or a mesenchymal phenotype respectively. Mesenchymal cells move individually, but hybrid E/M cells migrate collectively as observed during gastrulation, wound healing, and the formation of tumor clusters detected as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs). Typically, the hybrid E/M phenotype has largely been tacitly assumed to be transient and ‘metastable’. Here, we identify certain ‘phenotypic stability factors’ (PSFs) such as GRHL2 that couple to the core EMT decision-making circuit (miR-200/ZEB) and stabilize hybrid E/M phenotype. Further, we show that H1975 lung cancer cells can display a stable hybrid E/M phenotype and migrate collectively, a behavior that is impaired by knockdown of GRHL2 and another previously identified PSF - OVOL. In addition, our computational model predicts that GRHL2 can also associate hybrid E/M phenotype with high tumor-initiating potential, a prediction strengthened by the observation that the higher levels of these PSFs may be predictive of poor patient outcome. Finally, based on these specific examples, we deduce certain network motifs that can stabilize the hybrid E/M phenotype. Our results suggest that partial EMT, i.e. a hybrid E/M phenotype, need not be ‘metastable’, and strengthen the emerging notion that partial EMT, but not necessarily a complete EMT, is associated with aggressive tumor progression. PMID:27008704

  14. Metabolic phenotype of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Berardi, Rossana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Metabolism of bladder cancer represents a key issue for cancer research. Several metabolic altered pathways are involved in bladder tumorigenesis, representing therefore interesting targets for therapy. Tumor cells, including urothelial cancer cells, rely on a peculiar shift to aerobic glycolysis-dependent metabolism (the Warburg-effect) as the main energy source to sustain their uncontrolled growth and proliferation. Therefore, the high glycolytic flux depends on the overexpression of glycolysis-related genes (SRC-3, glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT1], GLUT3, lactic dehydrogenase A [LDHA], LDHB, hexokinase 1 [HK1], HK2, pyruvate kinase type M [PKM], and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha [HIF-1α]), resulting in an overproduction of pyruvate, alanine and lactate. Concurrently, bladder cancer metabolism displays an increased expression of genes favoring the pentose phosphate pathway (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PD]) and the fatty-acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase [FASN]), along with a decrease of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Krebs cycle activities. Moreover, the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, hyper-activated in bladder cancer, acts as central regulator of aerobic glycolysis, hence contributing to cancer metabolic switch and tumor cell proliferation. Besides glycolysis, glycogen metabolism pathway plays a robust role in bladder cancer development. In particular, the overexpression of GLUT-1, the loss of the tumor suppressor glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL), and the increased activity of the tumor promoter enzyme glycogen phosphorylase impair glycogen metabolism. An increase in glucose uptake, decrease in normal cellular glycogen storage, and overproduction of lactate are consequences of decreased oxidative phosphorylation and inability to reuse glucose into the pentose phosphate and de novo fatty acid synthesis pathways. Moreover, AGL loss determines augmented levels of the serine-to-glycine enzyme

  15. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M;

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection...

  16. The Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Robert S. E.; Losh, Molly; Parlier, Morgan; Reznick, J. Steven; Piven, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The broad autism phenotype (BAP) is a set of personality and language characteristics that reflect the phenotypic expression of the genetic liability to autism, in non-autistic relatives of autistic individuals. These characteristics are milder but qualitatively similar to the defining features of autism. A new instrument designed to measure the…

  17. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  18. Exosomes from adipose-derived stem cells ameliorate phenotype of Huntington's disease in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mijung; Liu, Tian; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Manho

    2016-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by the aggregation of mutant Huntingtin (mHtt). Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have a potential for use in the treatment of incurable disorders, including HD. ASCs secrete various neurotrophic factors and microvesicles, and modulate hostile microenvironments affected by disease through paracrine mechanisms. Exosomes are small vesicles that transport nucleic acid and protein between cells. Here, we investigated the therapeutic role of exosomes from ASCs (ASC-exo) using in vitro HD model by examining pathological phenotypes of this model. Immunocytochemistry result showed that ASC-exo significantly decreases mHtt aggregates in R6/2 mice-derived neuronal cells. Western blot result further confirmed the reduction in mHtt aggregates level by ASC-exo treatment. ASC-exo up-regulates PGC-1, phospho-CREB and ameliorates abnormal apoptotic protein level in an in vitro HD model. In addition, MitoSOX Red, JC-1 and cell viability assay showed that ASC-exo reduces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis of in vitro HD model. These findings suggest that ASC-exo has a therapeutic potential for treating HD by modulating representative cellular phenotypes of HD. PMID:27177616

  19. The GARP complex is required for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, Florian; Petit, Constance; Kory, Nora;

    2015-01-01

    (GARP) complex, which functions in endosome-to-Golgi retrograde vesicular transport, as a critical player in sphingolipid homeostasis. GARP deficiency leads to accumulation of sphingolipid synthesis intermediates, changes in sterol distribution, and lysosomal dysfunction. A GARP complex mutation...... the phenotypes of GARP-deficient yeast or mammalian cells. Together, these data show that GARP is essential for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis and suggest a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCCA2....

  20. Antibiotic efficacy is linked to bacterial cellular respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Lobritz, Michael A.; Belenky, Peter; Porter, Caroline B. M.; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Yang, Jason H.; Schwarz, Eric G.; Dwyer, Daniel J; Khalil, Ahmad S.; James J Collins

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of antibiotic resistance has created a demand to better understand the basic mechanisms of existing antibiotics. Of significant interest is how antibiotics may perturb bacterial metabolism, and how bacterial metabolism may influence antibiotic activity. Here, we study the interaction of bacteriostatic and bactericidal antibiotics, the two major phenotypic drug classes. Interestingly, the two classes differentially perturb bacterial cellular respiration, with major consequenc...

  1. Building bridges toward invasion: tumor promoter treatment induces a novel protein kinase C-dependent phenotype in MCF10A mammary cell acini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine S Klos

    Full Text Available The potent tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA alters many cellular processes through activation of its receptor protein kinase C (PKC, including gene expression, cell cycle, and the regulation of cell morphology, raising an important question for developing targeted methods to prevent cancer: which effects of TPA are crucial for carcinogenesis? To address this question, we studied TPA action in the 3-dimensional (3D MCF10A human breast epithelial cell system, which models important features of in vivo epithelial tissue including growth constraints, structural organization of cells, and establishment of a basement membrane. MCF10A cells, which are immortalized but nontumorigenic, form hollow, spheroid structures in 3D culture referred to as acini. The development of normal acini requires the tight spatiotemporal regulation of cellular proliferation, polarization, apoptosis, and growth arrest. Treatment of MCF10A acini with TPA caused the appearance of multi-acinar structures. Surprisingly, this phenotype did not involve an increase in cell number or major changes in cell death, and polarization. Instead, live cell and confocal microscopy revealed that TPA stimulates MCF10A acini to aggregate. TPA induces the PKC-dependent production of actin-based protrusions, which leads to the formation of cellular bridges between acini, the clustering of acini, and allows cells to move into adjacent acini. During this process, the integrity of the laminin V basement membrane is disrupted, while E-cadherin-based cell-cell contacts remain intact. Altogether, our results show that under the biochemical and structural constraints of epithelial tissue, as modeled by the 3D MCF10A system, TPA induces a novel PKC-dependent phenotype that resembles local invasion. Of the many effects caused by TPA, these studies highlight the aggressive production of actin-based cellular protrusions as a potentially important event along the pathway to

  2. Emerging molecular phenotypes of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Oriss, Timothy B; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-01-15

    Although asthma has long been considered a heterogeneous disease, attempts to define subgroups of asthma have been limited. In recent years, both clinical and statistical approaches have been utilized to better merge clinical characteristics, biology, and genetics. These combined characteristics have been used to define phenotypes of asthma, the observable characteristics of a patient determined by the interaction of genes and environment. Identification of consistent clinical phenotypes has now been reported across studies. Now the addition of various 'omics and identification of specific molecular pathways have moved the concept of clinical phenotypes toward the concept of molecular phenotypes. The importance of these molecular phenotypes is being confirmed through the integration of molecularly targeted biological therapies. Thus the global term asthma is poised to become obsolete, being replaced by terms that more specifically identify the pathology associated with the disease. PMID:25326577

  3. Using iterative cluster merging with improved gap statistics to perform online phenotype discovery in the context of high-throughput RNAi screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Youxian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent emergence of high-throughput automated image acquisition technologies has forever changed how cell biologists collect and analyze data. Historically, the interpretation of cellular phenotypes in different experimental conditions has been dependent upon the expert opinions of well-trained biologists. Such qualitative analysis is particularly effective in detecting subtle, but important, deviations in phenotypes. However, while the rapid and continuing development of automated microscope-based technologies now facilitates the acquisition of trillions of cells in thousands of diverse experimental conditions, such as in the context of RNA interference (RNAi or small-molecule screens, the massive size of these datasets precludes human analysis. Thus, the development of automated methods which aim to identify novel and biological relevant phenotypes online is one of the major challenges in high-throughput image-based screening. Ideally, phenotype discovery methods should be designed to utilize prior/existing information and tackle three challenging tasks, i.e. restoring pre-defined biological meaningful phenotypes, differentiating novel phenotypes from known ones and clarifying novel phenotypes from each other. Arbitrarily extracted information causes biased analysis, while combining the complete existing datasets with each new image is intractable in high-throughput screens. Results Here we present the design and implementation of a novel and robust online phenotype discovery method with broad applicability that can be used in diverse experimental contexts, especially high-throughput RNAi screens. This method features phenotype modelling and iterative cluster merging using improved gap statistics. A Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM is employed to estimate the distribution of each existing phenotype, and then used as reference distribution in gap statistics. This method is broadly applicable to a number of different types of

  4. Inhibitors of the Cellular Trafficking of Ricin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gillet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the last decade, efforts to identify and develop effective inhibitors of the ricin toxin have focused on targeting its N-glycosidase activity. Alternatively, molecules disrupting intracellular trafficking have been shown to block ricin toxicity. Several research teams have recently developed high-throughput phenotypic screens for small molecules acting on the intracellular targets required for entry of ricin into cells. These screens have identified inhibitory compounds that can protect cells, and sometimes even animals against ricin. We review these newly discovered cellular inhibitors of ricin intoxication, discuss the advantages and drawbacks of chemical-genetics approaches, and address the issues to be resolved so that the therapeutic development of these small-molecule compounds can progress.

  5. Multiuser Cellular Network

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Modern radio communication is faced with a problem about how to distribute restricted frequency to users in a certain space. Since our task is to minimize the number of repeaters, a natural idea is enlarging coverage area. However, coverage has restrictions. First, service area has to be divided economically as repeater's coverage is limited. In this paper, our fundamental method is to adopt seamless cellular network division. Second, underlying physics content in frequency distribution problem is interference between two close frequencies. Consequently, we choose a proper frequency width of 0.1MHz and a relevantly reliable setting to apply one frequency several times. We make a few general assumptions to simplify real situation. For instance, immobile users yield to homogenous distribution; repeaters can receive and transmit information in any given frequency in duplex operation; coverage is mainly decided by antenna height. Two models are built up to solve 1000 users and 10000 users situations respectively....

  6. Epigenetic reversion of breast carcinoma phenotype is accompaniedby DNA sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandal, Tone; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Spencer, Virginia A.; Folberg,Robert; Bissell, Mina J.; Maniotis, Andrew J.

    2006-07-19

    The importance of microenvironment and context in regulation of tissue-specific genes is finally well established. DNA exposure to, or sequestration from, nucleases can be used to detect differences in higher order chromatin structure in intact cells without disturbing cellular or tissue architecture. To investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and tumor phenotype, we utilized an established 3-D assay where normal and malignant human breast cells can be easily distinguished by the morphology of the structures they make (acinus-like vs tumor-like, respectively). We show that these phenotypes can be distinguished also by sensitivity to AluI digestion where the malignant cells are resistant to digestion relative to non-malignant cells. Reversion of the T4-2 breast cancer cells by either cAMP analogs, or a phospatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13K) inhibitor not only reverted the phenotype, but also the chromatin sensitivity to AluI. By using different cAMP-analogs, we show that the cAMP-induced phenotypic reversion, polarization, and shift in DNA organization act through a cAMP-dependent-protein-kinase A-coupled signaling pathway. Importantly, inhibitory antibody to fibronectin also reverted the malignant phenotype, polarized the acini, and changed chromatin sequestration. These experiments show not only that modifying the tumor microenvironment can alter the organization of tumor cells but also that architecture of the tissues and the global chromatin organization are coupled and yet highly plastic.

  7. BCL11A Haploinsufficiency Causes an Intellectual Disability Syndrome and Dysregulates Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Cristina; Estruch, Sara B; Graham, Sarah A; McRae, Jeremy; Sawiak, Stephen J; Hurst, Jane A; Joss, Shelagh K; Holder, Susan E; Morton, Jenny E V; Turner, Claire; Thevenon, Julien; Mellul, Kelly; Sánchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Ibarra-Soria, Ximena; Deriziotis, Pelagia; Santos, Rui F; Lee, Song-Choon; Faivre, Laurence; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Liu, Pentao; Hurles, Mathew E; Fisher, Simon E; Logan, Darren W

    2016-08-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a common condition with considerable genetic heterogeneity. Next-generation sequencing of large cohorts has identified an increasing number of genes implicated in ID, but their roles in neurodevelopment remain largely unexplored. Here we report an ID syndrome caused by de novo heterozygous missense, nonsense, and frameshift mutations in BCL11A, encoding a transcription factor that is a putative member of the BAF swi/snf chromatin-remodeling complex. Using a comprehensive integrated approach to ID disease modeling, involving human cellular analyses coupled to mouse behavioral, neuroanatomical, and molecular phenotyping, we provide multiple lines of functional evidence for phenotypic effects. The etiological missense variants cluster in the amino-terminal region of human BCL11A, and we demonstrate that they all disrupt its localization, dimerization, and transcriptional regulatory activity, consistent with a loss of function. We show that Bcl11a haploinsufficiency in mice causes impaired cognition, abnormal social behavior, and microcephaly in accordance with the human phenotype. Furthermore, we identify shared aberrant transcriptional profiles in the cortex and hippocampus of these mouse models. Thus, our work implicates BCL11A haploinsufficiency in neurodevelopmental disorders and defines additional targets regulated by this gene, with broad relevance for our understanding of ID and related syndromes. PMID:27453576

  8. Evaluating diabetes and hypertension disease causality using mouse phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jing-Dong J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have found hundreds of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with common diseases. However, it is largely unknown what genes linked with the SNPs actually implicate disease causality. A definitive proof for disease causality can be demonstration of disease-like phenotypes through genetic perturbation of the genes or alleles, which is obviously a daunting task for complex diseases where only mammalian models can be used. Results Here we tapped the rich resource of mouse phenotype data and developed a method to quantify the probability that a gene perturbation causes the phenotypes of a disease. Using type II diabetes (T2D and hypertension (HT as study cases, we found that the genes, when perturbed, having high probability to cause T2D and HT phenotypes tend to be hubs in the interactome networks and are enriched for signaling pathways regulating metabolism but not metabolic pathways, even though the genes in these metabolic pathways are often the most significantly changed in expression levels in these diseases. Conclusions Compared to human genetic disease-based predictions, our mouse phenotype based predictors greatly increased the coverage while keeping a similarly high specificity. The disease phenotype probabilities given by our approach can be used to evaluate the likelihood of disease causality of disease-associated genes and genes surrounding disease-associated SNPs.

  9. Mechanical stretch regulates hypertrophic phenotype of the myometrium during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shynlova, Oksana; Kwong, Ruth; Lye, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    The adaptive growth of the uterus is a critical event that involves changes in cellular phenotypes throughout pregnancy. In early pregnancy, uterine growth is due to hyperplasia of uterine smooth muscle cells (SMCs) within the myometrium; however, the major component of myometrial growth occurs after mid-gestation. This study sought to test the hypothesis that increase in myometrial growth seen during late pregnancy is due to SMC hypertrophy caused by mechanical stretch of uterine tissue by a growing fetus(es) by providing direct measurements of individual SMC size. We employed a stereological approach to calculate the average cell volumes of uterine myocytes through diameter measurements using the Stereoinvestigator statistical software. Uterine tissues were collected from nonpregnant Wistar rats, as well as from gravid and nongravid horns of unilaterally pregnant animals on gestational days (d) 8 (early gestation), 14 (mid-gestation), 19 (late gestation), 22 (term), and 4 days post partum. Anti-caveolin-1 immunostaining was used to clearly delineate SMC boundaries. The stereological analysis revealed that the dramatic increase in myometrial growth seen during late gestation (d19-22) is due to a threefold increase in the size of uterine myocytes. A significant increase in SMC volumes was detected in the gravid uterine horn as compared with the corresponding empty horn of unilateral term pregnant animals (day 22, mean cell volume 1114 vs 361 microm(3), P<0.05), indicating the effect of uterine occupancy. The restriction of the hypertrophy to cells within the gravid horn suggests that it may be a response to the biological mechanical stretch of uterine walls by the growing fetus(es) and placenta(s).

  10. Huntington's disease: implications of associated cellular radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation sensitivity was studied in a series of Huntington's Disease (HD) patients and controls by measurement of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes and by clonogenic survival of lymphoblastoid cell lines. As a group, HD patients were found to be significantly more radioisensitive than controls (p<0.001), but there was an overlap between values for the two groups such that an absolute distinction is not possible. These data are consistent with an association between HD and radiosensitivity but not with identity between HD and a radiosensitive phenotype, so that cellular radiosensitivity cannot be used for individual diagnosis. Analysis of three families including 5 HD patients and 11 first-degree relatives confirmed this conclusion and demonstrated that even within a given family presymptomatic diagnosis cannot be based on measurement of radiosensitivity. However, the common association of cellular radiosensitivity with HD probands and their families provides a potential lead to the identification of HD gene(s) and so to an eventual understanding of the aetiopathogenesis of this disease at the molecular level. (author)

  11. Next-generation phenotypic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchal, Scott J; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Carragher, Neil O

    2016-07-01

    Phenotypic drug discovery (PDD) strategies are defined by screening and selection of hit or lead compounds based on quantifiable phenotypic endpoints without prior knowledge of the drug target. We outline the challenges associated with traditional phenotypic screening strategies and propose solutions and new opportunities to be gained by adopting modern PDD technologies. We highlight both historical and recent examples of approved drugs and new drug candidates discovered by modern phenotypic screening. Finally, we offer a prospective view of a new era of PDD underpinned by a wealth of technology advances in the areas of in vitro model development, high-content imaging and image informatics, mechanism-of-action profiling and target deconvolution. PMID:27357617

  12. Capturing phenotypes for precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter N; Mungall, Christopher J; Haendel, Melissa

    2015-10-01

    Deep phenotyping followed by integrated computational analysis of genotype and phenotype is becoming ever more important for many areas of genomic diagnostics and translational research. The overwhelming majority of clinical descriptions in the medical literature are available only as natural language text, meaning that searching, analysis, and integration of medically relevant information in databases such as PubMed is challenging. The new journal Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies will require authors to select Human Phenotype Ontology terms for research papers that will be displayed alongside the manuscript, thereby providing a foundation for ontology-based indexing and searching of articles that contain descriptions of phenotypic abnormalities-an important step toward improving the ability of researchers and clinicians to get biomedical information that is critical for clinical care or translational research. PMID:27148566

  13. Finding our way through phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Deans

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a large and multifaceted effort to understand the vast landscape of phenotypic data, their current form inhibits productive data analysis. The lack of a community-wide, consensus-based, human- and machine-interpretable language for describing phenotypes and their genomic and environmental contexts is perhaps the most pressing scientific bottleneck to integration across many key fields in biology, including genomics, systems biology, development, medicine, evolution, ecology, and systematics. Here we survey the current phenomics landscape, including data resources and handling, and the progress that has been made to accurately capture relevant data descriptions for phenotypes. We present an example of the kind of integration across domains that computable phenotypes would enable, and we call upon the broader biology community, publishers, and relevant funding agencies to support efforts to surmount today's data barriers and facilitate analytical reproducibility.

  14. Never-ageing cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ogrunc, Müge; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence was historically discovered as a form of cellular ageing of in vitro cultured cells. It has been under the spotlight following the evidence of oncogene-induced senescence in vivo and its role as a potent tumour suppressor mechanism. Presently, a PubMed search using keywords ‘cellular senescence and cancer’ reveals 8398 number of references (by April 2011) showing that while our knowledge of senescence keeps expanding, the complexity of the phenomenon keeps us – researchers...

  15. The State of Cellular Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Youngbin

    2003-01-01

    Cellular probe technology is one of several potentially promising technologies for obtaining accurate travel time information. In 1996, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) mandated E911 requirements that cellular location be provided when 911 emergency calls come in to emergency management authorities. The E911 requirements allow 50 -300 meters from the emergency call location, depending on the type of cellular phone technology used and whether handset-based or network-based solutions...

  16. Constraints on Speciation in Human Populations: Phenotypic Diversity Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara B. Jones

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A phenotype is an expression of a genotype interacting with a component of an environment. Phenotypic diversity can be generated by mutation, physiological mechanisms, developmental processes, or learning (reinforcing and aversive stimulus-response effects. Causes and consequences of lifetime reproductive success can be partitioned into one or another of the previous mechanisms of phenotypic diversity. This article highlights, in particular, the ways in which behavioral diversity including cultural rules, enhances a phenotype’s relative reproductive success. Expanding Frank’s (2013 theoretical framework, it is argued that, whilea diverse (e.g., “modular” human phenotype may broaden a phenotype’s success in a given landscape, byproducts are produced that increase gene flow between populations, limiting the potential for population divergence and reproductive isolation. The mechanisms discussed herein are not necessarily dependent upon conscious and aware operations.

  17. Cellular basis of gravity resistance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Shouhei; Inui, Kenichi; Zhang, Yan; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Takashi

    Mechanical resistance to the gravitational force is a principal gravity response in plants distinct from gravitropism. In the final step of gravity resistance, plants increase the rigidity of their cell walls via modifications to the cell wall metabolism and apoplastic environment. We studied cellular events that are related to the cell wall changes under hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation. Hypergravity induced reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions in epidermal cells of stem organs. In Arabidopsis tubulin mutants, the percentage of cells with longitudinal microtubules was high even at 1 g, and it was further increased by hypergravity. Hypocotyls of tubulin mutants also showed either left-handed or right-handed helical growth at 1 g, and the degree of twisting phenotype was intensified under hypergravity conditions. The left-handed helical growth mutants had right-handed microtubule arrays, whereas the right-handed mutant had left-handed arrays. There was a close correlation between the alignment angle of epidermal cell files and the alignment of cortical microtubules. Gadolinium ions suppressed both the twisting phenotype and reorientation of microtubules in tubulin mutants. These results support the hypothesis that cortical microtubules play an es-sential role in maintenance of normal growth phenotype against the gravitational force, and suggest that mechanoreceptors are involved in modifications to morphology and orientation of microtubule arrays by hypergravity. Actin microfilaments, in addition to microtubules, may be involved in gravity resistance. The nucleus of epidermal cells of azuki bean epicotyls, which is present almost in the center of the cell at 1 g, was displaced to the cell bottom by increasing the magnitude of gravity. Cytochalasin D stimulated the sedimentation by hypergravity of the nu-cleus, suggesting that the positioning of the nucleus is regulated by actin microfilaments, which is

  18. Cellular bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, David K; Noguchi, Takako

    2012-08-01

    Bioluminescence imaging of live cells has recently been recognized as an important alternative to fluorescence imaging. Fluorescent probes are much brighter than bioluminescent probes (luciferase enzymes) and, therefore, provide much better spatial and temporal resolution and much better contrast for delineating cell structure. However, with bioluminescence imaging there is virtually no background or toxicity. As a result, bioluminescence can be superior to fluorescence for detecting and quantifying molecules and their interactions in living cells, particularly in long-term studies. Structurally diverse luciferases from beetle and marine species have been used for a wide variety of applications, including tracking cells in vivo, detecting protein-protein interactions, measuring levels of calcium and other signaling molecules, detecting protease activity, and reporting circadian clock gene expression. Such applications can be optimized by the use of brighter and variously colored luciferases, brighter microscope optics, and ultrasensitive, low-noise cameras. This article presents a review of how bioluminescence differs from fluorescence, its applications to cellular imaging, and available probes, optics, and detectors. It also gives practical suggestions for optimal bioluminescence imaging of single cells.

  19. Case Study: The Mystery of the Seven Deaths--A Case Study in Cellular Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazdik, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Cellular respiration, the central component of cellular metabolism, can be a difficult concept for many students to fully understand. In this interrupted, problem-based case study, students explore the purpose of cellular respiration as they play the role of medical examiner, analyzing autopsy evidence to determine the mysterious cause of death…

  20. About Strongly Universal Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Margenstern

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we construct a strongly universal cellular automaton on the line with 11 states and the standard neighbourhood. We embed this construction into several tilings of the hyperbolic plane and of the hyperbolic 3D space giving rise to strongly universal cellular automata with 10 states.

  1. New structural and functional defects in polyphosphate deficient bacteria: A cellular and proteomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chávez Francisco P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP, a polymer of tens or hundreds of phosphate residues linked by ATP-like bonds, is found in all organisms and performs a wide variety of functions. PolyP is synthesized in bacterial cells by the actions of polyphosphate kinases (PPK1 and PPK2 and degraded by exopolyphosphatase (PPX. Bacterial cells with polyP deficiencies due to knocking out the ppk1 gene are affected in many structural and important cellular functions such as motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence among others. The cause of this pleiotropy is not entirely understood. Results The overexpression of exopolyphosphatase in bacteria mimicked some pleitropic defects found in ppk1 mutants. By using this approach we found new structural and functional defects in the polyP-accumulating bacteria Pseudomonas sp. B4, which are most likely due to differences in the polyP-removal strategy. Colony morphology phenotype, lipopolysaccharide (LPS structure changes and cellular division malfunction were observed. Finally, we used comparative proteomics in order to elucidate the cellular adjustments that occurred during polyP deficiency in this bacterium and found some clues that helped to understand the structural and functional defects observed. Conclusions The results obtained suggest that during polyP deficiency energy metabolism and particularly nucleoside triphosphate (NTP formation were affected and that bacterial cells overcame this problem by increasing the flux of energy-generating metabolic pathways such as tricarboxilic acid (TCA cycle, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation and by reducing energy-consuming ones such as active transporters and amino acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, our results suggest that a general stress response also took place in the cell during polyP deficiency.

  2. Structural Modeling Insights into Human VKORC1 Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin J. Czogalla

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1 catalyses the reduction of vitamin K and its 2,3-epoxide essential to sustain γ-carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Two different phenotypes are associated with mutations in human VKORC1. The majority of mutations cause resistance to 4-hydroxycoumarin- and indandione-based vitamin K antagonists (VKA used in the prevention and therapy of thromboembolism. Patients with these mutations require greater doses of VKA for stable anticoagulation than patients without mutations. The second phenotype, a very rare autosomal-recessive bleeding disorder caused by combined deficiency of vitamin K dependent clotting factors type 2 (VKCFD2 arises from a homozygous Arg98Trp mutation. The bleeding phenotype can be corrected by vitamin K administration. Here, we summarize published experimental data and in silico modeling results in order to rationalize the mechanisms of VKA resistance and VKCFD2.

  3. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  4. Missing heritability of complex diseases: Enlightenment by genetic variants from intermediate phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Gómez, Adrián; Castillo-Lluva, Sonia; Del Mar Sáez-Freire, María; Hontecillas-Prieto, Lourdes; Mao, Jian Hua; Castellanos-Martín, Andrés; Pérez-Losada, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    Diseases of complex origin have a component of quantitative genetics that contributes to their susceptibility and phenotypic variability. However, after several studies, a major part of the genetic component of complex phenotypes has still not been found, a situation known as "missing heritability." Although there have been many hypotheses put forward to explain the reasons for the missing heritability, its definitive causes remain unknown. Complex diseases are caused by multiple intermediate phenotypes involved in their pathogenesis and, very often, each one of these intermediate phenotypes also has a component of quantitative inheritance. Here we propose that at least part of the missing heritability can be explained by the genetic component of intermediate phenotypes that is not detectable at the level of the main complex trait. At the same time, the identification of the genetic component of intermediate phenotypes provides an opportunity to identify part of the missing heritability of complex diseases. PMID:27241833

  5. Interference cancellation technique under imperfect synchronization in cellular systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xin; WU; Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, an asynchronous cooperative cellular system applied with space-time block coding(STBC)is investigated. A signal detector is proposed based on parallel interference cancellation(PIC), to cancel the inter-symbol interference(ISI)caused by the imperfect synchronization. Simulation results show that the proposed PIC detector can effectively suppress the ISI, but there is still a comparatively high error floor, due to the co-channel interference(CCI)of the cellular system.

  6. Natural Products as Tools for Defining How Cellular Metabolism Influences Cellular Immune and Inflammatory Function during Chronic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica S. Lovelace

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic viral infections like those caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV cause disease that establishes an ongoing state of chronic inflammation. While there have been tremendous improvements towards curing HCV with directly acting antiviral agents (DAA and keeping HIV viral loads below detection with antiretroviral therapy (ART, there is still a need to control inflammation in these diseases. Recent studies indicate that many natural products like curcumin, resveratrol and silymarin alter cellular metabolism and signal transduction pathways via enzymes such as adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, and these pathways directly influence cellular inflammatory status (such as NF-κB and immune function. Natural products represent a vast toolkit to dissect and define how cellular metabolism controls cellular immune and inflammatory function.

  7. Cellular Deconstruction: Finding Meaning in Individual Cell Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberwine, James; Kim, Junhyong

    2015-10-01

    The advent of single cell transcriptome analysis has permitted the discovery of cell-to-cell variation in transcriptome expression of even presumptively identical cells. We hypothesize that this variability reflects a many-to-one relation between transcriptome states and the phenotype of a cell. In this relation, the molecular ratios of the subsets of RNA are determined by the stoichiometric constraints of the cell systems, which underdetermine the transcriptome state. Furthermore, the variability is, in part, induced by the tissue context and is important for system-level function. This theory is analogous to theories of literary deconstruction, where multiple 'signifiers' work in opposition to one another to create meaning. By analogy, transcriptome phenotypes should be defined as subsets of RNAs comprising selected RNA systems where the system-associated RNAs are balanced with each other to produce the associated cellular function. This idea provides a framework for understanding cellular heterogeneity in phenotypic responses to variant conditions, such as disease challenge. PMID:26410403

  8. The Effect of Selection on the Phenotypic Variance

    OpenAIRE

    Shnol, E.E.; Kondrashov, A S

    1993-01-01

    We consider the within-generation changes of phenotypic variance caused by selection w(x) which acts on a quantitative trait x. If before selection the trait has Gaussian distribution, its variance decreases if the second derivative of the logarithm of w(x) is negative for all x, while if it is positive for all x, the variance increases.

  9. Optimality and adaptation of phenotypically switching cells in fluctuating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belete, Merzu Kebede; Balázsi, Gábor

    2015-12-01

    Stochastic switching between alternative phenotypic states is a common cellular survival strategy during unforeseen environmental fluctuations. Cells can switch between different subpopulations that proliferate at different rates in different environments. Optimal population growth is typically assumed to occur when phenotypic switching rates match environmental switching rates. However, it is not well understood how this optimum behaves as a function of the growth rates of phenotypically different cells. In this study, we use mathematical and computational models to test how the actual parameters associated with optimal population growth differ from those assumed to be optimal. We find that the predicted optimum is practically always valid if the environmental durations are long. However, the regime of validity narrows as environmental durations shorten, especially if subpopulation growth rate differences differ from each other (are asymmetric) in two environments. Furthermore, we study the fate of mutants with switching rates previously predicted to be optimal. We find that mutants which match their phenotypic switching rates with the environmental ones can only sweep the population if the assumed optimum is valid, but not otherwise.

  10. Optimality and adaptation of phenotypically switching cells in fluctuating environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belete, Merzu Kebede; Balázsi, Gábor

    2015-12-01

    Stochastic switching between alternative phenotypic states is a common cellular survival strategy during unforeseen environmental fluctuations. Cells can switch between different subpopulations that proliferate at different rates in different environments. Optimal population growth is typically assumed to occur when phenotypic switching rates match environmental switching rates. However, it is not well understood how this optimum behaves as a function of the growth rates of phenotypically different cells. In this study, we use mathematical and computational models to test how the actual parameters associated with optimal population growth differ from those assumed to be optimal. We find that the predicted optimum is practically always valid if the environmental durations are long. However, the regime of validity narrows as environmental durations shorten, especially if subpopulation growth rate differences differ from each other (are asymmetric) in two environments. Furthermore, we study the fate of mutants with switching rates previously predicted to be optimal. We find that mutants which match their phenotypic switching rates with the environmental ones can only sweep the population if the assumed optimum is valid, but not otherwise.

  11. Cellular systems biology profiling applied to cellular models of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Kenneth A; Premkumar, Daniel R; Strock, Christopher J; Johnston, Patricia; Taylor, Lansing

    2009-11-01

    Building cellular models of disease based on the approach of Cellular Systems Biology (CSB) has the potential to improve the process of creating drugs as part of the continuum from early drug discovery through drug development and clinical trials and diagnostics. This paper focuses on the application of CSB to early drug discovery. We discuss the integration of protein-protein interaction biosensors with other multiplexed, functional biomarkers as an example in using CSB to optimize the identification of quality lead series compounds.

  12. Hsp90 selectively modulates phenotype in vertebrate development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L Yeyati

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Compromised heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 function reveals cryptic phenotypes in flies and plants. These observations were interpreted to suggest that this molecular stress-response chaperone has a capacity to buffer underlying genetic variation. Conversely, the protective role of Hsp90 could account for the variable penetrance or severity of some heritable developmental malformations in vertebrates. Using zebrafish as a model, we defined Hsp90 inhibitor levels that did not induce a heat shock response or perturb phenotype in wild-type strains. Under these conditions the severity of the recessive eye phenotype in sunrise, caused by a pax6b mutation, was increased, while in dreumes, caused by a sufu mutation, it was decreased. In another strain, a previously unobserved spectrum of severe structural eye malformations, reminiscent of anophthalmia, microphthalmia, and nanophthalmia complex in humans, was uncovered by this limited inhibition of Hsp90 function. Inbreeding of offspring from selected unaffected carrier parents led to significantly elevated malformation frequencies and revealed the oligogenic nature of this phenotype. Unlike in Drosophila, Hsp90 inhibition can decrease developmental stability in zebrafish, as indicated by increased asymmetric presentation of anophthalmia, microphthalmia, and nanophthalmia and sunrise phenotypes. Analysis of the sunrise pax6b mutation suggests a molecular mechanism for the buffering of mutations by Hsp90. The zebrafish studies imply that mild perturbation of Hsp90 function at critical developmental stages may underpin the variable penetrance and expressivity of many developmental anomalies where the interaction between genotype and environment plays a major role.

  13. Interrogating cellular fate decisions with high-throughput arrays of multiplexed cellular communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sisi; Bremer, Andrew W; Scheideler, Olivia J; Na, Yun Suk; Todhunter, Michael E; Hsiao, Sonny; Bomdica, Prithvi R; Maharbiz, Michel M; Gartner, Zev J; Schaffer, David V

    2016-01-01

    Recreating heterotypic cell-cell interactions in vitro is key to dissecting the role of cellular communication during a variety of biological processes. This is especially relevant for stem cell niches, where neighbouring cells provide instructive inputs that govern cell fate decisions. To investigate the logic and dynamics of cell-cell signalling networks, we prepared heterotypic cell-cell interaction arrays using DNA-programmed adhesion. Our platform specifies the number and initial position of up to four distinct cell types within each array and offers tunable control over cell-contact time during long-term culture. Here, we use the platform to study the dynamics of single adult neural stem cell fate decisions in response to competing juxtacrine signals. Our results suggest a potential signalling hierarchy between Delta-like 1 and ephrin-B2 ligands, as neural stem cells adopt the Delta-like 1 phenotype of stem cell maintenance on simultaneous presentation of both signals. PMID:26754526

  14. Actual problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kaupov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides review of cellular technologies used incardiology, describes types of cellular preparations depending onsources of cells and types of compounding cells. The generalmechanisms of therapies with stem cells applications are described.Use of cellular preparations for treatment of cardiovascular diseasesand is improvement of the forecast at patients with heartinsufficiency of various genesis is considered as alternative topractice with organ transplantations. Efforts of biotechnologicallaboratories are directed on search of optimum population of cellsfor application in cardiology and studying of mechanisms andfactors regulating function of cardiac stem cells.

  15. Influences of tumor stroma on the malignant phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Dau; Moeslund, Mette; Wandall, Hans H;

    2008-01-01

    , fibronectin and laminin 5 are all characteristics of the tumor stroma. Less is, however, known of the significance of the biophysical properties of the tumor stroma. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how cellular and mechanical properties of the three-dimensional collagen matrix may...... and laminin 5 was investigated. RESULTS: We found that expression of glycosylated oncofetal fibronectin was increased in the invasive phenotype of oral carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore we demonstrated that certain concentrations of collagen in the connective tissue equivalent, appears to stimulate...

  16. NaDC3 Induces Premature Cellular Senescence by Promoting Transport of Krebs Cycle Intermediates, Increasing NADH, and Exacerbating Oxidative Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxiang; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Du, Xuan; Fu, Bo; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter 3 (NaDC3) is a key metabolism-regulating membrane protein responsible for transport of Krebs cycle intermediates. NaDC3 is upregulated as organs age, but knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms by which NaDC3 modulates mammalian aging is limited. In this study, we showed that NaDC3 overexpression accelerated cellular senescence in young human diploid cells (MRC-5 and WI-38) and primary renal tubular cells, leading to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and increased expression of senescent biomarkers, senescence-associated β-galactosidase and p16. Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and carbonyl were significantly enhanced, and activities of respiratory complexes I and III and ATP level were significantly decreased in NaDC3-infected cells. Stressful premature senescent phenotypes induced by NaDC3 were markedly ameliorated via treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and Tempol. High expression of NaDC3 caused a prominent increase in intracellular levels of Krebs cycle intermediates and NADH. Exogenous NADH and NAD(+) may aggravate and attenuate the aging phenotypes induced by NaDC3, respectively. These results suggest that NaDC3 can induce premature cellular senescence by promoting the transport of Krebs cycle intermediates, increasing generation of NADH and reactive oxygen species and leading to oxidative damage. Our results clarify the aging signaling pathway regulated by NaDC3.

  17. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaag, A A; Grunnet, L G; Arora, G P;

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years ago, Hales and Barker along with their co-workers published some of their pioneering papers proposing the 'thrifty phenotype hypothesis' in Diabetologia (4;35:595-601 and 3;36:62-67). Their postulate that fetal programming could represent an important player in the origin of type 2...

  18. Leaf segmentation in plant phenotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharr, Hanno; Minervini, Massimo; French, Andrew P.; Klukas, Christian; Kramer, David M.; Liu, Xiaoming; Luengo, Imanol; Pape, Jean Michel; Polder, Gerrit; Vukadinovic, Danijela; Yin, Xi; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2016-01-01

    Image-based plant phenotyping is a growing application area of computer vision in agriculture. A key task is the segmentation of all individual leaves in images. Here we focus on the most common rosette model plants, Arabidopsis and young tobacco. Although leaves do share appearance and shape cha

  19. Phenotypic spectrum of GABRA1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Marini, Carla; Pfeffer, Siona;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To delineate phenotypic heterogeneity, we describe the clinical features of a cohort of patients with GABRA1 gene mutations. METHODS: Patients with GABRA1 mutations were ascertained through an international collaboration. Clinical, EEG, and genetic data were collected. Functional analy...

  20. Phenotype and genotype in 101 males with X-linked creatine transporter deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, J.M. van de; Betsalel, O.T.; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, S.; Abulhoul, L.; Grunewald, S.; Anselm, I.; Azzouz, H.; Bratkovic, D.; Brouwer, A.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Kleefstra, T.; Yntema, H.G.; Campistol, J.; Vilaseca, M.A.; Cheillan, D.; D'Hooghe, M.; Diogo, L.; Garcia, P.; Valongo, C.; Fonseca, M.; Frints, S.; Wilcken, B.; Haar, S. van der; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Hofstede, F.; Johnson, D.; Kant, S.G.; Lion-Francois, L.; Pitelet, G.; Longo, N.; Maat-Kievit, J.A.; Monteiro, J.P.; Munnich, A.; Muntau, A.C.; Nassogne, M.C.; Osaka, H.; Ounap, K.; Pinard, J.M.; Quijano-Roy, S.; Poggenburg, I.; Poplawski, N.; Abdul-Rahman, O.; Ribes, A.; Arias Vasquez, A.; Yaplito-Lee, J.; Schulze, A.; Schwartz, C.E.; Schwenger, S.; Soares, G.; Sznajer, Y.; Valayannopoulos, V.; Esch, H. van; Waltz, S.; Wamelink, M.M.; Pouwels, P.J.; Errami, A.; Knaap, M.S. van der; Jakobs, C.; Mancini, G.M.; Salomons, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Creatine transporter deficiency is a monogenic cause of X-linked intellectual disability. Since its first description in 2001 several case reports have been published but an overview of phenotype, genotype and phenotype-genotype correlation has been lacking. METHODS: We performed a retro

  1. Using Mouse Models to Explore Genotype-Phenotype Relationship in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Ahmad; Faizi, Mehrdad; Belichenko, Pavel V.; Mobley, William C.

    2007-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) caused by trisomy 21 is characterized by a variety of phenotypes and involves multiple organs. Sequencing of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) and subsequently of its orthologues on mouse chromosome 16 have created an unprecedented opportunity to explore the complex relationship between various DS phenotypes and the extra copy of…

  2. Prevalence and molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Escherichia coli expressing an AmpC phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rikke Lind; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Friis-Møller, Alice;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish the prevalence of the AmpC beta-lactamase phenotype in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and characterize the genetic resistance mechanisms causing the observed phenotype. METHODS: Clinical E. coli (n = 74) with reduced susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporin...

  3. Influence of electric field on cellular migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Cells have the ability to detect continuous current electric fields (EFs) and respond to them with a directed migratory movement. Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d.) cells, a key model organism for the study of eukaryotic chemotaxis, orient and migrate toward the cathode under the influence of an EF. The underlying sensing mechanism and whether it is shared by the chemotactic response pathway remains unknown. Whereas genes and proteins that mediate the electric sensing as well as that define the migration direction have been previously investigated in D.d. cells, a deeper knowledge about the cellular kinematic effects caused by the EF is still lacking. Here we show that besides triggering a directional bias the electric field influences the cellular kinematics by accelerating the movement of cells along their path. We found that the migratory velocity of the cells in an EF increases linearly with the exposure time. Through the analysis of the PI3K and Phg2 distribution in the cytosol and of the cellular adherence to the substrate we aim at elucidating whereas this speed up effect in the electric field is due to either a molecular signalling or the interaction with the substrate. This work is part of the MaxSynBio Consortium which is jointly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany and the Max Planck Society.

  4. Cellular mechanisms during vascular development

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system is an essential organ in vertebrate animals and provides the organism with enough oxygen and nutrients. It is composed of an interconnected network of blood vessels, which form using a number of different morphogenetic mechanisms. Angiogenesis describes the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting vessels. A number of molecular pathways have been shown to be essential during angiogenesis. However, cellular architecture of blood vessels as well as cellular mechanisms...

  5. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    OpenAIRE

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the...

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  7. Cellular mechanisms underlying eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaia, Girolamo; Vatrella, Alessandro; Busceti, Maria Teresa; Gallelli, Luca; Calabrese, Cecilia; Terracciano, Rosa; Maselli, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous chronic disease of the airways, characterized by either predominant eosinophilic or neutrophilic, or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory patterns. Eosinophilic inflammation can be associated with the whole spectrum of asthma severity, ranging from mild-to-moderate to severe uncontrolled disease, whereas neutrophilic inflammation occurs mostly in more severe asthma. Eosinophilic asthma includes either allergic or nonallergic phenotypes underlying immune responses mediated by T helper (Th)2 cell-derived cytokines, whilst neutrophilic asthma is mostly dependent on Th17 cell-induced mechanisms. These immune-inflammatory profiles develop as a consequence of a functional impairment of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes, which promotes the activation of dendritic cells directing the differentiation of distinct Th cell subsets. The recent advances in the knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying asthmatic inflammation are contributing to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, potentially suitable for the implementation of future improvements in antiasthma pharmacologic treatments. PMID:25878402

  8. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Eosinophilic and Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Pelaia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous chronic disease of the airways, characterized by either predominant eosinophilic or neutrophilic, or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory patterns. Eosinophilic inflammation can be associated with the whole spectrum of asthma severity, ranging from mild-to-moderate to severe uncontrolled disease, whereas neutrophilic inflammation occurs mostly in more severe asthma. Eosinophilic asthma includes either allergic or nonallergic phenotypes underlying immune responses mediated by T helper (Th2 cell-derived cytokines, whilst neutrophilic asthma is mostly dependent on Th17 cell-induced mechanisms. These immune-inflammatory profiles develop as a consequence of a functional impairment of T regulatory (Treg lymphocytes, which promotes the activation of dendritic cells directing the differentiation of distinct Th cell subsets. The recent advances in the knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying asthmatic inflammation are contributing to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, potentially suitable for the implementation of future improvements in antiasthma pharmacologic treatments.

  9. Endotypes and phenotypes of chronic rhinosinusitis: a PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Bachert, Claus; Cingi, Cemal; Dykewicz, Mark S; Hellings, Peter W; Naclerio, Robert M; Schleimer, Robert P; Ledford, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a complex disease consisting of several disease variants with different underlying pathophysiologies. Limited knowledge of the mechanisms of these disease subgroups is possibly the greatest obstacle in understanding the causes of CRS and improving treatment. It is generally agreed that there are clinically relevant CRS phenotypes defined by an observable characteristic or trait, such as the presence or absence of nasal polyps. Defining the phenotype of the patient is useful in making therapeutic decisions. However, clinical phenotypes do not provide full insight into all underlying cellular and molecular pathophysiologic mechanisms of CRS. Recognition of the heterogeneity of CRS has promoted the concept that CRS consists of multiple groups of biological subtypes, or "endotypes," which are defined by distinct pathophysiologic mechanisms that might be identified by corresponding biomarkers. Different CRS endotypes can be characterized by differences in responsiveness to different treatments, including topical intranasal corticosteroids and biological agents, such as anti-IL-5 and anti-IgE mAb, and can be based on different biomarkers that are linked to underlying mechanisms. CRS has been regarded as a single disease entity in clinical and genetic studies in the past, which can explain the failure to identify consistent genetic and environmental correlations. In addition, better identification of endotypes might permit individualization of therapy that can be targeted against the pathophysiologic processes of a patient's endotype, with potential for more effective treatment and better patient outcomes. PMID:23587334

  10. Histo-Cytometry: in situ multiplex cell phenotyping, quantification, and spatial analysis applied to dendritic cell subset micro-anatomy in lymph nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Gerner, Michael Y.; Kastenmuller, Wolfgang; Ifrim, Ina; Kabat, Juraj; Germain, Ronald N.

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry allows highly quantitative analysis of complex dissociated populations at the cost of neglecting their tissue localization. In contrast, conventional microscopy methods provide spatial information, but visualization and quantification of cellular subsets defined by complex phenotypic marker combinations is challenging. Here we describe an analytical microscopy method, "Histo-Cytometry," for visualizing and quantifying phenotypically complex cell populations directly in tissue s...

  11. Chemical Fluxes in Cellular Steady States Measured by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hong; Elson, Elliot L.

    Genetically, identical cells adopt phenotypes that have different structures, functions, and metabolic properties. In multi-cellular organisms, for example, tissue-specific phenotypes distinguish muscle cells, liver cells, fibroblasts, and blood cells that differ in biochemical functions, geometric forms, and interactions with extracellular environments. Tissue-specific cells usually have different metabolic functions such as synthesis of distinct spectra of secreted proteins, e.g., by liver or pancreatic cells, or of structural proteins, e.g., muscle vs. epithelial cells. But more importantly, a phenotype should include a dynamic aspect: different phenotypes can have distinctly different dynamic functions such as contraction of muscle cells and locomotion of leukocytes. The phenotypes of differentiated tissue cells are typically stable, but they can respond to changes in external conditions, e.g., as in the hypertrophy of muscle cells in response to extra load [1] or the phenotypic shift of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts as part of the wound healing response [2]. Cells pass through sequences of phenotypes during development and also undergo malignant phenotypic transformations as occur in cancer and heart disease.

  12. The puzzle of immune phenotypes of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf-Rauf, Katja; Anselm, Bettina; Schaub, Bianca

    2016-12-01

    Asthma represents the most common chronic childhood disease worldwide. Whereas preschool children present with wheezing triggered by different factors (multitrigger and viral wheeze), clinical asthma manifestation in school children has previously been classified as allergic and non-allergic asthma. For both, the underlying immunological mechanisms are not yet understood in depth in children. Treatment is still prescribed regardless of underlying mechanisms, and children are not always treated successfully. This review summarizes recent key findings on the complex mechanisms of the development and manifestation of childhood asthma. Whereas traditional classification of childhood asthma is primarily based on clinical symptoms like wheezing and atopy, novel approaches to specify asthma phenotypes are under way and face challenges such as including the stability of phenotypes over time and transition into adulthood. Epidemiological studies enclose more information on the patient's disease history and environmental influences. Latest studies define endotypes based on molecular and cellular mechanisms, for example defining risk and protective single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and new immune phenotypes, showing promising results. Also, regulatory T cells and recently discovered T helper cell subtypes such as Th9 and Th17 cells were shown to be important for the development of asthma. Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) could play a critical role in asthma patients as they produce different cytokines associated with asthma. Epigenetic findings showed different acetylation and methylation patterns for children with allergic and non-allergic asthma. On a posttranscriptional level, miRNAs are regulating factors identified to differ between asthma patients and healthy controls and also indicate differences within asthma phenotypes. Metabolomics is another exciting chapter important for endotyping asthmatic children. Despite the development of new biomarkers and the discovery of

  13. Hierarchical Cellular Structures in High-Capacity Cellular Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, R K; Agrawal, N K

    2011-01-01

    In the prevailing cellular environment, it is important to provide the resources for the fluctuating traffic demand exactly in the place and at the time where and when they are needed. In this paper, we explored the ability of hierarchical cellular structures with inter layer reuse to increase the capacity of mobile communication network by applying total frequency hopping (T-FH) and adaptive frequency allocation (AFA) as a strategy to reuse the macro and micro cell resources without frequency planning in indoor pico cells [11]. The practical aspects for designing macro- micro cellular overlays in the existing big urban areas are also explained [4]. Femto cells are inducted in macro / micro / pico cells hierarchical structure to achieve the required QoS cost effectively.

  14. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Nakamura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and sometimes present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The precise relationship between mutations in the DMD gene and cardiomyopathy remain unclear. However, some hypothetical mechanisms are being considered to be associated with the presence of some several dystrophin isoforms, certain reported mutations, and an unknown dystrophin-related pathophysiological mechanism. Recent therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the severe dystrophinopathy phenotype, appears promising, but the presence of XLDCM highlights the importance of focusing on cardiomyopathy while elucidating the pathomechanism and developing treatment.

  15. Association of erythrocyte acid phosphatase phenotypes with myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himabindu P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid phosphatase is a polymorphic nonspecific orthophosphate monoesterase which catalyses the cleaving of phosphoric acid and subsequent breakdown of several monophosphoric esters under acidic pH conditions. Acid phosphatase has a physiologic function as a flavin mononucleotide phosphatase (FMN and regulates the intracellular concentrations of flavin coenzymes that are electron carriers in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Myopia or nearsightedness is caused by both environmental and genetic factors. Myopic eyes when subjected to excessive oxidative stress results in retinal detachments .In the present study there is a significant elevation of AA phenotype in myopes when compared to controls. The AA phenotype is more susceptible to oxidative stress and its lower enzyme activity is known to be associated with increased intrauterine growth that further results in increased axial length in progressive myopia. The AA phenotype also confers risk for myopia development in males, early age group and cases with parental consanguinity.

  16. A new description of cellular quiescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary A Coller

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular quiescence, defined as reversible growth/proliferation arrest, is thought to represent a homogenous state induced by diverse anti-mitogenic signals. We used transcriptional profiling to characterize human diploid fibroblasts that exited the cell cycle after exposure to three independent signals--mitogen withdrawal, contact inhibition, and loss of adhesion. We show here that each signal caused regulation of a unique set of genes known to be important for cessation of growth and division. Therefore, contrary to expectation, cells enter different quiescent states that are determined by the initiating signal. However, underlying this diversity we discovered a set of genes whose specific expression in non-dividing cells was signal-independent, and therefore representative of quiescence per se, rather than the signal that induced it. This fibroblast "quiescence program" contained genes that enforced the non-dividing state, and ensured the reversibility of the cell cycle arrest. We further demonstrate that one mechanism by which the reversibility of quiescence is insured is the suppression of terminal differentiation. Expression of the quiescence program was not simply a downstream consequence of exit from the cell cycle, because key parts, including those involved in suppressing differentiation, were not recapitulated during the cell cycle arrest caused by direct inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These studies form a basis for understanding the normal biology of cellular quiescence.

  17. Deciphering the Galaxy Guppy phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Shaddock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal breeding hobbyists have been useful to science because they identify and isolate colorcoat mutations that geneticists can in turn use in their studies of the development and differentiation ofcolor cells. This paper discusses a very interesting color mutant, the Japanese Galaxy, tracing its creationfrom back to a self-educated genetics hobbyist, Hoskiki Tsutsui. The paper discusses a constituent genepreviously studied by Dr. Violet Phang, the snakeskin gene (the linked body and fin genes Ssb and Sst.And it discusses a gene previously unknown to science, the Schimmelpfennig Platinum gene (Sc.Through crossing experiments, the author determines that the combination of these two genes producesan intermediate phenotype, the Medusa. Incorporating the Grass (Gr, another gene unknown to sciencegene into the Medusa through a crossover produces the Galaxy phenotype. Microscope studies of thesnakeskin pattern in Galaxies and snakeskins reveals some parallels with similar studies made of theZebrafish Danio.

  18. Multiple cellular origins and molecular evolution of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Miaoyan; Lü, Lisheng; Lin, Peiyi; Chen, Zhisheng; Quan, Zhiwei; Tang, Zhaohui

    2016-09-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is an aggressive malignancy associated with unfavorable prognosis and for which no effective treatments are available. Its molecular pathogenesis is poorly understood. Genome-wide sequencing and high-throughput technologies have provided critical insights into the molecular basis of ICC while sparking a heated debate on the cellular origin. Cancer exhibits variabilities in origin, progression and cell biology. Recent evidence suggests that ICC has multiple cellular origins, including differentiated hepatocytes; intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells (IBECs)/cholangiocytes; pluripotent stem cells, such as hepatic stem/progenitor cells (HPCs) and biliary tree stem/progenitor cells (BTSCs); and peribiliary gland (PBG). However, both somatic mutagenesis and epigenomic features are highly cell type-specific. Multiple cellular origins may have profoundly different genomic landscapes and key signaling pathways, driving phenotypic variation and thereby posing significant challenges to personalized medicine in terms of achieving the optimal drug response and patient outcome. Considering this information, we have summarized the latest experimental evidence and relevant literature to provide an up-to-date view of the cellular origin of ICC, which will contribute to establishment of a hierarchical model of carcinogenesis and allow for improvement of the anatomical-based classification of ICC. These new insights have important implications for both the diagnosis and treatment of ICC patients. PMID:26940139

  19. ATM Couples Replication Stress and Metabolic Reprogramming during Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. Aird

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Replication stress induced by nucleotide deficiency plays an important role in cancer initiation. Replication stress in primary cells typically activates the cellular senescence tumor-suppression mechanism. Senescence bypass correlates with development of cancer, a disease characterized by metabolic reprogramming. However, the role of metabolic reprogramming in the cellular response to replication stress has been little explored. Here, we report that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM plays a central role in regulating the cellular response to replication stress by shifting cellular metabolism. ATM inactivation bypasses senescence induced by replication stress triggered by nucleotide deficiency. This was due to restoration of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP levels through both upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway via increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD activity and enhanced glucose and glutamine consumption. These phenotypes were mediated by a coordinated suppression of p53 and upregulation of c-MYC downstream of ATM inactivation. Our data indicate that ATM status couples replication stress and metabolic reprogramming during senescence.

  20. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  1. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetish Ranjan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequency reuse at a smaller distance. Maximizing the number of times each channel can be reused in a given geographical area is the key to an efficient cellular system design. During the past three decades, the world has seen significant changes in telecommunications industry. There have been some remarkable aspects to the rapid growth in wireless communications, as seen by the large expansion in mobile systems. This paper focuses on “Past, Present & Future of Cellular Telephony” and some light has been thrown upon the technologies of the cellular systems, namely 1G, 2G, 2.5G, 3G and future generations like 4G and 5G systems as well.

  2. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues. (paper)

  3. Phenotypic expression in mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernsen, P L; Wevers, R. A.; Gabreëls, F J; Lamers, K J; Sonnen, A E; Stekhoven, J H

    1987-01-01

    beta-glucuronidase deficiency is an extremely rare disorder which is known to have a considerable phenotypic variation. A survey of the clinical findings in 19 previously reported patients with mucopolysaccharidosis VII is presented together with the results of clinical and biochemical studies in two further patients. Because a similar clinical picture is present in a heterozygotic sister it is doubted whether all signs and symptoms can be attributed to the beta-glucuronidase deficiency. The ...

  4. Statistical models for trisomic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.; Feingold, E. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Certain genetic disorders are rare in the general population but more common in individuals with specific trisomies, which suggests that the genes involved in the etiology of these disorders may be located on the trisomic chromosome. As with all aneuploid syndromes, however, a considerable degree of variation exists within each phenotype so that any given trait is present only among a subset of the trisomic population. We have previously presented a simple gene-dosage model to explain this phenotypic variation and developed a strategy to map genes for such traits. The mapping strategy does not depend on the simple model but works in theory under any model that predicts that affected individuals have an increased likelihood of disomic homozygosity at the trait locus. This paper explores the robustness of our mapping method by investigating what kinds of models give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity. We describe a number of basic statistical models for trisomic phenotypes. Some of these are logical extensions of standard models for disomic phenotypes, and some are more specific to trisomy. Where possible, we discuss genetic mechanisms applicable to each model. We investigate which models and which parameter values give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity in individuals with the trait. Finally, we determine the sample sizes required to identify the increased disomic homozygosity under each model. Most of the models we explore yield detectable increases in disomic homozygosity for some reasonable range of parameter values, usually corresponding to smaller trait frequencies. It therefore appears that our mapping method should be effective for a wide variety of moderately infrequent traits, even though the exact mode of inheritance is unlikely to be known. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Wine Expertise Predicts Taste Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John E; Pickering, Gary J

    2012-03-01

    Taste phenotypes have long been studied in relation to alcohol intake, dependence, and family history, with contradictory findings. However, on balance - with appropriate caveats about populations tested, outcomes measured and psychophysical methods used - an association between variation in taste responsiveness and some alcohol behaviors is supported. Recent work suggests super-tasting (operationalized via propylthiouracil (PROP) bitterness) not only associates with heightened response but also with more acute discrimination between stimuli. Here, we explore relationships between food and beverage adventurousness and taste phenotype. A convenience sample of wine drinkers (n=330) were recruited in Ontario and phenotyped for PROP bitterness via filter paper disk. They also filled out a short questionnaire regarding willingness to try new foods, alcoholic beverages and wines as well as level of wine involvement, which was used to classify them as a wine expert (n=110) or wine consumer (n=220). In univariate logisitic models, food adventurousness predicted trying new wines and beverages but not expertise. Likewise, wine expertise predicted willingness to try new wines and beverages but not foods. In separate multivariate logistic models, willingness to try new wines and beverages was predicted by expertise and food adventurousness but not PROP. However, mean PROP bitterness was higher among wine experts than wine consumers, and the conditional distribution functions differed between experts and consumers. In contrast, PROP means and distributions did not differ with food adventurousness. These data suggest individuals may self-select for specific professions based on sensory ability (i.e., an active gene-environment correlation) but phenotype does not explain willingness to try new stimuli.

  6. Phenotypic and immunohistochemical characterization of sarcoglycanopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana F. B. Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy presents with heterogeneous clinical and molecular features. The primary characteristic of this disorder is proximal muscular weakness with variable age of onset, speed of progression, and intensity of symptoms. Sarcoglycanopathies, which are a subgroup of the limb-girdle muscular dystrophies, are caused by mutations in sarcoglycan genes. Mutations in these genes cause secondary deficiencies in other proteins, due to the instability of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Therefore, determining the etiology of a given sarcoglycanopathy requires costly and occasionally inaccessible molecular methods. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify phenotypic differences among limb-girdle muscular dystrophy patients who were grouped according to the immunohistochemical phenotypes for the four sarcoglycans. METHODS: To identify phenotypic differences among patients with different types of sarcoglycanopathies, a questionnaire was used and the muscle strength and range of motion of nine joints in 45 patients recruited from the Department of Neurology - HC-FMUSP (Clinics Hospital of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo were evaluated. The findings obtained from these analyses were compared with the results of the immunohistochemical findings. RESULTS: The patients were divided into the following groups based on the immunohistochemical findings: a-sarcoglycanopathies (16 patients, b-sarcoglycanopathies (1 patient, y-sarcoglycanopathies (5 patients, and nonsarcoglycanopathies (23 patients. The muscle strength analysis revealed significant differences for both upper and lower limb muscles, particularly the shoulder and hip muscles, as expected. No pattern of joint contractures was found among the four groups analyzed, even within the same family. However, a high frequency of tiptoe gait was observed in patients with a-sarcoglycanopathies, while calf pseudo-hypertrophy was most common in

  7. Genetic background of phenotypic variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A noteworthy feature of the living world is its bewildering variability. A key issue in several biological disciplines is the achievement of an understanding of the hereditary basis of this variability. Two opposing, but not necessarily irreconcilable conceptions attempt to explain the underlying mechanism. The gene function paradigm postulates that phenotypic variance is generated by the polymorphism in the coding sequences of genes. However, comparisons of a great number of homologous gene and protein sequences have revealed that they predominantly remained functionally conserved even across distantly related phylogenic taxa. Alternatively, the gene regulation paradigm assumes that differences in the cis-regulatory region of genes do account for phenotype variation within species. An extension of this latter concept is that phenotypic variability is generated by the polyrnorphism in the overall gene expression profiles of gene networks.In other words, the activity of a particular gene is a system property determined both by the cis-regulatory sequences of the given genes and by the other genes of a gene network, whose expressions vary among individuals, too. Novel proponents of gene function paradigm claim that functional genetic variance within the coding sequences of regulatory genes is critical for the generation of morphological polymorphism. Note, however, that these developmental genes play direct regulatory roles in the control of gene expression.

  8. Adaptive evolution of molecular phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Torsten; Nourmohammad, Armita; Lässig, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Molecular phenotypes link genomic information with organismic functions, fitness, and evolution. Quantitative traits are complex phenotypes that depend on multiple genomic loci. In this paper, we study the adaptive evolution of a quantitative trait under time-dependent selection, which arises from environmental changes or through fitness interactions with other co-evolving phenotypes. We analyze a model of trait evolution under mutations and genetic drift in a single-peak fitness seascape. The fitness peak performs a constrained random walk in the trait amplitude, which determines the time-dependent trait optimum in a given population. We derive analytical expressions for the distribution of the time-dependent trait divergence between populations and of the trait diversity within populations. Based on this solution, we develop a method to infer adaptive evolution of quantitative traits. Specifically, we show that the ratio of the average trait divergence and the diversity is a universal function of evolutionary time, which predicts the stabilizing strength and the driving rate of the fitness seascape. From an information-theoretic point of view, this function measures the macro-evolutionary entropy in a population ensemble, which determines the predictability of the evolutionary process. Our solution also quantifies two key characteristics of adapting populations: the cumulative fitness flux, which measures the total amount of adaptation, and the adaptive load, which is the fitness cost due to a population's lag behind the fitness peak.

  9. Separate Respiratory Phenotypes in Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 (Mecp2) Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bissonnette, John M.; Knopp, Sharon J.

    2006-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) that encodes a DNA binding protein involved in gene silencing. Selective deletion of Mecp2 in post-mitotic neurons in mice results in a Rettlike phenotype characterized by disturbances in motor activity and body weight, suggesting that these symptoms are exclusively caused by neuronal deficiency. Included in the RTT phenotype are episodes of respiratory depression...

  10. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan;

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...

  11. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  12. Phenotypic and Functional Changes Induced in Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells After Gamma-Ray Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonnet, A.J.; Nehme, J.; Leboulch, Ph.; Tronik-Le Roux, D. [Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Functional Bioengineering Laboratory, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Evry (France); Simonnet, A.J.; Nehme, J.; Leboulch, Ph.; Tronik-Le Roux, D. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) U733 (Unite Mixte de Recherche) - UMR INSERM CEA Paris XI (France); Vaigot, P. [Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Genetic Instability, Recombination and Repair, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Vaigot, P. [UMR 217, UMR-CEA-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France); Barroca, V. [Laboratory of Gametogenesis, Apoptosis, Genotoxicity, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Barroca, V. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale U566 - UMR INSERM-CEA-PARIS VII (France); Leboulch, Ph. [Genetics Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (US)

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure causes rapid and acute bone marrow (BM) suppression that is reversible for nonlethal doses. Evidence is accumulating that IR can also provoke long-lasting residual hematopoietic injury. To better understand these effects, we analyzed phenotypic and functional changes in the stem/progenitor compartment of irradiated mice over a 10-week period. We found that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) identified by their repopulating ability continued to segregate within the Hoechst dye excluding 'side population (SP)' early after IR exposure. However, transient phenotypic changes were observed within this cell population: Sca-1 (S) and c-Kit (K) expression levels were increased and severely reduced, respectively, with a concurrent increase in the proportion of SPSK cells positive for established indicators of the presence of HSCs: CD150 and CD105. Ten weeks after IR exposure, expression of Sca-1 and c-Kit at the SP cell surface returned to control levels, and BM cellularity of irradiated mice was restored. However, the c-Kit{sup +}Sca-1{sup +}Lin{sup -/low} (KSL) stem/progenitor compartment displayed major phenotypic modifications, including an increase and a severe decrease in the frequencies of CD150{sup +}Flk2{sup -} and CD150{sup -}Flk2{sup +} cells, respectively. CD150{sup +} KSL cells also showed impaired reconstituting ability, an increased tendency to apoptosis, and accrued DNA damage. Finally, 15 weeks after exposure, irradiated mice, but not age matched controls, allowed engraftment and significant hematopoietic contribution from transplanted con-genic HSCs without additional host conditioning. These results provide novel insight in our understanding of immediate and delayed IR-induced hematopoietic injury and highlight similarities between HSCs of young irradiated and old mice. (authors)

  13. In vitro analysis of the invasive phenotype of SUM 149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmawardhane Suranganie F; Wall Kristin M; Hoffmeyer Michaela R

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of locally invasive breast cancer known. However, very little information is available on the cellular mechanisms responsible for manifestation of the IBC phenotype. To understand the unique phenotype of IBC, we compared the motile and adhesive interactions of an IBC cell line, SUM 149, to the non-IBC cell line SUM 102. Results Our results demonstrate that both IBC and non-IBC cell lines exhibit similar adhesive prop...

  14. Integrating binary traits with quantitative phenotypes for association mapping of multivariate phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Saha, Sujayam; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Clinical binary end-point traits are often governed by quantitative precursors. Hence it may be a prudent strategy to analyze a clinical end-point trait by considering a multivariate phenotype vector, possibly including both quantitative and qualitative phenotypes. A major statistical challenge lies in integrating the constituent phenotypes into a reduced univariate phenotype for association analyses. We assess the performances of certain reduced phenotypes using analysis of variance and a model-free quantile-based approach. We find that analysis of variance is more powerful than the quantile-based approach in detecting association, particularly for rare variants. We also find that using a principal component of the quantitative phenotypes and the residual of a logistic regression of the binary phenotype on the quantitative phenotypes may be an optimal method for integrating a binary phenotype with quantitative phenotypes to define a reduced univariate phenotype. PMID:22373144

  15. Combinatorial Interventions Inhibit the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Support Hybrid Cellular Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Steinway, S. N.; Michel, P. J.; Feith, D. J.; Loughran, T. P., Jr.; Albert, Reka

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process hijacked by cancer cells to leave the primary tumor site and spread to other parts of the body. The molecular network regulating EMT involves the cooperation and cross-talk between multiple signaling pathways and key transcription factors, which we incorporated into systems-level logical network model for EMT. Using the EMT network model, we investigate potential EMT-suppressing interventions by identifying which individual and combinatorial perturbations suppress the induction of EMT by TGF β, an important signal driving EMT in liver cancer. We find that all non-trivial interventions are combinatorial and involve the inhibition of the SMAD complex together with other targets, several of which we experimentally tested and validated using liver cancer cell lines. We compare the combinatorial interventions with the results from a network control method we recently developed, which allowed us to determine the specific feedback regulatory motifs through which the interventions suppress EMT. Our results also reveal that blocking certain network components gives rise to steady states that are intermediate to the epithelial and mesenchymal states, supporting the existence of hybrid epithelial-mesenchymal states. Supported by NSF Grants PHY 1205840 and IIS 1161001, and NIH Grant F30DK093234.

  16. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  17. Green Cellular Network Deployment To Reduce RF Pollution

    CERN Document Server

    Katiyar, Sumit; Agrawal, N K

    2012-01-01

    As the mobile telecommunication systems are growing tremendously all over the world, the numbers of handheld and base stations are also rapidly growing and it became very popular to see these base stations distributed everywhere in the neighborhood and on roof tops which has caused a considerable amount of panic to the public in Palestine concerning wither the radiated electromagnetic fields from these base stations may cause any health effect or hazard. Recently UP High Court in India ordered for removal of BTS towers from residential area, it has created panic among cellular communication network designers too. Green cellular networks could be a solution for the above problem. This paper deals with green cellular networks with the help of multi-layer overlaid hierarchical structure (macro / micro / pico / femto cells). Macrocell for area coverage, micro for pedestrian and a slow moving traffic while pico for indoor use and femto for individual high capacity users. This could be the answer of the problem of ...

  18. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  19. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  20. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  1. 1,4-Naphthoquinones: From Oxidative Damage to Cellular and Inter-Cellular Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars-Oliver Klotz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Naphthoquinones may cause oxidative stress in exposed cells and, therefore, affect redox signaling. Here, contributions of redox cycling and alkylating properties of quinones (both natural and synthetic, such as plumbagin, juglone, lawsone, menadione, methoxy-naphthoquinones, and others to cellular and inter-cellular signaling processes are discussed: (i naphthoquinone-induced Nrf2-dependent modulation of gene expression and its potentially beneficial outcome; (ii the modulation of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor by naphthoquinones, resulting in altered gap junctional intercellular communication. Generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of redox signaling are properties of naphthoquinones that render them interesting leads for the development of novel compounds of potential use in various therapeutic settings.

  2. Pathogen-induced proapoptotic phenotype and high CD95 (Fas expression accompany a suboptimal CD8+ T-cell response: reversal by adenoviral vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ronnie Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available MHC class Ia-restricted CD8(+ T cells are important mediators of the adaptive immune response against infections caused by intracellular microorganisms. Whereas antigen-specific effector CD8(+ T cells can clear infection caused by intracellular pathogens, in some circumstances, the immune response is suboptimal and the microorganisms survive, causing host death or chronic infection. Here, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms that could explain why CD8(+ T cell-mediated immunity during infection with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is not optimal. For that purpose, we compared the CD8(+ T-cell mediated immune responses in mice infected with T. cruzi or vaccinated with a recombinant adenovirus expressing an immunodominant parasite antigen. Several functional and phenotypic characteristics of specific CD8(+ T cells overlapped. Among few exceptions was an accelerated expansion of the immune response in adenoviral vaccinated mice when compared to infected ones. Also, there was an upregulated expression of the apoptotic-signaling receptor CD95 on the surface of specific T cells from infected mice, which was not observed in the case of adenoviral-vaccinated mice. Most importantly, adenoviral vaccine provided at the time of infection significantly reduced the upregulation of CD95 expression and the proapoptotic phenotype of pathogen-specific CD8(+ cells expanded during infection. In parallel, infected adenovirus-vaccinated mice had a stronger CD8 T-cell mediated immune response and survived an otherwise lethal infection. We concluded that a suboptimal CD8(+ T-cell response is associated with an upregulation of CD95 expression and a proapoptotic phenotype. Both can be blocked by adenoviral vaccination.

  3. ALMS1-deficient fibroblasts over-express extra-cellular matrix components, display cell cycle delay and are resistant to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Zulato

    Full Text Available Alström Syndrome (ALMS is a rare genetic disorder (483 living cases, characterized by many clinical manifestations, including blindness, obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiomyopathy. ALMS is caused by mutations in the ALMS1 gene, encoding for a large protein with implicated roles in ciliary function, cellular quiescence and intracellular transport. Patients with ALMS have extensive fibrosis in nearly all tissues resulting in a progressive organ failure which is often the ultimate cause of death. To focus on the role of ALMS1 mutations in the generation and maintenance of this pathological fibrosis, we performed gene expression analysis, ultrastructural characterization and functional assays in 4 dermal fibroblast cultures from ALMS patients. Using a genome-wide gene expression analysis we found alterations in genes belonging to specific categories (cell cycle, extracellular matrix (ECM and fibrosis, cellular architecture/motility and apoptosis. ALMS fibroblasts display cytoskeleton abnormalities and migration impairment, up-regulate the expression and production of collagens and despite the increase in the cell cycle length are more resistant to apoptosis. Therefore ALMS1-deficient fibroblasts showed a constitutively activated myofibroblast phenotype even if they do not derive from a fibrotic lesion. Our results support a genetic basis for the fibrosis observed in ALMS and show that both an excessive ECM production and a failure to eliminate myofibroblasts are key mechanisms. Furthermore, our findings suggest new roles for ALMS1 in both intra- and extra-cellular events which are essential not only for the normal cellular function but also for cell-cell and ECM-cell interactions.

  4. HDACs and the senescent phenotype of WI-38 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noonan Emily J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal cells possess a limited proliferative life span after which they enter a state of irreversible growth arrest. This process, known as replicative senescence, is accompanied by changes in gene expression that give rise to a variety of senescence-associated phenotypes. It has been suggested that these gene expression changes result in part from alterations in the histone acetylation machinery. Here we examine the influence of HDAC inhibitors on the expression of senescent markers in pre- and post-senescent WI-38 cells. Results Pre- and post-senescent WI-38 cells were treated with the HDAC inhibitors butyrate or trichostatin A (TSA. Following HDAC inhibitor treatment, pre-senescent cells increased p21WAF1 and β-galactosidase expression, assumed a flattened senescence-associated morphology, and maintained a lower level of proteasome activity. These alterations also occurred during normal replicative senescence of WI-38 cells, but were not accentuated further by HDAC inhibitors. We also found that HDAC1 levels decline during normal replicative senescence. Conclusion Our findings indicate that HDACs impact numerous phenotypic changes associated with cellular senescence. Reduced HDAC1 expression levels in senescent cells may be an important event in mediating the transition to a senescent phenotype.

  5. Caveolar vesicles generate DNA damage and perpetuate cellular aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keith Wheaton

    2011-01-01

    @@ The replicative limit of human fibroblasts has long provided a model to assess the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular aging [1].In culture, fibroblasts which reach the end of their proliferative lifespan acquire profound molecular changes that limit their response to growth factors, and cause permanent exit from the cell cycle [2].

  6. Q fever in pregnant goats: humoral and cellular immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, H.I.J.; Post, J.; Gelderen, van E.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis caused by the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Both humoral and cellular immunity are important in the host defence against intracellular bacteria. Little is known about the immune response to C. burnetii infections in domestic ruminants even though these species are

  7. Senescence-associated secretory phenotype and its possible role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Seeger, Werner; Voswinckel, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major disease of the lungs. It primarily occurs after a prolonged period of cigarette smoking. Chronic inflammation of airways and the alveolar space as well as lung tissue destruction are the hallmarks of COPD. Recently it has been shown that cellular senescence might play a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Cellular senescence comprises signal transduction program, leading to irreversible cell cycle arrest. The growth arrest in senescence can be triggered by many different mechanisms, including DNA damage and its recognition by cellular sensors, leading to the activation of cell cycle checkpoint responses and activation of DNA repair machinery. Senescence can be induced by several genotoxic factors apart from telomere attrition. When senescence induction is based on DNA damage, senescent cells display a unique phenotype, which has been termed "senescence-associated secretory phenotype" (SASP). SASP may be an important driver of chronic inflammation and therefore may be part of a vicious cycle of inflammation, DNA damage, and senescence. This research perspective aims to showcase cellular senescence with relevance to COPD and the striking similarities between the mediators and secretory phenotype in COPD and SASP. PMID:25171460

  8. Progressive skeletal myopathy, a phenotypic variant of desmin myopathy associated with desmin mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Goudeau, Bertrand; Park, Kye-Yoon; Takeda, Kazuyo; Simon-Casteras, Monique; Vasconcelos, Olavo; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Shatunov, Alexey; Nagle, James W; Sivakumar, Kumaraswamy; Vicart, Patrick; Goldfarb, Lev G

    2003-03-01

    Desmin myopathy is a familial or sporadic disorder characterized by the presence of desmin mutations that cause skeletal muscle weakness associated with cardiac conduction block, arrhythmia and heart failure. Distinctive histopathologic features include intracytoplasmic accumulation of desmin-reactive deposits and electron-dense granular aggregates in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. We describe two families with features of adult-onset slowly progressive skeletal myopathy without cardiomyopathy. N342D point mutation was present in the desmin helical rod domain in patients of family 1, and I451M mutation was found in the non-helical tail domain in patients of family 2. Of interest, the same I451M mutation has previously been reported in patients with cardiomyopathy and no signs of skeletal myopathy. Some carriers of the I451M mutation did not develop any disease, suggesting incomplete penetrance. Expression studies demonstrated inability of the N342D mutant desmin to form cellular filamentous network, confirming the pathogenic role of this mutation, but the network was not affected by the tail-domain I451M mutation. Progressive skeletal myopathy is a rare phenotypic variant of desmin myopathy allelic to the more frequent cardio-skeletal form.

  9. Phenotypic and Functional Comparison of Class Switch Recombination Deficiencies with a Subgroup of Common Variable Immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aan de Kerk, Daan J; Jansen, Machiel H; Jolles, Stephen; Warnatz, Klaus; Seneviratne, Suranjith L; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; van Leeuwen, Ester M M; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-10-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common immunodeficiency in humans, characterized by low levels of immunoglobulins and inadequate antibody responses upon immunization. These PADs may result from an early block in B cell development with a complete absence of peripheral B cells and lack of immunoglobulins. In the presence of circulating B cells, some PADs are genetically caused by a class switch recombination (CSR) defect, but in the most common PAD, common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), very few gene defects have as yet been characterized despite various phenotypic classifications. Using a functional read-out, we previously identified a functional subgroup of CVID patients with plasmablasts (PBs) producing IgM only. We have now further characterized such CVID patients by a direct functional comparison with patients having genetically well-characterized CSR defects in CD40L, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and uracil N-glycosylase activity (UNG). The CSR-like CVID patients showed a failure in B cell activation patterns similar to the classical AID/UNG defects in three out of five CVID patients and distinct more individual defects in the two other CVID cases when tested for cellular activation and PB differentiation. Thus, functional categorization of B cell activation and differentiation pathways extends the expected variation in CVID to CSR-like defects of as yet unknown genetic etiology. PMID:27484504

  10. RPTOR, a novel target of miR-155, elicits a fibrotic phenotype of cystic fibrosis lung epithelium by upregulating CTGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Motohiro; Kalurupalle, Swathi; Kumar, Parameet; Ghoshal, Sarani; Zhang, Yongqing; Lehrmann, Elin; Becker, Kevin G; Gorospe, Myriam; Biswas, Roopa

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, the most frequent of which is F508del-CFTR. CF is characterized by excessive secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators into the airway lumen, inducing a highly inflammatory cellular phenotype. This process triggers fibrosis, causing airway destruction and leading to high morbidity and mortality. We previously reported that miR-155 is upregulated in CF lung epithelial cells, but the molecular mechanisms by which miR-155 affects the disease phenotype is not understood. Here we report that RPTOR (regulatory associated protein of mTOR, complex 1) is a novel target of miR-155 in CF lung epithelial cells. The suppression of RPTOR expression and subsequent activation of TGF-β signaling resulted in the induction of fibrosis by elevating connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) abundance in CF lung epithelial cells. Thus, we propose that miR-155 might regulate fibrosis of CF lungs through the increased CTGF expression, highlighting its potential value in CF therapy. PMID:27284727

  11. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M;

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  12. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van Jan-Kees

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handli

  13. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, MQT; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian H.;

    2016-01-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN(-...

  14. 两个γTrp208Leu杂合突变导致的遗传性低纤维蛋白原血症家系表型和基因型分析%Analysis of phenotype and genotype in two Chinese pedigrees with inherited hypoifbrinogenemia caused by γTrp208Leu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽红; 郝秀萍; 丁红香; 金艳慧; 江明华; 王明山

    2015-01-01

    目的:对由同一突变位点导致的两个遗传性低纤维蛋白原血症家系进行临床表型和基因型分析,探讨其分子发病机制。方法:检测两个家系所有成员的血浆凝血酶原时间(PT)、活化部分凝血活酶时间(APTT)、凝血酶时间(TT)、纤溶酶原活性(PLG:C)和纤维蛋白(原)降解产物(FDPs),分别采用Clauss法与免疫比浊法测定血浆纤维蛋白原活性(Fg:C)和抗原(Fg:Ag)水平。提取DNA,PCR扩增Fg的FGA、FGB和FGG基因所有外显子和侧翼序列,PCR产物纯化后测序进行基因分析。采用Swiss-Model和PIC软件对突变位点进行蛋白模型和氨基酸相互作用的分析。结果:两家系先证者PT、APTT以及纤溶指标(PLG:C和FDPs)均在正常范围内,TT轻度延长;Fg:C明显降低,分别为0.49 g/L和0.63 g/L;Fg:Ag同步下降,分别为0.64 g/L和0.77 g/L。先证者A的奶奶和父亲,先证者B的母亲、阿姨和表弟,Fg:C和Fg:Ag均有不同程度降低。基因分析发现2例先证者FGG基因第7号外显子5792位发生G>T杂合错义突变,导致Fg γD结构域的208位色氨酸突变为亮氨酸(γTrp208Leu)。模型分析显示γTrp208Leu突变破坏了Trp208与Thr314间的天然氢键连接,并使该位点氨基酸侧链变短,空间构型改变,使突变蛋白稳定性下降。结论:纤维蛋白原FGG基因γTrp208Leu杂合错义突变是导致该两个遗传性低纤维蛋白原血症的原因。%Objective: To analyze the phenotype and genotype of two Chinese pedigrees with inherited hypoifbrinogenemiaidentify by the same mutation.Methods: Laboratory tests, including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), plasminogen activity (PLG:C), and ifbrinogen degradation products (FDPs) were detected in two pedigrees. The activity and antigen plasma ifbrinogen (Fg:C, Fg:Ag) were analyzed by Clauss and

  15. Targeted silver nanoparticles for ratiometric cell phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmore, Anne-Mari A.; Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Toome, Kadri; Paiste, Päärn; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mölder, Tarmo; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Braun, Gary B.; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-04-01

    Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The binding and uptake of the peptide-functionalized AgNPs by cultured PPC-1 prostate cancer and M21 melanoma cells was dependent on the cell surface expression of the cognate peptide receptors. Barcoded peptide-functionalized AgNPs were synthesized from silver and palladium isotopes. The cells were incubated with a cocktail of the barcoded nanoparticles [RPARPAR (R), GKRK (K), and control], and cellular binding and internalization of each type of nanoparticle was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results of isotopic analysis were in agreement with data obtained using optical methods. Using ratiometric measurements, we were able to classify the PPC-1 cell line as mainly NRP-1-positive, with 75 +/- 5% R-AgNP uptake, and the M21 cell line as only p32-positive, with 89 +/- 9% K-AgNP uptake. The isotopically barcoded multiplexed AgNPs are useful as an in vitro ratiometric phenotyping tool and have potential uses in functional evaluation of the expression of accessible homing peptide receptors in vivo.Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The

  16. Knowledge-based analysis of phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoendorf, Robert

    2016-01-27

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism, and they are widely recorded in biology and medicine. To facilitate data integration, ontologies that formally describe phenotypes are being developed in several domains. I will describe a formal framework to describe phenotypes. A formalized theory of phenotypes is not only useful for domain analysis, but can also be applied to assist in the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases, and I will show how our results on the ontology of phenotypes is now applied in biomedical research.

  17. The other side of phenotypic plasticity: a developmental system that generates an invariant phenotype despite environmental variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braendle, Christian; Felix, Marie-Anne

    2009-10-01

    Understanding how the environment impacts development is of central interest in developmental and evolutionary biology. On the one hand, we would like to understand how the environment induces phenotypic changes (the study of phenotypic plasticity). On the other hand, we may ask how a development system maintains a stable and precise phenotypic output despite the presence of environmental variation. We study such developmental robustness to environmental variation using vulval cell fate patterning in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a study system. Here we review both mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of these studies, focusing on recently obtained experimental results. First, we present evidence indicating that vulval formation is under stabilizing selection. Second, we discuss quantitative data on the precision and variability in the output of the vulval developmental system in different environments and different genetic backgrounds. Third, we illustrate how environmental and genetic variation modulate the cellular and molecular processes underlying the formation of the vulva. Fourth, we discuss the evolutionary significance of environmental sensitivity of this developmental system.

  18. The other side of phenotypic plasticity: a developmental system that generates an invariant phenotype despite environmental variation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Christian Braendle; Marie-Anne Félix

    2009-10-01

    Understanding how the environment impacts development is of central interest in developmental and evolutionary biology. On the one hand, we would like to understand how the environment induces phenotypic changes (the study of phenotypic plasticity). On the other hand, we may ask how a development system maintains a stable and precise phenotypic output despite the presence of environmental variation. We study such developmental robustness to environmental variation using vulval cell fate patterning in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a study system. Here we review both mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of these studies, focusing on recently obtained experimental results. First, we present evidence indicating that vulval formation is under stabilizing selection. Second, we discusss quantitative data on the precision and variability in the output of the vulval developmental system in different environments and different genetic backgrounds. Third, we illustrate how environmental and genetic variation modulate the cellular and molecular processes underlying the formation of the vulva. Fourth, we discuss the evolutionary significance of environmental sensitivity of this developmental system.

  19. Hemogoblin phenotypes in Murgese horse

    OpenAIRE

    Carmela Bottiglieri; Rosario Rullo; Aldo Di Luccia; Elisa Pieragostini

    2010-01-01

    In this note we describe two new equine hemoglobin phenotypes found during a survey of the Murgese horse, a rare  Apulian native breed, among whose ancestors the Arabian surely plays an important role. To date we have analysed about  300 individual hemolysates by different chromatographic analyses (PAGIF, IPG, CMC). The results pointed out two unusu-  al patterns where the ratio of the α24Phe60Gln band to the α24Phe60Lys band was 93:7 and 70:30 rather than 60:40&nbs...

  20. Increased OXPHOS activity precedes rise in glycolytic rate in H-RasV12/E1A transformed fibroblasts that develop a Warburg phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pluk Helma

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Warburg phenotype in cancer cells has been long recognized, but there is still limited insight in the consecutive metabolic alterations that characterize its establishment. We obtained better understanding of the coupling between metabolism and malignant transformation by studying mouse embryonic fibroblast-derived cells with loss-of-senescence or H-RasV12/E1A-transformed phenotypes at different stages of oncogenic progression. Results Spontaneous immortalization or induction of senescence-bypass had only marginal effects on metabolic profiles and viability. In contrast, H-RasV12/E1A transformation initially caused a steep increase in oxygen consumption and superoxide production, accompanied by massive cell death. During prolonged culture in vitro, cell growth rate increased gradually, along with tumor forming potential in in vitro anchorage-independent growth assays and in vivo tumor formation assays in immuno-deficient mice. Notably, glucose-to-lactic acid flux increased with passage number, while cellular oxygen consumption decreased. This conversion in metabolic properties was associated with a change in mitochondrial NAD+/NADH redox, indicative of decreased mitochondrial tricarboxic acid cycle and OXPHOS activity. Conclusion The high rate of oxidative metabolism in newly transformed cells is in marked contrast with the high glycolytic rate in cells in the later tumor stage. In our experimental system, with cells growing under ambient oxygen conditions in nutrient-rich media, the shift towards this Warburg phenotype occurred as a step-wise adaptation process associated with augmented tumorigenic capacity and improved survival characteristics of the transformed cells. We hypothesize that early-transformed cells, which potentially serve as founders for new tumor masses may escape therapies aimed at metabolic inhibition of tumors with a fully developed Warburg phenotype.

  1. Modifying factors and phenotypic diversity in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2014-05-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a human disorder of copper homeostasis caused by mutations in the copper-transporting ATPase ATP7B. WD is characterized by copper accumulation, predominantly in the liver and brain, hepatic pathology, and wide differences between patients in the age of onset and the spectrum of symptoms. Several factors contribute to the phenotypic variability of WD. The WD-causing mutations produce a wide range of changes in stability, activity, intracellular localization, and trafficking of ATP7B; the nonpathogenic genetic polymorphisms may contribute to the phenotype. In Atp7b(-/-) mice, a mouse model of WD, an abnormal intracellular distribution of copper in the liver triggers distinct changes in the transcriptome; these mRNA profiles might be used to more specifically define disease progression. The major effect of accumulating copper on lipid metabolism and especially cholesterol homeostasis in mice and humans suggests the importance of fat and cholesterol metabolism as modifying factors in WD.

  2. Regulation of autophagy in oxygen-dependent cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by supraphysiological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), can cause cellular injury associated with protein and lipid oxidation, DNA damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The cellular responses triggered by oxidative stress include the altered regulation of signaling pathways that culminate in the regulation of cell survival or cell death pathways. Recent studies suggest that autophagy, a cellular homeostatic process that governs the turnover of damaged organelles and proteins, may represent a general cellular and tissue response to oxidative stress. The autophagic pathway involves the encapsulation of substrates in double-membraned vesicles, which are subsequently delivered to the lysosome for enzymatic degradation and recycling of metabolic precursors. Autophagy may play multifunctional roles in cellular adaptation to stress, by maintaining mitochondrial integrity, and removing damaged proteins. Additionally, autophagy may play important roles in the regulation of inflammation and immune function. Modulation of the autophagic pathway has been reported in cell culture models of oxidative stress, including altered states of oxygen tension (i.e., hypoxia, hyperoxia), and exposure to oxidants. Furthermore, proteins that regulate autophagy may be subject to redox regulation. The heme oxygenase- 1 (HO)-1 enzyme system may have a role in the regulation of autophagy. Recent studies suggest that carbon monoxide (CO), a reaction product of HO activity which can alter mitochondrial function, may induce autophagy in cultured epithelial cells. In conclusion, current research suggests a central role for autophagy as a mammalian oxidative stress response and its interrelationship to other stress defense systems. PMID:23092322

  3. Modeling integrated cellular machinery using hybrid Petri-Boolean networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Berestovsky

    Full Text Available The behavior and phenotypic changes of cells are governed by a cellular circuitry that represents a set of biochemical reactions. Based on biological functions, this circuitry is divided into three types of networks, each encoding for a major biological process: signal transduction, transcription regulation, and metabolism. This division has generally enabled taming computational complexity dealing with the entire system, allowed for using modeling techniques that are specific to each of the components, and achieved separation of the different time scales at which reactions in each of the three networks occur. Nonetheless, with this division comes loss of information and power needed to elucidate certain cellular phenomena. Within the cell, these three types of networks work in tandem, and each produces signals and/or substances that are used by the others to process information and operate normally. Therefore, computational techniques for modeling integrated cellular machinery are needed. In this work, we propose an integrated hybrid model (IHM that combines Petri nets and Boolean networks to model integrated cellular networks. Coupled with a stochastic simulation mechanism, the model simulates the dynamics of the integrated network, and can be perturbed to generate testable hypotheses. Our model is qualitative and is mostly built upon knowledge from the literature and requires fine-tuning of very few parameters. We validated our model on two systems: the transcriptional regulation of glucose metabolism in human cells, and cellular osmoregulation in S. cerevisiae. The model produced results that are in very good agreement with experimental data, and produces valid hypotheses. The abstract nature of our model and the ease of its construction makes it a very good candidate for modeling integrated networks from qualitative data. The results it produces can guide the practitioner to zoom into components and interconnections and investigate them

  4. Cellular responses during morphological transformation in Azospirillum brasilense and Its flcA knockout mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xingsheng; McMillan, Mary; Coumans, Joëlle V F; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J; Pereg, Lily

    2014-01-01

    FlcA is a response regulator controlling flocculation and the morphological transformation of Azospirillum cells from vegetative to cyst-like forms. To understand the cellular responses of Azospirillum to conditions that cause morphological transformation, proteins differentially expressed under flocculation conditions in A. brasilense Sp7 and its flcA knockout mutant were investigated. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of wild-type (Sp7) and a flcA deletion mutant (Sp7-flcAΔ) revealed a total of 33 differentially expressed 2-DE gel spots, with 22 of these spots confidently separated to allow protein identification. Analysis of these spots by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and MASCOT database searching identified 48 proteins (≥10% emPAI in each spot). The functional characteristics of these proteins included carbon metabolism (beta-ketothiolase and citrate synthase), nitrogen metabolism (Glutamine synthetase and nitric oxide synthase), stress tolerance (superoxide dismutase, Alkyl hydroperoxidase and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit) and morphological transformation (transducer coupling protein). The observed differences between Sp7 wild-type and flcA- strains enhance our understanding of the morphological transformation process and help to explain previous phenotypical observations. This work is a step forward in connecting the Azospirillum phenome and genome.

  5. Cellular responses during morphological transformation in Azospirillum brasilense and Its flcA knockout mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingsheng Hou

    Full Text Available FlcA is a response regulator controlling flocculation and the morphological transformation of Azospirillum cells from vegetative to cyst-like forms. To understand the cellular responses of Azospirillum to conditions that cause morphological transformation, proteins differentially expressed under flocculation conditions in A. brasilense Sp7 and its flcA knockout mutant were investigated. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of wild-type (Sp7 and a flcA deletion mutant (Sp7-flcAΔ revealed a total of 33 differentially expressed 2-DE gel spots, with 22 of these spots confidently separated to allow protein identification. Analysis of these spots by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and MASCOT database searching identified 48 proteins (≥10% emPAI in each spot. The functional characteristics of these proteins included carbon metabolism (beta-ketothiolase and citrate synthase, nitrogen metabolism (Glutamine synthetase and nitric oxide synthase, stress tolerance (superoxide dismutase, Alkyl hydroperoxidase and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit and morphological transformation (transducer coupling protein. The observed differences between Sp7 wild-type and flcA- strains enhance our understanding of the morphological transformation process and help to explain previous phenotypical observations. This work is a step forward in connecting the Azospirillum phenome and genome.

  6. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: correlation between genotype, phenotype and keratan sulfate levels

    OpenAIRE

    Dũng, Vu Chi; Tomatsu, Shunji; Adriana M. Montaño; Gottesman, Gary; Bober, Michael B.; Mackenzie, William; Maeda, Miho; Mitchell, Grant A.; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), leading to systemic skeletal dysplasia because of excessive storage of keratan sulfate (KS) in chondrocytes. In an effort to determine a precise prognosis and personalized treatment, we aim to characterize clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in MPS IVA patients, and to seek correlations between genotype, phenotype, and blood and urine KS levels. Mutation screening of GAL...

  7. Further studies of the engrailed phenotype in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, P. A.; Struhl, G

    1982-01-01

    Although most mutations at the engrailed locus of Drosophila cause embryonic death when homozygous, they are viable in clones of cells. We describe the phenotype of such clones in the eye-antenna, proboscis, humerus, wing, legs, and terminalia. When in anterior compartments the clones are normal, but in most posterior compartments they are abnormal and fail to respect the anteroposterior compartment boundary. We find that the yield of engrailed-lethal clones in posterior compartments is often...

  8. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from pathology to phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Mathey, Emily K; Susanna B Park; Hughes, Richard A C; Pollard, John D.; Armati, Patricia J; Barnett, Michael H.; Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P. James B.; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy S-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory neuropathy, classically characterised by a slowly progressive onset and symmetrical, sensorimotor involvement. However, there are many phenotypic variants, suggesting that CIDP may not be a discrete disease entity but rather a spectrum of related conditions. While the abiding theory of CIDP pathogenesis is that cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to ...

  9. Infectious and Immunologic Phenotype of MECP2 Duplication Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Michael; Kölsch, Uwe; Krüger, Renate; Unterwalder, Nadine; Hameister, Karin; Kaiser, Fabian Marc; Vignoli, Aglaia; Rossi, Rainer; Botella, Maria Pilar; Budisteanu, Magdalena; Rosello, Monica; Orellana, Carmen; Tejada, Maria Isabel; Papuc, Sorina Mihaela; Patat, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    MECP2 (methyl CpG binding protein 2) duplication causes syndromic intellectual disability. Patients often suffer from life-threatening infections, suggesting an additional immunodeficiency. We describe for the first time the detailed infectious and immunological phenotype of MECP2 duplication syndrome. 17/27 analyzed patients suffered from pneumonia, 5/27 from at least one episode of sepsis. Encapsulated bacteria (S.pneumoniae, H.influenzae) were frequently isolated. T-cell immunity showed no...

  10. Impact of temporal variation on design and analysis of mouse knockout phenotyping studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha A Karp

    Full Text Available A significant challenge facing high-throughput phenotyping of in-vivo knockout mice is ensuring phenotype calls are robust and reliable. Central to this problem is selecting an appropriate statistical analysis that models both the experimental design (the workflow and the way control mice are selected for comparison with knockout animals and the sources of variation. Recently we proposed a mixed model suitable for small batch-oriented studies, where controls are not phenotyped concurrently with mutants. Here we evaluate this method both for its sensitivity to detect phenotypic effects and to control false positives, across a range of workflows used at mouse phenotyping centers. We found the sensitivity and control of false positives depend on the workflow. We show that the phenotypes in control mice fluctuate unexpectedly between batches and this can cause the false positive rate of phenotype calls to be inflated when only a small number of batches are tested, when the effect of knockout becomes confounded with temporal fluctuations in control mice. This effect was observed in both behavioural and physiological assays. Based on this analysis, we recommend two approaches (workflow and accompanying control strategy and associated analyses, which would be robust, for use in high-throughput phenotyping pipelines. Our results show the importance in modelling all sources of variability in high-throughput phenotyping studies.

  11. Modelling neuroinflammatory phenotypes in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyss-Coray Tony

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inflammation of the central nervous system is an important but poorly understood part of neurological disease. After acute brain injury or infection there is a complex inflammatory response that involves activation of microglia and astrocytes and increased production of cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, and complement factors. Antibodies and T lymphocytes may be involved in the response as well. In neurodegenerative disease, where injury is more subtle but consistent, the inflammatory response is continuous. The purpose of this prolonged response is unclear, but it is likely that some of its components are beneficial and others are harmful. Animal models of neurological disease can be used to dissect the specific role of individual mediators of the inflammatory response and assess their potential benefit. To illustrate this approach, we discuss how mutant mice expressing different levels of the cytokine transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1, a major modulator of inflammation, produce important neuroinflammatory phenotypes. We then demonstrate how crosses of TGF-β1 mutant mice with mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD produced important new information on the role of inflammation in AD and on the expression of different neuropathological phenotypes that characterize this disease.

  12. Cellular Prion Protein: From Physiology to Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Kikuchi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular prion protein (PrPC is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored membrane glycoprotein with two N-glycosylation sites at residues 181 and 197. This protein migrates in several bands by Western blot analysis (WB. Interestingly, PNGase F treatment of human brain homogenates prior to the WB, which is known to remove the N-glycosylations, unexpectedly gives rise to two dominant bands, which are now known as C-terminal (C1 and N-terminal (N1 fragments. This resembles the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP in Alzheimer disease (AD, which can be physiologically processed by α-, β-, and γ-secretases. The processing of APP has been extensively studied, while the identity of the cellular proteases involved in the proteolysis of PrPC and their possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the neurotoxicity caused by prion proteins and the blockade of their normal proteolysis. For example, expression of non-cleavable PrPC mutants in transgenic mice generates neurotoxicity, even in the absence of infectious prions, suggesting that PrPC proteolysis is physiologically and pathologically important. As many mouse models of prion diseases have recently been developed and the knowledge about the proteases responsible for the PrPC proteolysis is accumulating, we examine the historical experimental evidence and highlight recent studies that shed new light on this issue.

  13. Single-Molecule Imaging of Cellular Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keijzer, Sandra; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Spaink, Herman P.; Schmidt, Thomas

    Single-molecule microscopy is an emerging technique to understand the function of a protein in the context of its natural environment. In our laboratory this technique has been used to study the dynamics of signal transduction in vivo. A multitude of signal transduction cascades are initiated by interactions between proteins in the plasma membrane. These cascades start by binding a ligand to its receptor, thereby activating downstream signaling pathways which finally result in complex cellular responses. To fully understand these processes it is important to study the initial steps of the signaling cascades. Standard biological assays mostly call for overexpression of the proteins and high concentrations of ligand. This sets severe limits to the interpretation of, for instance, the time-course of the observations, given the large temporal spread caused by the diffusion-limited binding processes. Methods and limitations of single-molecule microscopy for the study of cell signaling are discussed on the example of the chemotactic signaling of the slime-mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule studies, as reviewed in this chapter, appear to be one of the essential methodologies for the full spatiotemporal clarification of cellular signaling, one of the ultimate goals in cell biology.

  14. Cellular contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Cinnamon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular contractility, essential for cell movement and proliferation, is regulated by microtubules, RhoA and actomyosin. The RhoA dependent kinase ROCK ensures the phosphorylation of the regulatory Myosin II Light Chain (MLC Ser19, thereby activating actomyosin contractions. Microtubules are upstream inhibitors of contractility and their depolymerization or depletion cause cells to contract by activating RhoA. How microtubule dynamics regulates RhoA remains, a major missing link in understanding contractility. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed that contractility is inhibited by microtubules not only, as previously reported, in adherent cells, but also in non-adhering interphase and mitotic cells. Strikingly we observed that contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis by a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase. Inhibition of proteolysis, ubiquitination and neddylation all led to complete cessation of contractility and considerably reduced MLC Ser19 phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results imply that cells express a contractility inhibitor that is degraded by ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, either constitutively or in response to microtubule depolymerization. This degradation seems to depend on a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase and is required for cellular contractions.

  15. Piezoelectric nanoribbons for monitoring cellular deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh D.; Deshmukh, Nikhil; Nagarah, John M.; Kramer, Tal; Purohit, Prashant K.; Berry, Michael J.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2012-09-01

    Methods for probing mechanical responses of mammalian cells to electrical excitations can improve our understanding of cellular physiology and function. The electrical response of neuronal cells to applied voltages has been studied in detail, but less is known about their mechanical response to electrical excitations. Studies using atomic force microscopes (AFMs) have shown that mammalian cells exhibit voltage-induced mechanical deflections at nanometre scales, but AFM measurements can be invasive and difficult to multiplex. Here we show that mechanical deformations of neuronal cells in response to electrical excitations can be measured using piezoelectric PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT) nanoribbons, and we find that cells deflect by 1 nm when 120 mV is applied to the cell membrane. The measured cellular forces agree with a theoretical model in which depolarization caused by an applied voltage induces a change in membrane tension, which results in the cell altering its radius so that the pressure remains constant across the membrane. We also transfer arrays of PZT nanoribbons onto a silicone elastomer and measure mechanical deformations on a cow lung that mimics respiration. The PZT nanoribbons offer a minimally invasive and scalable platform for electromechanical biosensing.

  16. Mechanisms of cellular invasion by intracellular parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dawn M; Oghumu, Steve; Gupta, Gaurav; McGwire, Bradford S; Drew, Mark E; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-04-01

    Numerous disease-causing parasites must invade host cells in order to prosper. Collectively, such pathogens are responsible for a staggering amount of human sickness and death throughout the world. Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, toxoplasmosis, and malaria are neglected diseases and therefore are linked to socio-economical and geographical factors, affecting well-over half the world's population. Such obligate intracellular parasites have co-evolved with humans to establish a complexity of specific molecular parasite-host cell interactions, forming the basis of the parasite's cellular tropism. They make use of such interactions to invade host cells as a means to migrate through various tissues, to evade the host immune system, and to undergo intracellular replication. These cellular migration and invasion events are absolutely essential for the completion of the lifecycles of these parasites and lead to their for disease pathogenesis. This review is an overview of the molecular mechanisms of protozoan parasite invasion of host cells and discussion of therapeutic strategies, which could be developed by targeting these invasion pathways. Specifically, we focus on four species of protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium, and Toxoplasma, which are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality.

  17. Cellular factors implicated in filovirus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Hope, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Although filoviral infections are still occurring in different parts of the world, there are no effective preventive or treatment strategies currently available against them. Not only do filoviruses cause a deadly infection, but they also have the potential of being used as biological weapons. This makes it imperative to comprehensively study these viruses in order to devise effective strategies to prevent the occurrence of these infections. Entry is the foremost step in the filoviral replication cycle and different studies have reported the involvement of a myriad of cellular factors including plasma membrane components, cytoskeletal proteins, endosomal components, and cytosolic factors in this process. Signaling molecules such as the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases comprising of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer have also been implicated as putative entry factors. Additionally, filoviruses are suggested to bind to a common receptor and recent studies have proposed T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) as potential receptor candidates. This paper summarizes the existing literature on filoviral entry with a special focus on cellular factors involved in this process and also highlights some fundamental questions. Future research aimed at answering these questions could be very useful in designing novel antiviral therapeutics. PMID:23365575

  18. Cellular Factors Implicated in Filovirus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchita Bhattacharyya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although filoviral infections are still occurring in different parts of the world, there are no effective preventive or treatment strategies currently available against them. Not only do filoviruses cause a deadly infection, but they also have the potential of being used as biological weapons. This makes it imperative to comprehensively study these viruses in order to devise effective strategies to prevent the occurrence of these infections. Entry is the foremost step in the filoviral replication cycle and different studies have reported the involvement of a myriad of cellular factors including plasma membrane components, cytoskeletal proteins, endosomal components, and cytosolic factors in this process. Signaling molecules such as the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases comprising of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer have also been implicated as putative entry factors. Additionally, filoviruses are suggested to bind to a common receptor and recent studies have proposed T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1 and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1 as potential receptor candidates. This paper summarizes the existing literature on filoviral entry with a special focus on cellular factors involved in this process and also highlights some fundamental questions. Future research aimed at answering these questions could be very useful in designing novel antiviral therapeutics.

  19. The role of the Parkinson's disease gene PARK9 in essential cellular pathways and the manganese homeostasis network in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Chesi

    Full Text Available YPK9 (Yeast PARK9; also known as YOR291W is a non-essential yeast gene predicted by sequence to encode a transmembrane P-type transport ATPase. However, its substrate specificity is unknown. Mutations in the human homolog of YPK9, ATP13A2/PARK9, have been linked to genetic forms of early onset parkinsonism. We previously described a strong genetic interaction between Ypk9 and another Parkinson's disease (PD protein α-synuclein in multiple model systems, and a role for Ypk9 in manganese detoxification in yeast. In humans, environmental exposure to toxic levels of manganese causes a syndrome similar to PD and is thus an environmental risk factor for the disease. How manganese contributes to neurodegeneration is poorly understood. Here we describe multiple genome-wide screens in yeast aimed at defining the cellular function of Ypk9 and the mechanisms by which it protects cells from manganese toxicity. In physiological conditions, we found that Ypk9 genetically interacts with essential genes involved in cellular trafficking and the cell cycle. Deletion of Ypk9 sensitizes yeast cells to exposure to excess manganese. Using a library of non-essential gene deletions, we screened for additional genes involved in tolerance to excess manganese exposure, discovering several novel pathways involved in manganese homeostasis. We defined the dependence of the deletion strain phenotypes in the presence of manganese on Ypk9, and found that Ypk9 deletion modifies the manganese tolerance of only a subset of strains. These results confirm a role for Ypk9 in manganese homeostasis and illuminates cellular pathways and biological processes in which Ypk9 likely functions.

  20. Mutations in LMNA modulate the lamin A--Nesprin-2 interaction and cause LINC complex alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In eukaryotes the genetic material is enclosed by a continuous membrane system, the nuclear envelope (NE. Along the NE specific proteins assemble to form meshworks and mutations in these proteins have been described in a group of human diseases called laminopathies. Laminopathies include lipodystrophies, muscle and cardiac diseases as well as metabolic or progeroid syndromes. Most laminopathies are caused by mutations in the LMNAgene encoding lamins A/C. Together with Nesprins (Nuclear Envelope Spectrin Repeat Proteins they are core components of the LINC complex (Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton. The LINC complex connects the nucleoskeleton and the cytoskeleton and plays a role in the transfer of mechanically induced signals along the NE into the nucleus, and its components have been attributed functions in maintaining nuclear and cellular organization as well as signal transduction. RESULTS: Here we narrowed down the interaction sites between lamin A and Nesprin-2 to aa 403-425 in lamin A and aa 6146-6347 in Nesprin-2. Laminopathic mutations in and around the involved region of lamin A (R401C, G411D, G413C, V415I, R419C, L421P, R427G, Q432X modulate the interaction with Nesprin-2 and this may contribute to the disease phenotype. The most notable mutation is the lamin A mutation Q432X that alters LINC complex protein assemblies and causes chromosomal and transcription factor rearrangements. CONCLUSION: Mutations in Nesprin-2 and lamin A are characterised by complex genotype phenotype relations. Our data show that each mutation in LMNAanalysed here has a distinct impact on the interaction among both proteins that substantially explains how distinct mutations in widely expressed genes lead to the formation of phenotypically different diseases.

  1. Pathologic Cellular Events in Smoking-Related Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrower, Edwin [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare, West Haven, CT 06516 (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Pancreatitis, a debilitating inflammatory disorder, results from pancreatic injury. Alcohol abuse is the foremost cause, although cigarette smoking has recently surfaced as a distinct risk factor. The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke and its toxins initiate pathological cellular events leading to pancreatitis, have not been clearly defined. Although cigarette smoke is composed of more than 4000 compounds, it is mainly nicotine and the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), which have been extensively studied with respect to pancreatic diseases. This review summarizes these research findings and highlights cellular pathways which may be of relevance in initiation and progression of smoking-related pancreatitis.

  2. Cellular solidification of transparent monotectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulker, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding how liquid phase particles are engulfed or pushed during freezing of a monotectic is addressed. The additional complication is that the solid-liquid interface is nonplanar due to constitutional undercooling. Some evidence of particle pushing where the particles are the liquid phase of the montectic was already observed. Cellular freezing of the succinonitrile-glycerol system also occurred. Only a few compositions were tested at that time. The starting materials were not especially pure so that cellular interface observed was likely due to the presence of unkown impurities, the major portion of which was water. Topics addressed include: the effort of modeling the particle pushing process using the computer, establishing an apparatus for the determination of phase diagrams, and the measurement of the temperature gradients with a specimen which will solidify on the temperature gradient microscope stage.

  3. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  4. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handling set-up times as well as transfer and process batch size information of multiple products that flow through the system. It is assumed that two sets of discrete material handling devices are used fo...

  5. Identification of Nonstationary Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AndrewI.Adamatzky

    1992-01-01

    The principal feature of nonstationary cellular automata(NCA) is that a local transitiol rule of each cell is changed at each time step depending on neighborhood configuration at previous time step.The identification problem for NCA is extraction of local transition rules and the establishment of mechanism for changing these rules using sequence of NCA configurations.We present serial and parallel algorithms for identification of NCA.

  6. The Origins of Cellular Life

    OpenAIRE

    Schrum, Jason P.; Zhu, Ting F.; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the origin of cellular life on Earth requires the discovery of plausible pathways for the transition from complex prebiotic chemistry to simple biology, defined as the emergence of chemical assemblies capable of Darwinian evolution. We have proposed that a simple primitive cell, or protocell, would consist of two key components: a protocell membrane that defines a spatially localized compartment, and an informational polymer that allows for the replication and inheritance of fun...

  7. Stochastic Nature in Cellular Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 刘圣君; 王祺; 晏世伟; 耿轶钊; SAKATA Fumihiko; GAO Xing-Fa

    2011-01-01

    The importance of stochasticity in cellular processes is increasingly recognized in both theoretical and experimental studies. General features of stochasticity in gene regulation and expression are briefly reviewed in this article, which include the main experimental phenomena, classification, quantization and regulation of noises. The correlation and transmission of noise in cascade networks are analyzed further and the stochastic simulation methods that can capture effects of intrinsic and extrinsic noise are described.

  8. CELLULAR FETAL MICROCHIMERISM IN PREECLAMPSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Gammill, Hilary S; Aydelotte, Tessa M.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Nkwopara, Evangelyn C.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown elevated concentrations of free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid and erythroblasts in maternal circulation in preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. Pluripotent and immunocompetent fetal cells also transfer to the maternal circulation during pregnancy, but whether concentrations of fetal mononuclear cells also differed in preeclampsia was unknown. We sought to quantify cellular fetal microchimerism in maternal circulation in women with preeclampsia and healthy con...

  9. Cellular reactions to patterned biointerfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Vera Antonie

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is to study cellular reactions to topographically, mechanically and biochemically tunable polymeric biomaterials. Different aspects of in vitro cell-biomaterial interactions were systematically studied with the murine fibroblast cell line NIH L929 and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Besides a general cytocompatibility assessment of the applied materials and the quantification of cell adhesion per se, cell morphological changes (e.g. cell spreading) and intr...

  10. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, O.; Sumanovski, L. T.; I. Checiu; Elisabeta Popescu; G. N. Misevic

    1999-01-01

    Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals) have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of...

  11. CtIP Mutations Cause Seckel and Jawad Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Qvist

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome is a recessively inherited dwarfism disorder characterized by microcephaly and a unique head profile. Genetically, it constitutes a heterogeneous condition, with several loci mapped (SCKL1-5 but only three disease genes identified: the ATR, CENPJ, and CEP152 genes that control cellular responses to DNA damage. We previously mapped a Seckel syndrome locus to chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2 (SCKL2. Here, we report two mutations in the CtIP (RBBP8 gene within this locus that result in expression of C-terminally truncated forms of CtIP. We propose that these mutations are the molecular cause of the disease observed in the previously described SCKL2 family and in an additional unrelated family diagnosed with a similar form of congenital microcephaly termed Jawad syndrome. While an exonic frameshift mutation was found in the Jawad family, the SCKL2 family carries a splicing mutation that yields a dominant-negative form of CtIP. Further characterization of cell lines derived from the SCKL2 family revealed defective DNA damage induced formation of single-stranded DNA, a critical co-factor for ATR activation. Accordingly, SCKL2 cells present a lowered apoptopic threshold and hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Notably, over-expression of a comparable truncated CtIP variant in non-Seckel cells recapitulates SCKL2 cellular phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. This work thus identifies CtIP as a disease gene for Seckel and Jawad syndromes and defines a new type of genetic disease mechanism in which a dominant negative mutation yields a recessively inherited disorder.

  12. Progress of cellular dedifferentiation research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hu-xian; HU Da-hai; JIA Chi-yu; FU Xiao-bing

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation, the stepwise specialization of cells, and transdifferentiation, the apparent switching of one cell type into another, capture much of the stem cell spotlight. But dedifferentiation, the developmental reversal of a cell before it reinvents itself, is an important process too. In multicellular organisms, cellular dedifferentiation is the major process underlying totipotency, regeneration and formation of new stem cell lineages. In humans,dedifferentiation is often associated with carcinogenesis.The study of cellular dedifferentiation in animals,particularly early events related to cell fate-switch and determination, is limited by the lack of a suitable,convenient experimental system. The classic example of dedifferentiation is limb and tail regeneration in urodele amphibians, such as salamanders. Recently, several investigators have shown that certain mammalian cell types can be induced to dedifferentiate to progenitor cells when stimulated with the appropriate signals or materials. These discoveries open the possibility that researchers might enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of mammals by inducing cellular dedifferentiation in vivo.

  13. The insect cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael R. Strand

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system of insects is divided into humoral defenses that include the production of soluble effector molecules and cellular defenses like phagocytosis and encapsulation that are mediated by hemocytes. This review summarizes current understanding of the cellular immune response. Insects produce several terminally differentiated types of hemocytes that are distinguished by morphology, molecular and antigenic markers, and function. The differentiated hemocytes that circulate in larval or nymphal stage insects arise from two sources: progenitor cells produced during embryogenesis and mesodermally derived hematopoietic organs. Regulation of hematopoiesis and hemocyte differentiation also involves several different signaling pathways. Phagocytosis and encapsulation require that hemocytes first recognize a given target as foreign followed by activation of downstream signaling and effector responses. A number of humoral and cellular receptors have been identified that recognize different microbes and multicellular parasites. In turn, activation of these receptors stimulates a number of signaling pathways that regulate different hemocyte functions. Recent studies also identify hemocytes as important sources of a number of humoral effector molecules required for killing different foreign invaders.

  14. Predictive model to describe water migration in cellular solid foods during storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.A.; Hirte, A.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Water migration in cellular solid foods during storage causes loss of crispness. To improve crispness retention, physical understanding of this process is needed. Mathematical models are suitable tools to gain this physical knowledge. Results: Water migration in cellular solid foods invo

  15. Predictive model to describe water migration in cellular solid foods during storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.A.; Hirte, A.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Water migration in cellular solid foods during storage causes loss of crispness. To improve crispness retention, physical understanding of this process is needed. Mathematical models are suitable tools to gain this physical knowledge. RESULTS: Water migration in cellular solid foods invo

  16. 75 FR 27672 - Restrictions on Railroad Operating Employees' Use of Cellular Telephones and Other Electronic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... caused by cell phones (mobile phones/cellular phones) have been a concern for years. In addition, each...' Use of Cellular Telephones and Other Electronic Devices AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA... send a text message, dial a phone, or become occupied with another activity while driving. In...

  17. Understanding Genotype-Phenotype Effects in Cancer via Network Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Ah Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is now increasingly studied from the perspective of dysregulated pathways, rather than as a disease resulting from mutations of individual genes. A pathway-centric view acknowledges the heterogeneity between genomic profiles from different cancer patients while assuming that the mutated genes are likely to belong to the same pathway and cause similar disease phenotypes. Indeed, network-centric approaches have proven to be helpful for finding genotypic causes of diseases, classifying disease subtypes, and identifying drug targets. In this review, we discuss how networks can be used to help understand patient-to-patient variations and how one can leverage this variability to elucidate interactions between cancer drivers.

  18. Cellular communications a comprehensive and practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Even as newer cellular technologies and standards emerge, many of the fundamental principles and the components of the cellular network remain the same. Presenting a simple yet comprehensive view of cellular communications technologies, Cellular Communications provides an end-to-end perspective of cellular operations, ranging from physical layer details to call set-up and from the radio network to the core network. This self-contained source forpractitioners and students represents a comprehensive survey of the fundamentals of cellular communications and the landscape of commercially deployed

  19. Evolutionary escape on complex genotype-phenotype networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Marcelo, Esther; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    We study the problem of evolutionary escape that is the process whereby a population under sudden changes in the selective pressures acting upon it try to evade extinction by evolving from previously well-adapted phenotypes to those that are favoured by the new selective pressure. We perform a comparative analysis between results obtained by modelling genotype space as a regular hypercube (H-graphs), which is the scenario considered in previous work on the subject, to those corresponding to a complex genotype-phenotype network (B-graphs). In order to analyse the properties of the escape process on both these graphs, we apply a general theory based on multi-type branching processes to compute the evolutionary dynamics and probability of escape. We show that the distribution of distances between phenotypes in B-graphs exhibits a much larger degree of heterogeneity than in H-graphs. This property, one of the main structural differences between both types of graphs, causes heterogeneous behaviour in all results associated to the escape problem. We further show that, due to the heterogeneity characterising escape on B-graphs, escape probability can be underestimated by assuming a regular hypercube genotype network, even if we compare phenotypes at the same distance in H-graphs. Similarly, it appears that the complex structure of B-graphs slows down the rate of escape.

  20. Cellular Mechanism of Inner Ear Genetic Disease, roles of Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi Nik, Atefeh

    Potassium channels are the most diverse and widely distributed membrane protein in all living organisms. They have various roles in the body such as controlling membrane potential, cell volume, and cell migration. Many studies have shown that mutation in these channels is associated with different diseases for example: Hearing Defect, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Episodic Ataxia, Seizure and Neuromyotonia. One of the most important diseases associated with K+ channel mutations is called Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS). This disease causes bilateral congenital deafness and the patients also suffer from Long QT and they usually experience syncopal episodes in their life and eventually die as a result of cardiac arrest. The gene KCNQ1 encodes the Kv7.1 voltage gated potassium channel. This channel expresses in apical membrane of marginal cell in stria vasularis of cochlea and secret K+ ion to endolymp to keep the endocochlear potential stable, which is necessary for the inner ear to function properly. Kv7.1 channel also expresses in cardiac myocytes and mutation in this gene is associated with another syndrome called Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS). Although Romano-Ward patients have mutation in KCNQ1, similar to Jervell and Lange-Nielsen patients, they only suffer from cardiac defect, and their hearing is completely normal. Several studies identified that mutations in Kv7.1 gene is associated with JLNS and RWS, but the biophysical and cellular mechanisms of these mutations are still unknown. To determine the cellular mechanisms of JLNS and RWS, and to provide mechanistic insight on the functional outputs of JLNS versus RWS mutations, we generated several mutant forms of the human Kv7.1 ( KCNQ1) clone, using site-directed mutagenesis to define their sub-cellular localization and examined their electrophysiological properties. We identified JLNS and RWS mutations at the S4-S5-linker, the pore loop (P-loop) and the C-terminus of hKv7.1 which have been found to control

  1. Hemogoblin phenotypes in Murgese horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Bottiglieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this note we describe two new equine hemoglobin phenotypes found during a survey of the Murgese horse, a rare  Apulian native breed, among whose ancestors the Arabian surely plays an important role. To date we have analysed about  300 individual hemolysates by different chromatographic analyses (PAGIF, IPG, CMC. The results pointed out two unusu-  al patterns where the ratio of the α24Phe60Gln band to the α24Phe60Lys band was 93:7 and 70:30 rather than 60:40  which would have been expected of BII homozygote. Given that the three horses exhibiting the unusual patterns shared  a common ancestor and that none of the possible combinations of the known haplotypes can account for 7-8%  α24Phe60Lys, reasonably a triplicated arrangement has to be postulated. 

  2. Pain relief with lidocaine 5% patch in localized peripheral neuropathic pain in relation to pain phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Dyveke T; Lund, Karen; Finnerup, Nanna B;

    2015-01-01

    periods of lidocaine 5% patch and placebo was performed to search for phenotype differences in effect. The primary efficacy measure was the total pain intensity on an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS), and the primary objective was to compare the effect of lidocaine in patients with and without...... had an effect on peripheral neuropathic pain, and it may be most efficacious in patients with irritable nociceptor phenotype. The lack of significant phenotype differences may be caused by too low statistical power.......In neuropathic pain with irritable nociceptor phenotype, up-regulation of sodium channels on nociceptors is supposed to be an important pain mechanism that may be targeted by topical sodium channel blockade. This randomised, double-blind, phenotype-panel, cross-over study with 4-week treatment...

  3. Reverse genetic screening reveals poor correlation between morpholino-induced and mutant phenotypes in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Fatma O; Shin, Masahiro; Ni, Chih-Wen; Gupta, Ankit; Grosse, Ann S; van Impel, Andreas; Kirchmaier, Bettina C; Peterson-Maduro, Josi; Kourkoulis, George; Male, Ira; DeSantis, Dana F; Sheppard-Tindell, Sarah; Ebarasi, Lwaki; Betsholtz, Christer; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Wolfe, Scot A; Lawson, Nathan D

    2015-01-12

    The widespread availability of programmable site-specific nucleases now enables targeted gene disruption in the zebrafish. In this study, we applied site-specific nucleases to generate zebrafish lines bearing individual mutations in more than 20 genes. We found that mutations in only a small proportion of genes caused defects in embryogenesis. Moreover, mutants for ten different genes failed to recapitulate published Morpholino-induced phenotypes (morphants). The absence of phenotypes in mutant embryos was not likely due to maternal effects or failure to eliminate gene function. Consistently, a comparison of published morphant defects with the Sanger Zebrafish Mutation Project revealed that approximately 80% of morphant phenotypes were not observed in mutant embryos, similar to our mutant collection. Based on these results, we suggest that mutant phenotypes become the standard metric to define gene function in zebrafish, after which Morpholinos that recapitulate respective phenotypes could be reliably applied for ancillary analyses.

  4. Down syndrome phenotypes: The consequences of chromosomal imbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N.; Schipper, R.; Sun, Z.; Gonsky, R.; Gerwehr, S.; Graham, J.M. Jr. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Carpenter, N.; Say, B. (H.A. Chapman Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States)); Daumer, C. (Univ. of Munich (Germany)) (and others)

    1994-05-24

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of mental retardation and congenital heart disease. Besides a characteristic set of facial and physical features, DS is associated with congenital anomalies of the gastrointestinal tract, an increased risk of leukemia, immune system defects, and an Alzheimer-like dementia. Moreover, DS is a model for the study of human aneuploidy. Although usually caused by the presence of an extra chromosome 21, subsets of the phenotypic features of DS may be caused by the duplication of small regions of the chromosome. The physical map of chromosome 21 allows the molecular definition of the regions duplicated in these rare cases of partial trisomy. As a first step in identifying the genes responsible for individual DS features and their pathophysiology, a panel of cell lines derived from 16 such individuals has been established and the molecular break points have been determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Southern blot dosage analysis of 32 markers unique to human chromosome 21. Combining this information with detailed clinical evaluations of these patients, the authors have now constructed a [open quotes]phenotypic map[close quotes] that includes 25 features and assigns regions of 2-20 megabases as likely to contain the genes responsible. This study provides evidence for a significant contribution of genes outside the D21S55 region to the DS phenotypes, including the facies, microcephaly, short stature, hypotonia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and mental retardation. This strongly suggests DS is a contiguous gene syndrome and augurs against a single DS chromosomal region responsible for most of the DS phenotypic features.

  5. Clinical Asthma Phenotypes and Therapeutic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Zedan, M.; Attia, G.; Zedan, M. M.; Osman, A; Abo-Elkheir, N.; Maysara, N.; Barakat, T.; Gamil, N.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that means not all asthmatics respond to the same treatment. We hypothesize an approach to characterize asthma phenotypes based on symptomatology (shortness of breath (SOB), cough, and wheezy phenotypes) in correlation with airway inflammatory biomarkers and FEV1. We aimed to detect whether those clinical phenotypes have an impact on the response to asthma medications. Two hundred three asthmatic children were allocated randomly to receive either montelukast ...

  6. Latent phenotypes pervade gene regulatory circuits.

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Latent phenotypes are non-adaptive byproducts of adaptive phenotypes. They exist in biological systems as different as promiscuous enzymes and genome-scale metabolic reaction networks, and can give rise to evolutionary adaptations and innovations. We know little about their prevalence in the gene expression phenotypes of regulatory circuits, important sources of evolutionary innovations. RESULTS Here, we study a space of more than sixteen million three-gene model regulatory circ...

  7. Latent phenotypes pervade gene regulatory circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Latent phenotypes are non-adaptive byproducts of adaptive phenotypes. They exist in biological systems as different as promiscuous enzymes and genome-scale metabolic reaction networks, and can give rise to evolutionary adaptations and innovations. We know little about their prevalence in the gene expression phenotypes of regulatory circuits, important sources of evolutionary innovations. Results Here, we study a space of more than sixteen million three-gene model regulatory circuit...

  8. Phenotypes and Survival of Hatchling Lizards

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, Daniel Augustus

    2001-01-01

    The phenotypes of hatchling reptiles are influenced by the environmental conditions that embryos experience during incubation, by yolk invested into the egg, and by the genetic contributions of the parents. Phenotypic traits are influenced by these factors in ways that potentially affect the fitness of hatchlings. The physical conditions that embryos experience within the nest affects development, hatching success, and hatchling phenotypes. Thus, the nest site that a female selects can inf...

  9. Marital assortment and phenotypic convergence: longitudinal evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, A; Herbener, E S

    1993-01-01

    This study provides a direct test of whether the observed similarity of spouses is due to initial assortment rather than to convergence of phenotypes. With data from three well-known longitudinal studies, phenotypic convergence is examined using both variable- and person-centered analyses. The longitudinal evidence does not support the hypothesis that couples increasingly resemble each other with time. Spouse correlations most likely reflect initial assortment at marriage and not the convergence of phenotypes.

  10. A Turner syndrome neurocognitive phenotype maps to Xp22.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Frederick F

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Turner syndrome (TS is associated with a neurocognitive phenotype that includes selective nonverbal deficits, e.g., impaired visual-spatial abilities. We previously reported evidence that this phenotype results from haploinsufficiency of one or more genes on distal Xp. This inference was based on genotype/phenotype comparisons of individual girls and women with partial Xp deletions, with the neurocognitive phenotype considered a dichotomous trait. We sought to confirm our findings in a large cohort (n = 47 of adult women with partial deletions of Xp or Xq, enriched for subjects with distal Xp deletions. Methods Subjects were recruited from North American genetics and endocrinology clinics. Phenotype assessment included measures of stature, ovarian function, and detailed neurocognitive testing. The neurocognitive phenotype was measured as a quantitative trait, the Turner Syndrome Cognitive Summary (TSCS score, derived from discriminant function analysis. Genetic analysis included karyotyping, X inactivation studies, fluorescent in situ hybridization, microsatellite marker genotyping, and array comparative genomic hybridization. Results We report statistical evidence that deletion of Xp22.3, an interval containing 31 annotated genes, is sufficient to cause the neurocognitive phenotype described by the TSCS score. Two other cardinal TS features, ovarian failure and short stature, as well as X chromosome inactivation pattern and subject's age, were unrelated to the TSCS score. Conclusion Detailed mapping suggests that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in Xp22.3, the distal 8.3 megabases (Mb of the X chromosome, is responsible for a TS neurocognitive phenotype. This interval includes the 2.6 Mb Xp-Yp pseudoautosomal region (PAR1. Haploinsufficiency of the short stature gene SHOX in PAR1 probably does not cause this TS neurocognitive phenotype. Two genes proximal to PAR1 within the 8.3 Mb critical region, STS and NLGN4X, are

  11. Diagnosis, assessment, and phenotyping of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Halpin, David M; O'Donnell, Denis E;

    2016-01-01

    biomarkers to confirm and further assess the diagnosis of COPD. However, it is possible to identify patients who display different phenotypic characteristics of COPD that relate to clinically relevant outcomes. Currently, validated phenotypes of COPD include alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, and "frequent...... exacerbators". Recently, a definition and assessment of a new phenotype comprising patients with overlapping features of asthma and COPD has been suggested and is known as "asthma COPD overlap syndrome". Several other phenotypes have been proposed, but require validation against clinical outcomes. Defining...

  12. Immunogenetic phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marla C Dubinsky; Kent Taylor; Stephan R Targan; Jerome I Rotter

    2006-01-01

    The currently accepted etiopathogenic hypothesis suggests that the chronic intestinal inflammation and related systemic manifestations characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are due to an overly aggressive or pathologic immune response to resident luminal bacterial constituents. Predisposing factors are genetic dysregulation of mucosal immune responses and/or barrier function, with onset triggered by environmental stimuli. These factors and their interactions may also be important determinants of disease phenotype and disease progression. The emergence of immunogenetic phenotypes lends support to the proposed hypothesis that susceptibility genes regulate distinct immune processes, driven by luminal antigens, expressed as specific immune phenotypes which in turn influence clinical phenotypes in IBD patient

  13. Phenotypic plasticity's impacts on diversification and speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, David W; Wund, Matthew A; Snell-Rood, Emilie C; Cruickshank, Tami; Schlichting, Carl D; Moczek, Armin P

    2010-08-01

    Phenotypic plasticity (the ability of a single genotype to produce multiple phenotypes in response to variation in the environment) is commonplace. Yet its evolutionary significance remains controversial, especially in regard to whether and how it impacts diversification and speciation. Here, we review recent theory on how plasticity promotes: (i) the origin of novel phenotypes, (ii) divergence among populations and species, (iii) the formation of new species and (iv) adaptive radiation. We also discuss the latest empirical support for each of these evolutionary pathways to diversification and identify potentially profitable areas for future research. Generally, phenotypic plasticity can play a largely underappreciated role in driving diversification and speciation.

  14. The immature dentate gyrus represents a shared phenotype of mouse models of epilepsy and psychiatric disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Rick; Kobayashi, Katsunori; Hagihara, Hideo; Kogan, Jeffrey H.; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Walton, Noah M.; Gross, Adam K; Heusner, Carrie L.; Chen, Qian; Tamura, Kouichi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is accumulating evidence to suggest psychiatric disorders, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, share common etiologies, pathophysiologies, genetics, and drug responses with many of the epilepsies. Here, we explored overlaps in cellular/molecular, electrophysiological, and behavioral phenotypes between putative mouse models of bipolar disorder/schizophrenia and epilepsy. We tested the hypothesis that an immature dentate gyrus (iDG), whose association with psychosis in ...

  15. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone.

  16. Estimation in Cellular Radio Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Fredrik; Gustafsson, Fredrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem to track time-varying parameters in cellular radio systems is studied, and the focus is on estimation based only on the signals that are readily available. Previous work have demonstrated very good performance, but were relying on analog measurement that are not available. Most of the information is lost due to quantization and sampling at a rate that might be as low as 2 Hz (GSM case). For that matter a maximum likelihood estimator have been designed and exemplified in the case o...

  17. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  18. Cellular automata a parallel model

    CERN Document Server

    Mazoyer, J

    1999-01-01

    Cellular automata can be viewed both as computational models and modelling systems of real processes. This volume emphasises the first aspect. In articles written by leading researchers, sophisticated massive parallel algorithms (firing squad, life, Fischer's primes recognition) are treated. Their computational power and the specific complexity classes they determine are surveyed, while some recent results in relation to chaos from a new dynamic systems point of view are also presented. Audience: This book will be of interest to specialists of theoretical computer science and the parallelism challenge.

  19. Game of Life Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1960s, British mathematician John Conway invented a virtual mathematical machine that operates on a two-dimensional array of square cell. Each cell takes two states, live and dead. The cells' states are updated simultaneously and in discrete time. A dead cell comes to life if it has exactly three live neighbours. A live cell remains alive if two or three of its neighbours are alive, otherwise the cell dies. Conway's Game of Life became the most programmed solitary game and the most known cellular automaton. The book brings together results of forty years of study into computational

  20. The deubiquitinase activity of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 effector, SseL, prevents accumulation of cellular lipid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ellen T; Auweter, Sigrid D; Antunes, L Caetano M; Vogl, A Wayne; Han, Jun; Guttman, Julian A; Croxen, Matthew A; Menendez, Alfredo; Covey, Scott D; Borchers, Christoph H; Finlay, B Brett

    2011-11-01

    To cause disease, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium requires two type III secretion systems that are encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2). These secretion systems serve to deliver specialized proteins (effectors) into the host cell cytosol. While the importance of these effectors to promote colonization and replication within the host has been established, the specific roles of individual secreted effectors in the disease process are not well understood. In this study, we used an in vivo gallbladder epithelial cell infection model to study the function of the SPI-2-encoded type III effector, SseL. The deletion of the sseL gene resulted in bacterial filamentation and elongation and the unusual localization of Salmonella within infected epithelial cells. Infection with the ΔsseL strain also caused dramatic changes in host cell lipid metabolism and led to the massive accumulation of lipid droplets in infected cells. This phenotype was directly attributable to the deubiquitinase activity of SseL, as a Salmonella strain carrying a single point mutation in the catalytic cysteine also resulted in extensive lipid droplet accumulation. The excessive buildup of lipids due to the absence of a functional sseL gene also was observed in murine livers during S. Typhimurium infection. These results suggest that SseL alters host lipid metabolism in infected epithelial cells by modifying the ubiquitination patterns of cellular targets.

  1. Numerical simulation of Mach reflection of cellular detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Lee, J. H. S.

    2016-09-01

    The Mach reflection of cellular detonation waves on a wedge is investigated numerically in an attempt to elucidate the effect of cellular instabilities on Mach reflection, the dependence of self-similarity on the thickness of a detonation wave, and the initial development of the Mach stem near the wedge apex. A two-step chain-branching reaction model is used to give a thermally neutral induction zone followed by a chemical reaction zone for the detonation wave. A sufficiently large distance of travel of the Mach stem is computed to observe the asymptotic behavior in the far field. Depending on the scale at which the Mach reflection process occurs, it is found that the Mach reflection of a cellular detonation behaves essentially in the same way as a planar ZND detonation wave. The cellular instabilities, however, cause the triple-point trajectory to fluctuate. The fluctuations are due to interactions of the triple point of the Mach stem with the transverse waves of cellular instabilities. In the vicinity of the wedge apex, the Mach reflection is found to be self-similar and corresponds to that of a shock wave of the same strength, since the Mach stem is highly overdriven initially. In the far field, the triple-point trajectory approaches a straight line, indicating that the Mach reflection becomes self-similar asymptotically. The distance of the approach to self-similarity is found to decrease rapidly with decreasing thickness of the detonation front.

  2. Numerical simulation of Mach reflection of cellular detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Lee, J. H. S.

    2016-07-01

    The Mach reflection of cellular detonation waves on a wedge is investigated numerically in an attempt to elucidate the effect of cellular instabilities on Mach reflection, the dependence of self-similarity on the thickness of a detonation wave, and the initial development of the Mach stem near the wedge apex. A two-step chain-branching reaction model is used to give a thermally neutral induction zone followed by a chemical reaction zone for the detonation wave. A sufficiently large distance of travel of the Mach stem is computed to observe the asymptotic behavior in the far field. Depending on the scale at which the Mach reflection process occurs, it is found that the Mach reflection of a cellular detonation behaves essentially in the same way as a planar ZND detonation wave. The cellular instabilities, however, cause the triple-point trajectory to fluctuate. The fluctuations are due to interactions of the triple point of the Mach stem with the transverse waves of cellular instabilities. In the vicinity of the wedge apex, the Mach reflection is found to be self-similar and corresponds to that of a shock wave of the same strength, since the Mach stem is highly overdriven initially. In the far field, the triple-point trajectory approaches a straight line, indicating that the Mach reflection becomes self-similar asymptotically. The distance of the approach to self-similarity is found to decrease rapidly with decreasing thickness of the detonation front.

  3. The Role of ATRX in the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João P. Amorim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are responsible for protecting chromosome ends in order to prevent the loss of coding DNA. Their maintenance is required for achieving immortality by neoplastic cells and can occur by upregulation of the telomerase enzyme or through a homologous recombination-associated process, the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT. The precise mechanisms that govern the activation of ALT or telomerase in tumor cells are not fully understood, although cellular origin may favor one of the other mechanisms that have been found thus far in mutual exclusivity. Specific mutational events influence ALT activation and maintenance: a unifying frequent feature of tumors that acquire this phenotype are the recurrent mutations of the Alpha Thalassemia/Mental Retardation Syndrome X-Linked (ATRX or Death-Domain Associated Protein (DAXX genes. This review summarizes the established criteria about this phenotype: its prevalence, theoretical molecular mechanisms and relation with ATRX, DAXX and other proteins (directly or indirectly interacting and resulting in the ALT phenotype.

  4. The Role of ATRX in the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, João P; Santos, Gustavo; Vinagre, João; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are responsible for protecting chromosome ends in order to prevent the loss of coding DNA. Their maintenance is required for achieving immortality by neoplastic cells and can occur by upregulation of the telomerase enzyme or through a homologous recombination-associated process, the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). The precise mechanisms that govern the activation of ALT or telomerase in tumor cells are not fully understood, although cellular origin may favor one of the other mechanisms that have been found thus far in mutual exclusivity. Specific mutational events influence ALT activation and maintenance: a unifying frequent feature of tumors that acquire this phenotype are the recurrent mutations of the Alpha Thalassemia/Mental Retardation Syndrome X-Linked (ATRX) or Death-Domain Associated Protein (DAXX) genes. This review summarizes the established criteria about this phenotype: its prevalence, theoretical molecular mechanisms and relation with ATRX, DAXX and other proteins (directly or indirectly interacting and resulting in the ALT phenotype). PMID:27657132

  5. Computational genes: a tool for molecular diagnosis and therapy of aberrant mutational phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova Zoya

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A finite state machine manipulating information-carrying DNA strands can be used to perform autonomous molecular-scale computations at the cellular level. Results We propose a new finite state machine able to detect and correct aberrant molecular phenotype given by mutated genetic transcripts. The aberrant mutations trigger a cascade reaction: specific molecular markers as input are released and induce a spontaneous self-assembly of a wild type protein or peptide, while the mutational disease phenotype is silenced. We experimentally demostrated in in vitro translation system that a viable protein can be autonomously assembled. Conclusion Our work demostrates the basic principles of computational genes and particularly, their potential to detect mutations, and as a response thereafter administer an output that suppresses the aberrant disease phenotype and/or restores the lost physiological function.

  6. The Role of ATRX in the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, João P.; Santos, Gustavo; Vinagre, João; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are responsible for protecting chromosome ends in order to prevent the loss of coding DNA. Their maintenance is required for achieving immortality by neoplastic cells and can occur by upregulation of the telomerase enzyme or through a homologous recombination-associated process, the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). The precise mechanisms that govern the activation of ALT or telomerase in tumor cells are not fully understood, although cellular origin may favor one of the other mechanisms that have been found thus far in mutual exclusivity. Specific mutational events influence ALT activation and maintenance: a unifying frequent feature of tumors that acquire this phenotype are the recurrent mutations of the Alpha Thalassemia/Mental Retardation Syndrome X-Linked (ATRX) or Death-Domain Associated Protein (DAXX) genes. This review summarizes the established criteria about this phenotype: its prevalence, theoretical molecular mechanisms and relation with ATRX, DAXX and other proteins (directly or indirectly interacting and resulting in the ALT phenotype). PMID:27657132

  7. Phenotype variation and newcomers in ion channel disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, D E

    1997-01-01

    Ion channels are part of a large family of macromolecules whose functions include the control and maintenance of electrical potential across cell membranes, secretion and signal transduction. Close inspection of the physiological processes involved in channel function and the secondary structure of various ion channels has served as a basis for subdividing ion channels into a number of superfamilies. The voltage-gated ion channels are one of these superfamilies. Recent work has shown that mutations in various ion channel genes are responsible for a number of neuromuscular and neurological disorders. Correlation of the various mutations with the clinical phenotype is providing us with insight into the pathophysiology of these channel proteins. Interestingly, different mutations within the same gene may cause quite distinct clinical disorders, while mutations in different channel genes may result in very similar phenotypes (genetic heterogeneity). Examples of phenotypic variation and genetic heterogeneity are presented in the context of the periodic paralytic disorders of skeletal muscle, episodic ataxia, migraine, long QT syndrome and paroxysmal dyskinesia. Some of these disorders are known to be caused by mutations in ion channel genes, while in the episodic movement disorders, ion channel genes are considered excellent candidate genes.

  8. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E;

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We...

  9. Protein accounting in the cellular economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the copy number of cellular proteins is critical for understanding cell physiology. By being able to measure the absolute synthesis rates of the majority of cellular proteins, Li et al. (2014) gain insights into key aspects of translation regulation and fundamental principles of cellular strategies to adjust protein synthesis according to the needs. PMID:24766801

  10. Genotype-phenotype correlation in 21 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome using high resolution array comparative genome hybridisation (CGH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, N. M. C.; Van Buggenhout, G.; Hannes, F.; Thienpont, B.; Sanlaville, D.; Kok, K.; Midro, A.; Andrieux, J.; Anderlid, B-M; Schoumans, J.; Hordijk, R.; Devriendt, K.; Fryns, J-P; Vermeesch, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is usually caused by terminal deletions of the short arm of chromosome 4 and is phenotypically defined by growth and mental retardation, seizures, and specific craniofacial manifestations. Large variation is observed in phenotypic expression of these fe

  11. Heterogeneity of phenotype in two cystic fibrosis patients homozygous for the CFTR exon 11 mutation G551D.

    OpenAIRE

    Parad, R B

    1996-01-01

    In the heterozygous state, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exon 11 mutation G551D has been described as "severe," causing pancreatic insufficiency. Two cystic fibrosis (CF) patients homozygous for this mutation showed a mild rather than severe pancreatic phenotype and a variable pulmonary phenotype.

  12. Divergence between phenotypic and genetic variation within populations of a common herb across Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Villellas, Jesús; Berjano, Enrique Regina; Terrab, Anass; García González, María Begoña

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the pattern and causes of phenotypic and genetic variation within and among populations might help to understand life history variability in plants, and to predict their responses to changing environmental conditions. Here we compare phenotypic variation and genetic diversity of the widespread herb Plantago coronopus across Europe, and evaluate their relationship with environmental and geographical factors. Genetic diversity was estimated in 18 populations from molecular markers wit...

  13. The Y141C knockin mutation in RDS leads to complex phenotypes in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Stuck, Michael W.; Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the photoreceptor-specific gene peripherin-2 (PRPH-2, also known as retinal degeneration slow/RDS) cause incurable retinal degeneration with a high degree of phenotypic variability. Patient phenotypes range from retinitis pigmentosa to various forms of macular and pattern dystrophy. Macular and pattern dystrophy in particular are associated with complex, poorly understood disease mechanisms, as severe vision loss is often associated both with defects in the photoreceptors, as wel...

  14. Phenotypic robustness can increase phenotypic variability after non-genetic perturbations in gene regulatory circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa-Soto, C.; Martin, O. C.; Wagner, A

    2010-01-01

    Non-genetic perturbations, such as environmental change or developmental noise, can induce novel phenotypes. If an induced phenotype confers a fitness advantage, selection may promote its genetic stabilization. Non-genetic perturbations can thus initiate evolutionary innovation. Genetic variation that is not usually phenotypically visible may play an important role in this process. Populations under stabilizing selection on a phenotype that is robust to mutations can accumulate such variation...

  15. Mobile telephony (cellular) and public health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One third of the world population uses mobile phones or cellular (TM), as possible repercussions on health has resulted in numerous studies. TM and their bases (antennae) exchange information through microwaves, which are non-ionizing electromagnetic radiations. Microwaves have thermal effects, which are avoided by current safety standards. However, there are lingering doubts about possible adverse health consequences of non-thermal effects of microwaves. As a whole, basic and epidemiological research on TM and cancer indicates a very low or nonexistent risk, although longer prospective studies are needed. In the nervous system, TM microwaves cause electrophysiological changes and modifications of blood flow, with little effect on performance. Possible effects on the thyroid gland, the reproductive system, and oxidative stress demand additional research. Some TM users complain of unspecific symptoms, but no causal relationship has been proved either in normal subjects or those self-characterized as hypersensitive to electromagnetic fields. Epidemiological research on populations living close to base stations suggests adverse effects from exposition, but experimental work has yielded contradictory results. The effects on children have just begun to be explored. TM may interfere with medical equipment when the phones are operated very close to the devices. Ironically, the clearest adverse effect of TM has no direct relationship with microwaves. The use of TM while driving causes a decrease in performance comparable to moderate consumption of alcohol and quadruples the risk of accidents. (author)

  16. Two Phase Flow Simulation Using Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical mathematical treatment of two-phase flows is based on the average of the conservation equations for each phase.In this work, a complementary approach to the modeling of these systems based on statistical population balances of aut omata sets is presented.Automata are entities defined by mathematical states that change following iterative rules representing interactions with the neighborhood.A model of automata for two-phase flow simulation is presented.This model consists of fie lds of virtual spheres that change their volumes and move around a certain environment.The model is more general than the classical cellular automata in two respects: the grid of cellular automata is dismissed in favor of a trajectory generator, and the rules of interaction involve parameters representing the actual physical interactions between phases.Automata simulation was used to study unsolved two-phase flow problems involving high heat flux rates. One system described in this work consists of a vertical channel with saturated water at normal pressure heated from the lower surface.The heater causes water to boil and starts the bubble production.We used cellular automata to describe two-phase flows and the interaction with the heater.General rule s for such cellular automata representing bubbles moving in stagnant liquid were used, with special attention to correct modeling of different mechanisms of heat transfer.The results of the model were compared to previous experiments and correlations finding good agreement.One of the most important findings is the confirmation of Kutateladze's idea about a close relation between the start of critical heat flux and a change in the flow's topology.This was analyzed using a control volume located in the upper surface of the heater.A strong decrease in the interfacial surface just before the CHF start was encountered.The automata describe quite well some characteristic parameters such as the shape of the local void fraction in the

  17. Stochastic developmental variation, an epigenetic source of phenotypic diversity with far-reaching biological consequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Günter Vogt

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the production of different phenotypes from the same genotype in the same environment by stochastic cellular events, nonlinear mechanisms during patterning and morphogenesis, and probabilistic self-reinforcing circuitries in the adult life. These aspects of phenotypic variation are summarized under the term‘stochastic developmental variation’ (SDV) in the following. In the past, SDV has been viewed primarily as a nuisance, impairing laboratory experiments, pharmaceutical testing, and true-to-type breeding. This article also emphasizes the positive biological effects of SDV and discusses implications for genotype-to-phenotype mapping, biological individuation, ecology, evolution, and applied biology. There is strong evidence from experiments with genetically identical organisms performed in narrowly standardized laboratory set-ups that SDV is a source of phenotypic variation in its own right aside from genetic variation and environmental variation. It is obviouslymediated bymolecular and higher-order epigeneticmechanisms. Comparison of SDV in animals, plants, fungi, protists, bacteria, archaeans, and viruses suggests that it is a ubiquitous and phylogenetically old phenomenon. In animals, it is usually smallest for morphometric traits and highest for life history traits and behaviour. SDV is thought to contribute to phenotypic diversity in all populations but is particularly relevant for asexually reproducing and genetically impoverished populations, where it generates individuality despite genetic uniformity. In each generation, SDV produces a range of phenotypes around a well-adapted target phenotype, which is interpreted as a bet-hedging strategy to cope with the unpredictability of dynamic environments. At least some manifestations of SDV are heritable, adaptable, selectable, and evolvable, and therefore, SDV may be seen as a hitherto overlooked evolution factor. SDV is also relevant for husbandry, agriculture, and medicine because most

  18. Cellular immunity in Pneumovirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, E.A.W.

    2006-01-01

    Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the leading cause of viral respiratory tract infection in infants worldwide. In the developed world viral bronchiolitis is the most common cause of hospitalization among infants, 70% of these are associated with RSV. In recent years the realization is growi

  19. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mai Thanh Quynh; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian Henry; Gammelgaard, Bente; Furger, Evelyne; Alberto, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN(-) and H2O, respectively), were included as control samples. The results indicated that B12 derivatives delivered cisplatin to both cellular cytosol and nuclei with an efficiency of one third compared to the uptake of free cisplatin cis-[Pt(II)Cl2(NH3)2]. In addition, uptake of charged B12 derivatives including [Cbl-OH2](+), [{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), [{Re}-{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), and [{Co}-CN-{trans-Pt(Cyt)(NH3)2}](2+) (Cyt = cytarabin) was high compared to neutral B12, which implied the existence of an additional internalization pathway for charged B12 vitamin analogs. The affinities of the charged B12 derivatives to the B12 transporters HC, IF and TC were similar to that of native vitamin B12. PMID:26739575

  20. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  1. Cellular automata modelling of SEIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Quan-Xing; Jin Zhen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the SEIRS epidemic spread is analysed, and a two-dimensional probability cellular automata model for SEIRS is presented. Each cellular automation cell represents a part of the population that may be found in one of five states of individuals: susceptible, exposed (or latency), infected, immunized (or recovered) and death. Here studied are the effects of two cases on the epidemic spread. i.e. the effects of non-segregation and segregation on the latency and the infected of population. The conclusion is reached that the epidemic will persist in the case of non-segregation but it will decrease in the case of segregation. The proposed model can serve as a basis for the development of algorithms to simulate real epidemics based on real data. Last we find the density series of the exposed and the infected will fluctuate near a positive equilibrium point, when the constant for the immunized is less than its corresponding constant τ0. Our theoretical results are verified by numerical simulations.

  2. Cellular functions of the microprocessor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Sara; Cordiner, Ross A; Cáceres, Javier F

    2013-08-01

    The microprocessor is a complex comprising the RNase III enzyme Drosha and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 gene) that catalyses the nuclear step of miRNA (microRNA) biogenesis. DGCR8 recognizes the RNA substrate, whereas Drosha functions as an endonuclease. Recent global analyses of microprocessor and Dicer proteins have suggested novel functions for these components independent of their role in miRNA biogenesis. A HITS-CLIP (high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation) experiment designed to identify novel substrates of the microprocessor revealed that this complex binds and regulates a large variety of cellular RNAs. The microprocessor-mediated cleavage of several classes of RNAs not only regulates transcript levels, but also modulates alternative splicing events, independently of miRNA function. Importantly, DGCR8 can also associate with other nucleases, suggesting the existence of alternative DGCR8 complexes that may regulate the fate of a subset of cellular RNAs. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of the diverse functional roles of the microprocessor.

  3. Universal map for cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Morales, V., E-mail: vmorales@ph.tum.de [Institute for Advanced Study – Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 2a, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-08-20

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived. -- Highlights: ► A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA). ► The map is generalized to 2D for Von Neumann, Moore and hexagonal neighborhoods. ► A map for all Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs is derived. ► A map for Conway's “Game of Life” is obtained.

  4. Melanoma screening with cellular phones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Massone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mobile teledermatology has recently been shown to be suitable for teledermatology despite limitations in image definition in preliminary studies. The unique aspect of mobile teledermatology is that this system represents a filtering or triage system, allowing a sensitive approach for the management of patients with emergent skin diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigated the feasibility of teleconsultation using a new generation of cellular phones in pigmented skin lesions. 18 patients were selected consecutively in the Pigmented Skin Lesions Clinic of the Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria. Clinical and dermoscopic images were acquired using a Sony Ericsson with a built-in two-megapixel camera. Two teleconsultants reviewed the images on a specific web application (http://www.dermahandy.net/default.asp where images had been uploaded in JPEG format. Compared to the face-to-face diagnoses, the two teleconsultants obtained a score of correct telediagnoses of 89% and of 91.5% reporting the clinical and dermoscopic images, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work is the first study performing mobile teledermoscopy using cellular phones. Mobile teledermatology has the potential to become an easy applicable tool for everyone and a new approach for enhanced self-monitoring for skin cancer screening in the spirit of the eHealth program of the European Commission Information for Society and Media.

  5. PROGRESSION TO ANDROGEN-INDEPENDENT LNCAP HUMAN PROSTATE TUMORS: CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR ALTERATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jin-Rong; Yu, Lunyin; Zerbini, Luiz F.; Libermann, Towia A.; Blackburn, George L.

    2004-01-01

    Lethal phenotypes of human prostate cancer are characterized by progression to androgen-independence and metastasis. For want of a clinically relevant animal model, mechanisms behind this progression remain unclear. Our study used an in vivo model of androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cell xenografts in male SCID mice to study the cellular and molecular biology of tumor progression. Primary tumors were established orthotopically, and the mice were then surgically castrated to with...

  6. Jagged 1 Rescues the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Natassia M; Elvers, Ingegerd; Alexander, Matthew S; Moreira, Yuri B; Eran, Alal; Gomes, Juliana P; Marshall, Jamie L; Karlsson, Elinor K; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana

    2015-11-19

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by mutations at the dystrophin gene, is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. There is no cure for DMD and current therapeutic approaches to restore dystrophin expression are only partially effective. The absence of dystrophin in muscle results in dysregulation of signaling pathways, which could be targets for disease therapy and drug discovery. Previously, we identified two exceptional Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs that are mildly affected, have functional muscle, and normal lifespan despite the complete absence of dystrophin. Now, our data on linkage, whole-genome sequencing, and transcriptome analyses of these dogs compared to severely affected GRMD and control animals reveals that increased expression of Jagged1 gene, a known regulator of the Notch signaling pathway, is a hallmark of the mild phenotype. Functional analyses demonstrate that Jagged1 overexpression ameliorates the dystrophic phenotype, suggesting that Jagged1 may represent a target for DMD therapy in a dystrophin-independent manner. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26582133

  7. A side effect resource to capture phenotypic effects of drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Michael; Campillos, Monica; Letunic, Ivica;

    2010-01-01

    The molecular understanding of phenotypes caused by drugs in humans is essential for elucidating mechanisms of action and for developing personalized medicines. Side effects of drugs (also known as adverse drug reactions) are an important source of human phenotypic information, but so far research...... on this topic has been hampered by insufficient accessibility of data. Consequently, we have developed a public, computer-readable side effect resource (SIDER) that connects 888 drugs to 1450 side effect terms. It contains information on frequency in patients for one-third of the drug-side effect pairs. For 199...... drugs, the side effect frequency of placebo administration could also be extracted. We illustrate the potential of SIDER with a number of analyses. The resource is freely available for academic research at http://sideeffects.embl.de....

  8. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian M. Lavelle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF.

  9. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  10. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H.V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G.C.M.; Brown, D.L.; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.; Helbig, I.; Hurst, J.A.; Jahn, J.; Jackson, L.G.; Kelly, A.M.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Mansour, S.; Martin, C.L.; Moss, C.; Mumford, A.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Park, S.M.; Riggs, E.R.; Scott, R.H.; Sisodiya, S.; Vooren, S. van der; Wapner, R.J.; Wilkie, A.O.; Wright, C.F.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Leeuw, N. de; Vries, B. de; Washingthon, N.L.; Smith, C.L.; Westerfield, M.; Schofield, P.; Ruef, B.J.; Gkoutos, G.V.; Haendel, M.; Smedley, D.; Lewis, S.E.; Robinson, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have d

  11. Characterization and differential gene expression between two phenotypic phase variants in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Sheila K; Borewicz, Klaudyna; Johnson, Timothy; Xu, Wayne; Isaacson, Richard E

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 798 has previously been shown to undergo phenotypic phase variation. One of the phenotypes expresses virulence traits such as adhesion, while the other phenotype does not. Phenotypic phase variation appears to correlate with the ability of this strain to cause persistent, asymptomatic infections of swine. A new method to detect cells in either phenotypic phase was developed using Evans Blue-Uranine agar plates. Using this new assay, rates of phenotypic phase variation were obtained. The rate of phase variation from non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-4) per cell per generation while phase variation from the adhesive to the non-adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-6) per cell per generation. Two highly virulent S. Typhimurium strains, SL1344 and ATCC 14028, were also shown to undergo phase variation. However, while the rate from adhesive to non-adhesive phenotype was approximately the same as for strain 798, the non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype shift was 37-fold higher. Differential gene expression was measured using RNA-Seq. Eighty-three genes were more highly expressed by 798 cells in the adhesive phenotype compared to the non-adhesive cells. Most of the up-regulated genes were in virulence genes and in particular all genes in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 were up-regulated. When compared to the virulent strain SL1344, expression of the virulence genes was approximately equal to those up-regulated in the adhesive phenotype of strain 798. A comparison of invasive ability demonstrated that strain SL1344 was the most invasive followed by the adhesive phenotype of strain 798, then the non-adhesive phenotype of strain 798. The least invasive strain was ATCC 14028. The genome of strain 798 was sequenced and compared to SL1344. Both strains had very similar genome sequences and gene deletions could not readily explain differences in the rates of phase variation from non-adhesive to the

  12. Characterization and differential gene expression between two phenotypic phase variants in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila K Patterson

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 798 has previously been shown to undergo phenotypic phase variation. One of the phenotypes expresses virulence traits such as adhesion, while the other phenotype does not. Phenotypic phase variation appears to correlate with the ability of this strain to cause persistent, asymptomatic infections of swine. A new method to detect cells in either phenotypic phase was developed using Evans Blue-Uranine agar plates. Using this new assay, rates of phenotypic phase variation were obtained. The rate of phase variation from non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-4 per cell per generation while phase variation from the adhesive to the non-adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-6 per cell per generation. Two highly virulent S. Typhimurium strains, SL1344 and ATCC 14028, were also shown to undergo phase variation. However, while the rate from adhesive to non-adhesive phenotype was approximately the same as for strain 798, the non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype shift was 37-fold higher. Differential gene expression was measured using RNA-Seq. Eighty-three genes were more highly expressed by 798 cells in the adhesive phenotype compared to the non-adhesive cells. Most of the up-regulated genes were in virulence genes and in particular all genes in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 were up-regulated. When compared to the virulent strain SL1344, expression of the virulence genes was approximately equal to those up-regulated in the adhesive phenotype of strain 798. A comparison of invasive ability demonstrated that strain SL1344 was the most invasive followed by the adhesive phenotype of strain 798, then the non-adhesive phenotype of strain 798. The least invasive strain was ATCC 14028. The genome of strain 798 was sequenced and compared to SL1344. Both strains had very similar genome sequences and gene deletions could not readily explain differences in the rates of phase variation from non

  13. Use of zinc-finger nucleases to knock out the WAS gene in K562 cells: a human cellular model for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel G. Toscano

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the WAS gene cause Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS, which is characterized by eczema, immunodeficiency and microthrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASP in lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role on megakaryocyte (MK development is poorly understood. In order to develop a human cellular model that mimics the megakaryocytic-derived defects observed in WAS patients we used K562 cells, a well-known model for study of megakaryocytic development. We knocked out the WAS gene in K562 cells using a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN pair targeting the WAS intron 1 and a homologous donor DNA that disrupted WASP expression. Knockout of WASP on K562 cells (K562WASKO cells resulted in several megakaryocytic-related defects such as morphological alterations, lower expression of CD41ɑ, lower increments in F-actin polymerization upon stimulation, reduced CD43 expression and increased phosphatidylserine exposure. All these defects have been previously described either in WAS-knockout mice or in WAS patients, validating K562WASKO as a cell model for WAS. However, K562WASPKO cells showed also increased basal F-actin and adhesion, increased expression of CD61 and reduced expression of TGFβ and Factor VIII, defects that have never been described before for WAS-deficient cells. Interestingly, these phenotypic alterations correlate with different roles for WASP in megakaryocytic differentiation. All phenotypic alterations observed in K562WASKO cells were alleviated upon expression of WAS following lentiviral transduction, confirming the role of WASP in these phenotypes. In summary, in this work we have validated a human cellular model, K562WASPKO, that mimics the megakaryocytic-related defects found in WAS-knockout mice and have found evidences for a role of WASP as regulator of megakaryocytic differentiation. We propose the use of K562WASPKO cells as a tool to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the megakaryocytic-related defects observed in WAS

  14. The Cognitive Phenotype of Spina Bifida Meningomyelocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Maureen; Barnes, Marcia A.

    2010-01-01

    A cognitive phenotype is a product of both assets and deficits that specifies what individuals with spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM) can and cannot do and why they can or cannot do it. In this article, we review the cognitive phenotype of SBM and describe the processing assets and deficits that cut within and across content domains, sensory…

  15. The autonomic phenotype of rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Cristina; Shapiro, David; Davydov, Dmitry M; Goldstein, Iris B; Mills, Paul J

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that ruminative thoughts may be mediators of the prolonged physiological effects of stress. We hypothesized that autonomic dysregulation plays a role in the relation between rumination and health. Rumination was induced by an anger-recall task in 45 healthy subjects. Heart rate variability (HRV), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and baroreflex effectiveness index (BEI) change scores were evaluated to obtain the autonomic phenotype of rumination. Personality traits and endothelial activation were examined for their relation to autonomic responses during rumination. Degree of endothelial activation was assessed by circulating soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1). Vagal withdrawal during rumination was greater for women than men. Larger decreases in the high frequency component of HRV were associated with higher levels of anger-in, depression, and sICAM-1 levels. BRS reactivity was negatively related to trait anxiety. BEI reactivity was positively related to anger-in, hostility, anxiety, and depression. Lower BEI and BRS recovery were associated with lower social desirability and higher anger-out, anxiety, and depression. Findings suggest that the autonomic dysregulation that characterizes rumination plays a role in the relationships between personality and cardiovascular health. PMID:19272312

  16. Microglial Aging in the Healthy CNS: Phenotypes, Drivers, and Rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai T Wong

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and age-related macular degeneration, share two characteristics in common: 1 a disease prevalence that increases markedly with advancing age, and 2 neuroinflammatory changes in which microglia, the primary resident immune cell of the CNS, feature prominently. These characteristics have led to the hypothesis that pathogenic mechanisms underlying age-related neurodegenerative disease involve aging changes in microglia. If correct, targeting features of microglial senescence may constitute a feasible therapeutic strategy. This review explores this hypothesis and its implications by considering the current knowledge on how microglia undergo change during aging and how the emergence of these aging phenotypes relate to significant alterations in microglial function. Evidence and theories on cellular mechanisms implicated in driving senescence in microglia are reviewed, as are rejuvenative measures and strategies that aim to reverse or ameliorate the aging microglial phenotype. Understanding and controlling microglial aging may represent an opportunity for elucidating disease mechanisms and for formulating novel therapies.

  17. Metabolomic phenotyping of af cloned pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou;

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes...... and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal...... outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5) was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n...

  18. Constraints on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murren, Courtney J; Auld, Josh R.; Callahan, Hilary S;

    2015-01-01

    costly. In addition, we examine opportunities to offset costs of phenotypes through ontogeny, amelioration of phenotypic costs across environments, and the condition-dependent hypothesis. We propose avenues of further inquiry in the limits of plasticity using new and classic methods of ecological......Phenotypic plasticity is ubiquitous and generally regarded as a key mechanism for enabling organisms to survive in the face of environmental change. Because no organism is infinitely or ideally plastic, theory suggests that there must be limits (for example, the lack of ability to produce...... an optimal trait) to the evolution of phenotypic plasticity, or that plasticity may have inherent significant costs. Yet numerous experimental studies have not detected widespread costs. Explicitly differentiating plasticity costs from phenotype costs, we re-evaluate fundamental questions of the limits...

  19. Phenotypic character gradient variation of Melia azedarach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Shiming; GU Wanchun

    2007-01-01

    Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) was applied on the research data of five geographical-climatic factors and 18 phenotypic characters of 729 trees of 24 populations of Melia azedarach distributed in China.The eigenvalue of the first canonical variable is 0.997 9 (significant at 0.01 level),accounting for 78% of all eigenvalues.A study on the principal component analysis (PCA) was done,taking the first canonical variable coordinate values as the phenotypic character gradient axes (PCGA).The isogram of the PCGA was drawn out with 0.2 contours,which showed a geographical model with a northeast-southwest variation trend of the phenotypic characters of M.azedarach.Meanwhile,the path analysis results show the direct and indirect effects of phenotypic characters with phenotypic character gradient values,which prove that the propagative organs,are steadily changing.

  20. Monocyte Activation in Immunopathology: Cellular Test for Development of Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several highly prevalent human diseases are associated with immunopathology. Alterations in the immune system are found in such life-threatening disorders as cancer and atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation followed by macrophage polarization is an important step in normal immune response to pathogens and other relevant stimuli. Depending on the nature of the activation signal, macrophages can acquire pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes that are characterized by the expression of distinct patterns of secreted cytokines and surface antigens. This process is disturbed in immunopathologies resulting in abnormal monocyte activation and/or bias of macrophage polarization towards one or the other phenotype. Such alterations could be used as important diagnostic markers and also as possible targets for the development of immunomodulating therapy. Recently developed cellular tests are designed to analyze the phenotype and activity of living cells circulating in patient’s bloodstream. Monocyte/macrophage activation test is a successful example of cellular test relevant for atherosclerosis and oncopathology. This test demonstrated changes in macrophage activation in subclinical atherosclerosis and breast cancer and could also be used for screening a panel of natural agents with immunomodulatory activity. Further development of cellular tests will allow broadening the scope of their clinical implication. Such tests may become useful tools for drug research and therapy optimization.

  1. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of a novel phenotype in pigs characterized by juvenile hairlessness and age dependent emphysema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Camilla S.; Jørgensen, Claus B.; Bay, Lene;

    2008-01-01

    of musculi arrectores pili, and at puberty or later localized areas of emphysema are seen in the lungs. Comparative mapping predicted that the porcine ITGB6 and ITGAV orthologs map to SSC15. In an experimentall family (n=113), showing segregation of the trait, the candidate region was confirmed by linkage...... analysis with four microsatellite markers. Mapping of the porcine ITGB6 and ITGAV in the IMpRH radiation hybrid panel confirmed the comparative mapping information. Sequencing of the ITGB6 and ITGAV coding sequences from affected and normal pigs revealed no evidence of a causative mutation, but alternative...... resembling the integrin ß6-/- knockout phenotype seen in mice has been characterized in the pig. The candidate region on SSC15 has been confirmed by linkage analysis but molecular and functional analyses have excluded that the mutated phenotype is caused by structural mutations in or ablation of any...

  2. CANCELLED EMT and back again: does cellular plasticity fuelneoplasticprogressi on?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turley, Eva A.; Veiseh, Mandana; Radisky, Derek C.; Bissell, MinaJ.

    2007-02-24

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular transdifferentiation program that facilitates organ morphogenesis and tissue remodeling in physiological processes such as embryonic development and wound healing. However, a similar phenotypic conversion is also detected in fibrotic diseases and neoplasia, in which it is associated with disease progression. EMT in cancer epithelial cells often appears to be an incomplete and bi-directional process. Here we discuss the phenomenon of EMT as it pertains to tumor development, focusing on exceptions to the commonly held rule that EMT promotes invasion and metastasis. We also highlight the role of the Ras-controlled signaling mediators, ERK1, ERK2 and PI3-kinase, as microenvironmental responsive regulators of EMT.

  3. Molecular chaperones: The modular evolution of cellular networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tamás Korcsmáros; István A Kovács; Máté S Szalay; Péter Csermely

    2007-04-01

    Molecular chaperones play a prominent role in signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks of the cell. Recent advances uncovered that chaperones act as genetic buffers stabilizing the phenotype of various cells and organisms and may serve as potential regulators of evolvability. Chaperones have weak links, connect hubs, are in the overlaps of network modules and may uncouple these modules during stress, which gives an additional protection for the cell at the network-level. Moreover, after stress chaperones are essential to re-build inter-modular contacts by their low affinity sampling of the potential interaction partners in different modules. This opens the way to the chaperone-regulated modular evolution of cellular networks, and helps us to design novel therapeutic and anti-aging strategies.

  4. Air Pollution Stress and the Aging Phenotype: The Telomere Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Dries S; Nawrot, Tim S

    2016-09-01

    Aging is a complex physiological phenomenon. The question why some subjects grow old while remaining free from disease whereas others prematurely die remains largely unanswered. We focus here on the role of air pollution in biological aging. Hallmarks of aging can be grouped into three main categories: genomic instability, telomere attrition, and epigenetic alterations leading to altered mitochondrial function and cellular senescence. At birth, the initial telomere length of a person is largely determined by environmental factors. Telomere length shortens with each cell division and exposure to air pollution as well as low residential greens space exposure is associated with shorter telomere length. Recent studies show that the estimated effects of particulate air pollution exposure on the telomere mitochondrial axis of aging may play an important role in chronic health effects of air pollution. The exposome encompasses all exposures over an entire life. As telomeres can be considered as the cellular memories of exposure to oxidative stress and inflammation, telomere maintenance may be a proxy for assessing the "exposome". If telomeres are causally related to the aging phenotype and environmental air pollution is an important determinant of telomere length, this might provide new avenues for future preventive strategies. PMID:27357566

  5. Air Pollution Stress and the Aging Phenotype: The Telomere Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Dries S; Nawrot, Tim S

    2016-09-01

    Aging is a complex physiological phenomenon. The question why some subjects grow old while remaining free from disease whereas others prematurely die remains largely unanswered. We focus here on the role of air pollution in biological aging. Hallmarks of aging can be grouped into three main categories: genomic instability, telomere attrition, and epigenetic alterations leading to altered mitochondrial function and cellular senescence. At birth, the initial telomere length of a person is largely determined by environmental factors. Telomere length shortens with each cell division and exposure to air pollution as well as low residential greens space exposure is associated with shorter telomere length. Recent studies show that the estimated effects of particulate air pollution exposure on the telomere mitochondrial axis of aging may play an important role in chronic health effects of air pollution. The exposome encompasses all exposures over an entire life. As telomeres can be considered as the cellular memories of exposure to oxidative stress and inflammation, telomere maintenance may be a proxy for assessing the "exposome". If telomeres are causally related to the aging phenotype and environmental air pollution is an important determinant of telomere length, this might provide new avenues for future preventive strategies.

  6. Cellular Delivery of RNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlea, Lorena; Puri, Anu; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Bindewald, Eckart; Zakrevsky, Paul; Satterwhite, Emily; Joseph, Kenya; Afonin, Kirill A; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2016-09-12

    RNA nanostructures can be programmed to exhibit defined sizes, shapes and stoichiometries from naturally occurring or de novo designed RNA motifs. These constructs can be used as scaffolds to attach functional moieties, such as ligand binding motifs or gene expression regulators, for nanobiology applications. This review is focused on four areas of importance to RNA nanotechnology: the types of RNAs of particular interest for nanobiology, the assembly of RNA nanoconstructs, the challenges of cellular delivery of RNAs in vivo, and the delivery carriers that aid in the matter. The available strategies for the design of nucleic acid nanostructures, as well as for formulation of their carriers, make RNA nanotechnology an important tool in both basic research and applied biomedical science. PMID:27509068

  7. Discrete geodesics and cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a dynamical notion of discrete geodesics, understood as straightest trajectories in discretized curved spacetime. The notion is generic, as it is formulated in terms of a general deviation function, but readily specializes to metric spaces such as discretized pseudo-riemannian manifolds. It is effective: an algorithm for computing these geodesics naturally follows, which allows numerical validation---as shown by computing the perihelion shift of a Mercury-like planet. It is consistent, in the continuum limit, with the standard notion of timelike geodesics in a pseudo-riemannian manifold. Whether the algorithm fits within the framework of cellular automata is discussed at length. KEYWORDS: Discrete connection, parallel transport, general relativity, Regge calculus.

  8. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  9. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-09-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  10. Novel Materials for Cellular Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi

    modifications for electrochemical nanosensors for the detection of analytes released from cells. Two type of materials were investigated, each pertaining to the two different aspects of such devices: peptide nanostructures were studied for the creation of cellular sensing substrates that mimic in vivo surfaces......' functionalization with biomolecules, metal nanoparticles and chemical functional groups such as thiols, showing the versatility and flexibility of this material's applications. A technique for the patterning of these nanostructures using soft lithography was also developed and tested for suitable cell sensing....... An in vivo investigation also gave evidence of how the peptide nanowires can be used as surface modification in implantable electrodes for neurological measurements. Conducting polymers were utilized in electrode modifications for electrochemical sensor surfaces. Both chemical and electrochemical deposition...

  11. PHENOTYPIC TRAITS IN ZAGORJE TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Janječić

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of turkeys in the region of Hrvatsko zagorje began in second half of 16th century, when there was a little influence of other turkey breeds from other region. Recently, interest for protection and preservation of autochthonous poultry breeds in Croatia is growing and in that sense this investigation was set to determine the phenotypic traits of Zagorje turkey. One hundred 10-month old turkeys (5 males and 20 females of four strains (bronze, black, grey and pale were measured, while egg production data were collected by a poll among the breeders. Average body weight of bronze, black, grey and pale strain males were 7.08, 6.88, 6.10 and 6.09 kg, respectively, while in females the average values were 4.02, 4.07, 3.63, and 3.68 kg. Generally, according to body measures of male birds, other than body weight, of all of the strains of Zagorje turkey, the black one is the biggest, as it had the highest values for body length, length of sternum, length of drumstick, length of shank, depth of chest and head measures. At the same time, the bronze strain had the highest value for carcass width. Body measures mentioned previously were not so different in females. Number of reared chicks was lowest in the pale strain. From the body measures assessed it is possible to conclude that Zagorje turkeys are rather uniform within the strain but differences in most of the breed traits are present between the strains, especially in males of bronze and black strain, when compared to gray and pale strain.

  12. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Aumailley

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles.

  13. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callesen Henrik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5 was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n = 6 by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could not be established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals.

  14. Phenotyping: targeting genotype's rich cousin for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynam, Gareth; Walters, Mark; Claes, Peter; Kung, Stefanie; LeSouef, Peter; Dawkins, Hugh; Bellgard, Matthew; Girdea, Marta; Brudno, Michael; Robinson, Peter; Zankl, Andreas; Groza, Tudor; Gillett, David; Goldblatt, Jack

    2015-04-01

    There are many current and evolving tools to assist clinicians in their daily work of phenotyping. In medicine, the term 'phenotype' is usually taken to mean some deviation from normal morphology, physiology and behaviour. It is ascertained via history, examination and investigations, and a primary aim is diagnosis. Therefore, doctors are, by necessity, expert 'phenotypers'. There is an inherent and partially realised power in phenotypic information that when harnessed can improve patient care. Furthermore, phenotyping developments are increasingly important in an era of rapid advances in genomic technology. Fortunately, there is an expanding network of phenotyping tools that are poised for clinical translation. These tools will preferentially be implemented to mirror clinical workflows and to integrate with advances in genomic and information-sharing technologies. This will synergise with and augment the clinical acumen of medical practitioners. We outline key enablers of the ascertainment, integration and interrogation of clinical phenotype by using genetic diseases, particularly rare ones, as a theme. Successes from the test bed or rare diseases will support approaches to common disease.

  15. Evolution of molecular phenotypes under stabilizing selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Schiffels, Stephan; Lässig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Molecular phenotypes are important links between genomic information and organismic functions, fitness, and evolution. Complex phenotypes, which are also called quantitative traits, often depend on multiple genomic loci. Their evolution builds on genome evolution in a complicated way, which involves selection, genetic drift, mutations and recombination. Here we develop a coarse-grained evolutionary statistics for phenotypes, which decouples from details of the underlying genotypes. We derive approximate evolution equations for the distribution of phenotype values within and across populations. This dynamics covers evolutionary processes at high and low recombination rates, that is, it applies to sexual and asexual populations. In a fitness landscape with a single optimal phenotype value, the phenotypic diversity within populations and the divergence between populations reach evolutionary equilibria, which describe stabilizing selection. We compute the equilibrium distributions of both quantities analytically and we show that the ratio of mean divergence and diversity depends on the strength of selection in a universal way: it is largely independent of the phenotype’s genomic encoding and of the recombination rate. This establishes a new method for the inference of selection on molecular phenotypes beyond the genome level. We discuss the implications of our findings for the predictability of evolutionary processes.

  16. Characterization of cellular titanium for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabe, Nikolas Wilson

    By controlling structural features (relative density, pore size, strut size) of cellular titanium (also known as porous titanium), the mechanical properties can be optimized to reduce the effects of stress shielding currently observed in load-bearing bone replacement implants. Thermal gravimetric analysis of a sacrificial scaffold system lead to important processing modifications in an attempt to meet chemistry requirements for surgical grade titanium not met in previous work. Despite these modifications chemistry did not meet requirements for carbon, nitrogen, or oxygen. Commercially pure titanium (CPTi) porous structures were made over a range of relative densities using laser engineered net shaping (LENS). From monotonic compression tests, yield strength and elastic modulus in the range of bone were achieved but did not scale with relative density as predicted by the Gibson-Ashby analytical model. Compression-compression fatigue resistance was high, as no failures were observed for test stresses up to 133% yield strength, which is thought to be influenced by the dense exterior shell of the samples. Structures were also fabricated over a range of relative densities using selective electron beam melting (SEBM or EBM), and structural, mechanical, and in-vitro properties were measured for three materials (as-built Ti-6A1-4V, Ti-6A1-4V after hot isostatic pressing (HIPing), and as-built CPTi). For structures of all three materials, yield strength and elastic modulus was within the range for bone. Numerical modeling results suggested cell shape and sintered particles on strut surfaces affect the scaling of elastic modulus with relative density and lead to the observed difference from the Gibson-Ashby model. Normalized fatigue strengths at 106 cycles ranged from 0.150.25 for as-built Ti-6A1-4V structures, which is lower than expected. Results for HIPed Ti-6A1-4V structures and CPTi structures suggest that stress concentrations from closed porosity within struts as well

  17. Multi-cellular logistics of collective cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Yamao

    Full Text Available During development, the formation of biological networks (such as organs and neuronal networks is controlled by multicellular transportation phenomena based on cell migration. In multi-cellular systems, cellular locomotion is restricted by physical interactions with other cells in a crowded space, similar to passengers pushing others out of their way on a packed train. The motion of individual cells is intrinsically stochastic and may be viewed as a type of random walk. However, this walk takes place in a noisy environment because the cell interacts with its randomly moving neighbors. Despite this randomness and complexity, development is highly orchestrated and precisely regulated, following genetic (and even epigenetic blueprints. Although individual cell migration has long been studied, the manner in which stochasticity affects multi-cellular transportation within the precisely controlled process of development remains largely unknown. To explore the general principles underlying multicellular migration, we focus on the migration of neural crest cells, which migrate collectively and form streams. We introduce a mechanical model of multi-cellular migration. Simulations based on the model show that the migration mode depends on the relative strengths of the noise from migratory and non-migratory cells. Strong noise from migratory cells and weak noise from surrounding cells causes "collective migration," whereas strong noise from non-migratory cells causes "dispersive migration." Moreover, our theoretical analyses reveal that migratory cells attract each other over long distances, even without direct mechanical contacts. This effective interaction depends on the stochasticity of the migratory and non-migratory cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that stochastic behavior at the single-cell level works effectively and precisely to achieve collective migration in multi-cellular systems.

  18. Establishment of X chromosome inactivation and epigenomic features of the inactive X depend on cellular contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallot, Céline; Ouimette, Jean-François; Rougeulle, Claire

    2016-09-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an essential epigenetic process that ensures X-linked gene dosage equilibrium between sexes in mammals. XCI is dynamically regulated during development in a manner that is intimately linked to differentiation. Numerous studies, which we review here, have explored the dynamics of X inactivation and reactivation in the context of development, differentiation and diseases, and the phenotypic and molecular link between the inactive status, and the cellular context. Here, we also assess whether XCI is a uniform mechanism in mammals by analyzing epigenetic signatures of the inactive X (Xi) in different species and cellular contexts. It appears that the timing of XCI and the epigenetic signature of the inactive X greatly vary between species. Surprisingly, even within a given species, various Xi configurations are found across cellular states. We discuss possible mechanisms underlying these variations, and how they might influence the fate of the Xi.

  19. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings. PMID:27687249

  20. Genetics of human sleep behavioral phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pei-Ken; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Quality sleep is critical for daily functions of human beings and thus the timing and duration of sleep are tightly controlled. However, rare genetic variants affecting sleep regulatory mechanisms can result in sleep phenotypes of extremely deviated sleep/wake onset time or duration. Using genetic analyses in families with multiple members expressing particular sleep phenotypes, these sleep-associated genetic variants can be identified. Deciphering the nature of these genetic variants using animal models or biochemical methods helps further our understanding of sleep processes. In this chapter, we describe the methods for studying genetics of human sleep behavioral phenotypes.

  1. Genotype and phenotype in Klinefelter syndrome - impact of androgen receptor polymorphism and skewed X inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, A; Hertz, J M; Gravholt, C H

    2011-01-01

    The phenotypic variation of Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is wide and may by caused by various genetic and epigenetic effects. Skewed inactivation of the supra-numerical X chromosome and polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) have been suggested as plausible causes. We wanted to describe X-chromo......-chromosome inactivation did not. The impact of CAGn on final height may be caused by later reactivation of the pituitary-gonadal axis....

  2. CD44+/CD24- breast cancer cells exhibit phenotypic reversion in three-dimensional self-assembling peptide RADA16 nanofiber scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kun Mi,1 Zhihua Xing2 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital and Institute, 2Laboratory of Ethnopharmacology, Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Background: Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds have been shown to be a ­permissive biological material for tissue repair, cell proliferation, differentiation, etc. Recently, a subpopulation (CD44+/CD24- of breast cancer cells has been reported to have stem/progenitor cell properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this subpopulation of cancer cells have different phenotypes in self-assembling COCH3-RADARADARADARADA-CONH2 (RADA16 peptide nanofiber scaffold compared with Matrigel® (BD Biosciences, Two Oak Park, Bedford, MA, USA and collagen I.Methods: CD44 and CD24 expression was determined by flow cytometry. Cell proliferation was measured by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine assay and DNA content measurement. Immunostaining was used to indicate the morphologies of cells in three-dimensional (3D cultures of different scaffolds and the localization of β-catenin in the colonies. Western blot was used to determine the expression of signaling proteins. In vitro migration assay and inoculation into nude mice were used to evaluate invasion and tumorigenesis in vivo.Results: The breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-435S contained a high percentage (>99% of CD44+/CD24- cells, which exhibited phenotypic reversion in 3D RADA16 nanofiber scaffold compared with collagen I and Matrigel. The newly formed reverted acini-like colonies reassembled a basement membrane and reorganized their cytoskeletons. At the same time, cells cultured and embedded in RADA16 peptide scaffold exhibited growth arrest. Also, they exhibited different migration potential, which links their migration ability with their cellular morphology. Consistent with studies in vitro, the in vivo tumor

  3. Tumor cell phenotype is sustained by selective MAPK oxidation in mitochondria.

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    Soledad Galli

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are major cellular sources of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2, the production of which is modulated by oxygen availability and the mitochondrial energy state. An increase of steady-state cell H(2O(2 concentration is able to control the transition from proliferating to quiescent phenotypes and to signal the end of proliferation; in tumor cells thereby, low H(2O(2 due to defective mitochondrial metabolism can contribute to sustain proliferation. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs orchestrate signal transduction and recent data indicate that are present in mitochondria and regulated by the redox state. On these bases, we investigated the mechanistic connection of tumor mitochondrial dysfunction, H(2O(2 yield, and activation of MAPKs in LP07 murine tumor cells with confocal microscopy, in vivo imaging and directed mutagenesis. Two redox conditions were examined: low 1 microM H(2O(2 increased cell proliferation in ERK1/2-dependent manner whereas high 50 microM H(2O(2 arrested cell cycle by p38 and JNK1/2 activation. Regarding the experimental conditions as a three-compartment model (mitochondria, cytosol, and nuclei, the different responses depended on MAPKs preferential traffic to mitochondria, where a selective activation of either ERK1/2 or p38-JNK1/2 by co-localized upstream kinases (MAPKKs facilitated their further passage to nuclei. As assessed by mass spectra, MAPKs activation and efficient binding to cognate MAPKKs resulted from oxidation of conserved ERK1/2 or p38-JNK1/2 cysteine domains to sulfinic and sulfonic acids at a definite H(2O(2 level. Like this, high H(2O(2 or directed mutation of redox-sensitive ERK2 Cys(214 impeded binding to MEK1/2, caused ERK2 retention in mitochondria and restricted shuttle to nuclei. It is surmised that selective cysteine oxidations adjust the electrostatic forces that participate in a particular MAPK-MAPKK interaction. Considering that tumor mitochondria are dysfunctional, their inability to

  4. High-throughput phenotypic profiling of gene-environment interactions by quantitative growth curve analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Andrew; Delproposto, James; Giroux, Craig N

    2004-04-01

    Cell-based assays are widely used in high-throughput screening to determine the effects of toxicants and drugs on their biological targets. To enable a functional genomics modeling of gene-environment interactions, quantitative assays are required both for gene expression and for the phenotypic responses to environmental challenge. To address this need, we describe an automated high-throughput methodology that provides phenotypic profiling of the cellular responses to environmental stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Standardized assay conditions enable the use of a single metric value to quantify yeast microculture growth curves. This assay format allows precise control of both genetic and environmental determinants of the cellular responses to oxidative stress, a common mechanism of environmental insult. These yeast-cell-based assays are validated with hydrogen peroxide, a simple direct-acting oxidant. Phenotypic profiling of the oxidative stress response of a yap1 mutant strain demonstrates the mechanistic analysis of genetic susceptibility to oxidative stress. As a proof of concept for analysis of more complex gene-environment interactions, we describe a combinatorial assay design for phenotypic profiling of the cellular responses to tert-butyl hydroperoxide, a complex oxidant that is actively metabolized by its target cells. Thus, the yeast microculture assay format supports comprehensive applications in toxicogenomics. PMID:15033507

  5. Profibrotic Phenotype of Conjunctival Fibroblasts from Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Valerie P.J.; Schmidt, Enno; Offiah, Ifeoma; Galatowicz, Grazyna; Zillikens, Detlef; Dart, John K.G.; Calder, Virginia L.; Daniels, Julie T.

    2011-01-01

    Ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid is an immunobullous disease in which excessive conjunctival fibrosis causes blindness, and the pathogenesis of scarring is incompletely understood. To establish whether profibrotic fibroblasts with an altered phenotype exist in ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid, we compared the functional characteristics of pemphigoid conjunctival fibroblasts to normal conjunctival fibroblasts with respect to cell division; migration; collagen contraction; matrix metalloproteinase, secretion of collagen and chemokines; and myofibroblast differentiation. We found that pemphigoid fibroblasts showed increased cell division (P = 0.01), increased migration in serum-free medium (72 ± 18 migrated cells versus 33 ± 11, P = 0.04), increased collagen contraction in the presence of 10 ng/ml tumor necrosis factor-α, increased collagen type I secretion (P = 0.03), increased secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (P = 0.03), and increased secretion of eotaxin in response to interleukin-13 (P = 0.04). Differences between pemphigoid and normal conjunctival fibroblasts with respect to collagen contraction and MMP secretion in the presence of interleukin-13 were also observed. Together, these findings indicate that pemphigoid conjunctival fibroblasts have a profibrotic phenotype that is maintained in vitro. No differences between pemphigoid fibroblasts obtained from acutely inflamed versus clinically uninflamed conjunctiva were observed. Developing effective antifibrotic therapies will require understanding of the mechanisms that both induce and maintain the profibrotic phenotype. PMID:21224056

  6. Estimating the variation, autocorrelation, and environmental sensitivity of phenotypic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevin, Luis-Miguel; Visser, Marcel E; Tufto, Jarle

    2015-09-01

    Despite considerable interest in temporal and spatial variation of phenotypic selection, very few methods allow quantifying this variation while correctly accounting for the error variance of each individual estimate. Furthermore, the available methods do not estimate the autocorrelation of phenotypic selection, which is a major determinant of eco-evolutionary dynamics in changing environments. We introduce a new method for measuring variable phenotypic selection using random regression. We rely on model selection to assess the support for stabilizing selection, and for a moving optimum that may include a trend plus (possibly autocorrelated) fluctuations. The environmental sensitivity of selection also can be estimated by including an environmental covariate. After testing our method on extensive simulations, we apply it to breeding time in a great tit population in the Netherlands. Our analysis finds support for an optimum that is well predicted by spring temperature, and occurs about 33 days before a peak in food biomass, consistent with what is known from the biology of this species. We also detect autocorrelated fluctuations in the optimum, beyond those caused by temperature and the food peak. Because our approach directly estimates parameters that appear in theoretical models, it should be particularly useful for predicting eco-evolutionary responses to environmental change. PMID:26227394

  7. Cellular pleomorphism in papillary tumors of the pineal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Juliana; Rostad, Steven; Foltz, Greg; Pytel, Peter; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2015-01-01

    Papillary tumor of the pineal region (PTPR) is a recently recognized entity. We present the pathologic findings of two cases of PTPR as examples, and discuss the presence of cellular pleomorphism in these tumors. Patient 1 is a 48-year-old man with a pineal region mass. The tumor had unique biphasic patterns, papillary/pseudopapillary areas, and increased mitotic activity. Juxtaposed areas had marked pleomorphism, including nuclear enlargement, smudgy chromatin, nuclear pseudoinclusions, and cytoplasmic vacuolation. Mitoses were absent in these areas. Immunohistochemical staining revealed strong S100 expression. CAM 5.2 and CK18 were strongly positive in a patchy fashion. MIB1 labeling indices were high in classic PTPR regions but very low in pleomorphic areas. Patient 2 was a 35-year-old male with a pineal region tumor characterized by papillary architecture and overall cellular monotony, rare mitoses, and pleomorphism as a more isolated finding, with associated nuclear enlargement and crowding. S100 and CAM 5.2 labeling were present, and MIB1 labeling index was very low throughout the tumor. We discuss the pathologic and phenotypic features of PTPR. Variable pleomorphism may be present, reflected in size variation and nuclear hyperchromasia, but was not accompanied by increased proliferative activity in these cases, suggesting a degenerative phenomenon. PMID:22622671

  8. Cellular pleomorphism in papillary tumors of the pineal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Juliana; Rostad, Steven; Foltz, Greg; Pytel, Peter; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2013-04-01

    Papillary tumor of the pineal region (PTPR) is a recently recognized entity. We present the pathologic findings of two cases of PTPR as examples, and discuss the presence of cellular pleomorphism in these tumors. Patient 1 is a 48-year-old man with a pineal region mass. The tumor had unique biphasic patterns, papillary/pseudopapillary areas, and increased mitotic activity. Juxtaposed areas had marked pleomorphism, including nuclear enlargement, smudgy chromatin, nuclear pseudoinclusions, and cytoplasmic vacuolation. Mitoses were absent in these areas. Immunohistochemical staining revealed strong S100 expression. CAM 5.2 and CK18 were strongly positive in a patchy fashion. MIB1 labeling indices were high in classic PTPR regions but very low in pleomorphic areas. Patient 2 was a 35-year-old male with a pineal region tumor characterized by papillary architecture and overall cellular monotony, rare mitoses, and pleomorphism as a more isolated finding, with associated nuclear enlargement and crowding. S100 and CAM 5.2 labeling were present, and MIB1 labeling index was very low throughout the tumor. We discuss the pathologic and phenotypic features of PTPR. Variable pleomorphism may be present, reflected in size variation and nuclear hyperchromasia, but was not accompanied by increased proliferative activity in these cases, suggesting a degenerative phenomenon.

  9. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Steve

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin (SM), a natural product, is touted as a liver protectant and preventer of both chronic inflammation and diseases. To define how SM elicits these effects at a systems level, we performed transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies in human liver and T cell lines. Multiple pathways associated with cellular stress and metabolism were modulated by SM treatment within 0.5 to four hours: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed suppression of glycolytic, TCA cycle, and amino acid metabolism by SM treatment. Antiinflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 hours) SM exposure, with suppression of multiple proinflammatory mRNAs and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling. Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that SM inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while SM inhibition of the mTOR pathway in part required DDIT4. Thus, SM activates stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Therefore, natural products like SM may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation.

  10. An expanded model of HIV cell entry phenotype based on multi-parameter single-cell data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozek Katarzyna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 into the host cell involves interactions between the viral envelope glycoproteins (Env and the cellular receptor CD4 as well as a coreceptor molecule (most importantly CCR5 or CXCR4. Viral preference for a specific coreceptor (tropism is in particular determined by the third variable loop (V3 of the Env glycoprotein gp120. The approval and use of a coreceptor antagonist for antiretroviral therapy make detailed understanding of tropism and its accurate prediction from patient derived virus isolates essential. The aim of the present study is the development of an extended description of the HIV entry phenotype reflecting its co-dependence on several key determinants as the basis for a more accurate prediction of HIV-1 entry phenotype from genotypic data. Results Here, we established a new protocol of quantitation and computational analysis of the dependence of HIV entry efficiency on receptor and coreceptor cell surface levels as well as viral V3 loop sequence and the presence of two prototypic coreceptor antagonists in varying concentrations. Based on data collected at the single-cell level, we constructed regression models of the HIV-1 entry phenotype integrating the measured determinants. We developed a multivariate phenotype descriptor, termed phenotype vector, which facilitates a more detailed characterization of HIV entry phenotypes than currently used binary tropism classifications. For some of the tested virus variants, the multivariant phenotype vector revealed substantial divergences from existing tropism predictions. We also developed methods for computational prediction of the entry phenotypes based on the V3 sequence and performed an extrapolating calculation of the effectiveness of this computational procedure. Conclusions Our study of the HIV cell entry phenotype and the novel multivariate representation developed here contributes to a more detailed

  11. Cellular phones: are they detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Osama E; Abou El Naga, Randa M

    2004-01-01

    The issue of possible health effects of cellular phones is very much alive in the public's mind where the rapid increase in the number of the users of cell phones in the last decade has increased the exposure of people to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Health consequences of long term use of mobile phones are not known in detail but available data indicates the development of non specific annoying symptoms on acute exposure to mobile phone radiations. In an attempt to determine the prevalence of such cell phones associated health manifestations and the factors affecting their occurrence, a cross sectional study was conducted in five randomly selected faculties of Alexandria University. Where, 300 individuals including teaching staff, students and literate employee were equally allocated and randomly selected among the five faculties. Data about mobile phone's users and their medical history, their pattern of mobile usage and the possible deleterious health manifestations associated with cellular phone use was collected. The results revealed 68% prevalence of mobile phone usage, nearly three quarters of them (72.5%) were complainers of the health manifestations. They suffered from headache (43%), earache (38.3%), sense of fatigue (31.6%), sleep disturbance (29.5%), concentration difficulty (28.5%) and face burning sensation (19.2%). Both univariate and multivariate analysis were consistent in their findings. Symptomatic users were found to have significantly higher frequency of calls/day, longer call duration and longer total duration of mobile phone usage/day than non symptomatic users. For headache both call duration and frequency of calls/day were the significant predicting factors for its occurrence (chi2 = 18.208, p = 0.0001). For earache, in addition to call duration, the longer period of owning the mobile phone were significant predictors (chi2 = 16.996, p = 0.0002). Sense of fatigue was significantly affected by both call duration and age of the user

  12. The cardiac phenotype in patients with a CHD7 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corsten-Janssen, Nicole; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S; du Marchie Sarvaas, Gideon J;

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in CHD7 cause Coloboma, Heart Disease, Atresia of Choanae, Retardation of Growth and/or Development, Genital Hypoplasia, and Ear Abnormalities With or Without Deafness (CHARGE) syndrome, a variable combination of multiple congenital malformations including heart defects....... Heart defects are reported in 70% to 92% of patients with a CHD7 mutation, but most studies are small and do not provide a detailed classification of the defects. We present the first, detailed, descriptive study on the cardiac phenotype of 299 patients with a CHD7 mutation and discuss the role of CHD7...... in cardiac development....

  13. Elevated oxidative membrane damage associated with genetic modifiers of Lyst-mutant phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen M Trantow

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available LYST is a large cytosolic protein that influences the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, and mutation of the encoding gene, LYST, can cause Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Recently, Lyst-mutant mice were recognized to also exhibit an iris disease resembling exfoliation syndrome, a common cause of glaucoma in humans. Here, Lyst-mutant iris phenotypes were used in a search for genes that influence Lyst pathways. In a candidate gene-driven approach, albino Lyst-mutant mice homozygous for a mutation in Tyr, whose product is key to melanin synthesis within melanosomes, exhibited complete rescue of Lyst-mutant iris phenotypes. In a genetic background-driven approach using a DBA/2J strain of congenic mice, an interval containing Tyrp1 enhanced Lyst-dependent iris phenotypes. Thus, both experimental approaches implicated the melanosome, an organelle that is a potential source of oxidative stress, as contributing to the disease phenotype. Confirming an association with oxidative damage, Lyst mutation resulted in genetic context-sensitive changes in iris lipid hydroperoxide levels, being lowest in albino and highest in DBA/2J mice. Surprisingly, the DBA/2J genetic background also exposed a late-onset neurodegenerative phenotype involving cerebellar Purkinje-cell degeneration. These results identify an association between oxidative damage to lipid membranes and the severity of Lyst-mutant phenotypes, revealing a new mechanism that contributes to pathophysiology involving LYST.

  14. [Paternal GNAS mutations: Which phenotypes? What genetic counseling?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Marie-Laure

    2015-05-01

    Parental imprinting and the type of the genetic alteration play a determinant role in the phenotype expression of GNAS locus associated to pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP). GNAS locus gives rise to several different messenger RNA transcripts that are derived from the paternal allele, the maternal allele, or both and can be either coding or non-coding. As a consequence, GNAS mutations lead to a wide spectrum of phenotypes. An alteration in the coding sequence of the gene leads to a haplo-insufficiency and a dysmorphic phenotype (Albright's syndrome or AHO). AHO is a clinical syndrome defined by specific physical features including short stature, obesity, round-shaped face, subcutaneous ossifications, brachymetarcapy (mainly of the 4th and 5th ray). If the alteration is on the maternal allele, there is a hormonal resistance to the PTH at the kidney level and to the TSH at the thyroid level. The phenotype is known as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a). If the alteration is on the paternal allele, there are few clinical signs with no hormonal resistance and the phenotype is known as pseudopseudo hypoparathyroidism (pseudo-PPHP). Heterozygous GNAS mutations on the paternal GNAS allele were associated with intra uterin growth retardation (IUGR). Moreover, birth weights were lower with paternal GNAS mutations affecting exon 2-13 than with exon 1/intron 1 mutations suggesting a role for loss of function XLαs. Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) is a rare disease of ectopic bone formation, characterized by cutaneous and subcutaneous ossifications progressing towards deep connective and muscular tissues. POH is caused by a heterozygous GNAS inactivating mutation and has been associated with paternal inheritance. However, genotype/phenotype correlations suggest that there is no direct correlation between the ossifying process and parental origin, as there is high variability in heterotopic ossification. Clinical heterogeneity makes genetic counseling a very delicate

  15. Breast cancer phenotypes regulated by tissue factor-factor VII pathway: Possible therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2014-12-10

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women, worldwide. Fortunately, breast cancer is relatively chemosensitive, with recent advances leading to the development of effective therapeutic strategies, significantly increasing disease cure rate. However, disease recurrence and treatment of cases lacking therapeutic molecular targets, such as epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and hormone receptors, referred to as triple-negative breast cancers, still pose major hurdles in the treatment of breast cancer. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches to treat aggressive breast cancers are essential. Blood coagulation factor VII (fVII) is produced in the liver and secreted into the blood stream. Tissue factor (TF), the cellular receptor for fVII, is an integral membrane protein that plays key roles in the extrinsic coagulation cascade. TF is overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. The TF-fVII complex may be formed in the absence of injury, because fVII potentially exists in the tissue fluid within cancer tissues. The active form of this complex (TF-fVIIa) may stimulate the expression of numerous malignant phenotypes in breast cancer cells. Thus, the TF-fVII pathway is a potentially attractive target for breast cancer treatment. To date, a number of studies investigating the mechanisms by which TF-fVII signaling contributes to breast cancer progression, have been conducted. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms controlling TF and fVII synthesis and regulation in breast cancer cells. Our current understanding of the TF-fVII pathway as a mediator of breast cancer progression will be also described. Finally, we will discuss how this knowledge can be applied to the design of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25493229

  16. Radiation, nitric oxide and cellular death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of radiation induced cellular death constitute an objective of research ever since the first biological effects of radiation were first observed. The explosion of information produced in the last 20 years calls for a careful analysis due to the apparent contradictory data related to the cellular system studied and the range of doses used. This review focuses on the role of the active oxygen species, in particular the nitric oxides, in its relevance as potential mediator of radiation induced cellular death

  17. Autophagy and mitophagy in cellular damage control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy and mitophagy are important cellular processes that are responsible for breaking down cellular contents, preserving energy and safeguarding against accumulation of damaged and aggregated biomolecules. This graphic review gives a broad summary of autophagy and discusses examples where autophagy is important in controlling protein degradation. In addition we highlight how autophagy and mitophagy are involved in the cellular responses to reactive species and mitochondrial dysfunction. The key signaling pathways for mitophagy are described in the context of bioenergetic dysfunction.

  18. PhenoBlocks: Phenotype Comparison Visualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, Michael; Hamilton, Peter; Chevalier, Fanny; Breslav, Simon; Khan, Azam; Wigdor, Daniel; Brudno, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of hereditary disorders is a challenging task for clinicians due to the heterogeneity of phenotypes that can be observed in patients. Existing clinical tools are often text-based and do not emphasize consistency, completeness, or granularity of phenotype reporting. This can impede clinical diagnosis and limit their utility to genetics researchers. Herein, we present PhenoBlocks, a novel visual analytics tool that supports the comparison of phenotypes between patients, or between a patient and the hallmark features of a disorder. An informal evaluation of PhenoBlocks with expert clinicians suggested that the visualization effectively guides the process of differential diagnosis and could reinforce the importance of complete, granular phenotypic reporting.

  19. Large phenotype jumps in biomolecular evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bardou, F

    2003-01-01

    By defining the phenotype of a biopolymer by its active three-dimensional shape, and its genotype by its primary sequence, we propose a model that predicts and characterizes the statistical distribution of a population of biopolymers with a specific phenotype, that originated from a given genotypic sequence by a single mutational event. Depending on the ratio g0 that characterizes the spread of potential energies of the mutated population with respect to temperature, three different statistical regimes have been identified. We suggest that biopolymers found in nature are in a critical regime with g0 in the range 1-6, corresponding to a broad, but not too broad, phenotypic distribution resembling a truncated Levy flight. Thus the biopolymer phenotype can be considerably modified in just a few mutations.

  20. Mining skeletal phenotype descriptions from scientific literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Groza

    Full Text Available Phenotype descriptions are important for our understanding of genetics, as they enable the computation and analysis of a varied range of issues related to the genetic and developmental bases of correlated characters. The literature contains a wealth of such phenotype descriptions, usually reported as free-text entries, similar to typical clinical summaries. In this paper, we focus on creating and making available an annotated corpus of skeletal phenotype descriptions. In addition, we present and evaluate a hybrid Machine Learning approach for mining phenotype descriptions from free text. Our hybrid approach uses an ensemble of four classifiers and experiments with several aggregation techniques. The best scoring technique achieves an F-1 score of 71.52%, which is close to the state-of-the-art in other domains, where training data exists in abundance. Finally, we discuss the influence of the features chosen for the model on the overall performance of the method.

  1. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou;

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and...... established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals....... possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal...

  2. Phenotypic profiles of Armenian grape cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroutiounian Rouben

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conservation and sustainable use of grapevine biodiversity in Armenia is particularly important due to the large number of traditional local varieties. Being partially different from European grapevine gene pool, the material of Armenian local cultivars significantly contributes to the understanding of the genetic variation and is valuable source for target selection. During last years many Armenian grapevine cultivars have been already described and their genotypes determined, but some local varieties and wild accessions remain unidentified and their phenotypic characteristics overlooked. The comprehensive analysis of phenotypes is essential for research, including genetic association studies, cultivar evaluation and selection. The goal of our research was the phenotyping on the base of reproductive, carpological and analytical characteristics of 80 Armenian aboriginal and new grape cultivars. Description of phenotypic profiles is important step towards identification and conservation of genetic resources of Armenian grapes. In future, these data can be applied for breeding of improved grape varieties targeted to fresh consumption and wine production.

  3. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of adipogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Dmitrievich Egorov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main components of metabolic syndrome include insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia and arterial hypertension. Obesity is the cause of metabolic syndrome, mainly as a consequence of the endocrine function of adipose tissue. The volume of adipose tissue depends on the size of individual adipocytes and on their number. The number of adipocytes increases as a result of enhanced adipocyte differentiation. The transcriptional cascade that regulates this differentiation has been well studied. The major adipogenic transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor with essential roles in adipogenesis. Its ligands are used to treat metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present article describes the basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of adipogenesis and discusses the impact of insulin, glucocorticoids, cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activating agents, nuclear receptors and transcription factors on the process of adipogenesis. New regulatory regions of the genome that are capable of binding multiple transcription factors are described, and the most promising drug targets for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and obesity, including the homeodomain proteins Pbx1 and Prep1, are discussed.

  4. [Cellular structure of propionibacteria during their multiplication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, E; Kocoń, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the structure of bacterial cells from Propionibacterium genus as well as their structure during the cellular division. On the basis of the observations made in the electron transmission microscope, in uranyl-acetates-tained preparations of ultra-thin specimens of bacteria, it was stated that propionic bacteria appeared in a shape of short rods, possessing regular profiles of cell walls as opposed to Gram-negative bacteria with a very creased edge line. Besides, it was observed that division of cells had place by formation of septum, most probably preceded by the division of mezosome, which is a signal for creating the divisional wall. In the conducted studies, the following phenomena were started: presence of membraneous structure of mezosomes, which is linked with the chain of circular DNA in bacterial cell, appearance of numerous ribosomes in the regions of tangled threads of nucleic acids, and existence of other undefinite elements. Mezosome present in the cell of propionic bacteria is probably linked with the cell wall at least in two places and on the surface of external cell wall at the site of its linking; it causes the change in electronic density, demonstrated by the undefined holes or scars in cell wall. This finding gives the possibility of distinguishing this genus of Propionibacterium, in the respect of morphology, from other bacteria what, in the opinion of the authors, is a new achievement in the studies on the structure of propionic bacteria.

  5. [Cellular structure of propionibacteria during their multiplication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, E; Kocoń, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the structure of bacterial cells from Propionibacterium genus as well as their structure during the cellular division. On the basis of the observations made in the electron transmission microscope, in uranyl-acetates-tained preparations of ultra-thin specimens of bacteria, it was stated that propionic bacteria appeared in a shape of short rods, possessing regular profiles of cell walls as opposed to Gram-negative bacteria with a very creased edge line. Besides, it was observed that division of cells had place by formation of septum, most probably preceded by the division of mezosome, which is a signal for creating the divisional wall. In the conducted studies, the following phenomena were started: presence of membraneous structure of mezosomes, which is linked with the chain of circular DNA in bacterial cell, appearance of numerous ribosomes in the regions of tangled threads of nucleic acids, and existence of other undefinite elements. Mezosome present in the cell of propionic bacteria is probably linked with the cell wall at least in two places and on the surface of external cell wall at the site of its linking; it causes the change in electronic density, demonstrated by the undefined holes or scars in cell wall. This finding gives the possibility of distinguishing this genus of Propionibacterium, in the respect of morphology, from other bacteria what, in the opinion of the authors, is a new achievement in the studies on the structure of propionic bacteria. PMID:6845903

  6. Noise Reduction Potential of Cellular Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Hinze

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rising numbers of flights and aircrafts cause increasing aircraft noise, resulting in the development of various approaches to change this trend. One approach is the application of metallic liners in the hot gas path of aero-engines. At temperatures of up to 600 °C only metallic or ceramic structures can be used. Due to fatigue loading and the notch effect of the pores, mechanical properties of porous metals are superior to the ones of ceramic structures. Consequently, cellular metals like metallic foams, sintered metals, or sintered metal felts are most promising materials. However, acoustic absorption depends highly on pore morphology and porosity. Therefore, both parameters must be characterized precisely to analyze the correlation between morphology and noise reduction performance. The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between pore morphology and acoustic absorption performance. The absorber materials are characterized using image processing based on two dimensional microscopy images. The sound absorption properties are measured using an impedance tube. Finally, the correlation of acoustic behavior, pore morphology, and porosity is outlined.

  7. CYP4F2 affects phenotypic outcome in adrenoleukodystrophy by modulating the clearance of very long-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engen, Catherine E; Ofman, Rob; Dijkstra, Inge M E; van Goethem, Tessa Jacobs; Verheij, Eveline; Varin, Jennifer; Vidaud, Michel; Wanders, Ronald J A; Aubourg, Patrick; Kemp, Stephan; Barbier, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder caused by the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) due to mutations in the ABCD1 gene. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a fatal cerebral demyelinating disease in childhood (cerebral ALD) to a progressive myelopathy without cerebral involvement in adulthood (adrenomyeloneuropathy). Because ABCD1 mutations have no predictive value with respect to clinical outcome a role for modifier genes was postulated. We report that the CYP4F2 polymorphism rs2108622 increases the risk of developing cerebral ALD in Caucasian patients. The rs2108622 polymorphism (c.1297G>A) results in an amino acid substitution valine for methionine at position 433 (p.V433M). Using cellular models of VLCFA accumulation, we show that p.V433M decreases the conversion of VLCFA into very long-chain dicarboxylic acids by ω-oxidation, a potential escape route for the deficient peroxisomal β-oxidation of VLCFA in ALD. Although p.V433M does not affect the catalytic activity of CYP4F2 it reduces CYP4F2 protein levels markedly. These findings open perspectives for therapeutic interventions in a disease with currently limited treatment options. PMID:27425035

  8. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copp& #233; , Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  9. Senescence-associated secretory phenotypes reveal cell-nonautonomous functions of oncogenic RAS and the p53 tumor suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Coppé

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  10. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies proposes to develop a unique structural cellular core material to improve mechanical performance, reduce platform weight and lower...

  11. Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaal, Mate; Bovtun, Viktor; Stark, Wolfgang; Erhard, Anton; Yakymenko, Yuriy; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets (PP FEs) were studied at low frequencies (0.3-33 Hz) by dynamic mechanical analysis and at high frequencies (250 kHz) by laser Doppler vibrometry. Relaxation behavior of the in-plane Young's modulus ( Y11 ' ˜ 1500 MPa at room temperature) was observed and attributed to the viscoelastic response of polypropylene matrix. The out-of-plane Young's modulus is very small ( Y33 ' ≈ 0.1 MPa) at low frequencies, frequency- and stress-dependent, evidencing nonlinear viscoelastic response of PP FEs. The high-frequency mechanical response of PP FEs is shown to be linear viscoelastic with Y33 ' ≈ 0.8 MPa. It is described by thickness vibration mode and modeled as a damped harmonic oscillator with one degree of freedom. Frequency dependence of Y33 * in the large dynamic strain regime is described by the broad Cole-Cole relaxation with a mean frequency in kHz range attributed to the dynamics of the air flow between partially closed air-filled voids in PP FEs. Switching-off the relaxation contribution causes dynamic crossover from the nonlinear viscoelastic regime at low frequencies to the linear viscoelastic regime at high frequencies. In the small strain regime, contribution of the air flow seems to be insignificant and the power-law response, attributed to the mechanics of polypropylene cell walls and closed air voids, dominates in a broad frequency range. Mechanical relaxation caused by the air flow mechanism takes place in the sound and ultrasound frequency range (10 Hz-1 MHz) and, therefore, should be taken into account in ultrasonic applications of the PP FEs deal with strong exciting or receiving signals.

  12. Efficiency of cellular information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Barato, Andre C; Seifert, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We show that a rate of conditional Shannon entropy reduction, characterizing the learning of an internal process about an external process, is bounded by the thermodynamic entropy production. This approach allows for the definition of an informational efficiency that can be used to study cellular information processing. We analyze three models of increasing complexity inspired by the E. coli sensory network, where the external process is an external ligand concentration jumping between two values. We start with a simple model for which ATP must be consumed so that a protein inside the cell can learn about the external concentration. With a second model for a single receptor we show that the rate at which the receptor learns about the external environment can be nonzero even without any dissipation inside the cell since chemical work done by the external process compensates for this learning rate. The third model is more complete, also containing adaptation. For this model we show inter alia that a bacterium i...

  13. A Regulatory RNA Inducing Transgenerationally Inherited Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lea Møller

    . The variation in Arabidopsis enables different regulatory networks and mechanisms to shape the phenotypic characteristics. The thesis describes the identification of regulatory RNA encoded by an enzyme encoding gene. The RNA regulates by inducing transgenerationally inherited phenotypes. The function of the RNA...... is dependent on the genetic background illustrating that polymorphisms are found in either interactors or target genes of the RNA. Furthermore, the RNA provides a mechanistic link between accumulation of glucosinolate and onset of flowering....

  14. Next Generation Sequencing Demands Next Generation Phenotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Hennekam, Raoul CM; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2012-01-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is the most powerful diagnostic tool since the roentgenogram. NGS will facilitate diagnosis on a massive scale –allowing interrogation of all genes in a single assay. It has been suggested that NGS will decrease the need for phenotyping in general, and medical geneticists in particular. We argue that NGS will shift focus and approach of phenotyping. We predict that NGS performed for diagnostic purposes will yield variants in several genes, and consequences of ...

  15. Phenotyping of robustness and milk quality

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, D. P.; Mcparland, S.; Bastin, Catherine; Wall, E.; Gengler, Nicolas; Soyeurt, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    A phenotype describes the outcome of the interacting development between the genotype of an individual and its specific environment throughout life. Animal breeding currently exploits large data sets of phenotypic and pedigree information to estimate the genetic merit of animals. Here we describe rapid, low-cost phenomic tools for dairy cattle. We give particular emphasis to infrared spectroscopy of milk because the necessary spectral data are already routinely available on milk samples from ...

  16. A standardized clinical evaluation of phenotypic diversity in diabetic polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Joachim; Rathmell, James P; David, William S; Chad, David A; Broderick, Alithia C; Perros, Stephen G; Shin, Naomi S; Wells, Jenna L; Davis, John B; DiMaggio, Charles J; Wang, Shuang; Tate, Simon N

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is a major cause of neuropathic pain and a frequent target condition in analgesic treatment trials. Differences in the clinical symptoms and signs associated with DPN suggest distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying nerve damage and dysfunction that are likely to have therapeutic relevance. The aim of this study was to develop a tool for the bedside assessment of painful neuropathies such as DPN that captures the diversity of phenotypes. Sixty-one patients with type 2 diabetes and painful neuropathy, 19 patients with painless DPN, 25 patients with type 2 diabetes but no clinical evidence of neuropathy, and 20 healthy control subjects completed a structured interview (47 items) and a standardized physical examination (39 items). After analyzing critical features of pain and painless symptoms and examining the outcome of physical tests of sensory function, we determined principal components of the phenotypic variance among patients. Increased sensitivity to mechanical or thermal stimuli and, to a lesser extent, the sensory quality of pain or paresthesia were the most discriminating elements of DPN phenotypes. Correlation patterns of symptoms and signs indicated the involvement of functionally distinct nerve fiber populations. We combined interview questions and physical tests identifying these differences in a shortened assessment protocol that we named Standardized Evaluation of Pain and Somatosensory Function (StEPS). The protocol StEPS generates a phenotypic profile of patients with neuropathy. Separate intensity ratings for spontaneous painful symptoms and pain evoked by standard stimuli support a detailed documentation of neuropathic pain and its response to analgesic treatment. PMID:27322439

  17. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: correlation between genotype, phenotype and keratan sulfate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dũng, Vũ Chí; Tomatsu, Shunji; Montaño, Adriana M; Gottesman, Gary; Bober, Michael B; Mackenzie, William; Maeda, Miho; Mitchell, Grant A; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), leading to systemic skeletal dysplasia because of excessive storage of keratan sulfate (KS) in chondrocytes. In an effort to determine a precise prognosis and personalized treatment, we aim to characterize clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in MPS IVA patients, and to seek correlations between genotype, phenotype, and blood and urine KS levels. Mutation screening of GALNS gene was performed in 55 MPS IVA patients (severe: 36, attenuated: 13, undefined: 6) by genomic PCR followed by direct sequence analysis. Plasma and urine KS levels were measured by ELISA method. Genotype/phenotype/KS correlations were assessed when data were available. Fifty-three different mutations including 19 novel ones (41 missense, 2 nonsense, 4 small deletions, 1 insertion, and 5 splice-site) were identified in 55 patients and accounted for 93.6% of the analyzed mutant alleles. Thirty-nine mutations were associated with a severe phenotype and ten mutations with an attenuated one. Blood and urine KS concentrations in MPS IVA patients were age-dependent and markedly higher than those in age-matched normal controls. Plasma and urine KS levels in MPS IVA patients with the severe phenotype were higher than in those with an attenuated form. This study provides evidence for extensive allelic heterogeneity of MPS IVA. Accumulation of mutations as well as clinical descriptions and KS levels allows us to predict clinical severity more precisely and should be used for evaluation of responses to potential treatment options.

  18. A new method for classifying different phenotypes of kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong; Liu, Zexian; Pan, Zhicheng; Qian, Mengjia; Wang, Linyan; Zhu, Tongyu; Xue, Yu; Wu, Duojiao

    2016-08-01

    For end-stage renal diseases, kidney transplantation is the most efficient treatment. However, the unexpected rejection caused by inflammation usually leads to allograft failure. Thus, a systems-level characterization of inflammation factors can provide potentially diagnostic biomarkers for predicting renal allograft rejection. Serum of kidney transplant patients with different immune status were collected and classified as transplant patients with stable renal function (ST), impaired renal function with negative biopsy pathology (UNST), acute rejection (AR), and chronic rejection (CR). The expression profiles of 40 inflammatory proteins were measured by quantitative protein microarrays and reduced to a lower dimensional space by the partial least squares (PLS) model. The determined principal components (PCs) were then trained by the support vector machines (SVMs) algorithm for classifying different phenotypes of kidney transplantation. There were 30, 16, and 13 inflammation proteins that showed statistically significant differences between CR and ST, CR and AR, and CR and UNST patients. Further analysis revealed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network among 33 inflammatory proteins and proposed a potential role of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in CR. Based on the network analysis and protein expression information, two PCs were determined as the major contributors and trained by the PLS-SVMs method, with a promising accuracy of 77.5 % for classification of chronic rejection after kidney transplantation. For convenience, we also developed software packages of GPS-CKT (Classification phenotype of Kidney Transplantation Predictor) for classifying phenotypes. By confirming a strong correlation between inflammation and kidney transplantation, our results suggested that the network biomarker but not single factors can potentially classify different phenotypes in kidney transplantation. PMID:27278387

  19. Endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma M Al-Jasser

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year–old man with pre-existing rheumatic heart disease and aortic regurgitation (AR presented with intermittent fever, ankle swelling and clinical evidence of endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiogram (TEE revealed vegetations and destruction of the aortic valve (AV. Blood cultures grew a gram positive coccobacillus which was phenotypically identified as Abiotrophia defectvia (A.defectiva. A diagnosis of infective endocarditis (IE due to A.defectiva was made. Treatment, with penicillin and gentamicin, was administered for 4 weeks. Mechanical valve replacement was required few days after starting the antibiotic therapy. The patient had a favorable outcome on follow up.Although A.defectiva is an uncommon cause of endocarditis, early and correct identification of this pathogen is important to improve the outcome and the prognosis of patients with IE due to this organism.

  20. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium: past and future perspectives on mouse phenotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Steve D M Brown; Moore, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the function of all mammalian genes remains a major challenge for the biomedical science community in the 21st century. The goal of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) over the next 10 years is to undertake broad-based phenotyping of 20,000 mouse genes, providing an unprecedented insight into mammalian gene function. This short article explores the drivers for large-scale mouse phenotyping and provides an overview of the aims and processes involved in IMPC mouse ...