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Sample records for cellular parameters final

  1. Designing Underwater Cellular Networks Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejman Khadivi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Oceanographic data collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, disaster prevention, assisted navigation and tactical surveillance are some of the applications of underwater networks. Underwater networks should send the gathered information to other users or an offshore station via a base station in the sea. Since the available bandwidth in underwater is severely limited, frequency reuse and cellular networks concepts are very important. In this paper, after driving the ratio of signal to interference for underwater acoustic channels, the constraints for the cell radius are determined. One of the important results of this work is that, for special parameters like bandwidth, it may be impossible to provide the required signal to interference ratio and bandwidth for the network users. Furthermore, in this paper, number of supportable users, per-user bandwidth, and the user capacity for a cellular underwater network are determined.

  2. Estimating cellular parameters through optimization procedures: elementary principles and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akatsuki eKimura

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Construction of quantitative models is a primary goal of quantitative biology, which aims to understand cellular and organismal phenomena in a quantitative manner. In this article, we introduce optimization procedures to search for parameters in a quantitative model that can reproduce experimental data. The aim of optimization is to minimize the sum of squared errors (SSE in a prediction or to maximize likelihood. A (local maximum of likelihood or (local minimum of the SSE can efficiently be identified using gradient approaches. Addition of a stochastic process enables us to identify the global maximum/minimum without becoming trapped in local maxima/minima. Sampling approaches take advantage of increasing computational power to test numerous sets of parameters in order to determine the optimum set. By combining Bayesian inference with gradient or sampling approaches, we can estimate both the optimum parameters and the form of the likelihood function related to the parameters. Finally, we introduce four examples of research that utilize parameter optimization to obtain biological insights from quantified data: transcriptional regulation, bacterial chemotaxis, morphogenesis, and cell cycle regulation. With practical knowledge of parameter optimization, cell and developmental biologists can develop realistic models that reproduce their observations and thus, obtain mechanistic insights into phenomena of interest.

  3. Biological dosimetry: biochemical and cellular parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early after the beginning of radiobiology studies, biochemistry has led to research of a biological dosimeter. From an extensive literature review, methods were selected that might be suitable for dose assessment via biochemical indicators. By now, research both in laboratory animals and in therapeutic or accidental human exposures, do not allow to retain a biochemical parameter alone for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. Several enzymatic activities have been precociously studied after irradiation: from these studies, it seems that analysis of four enzymatic activities in serum (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, amylase, lactic dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase) could be the most useful dosimetry system for mass sorting. Detection of DNA damage or methods for measuring somatic mutations are currently advancing and provide important new opportunities for biological dosimetry of low doses

  4. Boltzmann learning of parameters in cellular neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai

    1992-01-01

    The use of Bayesian methods to design cellular neural networks for signal processing tasks and the Boltzmann machine learning rule for parameter estimation is discussed. The learning rule can be used for models with hidden units, or for completely unsupervised learning. The latter is exemplified ...... unsupervised adaptation of an image segmentation cellular network. The learning rule is applied to adaptive segmentation of satellite imagery......The use of Bayesian methods to design cellular neural networks for signal processing tasks and the Boltzmann machine learning rule for parameter estimation is discussed. The learning rule can be used for models with hidden units, or for completely unsupervised learning. The latter is exemplified by...

  5. Extended abstracts: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response [final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 1999, we organized the 4th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held in Killiney Bay, Dublin, Ireland, on July 17-18. Roughly 75 scientists (about equal numbers of physicists and biologists) attended the workshop, the fourth in a bi-annual series. Extended abstracts from the meeting were published in the Radiation Research journal, vol. 153, iss. 2, pp. 220-238 (February 2000)(attached). All the objectives in the proposal were met

  6. Cellular Neural Networks: A genetic algorithm for parameters optimization in artificial vision applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taraglio, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Zanela, A. [Rome Univ. `La Sapienza` (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1997-03-01

    An optimization method for some of the CNN`s (Cellular Neural Network) parameters, based on evolutionary strategies, is proposed. The new class of feedback template found is more effective in extracting features from the images that an autonomous vehicle acquires, than in the previous CNN`s literature.

  7. Cellular Neural Networks: A genetic algorithm for parameters optimization in artificial vision applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimization method for some of the CNN's (Cellular Neural Network) parameters, based on evolutionary strategies, is proposed. The new class of feedback template found is more effective in extracting features from the images that an autonomous vehicle acquires, than in the previous CNN's literature

  8. Parameters and characteristics governing cellular internalization and trans-barrier trafficking of nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugan K

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Karmani Murugan, Yahya E Choonara, Pradeep Kumar, Divya Bijukumar, Lisa C du Toit, Viness Pillay Wits Advanced Drug Delivery Platform Research Unit, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, School of Therapeutic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Cellular internalization and trans-barrier transport of nanoparticles can be manipulated on the basis of the physicochemical and mechanical characteristics of nanoparticles. Research has shown that these factors significantly influence the uptake of nanoparticles. Dictating these characteristics allows for the control of the rate and extent of cellular uptake, as well as delivering the drug-loaded nanosystem intra-cellularly, which is imperative for drugs that require a specific cellular level to exert their effects. Additionally, physicochemical characteristics of the nanoparticles should be optimal for the nanosystem to bypass the natural restricting phenomena of the body and act therapeutically at the targeted site. The factors at the focal point of emerging smart nanomedicines include nanoparticle size, surface charge, shape, hydrophobicity, surface chemistry, and even protein and ligand conjugates. Hence, this review discusses the mechanism of internalization of nanoparticles and ideal nanoparticle characteristics that allow them to evade the biological barriers in order to achieve optimal cellular uptake in different organ systems. Identifying these parameters assists with the progression of nanomedicine as an outstanding vector of pharmaceuticals. Keywords: nanoparticles, transport mechanisms, cellular uptake, size, shape, charge

  9. Genetic algorithms for determining the parameters of cellular automata in urban simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Xia; YANG; QingSheng; LIU; XiaoPing

    2007-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that cellular automata (CA) can be a useful tool for analyzing the process of many geographical phenomena. There are many studies on using CA to simulate the evolution of cites. Urban dynamics is determined by many spatial variables. The contribution of each spatial variable to the simulation is quantified by its parameter or weight. Calibration procedures are usually required for obtaining a suitable set of parameters so that the realistic urban forms can be simulated. Each parameter has a unique role in controlling urban morphology in the simulation. In this paper, these parameters for urban simulation are determined by using empirical data. Genetic algorithms are used to search for the optimal combination of these parameters. There are spatial variations for urban dynamics in a large region. Distinct sets of parameters can be used to represent the unique features of urban dynamics for various subregions. A further experiment is to evaluate each set of parameters based on the theories of compact cities. It is considered that the better set of parameters can be identified according to the utility function in terms of compact development. This set of parameters can be cloned to other regions to improve overall urban morphology. The original parameters can be also modified to produce more compact urban forms for planning purposes. This approach can provide a useful exploratory tool for testing various planning scenarios for urban development.

  10. Cellular and subcellular oxidative stress parameters following severe spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visavadiya, Nishant P; Patel, Samir P; VanRooyen, Jenna L; Sullivan, Patrick G; Rabchevsky, Alexander G

    2016-08-01

    The present study undertook a comprehensive assessment of the acute biochemical oxidative stress parameters in both cellular and, notably, mitochondrial isolates following severe upper lumbar contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) in adult female Sprague Dawley rats. At 24h post-injury, spinal cord tissue homogenate and mitochondrial fractions were isolated concurrently and assessed for glutathione (GSH) content and production of nitric oxide (NO(•)), in addition to the presence of oxidative stress markers 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), protein carbonyl (PC), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Moreover, we assessed production of superoxide (O2(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in mitochondrial fractions. Quantitative biochemical analyses showed that compared to sham, SCI significantly lowered GSH content accompanied by increased NO(•) production in both cellular and mitochondrial fractions. SCI also resulted in increased O2(•-) and H2O2 levels in mitochondrial fractions. Western blot analysis further showed that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) mediated PC and 3-NT production were significantly higher in both fractions after SCI. Conversely, neither 4-HNE levels nor LPO formation were increased at 24h after injury in either tissue homogenate or mitochondrial fractions. These results indicate that by 24h post-injury ROS-induced protein oxidation is more prominent compared to lipid oxidation, indicating a critical temporal distinction in secondary pathophysiology that is critical in designing therapeutic approaches to mitigate consequences of oxidative stress. PMID:26760911

  11. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and processing parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2015-03-01

    Selective laser melting is yet to become a standardized industrial manufacturing technique. The process continues to suffer from defects such as distortions, residual stresses, localized deformations and warpage caused primarily due to the localized heating, rapid cooling and high temperature gradients that occur during the process. While process monitoring and control of selective laser melting is an active area of research, establishing the reliability and robustness of the process still remains a challenge. In this paper, a methodology for generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and process parameters for selective laser melting of a standard sample is introduced. The processing of the sample is simulated by sequentially coupling a calibrated 3D pseudo-analytical thermal model with a 3D finite element mechanical model. The optimized processing parameters are subjected to a Monte Carlo method based uncertainty and reliability analysis. The reliability of the scanning paths are established using cumulative probability distribution functions for process output criteria such as sample density, thermal homogeneity, etc. A customized genetic algorithm is used along with the simulation model to generate optimized cellular scanning strategies and processing parameters, with an objective of reducing thermal asymmetries and mechanical deformations. The optimized scanning strategies are used for selective laser melting of the standard samples, and experimental and numerical results are compared.

  12. Effect of preoperative immunonutrition and other nutrition models on cellular immune parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusuf Gunerhan; Neset Koksal; Umit Yasar Sahin; Mehmet Ali Uzun; Emel Ek(s)ioglu-Demiralp

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of preoperative immunonutrition and other nutrition models on the cellular immunity parameters of patients with gastrointestinal tumors before surgical intervention. In addition, effects on postoperative complications were examined.METHODS: Patients with gastrointestinal tumors were randomized into 3 groups. The immunonutrition group received a combination of arginine, fatty acids and nucleotides. The second and third group received normal nutrition and standard enteral nutrition,respectively. Nutrition protocols were administered for 7 d prior to the operation. Nutritional parameters,in particular prealbumin levels and lymphocyte subpopulations (CD4+, CD8+, CD16+/56+, and CD69 cells) were evaluated before and after the nutrition protocols. Groups were compared in terms of postoperative complications and duration of hospital stay.RESULTS: Of the 42 patients who completed the study, 16 received immunonutrition, 13 received normal nutrition and 13 received standard enteral nutrition.prealbumin values were low in every group, but this parameter was improved after the nutritional protocol only in the immunonutrition group (13.64 ± 8.83vs 15.98 ± 8.66, P = 0.037). Groups were similar in terms of CD4+, CD16+/56, and CD69+ prior to the nutritional protocol; whereas CD8+ was higher in the standard nutrition group compared to the immunonutrition group. After nutritional protocols,none of the groups had an increase in their lymphocyte subpopulations. Also, groups did not differ in terms of postoperative complications and postoperative durations of hospital stay.CONCLUSION: Preoperative immunonutrition provided a significant increase in prealbumin levels,while it did not significantly alter T lymphocyte subpopulation counts, the rate of postoperative complications and the duration of hospital stay.

  13. Real time kinetic flow cytometry measurements of cellular parameter changes evoked by nanosecond pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbán, Csaba; Pérez-García, Esther; Bajnok, Anna; McBean, Gethin; Toldi, Gergely; Blanco-Fernandez, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a novel method to increase cell proliferation rate. The phenomenon is based on the microporation of cellular organelles and membranes. However, we have limited information on the effects of nsPEF on cell physiology. Several studies have attempted to describe the effects of this process, however no real time measurements have been conducted to date. In this study we designed a model system which allows the measurement of cellular processes before, during and after nsPEF treatment in real time. The system employs a Vabrema Mitoplicator(TM) nsPEF field generating instrument connected to a BD Accuri C6 cytometer with a silicon tube led through a peristaltic pump. This model system was applied to observe the effects of nsPEF in mammalian C6 glioblastoma (C6 glioma) and HEK-293 cell lines. Viability (using DRAQ7 dye), intracellular calcium levels (using Fluo-4 dye) and scatter characteristics were measured in a kinetic manner. Data were analyzed using the FACSKin software. The viability and morphology of the investigated cells was not altered upon nsPEF treatment. The response of HEK-293 cells to ionomycin as positive control was significantly lower in the nsPEF treated samples compared to non-treated cells. This difference was not observed in C6 cells. FSC and SSC values were not altered significantly by the nsPEF treatment. Our results indicate that this model system is capable of reliably investigating the effects of nsPEF on cellular processes in real time. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:26990601

  14. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and processing parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    Selective laser melting is yet to become a standardized industrial manufacturing technique. The process continues to suffer from defects such as distortions, residual stresses, localized deformations and warpage caused primarily due to the localized heating, rapid cooling and high temperature...... gradients that occur during the process. While process monitoring and control of selective laser melting is an active area of research, establishing the reliability and robustness of the process still remains a challenge.In this paper, a methodology for generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and...... process parameters for selective laser melting of a standard sample is introduced. The processing of the sample is simulated by sequentially coupling a calibrated 3D pseudo-analytical thermal model with a 3D finite element mechanical model.The optimized processing parameters are subjected to a Monte Carlo...

  15. Experimental study on detonation parameters and cellular structures of fuel cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li-Feng; Li, Bin; Zhang, Yu-Lei

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, detonation parameters of fuel cloud, such as propylene oxide (PO), isopropyl nitrate (IPN), hexane, 90# oil and decane were measured in a self-designed and constructed vertical shock tube. Results show that the detonation pressure and velocity of PO increase to a peak value and then decrease smoothly with increasing equivalence ratio. Several nitrate sensitizers were added into PO to make fuel mixtures, and test results indicated that the additives can efficiently enhance detonation velocity and pressure of fuel cloud and one type of additive n-propyl nitrate (NPN) played the best in the improvement. The critical initiation energy that directly initiated detonation of all the test liquid fuel clouds showed a U-shape curve relationship with equivalence ratios. The optimum concentration lies on the rich-fuel side ( ϕ > 1). The critical initiation energy is closely related to molecular structure and volatility of fuels. IPN and PO have similar critical values while that of alkanes are larger. Detonation cell sizes of PO were respectively investigated at 25°C, 35°C and 50°C with smoked foil technique. The cell width shows a U-shape curve relationship with equivalence ratios at all temperatures. The minimal cell width also lies on the rich-fuel side ( ϕ > 1). The cell width of PO vapor is slightly larger than that of PO cloud. Therefore, the detonation reaction of PO at normal temperature is controlled by gas phase reaction.

  16. Experimental study on detonation parameters and cellular structures of fuel cloud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Feng Xie; Bin Li; Yu-Lei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,detonation parameters of fuel cloud,such as propylene oxide (PO),isopropyl nitrate (IPN),hexane,90# oil and decane were measured in a self-designed and constructed vertical shock tube.Results show that the detonation pressure and velocity of PO increase to a peak value and then decrease smoothly with increasing equivalence ratio.Several nitrate sensitizers were added into PO to make fuel mixtures,and test results indicated that the additives can efficiently enhance detonation velocity and pressure of fuel cloud and one type of additive n-propyl nitrate (NPN) played the best in the improvement.The critical initiation energy that directly initiated detonation of all the test liquid fuel clouds showed a U-shape curve relationship with equivalence ratios.The optimum concentration lies on the rich-fuel side (φ > 1).The critical initiation energy is closely related to molecular structure and volatility of fuels.IPN and PO have similar critical values while that of alkanes are larger.Detonation cell sizes of PO were respectively investigated at 25℃,35℃ and 50℃ with smoked foil technique.The cell width shows a U-shape curve relationship with equivalence ratios at all temperatures.The minimal cell width also lies on the rich-fuel side (φ > 1).The cell width of PO vapor is slightly larger than that of PO cloud.Therefore,the detonation reaction of PO at normal temperature is controlled by gas phase reaction.

  17. Effects of cellular parameters on the in vitro osteogenic potential of dual-gelling mesenchymal stem cell-laden hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Tiffany N; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mikos, Antonios G

    2016-08-01

    This work investigated the effects of cellular encapsulation density and differentiation stage on the osteogenic capacity of injectable, dual physically and chemically gelling hydrogels comprised of thermogelling macromers and polyamidoamine crosslinkers. Undifferentiated and osteogenically predifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were encapsulated within 20 wt% composite hydrogels with gelatin microparticles at densities of six or 15 million cells/mL. We hypothesized that a high encapsulation density and predifferentiation would promote increased cellular interaction and accelerate osteogenesis, leading to enhanced osteogenic potential in vitro. Hydrogels were able to maintain the viability of the encapsulated cells over a period of 28 days, with the high encapsulation density and predifferentiation group possessing the highest DNA content at all time points. Early alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization were promoted by encapsulation density, whereas this effect by predifferentiation was only observed in the low seeding density groups. Both parameters only demonstrated short-lived effects when examined independently, but jointly led to greater levels of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization. The combined effects suggest that there may be optimal encapsulation densities and differentiation periods that need to be investigated to improve MSCs for biomaterial-based therapeutics in bone tissue engineering. PMID:27328947

  18. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity. Final report, September 15, 1988--September 14, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L.R.; D`Surney, S.J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1991-12-15

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

  19. Characterization of clear cell renal cell carcinoma with diffusion kurtosis imaging: correlation between diffusion kurtosis parameters and tumor cellularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yongming; Yao, Qiuying; Wu, Guangyu; Wu, Dongmei; Wu, Lianming; Zhu, Li; Xue, Rong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) in the characterization of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and to correlate DKI parameters with tumor cellularity. Fifty-nine patients with pathologically diagnosed ccRCCs were evaluated by DKI on a 3-T scanner. Regions of interest were drawn on the maps of the mean diffusion coefficient (MD) and mean diffusion kurtosis (MK). All ccRCCs were histologically graded according to the Fuhrman classification system. Tumor cellularity was measured by the nuclear-to-cytoplasm (N/C) ratio and the number of tumor cell nuclei (NTCN). ccRCCs were classified as grade 1 (n = 23), grade 2 (n = 24), grade 3 (n = 10) and grade 4 (n = 3). Both MD and MK could readily discriminate between normal renal parenchyma and ccRCCs (p  0.05) for both MD and MK. With regard to NTCN, no significant difference was found between any two grades (p > 0.05), and the N/C ratio changed significantly with grade (p correlations were found between MK and MD (r = -0.56, p r = -0.36, p correlated (r = 0.45, p = 0.003). DKI could quantitatively characterize ccRCC with different grades by probing non-Gaussian diffusion properties related to changes in the tumor microenvironment or tissue complexities in the tumor. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27119793

  20. Investigations of cellular parameters to establish the response of a biomodulator: galactoside-specific Lectin from Viscum album plant extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajto, T; Hostanska, K; Fischer, J; Lentzen, H

    1996-09-01

    Injections of non-toxic doses of purified galactoside-specific lectin from the Viscum album plant (VAA-I) caused significant changes in the cellular host defense system in animal models. To establish the immunomodulatory potency of VAA-I on human subjects, four randomized double blind crossover trials were performed on healthy volunteers. In the first and second trials using either older (storage over 8 months at 4°C) or freshly (application immediately after production) isolated lectin enriched preparation from mistletoe extract by ultrafiltration with known VAA-I content, the effect of lectin on the number of CD 3+, CD4+, CD 8+, CD 16+/56+ cells, natural killer cytotoxicity and frequency of large granular lymphocytes was tested in peripheral blood of nine and eight individuals, respectively. In comparison to the significant increase in the number of peripheral lymphocytes observed in balb/c mice, human healthy individuals showed no significant difference between their responses after lectin enriched preparation and saline treatment. Due the considerable intrinsic fluctuation of these parameters in placebo control and the assumption that a change in immunomodulatory potency of VAA-I in lectin enriched preparation depends on aging, a third and fourth double blind trial, in this case using freshly isolated VAA-I from plant, were performed on six and eight healthy volunteers, respectively. In these studies an other more rapidly detectable parameter, the priming of polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes, was monitored. In both studies, 5 h after lectin injection, significant enhancement in priming of circulating PMNs was found compared to the placebo response. PMID:23194960

  1. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (landfill final cover soil.

  2. A summary of the sources of input parameter values for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant final porosity surface calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the input parameter values used in final predictions of closure and waste densification in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room is presented, along with supporting references. These predictions are referred to as the final porosity surface data and will be used for WIPP performance calculations supporting the Compliance Certification Application to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report includes tables and list all of the input parameter values, references citing their source, and in some cases references to more complete descriptions of considerations leading to the selection of values

  3. Semen molecular and cellular features: these parameters can reliably predict subsequent ART outcome in a goat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mereu Paolo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, the assessment of sperm function in a raw or processed semen sample is not able to reliably predict sperm ability to withstand freezing and thawing procedures and in vivo fertility and/or assisted reproductive biotechnologies (ART outcome. The aim of the present study was to investigate which parameters among a battery of analyses could predict subsequent spermatozoa in vitro fertilization ability and hence blastocyst output in a goat model. Ejaculates were obtained by artificial vagina from 3 adult goats (Capra hircus aged 2 years (A, B and C. In order to assess the predictive value of viability, computer assisted sperm analyzer (CASA motility parameters and ATP intracellular concentration before and after thawing and of DNA integrity after thawing on subsequent embryo output after an in vitro fertility test, a logistic regression analysis was used. Individual differences in semen parameters were evident for semen viability after thawing and DNA integrity. Results of IVF test showed that spermatozoa collected from A and B lead to higher cleavage rates (0

  4. TGLF Recalibration for ITER Standard Case Parameters FY2015: Theory and Simulation Performance Target Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    flows that fit the GYRO simulations, the parameters of the model had to be tuned to each case. A physics basis for the zonal flow model was lacking. Electron energy transport at short wavelength: A secondary issue – the high-k electron energy flux – was initially assumed to be independent of the zonal flow effect. However, detailed studies of the fluctuation spectra from recent multiscale (electron and ion scale) GYRO simulations provided a critical new insight into the role of zonal flows. The multiscale simulations suggested that advection by the zonal flows strongly suppressed electron-scale turbulence. Radial shear of the zonal ExB fluctuation could not compete with the large electron-scale linear growth rate, but the kx-mixing rate of the ExB advection could. This insight led to a preliminary new model for the way zonal flows saturate both electron and ion-scale turbulence. It was also discovered that the strength of the zonal ExB velocity could be computed from the linear growth rate spectrum. The new saturation model (SAT1), which replaces the original model (SAT0), was fit to the multiscale GYRO simulations as well as the ion-scale GYRO simulations used to calibrate the original SAT0 model. Thus, SAT1 captures the physics of both multiscale electron transport and zonal-flow stabilization. In future work, it the SAT1 model will require significant further testing and (expensive) calibration with nonlinear multiscale gyrokinetic simulations over a wider variety of plasma conditions – certainly more than the small set of scans about a single C-Mod L-mode discharge. We believe the SAT1 model holds great promise as a physics-based model of the multiscale turbulent transport in fusion devices. Correction to ITER performance predictions: Finally, the impact of the SAT1model on the ITER hybrid case is mixed. Without the electron-scale contribution to the fluxes, the Dimits shift makes a significant improvement in the predicted fusion power as originally

  5. Final Technical Report - Integrated Hydrogeophysical and Hydrogeologic Driven Parameter Upscaling for Dual-Domain Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, John M

    2012-11-05

    The three major components of this research were: 1. Application of minimally invasive, cost effective hydrogeophysical techniques (surface and borehole), to generate fine scale (~1m or less) 3D estimates of subsurface heterogeneity. Heterogeneity is defined as spatial variability in hydraulic conductivity and/or hydrolithologic zones. 2. Integration of the fine scale characterization of hydrogeologic parameters with the hydrogeologic facies to upscale the finer scale assessment of heterogeneity to field scale. 3. Determination of the relationship between dual-domain parameters and practical characterization data.

  6. Parameter Resetting in Second Language Acquisition. University Research Institute Final Project Report, 1987-88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney-Liapis, Marianne

    Analyses of the Null Subject Parameter (NSP) suggest that several factors may influence the resetting process for second language acquisition, such as specific "trigger" data, awareness of agreement as a part of awareness of agreement (INFL), and stylistic rules such as subject postposing and anaphoric reference. Four tests were administered to…

  7. Determination of Cellular Processing Rates for a Trastuzumab-Maytansinoid Antibody-Drug Conjugate (ADC) Highlights Key Parameters for ADC Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Katie F; Kulkarni, Chethana; Betts, Alison M; Wittrup, K Dane

    2016-05-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a promising class of cancer therapeutics that combine the specificity of antibodies with the cytotoxic effects of payload drugs. A quantitative understanding of how ADCs are processed intracellularly can illustrate which processing steps most influence payload delivery, thus aiding the design of more effective ADCs. In this work, we develop a kinetic model for ADC cellular processing as well as generalizable methods based on flow cytometry and fluorescence imaging to parameterize this model. A number of key processing steps are included in the model: ADC binding to its target antigen, internalization via receptor-mediated endocytosis, proteolytic degradation of the ADC, efflux of the payload out of the cell, and payload binding to its intracellular target. The model was developed with a trastuzumab-maytansinoid ADC (TM-ADC) similar to trastuzumab-emtansine (T-DM1), which is used in the clinical treatment of HER2+ breast cancer. In three high-HER2-expressing cell lines (BT-474, NCI-N87, and SK-BR-3), we report for TM-ADC half-lives for internalization of 6-14 h, degradation of 18-25 h, and efflux rate of 44-73 h. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the internalization rate and efflux rate are key parameters for determining how much payload is delivered to a cell with TM-ADC. In addition, this model describing the cellular processing of ADCs can be incorporated into larger pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics models, as demonstrated in the associated companion paper. PMID:26912181

  8. Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, Roy; Day-Lewis, Fred; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-20

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  9. Processes and parameters involved in modeling radionuclide transport from bedded salt repositories. Final report. Technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parameters necessary to model radionuclide transport in salt beds are identified and described. A proposed plan for disposal of the radioactive wastes generated by nuclear power plants is to store waste canisters in repository sites contained in stable salt formations approximately 600 meters below the ground surface. Among the principal radioactive wastes contained in these canisters will be radioactive isotopes of neptunium, americium, uranium, and plutonium along with many highly radioactive fission products. A concern with this form of waste disposal is the possibility of ground-water flow occurring in the salt beds and endangering water supplies and the public health. Specifically, the research investigated the processes involved in the movement of radioactive wastes from the repository site by groundwater flow. Since the radioactive waste canisters also generate heat, temperature is an important factor. Among the processes affecting movement of radioactive wastes from a repository site in a salt bed are thermal conduction, groundwater movement, ion exchange, radioactive decay, dissolution and precipitation of salt, dispersion and diffusion, adsorption, and thermomigration. In addition, structural changes in the salt beds as a result of temperature changes are important. Based upon the half-lives of the radioactive wastes, he period of concern is on the order of a million years. As a result, major geologic phenomena that could affect both the salt bed and groundwater flow in the salt beds was considered. These phenomena include items such as volcanism, faulting, erosion, glaciation, and the impact of meteorites. CDM reviewed all of the critical processes involved in regional groundwater movement of radioactive wastes and identified and described the parameters that must be included to mathematically model their behavior. In addition, CDM briefly reviewed available echniques to measure these parameters

  10. Cellular morphometry and cycling cell populations of human and dog bronchi. Final report, April 1, 1988 - December 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative data of the human bronchial epithelial cells at possible risk for malignant transformation in lung cancer is crucial for accurate radon dosimetry and risk analysis. The locations and other parameters of the nuclei which may be damaged by α particles and develop into cancers have been determined and compared in different airway generations, among smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers, between men and women and in people of different ages. This research included extended morphometric studies on electron micrographs of human epithelium of defined airway generations. Since cycling cells can be more sensitive to damage from carcinogens and radioactivity, a second major part of this research consisted of studies to quantitate the cycling tracheobronchial epithelial population(s) using immunocytochemistry and the proliferation marker PCNA on paraffin sections. The basal and suprabasal cycling cell populations of the bronchi of smokers, non-smokers, and ex-smokers, men and women were compared. Normal human airway linings were also compared with normal adult dog trachea and bronchi as well as metaplastic and repairing human airways. The quantitative data from this project resulted in several publications on the cycling and putative stem cells of the tracheobronchial epithelium and more accurate radon dosimetry and risk analyses

  11. Computer software to calculate and map geologic parameters required in estimating coal production costs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honea, R.B.; Petrich, C.H.; Wilson, D.L.; Dillard, C.A.; Durfee, R.C.; Faber, J.A.

    1979-04-01

    This report documents methodologic and computer software developed by Energy Division and Computer Sciences Division personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The software is designed to quantify and automatically map geologic and other cost-related parameters as required to estimate coal mining costs. The software complements the detailed coal production cost models for both underground and surface mines which have been developed for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) by NUS, Corp. These models require input variables such as coal seam thickness, coal seam depth, surface slope, etc., to estimate mining costs. This report provides a general overview of the software and methodology developed by ORNL to calculate some of these parameters along with sample map output which indicates the geographical distribution of these geologic characteristics. A detailed user guide for implementing the software has been prepared and is included in the appendixes. (Sample input data which may be used to verify the operation of the software are available from ORNL.) Also included is a brief review of coal production, coal recovery, and coal resource calculation studies. This system will be useful to utilities and coal mine operators alike in estimating costs through comprehensive assessment before mining takes place.

  12. Probabilistic calculations and sensitivity analysis of parameters for a reference biosphere modell assessing final deposition of radioaktive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioecological models are used for the assessment of potential exposures of a population to radionuclides from final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Due to the long disposal time frame, changes in model relevant exposure pathways need to be accounted for. Especially climate change will result in changes of the modelled system. Reference biosphere models are used to asses climate related changes in the far field of a final repository. In this approach, model scenarios are developed for potential future climate states and defined by parameters derived from currently existing, similar climate regions. It is assumed, that habits and agricultural practices of a population will adapt to the new climate over long periods of time, until they mirror the habits of a contemporary population living in a similar climate. As an end point of the models, Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCF) are calculated. These radionuclide specific BDCF describe the exposure of a hypothetical population resulting from a standardized radionuclide contamination in near surface ground water. Model results are subject to uncertainties due to inherent uncertainties of assumed future developments, habits and empirically measured parameters. In addition to deterministic calculations, sensitivity analysis and probabilistic calculations were done for several model scenarios, to control the quality of the model and due to the high number of parameters used to define different climate states, soil types and consumption habits.

  13. Final Report: Medium Energy Measurements of N-N Parameters, April 1, 1994 - September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our research program had four main thrusts, only one of which can be considered as measurements of N-N parameters: (1) Finishing the data analyses associated with recent LAMPF and TRIUMPF N-N experiments, whose overall purpose has been the determination of the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes, both for isospin 0 and 1 at medium energies; (2) continuing work on BNL E871, a search for rare decay modes of the KL; (3) work on the RHIC-STAR project, an experiment to create and study a quark gluon plasma and nuclear matter at high energy density; (4) beginning a new AGS experiment (E896) which will search for the lowest mass state of the predicted strange di-baryons, the Ho, and other exotic states of nuclear matter through nucleus-nucleus collisions

  14. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; HHS Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2017. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This final rule sets forth payment parameters and provisions related to the risk adjustment, reinsurance, and risk corridors programs; cost-sharing parameters and cost-sharing reductions; and user fees for Federally-facilitated Exchanges. It also provides additional amendments regarding the annual open enrollment period for the individual market for the 2017 and 2018 benefit years; essential health benefits; cost sharing; qualified health plans; Exchange consumer assistance programs; network adequacy; patient safety; the Small Business Health Options Program; stand-alone dental plans; third-party payments to qualified health plans; the definitions of large employer and small employer; fair health insurance premiums; student health insurance coverage; the rate review program; the medical loss ratio program; eligibility and enrollment; exemptions and appeals; and other related topics. PMID:26964153

  15. Derivation of radioecological parameters from the long-term emission of iodine-129. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, the distribution and behaviour of 129I and 127I in the environment and its pathways through the environment to man were comprehensively investigated in order to provide a basis for estimating the radiation exposure to man due to releases of 129I. To this end, the actual situation in Lower Saxony, Germany, was studied for exemplary regions near to and far from the coast of the North Sea. Accelerator mass spectrometry, radiochemical neutron activation analysis, ion chromatography, and ICP-MS were applied to measure the iodine isotopes, 129I and P127I, in sea-water, air, precipitation, surface and ground waters, soils, plants, animals, foodstuffs, total diet, and human and animal thyroid glands. For air-borne iodine, the speciation as well as the particle size distribution of aerosols was determined. Soil depth profiles were investigated down to depths of 2.5 m in order to study the iodine migration as well as individual surface soil samples to allow for the determination of transfer factors of the iodine isotopes into plants. From the analytical results radioecological parameters for the long-term behaviour of 129I in the pedo- and biosphere were derived. The iodine isotopes are in severe disequilibrium in the different environmental compartments. The pre-nuclear equilibrium 129I/127I ratio in the biosphere was determined to be 2.0 x 10-13 with a geometric standard deviation of 1.39. Today, the environmental isotopic ratios in Northern Germany range from 10-6 to 10-10. The highest ratios are found in North Sea water, the lowest in deep soil samples and ground water. The North Sea appears as the dominant source of air-borne iodine in Northern Germany due to the emissions of European reprocessing plants. The results are discussed with respect to their radiological relevance and in view of the general protection of the environment, i.e. air, water, soil and the biosphere. (orig.)

  16. Filtered Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for multi-parameter thermal-fluids measurements : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Grasser, Thomas W.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Schefer, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation-based life-cycle-engineering and the ASCI program have resulted in models of unprecedented size and fidelity. The validation of these models requires high-resolution, multi-parameter diagnostics. Within the thermal-fluids disciplines, the need for detailed, high-fidelity measurements exceeds the limits of current engineering sciences capabilities and severely tests the state of the art. The focus of this LDRD is the development and application of filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) for high-resolution, nonintrusive measurement of gas-phase velocity and temperature. With FRS, the flow is laser-illuminated and Rayleigh scattering from naturally occurring sources is detected through a molecular filter. The filtered transmission may be interpreted to yield point or planar measurements of three-component velocities and/or thermodynamic state. Different experimental configurations may be employed to obtain compromises between spatial resolution, time resolution, and the quantity of simultaneously measured flow variables. In this report, we present the results of a three-year LDRD-funded effort to develop FRS combustion thermometry and Aerosciences velocity measurement systems. The working principles and details of our FRS opto-electronic system are presented in detail. For combustion thermometry we present 2-D, spatially correlated FRS results from nonsooting premixed and diffusion flames and from a sooting premixed flame. The FRS-measured temperatures are accurate to within {+-}50 K (3%) in a premixed CH4-air flame and within {+-}100 K for a vortex-strained diluted CH4-air diffusion flame where the FRS technique is severely tested by large variation in scattering cross section. In the diffusion flame work, FRS has been combined with Raman imaging of the CH4 fuel molecule to correct for the local light scattering properties of the combustion gases. To our knowledge, this is the first extension of FRS to nonpremixed combustion and the first use of joint FRS

  17. CP-violation parameters from decay rates of B±→DK±, D→multibody final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a method for measuring CP-violation parameters from which the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle γ may be extracted. The method makes use of the total decay rates in B±→DK± decays, where the neutral D meson decays to multibody final states. We analyze the error of the method using experimental CP-violation analysis variables that enable straightforward sensitivity comparison with other methods for extracting γ, and discuss the use of B-factory and charm-factory data to obtain the relevant charm-decay information needed for this measurement. Measurement sensitivities are estimated for the currently available B-factory data sample, and D decay modes for which use of this method can make a significant contribution toward reducing the total error on γ are identified.

  18. Medium energy measurements of N-N parameters. Final technical report, April 1, 1994--September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a final technical report describing the accomplishments of the medium/high energy nuclear physics research program at the University of Texas at Austin. The research program had four main thrusts, only one of which can be considered as measurements of N-N parameters: (1) finishing the data analyses associated with recent LAMPF and TRIUMPF N-N experiments, whose overall purpose has been the determination of the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes, both for isospin 0 and 1 at medium energies; (2) continuing work on BNL E871, a search for rare decay modes of the KL; (3) work on the RHIC-STAR project, an experiment to create and study a quark gluon plasma and nuclear matter at high energy density; (4) beginning a new AGS experiment (E896) which will search for the lowest mass state of the predicted strange di-baryons, the Ho, and other exotic states of nuclear matter through nucleus-nucleus collisions

  19. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  20. Influence of the injection-molding parameters on the cellular structure and thermo-mechanical properties of ethylene-propylene block copolymer foams

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Gómez, Jaime Francisco; Arencón Osuna, David; Sánchez Soto, Miguel; Martínez Benasat, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Microcellular injection-molding technology is capable of producing lightweight polymeric products. The foam morphology is determined by the injection-molding parameters, and it has been observed that depending on the parameter variations, the cell structure may exhibit substantial morphological differences through the entire section along the melt flow direction of the injected part. The effects of varying injection-molding parameters on foam morphology and thermal mechanical p...

  1. Cellular X-ray repair parameters of early passage squamous cell carcinoma lines derived from patients with known responses to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray survival parameters and repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) were investigated in ten early passage squamous cell carcinoma cell lines derived from patients who were biopsied before initiation of radiotherapy or after radiation therapy failure. Radiosensitivity (D0) ranged from 1.07 to 1.93 (Gy), extrapolation numbers (n-bar) from 1.17 to 2.14 and PLD recovery at 24 h from 1.4 to 20.3. Despite significant differences in these parameters amongst the cell lines, a firm correlation between radiocurability and any individual radiobiological parameter could not be established. The data suggest that the mechanisms associated with radioresistance are complex and that any single radiobiological parameter may not predict clinical success or failure. (author)

  2. Investigation of the use of fly-ash based autoclaved cellular concrete blocks in coal mines for air duct work. Final report, January 25, 1993--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, M.L. [Ohio Edison Co., Akron, OH (United States)

    1995-06-19

    Coal mines are required to provide ventilation to occupied portions of underground mines. Concrete block is used in this process to construct air duct walls. However, normal concrete block is heavy and not easy to work with and eventually fails dramatically after being loaded due to mine ceiling convergence and/or floor heave. Autoclaved cellular concrete block made from (70{plus_minus}%) coal fly ash is lightweight and less rigid when loaded. It is lighter and easier to use than regular concrete block for underground mine applications. It has also been used in surface construction around the world for over 40 years. Ohio Edison along with eight other electric utility companies, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and North American Cellular Concrete constructed a mobile demonstration plant to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block from utility fly ash. To apply this research in Ohio, Ohio Edison also worked with the Ohio Coal Development Office and CONSOL Inc. to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block not only from coal ash but also from LIMB ash, SNRB ash, and PFBC ash from various clean coal technology projects sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the potential for beneficial use of fly ash and clean coal technology by-products in the production of lightweight block.

  3. Handbook for calculations of nuclear reaction data. Reference input parameter library. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim to develop an internationally recognised input parameter library with the contributions from all major nuclear data laboratories, IAEA initiated and co-ordinated a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled 'Development of Reference Input Parameter Library for Nuclear Model calculations of Nuclear Data (Phase 1: Starter File)'. Between 1994 and 1997 the following two major results were produced: complete electronic Reference Input Parameter Library (Starter File) available to users cost-free and this Handbook containing a detailed description of the Library. Starter file contains input parameters for calculations of nuclear reaction cross sections arranged in seven segments (directories): Atomic masses and deformations, Discrete level schemes, Average neutron resonance parameters, Optical model parameters, Level densities, Gamma-ray strength functions, Continuum angular distributions. This book contains ten papers describing the cited subjects, each with a separate abstract

  4. Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnoli, Franco

    1998-01-01

    An introduction to cellular automata (both deterministic and probabilistic) with examples. Definition of deterministic automata, dynamical properties, damage spreading and Lyapunov exponents; probabilistic automata and Markov processes, nonequilibrium phase transitions, directed percolation, diffusion; simulation techniques, mean field. Investigation themes: life, epidemics, forest fires, percolation, modeling of ecosystems and speciation. They represent my notes for the school "Dynamical Mod...

  5. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    analysis revealed that the order of severity of damage declines from the spino-cerebellar, ventral, and dorsal tract respectively, suggesting neuroanatomical specificity. Thus, early activation of cell death and cell survival processes may play significant role in the clinical progression and syndromic clinical feature presentation of OPIDN. -- Highlights: ► Multiple mechanisms of neurodegeneration were indicated in a study on OPIDN model. ► Altered expressions of BCL2 and GADD45 were recorded in various tissues of CNS. ► Multiple anomalous cellular (neuronal and astroglial) features were recorded. ► Anatomical specificity of the neurodegeneration was described.

  6. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damodaran, T.V., E-mail: tdamodar@nccu.edu [Dept of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Dept of Biology, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707 (United States); Attia, M.K. [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Abou-Donia, M.B., E-mail: donia@mc.duke.edu [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    analysis revealed that the order of severity of damage declines from the spino-cerebellar, ventral, and dorsal tract respectively, suggesting neuroanatomical specificity. Thus, early activation of cell death and cell survival processes may play significant role in the clinical progression and syndromic clinical feature presentation of OPIDN. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple mechanisms of neurodegeneration were indicated in a study on OPIDN model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Altered expressions of BCL2 and GADD45 were recorded in various tissues of CNS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple anomalous cellular (neuronal and astroglial) features were recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anatomical specificity of the neurodegeneration was described.

  7. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-10

    . In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area.

  8. Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-01ER63220 "The Dynamics of Cellular Stress Responses in Deinococcus radiodurans"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PI: Michael J. Daly, Ph.D., Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; Co-Investigators: James K. Fredrickson, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richard D. Smith, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Eugene Koonin, Ph.D., National Center for Biotechnology Information; Jizhong Zhou, Ph.D.\t, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Mary S. Lipton, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-03-06

    Bacteria belonging to the family Deinococcaceae are some of the most ionizing radiation (IR) resistant organisms yet discovered. Deinococcus radiodurans is obligate aerobic, capable of growth under chronic IR (60 Gy/hour) and relatively resistant to many DNA damaging conditions including exposure to desiccation, ultraviolet radiation and hydrogen peroxide. The genes and cellular pathways underlying the survival strategies of D. radiodurans have been under investigation for fifty years. In the last decade, D. radiodurans was subjected to whole-genome sequencing, annotation and comparative analysis, whole-transcriptome and whole-proteome analyses, and numerous DNA repair studies. Collectively, published reports support that the key to survival of D. radiodurans resides in its ability to repair DNA, but the mechanisms responsible remain poorly defined. Unexpectedly, many novel genes implicated in recovery from IR by transcriptome and proteome profiling have had little effect on survival when disrupted, and there is reason to ask if something is missing from classical models of radiation resistance. The prevailing dogma of radiation toxicity has been that the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of radiation are principally the result of DNA damage that occurs during IR. However, in light of available whole genome sequences, one broad observation that is difficult to reconcile with this view is that many organisms that encode a compliment of DNA repair and protection functions are killed at radiation doses that cause little DNA damage. This indicates that there are cellular targets involved in recovery that are more vulnerable to IR damage than DNA. It has been reported that D. radiodurans and other resistant organisms accumulate very high intracellular concentrations of Mn(II), and restricting the amount of Mn(II) during recovery from IR substantially reduced survival of D. radiodurans. At high intracellular concentrations, Mn(II) is known to act as a true catalyst of the

  9. Cellular resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  10. Cellular recurrent deep network for image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M.; Vidyaratne, L.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2015-09-01

    Image registration using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) remains a challenging learning task. Registration can be posed as a two-step problem: parameter estimation and actual alignment/transformation using the estimated parameters. To date ANN based image registration techniques only perform the parameter estimation, while affine equations are used to perform the actual transformation. In this paper, we propose a novel deep ANN based image rigid registration that combines parameter estimation and transformation as a simultaneous learning task. Our previous work shows that a complex universal approximator known as Cellular Simultaneous Recurrent Network (CSRN) can successfully approximate affine transformations with known transformation parameters. This study introduces a deep ANN that combines a feed forward network with a CSRN to perform full rigid registration. Layer wise training is used to pre-train feed forward network for parameter estimation and followed by a CSRN for image transformation respectively. The deep network is then fine-tuned to perform the final registration task. Our result shows that the proposed deep ANN architecture achieves comparable registration accuracy to that of image affine transformation using CSRN with known parameters. We also demonstrate the efficacy of our novel deep architecture by a performance comparison with a deep clustered MLP.

  11. The influence of design and fuel parameters on the particle emissions from wood pellets combustion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiinikka, Henrik; Gebart, Rikard [Energy Technology Centre, Piteaa (Sweden)

    2005-02-01

    Combustion of solid biomass under fixed bed conditions is a common technique to generate heat and power in both small and large scale grate furnaces (domestic boilers, stoves, district heating plants). Unfortunately, combustion of biomass will generate particle emissions containing both large fly ash particles and fine particles that consist of fly ash and soot. The large fly ash particles have been produced from fusion of non-volatile ash-forming species in burning char particle. The inorganic fine particles have been produced from nucleation of volatilised ash elements (K, Na, S, Cl and Zn). If the combustion is incomplete, soot particles are also produced from secondary reaction of tar. The particles in the fine fraction grows by coagulation and coalescence to a particle diameter around 0.1 pm. Since the smallest particles are very hard to collect in ordinary cleaning devices they contribute to the ambient air pollution. Furthermore, fine airborne particles have been correlated to adverse effects on the human health. It is therefore essential to minimize particle formation from the combustion process and thereby reduce the emissions of particulates to the ambient air. The aim with this project is to study particle emissions from small scale combustion of wood pellets and to investigate the impact of different operating, construction and fuel parameters on the amount and characteristic of the combustion generated particles. To address these issues, experiments were carried out in a 10 kW updraft fired wood pellets reactor that has been custom designed for systematic investigations of particle emissions. In the flue gas stack, particle emissions were sampled on a filter. The particle mass and number size distributions were analysed by a low pressure cascade impactor and a SMPS (Scanning Electron Mobility Particle Sizer). The results showed that the temperature and the flow pattern in the combustion zone affect the particle emissions. Increasing combustion

  12. Final Report for NFE-07-00912: Development of Model Fuels Experimental Engine Data Base & Kinetic Modeling Parameter Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    The automotive and engine industries are in a period of very rapid change being driven by new emission standards, new types of after treatment, new combustion strategies, the introduction of new fuels, and drive for increased fuel economy and efficiency. The rapid pace of these changes has put more pressure on the need for modeling of engine combustion and performance, in order to shorten product design and introduction cycles. New combustion strategies include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), partial-premixed combustion compression ignition (PCCI), and dilute low temperature combustion which are being developed for lower emissions and improved fuel economy. New fuels include bio-fuels such as ethanol or bio-diesel, drop-in bio-derived fuels and those derived from new crude oil sources such as gas-to-liquids, coal-to-liquids, oil sands, oil shale, and wet natural gas. Kinetic modeling of the combustion process for these new combustion regimes and fuels is necessary in order to allow modeling and performance assessment for engine design purposes. In this research covered by this CRADA, ORNL developed and supplied experimental data related to engine performance with new fuels and new combustion strategies along with interpretation and analysis of such data and consulting to Reaction Design, Inc. (RD). RD performed additional analysis of this data in order to extract important parameters and to confirm engine and kinetic models. The data generated was generally published to make it available to the engine and automotive design communities and also to the Reaction Design Model Fuels Consortium (MFC).

  13. From cellular doses to average lung dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitive basal and secretory cells receive a wide range of doses in human bronchial and bronchiolar airways. Variations of cellular doses arise from the location of target cells in the bronchial epithelium of a given airway and the asymmetry and variability of airway dimensions of the lung among airways in a given airway generation and among bronchial and bronchiolar airway generations. To derive a single value for the average lung dose which can be related to epidemiologically observed lung cancer risk, appropriate weighting scenarios have to be applied. Potential biological weighting parameters are the relative frequency of target cells, the number of progenitor cells, the contribution of dose enhancement at airway bifurcations, the promotional effect of cigarette smoking and, finally, the application of appropriate regional apportionment factors. Depending on the choice of weighting parameters, detriment-weighted average lung doses can vary by a factor of up to 4 for given radon progeny exposure conditions. (authors)

  14. Dynamic properties of cellular neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Slavova

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behavior of a new class of information-processing systems called Cellular Neural Networks is investigated. In this paper we introduce a small parameter in the state equation of a cellular neural network and we seek for periodic phenomena. New approach is used for proving stability of a cellular neural network by constructing Lyapunov's majorizing equations. This algorithm is helpful for finding a map from initial continuous state space of a cellular neural network into discrete output. A comparison between cellular neural networks and cellular automata is made.

  15. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    OpenAIRE

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the...

  16. Alteration of cellular and subcellular electrophysiological parameters in mammalian cells by high- and low-LET irradiation at low dose-levels. Part of a coordinated programme on cell membrane probes as biological indicators in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transmembrane resting potential (MRP) was chosen as a highly sensitive indicator for cellular reactions. The MRP was studied for its suitability as biological indicator of the level of accidental radiation exposure. The development of methodology and installation of a low-cost test chamber, and dose-response studies of MRP-changes of human cells after irradiation with low- and high-LET radiation were considered. Cultured human embryonic lung fibroblasts and human lung biopsy samples were used, with a Co-60 source for low-LET irradiation at dose rates of 2 rad and 20 rad/min, respectively. For high-LET irradiation an Am-241 source was used. The onset of radiation induced effects on cell membranes was prompt but of short duration. In general, full recovery followed within hours of irradiation, at least under the particular experimental conditions. MRP changes in irradiated cells proved a highly sensitive parameter for assessing radiation effects on cell membranes. It appears premature to draw conclusions on the suitability of the method as a biological indicator of radiation damage from accidental exposure, in view of the short duration and prompt reversibility of the effects, and an incomplete understanding of the radiation-induced reactions involved at different LET's and at different doses and dose-rates

  17. CP-violation parameters from decay rates of $B^\\pm \\to DK^\\pm$, $D\\to$ multibody final states

    CERN Document Server

    Soffer, Abner; Winklmeier, Frank

    2009-01-01

    We describe a method for measuring CP-violation parameters from which the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle $\\gamma$ may be extracted. The method makes use of the total decay rates in $B^\\pm \\to DK^\\pm$ decays, where the neutral $D$ meson decays to multibody final states. We analyze the error of the method using experimental CP-violation analysis variables that enable straightforward sensitivity comparison with other methods for extracting $\\gamma$, and discuss the use of $B$-factory and charm-factory data to obtain the relevant charm decay information needed for this measurement. Measurement sensitivities are estimated for the currently available $B$-factory data sample, and $D$ decay modes for which use of this method can make a significant contribution toward reducing the total error on $\\gamma$ are identified.

  18. The effect of intake of water on the final values of body composition parameters in active athletes using two different bioimpedance analyzers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kutáč

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:The method of bioelectrical impedance (BIA is frequently used to estimate body composition in sports. The total body water (TBW is the basic variable that BIA measures. That implies the degree of sensitivity of BIA to the hydration of the organism, which is also demonstrated by the principles of measurement that primarily relate to the hydration of the organism. It is difficult to provide standard hydration of the organism of subjects prior to measurements when taking the measurements in the field. Objective:The objective of the study is to assess the changes in the final values of the selected body composition parameters in soccer players caused by intake of water, using two devices commonly used in the field. Methods:The research was performed in a group of 33 soccer players (mean age 20.30 ± 1.18 years. The measurements were taken using Tanita BC 418 MA (frequency 50 kHz and Nutriguard-M (frequency 100 kHz. To evaluate the effect of water intake, we took two measurements before and after the intake of 500 ml of water. The parameters measured by Tanita BC 418 MA were body weight (BW, total body water (TBW, body fat (BF, fat free mass (FFM. Nutriguard-M was used to measure total body water (TBW, intra and extracellular water (ICW and ECW, body fat (BF, fat free mass (FFM, intra and extracellular mass (BCM and ECM. The differences in the means (M1 and M2 of the monitored parameters were evaluated using the Paired Samples t-test. In statistically significant differences in the mean, the practical significance was also verified using the effect of size (Cohen's d. Results:The Tanita device showed statistically significant differences after the intake of 500 ml in parameters BW (+0.42 kg, BF (+0.39 kg, +0.53% and TBW (-0.38%. As for the Nutriguard device, statistically significant differences were found in parameters TBW (+0.77 kg, ICW (+0.83 kg, FFM (+1.05 kg, BCM (+0.79 kg and ECM/BCM (-0.01. Conclusion

  19. Quantum cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porod, Wolfgang; Lent, Craig S.; Bernstein, Gary H.

    1994-06-01

    The Notre Dame group has developed a new paradigm for ultra-dense and ultra-fast information processing in nanoelectronic systems. These Quantum Cellular Automata (QCA's) are the first concrete proposal for a technology based on arrays of coupled quantum dots. The basic building block of these cellular arrays is the Notre Dame Logic Cell, as it has been called in the literature. The phenomenon of Coulomb exclusion, which is a synergistic interplay of quantum confinement and Coulomb interaction, leads to a bistable behavior of each cell which makes possible their use in large-scale cellular arrays. The physical interaction between neighboring cells has been exploited to implement logic functions. New functionality may be achieved in this fashion, and the Notre Dame group invented a versatile majority logic gate. In a series of papers, the feasibility of QCA wires, wire crossing, inverters, and Boolean logic gates was demonstrated. A major finding is that all logic functions may be integrated in a hierarchial fashion which allows the design of complicated QCA structures. The most complicated system which was simulated to date is a one-bit full adder consisting of some 200 cells. In addition to exploring these new concepts, efforts are under way to physically realize such structures both in semiconductor and metal systems. Extensive modeling work of semiconductor quantum dot structures has helped identify optimum design parameters for QCA experimental implementations.

  20. A radiation measurement study on cellular phone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will explain the radiation level produced by various selected cellular phone from various models and brands available in the market. The result obtained from this study will also recommend whether a cellular phone is safe for public usage or it might cause any effect on public health. Finally, a database of radiation measurement level produced by selected various cellular phone will also be developed and exhibited in this paper. (Author)

  1. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    levels in order to achieve green goals. Finally, we introduce the notion of green mobile operator collaboration as a new aspect of the green networking where competitive cellular companies might cooperate together in order to achieve green goals.

  2. From Cnn Dynamics to Cellular Wave Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roska, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Embedded in a historical overview, the development of the Cellular Wave Computing paradigm is presented, starting from the standard CNN dynamics. The theoretical aspects, the physical implementation, the innovation process, as well as the biological relevance are discussed in details. Finally, the latest developments, the physical versus virtual cellular machines, as well as some open questions are presented.

  3. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  4. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  5. Evaluation of average neutron resonance parameters of actinides with the account of experimental resolution and discrimination threshold. Final report for the period 15 December 1996 - 14 December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New evaluation of average resonance parameters for 32 isotopes of the actinide region (229Th-252Cf) was completed. Obtained values of average level spacings produce a smooth systematics of the main level density parameter. The results were included into the Starter File of the Reference Input Parameter Library (segment Average Neutron Resonances) and officially released on 15 May 1998. The numerical results are available from the Internet (http://iaeand.iaea.or.at/ripl) and on CD-ROM. (author)

  6. Active Cellular Nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  7. Studies on the Consequences of the Administration of Aqueous Extracts of Azadiracta Indica and Morinda Lucida on the Heamatological Parameter and the Activities of Phosphatases in Rats Cellular Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Ejembi Daniel; Sanni Momoh

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the effects of the combination of aqueous extracts of Azadiracta indica and Morinda lucida on packed cell volume(PCV) and the activities of phosphatases of rat cellular tissues was investigated. Twenty eight (28) albino rats of six month old of an average weight 182.4g were grouped in to four groups; A, B, C and D. All the rats in the four groups were fed with fowl formulation feeds obtained from poultry store in VOM Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria and water was provided ad libitum for...

  8. Cellular Cell Bifurcation of Cylindrical Detonations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Gui-Lai; JIANG Zong-Lin; WANG Chun; ZHANG Fan

    2008-01-01

    Cellular cell pattern evolution of cylindrically-diverging detonations is numerically simulated successfully by solving two-dimensional Euler equations implemented with an improved two-step chemical kinetic model. From the simulation, three cell bifurcation modes are observed during the evolution and referred to as concave front focusing, kinked and wrinkled wave front instability, and self-merging of cellular cells. Numerical research demonstrates that the wave front expansion resulted from detonation front diverging plays a major role in the cellular cell bifurcation, which can disturb the nonlinearly self-sustained mechanism of detonations and finally lead to cell bifurcations.

  9. Studies on the Consequences of the Administration of Aqueous Extracts of Azadiracta Indica and Morinda Lucida on the Heamatological Parameter and the Activities of Phosphatases in Rats Cellular Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejembi Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the effects of the combination of aqueous extracts of Azadiracta indica and Morinda lucida on packed cell volume(PCV and the activities of phosphatases of rat cellular tissues was investigated. Twenty eight (28 albino rats of six month old of an average weight 182.4g were grouped in to four groups; A, B, C and D. All the rats in the four groups were fed with fowl formulation feeds obtained from poultry store in VOM Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria and water was provided ad libitum for 18 days. Rats in group A, B, C were administered 0.5ml/kg body wt each of A.indica extract, only M.lucida extract, and combination of A.indica and M.lucida extracts orally respectively for 18 days. Group D contained seven rats designated “control”. One of the rats from the control was sacrificed at day one, its cellular tissues (liver, kidney, small intestine, and large intestine were collected and analyzed for PCV, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP and Acid Phosphatase (ACP activities. One of the rats from each of the groups A, B, C and D were sacrificed at every three days interval and these tissues were also collected and analyzed for PCV, ALP, and ACP activities. The result showed a significant decrease in the activities of these enzymes as compared to the control values. The trends of the activities of these enzymes were similar following repeated administration of the extracts, and thereby caused alterations in the activities of both enzymes. This trend when subjected to student t-test analysis, showed significant difference at P>0.05.

  10. 'Biomoleculas': cellular metabolism didactic software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Biomoleculas' is a software that deals with topics such as the digestion, cellular metabolism and excretion of nutrients. It is a pleasant, simple and didactic guide, made by and for students. In this program, each biomolecule (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) is accompanied until its degradation and assimilation by crossing and interrelating the different metabolic channels to finally show the destination of the different metabolites formed and the way in which these are excreted. It is used at present as a teaching-learning process tool by the chair of Physiology and Biophysics at the Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios

  11. Two Phase Flow Simulation Using Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical mathematical treatment of two-phase flows is based on the average of the conservation equations for each phase.In this work, a complementary approach to the modeling of these systems based on statistical population balances of aut omata sets is presented.Automata are entities defined by mathematical states that change following iterative rules representing interactions with the neighborhood.A model of automata for two-phase flow simulation is presented.This model consists of fie lds of virtual spheres that change their volumes and move around a certain environment.The model is more general than the classical cellular automata in two respects: the grid of cellular automata is dismissed in favor of a trajectory generator, and the rules of interaction involve parameters representing the actual physical interactions between phases.Automata simulation was used to study unsolved two-phase flow problems involving high heat flux rates. One system described in this work consists of a vertical channel with saturated water at normal pressure heated from the lower surface.The heater causes water to boil and starts the bubble production.We used cellular automata to describe two-phase flows and the interaction with the heater.General rule s for such cellular automata representing bubbles moving in stagnant liquid were used, with special attention to correct modeling of different mechanisms of heat transfer.The results of the model were compared to previous experiments and correlations finding good agreement.One of the most important findings is the confirmation of Kutateladze's idea about a close relation between the start of critical heat flux and a change in the flow's topology.This was analyzed using a control volume located in the upper surface of the heater.A strong decrease in the interfacial surface just before the CHF start was encountered.The automata describe quite well some characteristic parameters such as the shape of the local void fraction in the

  12. Modelling cellular behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  13. Parametric study of double cellular detonation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasainov, B.; Virot, F.; Presles, H.-N.; Desbordes, D.

    2013-05-01

    A parametric numerical study is performed of a detonation cellular structure in a model gaseous explosive mixture whose decomposition occurs in two successive exothermic reaction steps with markedly different characteristic times. Kinetic and energetic parameters of both reactions are varied in a wide range in the case of one-dimensional steady and two-dimensional (2D) quasi-steady self-supported detonations. The range of governing parameters of both exothermic steps is defined where a "marked" double cellular structure exists. It is shown that the two-level cellular structure is completely governed by the kinetic parameters and the local overdrive ratio of the detonation front propagating inside large cells. Furthermore, since it is quite cumbersome to use detailed chemical kinetics in unsteady 2D case, the proposed work should help to identify the mixtures and the domain of their equivalence ratio where double detonation structure could be observed.

  14. Mathematical Physics of Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Morales, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA) containing no freely adjustable parameters. The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and its invariances allow to classify all CA rules into equivalence classes. Complexity in 1D systems is then shown to emerge from the weak symmetry breaking of the addition modulo an integer number p. The latter symmetry is possessed by certain rules that produce Pascal simplices in their time evolution. These results elucidate Wolfram's classification of CA dynamics.

  15. Estimation in Cellular Radio Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Fredrik; Gustafsson, Fredrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem to track time-varying parameters in cellular radio systems is studied, and the focus is on estimation based only on the signals that are readily available. Previous work have demonstrated very good performance, but were relying on analog measurement that are not available. Most of the information is lost due to quantization and sampling at a rate that might be as low as 2 Hz (GSM case). For that matter a maximum likelihood estimator have been designed and exemplified in the case o...

  16. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  17. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  18. Handbook for calculations of nuclear reaction data, RIPL-2. Reference Input Parameter Library-2. Final report of a coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear data for applications constitute an integral part of the IAEA programme of activities. When considering low-energy nuclear reactions induced with light particles, such as neutrons, protons, deuterons, alphas and photons, a broad range of applications are addressed, from nuclear power reactors and shielding design through cyclotron production of medical radioisotopes and radiotherapy to transmutation of nuclear waste. All these and many other applications require a detailed knowledge of production cross sections, spectra of emitted particles and their angular distributions. A long-standing problem of how to meet the nuclear data needs of the future with limited experimental resources puts a considerable demand upon nuclear model computation capabilities. Originally, almost all nuclear data were provided by measurement programmes. Over time, theoretical understanding of nuclear phenomena has reached a high degree of reliability, and nuclear modeling has become standard practice in nuclear data evaluations (with measurements remaining critical for data testing and benchmarking). Thus, theoretical calculations are instrumental in obtaining complete and internally consistent nuclear data files. The practical use of nuclear model codes requires a considerable numerical input that describes the properties of the nuclei and the interactions involved. Experts have used a variety of different input sets, often developed over years in their own laboratories. Many of these partial input databases were poorly documented or not documented at all, and were not always available for other users. With the trend of reduced funds for nuclear data evaluations, there is a real threat that the immense accumulated knowledge of input parameters and associated calculations may be compromised or even lost for future applications. Therefore, the IAEA has undertaken an extensive co-ordinated effort to develop a library of evaluated and tested nuclear-model input parameters. Considering

  19. Noise Reduction Potential of Cellular Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Hinze

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rising numbers of flights and aircrafts cause increasing aircraft noise, resulting in the development of various approaches to change this trend. One approach is the application of metallic liners in the hot gas path of aero-engines. At temperatures of up to 600 °C only metallic or ceramic structures can be used. Due to fatigue loading and the notch effect of the pores, mechanical properties of porous metals are superior to the ones of ceramic structures. Consequently, cellular metals like metallic foams, sintered metals, or sintered metal felts are most promising materials. However, acoustic absorption depends highly on pore morphology and porosity. Therefore, both parameters must be characterized precisely to analyze the correlation between morphology and noise reduction performance. The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between pore morphology and acoustic absorption performance. The absorber materials are characterized using image processing based on two dimensional microscopy images. The sound absorption properties are measured using an impedance tube. Finally, the correlation of acoustic behavior, pore morphology, and porosity is outlined.

  20. Cellular oncogenes in neoplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, V T; McGee, J O

    1987-01-01

    In recent years cellular homologues of many viral oncogenes have been identified. As these genes are partially homologous to viral oncogenes and are activated in some tumour cell lines they are termed "proto-oncogenes". In tumour cell lines proto-oncogenes are activated by either quantitative or qualitative changes in gene structure: activation of these genes was originally thought to be a necessary primary event in carcinogenesis, but activated cellular oncogenes, unlike viral oncogenes, do ...

  1. Cellular Cardiomyoplasty: Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Chachques, J. (J.); Acar, C; J. Herreros; Trainini, J. (Jorge); Prosper, F.; D’Attellis, N. (N.); Fabiani, J. N.; Carpentier, A

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration can be induced with the implantation of a variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types. More than 150 patients have been treated with cellular cardiomyoplasty worldwide, 18 patients have been treated by our group. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit postischemic remodelling, and restore regional myocardial contractility. Techniques for skeletal myoblasts culture and ex vivo expansion using auto...

  2. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes span a huge range of length and time scales from the molecular to the near-macroscopic. Understanding how effects on one scale influence, and are themselves influenced by, those on lower and higher scales is a critical issue for the construction of models in Systems Biology....... Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle...... soon be coupled to Mass Action models allowing the parameters in such models to be continuously tuned according to the finer resolution simulation. This will help realize the goal of a computational cellular simulation that is able to capture the dynamics of membrane-associated processes such as...

  3. Optimization of parameters affecting LSM performance as diffractors of x rays: Final technical report, 13 May 1986-31 October 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our efforts during this contract period were directed toward a deeper understanding of several important issues related to multilayer x-ray mirrors. The results have important practical applications. The topics studied included: Basic Stress-Strain-Curvature Theory for Thin Silicon Wafers with Oxide and Nitride Films; this theory and accompanying experimental verification could form the basis for development of a code that will be able to predict the final figure of a silicon substrate that has been etched and treated with oxide or nitride films; this code will allow the design and fabrication of sophisticated curved multilayers; we have applied our theoretical understanding of multilayers to the design of multilayer x-ray optics; Multilayer X-ray Data Analysis Codes; these codes allow the massaging and display of x-ray multilayer characterization data in a wide variety of graphical ways; the code is user friendly; simulation of multilayers behavior in a high x-ray flux environment; this code combines an x-ray input code (BUCKL) with a 1-D hydrodynamic code (Chart-D) and our own iterative multilayer design code to determine the reflectivity of multilayers as a function of time when the multilayer is in a region of high x-ray flux; BUCKL and Chart-D are from Sandia Labs.; and we have completed the first series of experimental measurements of multilayer reflectivity while subjected to a pulse of intense x-ray flux; the experiments were done with the Phoenix laser at LLNL; the results are included. 48 refs., 29 figs

  4. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found. PMID:25291810

  5. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  6. Cellular Homeostasis and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Aging and longevity are controlled by a multiplicity of molecular and cellular signaling events that interface with environmental factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Modulation of these pathways to extend life span, including insulin-like signaling and the response to dietary restriction, identified the cellular machineries and networks of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and stress resistance pathways as critical players in the aging process. A decline of proteostasis capacity during aging leads to dysfunction of specific cell types and tissues, rendering the organism susceptible to a range of chronic diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of two reviews addressing our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying aging in model organisms and humans. PMID:27050288

  7. Derivation of radioecological parameters from the long-term emission of iodine-129. Final report; Ableitung von radiooekologischen Parametern aus dem langfristigen Eintrag von Iod-129. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, R.; Klipsch, K.; Ernst, T.; Gorny, M.; Jakob, D.; Vahlbruch, J. [Zentrum fuer Strahlenschutz und Radiooekologie (ZSR), Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Synal, H.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst., ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schnabel, C. [Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    In this project, the distribution and behaviour of {sup 129}I and {sup 127}I in the environment and its pathways through the environment to man were comprehensively investigated in order to provide a basis for estimating the radiation exposure to man due to releases of {sup 129}I. To this end, the actual situation in Lower Saxony, Germany, was studied for exemplary regions near to and far from the coast of the North Sea. Accelerator mass spectrometry, radiochemical neutron activation analysis, ion chromatography, and ICP-MS were applied to measure the iodine isotopes, {sup 129}I and P{sup 127}I, in sea-water, air, precipitation, surface and ground waters, soils, plants, animals, foodstuffs, total diet, and human and animal thyroid glands. For air-borne iodine, the speciation as well as the particle size distribution of aerosols was determined. Soil depth profiles were investigated down to depths of 2.5 m in order to study the iodine migration as well as individual surface soil samples to allow for the determination of transfer factors of the iodine isotopes into plants. From the analytical results radioecological parameters for the long-term behaviour of {sup 129}I in the pedo- and biosphere were derived. The iodine isotopes are in severe disequilibrium in the different environmental compartments. The pre-nuclear equilibrium {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio in the biosphere was determined to be 2.0 x 10{sup -13} with a geometric standard deviation of 1.39. Today, the environmental isotopic ratios in Northern Germany range from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -10}. The highest ratios are found in North Sea water, the lowest in deep soil samples and ground water. The North Sea appears as the dominant source of air-borne iodine in Northern Germany due to the emissions of European reprocessing plants. The results are discussed with respect to their radiological relevance and in view of the general protection of the environment, i.e. air, water, soil and the biosphere. (orig.)

  8. Wireless Cellular Mobile Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zalud

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article is briefly reviewed the history of wireless cellularmobile communications, examined the progress in current secondgeneration (2G cellular standards and discussed their migration to thethird generation (3G. The European 2G cellular standard GSM and itsevolution phases GPRS and EDGE are described somewhat in detail. Thethird generation standard UMTS taking up on GSM/GPRS core network andequipped with a new advanced access network on the basis of codedivision multiple access (CDMA is investigated too. A sketch of theperspective of mobile communication beyond 3G concludes this article.

  9. Translating partitioned cellular automata into classical type cellular automata

    OpenAIRE

    Poupet, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Partitioned cellular automata are a variant of cellular automata that was defined in order to make it very simple to create complex automata having strong properties such as number conservation and reversibility (which are often difficult to obtain on cellular automata). In this article we show how a partitioned cellular automaton can be translated into a regular cellular automaton in such a way that these properties are conserved.

  10. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  11. Radioactivity of cellular concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural radioactivity of cellular concrete is discussed. Some data on the concentrations of 40K, 226Ra and 232Th in building materials in Poland are given. The results of dose rates measurements in living quarters as well as outside are presented. (A.S.)

  12. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  13. Universal map for cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Morales, V., E-mail: vmorales@ph.tum.de [Institute for Advanced Study – Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 2a, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-08-20

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived. -- Highlights: ► A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA). ► The map is generalized to 2D for Von Neumann, Moore and hexagonal neighborhoods. ► A map for all Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs is derived. ► A map for Conway's “Game of Life” is obtained.

  14. Infrared image enhancement using Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Han, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa

    2016-05-01

    Image enhancement is a crucial technique for infrared images. The clear image details are important for improving the quality of infrared images in computer vision. In this paper, we propose a new enhancement method based on two priors via Cellular Automata. First, we directly learn the gradient distribution prior from the images via Cellular Automata. Second, considering the importance of image details, we propose a new gradient distribution error to encode the structure information via Cellular Automata. Finally, an iterative method is applied to remap the original image based on two priors, further improving the quality of enhanced image. Our method is simple in implementation, easy to understand, extensible to accommodate other vision tasks, and produces more accurate results. Experiments show that the proposed method performs better than other methods using qualitative and quantitative measures.

  15. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  16. Electromagnetic cellular interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, J. S.; Farhadi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2011), 223-246. ISSN 0079-6107. [36th International Congress of Physiological Sciences (IUPS2009). Kyoto, 27.07.2009-01.08.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP102/10/P454 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : bioelectric phenomena * cellular biophysics Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.203, year: 2011

  17. Magnetic Cellular Switches

    OpenAIRE

    Overby, Darryl R.; Alenghat, Francis J.; Montoya-Zavala, Martín; Bei, HuCheng; Oh, Philmo; Karavitis, John; Ingber, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of magnetic cellular switches to enable magnetic control of intracellular functions in living mammalian cells, including receptor signal transduction and gene transcription. Our approach takes advantage of the mechanosensitivity of adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) induction and downstream transcription controlled by the cAMP regulatory element (CRE) to engineer gene constructs that optically report gene expression in living cells. We activate transcri...

  18. Stability of Stochastic Neutral Cellular Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Zhao, Hongyong

    In this paper, we study a class of stochastic neutral cellular neural networks. By constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional and employing the nonnegative semi-martingale convergence theorem we give some sufficient conditions ensuring the almost sure exponential stability of the networks. The results obtained are helpful to design stability of networks when stochastic noise is taken into consideration. Finally, two examples are provided to show the correctness of our analysis.

  19. Cellular Signaling in the Bovine Antral Follicles

    OpenAIRE

    Juan F. Vásquez - Cano; Martha Olivera - A.

    2010-01-01

    Antral follicle development in the ovary of female cattle is the product of a complex of endocrine, paracrine and autocrine relationships. The interactions of the pituitary gonadotropins over granulosa and theca cells prepare the follicle to produce estradiol and for the final stages of maturation of the oocyte and its potencial ovulation or atresia inside subordinate follicles. It is a dynamic event where cellular signaling patterns changes sequentiallyand quickly at different stages of foll...

  20. Cellular therapy in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreemanta K. Parida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB. We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs, as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy.

  1. Cellular therapy in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Shreemanta K; Madansein, Rajhmun; Singh, Nalini; Padayatchi, Nesri; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs), as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy. PMID:25809753

  2. Determination of Auxin Transport Parameters on the Cellular Level

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrášek, Jan; Laňková, Martina; Zažímalová, Eva

    Totowa: Humana Press, 2014 - (Hicks, G.; Robert, S.), s. 241-253. (Methods in Molecular Biology). ISBN 978-1-62703-591-0 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Auxin transport assay * Plant cell cultures * Auxin influx Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  3. Numerical investigation on evolution of cylindrical cellular detonation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun; JIANG Zong-lin; HU Zong-min; HAN Gui-lai

    2008-01-01

    Cylindrical cellular detonation is numerically investigated by solving twodimensional reactive Euler equations with a finite volume method on a two-dimensional self-adaptive unstructured mesh.The one-step reversible chemical reaction model is applied to simplify the control parameters of chemical reaction.Numerical results demonstrate the evolution of cellular cell splitting of cylindrical cellular detonation explored in experimentas.Split of cellular structures shows different features in the near-field and far-field from the initiation zone.Variation of the local curvature is a key factor in the behavior of cell split of cylindrical cellular detonation in propagation.Numerical results show that split of cellular structures comes from the self-organization of transverse waves corresponding to the development of small disturbances along the detonation front related to detonation instability.

  4. Failover in cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2010-01-01

    A cellular automata (CA) configuration is constructed that exhibits emergent failover. The configuration is based on standard Game of Life rules. Gliders and glider-guns form the core messaging structure in the configuration. The blinker is represented as the basic computational unit, and it is shown how it can be recreated in case of a failure. Stateless failover using primary-backup mechanism is demonstrated. The details of the CA components used in the configuration and its working are described, and a simulation of the complete configuration is also presented.

  5. Cellular-scale hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Faivre, Magalie; Horton, Renita; Smistrup, Kristian; Best-Popescu, Catherine A; Stone, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    Microfluidic tools are providing many new insights into the chemical, physical and physicochemical responses of cells. Both suspension-level and single-cell measurements have been studied. We review our studies of these kinds of problems for red blood cells with particular focus on the shapes of ...... mechanical effects on suspended cells can be studied systematically in small devices, and how these features can be exploited to develop methods for characterizing physicochemical responses and possibly for the diagnosis of cellular-scale changes to environmental factors....

  6. Cellular mechanics and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  7. Radiolabelled Cellular Blood Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the abstracts of the 5th International Symposion on Radiolabelling of Cellular Blood Elements to be held in Vienna, Austria, September 10-14, 1989. The Meeting is the fifth in a series of meetings designed to discuss the basics and clinical application of radiolabelling techniques. In these days, beside the search for new labelling agents and extending the knowledge in clinical use, the use of monoclonal antibodies is a big new challenge. All reviewed contributions that have been accepted for presentation are contained in this volume. (authors) 58 of them are of INIS scope

  8. Introduction to Tissular and Cellular Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JF; STOLTZ

    2005-01-01

    Most human tissues do not regenerate spontaneously, which is why cellular therapies and tissular engineering are promising alternatives. The principle is simple: cells are sampled in a patient and introduced in the damaged tissue or in a tridimentional porous support and cultivated in a bioreactor in which the physico-chemical and mechanical parameters are controlled. Once the tissues (or the cells) are mature they may be implanted. In parallel, the development of biotherapies with stem cells is a field of ...

  9. Cellular basis of memory for addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of "cellular or molecular memory." Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of "behavioral memory," perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders. PMID:24459410

  10. Integrated cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C.

    The generation of new three-dimensional (3D) matrices that enable integration of biomolecular components and whole cells into device architectures, without adversely altering their morphology or activity, continues to be an expanding and challenging field of research. This research is driven by the promise that encapsulated biomolecules and cells can significantly impact areas as diverse as biocatalysis, controlled delivery of therapeutics, environmental and industrial process monitoring, early warning of warfare agents, bioelectronics, photonics, smart prosthetics, advanced physiological sensors, portable medical diagnostic devices, and tissue/organ replacement. This work focuses on the development of a fundamental understanding of the biochemical and nanomaterial mechanisms that govern the cell directed assembly and integration process. It was shown that this integration process relies on the ability of cells to actively develop a pH gradient in response to evaporation induced osmotic stress, which catalyzes silica condensation within a thin 3D volume surrounding the cells, creating a functional bio/nano interface. The mechanism responsible for introducing functional foreign membrane-bound proteins via proteoliposome addition to the silica-lipid-cell matrix was also determined. Utilizing this new understanding, 3D cellular immobilization capabilities were extended using sol-gel matrices endowed with glycerol, trehalose, and media components. The effects of these additives, and the metabolic phase of encapsulated S. cerivisiase cells, on long-term viability and the rate of inducible gene expression was studied. This enabled the entrapment of cells within a novel microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical detection of a single analyte, significantly improving confidence in the biosensor output. As a complementary approach, multiphoton protein lithography was utilized to engineer 3D protein matrices in which to

  11. Multiuser Cellular Network

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Modern radio communication is faced with a problem about how to distribute restricted frequency to users in a certain space. Since our task is to minimize the number of repeaters, a natural idea is enlarging coverage area. However, coverage has restrictions. First, service area has to be divided economically as repeater's coverage is limited. In this paper, our fundamental method is to adopt seamless cellular network division. Second, underlying physics content in frequency distribution problem is interference between two close frequencies. Consequently, we choose a proper frequency width of 0.1MHz and a relevantly reliable setting to apply one frequency several times. We make a few general assumptions to simplify real situation. For instance, immobile users yield to homogenous distribution; repeaters can receive and transmit information in any given frequency in duplex operation; coverage is mainly decided by antenna height. Two models are built up to solve 1000 users and 10000 users situations respectively....

  12. Modeling and cellular studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing the applicability of mathematical models with carefully designed experiments is a powerful tool in the investigations of the effects of ionizing radiation on cells. The modeling and cellular studies complement each other, for modeling provides guidance for designing critical experiments which must provide definitive results, while the experiments themselves provide new input to the model. Based on previous experimental results the model for the accumulation of damage in Chlamydomonas reinhardi has been extended to include various multiple two-event combinations. Split dose survival experiments have shown that models tested to date predict most but not all the observed behavior. Stationary-phase mammalian cells, required for tests of other aspects of the model, have been shown to be at different points in the cell cycle depending on how they were forced to stop proliferating. These cultures also demonstrate different capacities for repair of sublethal radiation damage

  13. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds......, and pharmaceuticals. However, making cells into efficient factories is challenging because cells have evolved robust metabolic networks with hard-wired, tightly regulated lines of communication between molecular pathways that resist efforts to divert resources. Here, we will review the current status and challenges...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  14. Parameter Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Heitzig, Martina; Cameron, Ian;

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter the importance of parameter estimation in model development is illustrated through various applications related to reaction systems. In particular, rate constants in a reaction system are obtained through parameter estimation methods. These approaches often require the application...... of optimisation techniques coupled with dynamic solution of the underlying model. Linear and nonlinear approaches to parameter estimation are investigated. There is also the application of maximum likelihood principles in the estimation of parameters, as well as the use of orthogonal collocation to...... generate a set of algebraic equations as the basis for parameter estimation.These approaches are illustrated using estimations of kinetic constants from reaction system models....

  15. Learning Cellular Sorting Pathways Using Protein Interactions and Sequence Motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tien-ho; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Murphy, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Proper subcellular localization is critical for proteins to perform their roles in cellular functions. Proteins are transported by different cellular sorting pathways, some of which take a protein through several intermediate locations until reaching its final destination. The pathway a protein is transported through is determined by carrier proteins that bind to specific sequence motifs. In this article, we present a new method that integrates protein interaction and sequence motif data to m...

  16. SELF-ORGANIZED CRITICALITY AND CELLULAR AUTOMATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-01-01

    Cellular automata provide a fascinating class of dynamical systems based on very simple rules of evolution yet capable of displaying highly complex behavior. These include simplified models for many phenomena seen in nature. Among other things, they provide insight into self-organized criticality, wherein dissipative systems naturally drive themselves to a critical state with important phenomena occurring over a wide range of length and the scales. This article begins with an overview of self-organized criticality. This is followed by a discussion of a few examples of simple cellular automaton systems, some of which may exhibit critical behavior. Finally, some of the fascinating exact mathematical properties of the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sand-pile model [1] are discussed.

  17. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that low molecular weight RNA may play a role in eukaryotic gene regulation. The low molecular weight RNA was electrophoresed on 16% acrylamide gels but very small molecular weight RNA (vsRNA) was not visible after methylene blue staining. Radioautography of 3T3 and HeLa RNA labeled with 32P demonstrated RNA smaller than t-RNA in size. We subsequently developed a highly sensitive silver staining procedure which revealed a very fine bands of RNA migrating faster than t-RNA. The success of platinum containing antitumor agents has stimulated interest in iridium containing agents. Irradiation of a solution of (NH4)2(IrCl6) in ammonia with UV light for seven hours produced a product active against Ehrlich ascites tumor with a T/C of 140% using a daily dose of 100 mg/kg for 8 days. Testing against L1210 (BDF1 mice) indicated a low activity with a maximum increase in lifespan of 20%

  18. Cellular glutathione prevents cytolethality of monomethylarsonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenicals are clearly toxicants and carcinogens in humans. In mammals, including humans, inorganic arsenic often undergoes methylation, forming compounds such as monomethylarsonic acid (MMAsV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAsV). However, much less information is available on the in vitro toxic potential or mechanisms of these methylated arsenicals, especially MMAsV. We studied the molecular mechanisms of in vitro cytolethality of MMAsV using a rat liver epithelial cell line (TRL 1215). MMAsV was not cytotoxic in TRL 1215 cells even at concentrations exceeding 10 mM, but it became weakly cytotoxic and induced both necrotic and apoptotic cell death when cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) was depleted with the glutathione synthase inhibitor, L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO), or the glutathione reductase inhibitor, carmustine. Similar results were observed in the other mammalian cells, such as human skin TIG-112 cells, chimpanzee skin CRT-1609 cells, and mouse metallothionein (MT) positive and MT negative embryonic cells. Ethacrynic acid (EA), an inhibitor of glutathione S-transferase (GST) that catalyses GSH-substrate conjugation, also enhanced the cytolethality of MMAsV, but aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of β-lyase that catalyses the final breakdown of GSH-substrate conjugates, had no effect. Both the cellular GSH levels and the cellular GST activity were increased by the exposure to MMAsV in TRL 1215 cells. On the other hand, the addition of exogenous extracellular GSH enhanced the cytolethality of MMAsV, although cellular GSH levels actually prevented the cytolethality of combined MMAsV and exogenous GSH. These findings indicate that human arsenic metabolite MMAsV is not a highly toxic compound in mammalian cells, and the level of cellular GSH is critical to its eventual toxic effects

  19. The State of Cellular Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Youngbin

    2003-01-01

    Cellular probe technology is one of several potentially promising technologies for obtaining accurate travel time information. In 1996, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) mandated E911 requirements that cellular location be provided when 911 emergency calls come in to emergency management authorities. The E911 requirements allow 50 -300 meters from the emergency call location, depending on the type of cellular phone technology used and whether handset-based or network-based solutions...

  20. Never-ageing cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ogrunc, Müge; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence was historically discovered as a form of cellular ageing of in vitro cultured cells. It has been under the spotlight following the evidence of oncogene-induced senescence in vivo and its role as a potent tumour suppressor mechanism. Presently, a PubMed search using keywords ‘cellular senescence and cancer’ reveals 8398 number of references (by April 2011) showing that while our knowledge of senescence keeps expanding, the complexity of the phenomenon keeps us – researchers...

  1. A Modified Sensitive Driving Cellular Automaton Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Hong-Xia; DAI Shi-Qiang; DONG Li-Yun; LEI Li

    2005-01-01

    A modified cellular automaton model for traffic flow on highway is proposed with a novel concept about the variable security gap. The concept is first introduced into the original Nagel-Schreckenberg model, which is called the non-sensitive driving cellular automaton model. And then it is incorporated with a sensitive driving NaSch model,in which the randomization brake is arranged before the deterministic deceleration. A parameter related to the variable security gap is determined through simulation. Comparison of the simulation results indicates that the variable security gap has different influence on the two models. The fundamental diagram obtained by simulation with the modified sensitive driving NaSch model shows that the maximumflow are in good agreement with the observed data, indicating that the presented model is more reasonable and realistic.

  2. Spectral efficiency of cellular land mobile radio systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hammuda, H; McGeehan, JP; Bateman, A.

    1988-01-01

    A rigorous and comprehensive approach to the definition and evaluation of spectral efficiency of cellular land mobile radio systems is presented. The method accounts for all pertinent system parameters within a cellular land mobile radio network. Subjective tests to evaluate the protection ratio for various systems is thought to be imperative to the evaluation of spectral efficiency. A comparison is made of a number of current and proposed mobile radio schemes based on the spectral efficiency...

  3. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  4. Cellular Particle Dynamics simulation of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Matthew; Kosztin, Ioan

    2013-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is a theoretical-computational-experimental framework for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems, such as fusion, sorting and compression. In CPD, cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through numerical integration of their equations of motion. Here we present CPD simulation results for the fusion of both spherical and cylindrical multi-cellular aggregates. First, we calibrate the relevant CPD model parameters for a given cell type by comparing the CPD simulation results for the fusion of two spherical aggregates to the corresponding experimental results. Next, CPD simulations are used to predict the time evolution of the fusion of cylindrical aggregates. The latter is relevant for the formation of tubular multi-cellular structures (i.e., primitive blood vessels) created by the novel bioprinting technology. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  5. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  6. Site characterization for the final disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (DFDSMA) by physico-chemical properties of the deep ground water and by the transport parameters of the critical radionuclides contained in the wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For DFDSMA site selection, geological, hydrological studies and transport measurements of the radionuclides contained in wastes were initiated at INR Pitesti in 1996, which led to choose Saligny site in the neighborhood of Cernavoda NPP as optimal. Geologically, the Saligny site appears to be a sedimentary formation covered with quaternary loessoid based on clay and sand deposits. To estimate the radionuclide transport, experiments were carried out to determine the physico-chemical characteristics of the deep ground water and the distribution and diffusion coefficients for the 137 Cs and 60 Co radionuclides. In the first case, pH, the conductivity, the content of solved salts, the concentrations of inter-exchangeable cations and major anions were determined. The physical chemical processes contributing to 137 Cs and 60 Co retaining on the surfaces of the mineral constituting the rocks were evaluated from investigation of the behavior of the solutions of these radionuclides in contact with the cores extracted at various depths (0-80 m) at Saligny site. Distribution coefficients, retardation factors, the migration speed and time were determined for characterizing the radionuclide migration in the intervening soils. The diffusion coefficients were determined by measuring transfer in diffusion cells with samples of loess and clay from Saligny site. The concentration profile was deduced by measuring the activity of the radionuclide in different locations in the sample. The experimental results were used as input data of the codes for performance evaluation of the final repository. The variation in time of the physico-chemical parameters of the deep water, the diffusion and distribution coefficients (Ds, Kd) and the retardation factor (R) for the geological samples for Saligny are given

  7. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  8. Tension and robustness in multitasking cellular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey V Wong

    Full Text Available Cellular networks multitask by exhibiting distinct, context-dependent dynamics. However, network states (parameters that generate a particular dynamic are often sub-optimal for others, defining a source of "tension" between them. Though multitasking is pervasive, it is not clear where tension arises, what consequences it has, and how it is resolved. We developed a generic computational framework to examine the source and consequences of tension between pairs of dynamics exhibited by the well-studied RB-E2F switch regulating cell cycle entry. We found that tension arose from task-dependent shifts in parameters associated with network modules. Although parameter sets common to distinct dynamics did exist, tension reduced both their accessibility and resilience to perturbation, indicating a trade-off between "one-size-fits-all" solutions and robustness. With high tension, robustness can be preserved by dynamic shifting of modules, enabling the network to toggle between tasks, and by increasing network complexity, in this case by gene duplication. We propose that tension is a general constraint on the architecture and operation of multitasking biological networks. To this end, our work provides a framework to quantify the extent of tension between any network dynamics and how it affects network robustness. Such analysis would suggest new ways to interfere with network elements to elucidate the design principles of cellular networks.

  9. A New Kind of Cellular Network%一种新的元胞网络模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李学伟; 孙有发; 吴今培

    2011-01-01

    用元胞替换传统人工神经网络中的神经元,以局部连接取代相邻层级元胞之间的全连接,用规则演化算法替代BP算法,建立元胞网络模型.设计了元胞网络的训练过程:内嵌的遗传算法用于寻优各元胞状态离散化边界值以及元胞网络拓扑结构.以一个红酒分类基准数据为例,检验了元胞网络的学习性能和分类性能,获得了较为满意的结果.%A novel concept of cellular network is proposed. The cellular network is constructed based on the traditional artificial neural network by replacing the neurons with ceils, replacing the full connections among cells with partial connections, and replacing the back-propagation algorithm with rule-evolution algorithm. The training process of cellular network is also designed. The embedded genetic algorithm is to search for the optimal parameters and structures of the network. Finally, the cellular network is applied to a benchmark data set (classification of Italy's red wine), and is validated to be of good performances of learning and predicting.

  10. Cellular Phone Base Stations: Technology and Exposures (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles and practice of cellular radio systems for mobile communications are presented using GSM 1800 as a reference system. In particular, the concepts of small cells and frequency re-use and the components of radio base station technology are described. Public and cellular broadcasting have been widely available for many years and a brief history is given to indicate length of exposure from these sources. National and international guidelines for safe exposure to non-ionising radiation are used by cellular operators to define exclusion zones around transmitting antennas. A methodology for calculating an exclusion zone is described, together with an example for a typical antenna configuration. Estimated levels of exposure near practical base stations are given and comparisons made with other sources of RF radiation. Finally, the digital nature of today's cellular radio systems, such as GSM, are explained and the implications described. (author)

  11. Actual problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kaupov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides review of cellular technologies used incardiology, describes types of cellular preparations depending onsources of cells and types of compounding cells. The generalmechanisms of therapies with stem cells applications are described.Use of cellular preparations for treatment of cardiovascular diseasesand is improvement of the forecast at patients with heartinsufficiency of various genesis is considered as alternative topractice with organ transplantations. Efforts of biotechnologicallaboratories are directed on search of optimum population of cellsfor application in cardiology and studying of mechanisms andfactors regulating function of cardiac stem cells.

  12. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis. (paper)

  13. Cellular mechanisms during vascular development

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system is an essential organ in vertebrate animals and provides the organism with enough oxygen and nutrients. It is composed of an interconnected network of blood vessels, which form using a number of different morphogenetic mechanisms. Angiogenesis describes the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting vessels. A number of molecular pathways have been shown to be essential during angiogenesis. However, cellular architecture of blood vessels as well as cellular mechanisms...

  14. Predictive Modelling of Cellular Load

    OpenAIRE

    Carolan, Emmett; McLoone, Seamus; Farrell, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the temporal dynamics of cellular load in four Irish regions. Large scale underutilisation of network resources is identified both at the regional level and at the level of individual cells. Cellular load is modeled and prediction intervals are generated. These prediction intervals are used to put an upper bound on usage in a particular cell at a particular time. Opportunities for improvements in network utilization by incorporating these upper bounds on usage are identifie...

  15. A magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool for quantitative analysis of strain induced cellular reorientation and actin alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademolhosseini, F.; Liu, C.-C.; Lim, C. J.; Chiao, M.

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available cell strain tools, such as pneumatically actuated elastomer substrates, require special culture plates, pumps, and incubator setups. In this work, we present a magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool (MACSAT) that can be implemented using off-the-shelf components and conventional incubators. We determine the strain field on the MACSAT elastomer substrate using numerical models and experimental measurements and show that a specific region of the elastomer substrate undergoes a quasi-uniaxial 2D stretch, and that cells confined to this region of the MACSAT elastomer substrate undergo tensile, compressive, or zero axial strain depending on their angle of orientation. Using the MACSAT to apply cyclic strain on endothelial cells, we demonstrate that actin filaments within the cells reorient away from the stretching direction, towards the directions of minimum axial strain. We show that the final actin orientation angles in strained cells are spread over a region of compressive axial strain, confirming previous findings on the existence of a varied pre-tension in the actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. We also demonstrate that strained cells exhibit distinctly different values of actin alignment coherency compared to unstrained cells and therefore propose that this parameter, i.e., the coherency of actin alignment, can be used as a new readout to determine the occurrence/extent of actin alignment in cell strain experiments. The tools and methods demonstrated in this study are simple and accessible and can be easily replicated by other researchers to study the strain response of other adherent cells.

  16. Spatial game in cellular automaton evacuation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schantz, Anton; Ehtamo, Harri

    2015-11-01

    For numerical simulations of crowd dynamics in an evacuation we need a computationally light environment, such as the cellular automaton model (CA). By choosing the right model parameters, different types of crowd behavior and collective effects can be produced. But the CA does not answer why, when, and how these different behaviors and collective effects occur. In this article, we present a model, where we couple a spatial evacuation game to the CA. In the game, an agent chooses its strategy by observing its neighbors' strategies. The game matrix changes with the distance to the exit as the evacuation conditions develop. In the resulting model, an agent's strategy choice alters the parameters that govern its behavior in the CA. Thus, with our model, we are able to simulate how evacuation conditions affect the behavior of the crowd. Also, we show that some of the collective effects observed in evacuations are a result of the simple game the agents play.

  17. Bomb parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reconstruction of neutron and gamma-ray doses at Hiroshima and Nagasaki begins with a determination of the parameters describing the explosion. The calculations of the air transported radiation fields and survivor doses from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs require knowledge of a variety of parameters related to the explosions. These various parameters include the heading of the bomber when the bomb was released, the epicenters of the explosions, the bomb yields, and the tilt of the bombs at time of explosion. The epicenter of a bomb is the explosion point in air that is specified in terms of a burst height and a hypocenter (or the point on the ground directly below the epicenter of the explosion). The current reassessment refines the energy yield and burst height for the Hiroshima bomb, as well as the locations of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki hypocenters on the modern city maps used in the analysis of the activation data for neutrons and TLD data for gamma rays. (J.P.N.)

  18. Hierarchical Cellular Structures in High-Capacity Cellular Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, R K; Agrawal, N K

    2011-01-01

    In the prevailing cellular environment, it is important to provide the resources for the fluctuating traffic demand exactly in the place and at the time where and when they are needed. In this paper, we explored the ability of hierarchical cellular structures with inter layer reuse to increase the capacity of mobile communication network by applying total frequency hopping (T-FH) and adaptive frequency allocation (AFA) as a strategy to reuse the macro and micro cell resources without frequency planning in indoor pico cells [11]. The practical aspects for designing macro- micro cellular overlays in the existing big urban areas are also explained [4]. Femto cells are inducted in macro / micro / pico cells hierarchical structure to achieve the required QoS cost effectively.

  19. Busy Bursts for Trading off Throughput and Fairness in Cellular OFDMA-TDD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra Ghimire

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Decentralised interference management for orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA operating in time division duplex (TDD cellular systems is addressed. Interference aware allocation of time-frequency slots is accomplished by letting receivers transmit a busy burst (BB in a time-multiplexed minislot, upon successful reception of data. Exploiting TDD channel reciprocity, an exclusion region around a victim receiver is established, whose size is determined by a threshold parameter, known at the entire network. By adjusting this threshold parameter, the amount of cochannel interference (CCI caused to active receivers in neighbouring cells is dynamically controlled. It is demonstrated that by tuning the interference threshold parameter, system throughput can be traded off for improving user throughput at the cell boundary, which in turn enhances fairness. Moreover, a variable BB power is proposed that allows an individual link to signal the maximum CCI it can tolerate whilst satisfying a certain quality-of-service constraint. The variable BB power variant not only alleviates the need to optimise the interference threshold parameter, but also achieves a favourable tradeoff between system throughput and fairness. Finally, link adaptation conveyed by BB signalling is proposed, where the transmission format is matched to the instantaneous channel conditions.

  20. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetish Ranjan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequency reuse at a smaller distance. Maximizing the number of times each channel can be reused in a given geographical area is the key to an efficient cellular system design. During the past three decades, the world has seen significant changes in telecommunications industry. There have been some remarkable aspects to the rapid growth in wireless communications, as seen by the large expansion in mobile systems. This paper focuses on “Past, Present & Future of Cellular Telephony” and some light has been thrown upon the technologies of the cellular systems, namely 1G, 2G, 2.5G, 3G and future generations like 4G and 5G systems as well.

  1. Cellular Antisense Activity of PNA-Oligo(bicycloguanidinium) Conjugates forming Self-Assembled Nano-aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valero, Julian; Shiraishi, Takehiko; de Mendoza, Javier; Nielsen, Peter Eigil

    2015-01-01

    scattering and electron microscopy analyses we propose that the activity and thus cellular delivery of these lipo-PNA-BG4 conjugates is dependent on self-assembled nano-aggregates. Finally, cellular activity is enhanced by the presence of serum. Therefore we conclude that the lipo-BG-PNA conjugates exhibit...

  2. Intra-cellular transport of single-headed molecular motors KIF1A

    CERN Document Server

    Nishinari, K; Schadschneider, A; Chowdhury, D; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Okada, Yasushi; Schadschneider, Andreas; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2005-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on KIF1A, a representative member of single-headed kinesin motor proteins family, we develop a theoretical model of intra-cellular transport by mutually interacting molecular motors. The model explicitly accounts not only for the hydrolysis of ATP, but also for the ratchet mechanism which is believed to drive each individual KIF1A motor. We study the model by a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. A remarkable feature of this model is that all the parameters in it can be completely evaluated from experimental data. Our results in the dilute limit are in excellent quantitative agreement with the empirical data from single molecule experiments. In the high density regime the predictions of the model also agree qualitatively with the corresponding experimental observations. We derive a phase diagram that shows the influence of hydrolysis and Langmuir kinetics on the collective spatio-temporal organization of the motors. Finally, we provide experimental evidence for ...

  3. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  4. Novel Materials for Cellular Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi

    The monitoring of cellular behavior is useful for the advancement of biomedical diagnostics, drug development and the understanding of a cell as the main unit of the human body. Micro- and nanotechnology allow for the creation of functional devices that enhance the study of cellular dynamics by...... modifications for electrochemical nanosensors for the detection of analytes released from cells. Two type of materials were investigated, each pertaining to the two different aspects of such devices: peptide nanostructures were studied for the creation of cellular sensing substrates that mimic in vivo surfaces...... and that offer advantages of functionalization, and conducting polymers were used as electrochemical sensor surface modifications for increasing the sensitivity towards relevant analytes, with focus on the detection of dopamine released from cells via exocytosis. Vertical peptide nanowires were...

  5. Cellular-based preemption system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Aaron D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cellular-based preemption system that uses existing cellular infrastructure to transmit preemption related data to allow safe passage of emergency vehicles through one or more intersections. A cellular unit in an emergency vehicle is used to generate position reports that are transmitted to the one or more intersections during an emergency response. Based on this position data, the one or more intersections calculate an estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the emergency vehicle, and transmit preemption commands to traffic signals at the intersections based on the calculated ETA. Additional techniques may be used for refining the position reports, ETA calculations, and the like. Such techniques include, without limitation, statistical preemption, map-matching, dead-reckoning, augmented navigation, and/or preemption optimization techniques, all of which are described in further detail in the above-referenced patent applications.

  6. MINOR PARAMETERS NEEDED FOR INDIVIDUAL-DOSE CALCULATIONS: Final Report for Tasks 7.1, 7.2, 8.1, 8.2, 9.1, 9.2, and 9.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2009-10-23

    This brief report documents the selection of parameters needed to support individual-dose calculations from 131I released into the environment with gaseous effluents from the Mayak Production Association.

  7. Genetic Algorithm Calibration of Probabilistic Cellular Automata for Modeling Mining Permit Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, S.J.; Raines, G.L.

    2003-01-01

    We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate a spatially and temporally resolved cellular automata to model mining activity on public land in Idaho and western Montana. The genetic algorithm searches through a space of transition rule parameters of a two dimensional cellular automata model to find rule parameters that fit observed mining activity data. Previous work by one of the authors in calibrating the cellular automaton took weeks - the genetic algorithm takes a day and produces rules leading to about the same (or better) fit to observed data. These preliminary results indicate that genetic algorithms are a viable tool in calibrating cellular automata for this application. Experience gained during the calibration of this cellular automata suggests that mineral resource information is a critical factor in the quality of the results. With automated calibration, further refinements of how the mineral-resource information is provided to the cellular automaton will probably improve our model.

  8. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  9. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  10. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    OpenAIRE

    Preetish Ranjan; Prabhat Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequen...

  11. Single-Molecule Imaging of Cellular Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keijzer, Sandra; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Spaink, Herman P.; Schmidt, Thomas

    Single-molecule microscopy is an emerging technique to understand the function of a protein in the context of its natural environment. In our laboratory this technique has been used to study the dynamics of signal transduction in vivo. A multitude of signal transduction cascades are initiated by interactions between proteins in the plasma membrane. These cascades start by binding a ligand to its receptor, thereby activating downstream signaling pathways which finally result in complex cellular responses. To fully understand these processes it is important to study the initial steps of the signaling cascades. Standard biological assays mostly call for overexpression of the proteins and high concentrations of ligand. This sets severe limits to the interpretation of, for instance, the time-course of the observations, given the large temporal spread caused by the diffusion-limited binding processes. Methods and limitations of single-molecule microscopy for the study of cell signaling are discussed on the example of the chemotactic signaling of the slime-mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule studies, as reviewed in this chapter, appear to be one of the essential methodologies for the full spatiotemporal clarification of cellular signaling, one of the ultimate goals in cell biology.

  12. Microsystems for cellular force measurement: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microsystems are providing key advances in studying single cell mechanical behavior. The mechanical interaction of cells with their extracellular matrix is fundamentally important for cell migration, division, phagocytosis and aptoptosis. This review reports the development of microsystems on studying cell forces. Microsystems provide advantages of studying single cells since the scale of cells is on the micron level. The components of microsystems provide culture, loading, guiding, trapping and on chip analysis of cellular mechanical forces. This paper gives overviews on how MEMS are advancing in the field of cell biomechno sensory systems. It presents different materials, and mode of studying cell mechanics. Finally, we comment on the future directions and challenges on the state of art techniques

  13. Particles and Patterns in Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Our objective has been to develop tools for studying particle interactions in a class of dynamical systems characterized by discreteness, determinism, local interaction, and an inherently parallel form of evolution. These systems can be described by cellular automata (CA) and the behavior we studied has improved our understanding of the nature of patterns generated by CAs, their ability to perform global computations, and their relationship to continuous dynamical systems. We have also developed a rule-table mathematics that enables one to custom-design CA rule tables to generate patterns of specified types, or to perform specified computational tasks

  14. Modeling In Vitro Cellular Responses to Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwaipayan Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanoparticles (NPs have been widely demonstrated to induce toxic effects to various cell types. In vitro cell exposure systems have high potential for reliable, high throughput screening of nanoparticle toxicity, allowing focusing on particular pathways while excluding unwanted effects due to other cells or tissue dosimetry. The work presented here involves a detailed biologically based computational model of cellular interactions with NPs; it utilizes measurements performed in human cell culture systems in vitro, to develop a mechanistic mathematical model that can support analysis and prediction of in vivo effects of NPs. The model considers basic cellular mechanisms including proliferation, apoptosis, and production of cytokines in response to NPs. This new model is implemented for macrophages and parameterized using in vitro measurements of changes in cellular viability and mRNA levels of cytokines: TNF, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. The model includes in vitro cellular dosimetry due to nanoparticle transport and transformation. Furthermore, the model developed here optimizes the essential cellular parameters based on in vitro measurements, and provides a “stepping stone” for the development of more advanced in vivo models that will incorporate additional cellular and NP interactions.

  15. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M;

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  16. Cellular signalling properties in microcircuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Wallén, Peter; Svirskis, Gytis; Hounsgaard, Jørn

    2005-01-01

    Molecules and cells are the signalling elements in microcircuits. Recent studies have uncovered bewildering diversity in postsynaptic signalling properties in all areas of the vertebrate nervous system. Major effort is now being invested in establishing the specialized signalling properties at th...... cellular and molecular levels in microcircuits in specific brain regions. This review is part of the TINS Microcircuits Special Feature....

  17. Quantum Cloning by Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ariano, G. M.; Macchiavello, C.; M. Rossi

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a quantum cellular automaton that achieves approximate phase-covariant cloning of qubits. The automaton is optimized for 1-to-2N economical cloning. The use of the automaton for cloning allows us to exploit different foliations for improving the performance with given resources.

  18. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van Jan-Kees

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handli

  19. Engineering Cellular Photocomposite Materials Using Convective Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlin D. Velev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fabricating industrial-scale photoreactive composite materials containing living cells, requires a deposition strategy that unifies colloid science and cell biology. Convective assembly can rapidly deposit suspended particles, including whole cells and waterborne latex polymer particles into thin (<10 µm thick, organized films with engineered adhesion, composition, thickness, and particle packing. These highly ordered composites can stabilize the diverse functions of photosynthetic cells for use as biophotoabsorbers, as artificial leaves for hydrogen or oxygen evolution, carbon dioxide assimilation, and add self-cleaning capabilities for releasing or digesting surface contaminants. This paper reviews the non-biological convective assembly literature, with an emphasis on how the method can be modified to deposit living cells starting from a batch process to its current state as a continuous process capable of fabricating larger multi-layer biocomposite coatings from diverse particle suspensions. Further development of this method will help solve the challenges of engineering multi-layered cellular photocomposite materials with high reactivity, stability, and robustness by clarifying how process, substrate, and particle parameters affect coating microstructure. We also describe how these methods can be used to selectively immobilize photosynthetic cells to create biomimetic leaves and compare these biocomposite coatings to other cellular encapsulation systems.

  20. A Mathematical Model for Cisplatin Cellular Pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardith W. El-Kareh

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple theoretical model for the cellular pharmacodynamics of cisplatin is presented. The model, which takes into account the kinetics of cisplatin uptake by cells and the intracellular binding of the drug, can be used to predict the dependence of survival (relative to controls on the time course of extracellular exposure. Cellular pharmacokinetic parameters are derived from uptake data for human ovarian and head and neck cancer cell lines. Survival relative to controls is assumed to depend on the peak concentration of DNA-bound intracellular platinum. Model predictions agree well with published data on cisplatin cytotoxicity for three different cancer cell lines, over a wide range of exposure times. In comparison with previously published mathematical models for anticancer drug pharmacodynamics, the present model provides a better fit to experimental data sets including long exposure times (∼100 hours. The model provides a possible explanation for the fact that cell kill correlates well with area under the extracellular concentration-time curve in some data sets, but not in others. The model may be useful for optimizing delivery schedules and for the dosing of cisplatin for cancer therapy.

  1. A Parallel Encryption Algorithm for Block Ciphers Based on Reversible Programmable Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Debasis

    2010-01-01

    A Cellular Automata (CA) is a computing model of complex System using simple rule. In CA the problem space into number of cell and each cell can be one or several final state. Cells are affected by neighbours' to the simple rule. Cellular Automata are highly parallel and discrete dynamical systems, whose behaviour is completely specified in terms of a local relation. This paper deals with the Cellular Automata (CA) in cryptography for a class of Block Ciphers through a new block encryption algorithm based on Reversible Programmable Cellular Automata Theory. The proposed algorithm belongs to the class of symmetric key systems.

  2. Cellular phones and their hazards: the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Anusheel; Jalali, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    The past decade has seen an exponential increase globally in the use of cellular phones (popularly known as mobile or cell phones). These phones are convenient and trendy. Discarding the wire means that the communication is through electromagnetic waves, which could have potential hazards. Alarmist reports in the lay press and high profile lawsuits, particularly in the West, have attracted attention to the possible harmful effects of cellular phones. Adverse effects investigated by various clinical trials include the possible link to increased risk of vehicular accidents, leukaemias, sleep disturbances and the more serious brain tumours. Available level II evidence suggests that the only proven side-effect is an increased risk of vehicular accidents. So far, all studies have consistently negated any association between cellular phones and brain tumours. Yet, the final word remains to be said. PMID:12502140

  3. Fission level density and barrier parameters for actinide neutron-induced cross section calculations. Final report of research contract 8832/RB. Time period covered: 15 December 1995 - 14 June 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission and total level densities modelling approach was developed. Neutron-induced fission cross section data for incident energies from 10 keV up to emissive fission threshold were employed to extract level density and fission barrier parameters. In particular, fission barrier parameters (inner barrier height, outer barrier height, curvatures) were extracted for altogether 49 isotopes of Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf. The adopted level density modelling approach and fission barrier parametrization was supported by calculations of fission cross section data above the emissive fission threshold, up to 20 MeV neutron incident energy. (author)

  4. Physiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physiological characteristics of man depend on the intake, metabolism and excretion of stable elements from food, water, and air. The physiological behavior of natural radionuclides and radionuclides from nuclear weapons testing and from the utilization of nuclear energy is believed to follow the pattern of stable elements. Hence information on the normal physiological processes occurring in the human body plays an important role in the assessment of the radiation dose received by man. Two important physiological parameters needed for internal dose determination are the pulmonary function and the water balance. In the Coordinated Research Programme on the characterization of Asian population, five participants submitted data on these physiological characteristics - China, India, Japan, Philippines and Viet Nam. During the CRP, data on other pertinent characteristics such as physical and dietary were simultaneously being collected. Hence, the information on the physiological characteristics alone, coming from the five participants were not complete and are probably not sufficient to establish standard values for the Reference Asian Man. Nonetheless, the data collected is a valuable contribution to this research programme

  5. Cellular solidification of transparent monotectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulker, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding how liquid phase particles are engulfed or pushed during freezing of a monotectic is addressed. The additional complication is that the solid-liquid interface is nonplanar due to constitutional undercooling. Some evidence of particle pushing where the particles are the liquid phase of the montectic was already observed. Cellular freezing of the succinonitrile-glycerol system also occurred. Only a few compositions were tested at that time. The starting materials were not especially pure so that cellular interface observed was likely due to the presence of unkown impurities, the major portion of which was water. Topics addressed include: the effort of modeling the particle pushing process using the computer, establishing an apparatus for the determination of phase diagrams, and the measurement of the temperature gradients with a specimen which will solidify on the temperature gradient microscope stage.

  6. Cellular ceramics in combustion environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuessel, Alexander; Boettge, Daniela; Adler, Joerg; Marschallek, Felix; Michaelis, Alexander [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Cellular materials have become increasingly interesting for applications in combustion environments. Improvements like high power efficiency and low emissions are the main targets of technological development in combustion processes. However, despite scientific and technical success in developing new or improved burner concepts over recent years, a lot of problems remain to be solved in the field of materials science: due to the high power density of the burners the materials are subjected to high loads in terms of thermal shock, temperature and corrosion, especially in so-called porous burner technology. This article shows some examples of research and development strategies and results in developing improved cellular ceramics. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Chiral hexagonal cellular sandwich structure: a vibro-acoustic assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Tze L.; Spadoni, Alessandro; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2005-05-01

    In this work we describe the vibroacoustic behavior of a novel concept of core for sandwich structures featuring auxetic characteristics, enhanced shear stiffness and compressive strength compared to classical cellular cores in sandwich components for sandwich applications. The out-plane properties and density values are described in terms of geometric parameters of the honeycomb unit cells. Opposite to classical honeycomb cellular applications, the hexagonal chiral structure presents a noncentresymemetric configuration, i.e., a "mirror" symmetrical topology. The derived mechanical properties are used to assess the modal behaviour and modal densities of sandwich plate elements with chiral and standard cellular cores. The analytical findings are backed up by structural tests on chiral honeycomb plates and sandwich beams.

  8. Error performance analysis in downlink cellular networks with interference management

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, Laila H.

    2015-05-01

    Modeling aggregate network interference in cellular networks has recently gained immense attention both in academia and industry. While stochastic geometry based models have succeeded to account for the cellular network geometry, they mostly abstract many important wireless communication system aspects (e.g., modulation techniques, signal recovery techniques). Recently, a novel stochastic geometry model, based on the Equivalent-in-Distribution (EiD) approach, succeeded to capture the aforementioned communication system aspects and extend the analysis to averaged error performance, however, on the expense of increasing the modeling complexity. Inspired by the EiD approach, the analysis developed in [1] takes into consideration the key system parameters, while providing a simple tractable analysis. In this paper, we extend this framework to study the effect of different interference management techniques in downlink cellular network. The accuracy of the proposed analysis is verified via Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Fuel management optimization based on power profile by Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel management in PWR nuclear reactors is comprised of a collection of principles and practices required for the planning, scheduling, refueling, and safe operation of nuclear power plants to minimize the total plant and system energy costs to the extent possible. Despite remarkable advancements in optimization procedures, inherent complexities in nuclear reactor structure and strong inter-dependency among the fundamental parameters of the core make it necessary to evaluate the most efficient arrangement of the core. Several patterns have been presented so far to determine the best configuration of fuels in the reactor core by emphasis on minimizing the local power peaking factor (Pq). In this research, a new strategy for optimizing the fuel arrangements in a VVER-1000 reactor core is developed while lowering the Pq is considered as the main target. For this purpose, a Fuel Quality Factor, Z(r), served to depict the reactor core pattern. Mapping to ideal pattern is tracked over the optimization procedure in which the ideal pattern is prepared with considering the Z(r) constraints and their effects on flux and Pq uniformity. For finding the best configuration corresponding to the desired pattern, Cellular Automata (CA) is applied as a powerful and reliable tool on optimization procedure. To obtain the Z(r) constraints, the MCNP code was used and core calculations were performed by WIMS and CITATION codes. The results are compared with the predictions of a Neural Network as a smart optimization method, and the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as a reference proposed by the designer.

  10. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  11. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  12. Stochastic Nature in Cellular Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 刘圣君; 王祺; 晏世伟; 耿轶钊; SAKATA Fumihiko; GAO Xing-Fa

    2011-01-01

    The importance of stochasticity in cellular processes is increasingly recognized in both theoretical and experimental studies. General features of stochasticity in gene regulation and expression are briefly reviewed in this article, which include the main experimental phenomena, classification, quantization and regulation of noises. The correlation and transmission of noise in cascade networks are analyzed further and the stochastic simulation methods that can capture effects of intrinsic and extrinsic noise are described.

  13. Xtoys cellular automata on xwindows

    CERN Document Server

    Creutz, M

    1995-01-01

    Xtoys is a collection of xwindow programs for demonstrating simulations of various statistical models. Included are xising, for the two dimensional Ising model, xpotts, for the q-state Potts model, xautomalab, for a fairly general class of totalistic cellular automata, xsand, for the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfield model of self organized criticality, and xfires, a simple forest fire simulation. The programs should compile on any machine supporting xwindows.

  14. Cellular reactions to patterned biointerfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Vera Antonie

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is to study cellular reactions to topographically, mechanically and biochemically tunable polymeric biomaterials. Different aspects of in vitro cell-biomaterial interactions were systematically studied with the murine fibroblast cell line NIH L929 and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Besides a general cytocompatibility assessment of the applied materials and the quantification of cell adhesion per se, cell morphological changes (e.g. cell spreading) and intr...

  15. Signal processing in cellular clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Forger, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    Many biochemical events within a cell need to be timed properly to occur at specific times of day, after other events have happened within the cell or in response to environmental signals. The cellular biochemical feedback loops that time these events have already received much recent attention in the experimental and modeling communities. Here, we show how ideas from signal processing can be applied to understand the function of these clocks. Consider two signals from the network s(t) and r(...

  16. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handling set-up times as well as transfer and process batch size information of multiple products that flow through the system. It is assumed that two sets of discrete material handling devices are used fo...

  17. Cellular Dynamics of RNA Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Chengqi; Pan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research have identified over 100 types of ribonucleosides that are post-transcriptionally modified. Many modified nucleosides are conserved in bacteria, archeae and eukaryotes, while some modified nucleosides are unique to each branch of life. However, the cellular and functional dynamics of RNA modifications remains largely unexplored, mostly due to the lack of functional hypotheses and experimental methods for quantification and large scale analysis. Just as many well characteri...

  18. Cellular Dynamics of RNA Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chengqi; Pan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Decades of research have identified over 100 types of ribonucleosides that are post-transcriptionally modified. Many modified nucleosides are conserved in bacteria, archeae and eukaryotes, while some modified nucleosides are unique to each branch of life. However, the cellular and functional dynamics of RNA modifications remains largely unexplored, mostly due to the lack of functional hypotheses and experimental methods for quantification and large scale analysis. Just as many well characterized protein and DNA modifications, many RNA modifications are not essential for life. Instead, increasingly more evidence indicates that RNA modifications can play regulatory roles in cells, especially in response to stress conditions. In this Account, we review some known examples of RNA modifications that are dynamically controlled in cells and introduce some contemporary technologies and methods that enhance the studies of cellular dynamics of RNA modifications. Examples of RNA modifications discussed in this Account include (Figure 1): (1) 4-thio uridine (s4U) which can act as a cellular sensor of near UV-light; (2) queuosine (Q) which is a potential biomarker for malignancy; (3) N6-methyl adenine (m6A) which is the prevalent modification in eukaryotic mRNAs; and (4) pseudouridine (ψ) which are inducible by nutrient deprivation. Two recent technical advances that stimulated the studies of cellular dynamics of modified ribonucleosides are also described. First, a genome-wide method combines primer extension and microarray to study N1-methyl adenine (m1A) hypomodification in human tRNA. Second, a quantitative mass spectrometric method investigates dynamic changes of a wide range of tRNA modifications under stress conditions in yeast. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms that control dynamic regulation of RNA modifications, and hypotheses for discovering potential RNA de-modification enzymes. We conclude the Account by highlighting the need to develop new

  19. CELLULAR FETAL MICROCHIMERISM IN PREECLAMPSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Gammill, Hilary S; Aydelotte, Tessa M.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Nkwopara, Evangelyn C.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown elevated concentrations of free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid and erythroblasts in maternal circulation in preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. Pluripotent and immunocompetent fetal cells also transfer to the maternal circulation during pregnancy, but whether concentrations of fetal mononuclear cells also differed in preeclampsia was unknown. We sought to quantify cellular fetal microchimerism in maternal circulation in women with preeclampsia and healthy con...

  20. The Origins of Cellular Life

    OpenAIRE

    Schrum, Jason P.; Zhu, Ting F.; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the origin of cellular life on Earth requires the discovery of plausible pathways for the transition from complex prebiotic chemistry to simple biology, defined as the emergence of chemical assemblies capable of Darwinian evolution. We have proposed that a simple primitive cell, or protocell, would consist of two key components: a protocell membrane that defines a spatially localized compartment, and an informational polymer that allows for the replication and inheritance of fun...

  1. Mathematical models and multiscale simulations of cellular secretion processes

    OpenAIRE

    González-Vélez, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Exocytosis is the cellular process whereby a product such as a hormone or a neurotransmitter is released as a response to stimulation. There are a lot of exocytotic cells in mammals, and each cell type has their specific subcellular mechanisms, needed to achieve the final substance release. Therefore, unveiling the role of subcellular mechanisms in secretion processes is highly relevant to understand disease evolution and possible therapies. The efficiency of the coupling between stimulus...

  2. Progress of cellular dedifferentiation research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hu-xian; HU Da-hai; JIA Chi-yu; FU Xiao-bing

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation, the stepwise specialization of cells, and transdifferentiation, the apparent switching of one cell type into another, capture much of the stem cell spotlight. But dedifferentiation, the developmental reversal of a cell before it reinvents itself, is an important process too. In multicellular organisms, cellular dedifferentiation is the major process underlying totipotency, regeneration and formation of new stem cell lineages. In humans,dedifferentiation is often associated with carcinogenesis.The study of cellular dedifferentiation in animals,particularly early events related to cell fate-switch and determination, is limited by the lack of a suitable,convenient experimental system. The classic example of dedifferentiation is limb and tail regeneration in urodele amphibians, such as salamanders. Recently, several investigators have shown that certain mammalian cell types can be induced to dedifferentiate to progenitor cells when stimulated with the appropriate signals or materials. These discoveries open the possibility that researchers might enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of mammals by inducing cellular dedifferentiation in vivo.

  3. Cellular communications a comprehensive and practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Even as newer cellular technologies and standards emerge, many of the fundamental principles and the components of the cellular network remain the same. Presenting a simple yet comprehensive view of cellular communications technologies, Cellular Communications provides an end-to-end perspective of cellular operations, ranging from physical layer details to call set-up and from the radio network to the core network. This self-contained source forpractitioners and students represents a comprehensive survey of the fundamentals of cellular communications and the landscape of commercially deployed

  4. Ratiometric fluorescence polarization as a cytometric functional parameter: theory and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yishai, Yitzhak; Fixler, Dror; Cohen-Kashi, Meir; Zurgil, Naomi; Deutsch, Mordechai [The Biophysical Interdisciplinary Jerome Schottenstein Center for the Research and the Technology of the Cellome, Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2003-08-07

    The use of ratiometric fluorescence polarization (RFP) as a functional parameter in monitoring cellular activation is suggested, based on the physical phenomenon of fluorescence polarization dependency on emission wavelengths in multiple (at least binary) solutions. The theoretical basis of this dependency is thoroughly discussed and examined via simulation. For simulation, aimed to imitate a fluorophore-stained cell, real values of the fluorescence spectrum and polarization of different single fluorophore solutions were used. The simulation as well as the experimentally obtained values of RFP indicated the high sensitivity of this measure. Finally, the RFP parameter was utilized as a cytometric measure in three exemplary cellular bioassays. In the first, the apoptotic effect of oxLDL in a human Jurkat FDA-stained T cell line was monitored by RFP. In the second, the interaction between cell surface membrane receptors of human T lymphocyte cells was monitored by RFP measurements as a complementary means to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. In the third bioassay, cellular thiol level of FDA- and CMFDA-labelled Jurkat T cells was monitored via RFP.

  5. Investigating CTL mediated killing with a 3D cellular automaton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Graw

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs are important immune effectors against intra-cellular pathogens. These cells search for infected cells and kill them. Recently developed experimental methods in combination with mathematical models allow for the quantification of the efficacy of CTL killing in vivo and, hence, for the estimation of parameters that characterize the effect of CTL killing on the target cell populations. It is not known how these population-level parameters relate to single-cell properties. To address this question, we developed a three-dimensional cellular automaton model of the region of the spleen where CTL killing takes place. The cellular automaton model describes the movement of different cell populations and their interactions. Cell movement patterns in our cellular automaton model agree with observations from two-photon microscopy. We find that, despite the strong spatial nature of the kinetics in our cellular automaton model, the killing of target cells by CTLs can be described by a term which is linear in the target cell frequency and saturates with respect to the CTL levels. Further, we find that the parameters describing CTL killing on the population level are most strongly impacted by the time a CTL needs to kill a target cell. This suggests that the killing of target cells, rather than their localization, is the limiting step in CTL killing dynamics given reasonable frequencies of CTL. Our analysis identifies additional experimental directions which are of particular importance to interpret estimates of killing rates and could advance our quantitative understanding of CTL killing.

  6. Impact Performance of 3D Integrated Cellular Woven Composite Panel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Wei; ZHU Cheng-yan

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied the impact resistance of 3D integrated cellular woven composite panel under persudo-static impact,comprised the test result with property of typical 3D woven composites, analyzed some parameters that maybe affect composites' impact resistance and at last used SEM to observe the damage process and mechanism of samples. The result shows that the impact resistance of 3D integrated cellular woven composites is much better than the performance of typical 3D woven composites; it is an active method to improve the impact resistance of composites that developing preform with cellular on the basis of typical 3D woven structure; for different 3D integrated cellular woven structure, the value of absorbed-energy is incrensing with the hollow percentage; tiny deformation will not emerge on samples until the acting force gets to 85% of the maximum;similar with typical 3D woven composites, the delaminated phenomenon of 3D integrated cellular woven composites is also unapparent during impact process.

  7. 76 FR 82179 - Drivers of CMVs: Restricting the Use of Cellular Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 75470), which restricted the use of ] hand-held mobile telephones by drivers of commercial... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: For FMCSA and PHMSA's Final Rule published on December 2, 2011 (76 FR 75470), the... Cellular Phones AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Final...

  8. Cellular host responses to gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Najbauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a 'network' with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a 'pair-wise' manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b high-generation xenografts (fifth passage had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with 'glomerulus-like' microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  9. Game of Life Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1960s, British mathematician John Conway invented a virtual mathematical machine that operates on a two-dimensional array of square cell. Each cell takes two states, live and dead. The cells' states are updated simultaneously and in discrete time. A dead cell comes to life if it has exactly three live neighbours. A live cell remains alive if two or three of its neighbours are alive, otherwise the cell dies. Conway's Game of Life became the most programmed solitary game and the most known cellular automaton. The book brings together results of forty years of study into computational

  10. Cellular automata a parallel model

    CERN Document Server

    Mazoyer, J

    1999-01-01

    Cellular automata can be viewed both as computational models and modelling systems of real processes. This volume emphasises the first aspect. In articles written by leading researchers, sophisticated massive parallel algorithms (firing squad, life, Fischer's primes recognition) are treated. Their computational power and the specific complexity classes they determine are surveyed, while some recent results in relation to chaos from a new dynamic systems point of view are also presented. Audience: This book will be of interest to specialists of theoretical computer science and the parallelism challenge.

  11. Protein accounting in the cellular economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the copy number of cellular proteins is critical for understanding cell physiology. By being able to measure the absolute synthesis rates of the majority of cellular proteins, Li et al. (2014) gain insights into key aspects of translation regulation and fundamental principles of cellular strategies to adjust protein synthesis according to the needs. PMID:24766801

  12. Cellular Functions of Transient Receptor Potential channels

    OpenAIRE

    Dadon, Daniela; Minke, Baruch

    2010-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential channels are polymodal cellular sensors involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, mainly by increasing cellular Ca2+. In this review we focus on the roles of these channels in: i) cell death ii) proliferation and differentiation and iii) synaptic vesicle release.

  13. Performance methods for mobility management in cellular networks

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, LQ; Munro, ATD; Barton, MH; McGeehan, JP

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents performance methods for mobility management in cellular networks. A queueing analysis is first undertaken, in which the system is modelled as an open Jackson network, consisting of M M/M/1 queues. Given environmental parameters, the corresponding probability matrix is obtained, and hence the traffic matrix equations. From these equations, the traffic load in each cell is evaluated. Secondly, a BONeS DESIGNER simulation model is created and applied to the evaluation of mobi...

  14. Ion beam analysis based on cellular nonlinear networks

    OpenAIRE

    Senger, V.; R. Tetzlaff; H. Reichau; Ratzinger, U.

    2011-01-01

    The development of a non- destructive measurement method for ion beam parameters has been treated in various projects. Although results are promising, the high complexity of beam dynamics has made it impossible to implement a real time process control up to now. In this paper we will propose analysing methods based on the dynamics of Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNN) that can be implemented on pixel parallel CNN based architectures and yield satisfying results even at low re...

  15. A Modified Cellular Automaton Model for Traffic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛红霞; 董力耘; 雷丽; 戴世强

    2004-01-01

    A modified cellular automaton model for traffic flow was proposed. A novel concept about the changeable security gap was introduced and a parameter related to the variable security gap was determined. The fundamental diagram obtained by simulation shows that the maximum flow more approaches to the observed data than that of the NaSch model, indicating that the presented model is more reasonable and realistic.

  16. Ion beam analysis based on cellular nonlinear networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, V.; Tetzlaff, R.; Reichau, H.; Ratzinger, U.

    2011-07-01

    The development of a non- destructive measurement method for ion beam parameters has been treated in various projects. Although results are promising, the high complexity of beam dynamics has made it impossible to implement a real time process control up to now. In this paper we will propose analysing methods based on the dynamics of Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNN) that can be implemented on pixel parallel CNN based architectures and yield satisfying results even at low resolutions.

  17. Cellular Neural Networks for NP-Hard Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Mária Ercsey-Ravasz; Tamás Roska; Zoltán Néda

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, Cellular Neural Networks (CNN) are practically implemented in parallel, analog computers, showing a fast developing trend. Physicist must be aware that such computers are appropriate for solving in an elegant manner practically important problems, which are extremely slow on the classical digital architecture. Here, CNN is used for solving NP-hard optimization problems on lattices. It is proved, that a CNN in which the parameters of all cells can be separately controlled, is the ana...

  18. Calculation of shielding parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the propose of reduce the hazard to radiation, exist three basic factors: a) time, the time to exposition to working person inside to area, from exist determined speed the doses, is proportional of the time permanence; b) distance, the reduce to doses is inverse square of the distance to exposition point; c) building, consist to interpose between source and exposition point to material. The main aspect development to the analysis of parameters distance and building. The analysis consist to development of the mathematical implicit, in the model of source radioactive, beginning with the geometry to source, distance to exposition source, and configuration building. In the final part was realize one comparative studied to calculus of parameters to blinding, employs two codes CPBGAM and MICROSHIELD, the first made as part to work thesis. The point source its a good approximation to any one real source, but in the majority of the time to propose analysis the spatial distribution of the source must realized in explicit way. The buildings calculus in volumetry's source can be approximate begin's of plan as source adaptations. It's important to have present that not only the building exist the exposition to the radiation, and the parameters time and distance plays an important paper too. (Author)

  19. Registration of cavity-conditioned horizontal movements above a cavern system in a salt rock, and provision of secured parameters for verification and calibration of three-dimensional movement models. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to all experience gathered so far, it is not yet possible to find a closed influence function which can simultaneously describe vertical and horizontal earth movements. For this reason, work was limited to reaffirm the validity of parameters determined in 1991 (convergence velocity, limit angle, azimuth of the maximum limit angle, and size and/or position of the sliding amounts and/or sliding maximum dependent) on the influence function for subsidences. Further measuring campaigns should be carried out in future in regular intervals of 2-3 years in order to be able to make more comprehensive statements, based on increasing data quantities, on the behaviour of horizontal earth movements above a salt dome. (orig./DG)

  20. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published in...

  1. The similia principle: results obtained in a cellular model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegant, Fred; Van Wijk, Roeland

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a research program focused on the beneficial effect of low dose stress conditions that were applied according to the similia principle to cells previously disturbed by more severe stress conditions. In first instance, we discuss criteria for research on the similia principle at the cellular level. Then, the homologous ('isopathic') approach is reviewed, in which the initial (high dose) stress used to disturb cellular physiology and the subsequent (low dose) stress are identical. Beneficial effects of low dose stress are described in terms of increased cellular survival capacity and at the molecular level as an increase in the synthesis of heat shock proteins (hsps). Both phenomena reflect a stimulation of the endogenous cellular self-recovery capacity. Low dose stress conditions applied in a homologous approach stimulate the synthesis of hsps and enhance survival in comparison with stressed cells that were incubated in the absence of low dose stress conditions. Thirdly, the specificity of the low dose stress condition is described where the initial (high dose) stress is different in nature from the subsequently applied (low dose) stress; the heterologous or 'heteropathic' approach. The results support the similia principle at the cellular level and add to understanding of how low dose stress conditions influence the regulatory processes underlying self-recovery. In addition, the phenomenon of 'symptom aggravation' which is also observed at the cellular level, is discussed in the context of self-recovery. Finally, the difference in efficiency between the homologous and the heterologous approach is discussed; a perspective is indicated for further research; and the relationship between studies on the similia principle and the recently introduced concept of 'postconditioning hormesis' is emphasized. PMID:20129172

  2. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  3. Correlation between structural parameters and viscosity yield in tenside-free and tenside-containing polymeric solutions. Final report. Korrelation zwischen strukturellen Parametern und Viskositaetsergiebigkeit in tensidfreien und tensidhaltigen Polymerloesungen. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zugenmaier, P.; Meyer-Kolshorn, U.; Aust, N.; Schreiber, A.

    1991-01-01

    Water soluble polymers in interaction with tensides which are suitable for EOR measures were hardly examined up to now. In a German Federal Ministry of Research and Technology project, fundamental structural parameters of dissolved polymers were investigated by means of quasielastic light dispersion and dynamical-rheological measurements as well as the effects of tenside additions. The viscosity yield of polymeric solutions is influenced decisively by the structure of the polymer. These investigations therefore are very important for the combined application of tensides and polymers in the case of the enhanced mineral oil recovery. Xanthane and polyacrylamides hydrolyzed differently were examined as polymers. An ethylene glycol sulfonate was used as a tenside. Viscosity changes after addition of salt or tenside could be correlated with the hydrodynamic radius clearly, providing prognoses on the efficiency of polymer tenside slugs in deposits with different salinity. Recommendations can be derived from these measurements on the application of the examined materials in the case of EOR measures. (orig.) With 15 refs., 10 tabs., 28 figs.

  4. Modeling evolution and immune system by cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezzi, M. [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Florence (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    In this review the behavior of two different biological systems is investigated using cellular automata. Starting from this spatially extended approach it is also tried, in some cases, to reduce the complexity of the system introducing mean-field approximation, and solving (or trying to solve) these simplified systems. It is discussed the biological meaning of the results, the comparison with experimental data (if available) and the different features between spatially extended and mean-field versions. The biological systems considered in this review are the following: Darwinian evolution in simple ecosystems and immune system response. In the first section the main features of molecular evolution are introduced, giving a short survey of genetics for physicists and discussing some models for prebiotic systems and simple ecosystems. It is also introduced a cellular automaton model for studying a set of evolving individuals in a general fitness landscape, considering also the effects of co-evolution. In particular the process of species formation (speciation) is described in sect. 5. The second part deals with immune system modeling. The biological features of immune response are discussed, as well as it is introduced the concept of shape space and of idiotypic network. More detailed reviews which deal with immune system models (mainly focused on idiotypic network models) can be found. Other themes here discussed: the applications of CA to immune system modeling, two complex cellular automata for humoral and cellular immune response. Finally, it is discussed the biological data and the general conclusions are drawn in the last section.

  5. Modeling evolution and immune system by cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review the behavior of two different biological systems is investigated using cellular automata. Starting from this spatially extended approach it is also tried, in some cases, to reduce the complexity of the system introducing mean-field approximation, and solving (or trying to solve) these simplified systems. It is discussed the biological meaning of the results, the comparison with experimental data (if available) and the different features between spatially extended and mean-field versions. The biological systems considered in this review are the following: Darwinian evolution in simple ecosystems and immune system response. In the first section the main features of molecular evolution are introduced, giving a short survey of genetics for physicists and discussing some models for prebiotic systems and simple ecosystems. It is also introduced a cellular automaton model for studying a set of evolving individuals in a general fitness landscape, considering also the effects of co-evolution. In particular the process of species formation (speciation) is described in sect. 5. The second part deals with immune system modeling. The biological features of immune response are discussed, as well as it is introduced the concept of shape space and of idiotypic network. More detailed reviews which deal with immune system models (mainly focused on idiotypic network models) can be found. Other themes here discussed: the applications of CA to immune system modeling, two complex cellular automata for humoral and cellular immune response. Finally, it is discussed the biological data and the general conclusions are drawn in the last section

  6. A Cellular GWAS Approach to Define Human Variation in Cellular Pathways Important to Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Samuel I; Chaudhary, Anu

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of common human diversity in innate immune pathways should be beneficial in understanding autoimmune diseases, susceptibility to infection, and choices of anti-inflammatory treatment. Such understanding could also result in definition of currently unknown components of human inflammation pathways. A cellular genome-wide association studies (GWAS) platform, termed Hi-HOST (High-throughput human in vitro susceptibility testing), was developed to assay in vitro cellular phenotypes of infection in genotyped lymphoblastoid cells from genetically diverse human populations. Hi-HOST allows for measurement of multiple host and pathogen parameters of infection/inflammation including: bacterial invasion and intracellular replication, host cell death, and cytokine production. Hi-HOST has been used to successfully define a significant portion of the heritable human diversity in inflammatory cell death in response to Salmonella typhimurium. It also led to the discovery of genetic variants important to protection against systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and protection against death and bacteremia in individuals with SIRS. Our laboratory is currently using this platform to define human diversity in autophagy and the NLPR3 inflammasome pathways, and to define new components that can impact the expression of phenotypes related to these pathways. PMID:27128945

  7. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  8. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in liver fibrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Erica; Cannito, Stefania; Paternostro, Claudia; Bocca, Claudia; Miglietta, Antonella; Parola, Maurizio

    2014-04-15

    Liver fibrogenesis is a dynamic and highly integrated molecular, tissue and cellular process, potentially reversible, that drives the progression of chronic liver diseases (CLD) towards liver cirrhosis and hepatic failure. Hepatic myofibroblasts (MFs), the pro-fibrogenic effector cells, originate mainly from activation of hepatic stellate cells and portal fibroblasts being characterized by a proliferative and survival attitude. MFs also contract in response to vasoactive agents, sustain angiogenesis and recruit and modulate activity of cells of innate or adaptive immunity. Chronic activation of wound healing and oxidative stress as well as derangement of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are "major" pro-fibrogenic mechanisms, whatever the etiology. However, literature has outlined a complex network of pro-fibrogenic factors and mediators proposed to modulate CLD progression, with some of them being at present highly debated in the field, including the role of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and Hedgehog signaling pathways. Hypoxia and angiogenesis as well as inflammasomes are recently emerged as ubiquitous pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic determinants whereas adipokines are mostly involved in CLD related to metabolic disturbances (metabolic syndrome and/or obesity and type 2 diabetes). Finally, autophagy as well as natural killer and natural killer-T cells have been recently proposed to significantly affect fibrogenic CLD progression. PMID:24631571

  9. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  10. Discrete geodesics and cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a dynamical notion of discrete geodesics, understood as straightest trajectories in discretized curved spacetime. The notion is generic, as it is formulated in terms of a general deviation function, but readily specializes to metric spaces such as discretized pseudo-riemannian manifolds. It is effective: an algorithm for computing these geodesics naturally follows, which allows numerical validation---as shown by computing the perihelion shift of a Mercury-like planet. It is consistent, in the continuum limit, with the standard notion of timelike geodesics in a pseudo-riemannian manifold. Whether the algorithm fits within the framework of cellular automata is discussed at length. KEYWORDS: Discrete connection, parallel transport, general relativity, Regge calculus.

  11. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  12. Exposure Metrics for RF Epidemiology: Cellular Phone Handsets (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parameters are described that characterise the exposure of the users of cellular phones. The parameters are distinguished in two classes: the human and the cell phone parameters. Among the human parameters the following are discussed: size and shape of head and neck, manner of holding the phone (left vs. right, finger tips vs. palm contact) and phone position on the face of the user. The cell phone parameters causing the largest exposure variations are: antenna geometry (size, shape, extended or retracted) and matching conditions; operating RF power level; proximity of tissue to RF currents on metal parts, channel access method (analogue, pulsed, CDMA). The large variability of the RF exposure is further expanded by the variety (ever increasing) of phone models available to users who may change service frequently or sporadically. After a brief discussion of possible dose definitions and the uncertainty of the 'user' of a cell phone for a specific call, the paper analyses the critical exposure parameters that should be investigated to characterise statistically the RF exposure of the subjects of an epidemiological study. The improved exposure assessment of the users of cellular phones requires the cooperation of network operators and equipment manufacturers. The statistics of the most critical parameters, those with variability greater than 10:1, can be collected by modifying the software and hardware of the cell phone equipment. The paper suggests base station software modifications and the introduction of cell phone 'dosemeter' devices that record some of the critical exposure parameters. A certain number of these 'dosemeters' should be distributed among subscribers to determine the statistical variations of the RF exposure from cell phones. The paper concludes by recommending a pilot dosimetric study independent from any epidemiological study. (author)

  13. Cellular tolerance to pulsed heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovski, Dimitrii; Sarkar, M.; Irani, A.; O'Connell-Rodwell, C.; Contag, C.; Schwettman, H. Alan; Palanker, D.

    2005-04-01

    Many laser therapies involve significant heating of tissue with pulses varying from picoseconds to minutes in duration. In some of the applications heating is a primary goal, while in others it is an undesirable side effect. In both cases, if a hyperthermia is involved, the knowledge about the threshold temperature leading to irreversible cellular damage is critically important. We study the dependence of the threshold temperature on duration of the heat exposure in the range of 0.3 ms to 5 seconds. Thin layer of cells cultured in a Petri dish was exposed to a pulsed CO2 laser radiation. Laser beam was focused onto sample providing Gaussian intensity distribution in the focal plane with a beam diameter (2w) 2-10 mm. Surface temperature in the central part of the focal spot (1mm in diameter) was measured by thermal infrared (IR) emission from the sample, recorded with a fast IR detector. For pulses shorter than 1 s the temperature profile across the focal spot was found to closely correspond to the radial distribution of the laser beam intensity, thus allowing for accurate determination of temperature at any given distance from the center of the spot. Immediate cellular damage was assessed using vital staining with the live/dead fluorescent assay. Threshold temperatures were found to vary from 65 °C at 5 s of heating to 160 °C at pulses of 0.3 ms in duration. The shorter end of this range was limited by vaporization, which occurs during the laser pulse and results in mechanical damage to cells. Dependence of the maximal temperature on pulse duration could be approximated by Arrhenius law with activation energy being about 1 eV.

  14. Modeling and Analysis of Cellular Networks using Stochastic Geometry: A Tutorial

    KAUST Repository

    ElSawy, Hesham

    2016-03-22

    This paper presents a tutorial on stochastic geometry (SG) based analysis for cellular networks. This tutorial is distinguished by its depth with respect to wireless communication details and its focus on cellular networks. The paper starts by modeling and analyzing the baseband interference in a basic cellular network model. Then, it characterizes signal-tointerference- plus-noise-ratio (SINR) and its related performance metrics. In particular, a unified approach to conduct error probability, outage probability, and rate analysis is presented. Although the main focus of the paper is on cellular networks, the presented unified approach applies for other types of wireless networks that impose interference protection around receivers. The paper then extends the baseline unified approach to capture cellular network characteristics (e.g., frequency reuse, multiple antenna, power control, etc.). It also presents numerical examples associated with demonstrations and discussions. Finally, we point out future research directions.

  15. A Parallel Encryption Algorithm for Block Ciphers Based on Reversible Programmable Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Debasis; Ray, Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    A Cellular Automata (CA) is a computing model of complex System using simple rule. In CA the problem space into number of cell and each cell can be one or several final state. Cells are affected by neighbours' to the simple rule. Cellular Automata are highly parallel and discrete dynamical systems, whose behaviour is completely specified in terms of a local relation. This paper deals with the Cellular Automata (CA) in cryptography for a class of Block Ciphers through a new block encryption al...

  16. Cellular automata modelling of biomolecular networks dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonchev, D; Thomas, S; Apte, A; Kier, L B

    2010-01-01

    The modelling of biological systems dynamics is traditionally performed by ordinary differential equations (ODEs). When dealing with intracellular networks of genes, proteins and metabolites, however, this approach is hindered by network complexity and the lack of experimental kinetic parameters. This opened the field for other modelling techniques, such as cellular automata (CA) and agent-based modelling (ABM). This article reviews this emerging field of studies on network dynamics in molecular biology. The basics of the CA technique are discussed along with an extensive list of related software and websites. The application of CA to networks of biochemical reactions is exemplified in detail by the case studies of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, the FAS-ligand (FASL)-induced and Bcl-2-related apoptosis. The potential of the CA method to model basic pathways patterns, to identify ways to control pathway dynamics and to help in generating strategies to fight with cancer is demonstrated. The different line of CA applications presented includes the search for the best-performing network motifs, an analysis of importance for effective intracellular signalling and pathway cross-talk. PMID:20373215

  17. Analytical Modeling of Uplink Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Novlan, Thomas D; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2012-01-01

    Cellular uplink analysis has typically been undertaken by either a simple approach that lumps all interference into a single deterministic or random parameter in a Wyner-type model, or via complex system level simulations that often do not provide insight into why various trends are observed. This paper proposes a novel middle way that is both accurate and also results in easy-to-evaluate integral expressions based on the Laplace transform of the interference. We assume mobiles and base stations are randomly placed in the network with each mobile pairing up to its closest base station. The model requires two important changes compared to related recent work on the downlink. First, dependence is introduced between the user and base station point processes to make sure each base station serves a single mobile in the given resource block. Second, per-mobile power control is included, which further couples the locations of the mobiles and their receiving base stations. Nevertheless, we succeed in deriving the cov...

  18. Cellular automata modeling of cooperative eutectic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Olejnik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The model and results of the 2D simulation of the cooperative growth of two phases in the lamellar eutectic are presented. The pro-posed model takes into account heat transfer, components diffusion and nonstationary concentration distribution in the liquid and solid phases, non-equlibrium nature of the phase transformation and kinetics of the growth, influence of the surface energy and interface curva-ture on the conditions of the thermodynamic equilibrium. For the determination of the phase interface shape the Cellular Automata tech-nique (CA was used. For the calculation of temperature and concentration distribution the numerical solution of the Fourier equation was used. The partial differential equations were solved by Finite Differences Method (FDM. The spatial position and cell sizes of CA lattice and FDM mesh are equal.Proposed model can predict the steady state growth with a constant interlamellar spacing in the regular plate eutectic, as well as some transient processes that bring to the changes of that parameters. Obtained simulation data show the solid-liquid interface changes result in the termination of lamella and enlargement of interlamellar spacing. Another simulation results illustrate a pocket formation in the center of one phase that forestalls nucleation (or intergrowth of the new lamellae of another phase. The data of the solidification study of the transparent material (CBr4 – 8,4% C2Cl6 obtained in the thin layer demonstrate the qualita-tive agreement of the simulation.

  19. Cellular phones: are they detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Osama E; Abou El Naga, Randa M

    2004-01-01

    The issue of possible health effects of cellular phones is very much alive in the public's mind where the rapid increase in the number of the users of cell phones in the last decade has increased the exposure of people to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Health consequences of long term use of mobile phones are not known in detail but available data indicates the development of non specific annoying symptoms on acute exposure to mobile phone radiations. In an attempt to determine the prevalence of such cell phones associated health manifestations and the factors affecting their occurrence, a cross sectional study was conducted in five randomly selected faculties of Alexandria University. Where, 300 individuals including teaching staff, students and literate employee were equally allocated and randomly selected among the five faculties. Data about mobile phone's users and their medical history, their pattern of mobile usage and the possible deleterious health manifestations associated with cellular phone use was collected. The results revealed 68% prevalence of mobile phone usage, nearly three quarters of them (72.5%) were complainers of the health manifestations. They suffered from headache (43%), earache (38.3%), sense of fatigue (31.6%), sleep disturbance (29.5%), concentration difficulty (28.5%) and face burning sensation (19.2%). Both univariate and multivariate analysis were consistent in their findings. Symptomatic users were found to have significantly higher frequency of calls/day, longer call duration and longer total duration of mobile phone usage/day than non symptomatic users. For headache both call duration and frequency of calls/day were the significant predicting factors for its occurrence (chi2 = 18.208, p = 0.0001). For earache, in addition to call duration, the longer period of owning the mobile phone were significant predictors (chi2 = 16.996, p = 0.0002). Sense of fatigue was significantly affected by both call duration and age of the user

  20. The mammary cellular hierarchy and breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oakes, Samantha R.; Gallego-Ortega, David; Ormandy, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the study of hematopoietic cell maturation have paved the way to a deeper understanding the stem and progenitor cellular hierarchy in the mammary gland. The mammary epithelium, unlike the hematopoietic cellular hierarchy, sits in a complex niche where communication between epithelial cells and signals from the systemic hormonal milieu, as well as from extra-cellular matrix, influence cell fate decisions and contribute to tissue homeostasis. We review the discovery, definition and ...

  1. Predicting Cellular Growth from Gene Expression Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Dunham, Maitreya J.; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Airoldi, Edoardo; Broach, James R.; Caudy, Amy A.; Gresham, David; Botstein, David; Huttenhower, Curtis; Lu, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining balanced growth in a changing environment is a fundamental systems-level challenge for cellular physiology, particularly in microorganisms. While the complete set of regulatory and functional pathways supporting growth and cellular proliferation are not yet known, portions of them are well understood. In particular, cellular proliferation is governed by mechanisms that are highly conserved from unicellular to multicellular organisms, and the disruption of these processes in metazo...

  2. Cellular structure in system of interacting particles

    OpenAIRE

    Lev, Bohdan

    2008-01-01

    The general description of formation the cellular structure in the system of interacting particles is proposed. Interactions between particles are presumably well-understood and the phase transition in which can be studied in the scale of particle resolution. We presented analytical results of possible cellular structures for suspension of colloidal particles, in system particles immersed in liquid crystal and gravitational system. We have shown that cellular structure formation can occur in ...

  3. Radiation, nitric oxide and cellular death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of radiation induced cellular death constitute an objective of research ever since the first biological effects of radiation were first observed. The explosion of information produced in the last 20 years calls for a careful analysis due to the apparent contradictory data related to the cellular system studied and the range of doses used. This review focuses on the role of the active oxygen species, in particular the nitric oxides, in its relevance as potential mediator of radiation induced cellular death

  4. Autophagy and mitophagy in cellular damage control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy and mitophagy are important cellular processes that are responsible for breaking down cellular contents, preserving energy and safeguarding against accumulation of damaged and aggregated biomolecules. This graphic review gives a broad summary of autophagy and discusses examples where autophagy is important in controlling protein degradation. In addition we highlight how autophagy and mitophagy are involved in the cellular responses to reactive species and mitochondrial dysfunction. The key signaling pathways for mitophagy are described in the context of bioenergetic dysfunction.

  5. The cellular particle swarm optimization algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a variant of the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) original algorithm, the Cellular-PSO. Inspired by the cellular Genetic Algorithm (GA), particles in Cellular-PSO are arranged into a matrix of cells interconnected according to a given topology. Such topology defines particle's neighborhood, inside which social adaptation may occur. As a consequence, population diversity is increased and the optimization process becomes more efficient and robust. The proposed Cellular-PSO has been applied to the nuclear reactor core design optimization problem and comparative experiments demonstrated that it is superior to the standard PSO. (author)

  6. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies proposes to develop a unique structural cellular core material to improve mechanical performance, reduce platform weight and lower...

  7. Marine molluscs in environmental monitoring. I. Cellular and molecular responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Vladimir; Abelson, Avigdor; Fishelson, Lev; Feldstein, Tamar; Rosenfeld, Michael; Mokady, Ofer

    2003-10-01

    The study reported here is part of an ongoing effort to establish sensitive and reliable biomonitoring markers for probing the coastal marine environment. Here, we report comparative measurements of a range of histological, cellular and sub-cellular parameters in molluscs sampled in polluted and reference sites along the Mediterranean coast of Israel and in the northern tip of the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. Available species enabled an examination of conditions in two environmental 'compartments': benthic (Donax trunculus) and intertidal (Brachidontes pharaonis, Patella caerulea) in the Mediterranean; pelagic (Pteria aegyptia) and intertidal (Cellana rota) in the Red Sea. The methodology used provides rapid results by combining specialized fluorescent probes and contact microscopy, by which all parameters are measured in unprocessed animal tissue. The research focused on three interconnected levels. First, antixenobiotic defence mechanisms aimed at keeping hazardous agents outside the cell. Paracellular permeability was 70-100% higher in polluted sites, and membrane pumps (MXRtr and SATOA) activity was up to 65% higher in polluted compared to reference sites. Second, intracellular defence mechanisms that act to minimize potential damage by agents having penetrated the first line of defence. Metallothionein expression and EROD activity were 160-520% higher in polluted sites, and lysosomal functional activity (as measured by neutral red accumulation) was 25-50% lower. Third, damage caused by agents not sufficiently eliminated by the above mechanisms (e.g. single-stranded DNA breaks, chromosome damage and other pathological alterations). At this level, the most striking differences were observed in the rate of micronuclei formation and DNA breaks (up to 150% and 400% higher in polluted sites, respectively). The different mollusc species used feature very similar trends between polluted and reference sites in all measured parameters. Concentrating on relatively basic

  8. Illuminating cellular physiology: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2007-01-01

    Bioluminescent methods are gaining more and more attention among scientists due to their sensitivity, selectivity and simplicity; coupled with the fact that the bioluminescence can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. Since the discovery of bioluminescence in the 19th century, enzymes involved in the bioluminescent process have been isolated and cloned. The bioluminescent reactions in several different organisms have also been fully characterized and used as reporters in a wide variety of biochemical assays. From the 1990s it became clear that bioluminescence can be detected and quantified directly from inside a living cell. This gave rise to numerous possibilities for the in vivo monitoring of intracellular processes non-invasively using bioluminescent molecules as reporters. This review describes recent developments in the area of bioluminescent imaging for cell biology. Newly developed imaging methods allow transcriptional/translational regulation, signal transduction, protein-protein interaction, oncogenic transformation, cell and protein trafficking, and target drug action to be monitored in vivo in real-time with high temporal and spatial resolution; thus providing researchers with priceless information on cellular functions. Advantages and limitations of these novel bioluminescent methods are discussed and possible future developments identified. PMID:17725230

  9. Efficiency of cellular information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Barato, Andre C; Seifert, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We show that a rate of conditional Shannon entropy reduction, characterizing the learning of an internal process about an external process, is bounded by the thermodynamic entropy production. This approach allows for the definition of an informational efficiency that can be used to study cellular information processing. We analyze three models of increasing complexity inspired by the E. coli sensory network, where the external process is an external ligand concentration jumping between two values. We start with a simple model for which ATP must be consumed so that a protein inside the cell can learn about the external concentration. With a second model for a single receptor we show that the rate at which the receptor learns about the external environment can be nonzero even without any dissipation inside the cell since chemical work done by the external process compensates for this learning rate. The third model is more complete, also containing adaptation. For this model we show inter alia that a bacterium i...

  10. Predicting bulk mechanical properties of cellularized collagen gels using multiphoton microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Raub, CB; Putnam, AJ; Tromberg, BJ; George, SC

    2010-01-01

    Cellularized collagen gels are a common model in tissue engineering, but the relationship between the microstructure and bulk mechanical properties is only partially understood. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an ideal non-invasive tool to examine collagen microstructure, cellularity and crosslink content in these gels. In order to identify robust image parameters that characterize microstructural determinants of the bulk elastic modulus, we performed serial MPM and mechanical tests on acellu...

  11. Getting parameters from learning data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy L. Lacroix

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Response time data in learning experiments show a typical trend. They start out slow, quickly improve, before finally tending toward optimal performance. This trend provides critical information that can be used to test various theories of learning. One convenient way to characterize the data is the use of a learning curve; an idealized curve that passes through the observed data points as a function of training. This idealized curve has free parameters that must be estimated using optimization techniques. In this tutorial, we show how to estimate learning curve parameters using three softwares (Excel, SPSS, and Mathematica assuming that the idealized curve is a power function. The techniques can easily be adapted to other functions. Finally, details are provided on related topics (maximizing block sizes, testing curvatures, etc..

  12. Integration of Neural Networks and Cellular Automata for Urban Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anthony Gar-on Yeh; LI Xia

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new type of cellular automata (CA) model for the simulation of alternative land development using neural networks for urban planning. CA models can be regarded as a planning tool because they can generate alternative urban growth. Alternative development patterns can be formed by using different sets of parameter values in CA simulation. A critical issue is how to define parameter values for realistic and idealized simulation. This paper demonstrates that neural networks can simplify CA models but generate more plausible results. The simulation is based on a simple three-layer network with an output neuron to generate conversion probability. No transition rules are required for the simulation. Parameter values are automatically obtained from the training of network by using satellite remote sensing data. Original training data can be assessed and modified according to planning objectives. Alternative urban patterns can be easily formulated by using the modified training data sets rather than changing the model.

  13. Modeling integrated cellular machinery using hybrid Petri-Boolean networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Berestovsky

    Full Text Available The behavior and phenotypic changes of cells are governed by a cellular circuitry that represents a set of biochemical reactions. Based on biological functions, this circuitry is divided into three types of networks, each encoding for a major biological process: signal transduction, transcription regulation, and metabolism. This division has generally enabled taming computational complexity dealing with the entire system, allowed for using modeling techniques that are specific to each of the components, and achieved separation of the different time scales at which reactions in each of the three networks occur. Nonetheless, with this division comes loss of information and power needed to elucidate certain cellular phenomena. Within the cell, these three types of networks work in tandem, and each produces signals and/or substances that are used by the others to process information and operate normally. Therefore, computational techniques for modeling integrated cellular machinery are needed. In this work, we propose an integrated hybrid model (IHM that combines Petri nets and Boolean networks to model integrated cellular networks. Coupled with a stochastic simulation mechanism, the model simulates the dynamics of the integrated network, and can be perturbed to generate testable hypotheses. Our model is qualitative and is mostly built upon knowledge from the literature and requires fine-tuning of very few parameters. We validated our model on two systems: the transcriptional regulation of glucose metabolism in human cells, and cellular osmoregulation in S. cerevisiae. The model produced results that are in very good agreement with experimental data, and produces valid hypotheses. The abstract nature of our model and the ease of its construction makes it a very good candidate for modeling integrated networks from qualitative data. The results it produces can guide the practitioner to zoom into components and interconnections and investigate them

  14. From cellular to tissue scales by asymptotic limits of thermostatted kinetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianca, Carlo; Dogbe, Christian; Lemarchand, Annie

    2016-02-01

    Tumor growth strictly depends on the interactions occurring at the cellular scale. In order to obtain the linking between the dynamics described at tissue and cellular scales, asymptotic methods have been employed, consisting in deriving tissue equations by suitable limits of mesoscopic models. In this paper, the evolution at the cellular scale is described by thermostatted kinetic theory that include conservative, nonconservative (proliferation, destruction and mutations), stochastic terms, and the role of external agents. The dynamics at the tissue scale (cell-density evolution) is obtained by performing a low-field scaling and considering the related convergence of the rescaled framework when the scaling parameter goes to zero.

  15. Phononic Band Gaps in 2D Quadratic and 3D Cubic Cellular Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Warmuth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The static and dynamic mechanical behaviour of cellular materials can be designed by the architecture of the underlying unit cell. In this paper, the phononic band structure of 2D and 3D cellular structures is investigated. It is shown how the geometry of the unit cell influences the band structure and eventually leads to full band gaps. The mechanism leading to full band gaps is elucidated. Based on this knowledge, a 3D cellular structure with a broad full band gap is identified. Furthermore, the dependence of the width of the gap on the geometry parameters of the unit cell is presented.

  16. Do integrable cellular automata have the confinement property?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grammaticos, B. [IMNC, Universite Paris VII-Paris XI, CNRS, UMR 8165, Bat. 104, 91406 Orsay (France); Ramani, A. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Tamizhmani, K.M. [Departement of Mathematics, Pondicherry University, Kalapet, 605014 Puducherry (India); Tamizhmani, T. [Department of Mathematics, Kanchi Mamunivar Centre for Postgraduate Studies, Puducherry (India); Carstea, A.S. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 407 Atomistilor, Magurele, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-07-27

    We analyse a criterion, introduced by Joshi and Lafortune, for the integrability of cellular automata obtained from discrete systems through the ultradiscretization procedure. We show that while this criterion can be used in order to single out integrable ultradiscrete systems, there do exist cases where the system is nonintegrable and still the criterion is satisfied. Conversely we show that for ultradiscrete systems that are derived from linearizable mappings the criterion is not satisfied. We investigate this phenomenon further in the case of a mapping which includes a linearizable subcase and show how the violation of the criterion comes to be. Finally, we comment on the growth properties of ultradiscrete systems. (fast track communication)

  17. Do integrable cellular automata have the confinement property?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyse a criterion, introduced by Joshi and Lafortune, for the integrability of cellular automata obtained from discrete systems through the ultradiscretization procedure. We show that while this criterion can be used in order to single out integrable ultradiscrete systems, there do exist cases where the system is nonintegrable and still the criterion is satisfied. Conversely we show that for ultradiscrete systems that are derived from linearizable mappings the criterion is not satisfied. We investigate this phenomenon further in the case of a mapping which includes a linearizable subcase and show how the violation of the criterion comes to be. Finally, we comment on the growth properties of ultradiscrete systems. (fast track communication)

  18. Getting parameters from learning data

    OpenAIRE

    Guy L. Lacroix; Denis Cousineau

    2006-01-01

    Response time data in learning experiments show a typical trend. They start out slow, quickly improve, before finally tending toward optimal performance. This trend provides critical information that can be used to test various theories of learning. One convenient way to characterize the data is the use of a learning curve; an idealized curve that passes through the observed data points as a function of training. This idealized curve has free parameters that must be estimated using optimizati...

  19. Investigation of Applications of SA in the Design of Dynamic Cellular Manufacturing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Jayakumar,

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing industries are under intense pressure from the increasingly competitive global marketplace. Shorter product lifecycle, time to market and diverse customer needs have challengedmanufacturers to improve the efficiency and productivity of their production activities. Manufacturing systems should be able to adjust or respond quickly to adopt necessary changes in product design and product demand without major investment. Traditional manufacturingsystems are not capable of satisfying such requirements. Although a cellular manufacturing system (CMS provides great benefits, the design of CMS is complex for real life problems. The design of such a kind of manufacturing system under dynamic production environment, with variety and demand varying between each planning horizon, requires pervasive use of a Metaheuristics such as Genetic Algorithm (GA, Simulated Annealing algorithm (SA, and Tabu Search (TS. Thedynamic cell formation (CF problem (involving the formation of a mathematical model depicting the variableproduct mix and demand across the planning horizons is known to be one of the NP-hard combinational problems. Although some optimization algorithms can find the optimal solution for small- and medium-sized problems, they have a disadvantage in that the memory and computational time requirements are extremely high, and increase exponentially, as the problem size increases. In such situations, meta-heuristics are used for exploring and exploiting the search space to obtain good solutions. In contrast to other stochastic searches, SAs in particularhave the following unique features: it does not get trapped in local minimum. Allow uphill moves controlled by parameter called temperature. Final result not dependent on initial state.These features often makes them a preferable choice over traditional heuristics. The objective of this paper is to review how the SA has been applied so far for the Design of Cellular Manufacturing

  20. Immune cellular response to HPV: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Guimarães Gonçalves

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular immunity is essential for the elimination of human papillomavirus (HPV, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We summarize the main mechanisms involved in cellular immune response to infections caused by HPV. Immunotherapies for HPV-related cancers require the disruption of T-cell response control mechanisms, associated with the stimulation of the Th1 cytokine response.

  1. Mechanisms of cellular transformation by carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: DNA Modification by Chemical Carcinogens; Role of DNA Lesions and Repair in the Transformation of Human Cells; The Induction and Regulation of Radiogenic Transformation In Vitro: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms; Cellular Transformation by Adenoviruses; and The fos Gene

  2. Recent development of cellular manufacturing systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Arora; A Haleem; M K Singh

    2013-06-01

    Cellular manufacturing system has been proved a vital approach for batch and job shop production systems. Group technology has been an essential tool for developing a cellular manufacturing system. The paper aims to discuss various cell formation techniques and highlights the significant research work done in past over the years and attempts to points out the gap in research.

  3. Mechanisms of cellular transformation by carcinogenic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunberger, D.; Goff, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: DNA Modification by Chemical Carcinogens; Role of DNA Lesions and Repair in the Transformation of Human Cells; The Induction and Regulation of Radiogenic Transformation In Vitro: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms; Cellular Transformation by Adenoviruses; and The fos Gene.

  4. LMS filters for cellular CDMA overlay

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper extends and complements previous research we have performed on the performance of nonadaptive narrowband suppression filters when used in cellular CDMA overlay situations. In this paper, an adaptive LMS filter is applied to cellular CDMA overlay situations in order to reject narrowband interference.

  5. Molecular and cellular limits to somatosensory specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viana Félix

    2008-04-01

    involved primarily in nerve impulse generation can also influence the gating of transducing channels, dramatically modifying their activation profile. Thus, we propose that the capacity exhibited by the different functional types of somatosensory receptor neurons to preferentially detect and encode specific stimuli into a discharge of nerve impulses, appears to result of a characteristic combinatorial expression of different ion channels in each neuronal type that finally determines their transduction and impulse firing properties. Transduction channels don't operate in isolation and their cellular context should also be taken into consideration to fully understand their function. Moreover, the inhomogeneous distribution of transduction and voltage-gated channels at soma, axonal branches and peripheral endings of primary sensory neurons influences the characteristics of the propagated impulse discharge that encodes the properties of the stimulus. Alteration of this concerted operation of ion channels in pathological conditions may underlie the changes in excitability accompanying peripheral sensory neuron injuries.

  6. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourret, D; Debierre, J-M; Song, Y; Mota, F L; Bergeon, N; Guérin, R; Trivedi, R; Billia, B; Karma, A

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  7. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  8. The Universe as a Cellular System

    CERN Document Server

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Cellular systems are observed everywhere in nature, from crystal domains in metals, soap froth and cucumber cells to the network of cosmological voids. Surprisingly, despite their disparate scale and origin all cellular systems follow certain scaling laws relating their geometry, topology and dynamics. Using a cosmological N-body simulation we found that the Cosmic Web, the largest known cellular system, follows the same scaling relations seen elsewhere in nature. Our results extend the validity of scaling relations in cellular systems by over 30 orders of magnitude in scale with respect to previous studies. The dynamics of cellular systems can be used to interpret local observations such as the local velocity anomaly as the result of a collapsing void in our cosmic backyard. Moreover, scaling relations depend on the curvature of space, providing an independent measure of geometry.

  9. Determination of equivalent diffusion theory parameters. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideal equivalent group diffusion theory constants are defined in a rigorous manner and the failure of standard flux-weighting procedures to yield these ideal constants is discussed. An iterative scheme based upon the Response Matrix Technique is then developed for finding improved two-group, two-dimensional equivalent group diffusion constants for symmetric assemblies. The use of these constants in a full-core criticality calculation results in a much more accurate prediction of integrated absorption rates and power densities than those predicted using the standard flux-weighted constants

  10. varying elastic parameters distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2014-12-01

    The experimental identication of mechanical properties is crucial in mechanics for understanding material behavior and for the development of numerical models. Classical identi cation procedures employ standard shaped specimens, assume that the mechanical elds in the object are homogeneous, and recover global properties. Thus, multiple tests are required for full characterization of a heterogeneous object, leading to a time consuming and costly process. The development of non-contact, full- eld measurement techniques from which complex kinematic elds can be recorded has opened the door to a new way of thinking. From the identi cation point of view, suitable methods can be used to process these complex kinematic elds in order to recover multiple spatially varying parameters through one test or a few tests. The requirement is the development of identi cation techniques that can process these complex experimental data. This thesis introduces a novel identi cation technique called the constitutive compatibility method. The key idea is to de ne stresses as compatible with the observed kinematic eld through the chosen class of constitutive equation, making possible the uncoupling of the identi cation of stress from the identi cation of the material parameters. This uncoupling leads to parametrized solutions in cases where 5 the solution is non-unique (due to unknown traction boundary conditions) as demonstrated on 2D numerical examples. First the theory is outlined and the method is demonstrated in 2D applications. Second, the method is implemented within a domain decomposition framework in order to reduce the cost for processing very large problems. Finally, it is extended to 3D numerical examples. Promising results are shown for 2D and 3D problems.

  11. Mathematical model for flood routing based on cellular automaton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin CAI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing frequency and severity of flooding have caused tremendous damage in China, requiring more essential countermeasures to alleviate the damage. In this study, the dynamic simulation property of a cellular automaton was used to make further progress in flood routing. In consideration of terrain’s influence on flood routing, we regarded the terrain elevation as an auxiliary attribute of a two-dimensional cellular automaton in path selection for flood routing and developed a mathematical model based on a cellular automaton. A numerical case of propagation of an outburst flood in an area of the lower Yangtze River was analyzed with both the fixed-step and variable-step models. The results show that the flood does not spread simultaneously in all directions, but flows into the lower place first, and that the submerged area grows quickly at the beginning, but slowly later on. The final submerged areas obtained from the two different models are consistent, and the flood volume balance test shows that the flood volume meets the requirement of the total volume balance. The analysis of the case shows that the proposed model can be a valuable tool for flood routing.

  12. GALAPAGOS: From Pixels to Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Barden, Marco; Peng, Chien Y; McIntosh, Daniel H; Guo, Yicheng; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.20619.x

    2012-01-01

    To automate source detection, two-dimensional light-profile Sersic modelling and catalogue compilation in large survey applications, we introduce a new code GALAPAGOS, Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SExtractor. Based on a single setup, GALAPAGOS can process a complete set of survey images. It detects sources in the data, estimates a local sky background, cuts postage stamp images for all sources, prepares object masks, performs Sersic fitting including neighbours and compiles all objects in a final output catalogue. For the initial source detection GALAPAGOS applies SExtractor, while GALFIT is incorporated for modelling Sersic profiles. It measures the background sky involved in the Sersic fitting by means of a flux growth curve. GALAPAGOS determines postage stamp sizes based on SExtractor shape parameters. In order to obtain precise model parameters GALAPAGOS incorporates a complex sorting mechanism and makes use of modern CPU's multiplexing capabilities. It...

  13. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  14. Cellular Automaton Simulation of Evacuation Process in Story

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chang-Qun; ZHENG Rong-Sen; GAO Chun-Yuan; QIU Bing; DENG Min-Yi; KONC Ling-Jiang; LIU Mu-Ren

    2008-01-01

    Computer simulations on the evacuation process in a story are launched with cellular automaton in this article. The story is composed of five rooms and one corridor. Influence of various parameters on the evacuation process is investigated. It shows that the width of the door of rooms has little influence but the width of the corridor and themaximum velocity of the pedestrian have great influence on the time for evacuation. The relation between evacuation time and the width of corridor is found as tc ∝ W-.0.84. It is also found that appropriate shape of the room is helpful to evacuation.

  15. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Philip L.

    2012-11-11

    Our research program was aimed at elucidating the nature of proton transport in ionomer membranes by means of a combination of analytical theory and molecular modeling. There were two broad thrusts. The first of these was directed towards understanding the equilibrium structure of Nafion and related polymers at various levels of hydration. The second thrust was concerned with the transport of protons through a membrane of this type. The research on structure proceeded by building on existing work, but with the introduction of some novel techniques, among which is a hybrid Molecular Dynamics--Monte Carlo approach. This method permits rapid computations by temporarily decoupling the motion of the polar side chains from that of the perfluorinated backbone, while still retaining the essential aspects of the constraint that phase separation can only continue to a very limited degree. Competition between an elastic energy due to this constraint and the tendency to phase separation lead to the equilibrium structure, which turns out to be qualitatively different at different levels of hydration. The use of a carefully formulated dielectric function was necessary to achieve accurate results. The work on transport of protons in Nafion-like membranes also involved a combination of theory and simulation. Atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations were employed to determine some of the characteristic parameters for the diffusion of hydronium in hydrated membranes. These results were used in a theoretical model of non-linear diffusion to predict transport coefficients. Among our results was the discovery that treatment with strong electric fields may enhance the properties of the polymer membranes. Our computer simulations showed that the vigorous application of a stretching force or an electric field can modify the structure of the ionomer that lies at the heart of a polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cell. If these predictions are verified experimentally, then it should be

  16. Wearable vital parameters monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramaliu, Radu Vadim; Vasile, Alexandru; Bacis, Irina

    2015-02-01

    The system we propose monitors body temperature, heart rate and beside this, it tracks if the person who wears it suffers a faint. It uses a digital temperature sensor, a pulse sensor and a gravitational acceleration sensor to monitor the eventual faint or small heights free falls. The system continuously tracks the GPS position when available and stores the last valid data. So, when measuring abnormal vital parameters the module will send an SMS, using the GSM cellular network , with the person's social security number, the last valid GPS position for that person, the heart rate, the body temperature and, where applicable, a valid fall alert or non-valid fall alert. Even though such systems exist, they contain only faint detection or heart rate detection. Usually there is a strong correlation between low/high heart rate and an eventual faint. Combining both features into one system results in a more reliable detection device.

  17. Estimating cellular network performance during hurricanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular networks serve a critical role during and immediately after a hurricane, allowing citizens to contact emergency services when land-line communication is lost and serving as a backup communication channel for emergency responders. However, due to their ubiquitous deployment and limited design for extreme loading events, basic network elements, such as cellular towers and antennas are prone to failures during adverse weather conditions such as hurricanes. Accordingly, a systematic and computationally feasible approach is required for assessing and improving the reliability of cellular networks during hurricanes. In this paper we develop a new multi-disciplinary approach to efficiently and accurately assess cellular network reliability during hurricanes. We show how the performance of a cellular network during and immediately after future hurricanes can be estimated based on a combination of hurricane wind field models, structural reliability analysis, Monte Carlo simulation, and cellular network models and simulation tools. We then demonstrate the use of this approach for assessing the improvement in system reliability that can be achieved with discrete topological changes in the system. Our results suggest that adding redundancy, particularly through a mesh topology or through the addition of an optical fiber ring around the perimeter of the system can be an effective way to significantly increase the reliability of some cellular systems during hurricanes.

  18. Taking Variable Correlation into Consideration during Parameter Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    T.J. Santos; Pinto, J C.

    1998-01-01

    Variable correlations are usually neglected during parameter estimation. Very frequently these are gross assumptions and may potentially lead to inadequate interpretation of final estimation results. For this reason, variable correlation and model parameters are sometimes estimated simultaneously in certain parameter estimation procedures. It is shown, however, that usually taking variable correlation into consideration during parameter estimation may be inadequate and unnecessary, unless ind...

  19. Macromolecular lesions and cellular radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our studies of the interaction of densely ionizing particles with macromolecules in the living cell may be divided into four parts: characterization of lesions to cellular DNA in the unmodified Bragg ionization curve; characterization of lesions to cellular DNA in the spread Bragg curve as used in radiation therapy; elucidation of the cellular radiation chemistry characteristic of high vs. low LET radiation qualities; and the introduction of novel techniques designed to give a better understanding of the fundamental properties of induction of lesions and their repair potentials in high LET radiation

  20. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial-encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisingly, found to act as regulators of mitochondrial translation. In turn, translation in mitochondria controls cellular proliferation, and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits contribute to the cytoplasmic stress response. Thus, translation in mitochondria is apparently integrated into cellular processes. PMID:26535422

  1. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progression. This review focuses on new findings that enhance understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis, the characteristics of myofibroblasts, their progenitors, and molecular pathways regulating both fibrogenesis and its resolution. PMID:24892703

  2. Nanomechanics of magnetically driven cellular endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, V.; Lunov, O.; Dejneka, A.; Jastrabík, L.; Polyakova, T.; Syrovets, T.; Simmet, Th.

    2011-10-01

    Being essential for many pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic processes and playing a crucial role in regulating substrate detachment that enables cellular locomotion, endocytotic mechanisms in many aspects still remain a mystery and therefore can hardly be controlled. Here, we report on experimental and modeling studies of the magnetically assisted endocytosis of functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by prostate cancer cells (PC-3) and characterize the time and force scales of the cellular uptake machinery. The results indicate how the cellular uptake rate could be controlled by applied magnetic field, membrane elasticity, and nanoparticle magnetic moment.

  3. Cellular Signaling Pathways and Their Clinical Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ceren Sumer-Turanligil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling pathways have important roles in cellular growth, differentiation, inflammatory response and apoptosis and in regulation of cellular responses under various chemical stimulators. Different proteins which belong to these pathways may be exposed to loss-of-function or gain-of-function mutations; this may lead to many clinical phenotypes including primarily cancer. In this review information about basic working principles of these pathways and diseases related to them are included. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(3.000: 180-191

  4. Imaging in cellular and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hanry

    2013-01-01

    Details on specific imaging modalities for different cellular and tissue engineering applications are scattered throughout articles and chapters in the literature. Gathering this information into a single reference, Imaging in Cellular and Tissue Engineering presents both the fundamentals and state of the art in imaging methods, approaches, and applications in regenerative medicine. The book underscores the broadening scope of imaging applications in cellular and tissue engineering. It covers a wide range of optical and biological applications, including the repair or replacement of whole tiss

  5. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates...

  6. Interworking of Wireless LANs and Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The next-generation of wireless communications are envisioned to be supported by heterogeneous networks by using various wireless access technologies. The popular cellular networks and wireless local area networks (WLANs) present perfectly complementary characteristics in terms of service capacity, mobility support, and quality-of-service (QoS) provisioning. The cellular/WLAN interworking is an effective way to promote the evolution of wireless networks. "Interworking of Wireless LANs and Cellular Networks" focuses on three aspects, namely access selection, call admission control and

  7. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Popescu

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of isolated and purified glyconectins revealed the presence of specific carbohydrate structures, acidic glycans, different from classical glycosaminoglycans. Such acidic glycans of high molecular weight containing fucose, glucuronic or galacturonic acids, and sulfate groups, originally found in sponges and sea urchin embryos, may represent a new class of carbohydrate carcino-embryonal antigens in mice and humans. Such interactions between biological macromolecules are usually investigated by kinetic binding studies, calorimetric methods, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and other spectroscopic analyses. However, these methods do not supply a direct estimation of the intermolecular binding forces that are fundamental for the function of the ligand-receptor association. Recently, we have introduced atomic force microscopy to quantify the binding strength between cell adhesion proteoglycans. Measurement of binding forces intrinsic to cell adhesion proteoglycans is necessary to assess their contribution to the maintenance of the anatomical integrity of multicellular organisms. As a model, we selected the glyconectin 1, a cell adhesion proteoglycan isolated from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera. This glyconectin mediates in vivo cell recognition and aggregation via homophilic, species-specific, polyvalent, and calcium ion-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. Under physiological conditions, an adhesive force of up to 400 piconewtons

  8. Leaf development: A cellular perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit TS Beemster

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Through its photosynthetic capacity the leaf provides the basis for growth of the whole plant. In order to improve crops for higher productivity and resistance for future climate scenarios, it is important to obtain a mechanistic understanding of leaf growth and development and the effect of genetic and environmental factors on the process. Cells are both the basic building blocks of the leaf and the regulatory units that integrate genetic and environmental information into the developmental program. Therefore, to fundamentally understand leaf development, one needs to be able to reconstruct the developmental pathway of individual cells (and their progeny from the stem cell niche to their final position in the mature leaf. To build the basis for such understanding, we review current knowledge on the spatial and temporal regulation mechanisms operating on cells, contributing to the formation of a leaf. We focus on the molecular networks that control exit from stem cell fate, leaf initiation, polarity, cytoplasmic growth, cell division, endoreduplication, transition between division and expansion, expansion and differentiation and their regulation by intercellular signaling molecules, including plant hormones, sugars, peptides, proteins and microRNAs. We discuss to what extent the knowledge available in the literature is suitable to be applied in systems biology approaches to model the process of leaf growth, in order to better understand and predict leaf growth starting with the model species Arabidopsis thaliana.

  9. Improving Quality of Clustering using Cellular Automata for Information retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Sree

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Clustering has been widely applied to Information Retrieval (IR on the grounds of its potential improved effectiveness over inverted file search. Clustering is a mostly unsupervised procedure and the majority of the clustering algorithms depend on certain assumptions in order to define the subgroups present in a data set .A clustering quality measure is a function that, given a data set and its partition into clusters, returns a non-negative real number representing the quality of that clustering. Moreover, they may behave in a different way depending on the features of the data set and their input parameters values. Therefore, in most applications the resulting clustering scheme requires some sort of evaluation as regards its validity. The quality of clustering can be enhanced by using a Cellular Automata Classifier for information retrieval. In this study we take the view that if cellular automata with clustering is applied to search results (query-specific clustering, then it has the potential to increase the retrieval effectiveness compared both to that of static clustering and of conventional inverted file search. We conducted a number of experiments using ten document collections and eight hierarchic clustering methods. Our results show that the effectiveness of query-specific clustering with cellular automata is indeed higher and suggest that there is scope for its application to IR.

  10. FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETER, GARY F. [UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

    2014-07-16

    of biomass samples imaged with all three methods, and using common analytical software to quantify parameters from the three dimensional images. In addition to the proposed experiments, we conducted imaging studies with a novel TOF-SIMS instrument available through collaborations with the AMOLF goup led by Ron Heeren at the FOM Institute in Amersterdam, Netherlands. ToF-SIMS was used to image intact cross sections of Populus stems with high spatial resolution, chemically selectivity. ToF-SIMS images were correlated with fluorescence microscopy which allowed for more positive ion identification.

  11. Open boundaries in a cellular automaton model for traffic flow with metastable states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlovic, Robert; Huisinga, Torsten; Schadschneider, Andreas; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2002-10-01

    The effects of open boundaries in the velocity-dependent randomization (VDR) model, a modified version of the well-known Nagel-Schreckenberg (NaSch) cellular automaton model for traffic flow, are investigated. In contrast to the NaSch model, the VDR model exhibits metastable states and phase separation in a certain density regime. A proper insertion strategy allows us to investigate the whole spectrum of possible system states and the structure of the phase diagram by Monte Carlo simulations. We observe an interesting microscopic structure of the jammed phases, which is different from the one of the NaSch model. For finite systems, the existence of high flow states in a certain parameter regime leads to a special structure of the fundamental diagram measured in the open system. Apart from that, the results are in agreement with an extremal principle for the flow, which has been introduced for models with a unique flow-density relation. Finally, we discuss the application of our findings for a systematic flow optimization. Here some surprising results are obtained, e.g., a restriction of the inflow can lead to an improvement of the total flow through a bottleneck.

  12. Complex I Disorders: Causes, Mechanisms, and Development of Treatment Strategies at the Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Federica; Koopman, Werner J. H.; Manjeri, Ganesh R.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; Willems, Peter H. G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) represents the final step in the conversion of nutrients into cellular energy. Genetic defects in the OXPHOS system have an incidence between 1:5,000 and 1:10,000 live births. Inherited isolated deficiency of the first complex (CI) of this system, a multisubunit assembly of 45 different proteins,…

  13. Cellular Automata Models Applied to the Study of Landslide Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liucci, Luisa; Melelli, Laura; Suteanu, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Landslides are caused by complex processes controlled by the interaction of numerous factors. Increasing efforts are being made to understand the spatial and temporal evolution of this phenomenon, and the use of remote sensing data is making significant contributions in improving forecast. This paper studies landslides seen as complex dynamic systems, in order to investigate their potential Self Organized Critical (SOC) behavior, and in particular, scale-invariant aspects of processes governing the spatial development of landslides and their temporal evolution, as well as the mechanisms involved in driving the system and keeping it in a critical state. For this purpose, we build Cellular Automata Models, which have been shown to be capable of reproducing the complexity of real world features using a small number of variables and simple rules, thus allowing for the reduction of the number of input parameters commonly used in the study of processes governing landslide evolution, such as those linked to the geomechanical properties of soils. This type of models has already been successfully applied in studying the dynamics of other natural hazards, such as earthquakes and forest fires. The basic structure of the model is composed of three modules: (i) An initialization module, which defines the topographic surface at time zero as a grid of square cells, each described by an altitude value; the surface is acquired from real Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). (ii) A transition function, which defines the rules used by the model to update the state of the system at each iteration. The rules use a stability criterion based on the slope angle and introduce a variable describing the weakening of the material over time, caused for example by rainfall. The weakening brings some sites of the system out of equilibrium thus causing the triggering of landslides, which propagate within the system through local interactions between neighboring cells. By using different rates of

  14. The role of sirtuins in cellular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupis, Wioleta; Pałyga, Jan; Tomal, Ewa; Niewiadomska, Ewa

    2016-09-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent lysine deacylases or ADP-ribosyltransferases. These cellular enzymes are metabolic sensors sensitive to NAD(+) levels that maintain physiological homeostasis in the animal and plant cells. PMID:27154583

  15. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies has developed, produced and tested, as part of the Phase-I SBIR, a new form of composite cellular core material, named Interply...

  16. MILLIMETER-WAVE EMISSIVITY OF CELLULAR SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A general analysis has been presented of the millimeter-wave and farinfrared spectroscopic properties of in vivo cellular systems, and of the boson radiative equilibrium with steady-state nonequilibrium molecular systems. The frequency threshhold of spectroscopic properties assoc...

  17. A Matrix Construction of Cellular Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dajing Xiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we give a concrete method to construct cellular algebras from matrix algebras by specifying certain fixed matrices for the data of inflations. In particular,orthogonal matrices can be chosen for such data.

  18. Vectorized multisite coding for hydrodynamic cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulating eight lattices for Pomeau's cellular automata simultaneously through bit-per-bit operations, a vectorized Fortran program reached 30 million updates per second and per Cray YMP processor. They authors give the full innermost loops

  19. 47 CFR 22.911 - Cellular geographic service area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular geographic service area. 22.911... PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.911 Cellular geographic service area. The Cellular Geographic Service Area (CGSA) of a cellular system is the geographic area considered by the...

  20. Lumped-parameter models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, M.

    2006-12-15

    A lumped-parameter model represents the frequency dependent soil-structure interaction of a massless foundation placed on or embedded into an unbounded soil domain. In this technical report the steps of establishing a lumped-parameter model are presented. Following sections are included in this report: Static and dynamic formulation, Simple lumped-parameter models and Advanced lumped-parameter models. (au)

  1. Line Complexity Asymptotics of Polynomial Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Cellular automata are discrete dynamical systems that consist of patterns of symbols on a grid, which change according to a locally determined transition rule. In this paper, we will consider cellular automata that arise from polynomial transition rules, where the symbols in the automaton are integers modulo some prime $p$. We are principally concerned with the asymptotic behavior of the line complexity sequence $a_T(k)$, which counts, for each $k$, the number of coefficient strings of length...

  2. Cellular Restriction Factors of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Carsten Münk; Jörg Zielonka

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses are known for their narrow cell- and species-tropisms, which are determined by cellular proteins whose absence or presence either support viral replication (dependency factors, cofactors) or inhibit viral replication (restriction factors). Similar to Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cat lentivirus Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is sensitive to recently discovered cellular restriction factors from non-host species that are able to stop viruses from replicating...

  3. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progressi...

  4. Building mathematics cellular phone learning communities

    OpenAIRE

    Wajeeh M. Daher

    2011-01-01

    Researchers emphasize the importance of maintaining learning communities and environments. This article describes the building and nourishment of a learning community, one comprised of middle school students who learned mathematics out-of-class using the cellular phone. The building of the learning community was led by three third year pre-service teachers majoring in mathematics and computers. The pre-service teachers selected thirty 8th grade students to learn mathematics with the cellular ...

  5. Directed Percolation arising in Stochastic Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Regnault, Damien

    2008-01-01

    Cellular automata are both seen as a model of computation and as tools to model real life systems. Historically they were studied under synchronous dynamics where all the cells of the system are updated at each time step. Meanwhile the question of probabilistic dynamics emerges: on the one hand, to develop cellular automata which are capable of reliable computation even when some random errors occur; on the other hand, because synchronous dynamics is not a reasonable assumption to simulate re...

  6. Apoptotic regulation of epithelial cellular extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    De Andrade, Daniel,; Rosenblatt, Jody

    2011-01-01

    Cellular extrusion is a mechanism that removes dying cells from epithelial tissues to prevent compromising their barrier function. Extrusion occurs in all observed epithelia in vivo and can be modeled in vitro by inducing apoptosis in cultured epithelial monolayers. We established that actin and myosin form a ring that contracts in the surrounding cells that drives cellular extrusion. It is not clear, however, if all apoptotic pathways lead to extrusion and how apoptosis and extrusion are mol...

  7. Understanding cisplatin resistance using cellular models.

    OpenAIRE

    STORDAL, BRITTA KRISTINA

    2007-01-01

    PUBLISHED Many mechanisms of cisplatin resistance have been proposed from studies of cellular models of resistance including changes in cellular drug accumulation, detoxification of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis and repair of the DNA adducts. A series of resistant models were developed from CCRF-CEM leukaemia cells with increasing doses of cisplatin from 100 ng/ml. This produced increasing resistance up to 7-fold with a treatment dose of 1.6 ?g/ml. Cisplatin resistance i...

  8. Understanding cisplatin resistance using cellular models

    OpenAIRE

    Stordal, Britta; Davey, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Many mechanisms of cisplatin resistance have been proposed from studies of cellular models of resistance including changes in cellular drug accumulation, detoxification of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis and repair of the DNA adducts. A series of resistant models were developed from CCRF-CEM leukaemia cells with increasing doses of cisplatin from 100 ng/ml. This produced increasing resistance up to 7-fold with a treatment dose of 1.6 microg/ml. Cisplatin resistance in these cells correlated...

  9. On the Behavior Characteristics of Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jin-cai; ZHANG Jiang-ling; FENG Dan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the inherent relationships between the running regulations and behavior characteristics of cellular automata are presented; an imprecise taxonomy of such systems is put forward; the three extreme cases of stable systems are discussed; and the illogicalness of evolutional strategies of cellular automata is analyzed. The result is suitable for the emulation and prediction of behavior of discrete dynamics systems; especially it can be taken as an important analysis means of dynamic performance of complex networks.

  10. Cellular Hyperproliferation and Cancer as Evolutionary Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances in biology have begun to dramatically change the way we think about evolution, development, health and disease. The ability to sequence the genomes of many individuals within a population, and across multiple species, has opened the door to the possibility of answering some long-standing and perplexing questions about our own genetic heritage. One such question revolves around the nature of cellular hyperproliferation. This cellular behavior is used to effect wound heal...

  11. Cellular Scaling Rules of Insectivore Brains

    OpenAIRE

    Sarko, Diana K.; Catania, Kenneth C.; Leitch, Duncan B.; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2009-01-01

    Insectivores represent extremes in mammalian body size and brain size, retaining various “primitive” morphological characteristics, and some species of Insectivora are thought to share similarities with small-bodied ancestral eutherians. This raises the possibility that insectivore brains differ from other taxa, including rodents and primates, in cellular scaling properties. Here we examine the cellular scaling rules for insectivore brains and demonstrate that insectivore scaling rules overla...

  12. Cellular scaling rules of insectivore brains

    OpenAIRE

    Sarko, Diana K.; Catania, Kenneth C.; Leitch, Duncan B.; Kaas, Jon H.; Suzana Herculano-Houzel

    2009-01-01

    Insectivores represent extremes in mammalian body size and brain size, retaining various “primitive” morphological characteristics, and some species of Insectivora are thought to share similarities with small-bodied ancestral eutherians. This raises the possibility that insectivore brains differ from other taxa, including rodents and primates, in cellular scaling properties. Here we examine the cellular scaling rules for insectivore brains and demonstrate that insectivore scaling ...

  13. Cellular scaling rules for primate brains

    OpenAIRE

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Collins, Christine E.; Wong, Peiyan; Kaas, Jon H.

    2007-01-01

    Primates are usually found to have richer behavioral repertoires and better cognitive abilities than rodents of similar brain size. This finding raises the possibility that primate brains differ from rodent brains in their cellular composition. Here we examine the cellular scaling rules for primate brains and show that brain size increases approximately isometrically as a function of cell numbers, such that an 11× larger brain is built with 10× more neurons and ≈12× more nonneuronal cells of ...

  14. Stochastic Simulations on the Cellular Wave Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Ercsey-Ravasz, M.; Roska, T.; Néda, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The computational paradigm represented by Cellular Neural/nonlinear Networks (CNN) and the CNN Universal Machine (CNN-UM) as a Cellular Wave Computer, gives new perspectives for computational physics. Many numerical problems and simulations can be elegantly addressed on this fully parallelized and analogic architecture. Here we study the possibility of performing stochastic simulations on this chip. First a realistic random number generator is implemented on the CNN-UM, and then as an example...

  15. Robustness of a Cellular Automata Model for the HIV Infection

    CERN Document Server

    Figueirêdo, P H; Santos, R M Zorzenon dos

    2008-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the robustness of the results obtained from the cellular automata model which describes the spread of the HIV infection within lymphoid tissues [R. M. Zorzenon dos Santos and S. Coutinho, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 168102 (2001)]. The analysis focussed on the dynamic behavior of the model when defined in lattices with different symmetries and dimensionalities. The results illustrated that the three-phase dynamics of the planar models suffered minor changes in relation to lattice symmetry variations and, while differences were observed regarding dimensionality changes, qualitative behavior was preserved. A further investigation was conducted into primary infection and sensitiveness of the latency period to variations of the model's stochastic parameters over wide ranging values. The variables characterizing primary infection and the latency period exhibited power-law behavior when the stochastic parameters varied over a few orders of magnitude. The power-law exponents were app...

  16. Cellular Neural Networks for NP-Hard Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Ercsey-Ravasz

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A cellular neural/nonlinear network (CNN is used for NP-hard optimization. We prove that a CNN in which the parameters of all cells can be separately controlled is the analog correspondent of a two-dimensional Ising-type (Edwards-Anderson spin-glass system. Using the properties of CNN, we show that one single operation (template always yields a local minimum of the spin-glass energy function. This way, a very fast optimization method, similar to simulated annealing, can be built. Estimating the simulation time needed on CNN-based computers, and comparing it with the time needed on normal digital computers using the simulated annealing algorithm, the results are astonishing. CNN computers could be faster than digital computers already at 10×10 lattice sizes. The local control of the template parameters was already partially realized on some of the hardwares, we think this study could further motivate their development in this direction.

  17. Weighted Centroid Correction Localization in Cellular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Zheng Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: There is a large demand for wireless Location-Based Service (LBS and it is provided by many wireless cellular systems. In process of positioning a Mobile Station (MS, the computing speed is as important as the positioning accuracy and the algorithm should also be resistant to environmental influences. Approach: A new positioning method based on Weighted Centroid Correction Localization (WCCL for wireless cellular systems is introduced in this article. Firstly, referring to the receiving-state of an MS in cellular systems, it computes a weighted centroid of surrounding Base Stations (BSs as a rough approximate position of the MS. Then, according to the distances between the MS and the BSs being less or bigger than the computed distances between the BSs and the weighted centroid, it corrects the coordinate of the weighted centroid towards the directions of the BSs by moving it closer or farther in turn. Results: According to our experiments, WCCL improves the positioning accuracy, as well as to provide a better resistance to environmental influences. Conclusion: As a modified centroid-based localization algorithm, WCCL obtains weighting factors from the receiving-state of MS in multi-cells structured cellular systems and obtains a better positioning result in cellular systems without updating the network equipment. Therefore, for the cellular positioning problem, WCCL algorithm can be an alternate solution.

  18. The Research of Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Chaos Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiping Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Research presents an image encryption algorithm which bases on chaotic cellular automata. This algorithm makes use of features that extreme sensitivity of chaotic system to initial conditions, the cellular automaton with a high degree of parallel processing. The encryption algorithm uses two-dimensional chaotic system to Encrypt image, Then establish a cellular automaton model on the initial encrypted image. Encryption key of this algorithm is made up of the initial value by the two-dimensional chaotic systems, parameters, two-dimensional cellular automata local evolution rules f and iterations n. Experimental results shows that the algorithm has features that high efficiency, better security, sensitivity to the key and so on.

  19. Dirac Cellular Automaton from Split-step Quantum Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Arindam; Chandrashekar, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Simulations of one quantum system by an other has an implication in realization of quantum machine that can imitate any quantum system and solve problems that are not accessible to classical computers. One of the approach to engineer quantum simulations is to discretize the space-time degree of freedom in quantum dynamics and define the quantum cellular automata (QCA), a local unitary update rule on a lattice. Different models of QCA are constructed using set of conditions which are not unique and are not always in implementable configuration on any other system. Dirac Cellular Automata (DCA) is one such model constructed for Dirac Hamiltonian (DH) in free quantum field theory. Here, starting from a split-step discrete-time quantum walk (QW) which is uniquely defined for experimental implementation, we recover the DCA along with all the fine oscillations in position space and bridge the missing connection between DH-DCA-QW. We will present the contribution of the parameters resulting in the fine oscillations on the Zitterbewegung frequency and entanglement. The tuneability of the evolution parameters demonstrated in experimental implementation of QW will establish it as an efficient tool to design quantum simulator and approach quantum field theory from principles of quantum information theory.

  20. Dirac Cellular Automaton from Split-step Quantum Walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Arindam; Chandrashekar, C M

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of one quantum system by an other has an implication in realization of quantum machine that can imitate any quantum system and solve problems that are not accessible to classical computers. One of the approach to engineer quantum simulations is to discretize the space-time degree of freedom in quantum dynamics and define the quantum cellular automata (QCA), a local unitary update rule on a lattice. Different models of QCA are constructed using set of conditions which are not unique and are not always in implementable configuration on any other system. Dirac Cellular Automata (DCA) is one such model constructed for Dirac Hamiltonian (DH) in free quantum field theory. Here, starting from a split-step discrete-time quantum walk (QW) which is uniquely defined for experimental implementation, we recover the DCA along with all the fine oscillations in position space and bridge the missing connection between DH-DCA-QW. We will present the contribution of the parameters resulting in the fine oscillations on the Zitterbewegung frequency and entanglement. The tuneability of the evolution parameters demonstrated in experimental implementation of QW will establish it as an efficient tool to design quantum simulator and approach quantum field theory from principles of quantum information theory. PMID:27184159

  1. Dirac Cellular Automaton from Split-step Quantum Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Arindam; Chandrashekar, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of one quantum system by an other has an implication in realization of quantum machine that can imitate any quantum system and solve problems that are not accessible to classical computers. One of the approach to engineer quantum simulations is to discretize the space-time degree of freedom in quantum dynamics and define the quantum cellular automata (QCA), a local unitary update rule on a lattice. Different models of QCA are constructed using set of conditions which are not unique and are not always in implementable configuration on any other system. Dirac Cellular Automata (DCA) is one such model constructed for Dirac Hamiltonian (DH) in free quantum field theory. Here, starting from a split-step discrete-time quantum walk (QW) which is uniquely defined for experimental implementation, we recover the DCA along with all the fine oscillations in position space and bridge the missing connection between DH-DCA-QW. We will present the contribution of the parameters resulting in the fine oscillations on the Zitterbewegung frequency and entanglement. The tuneability of the evolution parameters demonstrated in experimental implementation of QW will establish it as an efficient tool to design quantum simulator and approach quantum field theory from principles of quantum information theory. PMID:27184159

  2. Myokit: A simple interface to cardiac cellular electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerx, Michael; Collins, Pieter; de Lange, Enno; Volders, Paul G A

    2016-01-01

    Myokit is a new powerful and versatile software tool for modeling and simulation of cardiac cellular electrophysiology. Myokit consists of an easy-to-read modeling language, a graphical user interface, single and multi-cell simulation engines and a library of advanced analysis tools accessible through a Python interface. Models can be loaded from Myokit's native file format or imported from CellML. Model export is provided to C, MATLAB, CellML, CUDA and OpenCL. Patch-clamp data can be imported and used to estimate model parameters. In this paper, we review existing tools to simulate the cardiac cellular action potential to find that current tools do not cater specifically to model development and that there is a gap between easy-to-use but limited software and powerful tools that require strong programming skills from their users. We then describe Myokit's capabilities, focusing on its model description language, simulation engines and import/export facilities in detail. Using three examples, we show how Myokit can be used for clinically relevant investigations, multi-model testing and parameter estimation in Markov models, all with minimal programming effort from the user. This way, Myokit bridges a gap between performance, versatility and user-friendliness. PMID:26721671

  3. 47 CFR 22.970 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k), unacceptable interference to non-cellular part 90 licensees in...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone or part 90-800 MHz cellular systems. 22.970 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.970 Unacceptable interference to part 90...

  4. Evaluation of physical, chemical and irradiation parameters on crab shell's chitosan obtention process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Maiara S.; Moura, Eduardo de; Geraldo, Aurea B.C., E-mail: maiaraferreira@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Chitin it is found in exoskeletons of crustaceans and in the cellular wall of fungi. Chitosan is obtained through the stages of deproteinization, demineralization and deacetylation. Specially, crab shells present in their composition 15-20% of chitin, 25-40% of proteins and 40-55% calcium carbonate. The demineralization step aims to reduce the inorganic ions content and is realized under hydrochloric acid dissolution. The deproteinization has the function of reducing the proteins and aminoacids by sodium hydroxide solution added to the raw material. In this work, the experimental design used to determine the best steps conditions for the production of final product - chitosan from chitin of crab shells - had been time (10, 30, 60 and 120 minutes), concentration, relation reagent solution/raw material quantity and irradiation parameters (radiation font, dose and dose rate). The results are discussed in terms of total inorganic materials and proteins quantification and of thermal analysis. (author)

  5. Evaluation of physical, chemical and irradiation parameters on crab shell's chitosan obtention process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitin it is found in exoskeletons of crustaceans and in the cellular wall of fungi. Chitosan is obtained through the stages of deproteinization, demineralization and deacetylation. Specially, crab shells present in their composition 15-20% of chitin, 25-40% of proteins and 40-55% calcium carbonate. The demineralization step aims to reduce the inorganic ions content and is realized under hydrochloric acid dissolution. The deproteinization has the function of reducing the proteins and aminoacids by sodium hydroxide solution added to the raw material. In this work, the experimental design used to determine the best steps conditions for the production of final product - chitosan from chitin of crab shells - had been time (10, 30, 60 and 120 minutes), concentration, relation reagent solution/raw material quantity and irradiation parameters (radiation font, dose and dose rate). The results are discussed in terms of total inorganic materials and proteins quantification and of thermal analysis. (author)

  6. Final transport in gas and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There exist several possible schemes for final transport of the heavy ion beam through the reactor chamber in the presence of a background gas or plasma. The optimization of the transport process depends significantly on the heavy ion beam parameters. It was the purpose of the working group on the final transport in gas and plasma to examine and assess the various transport schemes in view of the new HIF parameters and other recent developments. The results are summarized

  7. Optimization of Inter Cellular Movement of Parts in Cellular Manufacturing System Using Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Siva Prasad Darla; C.D. Naiju; Polu Vidya Sagar; B. Venkat Likhit

    2014-01-01

    In the modern manufacturing environment, Cellular Manufacturing Systems (CMS) have gained greater importance in job shop or batch-type production to gain economic advantage similar to those of mass production. Successful implementation of CMS highly depends on the determination of part families; machine cells and minimizing inter cellular movement. This study considers machine component grouping problems namely inter-cellular movement and cell load variation by developing a mathematical model...

  8. Analytical Results to Improve the Capacity of A Cellular System In Frequency Selective Rayleigh Fading Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravindra Kumar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest draw back of wireless environment is the limited bandwidth. However, the users sharing this limited bandwidth have been increased considerably by using SDMA technique that can enhancethe capacity of communication system. There are some techniques that can increase the capacity of the cellular system, these are- Spreading Technique, Error Control Coding Technique, Multipath Diversity Technique ( i.e. Rake Receiver, Smart Antenna Technique. In this paper we have used all these technique and examined how thecapacity of cellular system vary with varying the different parameters such as- the value of spreading factor, the number of Rake fingers, the number of interfering cells, value of directivity of Adaptive Antenna at base station. In the results we find that the capacity of a cellular system is varying with these parameters.

  9. Optimization of Inter Cellular Movement of Parts in Cellular Manufacturing System Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Prasad Darla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern manufacturing environment, Cellular Manufacturing Systems (CMS have gained greater importance in job shop or batch-type production to gain economic advantage similar to those of mass production. Successful implementation of CMS highly depends on the determination of part families; machine cells and minimizing inter cellular movement. This study considers machine component grouping problems namely inter-cellular movement and cell load variation by developing a mathematical model and optimizing the solution using Genetic Algorithm to arrive at a cell formation to minimize the inter-cellular movement and cell load variation. The results are presented with a numerical example.

  10. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular structures...

  11. The Effect of Cellular Architecture on the Ductility and Strength of Metal Foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangipudi, K. R.; Onck, P. R.; Brechet, YJM; Embury, JD; Onck, PR

    2009-01-01

    A multiscale finite element model has been developed to study the fracture behaviour of two-dimensional random Voronoi structures. The influence of materials parameters and cellular architecture on the damage initiation and accumulation has been analyzed. The effect of the solid material's strain ha

  12. Photovoltaic module parameters acquisition model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Photovoltaic five-parameter model is proposed using Matlab® and Simulink. • The model acquisits input sparse data matrix from stigmatic measurement. • Computer simulations lead to continuous I–V and P–V characteristics. • Extrapolated I–V and P–V characteristics are in hand. • The model allows us to predict photovoltaics exploitation in different conditions. - Abstract: This paper presents basic procedures for photovoltaic (PV) module parameters acquisition using MATLAB and Simulink modelling. In first step, MATLAB and Simulink theoretical model are set to calculate I–V and P–V characteristics for PV module based on equivalent electrical circuit. Then, limited I–V data string is obtained from examined PV module using standard measurement equipment at standard irradiation and temperature conditions and stated into MATLAB data matrix as a reference model. Next, the theoretical model is optimized to keep-up with the reference model and to learn its basic parameters relations, over sparse data matrix. Finally, PV module parameters are deliverable for acquisition at different realistic irradiation, temperature conditions as well as series resistance. Besides of output power characteristics and efficiency calculation for PV module or system, proposed model validates computing statistical deviation compared to reference model

  13. Molecular physiology of cellular glucose transport - a potential area for clinical studies in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatoń, Jan; Piatkiewicz, Paweł; Czech, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The normalization of cellular glucose assimilation is the basic aim of metabolic therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It requires parallel changes in the process of cellular glucose transport (CGT). This review presents the pathophysiological and clinical outlines of CGT. Sequentially, the advances in the mechanisms and classification of CGT and their physiological and molecular base are described. The role of CGT pathogenetic significance in diabetes mellitus is stressed. Finally, the opinion is expressed that the CGT study is a potentially important approach to clinical interpretation of glucose metabolism disturbances and their pharmacotherapy. PMID:20602306

  14. Zero-Outage Cellular Downlink with Fixed-Rate D2D Underlay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich Pratas, Nuno; Popovski, Petar

    2015-01-01

    Two of the emerging trends in wireless cellular systems are Device-to-Device (D2D) and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications. D2D enables efficient reuse of the licensed spectrum to support localized transmissions, while M2M connections are often characterized by fixed and low transmission rates....... D2D connections can be instrumental in localized aggregation of uplink M2M traffic to a more capable cellular device, before being finally delivered to the Base Station (BS). In this paper we show that a fixed M2M rate is an enabler of efficient Machine-Type D2D underlay operation taking place...

  15. Spin Echo Studies on Cellular Water

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, D C; Nichols, B L; Rorschach, H E

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the physical state of cellular water could be significantly different from pure liquid water. To experimentally investigate this possibility, we conducted a series of spin-echo NMR measurements on water protons in rat skeletal muscle. Our result indicated that the spin-lattice relaxation time and the spin-spin relaxation time of cellular water protons are both significantly shorter than that of pure water (by 4.3-fold and 34-fold, respectively). Furthermore, the spin diffusion coefficient of water proton is almost 1/2 of that of pure water. These data suggest that cellular water is in a more ordered state in comparison to pure water.

  16. Software-Defined Cellular Mobile Network Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiandong Li; Peng Liu; Hongyan Li

    2014-01-01

    The emergency relating to software-defined networking (SDN), especially in terms of the prototype associated with OpenFlow, pro-vides new possibilities for innovating on network design. Researchers have started to extend SDN to cellular networks. Such new programmable architecture is beneficial to the evolution of mobile networks and allows operators to provide better services. The typical cellular network comprises radio access network (RAN) and core network (CN); hence, the technique roadmap diverges in two ways. In this paper, we investigate SoftRAN, the latest SDN solution for RAN, and SoftCell and MobileFlow, the latest solu-tions for CN. We also define a series of control functions for CROWD. Unlike in the other literature, we emphasize only software-defined cellular network solutions and specifications in order to provide possible research directions.

  17. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In today’s world, three great classes of non-infectious diseases – the metabolic syndromes (such as type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis), the cancers, and the neurodegenerative disorders – have risen to the fore. These diseases, all associated with increasing age of an individual, have proven to be remarkably complex and difficult to treat. This is because, in large measure, when the cellular signaling pathways responsible for maintaining homeostasis and health of the body become dysregulated, they generate equally stable disease states. As a result the body may respond positively to a drug, but only for a while and then revert back to the disease state. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease summarizes our current understanding of these regulatory networks in the healthy and diseased states, showing which molecular components might be prime targets for drug interventions. This is accomplished by presenting models that explain in mechanistic, molecular detail how a particular part of the cellular sign...

  18. Cellular automatons applied to gas dynamic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lyle N.; Coopersmith, Robert M.; McLachlan, B. G.

    1987-06-01

    This paper compares the results of a relatively new computational fluid dynamics method, cellular automatons, with experimental data and analytical results. This technique has been shown to qualitatively predict fluidlike behavior; however, there have been few published comparisons with experiment or other theories. Comparisons are made for a one-dimensional supersonic piston problem, Stokes first problem, and the flow past a normal flat plate. These comparisons are used to assess the ability of the method to accurately model fluid dynamic behavior and to point out its limitations. Reasonable results were obtained for all three test cases, but the fundamental limitations of cellular automatons are numerous. It may be misleading, at this time, to say that cellular automatons are a computationally efficient technique. Other methods, based on continuum or kinetic theory, would also be very efficient if as little of the physics were included.

  19. Cellular automatons applied to gas dynamic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lyle N.; Coopersmith, Robert M.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper compares the results of a relatively new computational fluid dynamics method, cellular automatons, with experimental data and analytical results. This technique has been shown to qualitatively predict fluidlike behavior; however, there have been few published comparisons with experiment or other theories. Comparisons are made for a one-dimensional supersonic piston problem, Stokes first problem, and the flow past a normal flat plate. These comparisons are used to assess the ability of the method to accurately model fluid dynamic behavior and to point out its limitations. Reasonable results were obtained for all three test cases, but the fundamental limitations of cellular automatons are numerous. It may be misleading, at this time, to say that cellular automatons are a computationally efficient technique. Other methods, based on continuum or kinetic theory, would also be very efficient if as little of the physics were included.

  20. Online isolation of defects in cellular nanocomputers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teijiro Isokawa; Shin'ya Kowada; Ferdinand Peper; Naotake Kamiura; Nobuyuki Matsui

    2007-01-01

    Unreliability will be a major issue for computers built from components at nanometer scales.Thus,it's to be expected that such computers will need a high degree of defect-tolerance to overcome components' defects which have arisen during the process of manufacturing.This paper presents a novel approach to defect-tolerance that is especially geared towards nanocomputers based on asynchronous cellular automata.According to this approach,defective cells are detected and isolated by small configurations that move around randomly in cellular space.These configurations,called random flies,will attach to configurations that are static,which is typical for configurations that contain defective cells.On the other hand,dynamic configurations,like those that conduct computations,will not be isolated from the rest of the cellular space by the random flies,and will be able to continue their operations unaffectedly.

  1. Phagocytosis, a cellular immune response in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Rosales

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Insects like many other organisms are exposed to a wide range of infectious agents. Defense against these agents is provided by innate immune systems, which include physical barriers, humoral responses, and cellular responses. The humoral responses are characterized by the production of antimicrobial peptides, while the cellular defense responses include nodulation, encapsulation, melanization and phagocytosis. The phagocytic process, whereby cells ingest large particles, is of fundamental importance for insects’ development and survival. Phagocytic cells recognize foreign particles through a series of receptors on their cell membrane for pathogen-associated molecules. These receptors in turn initiate a series of signaling pathways that instruct the cell to ingest and eventually destroy the foreign particle. This review describes insect innate humoral and cellular immune functions with emphasis on phagocytosis. Recent advances in our understanding of the phagocytic cell types in various insect species; the receptors involved and the signaling pathways activated during phagocytosis are discussed.

  2. Alleviate Cellular Congestion Through Opportunistic Trough Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichuan Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The demand for cellular data service has been skyrocketing since the debut of data-intensive smart phones and touchpads. However, not all data are created equal. Many popular applications on mobile devices, such as email synchronization and social network updates, are delay tolerant. In addition, cellular load varies significantly in both large and small time scales. To alleviate network congestion and improve network performance, we present a set of opportunistic trough filling schemes that leverage the time-variation of network congestion and delay-tolerance of certain traffic in this paper. We consider average delay, deadline, and clearance time as the performance metrics. Simulation results show promising performance improvement over the standard schemes. The work shed lights on addressing the pressing issue of cellular overload.

  3. Cellular Stress Response to Engineered Nanoparticles: Effect of Size, Surface Coating, and Cellular Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    CELLULAR STRESS RESPONSE TO ENGINEERED NANOPARTICLES: EFFECT OF SIZE, SURFACE COATING, AND CELLULAR UPTAKE RY Prasad 1, JK McGee2, MG Killius1 D Ackerman2, CF Blackman2 DM DeMarini2 , SO Simmons2 1 Student Services Contractor, US EPA, RTP, NC 2 US EPA, RTP, NC The num...

  4. About the embedding of one dimensional cellular automata into hyperbolic cellular automata

    OpenAIRE

    Margenstern, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we look at two ways to implement determinisitic one dimensional cellular automata into hyperbolic cellular automata in three contexts: the pentagrid, the heptagrid and the dodecagrid, these tilings being classically denoted by $\\{5,4\\}$, $\\{7,3\\}$ and $\\{5,3,4\\}$ respectively.

  5. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin eLee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554 in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression – including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding and degradation steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes.

  6. Cellularity of certain quantum endomorphism algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Lehrer, Gus; Zhang, Ruibin

    2015-01-01

    For any ring A˜ such that Z[q±1∕2]⊆A˜⊆Q(q1∕2), let ΔA˜(d) be an A˜-form of the Weyl module of highest weight d∈N of the quantised enveloping algebra UA˜ of sl2. For suitable A˜, we exhibit for all positive integers r an explicit cellular structure for EndUA˜(ΔA˜(d)⊗r). This algebra and its cellul...... we independently recover the weight multiplicities of indecomposable tilting modules for Uζ(sl2) from the decomposition numbers of the endomorphism algebras, which are known through cellular theory....

  7. Rapid Cellular Turnover in Adipose Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Rigamonti; Kristen Brennand; Frank Lau; Cowan, Chad A.

    2011-01-01

    It was recently shown that cellular turnover occurs within the human adipocyte population. Through three independent experimental approaches — dilution of an inducible histone 2B-green fluorescent protein (H2BGFP), labeling with the cell cycle marker Ki67 and incorporation of BrdU — we characterized the degree of cellular turnover in murine adipose tissue. We observed rapid turnover of the adipocyte population, finding that 4.8% of preadipocytes are replicating at any time and that between 1–...

  8. Cellular effects of LRRK2 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are a relatively common cause of inherited Parkinson's disease (PD) but the mechanism(s) by which mutations lead to disease are poorly understood. Here, I will discuss what is known about LRRK2 in cellular models, focusing on specifically on assays that have been used to tease apart the effects of LRRK2 mutations on cellular phenotypes. LRRK2 expression has been suggested to cause loss of neuronal viability, although because it also has a stro...

  9. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  10. Cellular basis of radiation-induced fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibrosis is a common sequela of both cancer treatment by radiotherapy and accidental irradiation and has been described in many tissues including skin, lung, heart and liver. The underlying mechanisms of the radiation-induced fibrosis still remain to be resolved. In the present review we tried to illustrate the basic cellular mechanisms of radiation-induced fibrosis based on the newest findings arising from molecular radiobiology and cell biology. Based on these findings the cellular mechanism of radiation-induced fibrosis can be seen as a multicellular process involving various interacting cell systems in the target organ resulting in the fibrotic phenotype of the fibroblast/fibrocyte cell system

  11. The cellular decision between apoptosis and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Jun Fan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis and autophagy are important molecular processes that maintain organismal and cellular homeostasis, respectively. While apoptosis fulfills its role through dismantling damaged or unwanted cells, autophagy maintains cellular homeostasis through recycling selective intracellular organelles and molecules. Yet in some conditions, autophagy can lead to cell death. Apoptosis and autophagy can be stimulated by the same stresses. Emerging evidence indicates an interplay between the core proteins in both pathways, which underlies the molecular mechanism of the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy. This review summarizes recent literature on molecules that regulate both the apoptotic and autophagic processes.

  12. Chaotic behavior in the disorder cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disordered cellular automata (DCA) represent an intermediate class between elementary cellular automata and the Kauffman network. Recently, Rule 126 of DCA has been explicated: the system can be accurately described by a discrete probability function. However, a means of extending to other rules has not been developed. In this investigation, a density map of the dynamical behavior of DCA is formulated based on Rule 22 and other totalistic rules. The numerical results reveal excellent agreement between the model and original automata. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous situation is also discussed

  13. External insulation with cellular plastic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Nielsen, Anker

    2014-01-01

    External thermal insulation composite systems (ETICS) can be used as extra insulation of existing buildings. The system can be made of cellular plastic materials or mineral wool. There is a European Technical guideline, ETAG 004, that describe the tests that shall be conducted on such systems....... This paper gives a comparison of systems with mineral wool and cellular plastic, based on experience from practice and literature. It is important to look at the details in the system and at long time stability of the properties such as thermal insulation, moisture and fire. Investigation of fire properties...

  14. Statistical analysis of selected cellular parameters in chronologically aging culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švenkrtová, Andrea; Volejníková, Andrea; Rogalewicz, V.

    Smolenice : Visegrad Fund, 2012. s. 85-85. ISSN 1336-4839. [Annual Conference on Yeasts /40./. 08.0.52012-11.05.2012, Smoleni] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570; GA MŠk ME09043; GA ČR GA301/07/0339 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : s. cerevisiae

  15. Influence of solidification parameters on the cellular sub-structure of tin and some tin alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an attempt to obtain qualitative data on sub-structure of samples solidified in contact with the cooler. The objective of experiments was to study micro segregation phenomena by investigating the substructure in the solidified sample obtained under experimental conditions which are similar to real solidification conditions

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Cellular Automata Model for Simulating Tillage Erosion in the Presence of Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwalleghem, T.; Jiménez-Hornero, F. J.; Giráldez, J. V.; Laguna, A.

    2009-04-01

    The process of tillage translocation is well studied and can be described adequately by different existing models. Nevertheless, in complex environments such as olive orchards, characterized by numerous obstacles, application of such conventional tillage erosion models is not straightforward. However, these obstacles have important effects on the spatial pattern of soil redistribution and on resulting soil properties. In this kind of environment, cellular automata could provide a valuable alternative. This study aims at developing a cellular automata model for tillage translocation (CATT) that can take into account such obstacles and at exploring its possibilities and limitations. A simple model was developed, which main parameters are tillage direction, speed and depth. Firstly, the modeĺs outcome was tested against existing 137Cs inventories for a study site in the Belgian loam belt. The observed spatial soil redistribution patterns could be adequately represented by the CATT model. Secondly, a sensitivity analysis was performed to explore the effect of input uncertainty on several selected model outputs. The variance-based extended FAST method was used to determine first and total order sensitivity indices. Tillage depth was identified as the input parameter that determined most of the output variance, followed respectively by tillage direction and speed. The difference between the total and first-order sensitivity indices, between 0.8 and 2, indicated that, in spite of the simple model structure, the model behaves non-linearly with respect to some of the model output variables. Higher-order interactions were especially important for determining the proportion of eroding and deposition cells. Finally, simulations were performed to analyse the model behaviour in complex landscapes, applying it to a field with protruding obstacles (e.g. olive trees). The model adequately represented some morphological features observed in the olive orchards, such as mounds around

  17. Cellular Transport Mechanisms of Cytotoxic Metallodrugs: An Overview beyond Cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Spreckelmeyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The field of medicinal inorganic chemistry has grown consistently during the past 50 years; however, metal-containing coordination compounds represent only a minor proportion of drugs currently on the market, indicating that research in this area has not yet been thoroughly realized. Although platinum-based drugs as cancer chemotherapeutic agents have been widely studied, exact knowledge of the mechanisms governing their accumulation in cells is still lacking. However, evidence suggests active uptake and efflux mechanisms are involved; this may be involved also in other experimental metal coordination and organometallic compounds with promising antitumor activities in vitro and in vivo, such as ruthenium and gold compounds. Such knowledge would be necessary to elucidate the balance between activity and toxicity profiles of metal compounds. In this review, we present an overview of the information available on the cellular accumulation of Pt compounds from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies, as well as a summary of reports on the possible accumulation mechanisms for different families of experimental anticancer metal complexes (e.g., Ru Au and Ir. Finally, we discuss the need for rationalization of the investigational approaches available to study metallodrug cellular transport.

  18. Electrostatic bio-manipulation for the modification of cellular functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washizu, Masao

    2013-03-01

    The use of electrostatic field effects, including field-induced reversible-breakdown of the membrane and dielectrophoresis (DEP), in microfabricated structures are investigated. With the use of field constriction created by a micro-orifice whose diameter is smaller than the cells, controlled magnitude of pulsed voltage can be applied across the cell membrane regardless of the cell size, shape or orientation. As a result, the breakdown occurs reproducibly and with minimal invasiveness. The breakdown is used for two purposes, electroporation by which foreign substances can be fed into cells, and electrofusion which creates genetic and/or cytoplasmic mixture among two cells. When GFP plasmid is fed into MSC cell, the gene expression started within 2 hours, and finally observed in more than 50% of cells. For cell fusion, several ten percent fusion yield is achieved for most cell types, with the colony formation in several percents. Timing-controlled feeding foreign substances or mixing cellular contents, with high-yield and low-invasiveness, is expected to bring about a new technology for both genetic and epigenetic modifications of cellular functions, in such field as regenerative medicine.

  19. Neural networks and cellular automata in experimental high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the past few years, two novel computing techniques, cellular automata and neural networks, have shown considerable promise in the solution of problems of a very high degree of complexity, such as turbulent fluid flow, image processing, and pattern recognition. Many of the problems faced in experimental high energy physics are also of this nature. Track reconstruction in wire chambers and cluster finding in cellular calorimeters, for instance, involve pattern recognition and high combinatorial complexity since many combinations of hits or cells must be considered in order to arrive at the final tracks or clusters. Here we examine in what way connective network methods can be applied to some of the problems of experimental high physics. It is found that such problems as track and cluster finding adapt naturally to these approaches. When large scale hardwired connective networks become available, it will be possible to realize solutions to such problems in a fraction of the time required by traditional methods. For certain types of problems, faster solutions are already possible using model networks implemented on vector or other massively parallel machines. It should also be possible, using existing technology, to build simplified networks that will allow detailed reconstructed event information to be used in fast trigger decisions

  20. Cellular automaton model of coupled mass transport and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass transport, coupled with chemical reactions, is modelled as a cellular automaton in which solute molecules perform a random walk on a lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔c and a + b →c, where we observe interesting macroscopic effects resulting from microscopic fluctuations and spatial correlations between molecules. We also simulate autocatalytic reaction schemes displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. Finally, we propose and discuss the limitations of a simple model for mineral-solute interaction. (author) 5 figs., 20 refs

  1. Fluorescence microscopy of single autofluorescent proteins for cellular biology

    CERN Document Server

    Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel; Lounis, Brahim

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we review the applicability of autofluorescent proteins for single-molecule imaging in biology. The photophysical characteristics of several mutants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and those of DsRed are compared and critically discussed for their use in cellular biology. The alternative use of two-photon excitation at the single-molecule level or Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy is envisaged for the study of individual autofluorescent proteins. Single-molecule experiments performed in live cells using eGFP and preferably eYFP fusion proteins are reviewed. Finally, the first use at the single-molecule level of citrine, a more photostable variant of the eYFP is reported when fused to a receptor for neurotransmitter in live cells.

  2. Edge detection of noisy images based on cellular neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaqing; Liao, Xiaofeng; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Hongyu; Li, Chaojie

    2011-09-01

    This paper studies a technique employing both cellular neural networks (CNNs) and linear matrix inequality (LMI) for edge detection of noisy images. Our main work focuses on training templates of noise reduction and edge detection CNNs. Based on the Lyapunov stability theorem, we derive a criterion for global asymptotical stability of a unique equilibrium of the noise reduction CNN. Then we design an approach to train edge detection templates, and this approach can detect the edge precisely and efficiently, i.e., by only one iteration. Finally, we illustrate performance of the proposed methodology from the aspect of peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) through computer simulations. Moreover, some comparisons are also given to prove that our method outperforms classical operators in gray image edge detection.

  3. Intrinsic fluorescence of selenium nanoparticles for cellular imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, A.; Tran, Phong A.; Norello, Romina; Simpson, David A.; O'Connor, Andrea J.; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles hold great potential in contributing to high-resolution bioimaging as well as for biomedical applications. Although, selenium (Se) nanoparticles (NPs) have been investigated owing to their potential roles in therapeutics, the imaging capability of these NPs has never been explored. This manuscript identifies the intrinsic fluorescence of Se NPs, which is highly beneficial for nanoscale imaging of biological structures. The emission of individual NPs and its evolution with time is explored. The photoluminescence spectra has revealed visible to near infrared emission for Se NPs. The work finally reflects on the role of this intrinsic fluorescence for in vitro imaging and tracking in fibroblast cells, without the need of any additional tags. This technique would overcome the limitations of the conventionally used methods of imaging with tagged fluorescent proteins and dyes, preventing possible adverse cellular effects or phototoxicity caused by the added fluorescent moieties.Nanoparticles hold great potential in contributing to high-resolution bioimaging as well as for biomedical applications. Although, selenium (Se) nanoparticles (NPs) have been investigated owing to their potential roles in therapeutics, the imaging capability of these NPs has never been explored. This manuscript identifies the intrinsic fluorescence of Se NPs, which is highly beneficial for nanoscale imaging of biological structures. The emission of individual NPs and its evolution with time is explored. The photoluminescence spectra has revealed visible to near infrared emission for Se NPs. The work finally reflects on the role of this intrinsic fluorescence for in vitro imaging and tracking in fibroblast cells, without the need of any additional tags. This technique would overcome the limitations of the conventionally used methods of imaging with tagged fluorescent proteins and dyes, preventing possible adverse cellular effects or phototoxicity caused by the added fluorescent

  4. Analytical modeling of mode selection and power control for underlay D2D communication in cellular networks

    KAUST Repository

    Elsawy, Hesham

    2014-11-01

    Device-to-device (D2D) communication enables the user equipments (UEs) located in close proximity to bypass the cellular base stations (BSs) and directly connect to each other, and thereby, offload traffic from the cellular infrastructure. D2D communication can improve spatial frequency reuse and energy efficiency in cellular networks. This paper presents a comprehensive and tractable analytical framework for D2D-enabled uplink cellular networks with a flexible mode selection scheme along with truncated channel inversion power control. The developed framework is used to analyze and understand how the underlaying D2D communication affects the cellular network performance. Through comprehensive numerical analysis, we investigate the expected performance gains and provide guidelines for selecting the network parameters.

  5. Identification of optimal parameter combinations for the emergence of bistability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májer, Imre; Hajihosseini, Amirhossein; Becskei, Attila

    2015-12-01

    Bistability underlies cellular memory and maintains alternative differentiation states. Bistability can emerge only if its parameter range is either physically realizable or can be enlarged to become realizable. We derived a general rule and showed that the bistable range of a reaction parameter is maximized by a pair of other parameters in any gene regulatory network provided they satisfy a general condition. The resulting analytical expressions revealed whether or not such reaction pairs are present in prototypical positive feedback loops. They are absent from the feedback loop enclosed by protein dimers but present in both the toggle-switch and the feedback circuit inhibited by sequestration. Sequestration can generate bistability even at narrow feedback expression range at which cooperative binding fails to do so, provided inhibition is set to an optimal value. These results help to design bistable circuits and cellular reprogramming and reveal whether bistability is possible in gene networks in the range of realistic parameter values.

  6. On reversibility of cellular automata with periodic boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobe, Atsushi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho 1-3, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Yura, Fumitaka [Imai Quantum Computing and Information Project, ERATO, JST, Daini Hongo White Bldg 201, 5-28-3 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2004-06-04

    Reversibility of one-dimensional cellular automata with periodic boundary conditions is discussed. It is shown that there exist exactly 16 reversible elementary cellular automaton rules for infinitely many cell sizes by means of a correspondence between elementary cellular automaton and the de Bruijn graph. In addition, a sufficient condition for reversibility of three-valued and two-neighbour cellular automaton is given.

  7. 47 CFR 22.905 - Channels for cellular service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channels for cellular service. 22.905 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.905 Channels for cellular service. The following frequency bands are allocated for assignment to service providers in the Cellular Radiotelephone Service....

  8. 47 CFR 22.923 - Cellular system configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular system configuration. 22.923 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.923 Cellular system configuration. Mobile stations... directly or through cellular repeaters. Auxiliary test stations may communicate with base or...

  9. Cellular automata and self-organized criticality

    OpenAIRE

    Creutz, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Cellular automata provide a fascinating class of dynamical systems capable of diverse complex behavior. These include simplified models for many phenomena seen in nature. Among other things, they provide insight into self-organized criticality, wherein dissipative systems naturally drive themselves to a critical state with important phenomena occurring over a wide range of length and time scales.

  10. Cellular Automata Rules and Linear Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Birendra Kumar; Sahoo, Sudhakar; Biswal, Sagarika

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, linear Cellular Automta (CA) rules are recursively generated using a binary tree rooted at "0". Some mathematical results on linear as well as non-linear CA rules are derived. Integers associated with linear CA rules are defined as linear numbers and the properties of these linear numbers are studied.

  11. Building mathematics cellular phone learning communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajeeh M. Daher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Researchers emphasize the importance of maintaining learning communities and environments. This article describes the building and nourishment of a learning community, one comprised of middle school students who learned mathematics out-of-class using the cellular phone. The building of the learning community was led by three third year pre-service teachers majoring in mathematics and computers. The pre-service teachers selected thirty 8th grade students to learn mathematics with the cellular phone and be part of a learning community experimenting with this learning. To analyze the building and development stages of the cellular phone learning community, two models of community building stages were used; first the team development model developed by Tuckman (1965, second the life cycle model of a virtual learning community developed by Garber (2004. The research findings indicate that a learning community which is centered on a new technology has five 'life' phases of development: Pre-birth, birth, formation, performing, and maturity. Further, the research finding indicate that the norms that were encouraged by the preservice teachers who initiated the cellular phone learning community resulted in a community which developed, nourished and matured to be similar to a community of experienced applied mathematicians who use mathematical formulae to study everyday phenomena.

  12. Phosphoproteomics: new insights into cellular signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Mumby, Marc; Brekken, Deirdre

    2005-01-01

    Developments in the field of phosphoproteomics have been fueled by the need simultaneously to monitor many different phosphoproteins within the signaling networks that coordinate responses to changes in the cellular environment. This article presents a brief review of phosphoproteomics with an emphasis on the biological insights that have been derived so far.

  13. Cellular grafts in management of leucoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular grafting methods constitute important advances in the surgical management of leucoderma. Different methods such as noncultured epidermal suspensions, melanocyte cultures, and melanocyte-keratinocyte cultures have all been shown to be effective. This article reviews these methods.

  14. Cellular dosimetry in nuclear medicine imaging: training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclides used in nuclear medicine imaging emit not only diagnostically useful photons, but also energy electron emissions, responsible for dose heterogeneity at the cellular level. The mean dose delivered to the cell nucleus by electron emissions of 99mTc, 123I, 111In, 67Ga, and 201Tl, has been calculated, for the cell nucleus, a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distribution of radioactivity. This model takes into account both the self-dose which results from the radionuclide located in the target cell, and the cross-dose, which comes from the surrounding cells. The results obtained by cellular dosimetry (Dcel) have been compared with those obtained with conventional dosimetry (Dconv), by assuming the same amount of radioactivity per cell. Cellular dosimetry shows, for a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, that the main contribution to the dose to the cell nucleus, comes from the surrounding cells. On the other hand, for a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity, the self-dose is not negligible and may be the main contribution. The comparison between cellular and conventional dosimetry shows that Dcel/Dconv ratio ranges from 0.61 and O.89, in case of a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, depending on the radionuclide and cell dimensions. Thus, conventional dosimetry slightly overestimates the mean dose to the cell nucleus. On the other hand, Dcel/Dconv ranges from 1.1 to 75, in case of a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity. Conventional dosimetry may strongly underestimates the absorbed dose to the nucleus, when radioactivity is located in the nucleus. The study indicates that in nuclear medicine imaging, cellular dosimetry may lead to a better understanding of biological effects of radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  15. Klotho-Dependent Cellular Transport Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopjani, M; Dërmaku-Sopjani, M

    2016-01-01

    Klotho is a transmembrane protein that in humans is encoded by the hKL gene. This protein is known to have aging suppressor effects and is predominantly expressed in the distal convoluted tubule of the kidney, parathyroid glands, and choroid plexus of the brain. The Klotho protein exists in both full-length membrane form and a soluble secreted form, which exerts numerous distinct functions. The extracellular domain of Klotho can be enzymatically cleaved off and released into the systemic circulation where it functions as β-glucuronidase and a hormone. Soluble Klotho is a multifunction protein present in the biological fluids including blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid of mammals. Klotho deficiency leads to multiple organ failure accompanied by early appearance of multiple age-related disorders and early death, whereas overexpression of Klotho results in the opposite effects. Klotho, an enzyme and hormone, has been reported to participate in the regulation of cellular transport processes across the plasma membrane either indirectly through inhibiting calcitriol (1,25(OH)2D3) formation or other mechanism, or by directly affecting transporter proteins, including ion channels, cellular carriers, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Accordingly, Klotho protein serves as a powerful regulator of cellular transport across the plasma membrane. Importantly, Klotho-dependent cellular transport regulation implies stimulatory or inhibitory effects. Klotho has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of multiple calcium and potassium ion channels, and various cellular carriers including the Na(+)-coupled cotransporters such as NaPi-IIa, NaPi-IIb, EAAT3, and EAAT4, CreaT1 as well as Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. These regulations are parts of the antiaging function of Klotho, which will be discussing throughout this chapter. Clearly, further experimental efforts are required to investigate the effect of Klotho on other transport proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms by which Klotho

  16. Composition, structure and mechanical properties of several natural cellular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The stem piths of sunflower, kaoliang and corn are natural cellular materials. In this paper, the contents of the compositions of these piths are determined and their cell shapes and structures are examined through scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Further research is conducted in the effects of the compositions and structures of the piths on the mechanical properties after testing the partial mechanical properties. The results show that the total cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin content of each sample approaches 75% of the dry mass of its primary cell walls. With the fall of R value, a parameter relative to the contents of the main compositions, the flexibilities of the cellular piths descend while their stresses and rigidities increase. The basic cell shape making up the sunflower pith is approximately a tetrakaidehedron. The stem piths of kaoliang and corn are made up of cells close to hexangular prisms and a few tubular ones which can observably reinforce their mechanical properties in the axial directions.

  17. Dirac Quantum Cellular Automaton from Split-step Quantum Walk

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    Simulations of one quantum system by an other has an implications in realization of quantum machine that can imitate any quantum systems and solve problems that are not accessible to classical computers. One of the approach to engineer quantum simulations is to discretize the space-time degree of freedom in quantum dynamics and define the quantum cellular automata (QCA), a local unitary update rule on a lattice. Different models of QCA are constructed using different set of conditions which are not uniquely defined. The form of the operators in these model are not always in implementable configuration on an other system. Here, starting from a split-step discrete-time quantum walk (DTQW) which are uniquely defined for experimental implementation, we recover the Dirac quantum cellular automaton (DQCA). This will bridge the connection between Dirac equation(DE)-DQCA-DTQW and eliminate the explicit use of invariance, symmetries and limiting range of parameter to establish the connections. For a combination of par...

  18. Parallel track reconstruction in CMS using the cellular automaton approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a general-purpose particle detector and comprises the largest silicon-based tracking system built to date with 75 million individual readout channels. The precise reconstruction of particle tracks from this tremendous amount of input channels is a compute-intensive task. The foreseen LHC beam parameters for the next data taking period, starting in 2015, will result in an increase in the number of simultaneous proton-proton interactions and hence the number of particle tracks per event. Due to the stagnating clock frequencies of individual CPU cores, new approaches to particle track reconstruction need to be evaluated in order to cope with this computational challenge. Track finding methods that are based on cellular automata (CA) offer a fast and parallelizable alternative to the well-established Kalman filter-based algorithms. We present a new cellular automaton based track reconstruction, which copes with the complex detector geometry of CMS. We detail the specific design choices made to allow for a high-performance computation on GPU and CPU devices using the OpenCL framework. We conclude by evaluating the physics performance, as well as the computational properties of our implementation on various hardware platforms and show that a significant speedup can be attained by using GPU architectures while achieving a reasonable physics performance at the same time.

  19. Fluorosis Caused Cellular Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress of Rat Kidneys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yang; WANG Jin-cheng; XU Hui; DU Zhen-wu; ZHANG Gui-zhen; SELIM Hamid Abdu; LI Guang-sheng

    2013-01-01

    As the strongest electronegative element,fluorine can stimulate the production of superoxide radicals in cells.In view of the important roles of kidneys in bone metabolism,the authors analyzed the quantitative pathomorphological characteristics of renal damage and the potential cellular apoptosis and oxidative stress mechanisms in rats treated with excessive fluoride.Wistar rats were exposed to 50 mg F-(110.5 mg NaF)/L,100 mg F-(221.0 mg NaF)/Land 150 mg F (331.5 mg NaF)/L in drinking water for 70 and 140 d,respectively.Microscope with image analysis was used to quantitate pathomorphological changes in renal tissues of the rats.Reactive oxygen species(ROS),the cell cycle and apoptosis of renal cells were measured by flow cytometry and TUNEL technique(terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling),respectively.The ion concentrations in serum and renal functional parameters were detected by automatic biochemical analyzer.Quantitative analysis results demonstrate the expanded Bowman's space of glomerulus and obvious dilatation of renal tubule.TUNEL technique revealed that NBT/BCIP (nitro blue tetrazoliurn/5-bromo-4-chloro-3′-indolylphosphate,p-toluidine salt)-staining positive apoptotic cells selectively located in medullocortical junction areas.The data suggest that renal damage in chronic fluorostic rats is associated with the cellular apoptosis and oxidative stress.

  20. Deriving force field parameters for coordination complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrby, Per-Ola; Brandt, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The process of deriving molecular mechanics force fields for coordination complexes is outlined. Force field basics are introduced with an emphasis on special requirements for metal complexes. The review is then focused on how to set up the initial model, define the target, refine the parameters......, and validate the final force field, Alternatives to force field derivation are discussed briefly....

  1. The Study Of Properties Of The Word Of Mouth Marketing Using Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska-Styczeń Agnieszka

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the possibility of using cellular automata, to study the properties of word of mouth (w-o-m marketing. Cellular automata allow to analyze the dynamics of changes in views and attitudes in social groups based on local interactions between people in small groups of friends, family members etc. The proposed paper shows the possibility of modelling the dynamics of word of mouth mechanism, if the basic assumptions of this process are: different size groups where this phenomenon occurs, and varied access to information. On the competing firms market, the dependence of the w-o-m mechanism dynamics on the model parameters is shown

  2. Cellular burdens and biological effects on tissue level caused by inhaled radon progenies

    CERN Document Server

    Madas, Balázs G; Farkas, Árpád; Szőke, István

    2014-01-01

    In the case of radon exposure, the spatial distribution of deposited radioactive particles is highly inhomogeneous in the central airways. The objective of this research is to investigate the consequences of this heterogeneity regarding cellular burdens in the bronchial epithelium and to study the possible biological effects on tissue level. Applying a computational fluid dynamics program, the deposition distribution of inhaled radon daughters has been determined in a bronchial airway model for 23 minutes of work in the New Mexico uranium mine corresponding to 0.0129 WLM exposure. A numerical epithelium model based on experimental data has been utilized in order to quantify cellular hits and doses. Finally, a carcinogenesis model considering cell death induced cell cycle shortening has been applied to assess the biological responses. Computations present, that cellular dose may reach 1.5 Gy, which is several orders of magnitude higher than tissue dose. The results are in agreement with the histological findin...

  3. Multiscale Model of Colorectal Cancer Using the Cellular Potts Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, James M

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major causes of death in the developed world and forms a canonical example of tumorigenesis. CRC arises from a string of mutations of individual cells in the colorectal crypt, making it particularly suited for multiscale multicellular modeling, where mutations of individual cells can be clearly represented and their effects readily tracked. In this paper, we present a multicellular model of the onset of colorectal cancer, utilizing the cellular Potts model (CPM). We use the model to investigate how, through the modification of their mechanical properties, mutant cells colonize the crypt. Moreover, we study the influence of mutations on the shape of cells in the crypt, suggesting possible cell- and tissue-level indicators for identifying early-stage cancerous crypts. Crucially, we discuss the effect that the motility parameters of the model (key factors in the behavior of the CPM) have on the distribution of cells within a homeostatic crypt, resulting in an optimal parameter regime that accurately reflects biological assumptions. In summary, the key results of this paper are 1) how to couple the CPM with processes occurring on other spatial scales, using the example of the crypt to motivate suitable motility parameters; 2) modeling mutant cells with the CPM; 3) and investigating how mutations influence the shape of cells in the crypt. PMID:26461973

  4. GRCop-84 Rolling Parameter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2008-01-01

    This report is a section of the final report on the GRCop-84 task of the Constellation Program and incorporates the results obtained between October 2000 and September 2005, when the program ended. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed a new copper alloy, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb), for rocket engine main combustion chamber components that will improve rocket engine life and performance. This work examines the sensitivity of GRCop-84 mechanical properties to rolling parameters as a means to better define rolling parameters for commercial warm rolling. Experiment variables studied were total reduction, rolling temperature, rolling speed, and post rolling annealing heat treatment. The responses were tensile properties measured at 23 and 500 C, hardness, and creep at three stress-temperature combinations. Understanding these relationships will better define boundaries for a robust commercial warm rolling process. The four processing parameters were varied within limits consistent with typical commercial production processes. Testing revealed that the rolling-related variables selected have a minimal influence on tensile, hardness, and creep properties over the range of values tested. Annealing had the expected result of lowering room temperature hardness and strength while increasing room temperature elongations with 600 C (1112 F) having the most effect. These results indicate that the process conditions to warm roll plate and sheet for these variables can range over wide levels without negatively impacting mechanical properties. Incorporating broader process ranges in future rolling campaigns should lower commercial rolling costs through increased productivity.

  5. Comparative studies in the cellular immunostimulation by whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the cellular immune response by total body irradiation was investigated. The transplant survival (skin grafts) was determined as immune parameter. Donors were colony bred Wistar rats and recipients were colony bred Sprague Dawley rats. The investigations were carried out with irradiated rats and with rats irradiated after thymectomy and/or adrenalectomy as well as with animals without irradiation. A single total-body irradiation (1 and 2 Gy) was administered. The skin graft survival in irradiated rats was significant shorter (radiogenic immunostimulation) than in unirradiated rats; there were no significant differences between the operated (thymectomy and/or adrenalectomy) and not operated animals. Including precedent examinations this radiogenic immunostimulation is caused by relativly selective inactivation of T-suppressor cells. (orig.)

  6. Coarse-grained cellular automaton for traffic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Malgorzata J

    2012-01-01

    A coarse-grained cellular automaton is proposed to simulate traffic systems. There, cells represent road sections. A cell can be in two states: jammed or passable. Numerical calculations are performed for a piece of square lattice with open boundary conditions, for the same piece with some cells removed and for a map of a small city. The results indicate the presence of a phase transition in the parameter space, between two macroscopic phases: passable and jammed. The results are supplemented by exact calculations of the stationary probabilities of states for the related Kripke structure constructed for the traffic system. There, the symmetry-based reduction of the state space allows to partially reduce the computational limitations of the numerical method.

  7. Production and properties of bronze based cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For production of lightweight components, cellular materials offer attractive potential. Here, manufacturing of sintered bodies from bronze hollow spheres is described. The process starts with fabrication of hollow copper particles by cementation of Cu on iron particles. The still fragile Cu shells are consolidated by coating with Sn and subsequent gravity sintering. The resulting specimens exhibit a closed cell bronze structure with rather consistent morphology and cell wall thickness. The apparent density may range between 1.5 and 3.0 gcm-3 and can be controlled by variation of particle size and wall thickness. The mechanical behavior of the structures esp. during compressive loading is described and related to the microstructural parameters. (author)

  8. Mosquito population dynamics from cellular automata-based simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafarina, Inna; Sadikin, Rifki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present an innovative model for simulating mosquito-vector population dynamics. The simulation consist of two stages: demography and dispersal dynamics. For demography simulation, we follow the existing model for modeling a mosquito life cycles. Moreover, we use cellular automata-based model for simulating dispersal of the vector. In simulation, each individual vector is able to move to other grid based on a random walk. Our model is also capable to represent immunity factor for each grid. We simulate the model to evaluate its correctness. Based on the simulations, we can conclude that our model is correct. However, our model need to be improved to find a realistic parameters to match real data.

  9. Global Network Model based on Earth Grid and Cellular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqi Lu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We aim to understand the current health state of the Earth and find how human activities influence it. Based on the theory of Earth’s Grid and Cellular Automata, we define and test a global network model, analyze the mutual interactions and feedbacks of ecosystem, hydrologic circle and atmosphere. In addition, we consult a lot of data to find a benchmark for the “Earth Health Map”, with the ecosystem distribution on it, which can be helpful for making a strategic decision for policy makers and prediction. Our model can be extended to other similar fields. In the end, we discuss the sensitivity of parameters selection, and the superiorities and weaknesses of our model.

  10. Simple cellular automata to mimic foraging ants submitted to abduction

    CERN Document Server

    Tejera, F

    2015-01-01

    Many species of ants forage by building up two files: an outbound one moving from the nest to the foraging area, and a nestbound one, returning from it to the nest. Those files are eventually submitted to different threats. If the danger is concentrated at one point of the file, one might expect that ants returning to the nest will pass danger information to their nestmates moving in the opposite direction towards the danger area. In this paper, we construct simple cellular automata models for foraging ants submitted to localized abduction, were danger information is transmitted using different protocols, including the possibility of no transmission. The parameters we have used in the simulations have been estimated from actual experiments under natural conditions. So, it would be easy to test our information-transmission hypothese in real experiments. Preliminary experimental results published elsewhere suggest that the behavior of foraging ants of the species Atta insularis is best described using the hypot...

  11. Quality Matters: Systematic Analysis of Endpoints Related to “Cellular Life” in Vitro Data of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkó, Myrtill; Remondini, Daniel; Zeni, Olga; Scarfi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-01-01

    Possible hazardous effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) at low exposure levels are controversially discussed due to inconsistent study findings. Therefore, the main focus of the present study is to detect if any statistical association exists between RF-EMF and cellular responses, considering cell proliferation and apoptosis endpoints separately and with both combined as a group of “cellular life” to increase the statistical power of the analysis. We searched for publications regarding RF-EMF in vitro studies in the PubMed database for the period 1995–2014 and extracted the data to the relevant parameters, such as cell culture type, frequency, exposure duration, SAR, and five exposure-related quality criteria. These parameters were used for an association study with the experimental outcome in terms of the defined endpoints. We identified 104 published articles, from which 483 different experiments were extracted and analyzed. Cellular responses after exposure to RF-EMF were significantly associated to cell lines rather than to primary cells. No other experimental parameter was significantly associated with cellular responses. A highly significant negative association with exposure condition-quality and cellular responses was detected, showing that the more the quality criteria requirements were satisfied, the smaller the number of detected cellular responses. According to our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of specific RF-EMF bio-effects in association to exposure quality, highlighting the need for more stringent quality procedures for the exposure conditions. PMID:27420084

  12. Cellular toxicity (High-Throughput Cellular Assays for Modeling Toxicity in the Fish Reproductive System)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to adapt cellular in vitro assay systems of the rainbow trout pituitary, liver and ovary for high-throughput screening (HTS) of...

  13. Modeling and simulation on dynamic recrystallization of 30Cr2Ni4MoV rotor steel using the cellular automaton method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular automaton (CA) method coupling fundamental metallurgical principles was used to simulate the initial microstructure and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of 30Cr2Ni4MoV rotor steel. For the initial microstructure generation, reasonable transformation rules were established based on the thermodynamic mechanism, the activation energy and the curvature-driven mechanism. For the purposes of obtaining the material constants which were used in the CA model for DRX, including initial grain size, nucleation rate, softening parameter and activation energy, the hot deformation characteristics of 30Cr2Ni4MoV rotor steel were investigated by uniaxial hot compression tests on Gleeble-3500 machine. The effect of a wide range of thermomechanical processing parameters (temperature and strain rate) on the nucleation rate, the percentage of DRX and the final grain size were investigated. By comparison of the flow stress–strain curves and the metallographs, it was shown that the CA model coupling fundamental metallurgical principles can accurately simulate the microstructural evolution and the plastic flow behavior for 30Cr2Ni4MoV rotor steel at various deformation parameters

  14. Cellular Dynamic Simulator: An Event Driven Molecular Simulation Environment for Cellular Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Michael J.; Waxham, M. Neal; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Cellular Dynamic Simulator (CDS) for simulating diffusion and chemical reactions within crowded molecular environments. CDS is based on a novel event driven algorithm specifically designed for precise calculation of the timing of collisions, reactions and other events for each individual molecule in the environment. Generic mesh based compartments allow the creation / importation of very simple or detailed cellular structures that exist in a 3D environment. Multi...

  15. Synthesis of New Styrylquinoline Cellular Dyes, Fluorescent Properties, Cellular Localization and Cytotoxic Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Rams-Baron, Marzena; Dulski, Mateusz; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Korzec, Mateusz; Cieslik, Wioleta; Spaczyńska, Ewelina; Bartczak, Piotr; Ratuszna, Alicja; Polanski, Jaroslaw; Musiol, Robert

    2016-01-01

    New styrylquinoline derivatives with their photophysical constants are described. The synthesis was achieved via Sonogashira coupling using the newly developed heterogeneous nano-Pd/Cu catalyst system, which provides an efficient synthesis of high purity products. The compounds were tested in preliminary fluorescent microscopy studies to in order to identify their preferable cellular localization, which appeared to be in the lipid cellular organelles. The spectroscopic properties of the compo...

  16. Energy Efficient Resource Allocation for Phantom Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-04-01

    Multi-tier heterogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Meanwhile, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for the recently proposed two-tier network architecture known as phantom cellular networks. The optimization framework includes both EE and SE. First, we consider sparsely deployed cells experiencing negligible interference and assume perfect channel state information (CSI). For this setting, we propose an algorithm that finds the SE and EE resource allocation strategies. Then, we compare the performance of both design strategies versus number of users, and phantom cells share of the total available resource units (RUs). We aim to investigate the effect of some system parameters to achieve improved SE performance at a non-significant loss in EE performance, or vice versa. It is found that increasing phantom cells share of RUs decreases the SE performance loss due to EE optimization when compared with the optimized SE performance. Second, we consider the densely deployed phantom cellular networks and model the EE optimization problem having into consideration the inevitable interference and imperfect channel estimation. To this end, we propose three resource allocation strategies aiming at optimizing the EE performance metric of this network. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of changing some of the system parameters on the performance of the proposed strategies, such as phantom cells share of RUs, number of deployed phantom cells within a macro cell coverage, number of pilots and the maximum power available for transmission by the phantom cells BSs. It is found that increasing the number of pilots deteriorates the EE performance of the whole setup, while increasing maximum power available for phantom cells transmissions reduces the EE of the whole setup in a

  17. Recognition of chemical compounds in contaminated water using time-dependent multiple dose cellular responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Dose- and time-dependent cellular responses are used to evaluate the cytotoxicity. ► The CI can reflect the cell number, cell viability, morphological change, etc. ► The CSVID can capture the dynamic information after cells exposed to toxins. ► The multi-class classification can distinguish the compounds using multi-doses. ► The majority vote strategy (fingerprint) can improve the classification accuracy. - Abstract: An early determination of toxicant compounds of water contaminations can gain critical time to protect citizens’ health and save substantial amounts of medical costs. To determine toxins in real time, a multi-dose classification algorithm using cellular state variable identification (CSVID) is developed in this paper. First, the dynamic cytotoxicity response profiles of living cells are measured using a real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) system. Changes in cell number expressed as cell index (CI) are recorded on-line as time series. Then CSVID, which reflects the cell killing, cell lysis and certain cellular pathological changes, is extracted from those dynamic cellular responses. Finally, a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm based on CSVID is employed to classify chemical compounds and determine their analogous cellular response pathway. In order to increase the classification accuracy, a majority vote of the class labels is also proposed. Several validation studies demonstrate that CSVID-based classification algorithm has great potential in distinguishing the cytotoxicity response of the cells in the presence of toxins.

  18. Cellular and molecular introduction to brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangning; Nardelli, Jeannette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the study of brain development over the last decades, especially recent findings regarding the evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex, and large-scale analyses of the proteome/transcriptome in the human brain, have offered novel insights into the molecular mechanisms guiding neural maturation, and the pathophysiology of multiple forms of neurological disorders. As a preamble to reviews of this issue, we provide an overview of the cellular, molecular and genetic bases of brain development with an emphasis on the major mechanisms associated with landmarks of normal neural development in the embryonic stage and early postnatal life, including neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation, cortical neuronal migration, evolution and folding of the cerebral cortex, synaptogenesis and neural circuit development, gliogenesis and myelination. We will only briefly depict developmental disorders that result from perturbations of these cellular or molecular mechanisms, and the most common perinatal brain injuries that could disturb normal brain development. PMID:26184894

  19. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  20. Designing beauty the art of cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, Genaro

    2016-01-01

    This fascinating, colourful book offers in-depth insights and first-hand working experiences in the production of art works, using simple computational models with rich morphological behaviour, at the edge of mathematics, computer science, physics and biology. It organically combines ground breaking scientific discoveries in the theory of computation and complex systems with artistic representations of the research results. In this appealing book mathematicians, computer scientists, physicists, and engineers brought together marvelous and esoteric patterns generated by cellular automata, which are arrays of simple machines with complex behavior. Configurations produced by cellular automata uncover mechanics of dynamic patterns formation, their propagation and interaction in natural systems: heart pacemaker, bacterial membrane proteins, chemical rectors, water permeation in soil, compressed gas, cell division, population dynamics, reaction-diffusion media and self-organisation. The book inspires artists to tak...

  1. Quantum features of natural cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cellular automata can show well known features of quantum mechanics, such as a linear rule according to which they evolve and which resembles a discretized version of the Schrödinger equation. This includes corresponding conservation laws. The class of “natural” Hamiltonian cellular automata is based exclusively on integer-valued variables and couplings and their dynamics derives from an Action Principle. They can be mapped reversibly to continuum models by applying Sampling Theory. Thus, “deformed” quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale l are obtained, which for l → 0 reproduce familiar continuum results. We have recently demonstrated that such automata can form “multipartite” systems consistently with the tensor product structures of nonrelativistic many-body quantum mechanics, while interacting and maintaining the linear evolution. Consequently, the Superposition Principle fully applies for such primitive discrete deterministic automata and their composites and can produce the essential quantum effects of interference and entanglement.

  2. Mobile Node Localization in Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Malik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Location information is the major component in location based applications. This information is used in different safety and service oriented applications to provide users with services according to their Geolocation. There are many approaches to locate mobile nodes in indoor and outdoor environments. In thispaper, we are interested in outdoor localization particularly in cellular networks of mobile nodes andpresented a localization method based on cell and user location information. Our localization method is based on hello message delay (sending and receiving time and coordinate information of Base Transceiver Station (BTSs. To validate our method across cellular network, we implemented and simulated our method in two scenarios i.e. maintaining database of base stations in centralize and distributed system. Simulation results show the effectiveness of our approach and its implementation applicability in telecommunication systems.

  3. Cellular automata in image processing and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Sun, Xianfang

    2014-01-01

    The book presents findings, views and ideas on what exact problems of image processing, pattern recognition and generation can be efficiently solved by cellular automata architectures. This volume provides a convenient collection in this area, in which publications are otherwise widely scattered throughout the literature. The topics covered include image compression and resizing; skeletonization, erosion and dilation; convex hull computation, edge detection and segmentation; forgery detection and content based retrieval; and pattern generation. The book advances the theory of image processing, pattern recognition and generation as well as the design of efficient algorithms and hardware for parallel image processing and analysis. It is aimed at computer scientists, software programmers, electronic engineers, mathematicians and physicists, and at everyone who studies or develops cellular automaton algorithms and tools for image processing and analysis, or develops novel architectures and implementations of mass...

  4. Molecular features of cellular reprogramming and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary D; Sindhu, Camille; Meissner, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Differentiating somatic cells are progressively restricted to specialized functions during ontogeny, but they can be experimentally directed to form other cell types, including those with complete embryonic potential. Early nuclear reprogramming methods, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and cell fusion, posed significant technical hurdles to precise dissection of the regulatory programmes governing cell identity. However, the discovery of reprogramming by ectopic expression of a defined set of transcription factors, known as direct reprogramming, provided a tractable platform to uncover molecular characteristics of cellular specification and differentiation, cell type stability and pluripotency. We discuss the control and maintenance of cellular identity during developmental transitions as they have been studied using direct reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. PMID:26883001

  5. Stochastic Simulations on the Cellular Wave Computers

    CERN Document Server

    Ercsey-Ravasz, M; Neda, Z

    2006-01-01

    The computational paradigm represented by Cellular Neural/nonlinear Networks (CNN) and the CNN Universal Machine (CNN-UM) as a Cellular Wave Computer, gives new perspectives for computational physics. Many numerical problems and simulations can be elegantly addressed on this fully parallelized and analogic architecture. Here we study the possibility of performing stochastic simulations on this chip. First a realistic random number generator is implemented on the CNN-UM, and then as an example the two-dimensional Ising model is studied by Monte Carlo type simulations. The results obtained on an experimental version of the CNN-UM with 128 * 128 cells are in good agreement with the results obtained on digital computers. Computational time measurements suggests that the developing trend of the CNN-UM chips - increasing the lattice size and the number of local logic memories - will assure an important advantage for the CNN-UM in the near future.

  6. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  7. Quantum features of natural cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cellular automata can show well known features of quantum mechanics, such as a linear rule according to which they evolve and which resembles a discretized version of the Schroedinger equation. This includes corresponding conservation laws. The class of "natural" Hamiltonian cellular automata is based exclusively on integer-valued variables and couplings and their dynamics derives from an Action Principle. They can be mapped reversibly to continuum models by applying Sampling Theory. Thus, "deformed" quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale $l$ are obtained, which for $l\\rightarrow 0$ reproduce familiar continuum results. We have recently demonstrated that such automata can form "multipartite" systems consistently with the tensor product structures of nonrelativistic many-body quantum mechanics, while interacting and maintaining the linear evolution. Consequently, the Superposition Principle fully applies for such primitive discrete deterministic automata and their composites and can produce...

  8. A Simple Scheme for Improved Performance of Fixed Outage Rate Cellular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein M.A. Basi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The traffic characteristic of mobile cellular systems is rather distinct from that of a fixed telephone network. However the system planning and design are still carried out with the tools of conventional traffic theory. In the recent days much work is being done in the performance evaluation of mobile or cellular communication systems in order to develop a system with greater efficiency. The useful parameters to estimate the performance of the system are voice quality, frequency spectrum efficiency and Grade of Service (GOS. The grade of service will be affected due to outage of channels. In this study, a new scheme is proposed to reduce lost calls due to channel outage in the fixed rate outage cellular system. In this proposed scheme the call will never dropped but may be delayed. The system performance is evaluated for different conditions and the results are discussed.

  9. On the Influence of Selection Operators on Performances in Cellular Genetic Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Simoncini, David; Verel, Sébastien; Clergue, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of the selective pressure on the performance of cellular genetic algorithms. Cellular genetic algorithms are genetic algorithms where the population is embedded on a toroidal grid. This structure makes the propagation of the best so far individual slow down, and allows to keep in the population potentially good solutions. We present two selective pressure reducing strategies in order to slow down even more the best solution propagation. We experiment these strategies on a hard optimization problem, the quadratic assignment problem, and we show that there is a value for of the control parameter for both which gives the best performance. This optimal value does not find explanation on only the selective pressure, measured either by take over time and diversity evolution. This study makes us conclude that we need other tools than the sole selective pressure measures to explain the performances of cellular genetic algorithms.

  10. Exponential Stability for Delayed Cellular Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-xiang; ZHONG Shou-ming; YAN Ke-yu

    2005-01-01

    The exponential stability of the delayed cellular neural networks (DCNN's) is investigated. By dividing the network state variables into some parts according to the characters of the neural networks, some new sufficient conditions of exponential stability are derived via constructing a Liapunov function. It is shown that the conditions differ from previous ones. The new conditions, which are associated with some initial value, are represented by some blocks of the interconnection matrix.

  11. A framework for understanding cellular manufacturing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Sílvio Carmo; Alves, Anabela Carvalho

    2002-01-01

    Many practical benefits, such as superior quality of products and short manufacturing lead times, are usually associated with Cellular Manufacturing. These and other benefits can lead to important competitive advantages of companies. However, to fully achieve these benefits there is a need for an evolution from the traditional concept of CM to the more comprehensive one, which we call Product Oriented Manufacturing. Here systems are dynamically reconfigured for total manufac...

  12. Spectrum sharing for future mobile cellular systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bennis, M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Spectrum sharing has become a high priority research area over the past few years. The motivation behind this lies in the fact that the limited spectrum is currently inefficiently utilized. As recognized by the World radio communication conference (WRC)-07, the amount of identified spectrum is not large enough to support large bandwidths for a substantial number of operators. Therefore, it is paramount for future mobile cellular systems to share the frequency spectrum and coexist ...

  13. Clinical applications of cellular therapy products

    OpenAIRE

    Serpil Yanbakan

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell types and have usage about lots of regenerative medicine research fields. Especially bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have a wide range of case presentation. New discoveries about stem cell biology will progress new options about cellular therapy products and isolation of different stem cell types will increase hope for treatment of important illness such as Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, malign brain tumors. It...

  14. Cellular Automata Studies of Vertical Silicon Devices

    OpenAIRE

    M. Saraniti; G. Zandler; G. Formicone; S. Goodnick

    1998-01-01

    We present systematic theoretical Cellular Automata (CA) studies of a novel nanometer scale Si device, namely vertically grown Metal Oxide Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET) with channel lengths between 65 and 120 nm. The CA simulations predict drain characteristics and output conductance as a function of gate length. The excellent agreement with available experimental data indicates a high quality oxide/semiconductor interface. Impact ionization is shown to be of minor importance. For inhomog...

  15. Mapping functional connectivity in cellular networks

    OpenAIRE

    Buibas, Marius

    2011-01-01

    My thesis is a collection of theoretical and practical techniques for mapping functional or effective connectivity in cellular neuronal networks, at the cell scale. This is a challenging scale to work with, primarily because of the difficulty in labeling and measuring the activities of networks of cells. It is also important as it underlies behavior, function, and complex diseases. I present methods to measure and quantify the dynamic activities of cells using the optical flow technique, whic...

  16. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    OpenAIRE

    Richter-Dennerlein, R.; Dennerlein Sven, S.; Rehling, P

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial- encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisin...

  17. Cognitive resource management for heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yongkang

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief focuses on cognitive resource management in heterogeneous cellular networks (Het Net) with small cell deployment for the LTE-Advanced system. It introduces the Het Net features, presents practical approaches using cognitive radio technology in accommodating small cell data relay and optimizing resource allocation and examines the effectiveness of resource management among small cells given limited coordination bandwidth and wireless channel uncertainty. The authors introduce different network characteristics of small cell, investigate the mesh of small cell access points in

  18. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  19. Imaging cellular and molecular biological functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorte, S.L. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France). Plateforme d' Imagerie Dynamique PFID-Imagopole; Frischknecht, F. (eds.) [Heidelberg Univ. Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Parasitology

    2007-07-01

    'Imaging cellular and molecular biological function' provides a unique selection of essays by leading experts, aiming at scientist and student alike who are interested in all aspects of modern imaging, from its application and up-scaling to its development. Indeed the philosophy of this volume is to provide student, researcher, PI, professional or provost the means to enter this applications field with confidence, and to construct the means to answer their own specific questions. (orig.)

  20. Empirical multiscale networks of cellular regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin de Bivort

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Grouping genes by similarity of expression across multiple cellular conditions enables the identification of cellular modules. The known functions of genes enable the characterization of the aggregate biological functions of these modules. In this paper, we use a high-throughput approach to identify the effective mutual regulatory interactions between modules composed of mouse genes from the Alliance for Cell Signaling (AfCS murine B-lymphocyte database which tracks the response of approximately 15,000 genes following chemokine perturbation. This analysis reveals principles of cellular organization that we discuss along four conceptual axes. (1 Regulatory implications: the derived collection of influences between any two modules quantifies intuitive as well as unexpected regulatory interactions. (2 Behavior across scales: trends across global networks of varying resolution (composed of various numbers of modules reveal principles of assembly of high-level behaviors from smaller components. (3 Temporal behavior: tracking the mutual module influences over different time intervals provides features of regulation dynamics such as duration, persistence, and periodicity. (4 Gene Ontology correspondence: the association of modules to known biological roles of individual genes describes the organization of functions within coexpressed modules of various sizes. We present key specific results in each of these four areas, as well as derive general principles of cellular organization. At the coarsest scale, the entire transcriptional network contains five divisions: two divisions devoted to ATP production/biosynthesis and DNA replication that activate all other divisions, an "extracellular interaction" division that represses all other divisions, and two divisions (proliferation/differentiation and membrane infrastructure that activate and repress other divisions in specific ways consistent with cell cycle control.

  1. Sumo and the cellular stress response

    OpenAIRE

    Enserink, Jorrit M.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin family member Sumo has important functions in many cellular processes including DNA repair, transcription and cell division. Numerous studies have shown that Sumo is essential for maintaining cell homeostasis when the cell encounters endogenous or environmental stress, such as osmotic stress, hypoxia, heat shock, genotoxic stress, and nutrient stress. Regulation of transcription is a key component of the Sumo stress response, and multiple mechanisms have been described by which ...

  2. Aging cellular networks: chaperones as major participants

    OpenAIRE

    Soti, Csaba; Csermely, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We increasingly rely on the network approach to understand the complexity of cellular functions. Chaperones (heat shock proteins) are key "networkers", which have among their functions to sequester and repair damaged protein. In order to link the network approach and chaperones with the aging process, we first summarize the properties of aging networks suggesting a "weak link theory of aging". This theory suggests that age-related random damage primarily affects the overwhelming majority of t...

  3. Typhoid fever as cellular microbiological model

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade Dahir Ramos de; Andrade Júnior Dahir Ramos de

    2003-01-01

    The knowledge about typhoid fever pathogenesis is growing in the last years, mainly about the cellular and molecular phenomena that are responsible by clinical manifestations of this disease. In this article are discussed several recent discoveries, as follows: a) Bacterial type III protein secretion system; b) The five virulence genes of Salmonella spp. that encoding Sips (Salmonella invasion protein) A, B, C, D and E, which are capable of induce apoptosis in macrophages; c) The function of ...

  4. Cellular immune findings in Lyme disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Sigal, L. H.; Moffat, C. M.; Steere, A. C.; Dwyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology o...

  5. Cellular mechanisms of nociception in the frog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuffler, D. P.; Lyfenko, Alla; Vyklický st., Ladislav; Vlachová, Viktorie

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2002), s. 1843-1850. ISSN 0022-3077 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1639; GA MŠk LN00B122 Grant ostatní: NATO(XX) Grant 977062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cellular mechanisms of nociception * frog Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.743, year: 2002

  6. Heterogeneous Force Chains in Cellularized Biopolymer Network

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymer Networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the mechanical response of a model biopolymer network due to the active contraction of embedded cells. Specifically, a graph (bond-node) model derived from confocal microscopy data is used to represent the network microstructure, and cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes, representing the fo...

  7. Cellular and synaptic network defects in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Peça, João; Feng, Guoping

    2012-01-01

    Many candidate genes are now thought to confer susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Here we review four interrelated complexes, each composed of multiple families of genes that functionally coalesce on common cellular pathways. We illustrate a common thread in the organization of glutamatergic synapses and suggest a link between genes involved in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Fragile X syndrome, Angelman syndrome and several synaptic ASD candidate genes. When viewed in this conte...

  8. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Jumaat Mohd Yussof; Effat Omar; Pai, Dinker R.; Suneet Sood

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth f...

  9. Cellular Automation of Galactic Habitable Zone

    CERN Document Server

    Vukotic, Branislav

    2010-01-01

    We present a preliminary results of our Galactic Habitable Zone (GHZ) 2D probabilistic cellular automata models. The relevant time-scales (emergence of life, it's diversification and evolution influenced with the global risk function) are modeled as the probability matrix elements and are chosen in accordance with the Copernican principle to be well-represented by the data inferred from the Earth's fossil record. With Fermi's paradox as a main boundary condition the resulting histories of astrobiological landscape are discussed.

  10. Cellular factors required for papillomavirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Melendy, T; Sedman, J; Stenlund, A

    1995-01-01

    In vitro replication of papillomavirus DNA has been carried out with a combination of purified proteins and partially purified extracts made from human cells. DNA synthesis requires the viral E1 protein and the papillomavirus origin of replication. The E2 protein stimulates DNA synthesis in a binding site-independent manner. Papillomavirus DNA replication is also dependent on the cellular factors replication protein A, replication factor C, and proliferating-cell nuclear antigen as well as a ...

  11. Image processing with a cellular nonlinear network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cellular nonlinear network (CNN) based on uncoupled nonlinear oscillators is proposed for image processing purposes. It is shown theoretically and numerically that the contrast of an image loaded at the nodes of the CNN is strongly enhanced, even if this one is initially weak. An image inversion can be also obtained without reconfiguration of the network whereas a gray levels extraction can be performed with an additional threshold filtering. Lastly, an electronic implementation of this CNN is presented

  12. Animal and cellular models of human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Arends, Mark; White, Eric; Whitelaw, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this eighteenth (2016) Annual Review Issue of The Journal of Pathology, we present a collection of 19 invited review articles that cover different aspects of cellular and animal models of disease. These include genetically-engineered models, chemically-induced models, naturally-occurring models, and combinations thereof, with the focus on recent methodological and conceptual developments across a wide range of human diseases.

  13. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    OpenAIRE

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira; João Paulo Ferreira Schoffen

    2010-01-01

    Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the fac...

  14. Cellular-based sea level gauge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Joseph, A.

    treaties with greater transparency. Among the various communication technologies used for real-time transmission of sea-level data are the wired telephone connection, VHF/UHF transceivers, satellite transmit terminals and cellular connectivity. Wired... telephone connections are severely susceptible to loss of connectivity during natural disasters such as storm surges, primarily because of telephone line breakage. Communication via VHF/UHF transceivers is limited by line-of-sight distance between...

  15. The flow of forces through cellular materials

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Mitchell A.

    2012-01-01

    Describing and measuring the elastic properties of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams can be a difficult problem when the cell structure is disordered. This paper suggests that tracking the flow of forces through the material can help in visualizing and understanding how the geometry of the cell structure affects the elastic behaviour. The mean strain tensor for a sample of material can be calculated by summing over the force paths, weighted by the strengths of the paths. This me...

  16. Elements of Cellular Blind Interference Alignment --- Aligned Frequency Reuse, Wireless Index Coding and Interference Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar, Syed A.

    2012-01-01

    We explore degrees of freedom (DoF) characterizations of partially connected wireless networks, especially cellular networks, with no channel state information at the transmitters. Specifically, we introduce three fundamental elements --- aligned frequency reuse, wireless index coding and interference diversity --- through a series of examples, focusing first on infinite regular arrays, then on finite clusters with arbitrary connectivity and message sets, and finally on heterogeneous settings...

  17. Dynamic Channel Allocation in Sectored Cellular Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is known that dynamic channel assignment(DCA) strategy outperforms the fixed channel assignment(FCA) strategy in omni-directional antenna cellular systems. One of the most important methods used in DCA was channel borrowing. But with the emergence of cell sectorization and spatial division multiple access(SDMA) which are used to increase the capacity of cellular systems, the channel assignment faces a series of new problems. In this paper, a dynamic channel allocation scheme based on sectored cellular systems is proposed. By introducing intra-cell channel borrowing (borrowing channels from neighboring sectors) and inter-cell channel borrowing (borrowing channels from neighboring cells) methods, previous DCA strategies, including compact pattern based channel borrowing(CPCB) and greedy based dynamic channel assignment(GDCA) schemes proposed by the author, are improved significantly. The computer simulation shows that either intra-cell borrowing scheme or inter-cell borrowing scheme is efficient enough to uniform and non-uniform traffic service distributions.

  18. Influence of electric field on cellular migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Cells have the ability to detect continuous current electric fields (EFs) and respond to them with a directed migratory movement. Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d.) cells, a key model organism for the study of eukaryotic chemotaxis, orient and migrate toward the cathode under the influence of an EF. The underlying sensing mechanism and whether it is shared by the chemotactic response pathway remains unknown. Whereas genes and proteins that mediate the electric sensing as well as that define the migration direction have been previously investigated in D.d. cells, a deeper knowledge about the cellular kinematic effects caused by the EF is still lacking. Here we show that besides triggering a directional bias the electric field influences the cellular kinematics by accelerating the movement of cells along their path. We found that the migratory velocity of the cells in an EF increases linearly with the exposure time. Through the analysis of the PI3K and Phg2 distribution in the cytosol and of the cellular adherence to the substrate we aim at elucidating whereas this speed up effect in the electric field is due to either a molecular signalling or the interaction with the substrate. This work is part of the MaxSynBio Consortium which is jointly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany and the Max Planck Society.

  19. Cellular cardiomyoplasty: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Race L; Browder, William; Li, Chuanfu

    2009-01-01

    Restoring blood flow, improving perfusion, reducing clinical symptoms, and augmenting ventricular function are the goals after acute myocardial infarction. Other than cardiac transplantation, no standard clinical procedure is available to restore damaged myocardium. Since we first reported cellular cardiomyoplasty in 1989, successful outcomes have been confirmed by experimental and clinical studies, but definitive long-term efficacy requires large-scale placebo-controlled double-blind randomized trials. On meta-analysis, stem cell-treated groups had significantly improved left ventricular ejection fraction, reduced infarct scar size, and decreased left ventricular end-systolic volume. Fewer myocardial infarctions, deaths, readmissions for heart failure, and repeat revascularizations were additional benefits. Encouraging clinical findings have been reported using satellite or bone marrow stem cells, but understanding of the benefit mechanisms demands additional studies. Adult mammalian ventricular myocardium lacks adequate regeneration capability, and cellular cardiomyoplasty offers a new way to overcome this; the poor retention and engraftment rate and high apoptotic rate of the implanted stem cells limit outcomes. The ideal type and number of cells, optimal timing of cell therapy, and ideal cell delivery method depend on determining the beneficial mechanisms. Cellular cardiomyoplasty has progressed rapidly in the last decade. A critical review may help us to better plan the future direction. PMID:19515892

  20. Cellular Kinetics of Perivascular MSC Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. W. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs and MSC-like multipotent stem/progenitor cells have been widely investigated for regenerative medicine and deemed promising in clinical applications. In order to further improve MSC-based stem cell therapeutics, it is important to understand the cellular kinetics and functional roles of MSCs in the dynamic regenerative processes. However, due to the heterogeneous nature of typical MSC cultures, their native identity and anatomical localization in the body have remained unclear, making it difficult to decipher the existence of distinct cell subsets within the MSC entity. Recent studies have shown that several blood-vessel-derived precursor cell populations, purified by flow cytometry from multiple human organs, give rise to bona fide MSCs, suggesting that the vasculature serves as a systemic reservoir of MSC-like stem/progenitor cells. Using individually purified MSC-like precursor cell subsets, we and other researchers have been able to investigate the differential phenotypes and regenerative capacities of these contributing cellular constituents in the MSC pool. In this review, we will discuss the identification and characterization of perivascular MSC precursors, including pericytes and adventitial cells, and focus on their cellular kinetics: cell adhesion, migration, engraftment, homing, and intercellular cross-talk during tissue repair and regeneration.

  1. HDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H F

    2011-12-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins alters gene expression and induces a host of cellular effects. The acetylation process is homeostatically balanced by two groups of cellular enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HAT activity relaxes the structure of the human chromatin, rendering it transcriptionally active, thereby increasing gene expression. In contrast, HDAC activity leads to gene silencing. The enzymatic balance can be \\'tipped\\' by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), leading to an accumulation of acetylated proteins, which subsequently modify cellular processes including stem cell differentiation, cell cycle, apoptosis, gene expression, and angiogenesis. There is a variety of natural and synthetic HDACi available, and their pleiotropic effects have contributed to diverse clinical applications, not only in cancer but also in non-cancer areas, such as chronic inflammatory disease, bone engineering, and neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, it appears that HDACi-modulated effects may differ between \\'normal\\' and transformed cells, particularly with regard to reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle arrest. The potential beneficial effects of HDACi for health, resulting from their ability to regulate global gene expression by epigenetic modification of DNA-associated proteins, also offer potential for application within restorative dentistry, where they may promote dental tissue regeneration following pulpal damage.

  2. Literature Review on Dynamic Cellular Manufacturing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri Houshyar, A.; Leman, Z.; Pakzad Moghadam, H.; Ariffin, M. K. A. M.; Ismail, N.; Iranmanesh, H.

    2014-06-01

    In previous decades, manufacturers faced a lot of challenges because of globalization and high competition in markets. These problems arise from shortening product life cycle, rapid variation in demand of products, and also rapid changes in manufcaturing technologies. Nowadays most manufacturing companies expend considerable attention for improving flexibility and responsiveness in order to overcome these kinds of problems and also meet customer's needs. By considering the trend toward the shorter product life cycle, the manufacturing environment is towards manufacturing a wide variety of parts in small batches [1]. One of the major techniques which are applied for improving manufacturing competitiveness is Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS). CMS is type of manufacturing system which tries to combine flexibility of job shop and also productivity of flow shop. In addition, Dynamic cellular manufacturing system which considers different time periods for the manufacturing system becomes an important topic and attracts a lot of attention to itself. Therefore, this paper made attempt to have a brief review on this issue and focused on all published paper on this subject. Although, this topic gains a lot of attention to itself during these years, none of previous researchers focused on reviewing the literature of that which can be helpful and useful for other researchers who intend to do the research on this topic. Therefore, this paper is the first study which has focused and reviewed the literature of dynamic cellular manufacturing system.

  3. Cellular vs. organ approaches to dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular distribution of tissue-incorporated radionuclides has generally been neglected in the dosimetry of internal emitters. Traditional dosimetry assumes homogeneous distribution of radionuclides in organs of interest, while presuming that the ranges of particulate radiations are large relative to typical cell diameters. The macroscopic distribution of dose thus calculated has generally served as a sufficient approximation for the energy deposited within radiosensitive sites. However, with the increasing utilization of intracellular agents, such as thallium-201, it has become necessary to examine the microscopic distribution of energy at the cellular level. This is particularly important in the instance of radionuclides that decay by electron capture or by internal conversion with the release of Auger and Coster-Kronig electrons. In many instances, these electrons are released as a dense shower of low-energy particles with ranges of subcellular dimensions. The high electron density in the immediate vicinity of the decaying atom produces a focal deposition of energy that far exceeds the average dose taken over several cell diameters. These studies point out the increasing need to take into account the microscopic distribution of dose on the cellular level as radionuclides distributed in cells become more commonplace, especially if the decay involves electron capture or internal conversion. As radiotracers are developed for the measurement of intracellular functions these factors should be given greater consideration. 16 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  4. Magnetic S-parameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We propose a direct test of the existence of gauge duals for nonsupersymmetric asymptotically free gauge theories developing an infrared fixed point by computing the S-parameter in the electric and dual magnetic description. In particular we show that at the lower bound of the conformal window the...... magnetic S-parameter, i.e. the one determined via the dual magnetic gauge theory, assumes a simple expression in terms of the elementary magnetic degrees of freedom. The results further support our recent conjecture of the existence of a universal lower bound on the S parameter and indicates that it is an...

  5. Cellular islet autoimmunity associates with clinical outcome of islet cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkert A L Huurman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Islet cell transplantation can cure type 1 diabetes (T1D, but only a minority of recipients remains insulin-independent in the following years. We tested the hypothesis that allograft rejection and recurrent autoimmunity contribute to this progressive loss of islet allograft function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-one T1D patients received cultured islet cell grafts prepared from multiple donors and transplanted under anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG induction and tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (MMF maintenance immunosuppression. Immunity against auto- and alloantigens was measured before and during one year after transplantation. Cellular auto- and alloreactivity was assessed by lymphocyte stimulation tests against autoantigens and cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor assays, respectively. Humoral reactivity was measured by auto- and alloantibodies. Clinical outcome parameters--including time until insulin independence, insulin independence at one year, and C-peptide levels over one year--remained blinded until their correlation with immunological parameters. All patients showed significant improvement of metabolic control and 13 out of 21 became insulin-independent. Multivariate analyses showed that presence of cellular autoimmunity before and after transplantation is associated with delayed insulin-independence (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively and lower circulating C-peptide levels during the first year after transplantation (p = 0.002 and p = 0.02, respectively. Seven out of eight patients without pre-existent T-cell autoreactivity became insulin-independent, versus none of the four patients reactive to both islet autoantigens GAD and IA-2 before transplantation. Autoantibody levels and cellular alloreactivity had no significant association with outcome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this cohort study, cellular islet-specific autoimmunity associates with clinical outcome of islet cell transplantation under ATG

  6. Effects of Initial Symmetry on the Global Symmetry of One-Dimensional Legal Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuko Tanaka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To examine the development of pattern formation from the viewpoint of symmetry, we applied a two-dimensional discrete Walsh analysis to a one-dimensional cellular automata model under two types of regular initial conditions. The amount of symmetropy of cellular automata (CA models under regular and random initial conditions corresponds to three Wolfram’s classes of CAs, identified as Classes II, III, and IV. Regular initial conditions occur in two groups. One group that makes a broken, regular pattern formation has four types of symmetry, whereas the other group that makes a higher hierarchy pattern formation has only two types. Additionally, both final pattern formations show an increased amount of symmetropy as time passes. Moreover, the final pattern formations are affected by iterations of base rules of CA models of chaos dynamical systems. The growth design formations limit possibilities: the ratio of developing final pattern formations under a regular initial condition decreases in the order of Classes III, II, and IV. This might be related to the difference in degree in reference to surrounding conditions. These findings suggest that calculations of symmetries of the structures of one-dimensional cellular automata models are useful for revealing rules of pattern generation for animal bodies.

  7. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, I-Ju [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  8. Cellular heredity in haploid cultures of somatic cells, March 1968-April 1981. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the development and application to cell-culture genetics of unique haploid cell lines from frog embryo developed in this laboratory. Since 1968, the main aim of this project has been to develop the haploid cell system for studies of mutagenesis in culture, particularly by ultraviolet radiation. In the course of this work we isolated chromosomally stable cell lines, derived and characterized a number of variants, and adapted cell hybridization and other methods to this material. Particular emphasis was placed on ultraviolet photobiology, including studies of cell survival, mutagenesis, and pathways of repair of uv-damaged DNA. Although at present less widely used for genetic experiments than mammalian cell lines, the frog cells offer the advantages of authentic haploidy and a favorable repertory of DNA repair pathways for study of uv mutagenesis

  9. Predicting transformers oil parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Shaban, K.; El-Hag, A.; Matveev, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper different configurations of artificial neural networks are applied to predict various transformers oil parameters. The prediction is performed through modeling the relationship between the transformer insulation resistance extracted from the Megger test and the breakdown strength, interfacial tension, acidity and the water content of the transformers oil. The process of predicting these oil parameters statuses is carried out using two different configurations of neural networks....

  10. PARAMETER DESIGN PROPELLER KAPAL

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Ridwan; - Sulaiman

    2012-01-01

      Designer propeller kapal harus mempertimbangkan berbagai parameter untuk menghasilkan bentuk, type dan ukuran propeller yang memiliki nilai  efektifitas dan effisiensi propulsi tinggi. Propulsi kapal merupakan faktor yang mendominasi  operasional kapal, karena pemakaian bahan bakar untuk operasional propulsi kapal merupakan 42% dari total cost operasional kapal dan merupakan added value yang akan diperoleh oleh perusahaan pelayaran. Pertimbangan parameter desain propeller arg...

  11. Reassessment of safeguards parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Richter, J.L.; Mullen, M.F.

    1994-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is reassessing the timeliness and goal quantity parameters that are used in defining safeguards approaches. This study reviews technology developments since the parameters were established in the 1970s and concludes that there is no reason to relax goal quantity or conversion time for reactor-grade plutonium relative to weapons-grade plutonium. For low-enriched uranium, especially in countries with advanced enrichment capability there may be an incentive to shorten the detection time.

  12. Histopathologic parameters determining the MR imaging appearance of cerebral astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper determines those histopathologic parameters that are responsible for the differences found between the MR images of low and high malignant gliomas. The MR imaging features (signal intensity in T1-, spin density-, and T2-weighted images; edemas; mass effect; border sharpness; anatomic invasion; intensity of contrast material enhancement; hemorrhage; flow void; calcium formation; and number of size of cysts) of 54 patients with biopsy-roved fibrillary astrocytomas were correlated to the histopathologic features (cellular atypia, mitotic activity, cellularity, endothelial proliferation, amount of necrosis, and microcyst formation) of the same patients

  13. Dynamics of the multiplicity of cellular infection in a plant virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafín Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available Recombination, complementation and competition profoundly influence virus evolution and epidemiology. Since viruses are intracellular parasites, the basic parameter determining the potential for such interactions is the multiplicity of cellular infection (cellular MOI, i.e. the number of viral genome units that effectively infect a cell. The cellular MOI values that prevail in host organisms have rarely been investigated, and whether they remain constant or change widely during host invasion is totally unknown. Here, we fill this experimental gap by presenting the first detailed analysis of the dynamics of the cellular MOI during colonization of a host plant by a virus. Our results reveal ample variations between different leaf levels during the course of infection, with values starting close to 2 and increasing up to 13 before decreasing to initial levels in the latest infection stages. By revealing wide dynamic changes throughout a single infection, we here illustrate the existence of complex scenarios where the opportunity for recombination, complementation and competition among viral genomes changes greatly at different infection phases and at different locations within a multi-cellular host.

  14. Statistical analysis of cellular detonation dynamics from numerical simulations: one-step chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, G. J.; Radulescu, M. I.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, two methods are developed for statistically analysing the nonlinear cellular dynamics from numerical simulations of gaseous detonations, one use of which is the systematic determination of detonation cell sizes from such simulations. Both these methods rely on signed vorticity records in which the individual families of transverse waves are captured independently. The first method involves an automated extraction of the main triple-point tracks from the vorticity records, allowing statistical analysis of the spacings between neighbouring tracks. The second method uses the autocorrelation function to spectrally analyse the vorticity records. These methods are then employed for a preliminary analysis of the cellular dynamics of the standard, idealized one-step chemistry model. Evidence is found for 'cell size doubling' bifurcations in the one-step model as the cellular dynamics become more irregular (e.g. as the activation is increased). It is also shown that the statistical models converge slowly due to systematic 'shot-to-shot' variation in the cellular dynamics for fixed parameters with different initial perturbations. Instead, it appears that a range of equally probable cell sizes can be obtained for given parameters.

  15. Presentation of a research project addressed to the realisation of a diamond-based cellular biosensing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarino, Luca; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio; Genovese, Marco; Gosso, Sara; Olivero, Paolo; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Picollo, Federico; Traina, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    In this proceedings we will present a research project financed by Piedmont regional government (Italy; finalized to the realization and commercialization of functional devices for cellular bio-sensing based on diamond. Partners of the project are: Crisel Instruments, Torino University, Torino Polytechnic, INRIM, Politronica, Bionica Tech, Ulm University Here the main features of the final devices will be briefly summarized. We envisage an active diamond-based cellular substrate that can simultaneously stimulate and detect a variety of signals (chemical, optical, electrical) to and from neuroendocrine cells, in a fully biocompatible environment for the cellular system under test. Such a device can be realized by fully exploiting the peculiar properties of diamond: optical transparency, biocompatibility, chemical inertness, accessibility to a conductive graphite-like phase; properties that will be further explored and tested during the project.

  16. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemical synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhorn, D E; Bayliss, D A; Erickson, J T; Gallman, E A; Szymeczek, C L; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Dean, J B

    1989-12-01

    During the last decade much progress has been made in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which nerve cells communicate with each other and nonneural (e.g., muscle) target tissue. This review is intended to provide the reader with an account of this work. We begin with an historical overview of research on cell-to-cell communication and then discuss recent developments that, in some instances, have led to dramatic changes in the concept of synaptic transmission. For instance, the finding that single neurons often contain multiple messengers (i.e., neurotransmitters) invalidated the long-held theory (i.e., Dale's Law) that individual neurons contain and release one and only one type of neurotransmitter. Moreover, the last decade witnessed the inclusion of an entire group of compounds, the neuropeptides, as messenger molecules. Enormous progress has also been made in elucidating postsynaptic receptor complexes and biochemical intermediaries involved in synaptic transmission. Here the development of recombinant DNA technology has made it possible to clone and determine the molecular structure for a number of receptors. This information has been used to gain insight into how these receptors function either as a ligand-gated channel or as a G protein-linked ligand recognition molecule. Perhaps the most progress made during this era was in understanding the molecular linkage of G protein-linked receptors to intramembranous and cytoplasmic macromolecules involved in signal amplification and transduction. We conclude with a brief discussion of how synaptic transmission leads to immediate alterations in the electrical activity and, in some cases, to a change in phenotype by altering gene expression. These alterations in cellular behavior are believed to be mediated by phosphoproteins, the final biochemical product of signal transduction. PMID:2575357

  17. An improved Cellular Automata model to simulate the behavior of high density crowd and validation by experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciani, Claudio; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2016-06-01

    In this article we present an improved version of the Cellular Automata floor field model making use of a sub-mesh system to increase the maximum density allowed during simulation and reproduce phenomena observed in dense crowds. In order to calibrate the model's parameters and to validate it we used data obtained from an empirical observation of bidirectional pedestrian flow. A good agreement was found between numerical simulation and experimental data and, in particular, the double outflow peak observed during the formation of deadlocks could be reproduced in numerical simulations, thus allowing the analysis of deadlock formation and dissolution. Finally, we used the developed high density model to compute the flow-ratio dependent fundamental diagram of bidirectional flow, demonstrating the instability of balanced flow and predicting the bidirectional flow behavior at very high densities. The model we presented here can be used to prevent dense crowd accidents in the future and to investigate the dynamics of the accidents which already occurred in the past. Additionally, fields such as granular and active matter physics may benefit from the developed framework to study different collective phenomena.

  18. A feedback approach to bifurcation analysis in biochemical networks with many parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Waldherr, Steffen; Allgower, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Feedback circuits in biochemical networks which underly cellular signaling pathways are important elements in creating complex behavior. A specific aspect thereof is how stability of equilibrium points depends on model parameters. For biochemical networks, which are modelled using many parameters, it is typically very difficult to estimate the influence of parameters on stability. Finding parameters which result in a change in stability is a key step for a meaningful bifurcation analysis. We ...

  19. Study on Physiological Parameter Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Madan Kshirsagar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease and stroke are considered among the world’s leading causes of death and disability. The non-invasive technique for physiological parameter monitoring is required to overcome the limitations of the existing systems. As per the study and observations, photoplenthesmography (PPG imaging technology can be used for capturing signals which contains pulsatile information. These signals can gives us many vital parameters such as heart rate, respiration rate, oxygen saturation level, heart rate variability, arterial fibrillation etc. These PPG signals contain noise due to motion artifacts. Motion artifact reduction results in better accuracy of final outcomes. In this paper, different PPG techniques and motion artifact reduction methods which have been used for estimation of some of the cardiovascular parameters are studied. Classification of the PPG data collection methods on the basis of some factors such as source of light, photo detector, skin part used, type of PPG used and extracted parameters etc. is carried out.

  20. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort will continue to develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular...

  1. ISBT 128 coding and labeling for cellular therapy products

    OpenAIRE

    Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the ISBT 128 coding and labeling for cellular therapy products. It is published on behalf of the international Cellular Therapy Coding and Labeling Advisory Group (see www.ICCBBA.org)

  2. Mapping of cellular iron using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eung Seok; Heo, Chaejeong; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Min

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive dopaminergic cell loss in the substantianigra (SN) and elevated iron levels demonstrated by autopsy and with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Direct visualization of iron with live imaging techniques has not yet been successful. The aim of this study is to visualize and quantify the distribution of cellular iron using an intrinsic iron hyperspectral fluorescence signal. The 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cellular model of PD was established in SHSY5Y cells. The cells were exposed to iron by treatment with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC, 100 μM) for up to 6 hours. The hyperspectral fluorescence imaging signal of iron was examined usinga high- resolution dark-field optical microscope system with signal absorption for the visible/ near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. The 6-hour group showed heavy cellular iron deposition compared with the small amount of iron accumulation in the 1-hour group. The cellular iron was dispersed in a small, particulate form, whereas extracellular iron was detected in an aggregated form. In addition, iron particles were found to be concentrated on the cell membrane/edge of shrunken cells. The cellular iron accumulation readily occurred in MPP+-induced cells, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating elevated iron levels in the SN in PD. This direct iron imaging methodology could be applied to analyze the physiological role of iron in PD, and its application might be expanded to various neurological disorders involving other metals, such as copper, manganese or zinc.

  3. Cellular Dynamic Simulator: An Event Driven Molecular Simulation Environment for Cellular Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michael J.; Waxham, M. Neal; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Cellular Dynamic Simulator (CDS) for simulating diffusion and chemical reactions within crowded molecular environments. CDS is based on a novel event driven algorithm specifically designed for precise calculation of the timing of collisions, reactions and other events for each individual molecule in the environment. Generic mesh based compartments allow the creation / importation of very simple or detailed cellular structures that exist in a 3D environment. Multiple levels of compartments and static obstacles can be used to create a dense environment to mimic cellular boundaries and the intracellular space. The CDS algorithm takes into account volume exclusion and molecular crowding that may impact signaling cascades in small sub-cellular compartments such as dendritic spines. With the CDS, we can simulate simple enzyme reactions; aggregation, channel transport, as well as highly complicated chemical reaction networks of both freely diffusing and membrane bound multi-protein complexes. Components of the CDS are generally defined such that the simulator can be applied to a wide range of environments in terms of scale and level of detail. Through an initialization GUI, a simple simulation environment can be created and populated within minutes yet is powerful enough to design complex 3D cellular architecture. The initialization tool allows visual confirmation of the environment construction prior to execution by the simulator. This paper describes the CDS algorithm, design implementation, and provides an overview of the types of features available and the utility of those features are highlighted in demonstrations. PMID:20361275

  4. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    OpenAIRE

    Bordelon, David E.; Zhang, Jian; Graboski, Sarah; Cox, Adrienne; Schreiber, Eric; Zhou, Otto Z.; Chang, Sha

    2008-01-01

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiothera...

  5. Parameter Estimation Through Ignorance

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Hailiang

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical modelling lies at the heart of our understanding of physical systems. Its role in science is deeper than mere operational forecasting, in that it allows us to evaluate the adequacy of the mathematical structure of our models. Despite the importance of model parameters, there is no general method of parameter estimation outside linear systems. A new relatively simple method of parameter estimation for nonlinear systems is presented, based on variations in the accuracy of probability forecasts. It is illustrated on the Logistic Map, the Henon Map and the 12-D Lorenz96 flow, and its ability to outperform linear least squares in these systems is explored at various noise levels and sampling rates. As expected, it is more effective when the forecast error distributions are non-Gaussian. The new method selects parameter values by minimizing a proper, local skill score for continuous probability forecasts as a function of the parameter values. This new approach is easier to implement in practice than alter...

  6. Neutron Thermalization Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical discussion of the neutron thermalization parameters employed to describe the transient time and space-dependent phenomena is presented. These parameters are (i) M2, the second energy transfer moment of the scattering kernel weighted by the Maxwellian distribution, (ii) the thermalization time constant, (iii) the diffusion cooling coefficient, (iv) the absorption cooling coefficient, (v) the rethermalization length, (vi) the diffusion heating coefficient, and (vii) the limit of the decay constant (vΣs)min. The determination of the time and space transient parameters using the polynomial representation for the energy part of the neutron flux is discussed. Based upon the low-order polynomial expansion, interrelationships between various parameters are obtained. Limitations of these expressions in the analysis of transient phenomena are pointed out. An attempt is made to compare theoretical and experimental results for several moderators. Theoretical M2 values are obtained using the first term of the Placzek mass expansion and the correction with the generalized Doppler approximation. In these calculations available theoretical or derived frequency spectra of the dynamical modes of the moderators are used. Various experimental methods for the determination of neutron thermalization parameters are compared. The uncertainties and limitations of the different methods are pointed out. Available experimental data are surveyed and a list of ''best values'' is suggested. The comparison between theoretical and experimental data shows that a large theoretical and experimental effort is needed to obtain a full understanding of the results. (author)

  7. Revisiting Cosmological parameter estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Jayanti

    2014-01-01

    Constraining theoretical models with measuring the parameters of those from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data is one of the most active areas in cosmology. WMAP, Planck and other recent experiments have shown that the six parameters standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model still best fits the data. Bayesian methods based on Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling have been playing leading role in parameter estimation from CMB data. In one of the recent studies \\cite{2012PhRvD..85l3008P} we have shown that particle swarm optimization (PSO) which is a population based search procedure can also be effectively used to find the cosmological parameters which are best fit to the WMAP seven year data. In the present work we show that PSO not only can find the best-fit point, it can also sample the parameter space quite effectively, to the extent that we can use the same analysis pipeline to process PSO sampled points which is used to process the points sampled by Markov Chains, and get consistent res...

  8. Parameter estimation through ignorance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hailiang; Smith, Leonard A

    2012-07-01

    Dynamical modeling lies at the heart of our understanding of physical systems. Its role in science is deeper than mere operational forecasting, in that it allows us to evaluate the adequacy of the mathematical structure of our models. Despite the importance of model parameters, there is no general method of parameter estimation outside linear systems. A relatively simple method of parameter estimation for nonlinear systems is introduced, based on variations in the accuracy of probability forecasts. It is illustrated on the logistic map, the Henon map, and the 12-dimensional Lorenz96 flow, and its ability to outperform linear least squares in these systems is explored at various noise levels and sampling rates. As expected, it is more effective when the forecast error distributions are non-Gaussian. The method selects parameter values by minimizing a proper, local skill score for continuous probability forecasts as a function of the parameter values. This approach is easier to implement in practice than alternative nonlinear methods based on the geometry of attractors or the ability of the model to shadow the observations. Direct measures of inadequacy in the model, the "implied ignorance," and the information deficit are introduced. PMID:23005513

  9. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is a heavy metal, which is widely used in industry, affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. In mammals, it exerts multiple toxic effects and has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cadmium affects cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular activities. Cd2+ does not catalyze Fenton-type reactions because it does not accept or donate electrons under physiological conditions, and it is only weakly genotoxic. Hence, indirect mechanisms are implicated in the carcinogenicity of cadmium. In this review multiple mechanisms are discussed, such as modulation of gene expression and signal transduction, interference with enzymes of the cellular antioxidant system and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibition of DNA repair and DNA methylation, role in apoptosis and disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cadmium affects both gene transcription and translation. The major mechanisms of gene induction by cadmium known so far are modulation of cellular signal transduction pathways by enhancement of protein phosphorylation and activation of transcription and translation factors. Cadmium interferes with antioxidant defense mechanisms and stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species, which may act as signaling molecules in the induction of gene expression and apoptosis. The inhibition of DNA repair processes by cadmium represents a mechanism by which cadmium enhances the genotoxicity of other agents and may contribute to the tumor initiation by this metal. The disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by cadmium probably further stimulates the development of tumors. It becomes clear that there exist multiple mechanisms which contribute to the carcinogenicity of cadmium, although the relative weights of these contributions are difficult to estimate

  10. From Cellular Mechanotransduction to Biologically Inspired Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a lecture I presented as the recipient of the 2009 Pritzker Distinguished Lecturer Award at the Biomedical Engineering Society annual meeting in October 2009. Here, I review more than thirty years of research from my laboratory, beginning with studies designed to test the theory that cells use tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture to stabilize their shape and sense mechanical signals, which I believed to be critical for control of cell function and tissue development. Although I was trained as a cell biologist, I found that the tools I had at my disposal were insufficient to experimentally test these theories, and thus I ventured into engineering to find critical solutions. This path has been extremely fruitful as it has led to confirmation of the critical role that physical forces play in developmental control, as well as how cells sense and respond to mechanical signals at the molecular level through a process known as cellular mechanotransduction. Many of the predictions of the cellular tensegrity model relating to cell mechanical behaviors have been shown to be valid, and this vision of cell structure led to discovery of the central role that transmembrane adhesion receptors, such as integrins, and the cytoskeleton play in mechanosensing and mechanochemical conversion. In addition, these fundamental studies have led to significant unexpected technology fallout, including development of micromagnetic actuators for non-invasive control of cellular signaling, microfluidic systems as therapeutic extracorporeal devices for sepsis therapy, and new DNA-based nanobiotechnology approaches that permit construction of artificial tensegrities that mimic properties of living materials for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20140519

  11. Cellular proteins in influenza virus particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L Shaw

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Virions are thought to contain all the essential proteins that govern virus egress from the host cell and initiation of replication in the target cell. It has been known for some time that influenza virions contain nine viral proteins; however, analyses of other enveloped viruses have revealed that proteins from the host cell can also be detected in virions. To address whether the same is true for influenza virus, we used two complementary mass spectrometry approaches to perform a comprehensive proteomic analysis of purified influenza virus particles. In addition to the aforementioned nine virus-encoded proteins, we detected the presence of 36 host-encoded proteins. These include both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound proteins that can be grouped into several functional categories, such as cytoskeletal proteins, annexins, glycolytic enzymes, and tetraspanins. Interestingly, a significant number of these have also been reported to be present in virions of other virus families. Protease treatment of virions combined with immunoblot analysis was used to verify the presence of the cellular protein and also to determine whether it is located in the core of the influenza virus particle. Immunogold labeling confirmed the presence of membrane-bound host proteins on the influenza virus envelope. The identification of cellular constituents of influenza virions has important implications for understanding the interactions of influenza virus with its host and brings us a step closer to defining the cellular requirements for influenza virus replication. While not all of the host proteins are necessarily incorporated specifically, those that are and are found to have an essential role represent novel targets for antiviral drugs and for attenuation of viruses for vaccine purposes.

  12. Probing cellular behaviors through nanopatterned chitosan membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a high-throughput method for developing physically modified chitosan membranes to probe the cellular behavior of MDCK epithelial cells and HIG-82 fibroblasts adhered onto these modified membranes. To prepare chitosan membranes with micro/nanoscaled features, we have demonstrated an easy-to-handle, facile approach that could be easily integrated with IC-based manufacturing processes with mass production potential. These physically modified chitosan membranes were observed by scanning electron microscopy to gain a better understanding of chitosan membrane surface morphology. After MDCK cells and HIG-82 fibroblasts were cultured on these modified chitosan membranes for various culture durations (i.e. 1, 2, 4, 12 and 24 h), they were investigated to decipher cellular behavior. We found that both cells preferred to adhere onto a flat surface rather than on a nanopatterned surface. However, most (> 80%) of the MDCK cells showed rounded morphology and would suspend in the cultured medium instead of adhering onto the planar surface of negatively nanopatterned chitosan membranes. This means different cell types (e.g. fibroblasts versus epithelia) showed distinct capabilities/preferences of adherence for materials of varying surface roughness. We also showed that chitosan membranes could be re-used at least nine times without significant contamination and would provide us consistency for probing cell–material interactions by permitting reuse of the same substrate. We believe these results would provide us better insight into cellular behavior, specifically, microscopic properties and characteristics of cells grown under unique, nanopatterned cell-interface conditions. (paper)

  13. Traffic Engineering of Cellular Wireless Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Villy Bæk

    2002-01-01

    In mobile communications an efficient utilisation of the channels is of great importance. In this paper we describe the basic principles for obtaining the maximum utilisation and study strategies for obtaining these limits. In general a high degree of sharing is efficient, but requires service...... protection mechanisms to guarantee the Quality of Service for all services. We study cellular systems with hierarchical cells, and the effect of overlapping cells, and we show that by call packing we obtain a very high utilisation. The models are generalisations of the Erlang-B formula, and include general...

  14. Propagation Mechanism of Cylindrical Cellular Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wen-Hu; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Jian-Guo

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of cylindrical cellular detonation with different instabilities. The numerical results show that with decreasing initial temperature, detonation becomes more unstable and the cells of the cylindrical detonation tend to be irregular. For stable detonation, a divergence of cylindrical detonation cells is formed eventually due to detonation instability resulting from a curved detonation front. For mildly unstable detonation, local overdriven detonation occurs. The detonation cell diverges and its size decreases. For highly unstable detonation, locally driven detonation is more obvious and the front is highly wrinkled. As a result, the diverging cylindrical detonation cell becomes highly irregular.

  15. Imaging Cellular Architecture with X-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Larabell, Carolyn A.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray imaging of biological samples is progressing rapidly. In this paper we review the progress to date in high resolution imaging of cellular architecture. In particular we survey the progress in soft X-ray tomography and argue that the field is coming of age and that important biological insights are starting to emerge. We then review the new ideas based on coherent diffraction. These methods are at a much earlier stage of development but, as they eliminate the need for X-ray optics, have ...

  16. Single spin measurement using cellular automata techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Delgado, C A; Cory, D G; Mosca, M; Cappellaro, Paola; Cory, David G.; Mosca, Michele; Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an approach for single spin measurement. Our method uses techniques from the theory of quantum cellular automata to correlate a large amount of ancillary spins to the one to be measured. It has the distinct advantage of being efficient, and to a certain extent fault-tolerant. Under ideal conditions, it requires the application of only order of cube root of N steps (each requiring a constant number of rf pulses) to create a system of N correlated spins. It is also fairly robust against pulse errors, imperfect initial polarization of the ancilla spin system, and does not rely on entanglement. We study the scalability of our scheme through numerical simulation.

  17. Single spin measurement using cellular automata techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Mosca, Michele; Cappellaro, Paola; Cory, David G.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an approach for single spin measurement. Our method uses techniques from the theory of quantum cellular automata to correlate a large amount of ancillary spins to the one to be measured. It has the distinct advantage of being efficient, and to a certain extent fault-tolerant. Under ideal conditions, it requires the application of only order of cube root of N steps (each requiring a constant number of rf pulses) to create a system of N correlated spins. It is also fairly robust agai...

  18. Wireless communications, cellular phones and relay antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wireless communications using radiofrequency fields (RF) have seen an increasing use with the massive deployment of cellular systems GSM, UMTS and now LTE. In parallel, public concerns have been raised about possible health effects. During the last decade, about 10 million Euros per year have been dedicated to research. In vivo, in vitro, animal and human studies have been carried out. This paper gives an overview of the subject. The applicable limits and regulation as well as the typical human exposure are presented. The state of knowledge on biological and health effect is summarized. The recent classification of RF by the IARC and some sociological aspects are also discussed. (authors)

  19. Effect of cellular mobility on immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. B.; Mannion, R.; Ruskin, H. J.

    2000-08-01

    Mobility of cell types in our HIV immune response model is subject to an intrinsic mobility and an explicit directed mobility, which is governed by Pmob. We investigate how restricting the explicit mobility, while maintaining the innate mobility of a viral-infected cell, affects the model's results. We find that increasing the explicit mobility of the immune system cells leads to viral dominance for certain levels of viral mutation. We conclude that increasing immune system cellular mobility indirectly increases the virus’ inherent mobility.

  20. Cellular regulation of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft and is a target for widely abused psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Nonetheless, little is known about the cellular distribution and trafficking of natively expressed DAT. DAT and its trafficking...... single-membrane spanning protein Tac, thereby creating an extracellular antibody epitope. Upon expression in HEK293 cells this TacDAT fusion protein displayed functional properties similar to the wild type transporter. In an ELISA based internalization assay, TacDAT intracellular accumulation was...

  1. Cellular spaces, null spaces and homotopy localization

    CERN Document Server

    Farjoun, Emmanuel Dror

    1996-01-01

    In this monograph we give an exposition of some recent development in homotopy theory. It relates to advances in periodicity in homotopy localization and in cellular spaces. The notion of homotopy localization is treated quite generally and encompasses all the known idempotent homotopy functors. It is applied to K-theory localizations, to Morava-theories, to Hopkins-Smith theory of types. The method of homotopy colimits is used heavily. It is written with an advanced graduate student in topology and research homotopy theorist in mind.

  2. Cellular automata modelling of hantarvirus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantaviruses are a group of viruses which have been identified as being responsible for the outbreak of diseases such as the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. In an effort to understand the characteristics and dynamics of hantavirus infection, mathematical models based on differential equations have been developed and widely studied. However, such models neglect the local characteristics of the spreading process and do not include variable susceptibility of individuals. In this paper, we develop an alternative approach based on cellular automata to analyze and study the spatiotemporal patterns of hantavirus infection.

  3. Cellular automata modelling of hantarvirus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Karim, Mohamad Faisal [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: faisal@usm.my; Md Ismail, Ahmad Izani [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: izani@cs.usm.my; Ching, Hoe Bee [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: Bee_Ching_Janice_Hoe@dell.com

    2009-09-15

    Hantaviruses are a group of viruses which have been identified as being responsible for the outbreak of diseases such as the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. In an effort to understand the characteristics and dynamics of hantavirus infection, mathematical models based on differential equations have been developed and widely studied. However, such models neglect the local characteristics of the spreading process and do not include variable susceptibility of individuals. In this paper, we develop an alternative approach based on cellular automata to analyze and study the spatiotemporal patterns of hantavirus infection.

  4. Rapid Cellular Identification by Dynamic Electromechanical Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, Maxim [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Reukov, Vladimir V [ORNL; Vertegel, Alexey [ORNL; Thompson, Gary L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena is ubiquitous in living systems. Here, we demonstrate rapid identification of cellular organisms using difference in electromechanical activity in a broad frequency range. Principal component analysis of the dynamic electromechanical response spectra bundled with neural network based recognition provides a robust identification algorithm based on their electromechanical signature, and allows unambiguous differentiation of model Micrococcus Lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas Fluorescens system. This methodology provides a universal pathway for biological identification obviating the need for well-defined analytical models of Scanning Probe Microscopy response.

  5. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  6. Quantumness of discrete Hamiltonian cellular automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elze Hans-Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize a recent study of discrete (integer-valued Hamiltonian cellular automata (CA showing that their dynamics can only be consistently defined, if it is linear in the same sense as unitary evolution described by the Schrödinger equation. This allows to construct an invertible map between such CA and continuous quantum mechanical models, which incorporate a fundamental scale. Presently, we emphasize general aspects of these findings, the construction of admissible CA observables, and the existence of solutions of the modified dispersion relation for stationary states.

  7. Conference on radionuclide labelled cellular blood elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The South African Medical Research Council presented this conference on radionuclide labelled cellular blood elements with application in atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The conference was held in Bloemfontein from 3-6 February 1986. This work only consists of the abstracts of the seminars that were delivered on the conference. The radioisotopes that occur most of the time in the abstracts include Indium 111, Indium 114, Chromium 51, Iodine 125, Iodine 131 and Carbon 14. Especially Indium 111 seems to be the method of choice for all labelling

  8. Cellular Scaling Rules for Primate Spinal Cords

    OpenAIRE

    Burish, Mark J.; Peebles, J. Klint; Baldwin, Mary K.; Tavares, Luciano; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    The spinal cord can be considered a major sensorimotor interface between the body and the brain. How does the spinal cord scale with body and brain mass, and how are its numbers of neurons related to the number of neurons in the brain across species of different body and brain sizes? Here we determine the cellular composition of the spinal cord in eight primate species and find that its number of neurons varies as a linear function of cord length, and accompanies body mass raised to an expone...

  9. 47 CFR 32.5003 - Cellular mobile revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular mobile revenue. 32.5003 Section 32... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Revenue Accounts § 32.5003 Cellular mobile revenue. This account shall include message revenue derived from cellular...

  10. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of the standard may be purchased from Global... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular service requirements and limitations... SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.901 Cellular service requirements...

  11. 47 CFR 22.917 - Emission limitations for cellular equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emission limitations for cellular equipment. 22... SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.917 Emission limitations for cellular equipment. The rules in this section govern the spectral characteristics of emissions in the...

  12. Simulation of evacuation processes using a bionics-inspired cellular automaton model for pedestrian dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchner, Ansgar; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    We present simulations of evacuation processes using a recently introduced cellular automaton model for pedestrian dynamics. This model applies a bionics approach to describe the interaction between the pedestrians using ideas from chemotaxis. Here we study a rather simple situation, namely the evacuation from a large room with one or two doors. It is shown that the variation of the model parameters allows to describe different types of behaviour, from regular to panic. We find a non-monotoni...

  13. Image Edge Detection Based on Cellular Neural Network and Particle Swarm Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Lili Li; Zhengxia Wang

    2014-01-01

    Edge detection is one of the basic pre-processing methods in digital image processing. In order to extract the edge of image effectively, this paper employs linear matrix inequality and particle swarm optimization (PSO) based on cellular neural networks (CNN). Among these templates obtained by using linear matrix inequality (LMI), we utilize the PSO to carry out the optimization parameters. The performance of the proposed edge detection method is evaluated on different test images and compare...

  14. Protein denaturation in intact hepatocytes and isolated cellular organelles during heat shock

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    There is circumstantial evidence that protein denaturation occurs in cells during heat shock at hyperthermic temperatures and that denatured or damaged protein is the primary inducer of the heat shock response. However, there is no direct evidence regarding the extent of denaturation of normal cellular proteins during heat shock. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is the most direct method of monitoring protein denaturation or unfolding. Due to the fundamental parameter measured, heat fl...

  15. Voluntary accreditation of cellular therapies: Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentin, P I

    2003-01-01

    Voluntary accreditation of cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based products intended for human transplantation is an important mechanism for improving quality in cellular therapy. The Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT) has developed and implemented programs of voluntary inspection and accreditation for hematopoietic cellular therapy, and for cord blood banking. These programs are based on the standards of the clinical and laboratory professionals of the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT), the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT), and NETCORD. FACT has collaborated with European colleagues in the development of the Joint Accreditation Committee in Europe (jACIE). FACT has published standards documents, a guidance manual, accreditation checklists, and inspection documents; and has trained as inspectors over 300 professionals active in the field. All inspectors have a minimum of 5 years' experience in the area they inspect. Since the incorporation of FACT in 1996, 215 hematopoietic progenitor cell facilities have applied for FACT accreditation. Of these facilities, 113 are fully accredited; the others are in the process of document submission or inspection. Significant opportunities and challenges exist for FACT in the future, including keeping standards and guidance materials current and relevant, recruiting and retaining expert inspectors, and establishing collaborations to develop standards and accreditation systems for new cellular products. The continuing dialogue with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is also important to ensure that they are aware of the accomplishments of voluntary accreditation, and keep FACT membership alerted to FDA intentions for the future. Other potential avenues of communication and cooperation with FDA and other regulatory agencies are being investigated and evaluated. PMID:12944235

  16. Cellular acidosis inhibits assembly, disassembly, and motility of stress granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudinova, E M; Nadezhdina, E S; Ivanov, P A

    2012-11-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are large ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-containing particles that form in cytoplasm in response to a variety of acute changes in the cellular environment. One of the general parameters of the cell environment is pH. In some diseases, as well as in muscle fatigue, tissue acidosis occurs, leading to decrease in intracellular pH. Here we studied whether decrease in pH causes the formation of SGs in cultured animal cells, whether it affects the formation of the SGs under the action of arsenite and, if such effects occur, what are the mechanisms of the influence of acidosis. Acidosis was simulated by decreasing the pH of the culture medium, which acidified the cytoplasm. We found that medium acidification to pH 6.0 in itself did not cause formation of SGs in cells. Moreover, acidification prevented the formation of SGs under treatment with sodium arsenite or sodium arsenite together with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and it inhibited the dissociation of preformed SGs under the influence of cycloheximide. We established that pH decrease did not affect the phosphorylation of eIF2α that occurs under the action of sodium arsenite, and even caused such phosphorylation by itself. We also found that the velocity of SG motion in cytoplasm at acidic pH was very low, and the mobile fraction of SG-incorporated PABP protein revealed by FRAP was decreased. We suppose that acidic pH impairs biochemical processes favoring assembly of RNPs in stress conditions and RNP dissociation on the termination of stress. Thus, in acidosis the reaction of the cellular translation apparatus to stress is modified. PMID:23240565

  17. A cellular automata-based mathematical model for thymocyte development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallan Souza-e-Silva

    Full Text Available Intrathymic T cell development is an important process necessary for the normal formation of cell-mediated immune responses. Importantly, such a process depends on interactions of developing thymocytes with cellular and extracellular elements of the thymic microenvironment. Additionally, it includes a series of oriented and tunely regulated migration events, ultimately allowing mature cells to cross endothelial barriers and leave the organ. Herein we built a cellular automata-based mathematical model for thymocyte migration and development. The rules comprised in this model take into account the main stages of thymocyte development, two-dimensional sections of the normal thymic microenvironmental network, as well as the chemokines involved in intrathymic cell migration. Parameters of our computer simulations with further adjusted to results derived from previous experimental data using sub-lethally irradiated mice, in which thymus recovery can be evaluated. The model fitted with the increasing numbers of each CD4/CD8-defined thymocyte subset. It was further validated since it fitted with the times of permanence experimentally ascertained in each CD4/CD8-defined differentiation stage. Importantly, correlations using the whole mean volume of young normal adult mice revealed that the numbers of cells generated in silico with the mathematical model fall within the range of total thymocyte numbers seen in these animals. Furthermore, simulations made with a human thymic epithelial network using the same mathematical model generated similar profiles for temporal evolution of thymocyte developmental stages. Lastly, we provided in silico evidence that the thymus architecture is important in the thymocyte development, since changes in the epithelial network result in different theoretical profiles for T cell development/migration. This model likely can be used to predict thymocyte evolution following therapeutic strategies designed for recovery of the

  18. Parameter estimation of the WMTD model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ji; QIU Hong-bing

    2009-01-01

    The MTD (mixture transition distribution) model based on Weibull distribution (WMTD model) is proposed in this paper, which is aimed at its parameter estimation. An EM algorithm for estimation is given and shown to work well by some simulations. And bootstrap method is used to obtain confidence regions for the parameters. Finally, the results of a real example--predicting stock prices--show that the WMTD model proposed is able to capture the features of the data from thick-tailed distribution better than GMTD (mixture transition distribution) model.

  19. PARAMETER DESIGN PROPELLER KAPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ridwan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available   Designer propeller kapal harus mempertimbangkan berbagai parameter untuk menghasilkan bentuk, type dan ukuran propeller yang memiliki nilai  efektifitas dan effisiensi propulsi tinggi. Propulsi kapal merupakan faktor yang mendominasi  operasional kapal, karena pemakaian bahan bakar untuk operasional propulsi kapal merupakan 42% dari total cost operasional kapal dan merupakan added value yang akan diperoleh oleh perusahaan pelayaran. Pertimbangan parameter desain propeller argonomis dapat mendukung tujuan di atas sehingga dapat menurunkan pemakaian bahan bakar hingga 20 % saat kapal dioperaionalkan.

  20. Recurrence time statistics of landslide events simulated by a cellular automaton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegari, Ester; Di Maio, Rosa; Avella, Adolfo

    2014-05-01

    The recurrence time statistics of a cellular automaton modelling landslide events is analyzed by performing a numerical analysis in the parameter space and estimating Fano factor behaviors. The model is an extended version of the OFC model, which is a paradigm for SOC in non-conserved systems, but it works differently from the original OFC model as a finite value of the driving rate is applied. By driving the system to instability with different rates, the model exhibits a smooth transition from a correlated to an uncorrelated regime as the effect of a change in predominant mechanisms to propagate instability. If the rate at which instability is approached is small, chain processes dominate the landslide dynamics, and power laws govern probability distributions. However, the power-law regime typical of SOC-like systems is found in a range of return intervals that becomes shorter and shorter by increasing the values of the driving rates. Indeed, if the rates at which instability is approached are large, domino processes are no longer active in propagating instability, and large events simply occur because a large number of cells simultaneously reach instability. Such a gradual loss of the effectiveness of the chain propagation mechanism causes the system gradually enter to an uncorrelated regime where recurrence time distributions are characterized by Weibull behaviors. Simulation results are qualitatively compared with those from a recent analysis performed by Witt et al.(Earth Surf. Process. Landforms, 35, 1138, 2010) for the first complete databases of landslide occurrences over a period as large as fifty years. From the comparison with the extensive landslide data set, the numerical analysis suggests that statistics of such landslide data seem to be described by a crossover region between a correlated regime and an uncorrelated regime, where recurrence time distributions are characterized by power-law and Weibull behaviors for short and long return times

  1. Cellular chromophores and signaling in low level light therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.

    2007-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light (LLLT) for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Originally thought to be a peculiar property of laser light (soft or cold lasers), the subject has now broadened to include photobiomodulation and photobiostimulation using non-coherent light. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. This likely is due to two main reasons; firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. In recent years major advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms that operate at the cellular and tissue levels during LLLT. Mitochondria are thought to be the main site for the initial effects of light and specifically cytochrome c oxidase that has absorption peaks in the red and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum matches the action spectra of LLLT effects. The discovery that cells employ nitric oxide (NO) synthesized in the mitochondria by neuronal nitric oxide synthase, to regulate respiration by competitive binding to the oxygen binding of cytochrome c oxidase, now suggests how LLLT can affect cell metabolism. If LLLT photodissociates inhibitory NO from cytochrome c oxidase, this would explain increased ATP production, modulation of reactive oxygen species, reduction and prevention of apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, increase of blood flow and induction of transcription factors. In

  2. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsky, Brian; Trinh, Brooke; Khammash, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise originating from the inherent random motion of reacting molecules in the living cell. In this noisy environment, clonal cell populations show cell-to-cell variability that can manifest significant phenotypic differences. Noise-induced stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We show that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks. PMID:19888213

  3. Validating Cellular Automata Lava Flow Emplacement Algorithms with Standard Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. A.; Connor, L.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Connor, C.; Gallant, E.

    2015-12-01

    A major existing need in assessing lava flow simulators is a common set of validation benchmark tests. We propose three levels of benchmarks which test model output against increasingly complex standards. First, imulated lava flows should be morphologically identical, given changes in parameter space that should be inconsequential, such as slope direction. Second, lava flows simulated in simple parameter spaces can be tested against analytical solutions or empirical relationships seen in Bingham fluids. For instance, a lava flow simulated on a flat surface should produce a circular outline. Third, lava flows simulated over real world topography can be compared to recent real world lava flows, such as those at Tolbachik, Russia, and Fogo, Cape Verde. Success or failure of emplacement algorithms in these validation benchmarks can be determined using a Bayesian approach, which directly tests the ability of an emplacement algorithm to correctly forecast lava inundation. Here we focus on two posterior metrics, P(A|B) and P(¬A|¬B), which describe the positive and negative predictive value of flow algorithms. This is an improvement on less direct statistics such as model sensitivity and the Jaccard fitness coefficient. We have performed these validation benchmarks on a new, modular lava flow emplacement simulator that we have developed. This simulator, which we call MOLASSES, follows a Cellular Automata (CA) method. The code is developed in several interchangeable modules, which enables quick modification of the distribution algorithm from cell locations to their neighbors. By assessing several different distribution schemes with the benchmark tests, we have improved the performance of MOLASSES to correctly match early stages of the 2012-3 Tolbachik Flow, Kamchakta Russia, to 80%. We also can evaluate model performance given uncertain input parameters using a Monte Carlo setup. This illuminates sensitivity to model uncertainty.

  4. Summary of the DREAM8 Parameter Estimation Challenge: Toward Parameter Identification for Whole-Cell Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Karr

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Whole-cell models that explicitly represent all cellular components at the molecular level have the potential to predict phenotype from genotype. However, even for simple bacteria, whole-cell models will contain thousands of parameters, many of which are poorly characterized or unknown. New algorithms are needed to estimate these parameters and enable researchers to build increasingly comprehensive models. We organized the Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods (DREAM 8 Whole-Cell Parameter Estimation Challenge to develop new parameter estimation algorithms for whole-cell models. We asked participants to identify a subset of parameters of a whole-cell model given the model's structure and in silico "experimental" data. Here we describe the challenge, the best performing methods, and new insights into the identifiability of whole-cell models. We also describe several valuable lessons we learned toward improving future challenges. Going forward, we believe that collaborative efforts supported by inexpensive cloud computing have the potential to solve whole-cell model parameter estimation.

  5. Piezoelectricity and ferroelectricity of cellular polypropylene electrets films characterized by piezoresponse force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular electrets polymer is a new ferroelectret material exhibiting large piezoelectricity and has attracted considerable attentions in researches and industries. Property characterization is very important for this material and current investigations are mostly on macroscopic properties. In this work, we conduct nanoscale piezoelectric and ferroelectric characterizations of cellular polypropylene (PP) films using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). First, both the single-frequency PFM and dual-frequency resonance-tracking PFM testings were conducted on the cellular PP film. The localized piezoelectric constant d33 is estimated to be 7–11pC/N by correcting the resonance magnification with quality factor and it is about one order lower than the macroscopic value. Next, using the switching spectroscopy PFM (SS-PFM), we studied polarization switching behavior of the cellular PP films. Results show that it exhibits the typical ferroelectric-like phase hysteresis loops and butterfly-shaped amplitude loops, which is similar to that of a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) ferroelectric polymer film. However, both the phase and amplitude loops of the PP film are intensively asymmetric, which is thought to be caused by the nonzero remnant polarization after poling. Then, the D-E hysteresis loops of both the cellular PP film and PVDF film were measured by using the same wave form as that used in the SS-PFM, and the results show significant differences. Finally, we suggest that the ferroelectric-like behavior of cellular electrets films should be distinguished from that of typical ferroelectrics, both macroscopically and microscopically

  6. Selection of Parameters in Ball-Spinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maosheng LI; Yongnian YAN; Shihong ZHANG; Dachang KANG

    2004-01-01

    Nowadays, with the development of spinning processes, more and more systematic research about spinning parameters has been published. Based on these results, a routing about how to select spinning parameters has been gradually formed. However, ball spinning, due to its own features plus research lack, is still unclear about its parameter selections. In addition, some manufacture-enterprises only notice the use of this technique whereas ignore the theory creation. The optimal parameters about the ball spinning although have been released from these enterprises but in fact not a helpful theory for other researchers and producers. Focus on selecting the parameters based on the trial-and-error, this article has carried a series of experiments to study the influence on the spinning working course from those parameters, especially the peeling phenomena, and the tube diameter bulging. An optimal graph of the working angle, the axial feeding rate, and the acceptable working course is put forward. Additionally, based on the theory of the minimal reduction rate, the selection of the ball diameter is finally described. Thus, it has given the rules to get the proper parameters in ball spinning.

  7. Cellular contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Cinnamon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular contractility, essential for cell movement and proliferation, is regulated by microtubules, RhoA and actomyosin. The RhoA dependent kinase ROCK ensures the phosphorylation of the regulatory Myosin II Light Chain (MLC Ser19, thereby activating actomyosin contractions. Microtubules are upstream inhibitors of contractility and their depolymerization or depletion cause cells to contract by activating RhoA. How microtubule dynamics regulates RhoA remains, a major missing link in understanding contractility. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed that contractility is inhibited by microtubules not only, as previously reported, in adherent cells, but also in non-adhering interphase and mitotic cells. Strikingly we observed that contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis by a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase. Inhibition of proteolysis, ubiquitination and neddylation all led to complete cessation of contractility and considerably reduced MLC Ser19 phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results imply that cells express a contractility inhibitor that is degraded by ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, either constitutively or in response to microtubule depolymerization. This degradation seems to depend on a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase and is required for cellular contractions.

  8. A new description of cellular quiescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary A Coller

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular quiescence, defined as reversible growth/proliferation arrest, is thought to represent a homogenous state induced by diverse anti-mitogenic signals. We used transcriptional profiling to characterize human diploid fibroblasts that exited the cell cycle after exposure to three independent signals--mitogen withdrawal, contact inhibition, and loss of adhesion. We show here that each signal caused regulation of a unique set of genes known to be important for cessation of growth and division. Therefore, contrary to expectation, cells enter different quiescent states that are determined by the initiating signal. However, underlying this diversity we discovered a set of genes whose specific expression in non-dividing cells was signal-independent, and therefore representative of quiescence per se, rather than the signal that induced it. This fibroblast "quiescence program" contained genes that enforced the non-dividing state, and ensured the reversibility of the cell cycle arrest. We further demonstrate that one mechanism by which the reversibility of quiescence is insured is the suppression of terminal differentiation. Expression of the quiescence program was not simply a downstream consequence of exit from the cell cycle, because key parts, including those involved in suppressing differentiation, were not recapitulated during the cell cycle arrest caused by direct inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These studies form a basis for understanding the normal biology of cellular quiescence.

  9. Huntington's disease: implications of associated cellular radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation sensitivity was studied in a series of Huntington's Disease (HD) patients and controls by measurement of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes and by clonogenic survival of lymphoblastoid cell lines. As a group, HD patients were found to be significantly more radioisensitive than controls (p<0.001), but there was an overlap between values for the two groups such that an absolute distinction is not possible. These data are consistent with an association between HD and radiosensitivity but not with identity between HD and a radiosensitive phenotype, so that cellular radiosensitivity cannot be used for individual diagnosis. Analysis of three families including 5 HD patients and 11 first-degree relatives confirmed this conclusion and demonstrated that even within a given family presymptomatic diagnosis cannot be based on measurement of radiosensitivity. However, the common association of cellular radiosensitivity with HD probands and their families provides a potential lead to the identification of HD gene(s) and so to an eventual understanding of the aetiopathogenesis of this disease at the molecular level. (author)

  10. Impaired nonspecific cellular immunity in experimental cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughneen, P T; Drath, D B; Kulkarni, A D; Rowlands, B J

    1987-11-01

    The abilities of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), to demonstrate chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and superoxide release after bile duct ligation in the rat were investigated to determine the effect of cholestasis on nonspecific cellular immune mechanisms. Chemotactic response to C5a and FMLP, phagocytosis of 14C labeled Staphylococcus aureus, and zymosan-induced superoxide release were evaluated 21 days after bile duct ligation (BDL), sham operation, or in normal controls. Serum total bilirubin level was elevated after BDL (p less than 0.01). Chemotactic ability was similar to each group. PMN phagocytic uptake of 14C labeled Staphylococcus aureus was depressed in BDL (p less than 0.05). BDL rats exhibited impaired PAM phagocytic indices and improved PMN superoxide release (p less than 0.03). PAM superoxide release was similar in each study group. Alterations in phagocytic function with cholestasis are important deficits in nonspecific cellular immunity that may contribute to the high incidence of infective complications associated with obstructive jaundice. PMID:2823730

  11. Early cellular signaling responses to axonal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used optic nerve injury as a model to study early signaling events in neuronal tissue following axonal injury. Optic nerve injury results in the selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. The time course of cell death takes place over a period of days with the earliest detection of RGC death at about 48 hr post injury. We hypothesized that in the period immediately following axonal injury, there are changes in the soma that signal surrounding glia and neurons and that start programmed cell death. In the current study, we investigated early changes in cellular signaling and gene expression that occur within the first 6 hrs post optic nerve injury. Results We found evidence of cell to cell signaling within 30 min of axonal injury. We detected differences in phosphoproteins and gene expression within the 6 hrs time period. Activation of TNFα and glutamate receptors, two pathways that can initiate cell death, begins in RGCs within 6 hrs following axonal injury. Differential gene expression at 6 hrs post injury included genes involved in cytokine, neurotrophic factor signaling (Socs3 and apoptosis (Bax. Conclusion We interpret our studies to indicate that both neurons and glia in the retina have been signaled within 30 min after optic nerve injury. The signals are probably initiated by the RGC soma. In addition, signals activating cellular death pathways occur within 6 hrs of injury, which likely lead to RGC degeneration.

  12. Typhoid fever as cellular microbiological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Dahir Ramos de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge about typhoid fever pathogenesis is growing in the last years, mainly about the cellular and molecular phenomena that are responsible by clinical manifestations of this disease. In this article are discussed several recent discoveries, as follows: a Bacterial type III protein secretion system; b The five virulence genes of Salmonella spp. that encoding Sips (Salmonella invasion protein A, B, C, D and E, which are capable of induce apoptosis in macrophages; c The function of Toll R2 and Toll R4 receptors present in the macrophage surface (discovered in the Drosophila. The Toll family receptors are critical in the signalizing mediated by LPS in macrophages in association with LBP and CD14; d The lines of immune defense between intestinal lumen and internal organs; e The fundamental role of the endothelial cells in the inflammatory deviation from bloodstream into infected tissues by bacteria. In addition to above subjects, the authors comment the correlation between the clinical features of typhoid fever and the cellular and molecular phenomena of this disease, as well as the therapeutic consequences of this knowledge.

  13. Typhoid fever as cellular microbiological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Dahir Ramos; de Andrade Júnior, Dahir Ramos

    2003-01-01

    The knowledge about typhoid fever pathogenesis is growing in the last years, mainly about the cellular and molecular phenomena that are responsible by clinical manifestations of this disease. In this article are discussed several recent discoveries, as follows: a) Bacterial type III protein secretion system; b) The five virulence genes of Salmonella spp. that encoding Sips (Salmonella invasion protein) A, B, C, D and E, which are capable of induce apoptosis in macrophages; c) The function of Toll R2 and Toll R4 receptors present in the macrophage surface (discovered in the Drosophila). The Toll family receptors are critical in the signalizing mediated by LPS in macrophages in association with LBP and CD14; d) The lines of immune defense between intestinal lumen and internal organs; e) The fundamental role of the endothelial cells in the inflammatory deviation from bloodstream into infected tissues by bacteria. In addition to above subjects, the authors comment the correlation between the clinical features of typhoid fever and the cellular and molecular phenomena of this disease, as well as the therapeutic consequences of this knowledge. PMID:14502344

  14. Cellular Auxin Homeostasis:Gatekeeping Is Housekeeping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michel Ruiz Rosquete; Elke Barbez; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn

    2012-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is essential for plant development and contributes to nearly every aspect of the plant life cycle.The spatio-temporal distribution of auxin depends on a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and cell-to-cell auxin transport.Auxin metabolism and transport are both crucial for plant development;however,it largely remains to be seen how these processes are integrated to ensure defined cellular auxin levels or even gradients within tissues or organs.In this review,we provide a glance at very diverse topics of auxin biology,such as biosynthesis,conjugation,oxidation,and transport of auxin.This broad,but certainly superficial,overview highlights the mutual importance of auxin metabolism and transport.Moreover,it allows pinpointing how auxin metabolism and transport get integrated to jointly regulate cellular auxin homeostasis.Even though these processes have been so far only separately studied,we assume that the phytohormonal crosstalk integrates and coordinates auxin metabolism and transport.Besides the integrative power of the global hormone signaling,we additionally introduce the hypothetical concept considering auxin transport components as gatekeepers for auxin responses.

  15. Cellular Prion Protein: From Physiology to Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Kikuchi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular prion protein (PrPC is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored membrane glycoprotein with two N-glycosylation sites at residues 181 and 197. This protein migrates in several bands by Western blot analysis (WB. Interestingly, PNGase F treatment of human brain homogenates prior to the WB, which is known to remove the N-glycosylations, unexpectedly gives rise to two dominant bands, which are now known as C-terminal (C1 and N-terminal (N1 fragments. This resembles the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP in Alzheimer disease (AD, which can be physiologically processed by α-, β-, and γ-secretases. The processing of APP has been extensively studied, while the identity of the cellular proteases involved in the proteolysis of PrPC and their possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the neurotoxicity caused by prion proteins and the blockade of their normal proteolysis. For example, expression of non-cleavable PrPC mutants in transgenic mice generates neurotoxicity, even in the absence of infectious prions, suggesting that PrPC proteolysis is physiologically and pathologically important. As many mouse models of prion diseases have recently been developed and the knowledge about the proteases responsible for the PrPC proteolysis is accumulating, we examine the historical experimental evidence and highlight recent studies that shed new light on this issue.

  16. Cellular factors implicated in filovirus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Hope, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Although filoviral infections are still occurring in different parts of the world, there are no effective preventive or treatment strategies currently available against them. Not only do filoviruses cause a deadly infection, but they also have the potential of being used as biological weapons. This makes it imperative to comprehensively study these viruses in order to devise effective strategies to prevent the occurrence of these infections. Entry is the foremost step in the filoviral replication cycle and different studies have reported the involvement of a myriad of cellular factors including plasma membrane components, cytoskeletal proteins, endosomal components, and cytosolic factors in this process. Signaling molecules such as the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases comprising of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer have also been implicated as putative entry factors. Additionally, filoviruses are suggested to bind to a common receptor and recent studies have proposed T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) as potential receptor candidates. This paper summarizes the existing literature on filoviral entry with a special focus on cellular factors involved in this process and also highlights some fundamental questions. Future research aimed at answering these questions could be very useful in designing novel antiviral therapeutics. PMID:23365575

  17. Cellular Factors Implicated in Filovirus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchita Bhattacharyya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although filoviral infections are still occurring in different parts of the world, there are no effective preventive or treatment strategies currently available against them. Not only do filoviruses cause a deadly infection, but they also have the potential of being used as biological weapons. This makes it imperative to comprehensively study these viruses in order to devise effective strategies to prevent the occurrence of these infections. Entry is the foremost step in the filoviral replication cycle and different studies have reported the involvement of a myriad of cellular factors including plasma membrane components, cytoskeletal proteins, endosomal components, and cytosolic factors in this process. Signaling molecules such as the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases comprising of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer have also been implicated as putative entry factors. Additionally, filoviruses are suggested to bind to a common receptor and recent studies have proposed T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1 and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1 as potential receptor candidates. This paper summarizes the existing literature on filoviral entry with a special focus on cellular factors involved in this process and also highlights some fundamental questions. Future research aimed at answering these questions could be very useful in designing novel antiviral therapeutics.

  18. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

    2007-10-01

    /storage/transportation equipment and the processor would build and operate the plant. Pilot fermentation studies demonstrated dramatic improvements in yields and rates with optimization of batch fermentor parameters. Demonstrated yields and rates are approaching those necessary for profitable commercial operation for production of ethanol or lactic acid. The ability of the biocatalyst to adapt to biomass hydrolysate (both biomass sugars and toxins in the hydrolysate) was demonstrated and points towards ultimate successful commercialization of the technology. However, some of this work will need to be repeated and possibly extended to adapt the final selected biocatalyst for the specific commercial hydrolysate composition. The path from corn stover in the farm field to final products, involves a number of steps. Each of these steps has options, problems, and uncertainties; thus creating a very complex multidimensional obstacle to successful commercial development. Through the tasks of this project, the technical and commercial uncertainties of many of these steps have been addressed; thus providing for a clearer understanding of paths forward and commercial viability of a corn stover-based biorefinery.

  19. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    /storage/transportation equipment and the processor would build and operate the plant. Pilot fermentation studies demonstrated dramatic improvements in yields and rates with optimization of batch fermentor parameters. Demonstrated yields and rates are approaching those necessary for profitable commercial operation for production of ethanol or lactic acid. The ability of the biocatalyst to adapt to biomass hydrolysate (both biomass sugars and toxins in the hydrolysate) was demonstrated and points towards ultimate successful commercialization of the technology. However, some of this work will need to be repeated and possibly extended to adapt the final selected biocatalyst for the specific commercial hydrolysate composition. The path from corn stover in the farm field to final products, involves a number of steps. Each of these steps has options, problems, and uncertainties; thus creating a very complex multidimensional obstacle to successful commercial development. Through the tasks of this project, the technical and commercial uncertainties of many of these steps have been addressed; thus providing for a clearer understanding of paths forward and commercial viability of a corn stover-based biorefinery

  20. The Cosmological Parameters 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Lahav, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    This is a review article for The Review of Particle Physics 2014 (aka the Particle Data Book). It forms a compact review of knowledge of the cosmological parameters at the beginning of 2014. Topics included are Parametrizing the Universe; Extensions to the standard model; Probes; Bringing observations together; Outlook for the future.