WorldWideScience

Sample records for cellular migratory regulator

  1. Control of intestinal promoter activity of the cellular migratory regulator gene ELMO3 by CDX2 and SP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Boyd, Mette; Olsen, Jørgen;

    2010-01-01

    migration. However, no information is available about the transcriptional regulation of the ELMO3 gene. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of CDX2 in the regulation of the ELMO3 promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that CDX2 bound to conserved CDX2...... sequences and mutations of the CDX2-binding sites, significantly reduced the promoter activity. Reporter gene assays demonstrated that the region mediating ELMO3 basal transcriptional activity to be located between -270 and -31 bp. Sequence analysis revealed no typical TATA-box, but four GC-rich sequences......An important aspect of the cellular differentiation in the intestine is the migration of epithelial cells from the crypt to the villus tip. As homeodomaine transcription factor CDX2 has been suggested to influence cell migration, we performed a genome-wide promoter analysis for CDX2 binding...

  2. 75 FR 3888 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... Register on November 20, 2009 (74 FR 60228), to propose migratory bird subsistence harvest regulations in... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 RIN 1018-AW67 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2010 Season AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...

  3. 78 FR 3446 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting AGENCY: Fish... issues concerning the 2013-14 migratory bird hunting regulations. DATES: The meeting will be held..., Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior,...

  4. 78 FR 78377 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service RIN 1018-AZ80 Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting... preliminary issues concerning the 2014-15 migratory bird hunting regulations. DATES: The meeting will be held..., Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior,...

  5. 77 FR 1718 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting AGENCY: Fish... issues concerning the 2012-13 migratory bird hunting regulations. DATES: The meeting will be held... CONTACT: Chief, Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of...

  6. 77 FR 17353 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... FR 68264) a proposed rule that provided our proposed migratory bird subsistence harvest regulations... Federal Register a proposed rule (76 FR 68264) to establish spring and summer migratory bird subsistence... Register on August 16, 2002 (67 FR 53511) and most recently on March 29, 2011 (76 FR 17353). Recent...

  7. 75 FR 29917 - Migratory Bird Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Migratory Bird Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... FR 61123) to establish regulations for the issuance of permits to rehabilitate migratory birds in the... Relations with Native American Tribal Governments'' (59 FR 22951), Executive Order 13175, and 512 DM 2, we... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AX09 Migratory Bird Permits; Changes in...

  8. 75 FR 53773 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ..., 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 47682), we proposed special migratory bird hunting regulations for the..., Federal Register (50 FR 23467). The guidelines respond to Tribal requests for Service recognition of their... the May 13, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 27144), we requested that Tribes desiring special...

  9. 78 FR 53217 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... Register (78 FR 47136), we proposed special migratory bird hunting regulations for the 2013-14 hunting... (50 FR 23467). The guidelines respond to tribal requests for Service recognition of their reserved... the April 9, 2013, Federal Register (78 FR 21200), we requested that tribes desiring special...

  10. 77 FR 54451 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ..., 2012, Federal Register (77 FR 49680), we proposed special migratory bird hunting regulations for the..., Federal Register (50 FR 23467). The guidelines respond to tribal requests for Service recognition of their... the April 17, 2012, Federal Register (77 FR 23094), we requested that tribes desiring special...

  11. 76 FR 54675 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... Register (76 FR 48694), we proposed special migratory bird hunting regulations for the 2011-12 hunting... (50 FR 23467). The guidelines respond to tribal requests for Service recognition of their reserved... the April 8, 2011, Federal Register (76 FR 19876), we requested that tribes desiring special...

  12. 75 FR 47681 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... Register (50 FR 23467). In this supplemental proposed rule, we propose special migratory bird hunting... Service, (703) 358-1714. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the May 13, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 27144... regulations were published in the Federal Register on July 29, 2010 (75 FR 44856); early-season...

  13. 76 FR 39368 - Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... migratory bird abatement permit. On January 12, 2007, we published a Federal Register notice (72 FR 1556..., we published a Federal Register notice (72 FR 69705-69706) announcing final permit conditions. This... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AW75 Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement...

  14. 76 FR 68263 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... migratory birds in Alaska in a proposed rule published in the Federal Register on April 8, 2011 (76 FR 19876..., and a history, was originally addressed in the Federal Register on August 16, 2002 (67 FR 53511) and most recently on March 29, 2011 (76 FR 17353). Recent Federal Register documents, which are all...

  15. 78 FR 52337 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Frameworks for Late-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... environmental impact assessment on migratory bird hunting. On May 31, 2013 (78 FR 32686), we published a notice... the Federal Register (78 FR 21200) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a... published in the Federal Register (78 FR 35844) a second document providing supplemental proposals for...

  16. 76 FR 36508 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... (76 FR 19876) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a background and overview of..., proposed rule (76 FR 19876): National Environmental Policy Act; Endangered Species Act; Regulatory... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 RIN 1018-AX34 Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental...

  17. 78 FR 21199 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2013-14 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ... June 4, 1985, Federal Register (50 FR 23467) to establish special migratory game bird hunting... Register (55 FR 9618). Regulatory Schedule for 2013-14 This document is the first in a series of proposed... season by indigenous inhabitants. On August 16, 2002, we published in the Federal Register (67 FR...

  18. 77 FR 58443 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Late-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... Register (77 FR 49868) the proposed frameworks for the 2012-13 late-season migratory bird hunting... Schedule for 2012 On April 17, 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 23094) a proposal to amend..., 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 29516) a second document providing...

  19. 76 FR 58681 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Late-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... the Federal Register (76 FR 53536) the proposed frameworks for the 2011-12 late-season migratory bird... Schedule for 2011 On April 8, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 19876) a proposal to amend..., 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 36508) a second document providing...

  20. 78 FR 11988 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... published in the Federal Register (77 FR 58732) a proposed rule that provided our proposed migratory bird... Federal Register on August 16, 2002 (67 FR 53511) and most recently on March 26, 2012 (77 FR 17353... (77 FR 23094), to amend 50 CFR part 20. While that proposed rule dealt primarily with the...

  1. 75 FR 58249 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Late-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... in the Federal Register (75 FR 27144) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a... FR 32872) a second document providing supplemental proposals for early- and late-season migratory... in the Federal Register (75 FR 44856) a third document specifically dealing with the...

  2. 78 FR 58123 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Late-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... environmental impact assessment on migratory bird hunting. On May 31, 2013 (78 FR 32686), we published a notice... Schedule for 2013 On April 9, 2013, we published in the Federal Register (78 FR 21200) a proposal to amend... incomplete. On June 14, 2013, we published in the Federal Register (78 FR 35844) a second document...

  3. 77 FR 58731 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... migratory birds in Alaska in a proposed rule published in the Federal Register on April 17, 2012, (77 FR..., and a history, was originally addressed in the Federal Register on August 16, 2002 (67 FR 53511) and most recently on March 26, 2012 (77 FR 17353). Recent Federal Register documents, which are...

  4. 76 FR 53535 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Frameworks for Late-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ... the migratory bird hunting program (see NEPA Considerations in the April 8, 2011, proposed rule (76 FR... the Federal Register (76 FR 19876) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a... published in the Federal Register (76 FR 36508) a second document providing supplemental proposals for...

  5. 50 CFR 92.12 - Relationship to the process for developing national hunting regulations for migratory game birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... national hunting regulations for migratory game birds. 92.12 Section 92.12 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED... developing national hunting regulations for migratory game birds. (a) Flyway councils. (1) Proposed annual... published in the Federal Register for public review and comment, similar to the annual migratory game...

  6. 76 FR 67650 - Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... for a specific permit authorizing the use of raptors in abatement activities (76 FR 39368). The... the advance notice of proposed rulemaking, please refer to that document at 76 FR 39368 (July 6, 2011... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AW75 Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement...

  7. Cellular regulation by protein phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Edmond H

    2013-01-11

    A historical account of the discovery of reversible protein phosphorylation is presented. This process was uncovered in the mid 1950s in a study undertaken with Edwin G. Krebs to elucidate the complex hormonal regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase. Contrary to the known activation of this enzyme by AMP which serves as an allosteric effector, its hormonal regulation results from a phosphorylation of the protein by phosphorylase kinase following the activation of the latter by Ca(2+) and ATP. The study led to the establishment of the first hormonal cascade of successive enzymatic reactions, kinases acting on kinases, initiated by cAMP discovered by Earl Sutherland. It also showed how two different physiological processes, carbohydrate metabolism and muscle contraction, could be regulated in concert.

  8. 76 FR 59298 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ..., purchased, shipped, carried, exported, or transported. In the August 8, 2011, Federal Register (76 FR 48694... Indian tribes, under the guidelines described in the June 4, 1985, Federal Register (50 FR 23467). The..., Federal Register (76 FR 19876), we requested that tribes desiring special hunting regulations in the...

  9. 75 FR 59041 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ..., carried, exported, or transported. In the August 6, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 47682), we proposed... the guidelines described in the June 4, 1985, Federal Register (50 FR 23467). The guidelines respond..., Federal Register (75 FR 27144), we requested that tribes desiring special hunting regulations in the...

  10. 77 FR 58657 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ..., carried, exported, or transported. In the August 16, 2012, Federal Register (77 FR 49680), we proposed... the guidelines described in the June 4, 1985, Federal Register (50 FR 23467). The guidelines respond..., Federal Register (77 FR 23094), we requested that tribes desiring special hunting regulations in the...

  11. 75 FR 52873 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ...: Regulations Schedule for 2010 On May 13, 2010, we published in the Federal Register (75 FR 27144) a proposal... discontinuous or appear incomplete. On June 10, 2010, we published in the Federal Register (75 FR 32872) a... Register (75 FR 44856) a third document specifically dealing with the proposed frameworks for...

  12. 78 FR 58233 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ..., purchased, shipped, carried, exported, or transported. In the August 2, 2013, Federal Register (78 FR 47136... Indian tribes, under the guidelines described in the June 4, 1985, Federal Register (50 FR 23467). The..., Federal Register (78 FR 21200), we requested that tribes desiring special hunting regulations in the...

  13. 76 FR 48693 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the April 8, 2011, Federal Register (76 FR 19376), we requested proposals from... season, under the guidelines described in the June 4, 1985, Federal Register (50 FR 23467). In this... proposal are discussed in the proposed frameworks for early-season regulations (76 FR 44730; July 26,...

  14. 75 FR 3395 - Migratory Bird Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Falconry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Parts 21 and 22 RIN 1018-AW44 Migratory Bird Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Falconry Correction In rule document 2010-12 beginning on page 927 in the issue...

  15. Lymphatic Regulation of Cellular Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels play vital roles in immune surveillance and immune regulation by conveying antigen loaded dendritic cells, memory T cells, macrophages and neutrophils from the peripheral tissues to draining lymph nodes where they initiate as well as modify immune responses. Until relatively recently however, there was little understanding of how entry and migration through lymphatic vessels is organized or the specific molecular mechanisms that might be involved. Within the last decade, the situation has been transformed by an explosion of knowledge generated largely through the application of microscopic imaging, transgenic animals, specific markers and function blocking mAbs that is beginning to provide a rational conceptual framework. This article provides a critical review of the recent literature, highlighting seminal discoveries that have revealed the fascinating ultrastructure of leucocyte entry sites in lymphatic vessels, as well as generating controversies over the involvement of integrin adhesion, chemotactic and haptotactic mechanisms in DC entry under normal and inflamed conditions. It also discusses the major changes in lymphatic architecture that occur during inflammation and the different modes of leucocyte entry and trafficking within inflamed lymphatic vessels, as well as presenting a timely update on the likely role of hyaluronan and the major lymphatic endothelial hyaluronan receptor LYVE-1 in leucocyte transit.

  16. Klotho-Dependent Cellular Transport Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopjani, M; Dërmaku-Sopjani, M

    2016-01-01

    Klotho is a transmembrane protein that in humans is encoded by the hKL gene. This protein is known to have aging suppressor effects and is predominantly expressed in the distal convoluted tubule of the kidney, parathyroid glands, and choroid plexus of the brain. The Klotho protein exists in both full-length membrane form and a soluble secreted form, which exerts numerous distinct functions. The extracellular domain of Klotho can be enzymatically cleaved off and released into the systemic circulation where it functions as β-glucuronidase and a hormone. Soluble Klotho is a multifunction protein present in the biological fluids including blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid of mammals. Klotho deficiency leads to multiple organ failure accompanied by early appearance of multiple age-related disorders and early death, whereas overexpression of Klotho results in the opposite effects. Klotho, an enzyme and hormone, has been reported to participate in the regulation of cellular transport processes across the plasma membrane either indirectly through inhibiting calcitriol (1,25(OH)2D3) formation or other mechanism, or by directly affecting transporter proteins, including ion channels, cellular carriers, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Accordingly, Klotho protein serves as a powerful regulator of cellular transport across the plasma membrane. Importantly, Klotho-dependent cellular transport regulation implies stimulatory or inhibitory effects. Klotho has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of multiple calcium and potassium ion channels, and various cellular carriers including the Na(+)-coupled cotransporters such as NaPi-IIa, NaPi-IIb, EAAT3, and EAAT4, CreaT1 as well as Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. These regulations are parts of the antiaging function of Klotho, which will be discussing throughout this chapter. Clearly, further experimental efforts are required to investigate the effect of Klotho on other transport proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms by which Klotho

  17. Juvenile hormone regulation of longevity in the migratory monarch butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, W S; Tatar, M

    2001-12-22

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) of eastern North America are well known for their long-range migration to overwintering roosts in south-central Mexico. An essential feature of this migration involves the exceptional longevity of the migrant adults; individuals persist from August/September to March while their summer counterparts are likely to live less than two months as adults. Migrant adults persist during a state of reproductive diapause in which both male and female reproductive development is arrested as a consequence of suppressed synthesis of juvenile hormone. Here, we describe survival in monarch butterflies as a function of the migrant syndrome. We show that migrant adults are longer lived than summer adults when each are maintained under standard laboratory conditions, that the longevity of migrant adults is curtailed by treatment with juvenile hormone and that the longevity of summer adults is increased by 100% when juvenile hormone synthesis is prevented by surgical removal of its source, the corpora allatum. Thus, monarch butterfly persistence through a long winter season is ensured in part by reduced ageing that is under endocrine regulation, as well as by the unique environmental properties of their winter roost sites. Phenotypic plasticity for ageing is an integral component of the monarch butterflies' migration-diapause syndrome. PMID:11749703

  18. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  19. 76 FR 39367 - Migratory Bird Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Raptor Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AX78 Migratory Bird Permits; Changes in the... primary responsibility for managing migratory birds. Our authority is based on the Migratory Bird Treaty... take and possession of migratory birds for many purposes. The BGEPA allows bald eagles and...

  20. Empirical multiscale networks of cellular regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin de Bivort

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Grouping genes by similarity of expression across multiple cellular conditions enables the identification of cellular modules. The known functions of genes enable the characterization of the aggregate biological functions of these modules. In this paper, we use a high-throughput approach to identify the effective mutual regulatory interactions between modules composed of mouse genes from the Alliance for Cell Signaling (AfCS murine B-lymphocyte database which tracks the response of approximately 15,000 genes following chemokine perturbation. This analysis reveals principles of cellular organization that we discuss along four conceptual axes. (1 Regulatory implications: the derived collection of influences between any two modules quantifies intuitive as well as unexpected regulatory interactions. (2 Behavior across scales: trends across global networks of varying resolution (composed of various numbers of modules reveal principles of assembly of high-level behaviors from smaller components. (3 Temporal behavior: tracking the mutual module influences over different time intervals provides features of regulation dynamics such as duration, persistence, and periodicity. (4 Gene Ontology correspondence: the association of modules to known biological roles of individual genes describes the organization of functions within coexpressed modules of various sizes. We present key specific results in each of these four areas, as well as derive general principles of cellular organization. At the coarsest scale, the entire transcriptional network contains five divisions: two divisions devoted to ATP production/biosynthesis and DNA replication that activate all other divisions, an "extracellular interaction" division that represses all other divisions, and two divisions (proliferation/differentiation and membrane infrastructure that activate and repress other divisions in specific ways consistent with cell cycle control.

  1. Conceptual bases of the government regulation migratory processes on base macroeconomic forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Shcherbachenko

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In article authors specify essence of migration and migration consequences, factors, which influence migratory processes in Ukraine and behind its limits are investigated. Theoretic-methodological approaches to macroeconomic forecasting of migratory streams are improved. It is developed recommendations about carrying out of a migratory policy of the state.

  2. Apoptotic regulation of epithelial cellular extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    De Andrade, Daniel,; Rosenblatt, Jody

    2011-01-01

    Cellular extrusion is a mechanism that removes dying cells from epithelial tissues to prevent compromising their barrier function. Extrusion occurs in all observed epithelia in vivo and can be modeled in vitro by inducing apoptosis in cultured epithelial monolayers. We established that actin and myosin form a ring that contracts in the surrounding cells that drives cellular extrusion. It is not clear, however, if all apoptotic pathways lead to extrusion and how apoptosis and extrusion are mol...

  3. Activation and Regulation of Cellular Eicosanoid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Brock

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing appreciation for the wide variety of physiological responses that are regulated by lipid messengers. One particular group of lipid messengers, the eicosanoids, plays a central role in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in a receptor-mediated fashion. These mediators are related in that they are all derived from one polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid. However, the various eicosanoids are synthesized by a wide variety of cell types by distinct enzymatic pathways, and have diverse roles in immunity and inflammation. In this review, the major pathways involved in the synthesis of eicosanoids, as well as key points of regulation, are presented.

  4. Cellular regulation of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    -membrane spanning protein Tac, thereby creating an extracellular antibody epitope. Upon expression in HEK293 cells this TacDAT fusion protein displayed functional properties similar to the wild type transporter. In an ELISA based internalization assay, TacDAT intracellular accumulation was increased by inhibitors......The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft and is a target for widely abused psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Nonetheless, little is known about the cellular distribution and trafficking of natively expressed DAT. DAT and its trafficking...... to natively expressed transporter, DAT was visualized directly in cultured DA neurons using the fluorescent cocaine analog JHC 1-64. These data showed pronounced colocalization upon constitutive internalization with Lysotracker, a late endosomal/lysosomal marker; however only little cololization was observed...

  5. How substrate rigidity regulates the cellular motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Mechanical stiffness of bio-adhesive substrates has been recognized as a major regulator of cell motility. We present a simple physical model to study the crawling locomotion of a contractile cell on a soft elastic substrate. The mechanism of rigidity sensing is accounted for using Schwarz's two spring model (Schwarz et al. (2006) BioSystems 83, 225-232). The predicted dependency between the speed of motility and substrate stiffness is qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. The model demonstrates that the rigidity dependent motility of cells is rooted in the regulation of actomyosin contractile forces by substrate deformation at each anchorage point. On stiffer substrates, the traction forces required for cell translocation acquire larger magnitude but show weaker asymmetry which leads to slower cell motility. On very soft substrates, the model predicts a biphasic relationship between the substrate rigidity and the speed of locomotion, over a narrow stiffness range, which has been observed experimentally for some cell types.

  6. Regulation of autophagy in oxygen-dependent cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by supraphysiological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), can cause cellular injury associated with protein and lipid oxidation, DNA damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The cellular responses triggered by oxidative stress include the altered regulation of signaling pathways that culminate in the regulation of cell survival or cell death pathways. Recent studies suggest that autophagy, a cellular homeostatic process that governs the turnover of damaged organelles and proteins, may represent a general cellular and tissue response to oxidative stress. The autophagic pathway involves the encapsulation of substrates in double-membraned vesicles, which are subsequently delivered to the lysosome for enzymatic degradation and recycling of metabolic precursors. Autophagy may play multifunctional roles in cellular adaptation to stress, by maintaining mitochondrial integrity, and removing damaged proteins. Additionally, autophagy may play important roles in the regulation of inflammation and immune function. Modulation of the autophagic pathway has been reported in cell culture models of oxidative stress, including altered states of oxygen tension (i.e., hypoxia, hyperoxia), and exposure to oxidants. Furthermore, proteins that regulate autophagy may be subject to redox regulation. The heme oxygenase- 1 (HO)-1 enzyme system may have a role in the regulation of autophagy. Recent studies suggest that carbon monoxide (CO), a reaction product of HO activity which can alter mitochondrial function, may induce autophagy in cultured epithelial cells. In conclusion, current research suggests a central role for autophagy as a mammalian oxidative stress response and its interrelationship to other stress defense systems. PMID:23092322

  7. Cellular pressure and volume regulation and implications for cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Sun, Sean X

    2013-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, small changes in cell volume can serve as important signals for cell proliferation, death, and migration. Volume and shape regulation also directly impacts the mechanics of cells and tissues. Here, we develop a mathematical model of cellular volume and pressure regulation, incorporating essential elements such as water permeation, mechanosensitive channels, active ion pumps, and active stresses in the cortex. The model can fully explain recent experimental data, and it predicts cellular volume and pressure for several models of cell cortical mechanics. Moreover, we show that when cells are subjected to an externally applied load, such as in an atomic force microscopy indentation experiment, active regulation of volume and pressure leads to a complex cellular response. Instead of the passive mechanics of the cortex, the observed cell stiffness depends on several factors working together. This provides a mathematical explanation of rate-dependent response of cells under force. PMID:23931309

  8. Piezo proteins: regulators of mechanosensation and other cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Gracheva, Elena O; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2014-11-14

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular development, volume regulation, cellular migration, proliferation, and elongation. Mutations in human Piezo proteins have been associated with a variety of disorders including hereditary xerocytosis and several syndromes with muscular contracture as a prominent feature.

  9. 78 FR 65953 - Migratory Bird Permits; Removal of Regulations Concerning Certain Depredation Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... 21.42 and 21.45, see 39 FR 1157, January 4, 1974; for 50 CFR 21.46, see 39 FR 31325, August 28, 1974...-Government Relations with Native American Tribal Governments'' (59 FR 22951), Executive Order 13175, and 512... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AX92 Migratory Bird Permits; Removal of...

  10. tRNA modifications regulate translation during cellular stress

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Chen; Thomas J Begley; Peter C. Dedon

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in response to stress is an essential cellular protection mechanism. Recent advances in tRNA modification analysis and genome-based codon bias analytics have facilitated studies that lead to a novel model for translational control, with translation elongation dynamically regulated during stress responses. Stress-induced increases in specific anticodon wobble bases are required for the optimal translation of stress response transcripts that are significantly b...

  11. Cellular Pressure and Volume Regulation and Implications for Cell Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Sun, Sean X.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, small changes in cell volume can serve as important signals for cell proliferation, death, and migration. Volume and shape regulation also directly impacts the mechanics of cells and tissues. Here, we develop a mathematical model of cellular volume and pressure regulation, incorporating essential elements such as water permeation, mechanosensitive channels, active ion pumps, and active stresses in the cortex. The model can fully explain recent experimental data, and it pr...

  12. Regulation of ARE-mRNA Stability by Cellular Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Lykke-Andersen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    but as a response to different cellular cues they can become either stabilized, allowing expression of a given gene, or further destabilized to silence their expression. These tightly regulated mRNAs include many that encode growth factors, proto-oncogenes, cytokines, and cell cycle regulators. Failure to properly......During recent years, it has become clear that regulation of mRNA stability is an important event in the control of gene expression. The stability of a large class of mammalian mRNAs is regulated by AU-rich elements (AREs) located in the mRNA 3′ UTRs. mRNAs with AREs are inherently labile...... regulate their stability can therefore lead to uncontrolled expression of factors associated with cell proliferation and has been implicated in several human cancers. A number of transfactors that recognize AREs and regulate the translation and degradation of ARE-mRNAs have been identified...

  13. Cellular regulation of the structure and function of aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail El-Hamamsy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic valve was long considered a passive structure that opens and closes in response to changes in transvalvular pressure. Recent evidence suggests that the aortic valve performs highly sophisticated functions as a result of its unique microscopic structure. These functions allow it to adapt to its hemodynamic and mechanical environment. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in normal valve physiology is essential to elucidate the mechanisms behind valve disease. We here review the structure and developmental biology of aortic valves; we examine the role of its cellular parts in regulating its function and describe potential pathophysiological and clinical implications.

  14. The late stage of autophagy: cellular events and molecular regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Jingjing; Yan, Xianghua; Yu, Li

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that delivers cytoplasmic contents to the lysosome for degradation. It is a “self-eating” process and plays a “house-cleaner” role in cells. The complex process consists of several sequential steps—induction, autophagosome formation, fusion of lysosome and autophagosome, degradation, efflux transportation of degradation products, and autophagic lysosome reformation. In this review, the cellular and molecular regulations of late stage of autopha...

  15. Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Kevin A; Hansen, Louise L; Putker, Marrit; Olivares-Yañez, Consuelo; Day, Jason; Eades, Lorna J; Larrondo, Luis F; Hoyle, Nathaniel P; O'Neill, John S; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2016-04-21

    Circadian clocks are fundamental to the biology of most eukaryotes, coordinating behaviour and physiology to resonate with the environmental cycle of day and night through complex networks of clock-controlled genes. A fundamental knowledge gap exists, however, between circadian gene expression cycles and the biochemical mechanisms that ultimately facilitate circadian regulation of cell biology. Here we report circadian rhythms in the intracellular concentration of magnesium ions, [Mg(2+)]i, which act as a cell-autonomous timekeeping component to determine key clock properties both in a human cell line and in a unicellular alga that diverged from each other more than 1 billion years ago. Given the essential role of Mg(2+) as a cofactor for ATP, a functional consequence of [Mg(2+)]i oscillations is dynamic regulation of cellular energy expenditure over the daily cycle. Mechanistically, we find that these rhythms provide bilateral feedback linking rhythmic metabolism to clock-controlled gene expression. The global regulation of nucleotide triphosphate turnover by intracellular Mg(2+) availability has potential to impact upon many of the cell's more than 600 MgATP-dependent enzymes and every cellular system where MgNTP hydrolysis becomes rate limiting. Indeed, we find that circadian control of translation by mTOR is regulated through [Mg(2+)]i oscillations. It will now be important to identify which additional biological processes are subject to this form of regulation in tissues of multicellular organisms such as plants and humans, in the context of health and disease.

  16. Cellular Functions Regulated by Phosphorylation of EGFR on Tyr845

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Sato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Src gene product (Src and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR are prototypes of oncogene products and function primarily as a cytoplasmic non-receptor tyrosine kinase and a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, respectively. The identification of Src and EGFR, and the subsequent extensive investigations of these proteins have long provided cutting edge research in cancer and other molecular and cellular biological studies. In 1995, we reported that the human epidermoid carcinoma cells, A431, contain a small fraction of Src and EGFR in which these two kinase were in physical association with each other, and that Src phosphorylates EGFR on tyrosine 845 (Y845 in the Src-EGFR complex. Y845 of EGFR is located in the activation segment of the kinase domain, where many protein kinases contain kinase-activating autophosphorylation sites (e.g., cAMP-dependent protein kinase, Src family kinases, transmembrane receptor type tyrosine kinases or trans-phosphorylation sites (e.g., cyclin-dependent protein kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Akt protein kinase. A number of studies have demonstrated that Y845 phosphorylation serves an important role in cancer as well as normal cells. Here we compile the experimental facts involving Src phosphorylation of EGFR on Y845, by which cell proliferation, cell cycle control, mitochondrial regulation of cell metabolism, gamete activation and other cellular functions are regulated. We also discuss the physiological relevance, as well as structural insights of the Y845 phosphorylation.

  17. Cellular manganese content is developmentally regulated in human dopaminergic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kevin K.; Lowe, Edward W., Jr.; Aboud, Asad A.; Neely, M. Diana; Redha, Rey; Bauer, Joshua A.; Odak, Mihir; Weaver, C. David; Meiler, Jens; Aschner, Michael; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is both an essential biological cofactor and neurotoxicant. Disruption of Mn biology in the basal ganglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as parkinsonism and Huntington's disease. Handling of other essential metals (e.g. iron and zinc) occurs via complex intracellular signaling networks that link metal detection and transport systems. However, beyond several non-selective transporters, little is known about the intracellular processes regulating neuronal Mn homeostasis. We hypothesized that small molecules that modulate intracellular Mn could provide insight into cell-level Mn regulatory mechanisms. We performed a high throughput screen of 40,167 small molecules for modifiers of cellular Mn content in a mouse striatal neuron cell line. Following stringent validation assays and chemical informatics, we obtained a chemical `toolbox' of 41 small molecules with diverse structure-activity relationships that can alter intracellular Mn levels under biologically relevant Mn exposures. We utilized this toolbox to test for differential regulation of Mn handling in human floor-plate lineage dopaminergic neurons, a lineage especially vulnerable to environmental Mn exposure. We report differential Mn accumulation between developmental stages and stage-specific differences in the Mn-altering activity of individual small molecules. This work demonstrates cell-level regulation of Mn content across neuronal differentiation.

  18. ATM-mediated Snail Serine 100 phosphorylation regulates cellular radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Activation of the DNA damage responsive protein kinase ATM is a critical step for cellular survival in response to ionizing irradiation (IR). Direct targets of ATM regulating radiosensitivity remain to be fully investigated. We have recently reported that ATM phosphorylates the transcriptional repressor Snail on Serine 100. We aimed to further study the functional significance of ATM-mediated Snail phosphorylation in response to IR. Material and methods: We transfected vector-only, wild-type, the Serine 100 to alanine (S100A) or to glutamic acid (S100E) substitution of Snail into various cell lines. We assessed colony formation, γ-H2AX focus formation and the invasion index in the cells treated with or without IR. Results: We found that over-expression of the S100A mutant Snail in HeLa cells significantly increased radiosensitivity. Meanwhile the expression of S100E, a phospho-mimicking mutation, resulted in enhanced radio-resistance. Interestingly, S100E could rescue the radiosensitive phenotype in ATM-deficient cells. We also found that expression of S100E increased γ-H2AX focus formation and compromised inhibition of invasion in response to IR independent of cell survival. Conclusion: ATM-mediated Snail Serine 100 phosphorylation in response to IR plays an important part in the regulation of radiosensitivity

  19. Regulation of System xc(-) by Pharmacological Manipulation of Cellular Thiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Rebecca; Raddatz, Nicholas J; Hjelmhaug, Julie; Baker, David A; Lobner, Doug

    2015-01-01

    The cystine/glutamate exchanger (system xc (-)) mediates the transport of cystine into the cell in exchange for glutamate. By releasing glutamate, system xc (-) can potentially cause excitotoxicity. However, through providing cystine to the cell, it regulates the levels of cellular glutathione (GSH), the main endogenous intracellular antioxidant, and may protect cells against oxidative stress. We tested two different compounds that deplete primary cortical cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes of intracellular GSH, L-buthionine-sulfoximine (L-BSO), and diethyl maleate (DEM). Both compounds caused significant concentration and time dependent decreases in intracellular GSH levels. However; DEM caused an increase in radiolabeled cystine uptake through system xc (-), while unexpectedly BSO caused a decrease in uptake. The compounds caused similar low levels of neurotoxicity, while only BSO caused an increase in oxidative stress. The mechanism of GSH depletion by these two compounds is different, DEM directly conjugates to GSH, while BSO inhibits γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, a key enzyme in GSH synthesis. As would be expected from these mechanisms of action, DEM caused a decrease in intracellular cysteine, while BSO increased cysteine levels. The results suggest that negative feedback by intracellular cysteine is an important regulator of system xc (-) in this culture system.

  20. Regulation of System xc- by Pharmacological Manipulation of Cellular Thiols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Albano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cystine/glutamate exchanger (system xc- mediates the transport of cystine into the cell in exchange for glutamate. By releasing glutamate, system xc- can potentially cause excitotoxicity. However, through providing cystine to the cell, it regulates the levels of cellular glutathione (GSH, the main endogenous intracellular antioxidant, and may protect cells against oxidative stress. We tested two different compounds that deplete primary cortical cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes of intracellular GSH, L-buthionine-sulfoximine (L-BSO, and diethyl maleate (DEM. Both compounds caused significant concentration and time dependent decreases in intracellular GSH levels. However; DEM caused an increase in radiolabeled cystine uptake through system xc-, while unexpectedly BSO caused a decrease in uptake. The compounds caused similar low levels of neurotoxicity, while only BSO caused an increase in oxidative stress. The mechanism of GSH depletion by these two compounds is different, DEM directly conjugates to GSH, while BSO inhibits γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, a key enzyme in GSH synthesis. As would be expected from these mechanisms of action, DEM caused a decrease in intracellular cysteine, while BSO increased cysteine levels. The results suggest that negative feedback by intracellular cysteine is an important regulator of system xc- in this culture system.

  1. 75 FR 927 - Migratory Bird Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Falconry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... training, flying, or hunting. And much of the sport is about enjoyment--of our birds, our relationship, and... Federal Register (73 FR 59448) to revise our regulations governing falconry in the United States. We... (75 FR 36158) to clarify or correct some provisions in the rule. Comments on the Proposed Rule...

  2. 76 FR 29665 - Migratory Bird Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Raptor Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... propagation of raptors in the United States (70 FR 60052). We proposed to reorganize the current regulations... Propagation'' (71 FR 35599). We solicited comments on the draft environmental assessment until September 19... until November 21, 2006 (71 FR 54794). After consideration of all the comments received, we published...

  3. Cellular metabolism regulates contact sites between vacuoles and mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hönscher, Carina; Mari, Muriel; Auffarth, Kathrin; Bohnert, Maria; Griffith, Janice; Geerts, Willie; van der Laan, Martin; Cabrera, Margarita; Reggiori, Fulvio; Ungermann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that contact sites between different organelles form central hubs in the coordination of cellular physiology. Although recent work has emphasized the crucial role of the endoplasmic reticulum in interorganellar crosstalk, the cooperative behavior of other organelles is lar

  4. The anti-migratory effects of FKBPL and its peptide derivative, AD-01: regulation of CD44 and the cytoskeletal pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Yakkundi

    Full Text Available FK506 binding protein-like (FKBPL and its peptide derivatives exert potent anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo and control tumour growth in xenograft models, when administered exogenously. However, the role of endogenous FKBPL in angiogenesis is not well characterised. Here we investigated the molecular effects of the endogenous protein and its peptide derivative, AD-01, leading to their anti-migratory activity. Inhibition of secreted FKBPL using a blocking antibody or siRNA-mediated knockdown of FKBPL accelerated the migration of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1. Furthermore, MDA-MB-231 tumour cells stably overexpressing FKBPL inhibited tumour vascular development in vivo suggesting that FKBPL secreted from tumour cells could inhibit angiogenesis. Whilst FKBPL and AD-01 target CD44, the nature of this interaction is not known and here we have further interrogated this aspect. We have demonstrated that FKBPL and AD-01 bind to the CD44 receptor and inhibit tumour cell migration in a CD44 dependant manner; CD44 knockdown abrogated AD-01 binding as well as its anti-migratory activity. Interestingly, FKBPL overexpression and knockdown or treatment with AD-01, regulated CD44 expression, suggesting a co-regulatory pathway for these two proteins. Downstream of CD44, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, indicated by intense cortical actin staining and a lack of cell spreading and communication were observed following treatment with AD-01, explaining the anti-migratory phenotype. Concomitantly, AD-01 inhibited Rac-1 activity, up-regulated RhoA and the actin binding proteins, profilin and vinculin. Thus the anti-angiogenic protein, FKBPL, and AD-01, offer a promising and alternative approach for targeting both CD44 positive tumours and vasculature networks.

  5. 50 CFR 92.22 - Subsistence migratory bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subsistence migratory bird species. 92.22... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS MIGRATORY BIRD SUBSISTENCE HARVEST IN ALASKA General Regulations Governing Subsistence Harvest § 92.22 Subsistence migratory bird species. You may harvest birds or...

  6. ATR-mediated regulation of nuclear and cellular plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidiyoor, Gururaj Rao; Kumar, Amit; Foiani, Marco

    2016-08-01

    ATR (Ataxia Telangiectasia and Rad3-related) is a member of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs) family, amongst six other vertebrate proteins known so far. ATR is indispensable for cell survival and its essential role is in sensing DNA damage and initiating appropriate repair responses. In this review we highlight emerging and recent observations connecting ATR to alternative roles in controlling the nuclear envelope, nucleolus, centrosome and other organelles in response to both internal and external stress conditions. We propose that ATR functions control cell plasticity by sensing structural deformations of different cellular components, including DNA and initiating appropriate repair responses, most of which are yet to be understood completely. PMID:27283761

  7. Regulation of REGγ cellular distribution and function by SUMO modification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wu; Honglin Luo; Xiaotao Li; Lu Wang; Ping Zhou; Guangqiang Wang; Yu Zeng; Ying Wang; Jian Liu; Bianhong Zhang; Shuang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of emerging REGy-regulated proteins has accentuated the RECry-proteasome as an important pathway in multiple biological processes, including cell growth, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. However, little is known about the regulation of the REGy-proteasome pathway. Here we demonstrate that REGγ can be SUMOylated in vitro and in vivo by SUMO-1, SUMO-2, and SUMO-3. The SUMO-E3 protein inhibitor of activated STAT(PIAS)1physically associates with REGy and promotes SUMOylation of REGy. SUMOylation of RECry was found to occur at multiple sites, including K6, K14, and K12. Mutation analysis indicated that these SUMO sites simultaneously contributed to the SUMOylation status of REGy in cells. Posttranslational modification of REGγ by SUMO conjugation was revealed to mediate cytosolic translocation of REGγ and to cause increased stability of this proteasome activator.SUMOylation-deficient REGγ displayed attenuated ability to degrade p21waf//Cipl due to reduced affinity of the REGγ SUMOylation-defective mutant for p21. Taken together, we report a previously unrecognized mechanism regulating the activity of the proteasome activator REGy. This regulatory mechanism may enable REGy to function as a more potent factor in protein degradation with a broader substrate spectrum.

  8. From Syncitium to Regulated Pump: A Cardiac Muscle Cellular Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzick, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information…

  9. Budded membrane microdomains as regulators for cellular tension

    OpenAIRE

    Sens, Pierre; Turner, Matthew S.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for mechanical regulation at the membrane of living cells, based on the exchange of membrane area between the cell membrane and a membrane reservoir. The reservoir is composed of invaginated membrane microdomains which are liable to flatten upon increase of membrane strain, effectively controlling membrane tension. We show that the domain shape transition is first order, allowing for coexistence between flat and invaginated domains. During coexistence, the membrane tens...

  10. Cellular adaptation to hypoxia and p53 transcription regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang ZHAO; Xue-qun CHEN; Ji-zeng DU

    2009-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors. Meanwhile, under stress conditions, p53 also acts as a transcription factor, regulating the expression of a series of target genes to maintain the integrity of genome. The target genes of p53 can be classified into genes regulating cell cycle arrest, genes involved in apoptosis, and genes inhibiting angiogenesis. p53 protein contains a transactivation domain, a sequence-specific DNA binding domain, a tetramerization domain, a non-specific DNA binding domain that recognizes damaged DNA, and a later identified proline-rich domain. Under stress, p53 proteins accumulate and are activated through two mechanisms. One, involving ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM), is that the interaction between p53 and its down-regulation factor murine double minute 2 (MDM2) decreases, leading to p53 phosphorylation on Ser15, as determined by the post-translational mechanism; the other holds that p53 increases and is activated through the binding of ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) or nucleolin to p53 mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR), regulating p53 translation. Under hypoxia, p53 decreases transactivation and increases transrepression. The mutations outside the DNA binding domain of p53 also contribute to tumor progress, so further studies on p53 should also be focused on this direction. The subterranean blind mole rat Spalax in Israel is a good model for hypoxia-adaptation. The p53 of Spalax mutated in residue 172 and residue 207 from arginine to lysine, conferring it the ability to survive hypoxic conditions. This model indicates that p53 acts as a master gene of diversity formation during evolution.

  11. Multi-cellular logistics of collective cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Yamao

    Full Text Available During development, the formation of biological networks (such as organs and neuronal networks is controlled by multicellular transportation phenomena based on cell migration. In multi-cellular systems, cellular locomotion is restricted by physical interactions with other cells in a crowded space, similar to passengers pushing others out of their way on a packed train. The motion of individual cells is intrinsically stochastic and may be viewed as a type of random walk. However, this walk takes place in a noisy environment because the cell interacts with its randomly moving neighbors. Despite this randomness and complexity, development is highly orchestrated and precisely regulated, following genetic (and even epigenetic blueprints. Although individual cell migration has long been studied, the manner in which stochasticity affects multi-cellular transportation within the precisely controlled process of development remains largely unknown. To explore the general principles underlying multicellular migration, we focus on the migration of neural crest cells, which migrate collectively and form streams. We introduce a mechanical model of multi-cellular migration. Simulations based on the model show that the migration mode depends on the relative strengths of the noise from migratory and non-migratory cells. Strong noise from migratory cells and weak noise from surrounding cells causes "collective migration," whereas strong noise from non-migratory cells causes "dispersive migration." Moreover, our theoretical analyses reveal that migratory cells attract each other over long distances, even without direct mechanical contacts. This effective interaction depends on the stochasticity of the migratory and non-migratory cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that stochastic behavior at the single-cell level works effectively and precisely to achieve collective migration in multi-cellular systems.

  12. Membrane plasmalogen composition and cellular cholesterol regulation: a structure activity study

    OpenAIRE

    Su-Myat Khine K; Khan Mohamed A; Ritchie Shawn A; Jayasinghe Dushmanthi; Ma Hong; Ahiahonu Pearson WK; Mankidy Rishikesh; Wood Paul L; Goodenowe Dayan B

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Disrupted cholesterol regulation leading to increased circulating and membrane cholesterol levels is implicated in many age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cancer. In vitro and ex vivo cellular plasmalogen deficiency models have been shown to exhibit impaired intra- and extra-cellular processing of cholesterol. Furthermore, depleted brain plasmalogens have been implicated in AD and serum plasmalogen deficiencies ...

  13. Structural and mechanistic insights into the regulation of cellular quiescence by Rb and p130

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschi, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The ability of a single cell to grow, replicate its genetic material, and divide into two identical daughter cells is a vital process to ensure the propagation of all life. This process is known as the cell division cycle (cell cycle) and is one of the most highly spatially and temporally regulated cellular processes. Misregulation of the cell cycle, particularly in ways that confer both a proliferative advantage and escape from ultimate growth control mechanisms like cellular senescence or a...

  14. Evolution and regulation of cellular periodic processes: a role for paralogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trachana, Kalliopi; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Bork, Peer

    2010-01-01

    paralogues. Thus, diverged temporal expression of paralogues seems to facilitate cellular orchestration under different periodic stimuli. Lineage-specific functional repertoires of periodic-associated paralogues imply that this mode of regulation might have evolved independently in several organisms....... performed the first systematic comparison in three organisms (Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) by using public microarray data. We observed that although diurnal-regulated and ultradian-regulated genes are not generally cell-cycle-regulated, they tend to have cell-cycle-regulated...

  15. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  16. Migratory and adhesive properties of Xenopus laevis primordial germ cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaksandr Dzementsei

    2013-11-01

    The directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs to the site of gonad formation is an advantageous model system to study cell motility. The embryonic development of PGCs has been investigated in different animal species, including mice, zebrafish, Xenopus and Drosophila. In this study we focus on the physical properties of Xenopus laevis PGCs during their transition from the passive to the active migratory state. Pre-migratory PGCs from Xenopus laevis embryos at developmental stages 17–19 to be compared with migratory PGCs from stages 28–30 were isolated and characterized in respect to motility and adhesive properties. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we observed a decline in adhesiveness of PGCs upon reaching the migratory state, as defined by decreased attachment to extracellular matrix components like fibronectin, and a reduced adhesion to somatic endodermal cells. Data obtained from qPCR analysis with isolated PGCs reveal that down-regulation of E-cadherin might contribute to this weakening of cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, however, using an in vitro migration assay, we found that movement of X. laevis PGCs can also occur independently of specific interactions with their neighboring cells. The reduction of cellular adhesion during PGC development is accompanied by enhanced cellular motility, as reflected in increased formation of bleb-like protrusions and inferred from electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS as well as time-lapse image analysis. Temporal alterations in cell shape, including contraction and expansion of the cellular body, reveal a higher degree of cellular dynamics for the migratory PGCs in vitro.

  17. Lysine acetylation targets protein complexes and co-regulates major cellular functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Kumar, Chanchal; Gnad, Florian;

    2009-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of proteins and plays a key role in regulating gene expression. Technological limitations have so far prevented a global analysis of lysine acetylation's cellular roles. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify 3600 ly...

  18. BICD2, dynactin, and LIS1 cooperate in regulating dynein recruitment to cellular structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Splinter (Daniël); D.S. Razafsky (David); M.A. Schlager (Max); A. Serra-Marques (Andrea); I. Grigoriev (Ilya); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); N. Keijzer (Nanda); K. Jiang (Kai); S. Poser; A. Hyman (Anthony); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); S.J. King (Stephen); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCytoplasmic dynein is the major microtubule minus-end-directed cellular motor. Most dynein activities require dynactin, but the mechanisms regulating cargo-dependent dynein-dynactin interaction are poorly understood. In this study, we focus on dynein-dynactin recruitment to cargo by the

  19. Regulation of cellular senescence by the essential caveolar component PTRF/Cavin-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Bai; Xiaoli Deng; Juanjuan Li; Miao Wang; Qian Li; Wei An; Deli A; Yu-Sheng Cong

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase I and transcript release factor (PTRF, also known as Cavin-1) is an essential component in the biogenesis and function of caveolae. Here, we show that PTRF expression is increased in senescent human fibroblasts.Importantly, overexpression of PTRF induced features characteristic of cellular senescence, whereas reduced PTRF expression extended the cellular replicative lifespan. Interestingly, we found that PTRF localized primarily to the nuclei of young and quiescent WI-38 human fibroblasts, but translocated to the cytosol and plasma membrane during cellular senescence. Furthermore, electron microscopic analysis demonstrated an increased number of caveolar structures in senescent and PTRF-transfected WI-38 cells. Our data suggest that the role of PTRF in cellular senes cence is dependent on its targeting to caveolae and its interaction with caveolin-l, which appeared to be regulated by the phosphorylation of PTRF. Taken together, our findings identify PTRF as a novel regulator of cellular senescence that acts through the p53/p21 and caveolar pathways.

  20. Suppressed invasive and migratory behaviors of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells through the regulation of Src, Rac1 GTPase, and MMP13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenxiao; Wan, Qiaoqiao; Na, Sungsoo; Yokota, Hiroki; Yan, Jing-Long; Hamamura, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second frequent type of primary bone cancer. In response to stress to the endoplasmic reticulum, activation of eIF2α-mediated signaling is reported to induce apoptosis. However, its effects on invasive and migratory behaviors of chondrosarcoma have not been understood. Focusing on potential roles of Src kinase, Rac1 GTPase, and MMP13, we investigated eIF2α-driven regulation of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells. In particular, we employed two chemical agents (salubrinal, Sal; and guanabenz, Gu) that elevate the level of eIF2α phosphorylation. The result revealed that both Sal and Gu reduced invasion and motility of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells in a dose dependent manner. Live imaging using a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique showed that Sal and Gu downregulated activities of Src kinase as well as Rac1 GTPase in an eIF2α dependent manner. RNA interference experiments supported an eIF2α-mediated regulatory network in the inhibitory role of Sal and Gu. Partial silencing of MMP13 also suppressed malignant phenotypes of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells. However, MMP13 was not regulated via eIF2α since administration of Sal but not Gu reduced expression of MMP13. In summary, we demonstrate that eIF2α dependent and independent pathways regulate invasion and motility of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells, and inactivation of Src, Rac1, and MMP13 by Sal could provide a potential adjuvant therapy for combating metastatic chondrosarcoma cells. PMID:26303573

  1. The Relevance of JAK2 in the Regulation of Cellular Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopjani, Mentor; Konjufca, Vjollca; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Dërmaku-Sopjani, Miribane

    2016-01-01

    Janus kinase-2 (JAK2) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase signaling molecule that mediates the effects of various hormones and cytokines, including interferon, erythropoietin, leptin, and growth hormone. It also fosters tumor growth and modifies the activity of several nutrient transporters. JAK2 contributes to the regulation of the cell volume, protectS cells during energy depletion, proliferation, and aids the survival of tumor cells. Recently, JAK2 was identified as a powerful regulator of transport processes across the plasma membrane. Either directly or indirectly JAK2 may stimulate or inhibit transporter proteins, including ion channels, carriers and Na(+)/K(+) pumps. As a powerful regulator of transport mechanisms across the cell membrane, JAK2 regulates a wide variety of potassium, calcium, sodium and chloride ion channels, multiple Na+-coupled cellular carriers including EAAT1-4, NaPi-IIa, SGLT1, BoaT1, PepT1-2, CreaT1, SMIT1, and BGT1 as well as Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. These cellular transport regulations contribute to various physiological and pathophysiological processes and thus exerting JAK2-sensitive effects. Future investigations will be important to determine whether JAK2 regulates cell-surface expression of other transporters and further elucidate underlying mechanisms governing JAK2 actions. PMID:26639094

  2. FIH Regulates Cellular Metabolism through Hydroxylation of the Deubiquitinase OTUB1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten C Scholz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The asparagine hydroxylase, factor inhibiting HIF (FIH, confers oxygen-dependence upon the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, a master regulator of the cellular adaptive response to hypoxia. Studies investigating whether asparagine hydroxylation is a general regulatory oxygen-dependent modification have identified multiple non-HIF targets for FIH. However, the functional consequences of this outside of the HIF pathway remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the deubiquitinase ovarian tumor domain containing ubiquitin aldehyde binding protein 1 (OTUB1 is a substrate for hydroxylation by FIH on N22. Mutation of N22 leads to a profound change in the interaction of OTUB1 with proteins important in cellular metabolism. Furthermore, in cultured cells, overexpression of N22A mutant OTUB1 impairs cellular metabolic processes when compared to wild type. Based on these data, we hypothesize that OTUB1 is a target for functional hydroxylation by FIH. Additionally, we propose that our results provide new insight into the regulation of cellular energy metabolism during hypoxic stress and the potential for targeting hydroxylases for therapeutic benefit.

  3. Integrated cellular network of transcription regulations and protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bor-Sen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the accumulation of increasing omics data, a key goal of systems biology is to construct networks at different cellular levels to investigate cellular machinery of the cell. However, there is currently no satisfactory method to construct an integrated cellular network that combines the gene regulatory network and the signaling regulatory pathway. Results In this study, we integrated different kinds of omics data and developed a systematic method to construct the integrated cellular network based on coupling dynamic models and statistical assessments. The proposed method was applied to S. cerevisiae stress responses, elucidating the stress response mechanism of the yeast. From the resulting integrated cellular network under hyperosmotic stress, the highly connected hubs which are functionally relevant to the stress response were identified. Beyond hyperosmotic stress, the integrated network under heat shock and oxidative stress were also constructed and the crosstalks of these networks were analyzed, specifying the significance of some transcription factors to serve as the decision-making devices at the center of the bow-tie structure and the crucial role for rapid adaptation scheme to respond to stress. In addition, the predictive power of the proposed method was also demonstrated. Conclusions We successfully construct the integrated cellular network which is validated by literature evidences. The integration of transcription regulations and protein-protein interactions gives more insight into the actual biological network and is more predictive than those without integration. The method is shown to be powerful and flexible and can be used under different conditions and for different species. The coupling dynamic models of the whole integrated cellular network are very useful for theoretical analyses and for further experiments in the fields of network biology and synthetic biology.

  4. Negative feedback regulation of cellular antiviral signaling by RBCK1-mediated degradation of IRF3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhang; Yang Tian; Rui-Peng Wang; Dong Gao; Yan Zhang; Fei-Ci Diao; Dan-Ying Chen; Zhong-He Zhai; Hong-Bing Shu

    2008-01-01

    Viral infection causes host cells to produce type Ⅰ interferons (IFNs), which are critically involved in viral clearance. Previous studies have demonstrated that activation of the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor (IRF)3 is essential for virus-triggered induction of type Ⅰ IFNs. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase RBCC protein interact-ing with PKC1 (RBCK1) catalyzes the ubiquitination and degradation of IRF3. Overexpression of RBCK1 negatively regulates Sendai virus-triggered induction of type Ⅰ IFNs, while knockdown of RBCK1 has the opposite effect. Plaque assays consistently demonstrate that RBCK1 negatively regulates the cellular antiviral response. Furthermore, viral infection leads to induction of RBCK1 and subsequent degradation of IRF3. These findings suggest that the cellular antiviral response is controlled by a negative feedback regulatory mechanism involving RBCK1-mediated ubiquitina-tion and degradation of IRF3.

  5. Annual Hunting Program : Migratory Waterfowl : Parker River National Wildlife Refuge : 1985-86

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This 1985-86 Annual Migratory Waterfowl Hunting Program outlines the reasons and regulations for migratory waterfowl hunting on Parker River National Wildlife...

  6. Annual Hunting Program : Migratory Waterfowl : Parker River National Wildlife Refuge : 1992-1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This 1992-93 Annual Migratory Waterfowl Hunting Program outlines the reasons and regulations for migratory waterfowl hunting on Parker River National Wildlife...

  7. Insulin as the main regulator of cellular glucose utilization--aetiological aspects of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatoń, Jan; Czech, Anna; Piatkiewicz, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    This review presents the advances in the molecular biology and the pathophysiology of insulin resistance with emphasis on disturbances in cellular glucose transport. New scientific information about the structure and function of glucotransporters from the GLUT4 and SLGT families underline their significance in endocrinopathies and metabolic disease pathogenesis as related to insulin resistance. The new discoveries in this area also contribute to a better understanding of the regulation of insulin receptor and post-receptor reactivity by hormones and by drugs. They refer to the regulation of glycaemia and to its disturbances in diabetes mellitus, particularly of type 2, to metabolic syndrome, and, in general, to the pathogenesis of many syndromes and clinical disturbances caused by insulin resistance. Impairment of cellular glucose transport may be one of the primary aetiological factors in this respect. Therefore, studies of cellular glucotransporters expression and function promise new clinical and pharmacotherapeutic developments. Progress in this area has already been transformed into many practical proposals which are improving clinical practice. PMID:20806184

  8. Stem-loop binding protein is a multifaceted cellular regulator of HIV-1 replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Lynne D.; Asara, John M.; Cheruiyot, Collins K.; Lu, Huafei; Wu, Zhijin J.; Newstein, Michael C.; Dooner, Mark S.; Friedman, Jennifer; Lally, Michelle A.; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    A rare subset of HIV-1–infected individuals is able to maintain plasma viral load (VL) at low levels without antiretroviral treatment. Identifying the mechanisms underlying this atypical response to infection may lead to therapeutic advances for treating HIV-1. Here, we developed a proteomic analysis to compare peripheral blood cell proteomes in 20 HIV-1–infected individuals who maintained either high or low VL with the aim of identifying host factors that impact HIV-1 replication. We determined that the levels of multiple histone proteins were markedly decreased in cohorts of individuals with high VL. This reduction was correlated with lower levels of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which is known to control histone metabolism. Depletion of cellular SLBP increased promoter engagement with the chromatin structures of the host gene high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1) and viral long terminal repeat (LTR), which led to higher levels of HIV-1 genomic integration and proviral transcription. Further, we determined that TNF-α regulates expression of SLBP and observed that plasma TNF-α levels in HIV-1–infected individuals correlated directly with VL levels and inversely with cellular SLBP levels. Our findings identify SLBP as a potentially important cellular regulator of HIV-1, thereby establishing a link between histone metabolism, inflammation, and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27454292

  9. Stem-loop binding protein is a multifaceted cellular regulator of HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Tucker, Lynne D; Asara, John M; Cheruiyot, Collins K; Lu, Huafei; Wu, Zhijin J; Newstein, Michael C; Dooner, Mark S; Friedman, Jennifer; Lally, Michelle A; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2016-08-01

    A rare subset of HIV-1-infected individuals is able to maintain plasma viral load (VL) at low levels without antiretroviral treatment. Identifying the mechanisms underlying this atypical response to infection may lead to therapeutic advances for treating HIV-1. Here, we developed a proteomic analysis to compare peripheral blood cell proteomes in 20 HIV-1-infected individuals who maintained either high or low VL with the aim of identifying host factors that impact HIV-1 replication. We determined that the levels of multiple histone proteins were markedly decreased in cohorts of individuals with high VL. This reduction was correlated with lower levels of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which is known to control histone metabolism. Depletion of cellular SLBP increased promoter engagement with the chromatin structures of the host gene high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1) and viral long terminal repeat (LTR), which led to higher levels of HIV-1 genomic integration and proviral transcription. Further, we determined that TNF-α regulates expression of SLBP and observed that plasma TNF-α levels in HIV-1-infected individuals correlated directly with VL levels and inversely with cellular SLBP levels. Our findings identify SLBP as a potentially important cellular regulator of HIV-1, thereby establishing a link between histone metabolism, inflammation, and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27454292

  10. HPV16 E2 could act as down-regulator in cellular genes implicated in apoptosis, proliferation and cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia-Hernández Armando

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV E2 plays several important roles in the viral cycle, including the transcriptional regulation of the oncogenes E6 and E7, the regulation of the viral genome replication by its association with E1 helicase and participates in the viral genome segregation during mitosis by its association with the cellular protein Brd4. It has been shown that E2 protein can regulate negative or positively the activity of several cellular promoters, although the precise mechanism of this regulation is uncertain. In this work we constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector to overexpress HPV16 E2 and evaluated the global pattern of biological processes regulated by E2 using microarrays expression analysis. Results The gene expression profile was strongly modified in cells expressing HPV16 E2, finding 1048 down-regulated genes, and 581 up-regulated. The main cellular pathway modified was WNT since we found 28 genes down-regulated and 15 up-regulated. Interestingly, this pathway is a convergence point for regulating the expression of genes involved in several cellular processes, including apoptosis, proliferation and cell differentiation; MYCN, JAG1 and MAPK13 genes were selected to validate by RT-qPCR the microarray data as these genes in an altered level of expression, modify very important cellular processes. Additionally, we found that a large number of genes from pathways such as PDGF, angiogenesis and cytokines and chemokines mediated inflammation, were also modified in their expression. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that HPV16 E2 has regulatory effects on cellular gene expression in HPV negative cells, independent of the other HPV proteins, and the gene profile observed indicates that these effects could be mediated by interactions with cellular proteins. The cellular processes affected suggest that E2 expression leads to the cells in to a convenient environment for a replicative cycle of the virus.

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate: regulation of cellular events in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Natsuko; Lang, Michael J; Weisman, Lois S

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol lipids are crucial for most eukaryotes and have diverse cellular functions. The low-abundance signalling lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P2] is critical for cellular homoeostasis and adaptation to stimuli. A large complex of proteins that includes the lipid kinase Fab1-PIKfyve, dynamically regulates the levels of PI(3,5)P2. Deficiencies in PI(3,5)P2 are linked to some human diseases, especially those of the nervous system. Future studies will probably determine new, undiscovered regulatory roles of PI(3,5)P2, as well as uncover mechanistic insights into how PI(3,5)P2 contributes to normal human physiology.

  12. Identification of novel pro-migratory, cancer-associated genes using quantitative, microscopy-based screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suha Naffar-Abu-Amara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell migration is a highly complex process, regulated by multiple genes, signaling pathways and external stimuli. To discover genes or pharmacological agents that can modulate the migratory activity of cells, screening strategies that enable the monitoring of diverse migratory parameters in a large number of samples are necessary. METHODOLOGY: In the present study, we describe the development of a quantitative, high-throughput cell migration assay, based on a modified phagokinetic tracks (PKT procedure, and apply it for identifying novel pro-migratory genes in a cancer-related gene library. In brief, cells are seeded on fibronectin-coated 96-well plates, covered with a monolayer of carboxylated latex beads. Motile cells clear the beads, located along their migratory paths, forming tracks that are visualized using an automated, transmitted-light screening microscope. The tracks are then segmented and characterized by multi-parametric, morphometric analysis, resolving a variety of morphological and kinetic features. CONCLUSIONS: In this screen we identified 4 novel genes derived from breast carcinoma related cDNA library, whose over-expression induces major alteration in the migration of the stationary MCF7 cells. This approach can serve for high throughput screening for novel ways to modulate cellular migration in pathological states such as tumor metastasis and invasion.

  13. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Jessica A; Rickel, Kirby E; Madeo, Marianna; Ahlers, Bethany A; Carlisle, Gabriel B; Nelson, Heidi J; Cardillo, Andrew L; Weber, Emily A; Vitiello, Peter F; Pearce, David A; Vitiello, Seasson P

    2016-01-01

    Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling. PMID:27142334

  14. BAF180 regulates cellular senescence and hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis through p21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyemin; Dai, Fangyan; Zhuang, Li; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; Kim, Jongchan; Zhang, Yilei; Ma, Li; You, M James; Wang, Zhong; Gan, Boyi

    2016-04-12

    BAF180 (also called PBRM1), a subunit of the SWI/SNF complex, plays critical roles in the regulation of chromatin remodeling and gene transcription, and is frequently mutated in several human cancers. However, the role of mammalian BAF180 in tumor suppression and tissue maintenance in vivo remains largely unknown. Here, using a conditional somatic knockout approach, we explored the cellular and organismal functions of BAF180 in mouse. BAF180 deletion in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) triggers profound cell cycle arrest, premature cellular senescence, without affecting DNA damage response or chromosomal integrity. While somatic deletion of BAF180 in adult mice does not provoke tumor development, BAF180 deficient mice exhibit defects in hematopoietic system characterized by progressive reduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), defective long-term repopulating potential, and hematopoietic lineage developmental aberrations. BAF180 deletion results in elevated p21 expression in both MEFs and HSCs. Mechanistically, we showed that BAF180 binds to p21 promoter, and BAF180 deletion enhances the binding of modified histones associated with transcriptional activation on p21 promoter. Deletion of p21 rescues cell cycle arrest and premature senescence in BAF180 deficient MEFs, and partially rescues hematopoietic defects in BAF180 deficient mice. Together, our study identifies BAF180 as a critical regulator of cellular senescence and HSC homeostasis, which is at least partially regulated through BAF180-mediated suppression of p21 expression. Our results also suggest that senescence triggered by BAF180 inactivation may serve as a failsafe mechanism to restrain BAF180 deficiency-associated tumor development, providing a conceptual framework to further understand BAF180 function in tumor biology.

  15. Previously uncharacterized isoforms of divalent metal transporter (DMT)-1: Implications for regulation and cellular function

    OpenAIRE

    Hubert, Nadia; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2002-01-01

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) mediates apical iron uptake into duodenal enterocytes and also transfers iron from the endosome into the cytosol after cellular uptake via the transferrin receptor. Hence, mutations in DMT1 cause systemic iron deficiency and anemia. DMT1 mRNA levels are increased in the duodenum of iron-deficient animals. This regulation has been observed for DMT1 mRNA harboring an iron–responsive element (IRE) in its 3′ UTR, but not for a processing variant lacking a 3′UTR...

  16. Membrane plasmalogen composition and cellular cholesterol regulation: a structure activity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Myat Khine K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupted cholesterol regulation leading to increased circulating and membrane cholesterol levels is implicated in many age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and cancer. In vitro and ex vivo cellular plasmalogen deficiency models have been shown to exhibit impaired intra- and extra-cellular processing of cholesterol. Furthermore, depleted brain plasmalogens have been implicated in AD and serum plasmalogen deficiencies have been linked to AD, CVD, and cancer. Results Using plasmalogen deficient (NRel-4 and plasmalogen sufficient (HEK293 cells we investigated the effect of species-dependent plasmalogen restoration/augmentation on membrane cholesterol processing. The results of these studies indicate that the esterification of cholesterol is dependent upon the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA-containing ethanolamine plasmalogen (PlsEtn present in the membrane. We further elucidate that the concentration-dependent increase in esterified cholesterol observed with PUFA-PlsEtn was due to a concentration-dependent increase in sterol-O-acyltransferase-1 (SOAT1 levels, an observation not reproduced by 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. Conclusion The present study describes a novel mechanism of cholesterol regulation that is consistent with clinical and epidemiological studies of cholesterol, aging and disease. Specifically, the present study describes how selective membrane PUFA-PlsEtn enhancement can be achieved using 1-alkyl-2-PUFA glycerols and through this action reduce levels of total and free cholesterol in cells.

  17. HTLV Tax: a fascinating multifunctional co-regulator of viral and cellular pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eCurrer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 has been identified as the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. The virus infects between 15 and 20 million people worldwide of which approximately 2 to 5% develop ATL. The past 35 years of research have yielded significant insight into the pathogenesis of HTLV-1, including the molecular characterization of Tax, the viral transactivator and oncoprotein. In spite of these efforts, the mechanisms of oncogenesis of this pleiotropic protein remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we illustrate the multiple oncogenic roles of Tax by summarizing a recent body of literature that refines our understanding of cellular transformation. A focused range of topics are discussed in this review including Tax-mediated regulation of the viral promoter and other cellular pathways, particularly the connection of the NF-κB pathway to both post-translational modifications of Tax and sub-cellular localization. Specifically, recent research on polyubiquitination of Tax as it relates to the activation of the IkappaB kinase (IKK complex is highlighted. Regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage responses due to Tax are also discussed, including Tax interaction with minichromosome maintenance proteins and the role of Tax in chromatin remodeling. The recent identification of HTLV-3 has amplified the importance of the characterization of emerging viral pathogens. The challenge of the molecular determination of pathogenicity and malignant disease of this virus lies in the comparison of the viral transactivators of HTLV-1, -2, and -3 in terms of transformation and immortalization. Consequently, differences between the three proteins are currently being studied to determine what factors are required for the differences in tumorogenesis.

  18. Cellular prion protein expression is not regulated by the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Lewis

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of molecular and cellular links between Alzheimer's disease (AD and prion diseases. The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, modulates the post-translational processing of the AD amyloid precursor protein (APP, through its inhibition of the β-secretase BACE1, and oligomers of amyloid-β bind to PrP(C which may mediate amyloid-β neurotoxicity. In addition, the APP intracellular domain (AICD, which acts as a transcriptional regulator, has been reported to control the expression of PrP(C. Through the use of transgenic mice, cell culture models and manipulation of APP expression and processing, this study aimed to clarify the role of AICD in regulating PrP(C. Over-expression of the three major isoforms of human APP (APP(695, APP(751 and APP(770 in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells had no effect on the level of endogenous PrP(C. Furthermore, analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mice over-expressing either wild type or familial AD associated mutant human APP revealed unaltered PrP(C levels. Knockdown of endogenous APP expression in cells by siRNA or inhibition of γ-secretase activity also had no effect on PrP(C levels. Overall, we did not detect any significant difference in the expression of PrP(C in any of the cell or animal-based paradigms considered, indicating that the control of cellular PrP(C levels by AICD is not as straightforward as previously suggested.

  19. Naringin abrogated radiation induced oxidative stress through modulation of redox regulated cellular signaling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is widely used as major diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation are due to generation of reactive oxygen species. The amounts of ionizing radiation that can be given to treat malignant tumours are often limited by toxicity in the surrounding normal tissues and organs. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Naringin (NG), a natural flavonoid, present in many plant parts against radiation induced oxidative stress with an evidence based exploration of the mechanism involved. Isolated murine splenocyte were irradiated with γ radiation (6 Gy) along with/without different concentrations of NG (50 and 100 μM). Biochemical, immunoblot, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence study was subject to be performed to observe its molecular mechanisms of action. Pretreatment with NG significantly prevented the radiation induced intracellular ROS generation, therefore prevented cellular TBARS formation and development of cellular nitrite. NG showed the significant reduction in nuclear DNA damage with respect to irradiated splenocyte through inhibition of DNA-PKcs and p-γH2AX. It recovered radiation induced reduced cell viability through modulation of redox regulated cell signaling system. It resulted in significant inhibition of radiation induced G1/S phase cell cycle arrest mediated by modulation of p53 dependent p21/WAF1 expression followed by Cyclin E and CDK2 expression. NG was involved in blocking radiation induced p38 function; reversed radiation mediated differential stress response through inhibition of NF-κB pathway. It prevented p-IKKα/β, p-IκBα, p-p65, COX2 expression. It also reversed the radiation induced p38/NF-κB guided inflammatory development. Thus it down regulated radiation induced CRP, MCP-1, and iNOS2 gene expression. This novel role of naringin provides a basis for therapeutic applications in future against radiation induced molecular and cellular functional

  20. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  1. Cellular volume regulation by anoctamin 6: Ca²⁺, phospholipase A2 and osmosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianant, Lalida; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2016-02-01

    During cell swelling, Cl(-) channels are activated to lower intracellular Cl(-) concentrations and to reduce cell volume, a process termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD). We show that anoctamin 6 (ANO6; TMEM16F) produces volume-regulated anion currents and controls cell volume in four unrelated cell types. Volume regulation is compromised in freshly isolated intestinal epithelial cells from Ano6-/- mice and also in lymphocytes from a patient lacking expression of ANO6. Ca(2+) influx is activated and thus ANO6 is stimulated during cell swelling by local Ca(2+) increase probably in functional nanodomains near the plasma membrane. This leads to stimulation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and generation of plasma membrane lysophospholipids, which activates ANO6. Direct application of lysophospholipids also activates an anion current that is inhibited by typical ANO6 blocker. An increase in intracellular Ca(2+) supports activation of ANO6, but is not required when PLA2 is fully activated, while re-addition of arachidonic acid completely blocked ANO6. Moreover, ANO6 is activated by low intracellular Cl(-) concentrations and may therefore operate as a cellular osmosensor. High intracellular Cl(-) concentration inhibits ANO6 and activation by PLA2. Taken together, ANO6 supports volume regulation and volume activation of anion currents by action as a Cl(-) channel or by scrambling membrane phospholipids. Thereby, it may support the function of LRRC8 proteins.

  2. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Perry E; Tansey, John T; Welte, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best-characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  3. BICD2, dynactin, and LIS1 cooperate in regulating dynein recruitment to cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splinter, Daniël; Razafsky, David S.; Schlager, Max A.; Serra-Marques, Andrea; Grigoriev, Ilya; Demmers, Jeroen; Keijzer, Nanda; Jiang, Kai; Poser, Ina; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; King, Stephen J.; Akhmanova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is the major microtubule minus-end–directed cellular motor. Most dynein activities require dynactin, but the mechanisms regulating cargo-dependent dynein–dynactin interaction are poorly understood. In this study, we focus on dynein–dynactin recruitment to cargo by the conserved motor adaptor Bicaudal D2 (BICD2). We show that dynein and dynactin depend on each other for BICD2-mediated targeting to cargo and that BICD2 N-terminus (BICD2-N) strongly promotes stable interaction between dynein and dynactin both in vitro and in vivo. Direct visualization of dynein in live cells indicates that by itself the triple BICD2-N–dynein–dynactin complex is unable to interact with either cargo or microtubules. However, tethering of BICD2-N to different membranes promotes their microtubule minus-end–directed motility. We further show that LIS1 is required for dynein-mediated transport induced by membrane tethering of BICD2-N and that LIS1 contributes to dynein accumulation at microtubule plus ends and BICD2-positive cellular structures. Our results demonstrate that dynein recruitment to cargo requires concerted action of multiple dynein cofactors. PMID:22956769

  4. BMP2 Regulation of CXCL12 Cellular, Temporal, and Spatial Expression is Essential During Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Timothy J; Longobardi, Lara; Willcockson, Helen; Temple, Joseph D; Tagliafierro, Lidia; Ye, Ping; Li, Tieshi; Esposito, Alessandra; Moats-Staats, Billie M; Spagnoli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    -reaching implications for understanding mechanisms regulating the selective recruitment of distinct cells into the repairing niches and the development of novel pharmacological (by targeting BMP2/CXCL12) and cellular (MSCs, endosteal cells) interventions to promote fracture healing. PMID:25967044

  5. Immediate-Early (IE) gene regulation of cytomegalovirus: IE1- and pp71-mediated viral strategies against cellular defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lilith; Tang, Qiyi

    2014-12-01

    Three crucial hurdles hinder studies on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV): strict species specificity, differences between in vivo and in vitro infection, and the complexity of gene regulation. Ever since the sequencing of the whole genome was first accomplished, functional studies on individual genes have been the mainstream in the CMV field. Gene regulation has therefore been elucidated in a more detailed fashion. However, viral gene regulation is largely controlled by both cellular and viral components. In other words, viral gene expression is determined by the virus-host interaction. Generally, cells respond to viral infection in a defensive pattern; at the same time, viruses try to counteract the cellular defense or else hide in the host (latency). Viruses evolve effective strategies against cellular defense in order to achieve replicative success. Whether or not they are successful, cellular defenses remain in the whole viral replication cycle: entry, immediate-early (IE) gene expression, early gene expression, DNA replication, late gene expression, and viral egress. Many viral strategies against cellular defense, and which occur in the immediate-early time of viral infection, have been documented. In this review, we will summarize the documented biological functions of IE1 and pp71 proteins, especially with regard to how they counteract cellular intrinsic defenses.

  6. Immediate–Early(IE) gene regulation of cytomegalovirus:IE1-and pp71-mediated viral strategies against cellular defenses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lilith; Torres; Qiyi; Tang

    2014-01-01

    Three crucial hurdles hinder studies on human cytomegalovirus(HCMV): strict species specificity, differences between in vivo and in vitro infection, and the complexity of gene regulation. Ever since the sequencing of the whole genome was first accomplished, functional studies on individual genes have been the mainstream in the CMV field. Gene regulation has therefore been elucidated in a more detailed fashion. However, viral gene regulation is largely controlled by both cellular and viral components. In other words, viral gene expression is determined by the virus–host interaction. Generally, cells respond to viral infection in a defensive pattern; at the same time, viruses try to counteract the cellular defense or else hide in the host(latency). Viruses evolve effective strategies against cellular defense in order to achieve replicative success. Whether or not they are successful, cellular defenses remain in the whole viral replication cycle: entry, immediate–early(IE) gene expression, early gene expression, DNA replication, late gene expression, and viral egress. Many viral strategies against cellular defense, and which occur in the immediate–early time of viral infection, have been documented. In this review, we will summarize the documented biological functions of IE1 and pp71 proteins, especially with regard to how they counteract cellular intrinsic defenses.

  7. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Jingbo [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Chung, Dai H., E-mail: dai.chung@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  8. The anticancer plant triterpenoid, avicin D, regulates glucocorticoid receptor signaling: implications for cellular metabolism.

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    Valsala Haridas

    Full Text Available Avicins, a family of apoptotic triterpene electrophiles, are known to regulate cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis, by targeting the mitochondria. Having evolved from "ancient hopanoids," avicins bear a structural resemblance with glucocorticoids (GCs, which are the endogenous regulators of metabolism and energy balance. These structural and functional similarities prompted us to compare the mode of action of avicin D with dexamethasone (Dex, a prototypical GC. Using cold competition assay, we show that Avicin D competes with Dex for binding to the GC receptor (GR, leading to its nuclear translocation. In contrast to Dex, avicin-induced nuclear translocation of GR does not result in transcriptional activation of GC-dependent genes. Instead we observe a decrease in the expression of GC-dependent metabolic proteins such as PEPCK and FASN. However, like Dex, avicin D treatment does induce a transrepressive effect on the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. While avicin's ability to inhibit NF-κB and its downstream targets appear to be GR-dependent, its pro-apoptotic effects were independent of GR expression. Using various deletion mutants of GR, we demonstrate the requirement of both the DNA and ligand binding domains of GR in mediating avicin D's transrepressive effects. Modeling of avicin-GR interaction revealed that avicin molecule binds only to the antagonist confirmation of GR. These findings suggest that avicin D has properties of being a selective GR modulator that separates transactivation from transrepression. Since the gene-activating properties of GR are mainly linked to its metabolic effects, and the negative interference with the activity of transcription factors to its anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effects, the identification of such a dissociated GR ligand could have great potential for therapeutic use.

  9. The anticancer plant triterpenoid, avicin D, regulates glucocorticoid receptor signaling: implications for cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Valsala; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Kitchen, Doug; Jiang, Anna; Michels, Peter; Gutterman, Jordan U

    2011-01-01

    Avicins, a family of apoptotic triterpene electrophiles, are known to regulate cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis, by targeting the mitochondria. Having evolved from "ancient hopanoids," avicins bear a structural resemblance with glucocorticoids (GCs), which are the endogenous regulators of metabolism and energy balance. These structural and functional similarities prompted us to compare the mode of action of avicin D with dexamethasone (Dex), a prototypical GC. Using cold competition assay, we show that Avicin D competes with Dex for binding to the GC receptor (GR), leading to its nuclear translocation. In contrast to Dex, avicin-induced nuclear translocation of GR does not result in transcriptional activation of GC-dependent genes. Instead we observe a decrease in the expression of GC-dependent metabolic proteins such as PEPCK and FASN. However, like Dex, avicin D treatment does induce a transrepressive effect on the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. While avicin's ability to inhibit NF-κB and its downstream targets appear to be GR-dependent, its pro-apoptotic effects were independent of GR expression. Using various deletion mutants of GR, we demonstrate the requirement of both the DNA and ligand binding domains of GR in mediating avicin D's transrepressive effects. Modeling of avicin-GR interaction revealed that avicin molecule binds only to the antagonist confirmation of GR. These findings suggest that avicin D has properties of being a selective GR modulator that separates transactivation from transrepression. Since the gene-activating properties of GR are mainly linked to its metabolic effects, and the negative interference with the activity of transcription factors to its anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effects, the identification of such a dissociated GR ligand could have great potential for therapeutic use.

  10. NR4A2 is regulated by gastrin and influences cellular responses of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

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    Kristine Misund

    Full Text Available The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2 expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1, suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells.

  11. Identifying disease feature genes based on cellular localized gene functional modules and regulation networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min; ZHU Jing; GUO Zheng; LI Xia; YANG Da; WANG Lei; RAO Shaoqi

    2006-01-01

    Identifying disease-relevant genes and functional modules, based on gene expression profiles and gene functional knowledge, is of high importance for studying disease mechanisms and subtyping disease phenotypes. Using gene categories of biological process and cellular component in Gene Ontology, we propose an approach to selecting functional modules enriched with differentially expressed genes, and identifying the feature functional modules of high disease discriminating abilities. Using the differentially expressed genes in each feature module as the feature genes, we reveal the relevance of the modules to the studied diseases. Using three datasets for prostate cancer, gastric cancer, and leukemia, we have demonstrated that the proposed modular approach is of high power in identifying functionally integrated feature gene subsets that are highly relevant to the disease mechanisms. Our analysis has also shown that the critical disease-relevant genes might be better recognized from the gene regulation network, which is constructed using the characterized functional modules, giving important clues to the concerted mechanisms of the modules responding to complex disease states. In addition, the proposed approach to selecting the disease-relevant genes by jointly considering the gene functional knowledge suggests a new way for precisely classifying disease samples with clear biological interpretations, which is critical for the clinical diagnosis and the elucidation of the pathogenic basis of complex diseases.

  12. Viral and cellular SOS-regulated motor proteins: dsDNA translocation mechanisms with divergent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Annie; Phipps, Kara; Weitao, Tao

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage attacks on bacterial cells have been known to activate the SOS response, a transcriptional response affecting chromosome replication, DNA recombination and repair, cell division and prophage induction. All these functions require double-stranded (ds) DNA translocation by ASCE hexameric motors. This review seeks to delineate the structural and functional characteristics of the SOS response and the SOS-regulated DNA translocases FtsK and RuvB with the phi29 bacteriophage packaging motor gp16 ATPase as a prototype to study bacterial motors. While gp16 ATPase, cellular FtsK and RuvB are similarly comprised of hexameric rings encircling dsDNA and functioning as ATP-driven DNA translocases, they utilize different mechanisms to accomplish separate functions, suggesting a convergent evolution of these motors. The gp16 ATPase and FtsK use a novel revolution mechanism, generating a power stroke between subunits through an entropy-DNA affinity switch and pushing dsDNA inward without rotation of DNA and the motor, whereas RuvB seems to employ a rotation mechanism that remains to be further characterized. While FtsK and RuvB perform essential tasks during the SOS response, their roles may be far more significant as SOS response is involved in antibiotic-inducible bacterial vesiculation and biofilm formation as well as the perspective of the bacteria-cancer evolutionary interaction.

  13. Intracellular redox status controls membrane localization of pro- and anti-migratory signaling molecules

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    Nadine Hempel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shifts in intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS have been shown to contribute to carcinogenesis and to tumor progression. In addition to DNA and cell damage by surges in ROS, sub-lethal increases in ROS are implicated in regulating cellular signaling that enhances pro-metastatic behavior. We previously showed that subtle increases in endogenous H2O2 regulate migratory and invasive behavior of metastatic bladder cancer cells through phosphatase inhibition and consequential phosphorylation of p130cas, an adapter of the FAK signaling pathway. We further showed that enhanced redox status contributed to enhanced localization of p130cas to the membrane of metastatic cells. Here we show that this signaling complex can similarly be induced in a redox-engineered cell culture model that enables regulation of intracellular steady state H2O2 level by enforced expression of superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2 and catalase. Expression of Sod2 leads to enhanced p130cas phosphorylation in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma and UM-UC-6 bladder cancer cells. These changes are mediated by H2O2, as co-expression of Catalase abrogates p130cas phosphorylation and its interaction with the adapter protein Crk. Importantly, we establish that the redox environment influence the localization of the tumor suppressor and phosphatase PTEN, in both redox-engineered and metastatic bladder cancer cells that display endogenous increases in H2O2. Importantly, PTEN oxidation leads to its dissociation from the plasma membrane. This indicates that oxidation of PTEN not only influences its activity, but also regulates its cellular localization, effectively removing it from its primary site of lipid phosphatase activity. These data introduce hitherto unappreciated paradigms whereby ROS can reciprocally regulate the cellular localization of pro- and anti-migratory signaling molecules, p130cas and PTEN, respectively. These data further confirm that altering antioxidant status and the intracellular ROS

  14. Optimal conservation of migratory species.

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    Tara G Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migratory animals comprise a significant portion of biodiversity worldwide with annual investment for their conservation exceeding several billion dollars. Designing effective conservation plans presents enormous challenges. Migratory species are influenced by multiple events across land and sea-regions that are often separated by thousands of kilometres and span international borders. To date, conservation strategies for migratory species fail to take into account how migratory animals are spatially connected between different periods of the annual cycle (i.e. migratory connectivity bringing into question the utility and efficiency of current conservation efforts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report the first framework for determining an optimal conservation strategy for a migratory species. Employing a decision theoretic approach using dynamic optimization, we address the problem of how to allocate resources for habitat conservation for a Neotropical-Nearctic migratory bird, the American redstart Setophaga ruticilla, whose winter habitat is under threat. Our first conservation strategy used the acquisition of winter habitat based on land cost, relative bird density, and the rate of habitat loss to maximize the abundance of birds on the wintering grounds. Our second strategy maximized bird abundance across the entire range of the species by adding the constraint of maintaining a minimum percentage of birds within each breeding region in North America using information on migratory connectivity as estimated from stable-hydrogen isotopes in feathers. We show that failure to take into account migratory connectivity may doom some regional populations to extinction, whereas including information on migratory connectivity results in the protection of the species across its entire range. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that conservation strategies for migratory animals depend critically upon two factors: knowledge of

  15. Optimal Conservation of Migratory Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tara G.; Chadès, Iadine; Arcese, Peter; Marra, Peter P.; Possingham, Hugh P.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2007-01-01

    Background Migratory animals comprise a significant portion of biodiversity worldwide with annual investment for their conservation exceeding several billion dollars. Designing effective conservation plans presents enormous challenges. Migratory species are influenced by multiple events across land and sea–regions that are often separated by thousands of kilometres and span international borders. To date, conservation strategies for migratory species fail to take into account how migratory animals are spatially connected between different periods of the annual cycle (i.e. migratory connectivity) bringing into question the utility and efficiency of current conservation efforts. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report the first framework for determining an optimal conservation strategy for a migratory species. Employing a decision theoretic approach using dynamic optimization, we address the problem of how to allocate resources for habitat conservation for a Neotropical-Nearctic migratory bird, the American redstart Setophaga ruticilla, whose winter habitat is under threat. Our first conservation strategy used the acquisition of winter habitat based on land cost, relative bird density, and the rate of habitat loss to maximize the abundance of birds on the wintering grounds. Our second strategy maximized bird abundance across the entire range of the species by adding the constraint of maintaining a minimum percentage of birds within each breeding region in North America using information on migratory connectivity as estimated from stable-hydrogen isotopes in feathers. We show that failure to take into account migratory connectivity may doom some regional populations to extinction, whereas including information on migratory connectivity results in the protection of the species across its entire range. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that conservation strategies for migratory animals depend critically upon two factors: knowledge of migratory

  16. Regulation of aggregate size and pattern by adenosine and caffeine in cellular slime molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal Pundrik

    2012-01-01

    . Our data strongly suggests that cytosolic glucose and extracellular cAMP levels are the other major determinants regulating aggregate size and pattern. Importantly, the aggregation process is conserved among different lineages of cellular slime molds despite using unrelated signalling molecules for aggregation.

  17. Identification and characterization of cellular receptors for the growth regulator, oncostatin M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsley, P.S.; Bolton-Hanson, M.; Horn, D.; Malik, N.; Kallestad, J.C.; Ochs, V.; Zarling, J.M.; Shoyab, M.

    1989-03-15

    Oncostatin M is a polypeptide growth regulator produced by activated T cells and phorbol ester-treated U937 cells. To identify specific cellular receptors for this factor, we have characterized the binding of 125I-labeled oncostatin M to a variety of normal and malignant mammalian cells. Recombinant oncostatin M was labeled with 125I with full retention of growth inhibitory activity on A375 melanoma cells. 125I-Oncostatin M bound to sensitive cells in a time- and temperature-dependent fashion. Binding was specifically inhibited by unlabeled native or recombinant oncostatin M, but not by other polypeptide growth factors tested. Binding to human leukemic and normal blood cells was generally less than to nonhematopoietic cells. With four different cell lines, maximal growth inhibition by oncostatin M was achieved at less than maximal binding site occupancy. Scatchard graphs of direct binding data were curvilinear and indicated that 125I-oncostatin M bound with higher apparent affinity at lower 125I-oncostatin M concentrations. Using a two binding site model, affinity constants of Kd1 = 11 +/- 11 pM and Kd2 = 1000 +/- 380 pM were extrapolated from binding data with A375 cells, and values of Kd1 = 3 +/- 2 pM and Kd2 = 400 +/- 44 pM from A549 cells. The major 125I-oncostatin M binding species in a number of mammalian cell lines was identified by chemical cross-linking as a specific protein(s) of Mr = 150,000-160,000. 125I-Oncostatin M was internalized (t1/2 = 30 min) and degraded subsequent to binding to a responsive cell line.

  18. SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN Regulate CD99-Mediated Cellular Differentiation in Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

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    Wenjing Jian

    Full Text Available Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL is a lymphoid neoplasm characterized by Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg (H/RS cells, which is regulated by CD99. We previously reported that CD99 downregulation led to the transformation of murine B lymphoma cells (A20 into cells with an H/RS phenotype, while CD99 upregulation induced differentiation of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL cells (L428 into terminal B-cells. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, using fluorescence two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS, we have analyzed the alteration of protein expression following CD99 upregulation in L428 cells as well as downregulation of mouse CD99 antigen-like 2 (mCD99L2 in A20 cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN, which are cytoskeleton proteins, were significantly differentially expressed, and chosen for further validation and functional analysis. Differential expression of SEPTIN2 was found in both models and was inversely correlated with CD99 expression. STATHMIN was identified in the A20 cell line model and its expression was positively correlated with that of CD99. Importantly, silencing of SEPTIN2 with siRNA substantially altered the cellular cytoskeleton in L428 cells. The downregulation of STATHMIN by siRNA promoted the differentiation of H/RS cells toward terminal B-cells. These results suggest that SEPTIN2-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and STATHMIN-mediated differentiation may contribute to changes in cell morphology and differentiation of H/RS cells with CD99 upregulation in HL.

  19. Identification of genes that regulate multiple cellular processes/responses in the context of lipotoxicity to hepatoma cells

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    Yedwabnick Matthew

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to devise efficient treatments for complex, multi-factorial diseases, it is important to identify the genes which regulate multiple cellular processes. Exposure to elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α alters multiple cellular processes, causing lipotoxicity. Intracellular lipid accumulation has been shown to reduce the lipotoxicity of saturated FFA. We hypothesized that the genes which simultaneously regulate lipid accumulation as well as cytotoxicity may provide better targets to counter lipotoxicity of saturated FFA. Results As a model system to test this hypothesis, human hepatoblastoma cells (HepG2 were exposed to elevated physiological levels of FFAs and TNF-α. Triglyceride (TG accumulation, toxicity and the genomic responses to the treatments were measured. Here, we present a framework to identify such genes in the context of lipotoxicity. The aim of the current study is to identify the genes that could be altered to treat or ameliorate the cellular responses affected by a complex disease rather than to identify the causal genes. Genes that regulate the TG accumulation, cytotoxicity or both were identified by a modified genetic algorithm partial least squares (GA/PLS analysis. The analyses identified NADH dehydrogenase and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs as important regulators of both cytotoxicity and lipid accumulation in response to FFA and TNF-α exposure. In agreement with the predictions, inhibiting NADH dehydrogenase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK reduced cytotoxicity significantly and increased intracellular TG accumulation. Inhibiting another MAPK pathway, the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK, on the other hand, improved the cytotoxicity without changing TG accumulation. Much greater reduction in the toxicity was observed upon inhibiting the NADH dehydrogenase and MAPK (which were identified by the dual-response analysis, than for the

  20. Detection of regulatory circuits by integrating the cellular networks of protein–protein interactions and transcription regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Margalit, Hanah

    2003-01-01

    The post-genomic era is marked by huge amounts of data generated by large-scale functional genomic and proteomic experiments. A major challenge is to integrate the various types of genome-scale information in order to reveal the intra- and inter- relationships between genes and proteins that constitute a living cell. Here we present a novel application of classical graph algorithms to integrate the cellular networks of protein–protein interactions and transcription regulation. We demonstrate ...

  1. DNMT3a epigenetic program regulates the HIF-2α oxygen-sensing pathway and the cellular response to hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Lachance, Gabriel; Uniacke, James; Audas, Timothy E.; Holterman, Chet E.; Franovic, Aleksandra; Payette, Josianne; Lee, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3a) mediates the de novo methylation of DNA to regulate gene expression and maintain cellular homeostasis. Mutations in DNMT3a in primary tumors suggest that the DNMT3a epigenetic program is modified during early tumorigenesis. We show that a major consequence of DNMT3a defects is the epigenetic deregulation and unscheduled activation of the EPAS1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 2α) gene that facilitates growth and viability under conditions of low oxygen availability....

  2. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Plays as a Physiological Glucose Sensor and Regulates Cellular Contractility in Rat Mesangial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Masanori Wakisaka; Tetsuhiko Nagao; Mototaka Yoshinari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mesangial cells play an important role in regulating glomerular filtration by altering their cellular tone. We report the presence of a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT) in rat mesangial cells. This study in rat mesangial cells aimed to evaluate the expression and role of SGLT2. Methods The SGLT2 expression in rat mesangial cells was assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Changes in the mesangial cell surface area at different gluc...

  3. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  4. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  5. Quantitative profiling of spreading-coupled protein tyrosine phosphorylation in migratory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yajun; Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Yuanya; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaorong; Liu, Kehui; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is an important mechanism that regulates cytoskeleton reorganization and cell spreading of migratory cells. A number of cytoskeletal proteins are known to be tyrosine phosphorylated (pY) in different cellular processes. However, the profile of pY proteins during different stages of cell spreading has not been available. Using immunoafffinity enrichment of pY proteins coupled with label free quantitative proteomics, we quantitatively identified 447 pY proteins in the migratory ECV-304 cells at the early spreading (adhesion) and the active spreading stages. We found that pY levels of the majority of the quantified proteins were significantly increased in the active spreading stage compared with the early spreading stage, suggesting that active cell spreading is concomitant with extra tyrosine phosphorylation. The major categories of proteins impacted by tyrosine phosphorylation are involved in cytoskeleton and focal adhesion regulation, protein translation and degradation. Our findings, for the first time, dissect the cell spreading-specific pY signals from the adhesion induced pY signals, and provide a valuable resource for the future mechanistic research regarding the regulation of cell spreading. PMID:27554326

  6. Cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying blood flow regulation in the retina and choroid in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A; Chan-Ling, Tailoi

    2012-09-01

    We review the cellular and physiological mechanisms responsible for the regulation of blood flow in the retina and choroid in health and disease. Due to the intrinsic light sensitivity of the retina and the direct visual accessibility of fundus blood vessels, the eye offers unique opportunities for the non-invasive investigation of mechanisms of blood flow regulation. The ability of the retinal vasculature to regulate its blood flow is contrasted with the far more restricted ability of the choroidal circulation to regulate its blood flow by virtue of the absence of glial cells, the markedly reduced pericyte ensheathment of the choroidal vasculature, and the lack of intermediate filaments in choroidal pericytes. We review the cellular and molecular components of the neurovascular unit in the retina and choroid, techniques for monitoring retinal and choroidal blood flow, responses of the retinal and choroidal circulation to light stimulation, the role of capillaries, astrocytes and pericytes in regulating blood flow, putative signaling mechanisms mediating neurovascular coupling in the retina, and changes that occur in the retinal and choroidal circulation during diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and Alzheimer's disease. We close by discussing issues that remain to be explored.

  7. Regulation of biofilm formation and cellular buoyancy through modulating intracellular cyclic di-GMP levels in engineered cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Marco; Waters, Christopher M; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic dimeric (3'→5') GMP (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in the transition between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation, cellular aggregation or flocculation, and cellular buoyancy are under the control of c-di-GMP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) and Fremyella diplosiphon. Synechocystis is a unicellular cyanobacterium and displays lower levels of c-di-GMP; F. diplosiphon is filamentous and displays higher intracellular c-di-GMP levels. We transformed Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon with a plasmid for constitutive expression of genes encoding diguanylate cylase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) proteins from Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli, respectively. These engineered strains allowed us to modulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Biofilm formation and cellular deposition were induced in the DGC-expressing Synechocystis strain which exhibited high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP; whereas strains expressing PDE in Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon to drive low intracellular levels of c-di-GMP exhibited enhanced cellular buoyancy. In addition, the PDE-expressing F. diplosiphon strain showed elevated chlorophyll levels. These results imply roles for coordinating c-di-GMP homeostasis in regulating native cyanobacterial phenotypes. Engineering exogenous DGC or PDE proteins to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels represents an effective tool for uncovering cryptic phenotypes or modulating phenotypes in cyanobacteria for practical applications in biotechnology applicable in photobioreactors and in green biotechnologies, such as energy-efficient harvesting of cellular biomass or the treatment of metal-containing wastewaters.

  8. Involvement of the interferon-regulated antiviral proteins PKR and RNase L in reovirus-induced shutoff of cellular translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer A; Schmechel, Stephen C; Williams, Bryan R G; Silverman, Robert H; Schiff, Leslie A

    2005-02-01

    Cellular translation is inhibited following infection with most strains of reovirus, but the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. The extent of host shutoff varies in a strain-dependent manner; infection with the majority of strains leads to strong host shutoff, while infection with strain Dearing results in minimal inhibition of cellular translation. A genetic study with reassortant viruses and subsequent biochemical analyses led to the hypothesis that the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, PKR, is responsible for reovirus-induced host shutoff. To directly determine whether PKR is responsible for reovirus-induced host shutoff, we used a panel of reovirus strains and mouse embryo fibroblasts derived from knockout mice. This approach revealed that PKR contributes to but is not wholly responsible for reovirus-induced host shutoff. Studies with cells lacking RNase L, the endoribonuclease component of the interferon-regulated 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase-RNase L system, demonstrated that RNase L also down-regulates cellular protein synthesis in reovirus-infected cells. In many viral systems, PKR and RNase L have well-characterized antiviral functions. An analysis of reovirus replication in cells lacking these molecules indicated that, while they contributed to host shutoff, neither PKR nor RNase L exerted an antiviral effect on reovirus growth. In fact, some strains of reovirus replicated more efficiently in the presence of PKR and RNase L than in their absence. Data presented in this report illustrate that the inhibition of cellular translation following reovirus infection is complex and involves multiple interferon-regulated gene products. In addition, our results suggest that reovirus has evolved effective mechanisms to avoid the actions of the interferon-stimulated antiviral pathways that include PKR and RNase L and may even benefit from their expression.

  9. Protease activated receptor-1 regulates macrophage-mediated cellular senescence : a risk for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Cong; Rezaee, Farhad; Waasdorp, Maaike; Shi, Kun; van der Poll, Tom; Borensztajn, Keren; Spek, C. Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a destructive disease in part resulting from premature or mature cellular aging. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) recently emerged as a critical component in the context of fibrotic lung diseases. Therefore, we aimed to study the role of macrophages in PAR

  10. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 Plays as a Physiological Glucose Sensor and Regulates Cellular Contractility in Rat Mesangial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Wakisaka

    Full Text Available Mesangial cells play an important role in regulating glomerular filtration by altering their cellular tone. We report the presence of a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT in rat mesangial cells. This study in rat mesangial cells aimed to evaluate the expression and role of SGLT2.The SGLT2 expression in rat mesangial cells was assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Changes in the mesangial cell surface area at different glucose concentrations and the effects of extracellular Na+ and Ca2+ and of SGLT and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX inhibitors on cellular size were determined. The cellular sizes and the contractile response were examined during a 6-day incubation with high glucose with or without phlorizin, an SGLT inhibitor.Western blotting revealed an SGLT2 band, and RT-PCR analysis of SGLT2 revealed the predicted 422-bp band in both rat mesangial and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. The cell surface area changed according to the extracellular glucose concentration. The glucose-induced contraction was abolished by the absence of either extracellular Na+ or Ca2+ and by SGLT and NCX inhibitors. Under the high glucose condition, the cell size decreased for 2 days and increased afterwards; these cells did not contract in response to angiotensin II, and the SGLT inhibitor restored the abolished contraction.These data suggest that SGLT2 is expressed in rat mesangial cells, acts as a normal physiological glucose sensor and regulates cellular contractility in rat mesangial cells.

  11. Cellular regulation of dinoflagellate bioluminescence : characterizing mechanosensitive ion channels in the signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence represents a dramatic response to mechanical stress found in nature. The cellular mechanisms that govern this pathway, however, are not completely understood. The objective of this thesis is to build and expand from previous studies to explore the mechanosensitive properties of dinoflagellate bioluminescence. Chapter I tests the hypothesis that the signaling pathway involves a stretch-activated component. Chapter I uses two separate, measurable types of biolumin...

  12. Regulation of aggregate size and pattern by adenosine and caffeine in cellular slime molds

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal Pundrik; Soldati Thierry; Thewes Sascha; Baskar Ramamurthy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multicellularity in cellular slime molds is achieved by aggregation of several hundreds to thousands of cells. In the model slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, adenosine is known to increase the aggregate size and its antagonist caffeine reduces the aggregate size. However, it is not clear if the actions of adenosine and caffeine are evolutionarily conserved among other slime molds known to use structurally unrelated chemoattractants. We have examined how the known factor...

  13. Mechanisms and Regulation of Intestinal Absorption of Water-soluble Vitamins: Cellular and Molecular Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Ebba; Said, Hamid M

    2012-01-01

    The water-soluble vitamins represent a group of structurally and functionally unrelated compounds that share the common feature of being essential for normal cellular functions, growth, and development. With the exception of some endogenous production of niacin, human cells cannot synthesize...... or deficiency. An impaired absorptive function occurs in a variety of conditions including congenital defects in the digestive or absorptive processes, intestinal diseases, drug interaction, and chronic alcohol use....

  14. Chapter Three - Ubiquitination and Protein Turnover of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in GPCR Signaling and Cellular Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penela, P

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for regulating a wide variety of physiological processes, and distinct mechanisms for GPCR inactivation exist to guarantee correct receptor functionality. One of the widely used mechanisms is receptor phosphorylation by specific G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), leading to uncoupling from G proteins (desensitization) and receptor internalization. GRKs and β-arrestins also participate in the assembly of receptor-associated multimolecular complexes, thus initiating alternative G-protein-independent signaling events. In addition, the abundant GRK2 kinase has diverse "effector" functions in cellular migration, proliferation, and metabolism homeostasis by means of the phosphorylation or interaction with non-GPCR partners. Altered expression of GRKs (particularly of GRK2 and GRK5) occurs during pathological conditions characterized by impaired GPCR signaling including inflammatory syndromes, cardiovascular disease, and tumor contexts. It is increasingly appreciated that different pathways governing GRK protein stability play a role in the modulation of kinase levels in normal and pathological conditions. Thus, enhanced GRK2 degradation by the proteasome pathway occurs upon GPCR stimulation, what allows cellular adaptation to chronic stimulation in a physiological setting. β-arrestins participate in this process by facilitating GRK2 phosphorylation by different kinases and by recruiting diverse E3 ubiquitin ligase to the receptor complex. Different proteolytic systems (ubiquitin-proteasome, calpains), chaperone activities and signaling pathways influence the stability of GRKs in different ways, thus endowing specificity to GPCR regulation as protein turnover of GRKs can be differentially affected. Therefore, modulation of protein stability of GRKs emerges as a versatile mechanism for feedback regulation of GPCR signaling and basic cellular processes. PMID:27378756

  15. Migratory birds, ticks, and Bartonella

    OpenAIRE

    Molin, Ylva; Lindeborg, Mats; Nyström, Fredrik; Madder, Maxime; Hjelm, Eva; Olsen, Björn; Thomas G.T. Jaenson; Ehrenborg, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Bartonella spp. infections are considered to be vector-borne zoonoses; ticks are suspected vectors of bartonellae. Migratory birds can disperse ticks infected with zoonotic pathogens such as Rickettsia and tickborne encephalitis virus and possibly also Bartonella. Thus, in the present study 386 tick specimens collected in spring 2009 from migratory birds on the Mediterranean islands Capri and Antikythera were screened for Bartonella spp. RNA. One or more ticks were found on 2.7% of the birds....

  16. Revolutionary non-migratory migrants

    OpenAIRE

    Jonker, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    In the migratory behaviour of the Barnacle Goose Branta leucopsis several changes have occurred over the past few decades. Barnacle geese breeding in Russia have delayed the commencement of spring migration with approximately one month since the 1980s, new populations have emerged in former stopover areas in the Baltic Sea region, and a non-migratory population has emerged in the wintering area in The Netherlands. This thesis aims to understand these changes. First, I studied the delay in com...

  17. Negative Regulation of STAT3 Protein-mediated Cellular Respiration by SIRT1 Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro;

    2011-01-01

    those of wild-type controls. Comparison of profiles of phospho-antibody array data indicated that the deletion of SirT1 was accompanied by constitutive activation of the pro-inflammatory NF-¿B pathway, which is key for STAT3 induction and increased cellular respiration in Sirt1-KO cells. Thus, SIRT1...... cells exhibited higher mitochondrial respiration as compared with wild-type MEFs. Two independent approaches, including ectopic expression of SIRT1 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of STAT3, led to reduction in intracellular ATP levels and increased lactate production in Sirt1-KO cells that were approaching...

  18. EGF-mediated regulation of IGFBP-3 determines esophageal epithelial cellular response to IGF-I

    OpenAIRE

    TAKAOKA, MUNENORI; Smith, Caitlin E.; Mashiba, Michael K.; Okawa, Takaomi; Andl, Claudia D; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    IGF and EGF regulate various physiological and pathological processes. IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3 regulates cell proliferation in IGF-dependent and -independent fashions. Recently, we identified IGFBP-3 as a novel EGF receptor (EGFR) downstream target molecule in primary and immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells, suggesting an interplay between the EGF and IGF signaling pathways. However, the regulatory mechanisms for IGFBP-3 expression and its functional role in esophageal cell p...

  19. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. ► Endothelial VEGFR levels are

  20. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F. [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mughal, Nadeem A. [Leeds Vascular Institute, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H. [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi [Leeds Vascular Institute, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan, E-mail: s.ponnambalam@leeds.ac.uk [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  1. The cellular protooncogenes c-fos and egr-1 are regulated by prostacyclin in rodent osteoblasts and fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glantschnig, H; Varga, F; Klaushofer, K

    1996-11-01

    PGs are local regulators of various cellular functions. They exert their effects via specific PG receptor subtypes. Induction of c-fos gene expression has been described for arachidonic acid and its metabolite PGE2. We demonstrate that another very short half-lifed prostanoid metabolite, namely prostacyclin (PGI2), is a regulator of immediate-early genes. PGI2 transiently induced the growth-associated immediate-early genes c-fos and egr-1 in osteoblastic as well as fibroblastic cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that PGI2 dose dependently stimulated new DNA synthesis in the osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. Although PGI2 is known to be a potent inducer of cyclooxygenases, we showed that this pathway is not necessary for protooncogene induction by PGI2. Our data indicate a direct effect of PGI2 on immediate-early gene expression, which does not depend on the synthesis of other prostanoids. Intracellular signal transduction mechanisms were studied with the protein kinase inhibitor H-7, a potent inhibitor of PGI2-induced c-fos expression. Experiments with phorbol esters revealed that protein kinase C activity is not obligatory for the effect of PGI2 on c-fos expression. We conclude from these results that PGI2, a rapidly inactivated prostanoid, has a major impact on cellular oncogene expression and growth in mesenchymally derived cells.

  2. Interleukin-27 inhibits vaccine-enhanced pulmonary disease following respiratory syncytial virus infection by regulating cellular memory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ruihong; Zhang, Huixian; Hai, Yan; Cui, Yuxiu; Wei, Lin; Li, Na; Liu, Jianxun; Li, Caixia; Liu, Ying

    2012-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of lower respiratory tract disease in young children. In the 1960s, infants vaccinated with formalin-inactivated RSV developed a more severe disease characterized by excessive inflammatory immunopathology in lungs upon natural RSV infection. The fear of causing the vaccine-enhanced disease (VED) is an important obstacle for development of safe and effective RSV vaccines. The recombinant vaccine candidate G1F/M2 immunization also led to VED. It has been proved that cellular memory induced by RSV vaccines contributed to VED. Interleukin-27 (IL-27) and IL-23 regulate Th1, Th17, and/or Th2 cellular immune responses. In this study, mice coimmunized with pcDNA3-IL-27 and G1F/M2 were fully protected and, importantly, did not develop vaccine-enhanced inflammatory responses and immunopathology in lungs after RSV challenge, which was correlated with moderate Th1-, suppressed Th2-, and Th17-like memory responses activated by RSV. In contrast, G1F/M2- or pcDNA3-IL-23+G1F/M2-immunized mice, in which robust Th2- and Th17-like memory responses were induced, developed enhanced pulmonary inflammation and severe immunopathology. Mice coimmunized with G1F/M2 and the two cytokine plasmids exhibited mild inflammatory responses as well as remarkable Th1-, suppressed Th2-, and Th17-like memory responses. These results suggested that Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-like memory responses and, in particular, excessive Th2- and Th17-like memory responses were closely associated with VED; IL-27 may inhibit VED following respiratory syncytial virus infection by regulating cellular memory responses.

  3. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kirjavainen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and polarization of various cell types, and, thus, serves as a candidate regulator of hair cell polarity. We have here induced Cdc42 inactivation in the late-embryonic OC. We show the role of Cdc42 in the establishment of planar polarity of hair cells and in cellular patterning. Abnormal planar polarity was displayed as disturbances in hair bundle orientation and morphology and in kinocilium/basal body positioning. These defects were accompanied by a disorganized cell-surface microtubule network. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC, a putative Cdc42 effector, colocalized with Cdc42 at the hair cell apex, and aPKC expression was altered upon Cdc42 depletion. Our data suggest that Cdc42 together with aPKC is part of the machinery establishing hair cell planar polarity and that Cdc42 acts on polarity through the cell-surface microtubule network. The data also suggest that defects in apical polarization are influenced by disturbed cellular patterning in the OC. In addition, our data demonstrates that Cdc42 is required for stereociliogenesis in the immature cochlea.

  4. A new flow-regulating cell type in the Demosponge Tethya wilhelma - functional cellular anatomy of a leuconoid canal system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg U Hammel

    Full Text Available Demosponges possess a leucon-type canal system which is characterized by a highly complex network of canal segments and choanocyte chambers. As sponges are sessile filter feeders, their aquiferous system plays an essential role in various fundamental physiological processes. Due to the morphological and architectural complexity of the canal system and the strong interdependence between flow conditions and anatomy, our understanding of fluid dynamics throughout leuconoid systems is patchy. This paper provides comprehensive morphometric data on the general architecture of the canal system, flow measurements and detailed cellular anatomical information to help fill in the gaps. We focus on the functional cellular anatomy of the aquiferous system and discuss all relevant cell types in the context of hydrodynamic and evolutionary constraints. Our analysis is based on the canal system of the tropical demosponge Tethya wilhelma, which we studied using scanning electron microscopy. We found a hitherto undescribed cell type, the reticuloapopylocyte, which is involved in flow regulation in the choanocyte chambers. It has a highly fenestrated, grid-like morphology and covers the apopylar opening. The minute opening of the reticuloapopylocyte occurs in an opened, intermediate and closed state. These states permit a gradual regulation of the total apopylar opening area. In this paper the three states are included in a theoretical study into flow conditions which aims to draw a link between functional cellular anatomy, the hydrodynamic situation and the regular body contractions seen in T. wilhelma. This provides a basis for new hypotheses regarding the function of bypass elements and the role of hydrostatic pressure in body contractions. Our study provides insights into the local and global flow conditions in the sponge canal system and thus enhances current understanding of related physiological processes.

  5. A new flow-regulating cell type in the Demosponge Tethya wilhelma - functional cellular anatomy of a leuconoid canal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Jörg U; Nickel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Demosponges possess a leucon-type canal system which is characterized by a highly complex network of canal segments and choanocyte chambers. As sponges are sessile filter feeders, their aquiferous system plays an essential role in various fundamental physiological processes. Due to the morphological and architectural complexity of the canal system and the strong interdependence between flow conditions and anatomy, our understanding of fluid dynamics throughout leuconoid systems is patchy. This paper provides comprehensive morphometric data on the general architecture of the canal system, flow measurements and detailed cellular anatomical information to help fill in the gaps. We focus on the functional cellular anatomy of the aquiferous system and discuss all relevant cell types in the context of hydrodynamic and evolutionary constraints. Our analysis is based on the canal system of the tropical demosponge Tethya wilhelma, which we studied using scanning electron microscopy. We found a hitherto undescribed cell type, the reticuloapopylocyte, which is involved in flow regulation in the choanocyte chambers. It has a highly fenestrated, grid-like morphology and covers the apopylar opening. The minute opening of the reticuloapopylocyte occurs in an opened, intermediate and closed state. These states permit a gradual regulation of the total apopylar opening area. In this paper the three states are included in a theoretical study into flow conditions which aims to draw a link between functional cellular anatomy, the hydrodynamic situation and the regular body contractions seen in T. wilhelma. This provides a basis for new hypotheses regarding the function of bypass elements and the role of hydrostatic pressure in body contractions. Our study provides insights into the local and global flow conditions in the sponge canal system and thus enhances current understanding of related physiological processes.

  6. Thioredoxin-dependent Redox Regulation of Cellular Signaling and Stress Response through Reversible Oxidation of Methionines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-06-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common feature of many forms of stress to which plants are exposed. Successful adaptation to changing environmental conditions requires sensitive sensors of ROS such as protein-bound methionines that are converted to their corresponding methionine sulfoxides, which in turn can influence cellular signaling pathways. Such a signaling protein is calmodulin, which represents an early and central point in calcium signaling pathways important to stress response in plants. We describe recent work elucidating fundamental mechanisms of reversible methionine oxidation within calmodulin, including the sensitivity of individual methionines within plant and animal calmodulin to ROS, the structural and functional consequences of their oxidation, and the interactions of oxidized calmodulin with methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes.

  7. p53-Dependent Nestin Regulation Links Tumor Suppression to Cellular Plasticity in Liver Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; Xue, Wen; Calvisi, Diego F;

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor coordinates a series of antiproliferative responses that restrict the expansion of malignant cells, and as a consequence, p53 is lost or mutated in the majority of human cancers. Here, we show that p53 restricts expression of the stem and progenitor-cell-associated protei...... by p53 restricts cellular plasticity and tumorigenesis in liver cancer.......The p53 tumor suppressor coordinates a series of antiproliferative responses that restrict the expansion of malignant cells, and as a consequence, p53 is lost or mutated in the majority of human cancers. Here, we show that p53 restricts expression of the stem and progenitor-cell-associated protein...

  8. Cytochrome P450s in the Regulation of Cellular Retinoic Acid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, A. Catharine; Zolfaghari, Reza

    2011-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA), is a powerful regulator of gene transcription. RA is also a therapeutic drug. The oxidative metabolism of RA by certain members of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily helps to maintain tissue RA concentrations within appropriate bounds. The CYP26 family—CYP26A1, CYP26B1, and CYP26C1—is distinguished by being both regulated by and active toward all-trans-RA (at-RA) while being expressed in different tissue-specific patterns. The CYP26A1...

  9. A Novel Chitosan CpG Nanoparticle Regulates Cellular and Humoral Immunity of Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To develop a safe and novel immunoadjuvant to enhance the immunity and resistance of animals against E.coli infection. Methods An 88-base immunostimulatory oligodeoxynuleotide containing eleven CpG motifs (CpG ODN)was synthesized and amplified by PCR. The chitosan nanoparticle (CNP) was prepared by ion linking method to entrap the CpG ODN that significantly promotes the proliferation of lymphocytes of pig in vitro. Then the CpG- CNP was inoculated into 21-day old Kunming mice, which were orally challenged with virulent K88/K99 E. Coli 35 days after inoculation. Blood was collected from the tail vein of mice on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, and 49 after inoculation to detect the changes and content of immunoglobulins, cytokines and immune cells by ELISA, such as IgG, IgA, IgM, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6. Results The CpG provoked remarkable proliferation of lymphocytes of pig in vitro in comparison with that of control group (P<0.05). The inoculation with CpG-CNP significantly raised the content of IgG, IgM, and IgA in the sera of immunized mice (P<0.05). The levels of IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6 in the mice significantly increased in comparison with those in controls (P<0.05), so was the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes in immunized mice. The humoral and cellular immunities were significantly enhanced in immunized mice, which resisted the infection of E. coli and survived, while the control mice manifested evident symptoms and lesions of infection. Conclusions CpG-CNP can significantly promote cellular and humoral immunity and resistance of mice against E. coli infection, and can be utilized as an effective adjuvant to improve the immunoprotection and resistance of porcine against infectious disease.

  10. Nutrient-induced modulation of gene expression and cellular functions: modeling epigenetic regulation in bovine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA), especially butyrate, participate in metabolism both as nutrients and as regulators of histone deacetylation. The major biochemical change that occurs in cells treated with butyrate is the global hyperacetylation of histones. One paradigmatic example of the nutrient-epige...

  11. Cellular contractility and extracellular matrix stiffness regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haage, Amanda; Schneider, Ian C

    2014-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is often driven by local invasion and metastasis. Recently, mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment have been identified as potent regulators of invasion and metastasis, while matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically known as significant enhancers of cancer cell migration and invasion. Here we have been able to sensitively measure MMP activity changes in response to specific extracellular matrix (ECM) environments and cell contractility states. Cells of a pancreatic cancer cell line, Panc-1, up-regulate MMP activities between 3- and 10-fold with increased cell contractility. Conversely, they down-regulate MMP activities when contractility is blocked to levels seen with pan-MMP activity inhibitors. Similar, albeit attenuated, responses are seen in other pancreatic cancer cell lines, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1. In addition, MMP activity was modulated by substrate stiffness, collagen gel concentration, and the degree of collagen cross-linking, when cells were plated on collagen gels ranging from 0.5 to 5 mg/ml that span the physiological range of substrate stiffness (50-2000 Pa). Panc-1 cells showed enhanced MMP activity on stiffer substrates, whereas BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 cells showed diminished MMP activity. In addition, eliminating heparan sulfate proteoglycans using heparinase completely abrogated the mechanical induction of MMP activity. These results demonstrate the first functional link between MMP activity, contractility, and ECM stiffness and provide an explanation as to why stiffer environments result in enhanced cell migration and invasion.

  12. Cell Cycle Regulates Nuclear Stability of AID and Determines the Cellular Response to AID.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quy Le

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AID (Activation Induced Deaminase deaminates cytosines in DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification and to reprogram CpG methylation in early development. AID is potentially highly mutagenic, and it causes genomic instability evident as translocations in B cell malignancies. Here we show that AID is cell cycle regulated. By high content screening microscopy, we demonstrate that AID undergoes nuclear degradation more slowly in G1 phase than in S or G2-M phase, and that mutations that affect regulatory phosphorylation or catalytic activity can alter AID stability and abundance. We directly test the role of cell cycle regulation by fusing AID to tags that destabilize nuclear protein outside of G1 or S-G2/M phases. We show that enforced nuclear localization of AID in G1 phase accelerates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, and is well-tolerated; while nuclear AID compromises viability in S-G2/M phase cells. We identify AID derivatives that accelerate somatic hypermutation with minimal impact on viability, which will be useful tools for engineering genes and proteins by iterative mutagenesis and selection. Our results further suggest that use of cell cycle tags to regulate nuclear stability may be generally applicable to studying DNA repair and to engineering the genome.

  13. Extracellular Matrix components regulate cellular polarity and tissue structure in the developing and mature Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed.

  14. Cellular differentiation regulated by gibberellin in the Arabidopsis thaliana pickle mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogas, J.; Somerville, C. [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States); Cheng, Jin-Chen; Sung, R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-07-04

    The plant growth regulator gibberellin (GA) has a profound effect on shoot development and promotes developmental transitions such as flowering. Little is known about any analogous effect GA might have on root development. In a screen for mutants, Arabi-dopsis plants carrying a mutation designated pickle (pkl) were isolated in which the primary root meristem retained characteristics of embryonic tissue. Expression of this aberrant differentiation state was suppressed by GA. Root tissue from plants carrying the pkl mutation spontaneously regenerated new embryos and plants. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. GASOTRANSMITTERS: FROM THE TOXIC EFFECTS TO THE REGULATION OF CELLULAR FUNCTION AND CLINICAL APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Sitdikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide II (NO, carbon monoxide (СО and hydrogen sulfide (H2S for many decades were described as the toxic gases inducing damaging action in man’s organisms. Recently it was found that NO, CO and H2S endogenously synthesized and served as signaling molecules of autocrine and paracrine regulation in many systems. The properties, mechanisms of synthesis and action in excitable systems are presented in this paper. Besides we also descried our results concerning the effects and mechanisms of action of gaseous messengers in peripheral nervous system – in neuromuscular junction. 

  16. Metformin-mediated increase in DICER1 regulates microRNA expression and cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noren Hooten, Nicole; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Dluzen, Douglas F; Zhang, Yongqing; Bernier, Michel; Zonderman, Alan B; Becker, Kevin G; Gorospe, Myriam; de Cabo, Rafael; Evans, Michele K

    2016-06-01

    Metformin, an oral hypoglycemic agent, has been used for decades to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent studies indicate that mice treated with metformin live longer and have fewer manifestations of age-related chronic disease. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotype are unknown. Here, we show that metformin treatment increases the levels of the microRNA-processing protein DICER1 in mice and in humans with diabetes mellitus. Our results indicate that metformin upregulates DICER1 through a post-transcriptional mechanism involving the RNA-binding protein AUF1. Treatment with metformin altered the subcellular localization of AUF1, disrupting its interaction with DICER1 mRNA and rendering DICER1 mRNA stable, allowing DICER1 to accumulate. Consistent with the role of DICER1 in the biogenesis of microRNAs, we found differential patterns of microRNA expression in mice treated with metformin or caloric restriction, two proven life-extending interventions. Interestingly, several microRNAs previously associated with senescence and aging, including miR-20a, miR-34a, miR-130a, miR-106b, miR-125, and let-7c, were found elevated. In agreement with these findings, treatment with metformin decreased cellular senescence in several senescence models in a DICER1-dependent manner. Metformin lowered p16 and p21 protein levels and the abundance of inflammatory cytokines and oncogenes that are hallmarks of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). These data lead us to hypothesize that changes in DICER1 levels may be important for organismal aging and to propose that interventions that upregulate DICER1 expression (e.g., metformin) may offer new pharmacotherapeutic approaches for age-related disease. PMID:26990999

  17. Intra-cellular mechanism of Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in regulation of follicular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Emily; Kushnir, Vitaly; Ma, Xiaoting; Biswas, Anindita; Prizant, Hen; Gleicher, Norbert; Sen, Aritro

    2016-09-15

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and plays a crucial role in testicular and ovarian functions. In clinical practice, AMH is used as a diagnostic and/or prognostic marker in women in association with ovulation induction and in various pathophysiological conditions. Despite widespread clinical use of AMH, our mechanistic understanding of AMH actions in regulating follicular development is limited. Using a mouse model, we in this study report that in vivo AMH treatment while stalls follicular development and inhibits ovulation, also prevents follicular atresia. We further show that these AMH actions are mediated through induction of two miRNAs, miR-181a and miR-181b, which regulate various aspects of FSH signaling and follicular growth, ultimately affecting downstream gene expression and folliculogenesis. We also report that in this mouse model AMH pre-treatment prior to superovulation improves oocyte yield. These studies, therefore, offer new mechanistic insight into AMH actions in folliculogenesis and point toward potential utilization of AMH as a therapeutic agent. PMID:27235859

  18. PKR is activated by cellular dsRNAs during mitosis and acts as a mitotic regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoosik; Lee, Jung Hyun; Park, Jong-Eun; Cho, Jun; Yi, Hyerim; Kim, V Narry

    2014-06-15

    dsRNA-dependent protein kinase R (PKR) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme well known for its roles in immune response. Upon binding to viral dsRNA, PKR undergoes autophosphorylation, and the phosphorylated PKR (pPKR) regulates translation and multiple signaling pathways in infected cells. Here, we found that PKR is activated in uninfected cells, specifically during mitosis, by binding to dsRNAs formed by inverted Alu repeats (IRAlus). While PKR and IRAlu-containing RNAs are segregated in the cytosol and nucleus of interphase cells, respectively, they interact during mitosis when nuclear structure is disrupted. Once phosphorylated, PKR suppresses global translation by phosphorylating the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). In addition, pPKR acts as an upstream kinase for c-Jun N-terminal kinase and regulates the levels of multiple mitotic factors such as cyclins A and B and Polo-like kinase 1 and phosphorylation of histone H3. Disruption of PKR activation via RNAi or expression of a transdominant-negative mutant leads to misregulation of the mitotic factors, delay in mitotic progression, and defects in cytokinesis. Our study unveils a novel function of PKR and endogenous dsRNAs as signaling molecules during the mitosis of uninfected cells.

  19. Molecular and cellular mechanisms for the regulation of ovarian follicular function in cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-08-25

    Ovary is an important organ that houses the oocytes (reproductive cell). Oocyte growth depends on the function of follicular cells such as the granulosa and theca cells. Two-cell two gonadotropin systems are associated with oocyte growth and follicular cell functions. In addition to these systems, it is also known that several growth factors regulate oocyte growth and follicular cell functions. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in thecal vasculature during follicular development and the suppression of granulosa cell apoptosis. Metabolic factors such as insulin, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) also play critical roles in the process of follicular development and growth. These factors are associated not only with follicular development, but also with follicular cell function. Steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progestins) that are secreted from follicular cells influence the function of the female genital tract and its affect the susceptibility to bacterial infection. This review covers our current understanding of the mechanisms by which gonadotrophins and/or steroid hormones regulate the growth factors in the follicular cells of the bovine ovary. In addition, this review describes the effect of endotoxin on the function of follicular cells. PMID:27097851

  20. El nucléolo como un regulador del envejecimiento celular The nucleolus as a regulator of cellular senescence

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    María Rosete

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El nucléolo, considerado únicamente como el sitio de síntesis de los ribosomas, actualmente representa una estructura nuclear dinámica que participa en la regulación de importantes procesos celulares. Numerosas evidencias han demostrado que el envejecimiento celular es una de las diversas funciones que son controladas por el nucléolo. Las mutaciones en las proteínas de localización nucleolar promueven el envejecimiento prematuro en levaduras y humanos. La carencia de represión en la transcripción de genes que codifican para el ARNr que se encuentran dañados, y las mutaciones en las helicasas del ADN encargadas de minimizar la formación de círculos extra-cromosómicos del ADN que codifica para el ARNr, provocan modificaciones en la estructura del nucléolo e inducen envejecimiento prematuro en levaduras. De igual manera, en los humanos la carencia de las helicasas del ADN localizadas en el nucléolo y que participan en el mantenimiento de la integridad genómica, favorecen el desarrollo de aquellas enfermedades asociadas con el envejecimiento acelerado. Además, la presencia de algunos componentes de la telomerasa en el nucléolo, indica que parte de la biosíntesis de esta enzima se realiza en esta estructura nuclear, sugiriendo una conexión entre el nucléolo y la síntesis de los telómeros en la regulación del envejecimiento celular. Por otra parte, el nucléolo secuestra proteínas para regular su actividad biológica durante el inicio o término de la vida replicativa celular.The nucleolus has been considered originally only as the site for the ribosome synthesis, but now it is well known that it represents a dynamic nuclear structure involved in important cellular processes. Several evidences have demonstrated that the nucleolus regulates the cellular senescence. Specific mutations on the DNAs codifying for nucleolar proteins induced premature senescence from yeast to human. The failure to repress the genes transcription

  1. Aiolos transcription factor controls cell death in T cells by regulating Bcl-2 expression and its cellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, F; Martínez-A, C; Camonis, J; Rebollo, A

    1999-01-01

    We searched for proteins that interact with Ras in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated or IL-2-deprived cells, and found that the transcription factor Aiolos interacts with Ras. The Ras-Aiolos interaction was confirmed in vitro and in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation. Indirect immunofluorescence shows that IL-2 controls the cellular distribution of Aiolos and induces its tyrosine phosphorylation, required for dissociation from Ras. We also identified functional Aiolos-binding sites in the Bcl-2 promoter, which are able to activate the luciferase reporter gene. Mutation of Aiolos-binding sites within the Bcl-2 promoter inhibits transactivation of the reporter gene luciferase, suggesting direct control of Bcl-2 expression by Aiolos. Co-transfection experiments confirm that Aiolos induces Bcl-2 expression and prevents apoptosis in IL-2-deprived cells. We propose a model for the regulation of Bcl-2 expression via Aiolos. PMID:10369681

  2. Zea mays Taxilin protein negatively regulates opaque-2 transcriptional activity by causing a change in its sub-cellular distribution.

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    Nan Zhang

    Full Text Available Zea mays (maize Opaque-2 (ZmO2 protein is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates the expression of major storage proteins (22-kD zeins and other important genes during maize seed development. ZmO2 is subject to functional regulation through protein-protein interactions. To unveil the potential regulatory network associated with ZmO2, a protein-protein interaction study was carried out using the truncated version of ZmO2 (O2-2 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a maize seed cDNA library. A protein with homology to Taxilin was found to have stable interaction with ZmO2 in yeast and was designated as ZmTaxilin. Sequence analysis indicated that ZmTaxilin has a long coiled-coil domain containing three conserved zipper motifs. Each of the three zipper motifs is individually able to interact with ZmO2 in yeast. A GST pull-down assay demonstrated the interaction between GST-fused ZmTaxilin and ZmO2 extracted from developing maize seeds. Using onion epidermal cells as in vivo assay system, we found that ZmTaxilin could change the sub-cellular distribution of ZmO2. We also demonstrated that this change significantly repressed the transcriptional activity of ZmO2 on the 22-kD zein promoter. Our study suggests that a Taxilin-mediated change in sub-cellular distribution of ZmO2 may have important functional consequences for ZmO2 activity.

  3. Innate cellular sources of interleukin-17A regulate macrophage accumulation in cigarette- smoke-induced lung inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovski, Steven; Seow, Huei Jiunn; Chan, Sheau Pyng Jamie; Anthony, Desiree; McQualter, Jonathan; Hansen, Michelle; Jenkins, Brendan J; Anderson, Gary P; Vlahos, Ross

    2015-11-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is a pivotal cytokine that regulates lung immunity and inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate how IL-17A regulates CS-induced lung inflammation in vivo. IL-17A knockout (KO) mice and neutralization of IL-17A in wild-type (WT) mice reduced macrophage and neutrophil recruitment and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL3 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 mRNA expression in response to acute CS exposure. IL-17A expression was increased in non-obese diabetic (NOD) severe combined immunodeficiency SCID) mice with non-functional B- and T-cells over a 4-week CS exposure period, where macrophages accumulated to the same extent as in WT mice. Gene expression analysis by QPCR (quantitative real-time PCR) of isolated immune cell subsets detected increased levels of IL-17A transcript in macrophages, neutrophils and NK/NKT cells in the lungs of CS-exposed mice. In order to further explore the relative contribution of innate immune cellular sources, intracellular IL-17A staining was performed. In the present study, we demonstrate that CS exposure primes natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and γδ T-cells to produce more IL-17A protein and CS alone increased the frequency of IL17+ γδ T-cells in the lung, whereas IL-17A protein was not detected in macrophages and neutrophils. Our data suggest that activation of innate cellular sources of IL-17A is an essential mediator of macrophage accumulation in CS-exposed lungs. Targeting non-conventional T-cell sources of IL-17A may offer an alternative strategy to reduce pathogenic macrophages in COPD. PMID:26201093

  4. An epidermal microRNA regulates neuronal migration through control of the cellular glycosylation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mikael Egebjerg; Snieckute, Goda; Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R; Pocock, Roger

    2013-09-20

    An appropriate balance in glycosylation of proteoglycans is crucial for their ability to regulate animal development. Here, we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans microRNA mir-79, an ortholog of mammalian miR-9, controls sugar-chain homeostasis by targeting two proteins in the proteoglycan biosynthetic pathway: a chondroitin synthase (SQV-5; squashed vulva-5) and a uridine 5'-diphosphate-sugar transporter (SQV-7). Loss of mir-79 causes neurodevelopmental defects through SQV-5 and SQV-7 dysregulation in the epidermis. This results in a partial shutdown of heparan sulfate biosynthesis that impinges on a LON-2/glypican pathway and disrupts neuronal migration. Our results identify a regulatory axis controlled by a conserved microRNA that maintains proteoglycan homeostasis in cells. PMID:24052309

  5. Role 14-3-3 Protein in Regulation Some Cellular Processes

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    Nagam Khudhair

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study to review an overview of the current information on the structure of proteins 14-3-3 and their complexes, in addition to that it provides insights into the mechanisms of their functions. The 14-3-3 proteins are from families maintain regulatory molecules expressed in all eukaryotic cells. It was discovered before thirty years, it is attributes of 14-3-3 proteins are able to connect a large number of signalling proteins are functionally diverse, including kinases, phosphatases and transmembrane receptors. 14-3-3 proteins play an important role in a variety of vital regulatory processes, such as protein regulation, apoptotic cell death and cell cycle control. In this review, we discussed the structural basis of 14-3-3 proteins, common structural features of their complexes, Phosphorylation, Cell cycle and Apoptosis.

  6. Testicular disorders induced by plant growth regulators: cellular protection with proanthocyanidins grape seeds extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hanaa A; Isa, Ahmed M; El-Kholy, Wafaa M; Nour, Samar E

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to investigate the adverse effects of plant growth regulators : gibberellic acid (GA3) and indoleacetic acid (IAA) on testicular functions in rats, and extends to investigate the possible protective role of grape seed extract, proanthocyanidin (PAC). Male rats were divided into six groups; control group, PAC, GA3, IAA, GA3 + PAC and IAA + PAC groups. The data showed that GA3 and IAA caused significant increase in total lipids, total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol in the serum, concomitant with a significant decrease in high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, total protein, and testosterone levels. In addition, there was significant decrease in the activity of alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase. A significant decrease was detected also in epididymyal fructose along with a significant reduction in sperm count. Testicular lipid peroxidation product and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were significantly increased. Meanwhile, the total antioxidant capacity, glutathione, sulphahydryl group content, as well as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity were significantly decreased. Moreover, there were a number of histopathological testicular changes including Leydig's cell degeneration, reduction in seminiferous tubule and necrotic symptoms and sperm degeneration in both GA3- and IAA-treated rats. However, an obvious recovery of all the above biochemical and histological testicular disorders was detected when PAC seed extract was supplemented to rats administered with GA3 or IAA indicating its protective effect. Therefore it was concluded that supplementation with PAC had ameliorative effects on those adverse effects of the mentioned plant growth regulators through its natural antioxidant properties.

  7. Tissue-specific expression of ferritin H regulates cellular iron homoeostasis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John; Di, Xiumin; Schönig, Kai; Buss, Joan L; Kock, Nancy D; Cline, J Mark; Saunders, Thomas L; Bujard, Hermann; Torti, Suzy V; Torti, Frank M

    2006-05-01

    Ferritin is a ubiquitously distributed iron-binding protein. Cell culture studies have demonstrated that ferritin plays a role in maintenance of iron homoeostasis and in the protection against cytokine- and oxidant-induced stress. To test whether FerH (ferritin H) can regulate tissue iron homoeostasis in vivo, we prepared transgenic mice that conditionally express FerH and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) from a bicistronic tetracycline-inducible promoter. Two transgenic models were explored. In the first, the FerH and EGFP transgenes were controlled by the tTA(CMV) (Tet-OFF) (where tTA and CMV are tet transactivator protein and cytomegalovirus respectively). In skeletal muscle of mice bearing the FerH/EGFP and tTA(CMV) transgenes, FerH expression was increased 6.0+/-1.1-fold (mean+/-S.D.) compared with controls. In the second model, the FerH/EGFP transgenes were controlled by an optimized Tet-ON transactivator, rtTA2(S)-S2(LAP) (where rtTA is reverse tTA and LAP is liver activator protein), resulting in expression predominantly in the kidney and liver. In mice expressing these transgenes, doxycycline induced FerH in the kidney by 14.2+/-4.8-fold (mean+/-S.D.). Notably, increases in ferritin in overexpressers versus control littermates were accompanied by an elevation of IRP (iron regulatory protein) activity of 2.3+/-0.9-fold (mean+/-S.D.), concurrent with a 4.5+/-2.1-fold (mean+/-S.D.) increase in transferrin receptor, indicating that overexpression of FerH is sufficient to elicit a phenotype of iron depletion. These results demonstrate that FerH not only responds to changes in tissue iron (its classic role), but can actively regulate overall tissue iron balance. PMID:16448386

  8. Assessing allowable take of migratory birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, M.C.; Sauer, J.R.; Avery, M.L.; Blackwell, B.F.; Koneff, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Legal removal of migratory birds from the wild occurs for several reasons, including subsistence, sport harvest, damage control, and the pet trade. We argue that harvest theory provides the basis for assessing the impact of authorized take, advance a simplified rendering of harvest theory known as potential biological removal as a useful starting point for assessing take, and demonstrate this approach with a case study of depredation control of black vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Virginia, USA. Based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey and other sources, we estimated that the black vulture population in Virginia was 91,190 (95% credible interval = 44,520?212,100) in 2006. Using a simple population model and available estimates of life-history parameters, we estimated the intrinsic rate of growth (rmax) to be in the range 7?14%, with 10.6% a plausible point estimate. For a take program to seek an equilibrium population size on the conservative side of the yield curve, the rate of take needs to be less than that which achieves a maximum sustained yield (0.5 x rmax). Based on the point estimate for rmax and using the lower 60% credible interval for population size to account for uncertainty, these conditions would be met if the take of black vultures in Virginia in 2006 was <3,533 birds. Based on regular monitoring data, allowable harvest should be adjusted annually to reflect changes in population size. To initiate discussion about how this assessment framework could be related to the laws and regulations that govern authorization of such take, we suggest that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act requires only that take of native migratory birds be sustainable in the long-term, that is, sustained harvest rate should be

  9. Pressuromodulation at the cell membrane as the basis for small molecule hormone and peptide regulation of cellular and nuclear function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Hemant

    2015-11-26

    Building on recent knowledge that the specificity of the biological interactions of small molecule hydrophiles and lipophiles across microvascular and epithelial barriers, and with cells, can be predicted on the basis of their conserved biophysical properties, and the knowledge that biological peptides are cell membrane impermeant, it has been further discussed herein that cellular, and thus, nuclear function, are primarily regulated by small molecule hormone and peptide/factor interactions at the cell membrane (CM) receptors. The means of regulating cellular, and thus, nuclear function, are the various forms of CM Pressuromodulation that exist, which include Direct CM Receptor-Mediated Stabilizing Pressuromodulation, sub-classified as Direct CM Receptor-Mediated Stabilizing Shift Pressuromodulation (Single, Dual or Tri) or Direct CM Receptor-Mediated Stabilizing Shift Pressuromodulation (Single, Dual or Tri) cum External Cationomodulation (≥3+ → 1+); which are with respect to acute CM receptor-stabilizing effects of small biomolecule hormones, growth factors or cytokines, and also include Indirect CM- or CM Receptor-Mediated Pressuromodulation, sub-classified as Indirect 1ary CM-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Perturbomodulation), Indirect 2ary CM Receptor-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Tri or Quad Receptor Internal Pseudo-Cationomodulation: SS 1+), Indirect 3ary CM Receptor-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Single or Dual Receptor Endocytic External Cationomodulation: 2+) or Indirect (Pseudo) 3ary CM Receptor-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Receptor Endocytic Hydroxylocarbonyloetheroylomodulation: 0), which are with respect to sub-acute CM receptor-stabilizing effects of small biomolecules, growth factors or cytokines. As a generalization, all forms of CM pressuromodulation decrease CM and nuclear membrane (NM) compliance (whole cell compliance), due to pressuromodulation of the intracellular microtubule network and increases the exocytosis of pre

  10. The master regulator of the cellular stress response (HSF1 is critical for orthopoxvirus infection.

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    Claire Marie Filone

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Orthopoxviridae contains a diverse group of human pathogens including monkeypox, smallpox and vaccinia. These viruses are presumed to be less dependent on host functions than other DNA viruses because they have large genomes and replicate in the cytoplasm, but a detailed understanding of the host factors required by orthopoxviruses is lacking. To address this topic, we performed an unbiased, genome-wide pooled RNAi screen targeting over 17,000 human genes to identify the host factors that support orthopoxvirus infection. We used secondary and tertiary assays to validate our screen results. One of the strongest hits was heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, the ancient master regulator of the cytoprotective heat-shock response. In investigating the behavior of HSF1 during vaccinia infection, we found that HSF1 was phosphorylated, translocated to the nucleus, and increased transcription of HSF1 target genes. Activation of HSF1 was supportive for virus replication, as RNAi knockdown and HSF1 small molecule inhibition prevented orthopoxvirus infection. Consistent with its role as a transcriptional activator, inhibition of several HSF1 targets also blocked vaccinia virus replication. These data show that orthopoxviruses co-opt host transcriptional responses for their own benefit, thereby effectively extending their functional genome to include genes residing within the host DNA. The dependence on HSF1 and its chaperone network offers multiple opportunities for antiviral drug development.

  11. Chitinase 3-like 1 Regulates Cellular and Tissue Responses via IL-13 Receptor α2

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    Chuan Hua He

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of the 18 glycosyl hydrolase (GH 18 gene family have been conserved over species and time and are dysregulated in inflammatory, infectious, remodeling, and neoplastic disorders. This is particularly striking for the prototypic chitinase-like protein chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1, which plays a critical role in antipathogen responses where it augments bacterial killing while stimulating disease tolerance by controlling cell death, inflammation, and remodeling. However, receptors that mediate the effects of GH 18 moieties have not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that Chi3l1 binds to interleukin-13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2 and that Chi3l1, IL-13Rα2, and IL-13 are in a multimeric complex. We also demonstrate that Chi3l1 activates macrophage mitogen-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B/AKT, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling and regulates oxidant injury, apoptosis, pyroptosis, inflammasome activation, antibacterial responses, melanoma metastasis, and TGF-β1 production via IL-13Rα2-dependent mechanisms. Thus, IL-13Rα2 is a GH 18 receptor that plays a critical role in Chi3l1 effector responses.

  12. 14-3-3σ regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by modulating Yap1 cellular localization

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    Sambandam, Sumitha A.T.; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Xue, Lei; Dean, Douglas C.; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2015-01-01

    The homozygous repeated epilation (Er/Er) mouse mutant of the gene encoding 14-3-3σ displays an epidermal phenotype characterized by hyperproliferative keratinocytes and undifferentiated epidermis. Heterozygous Er/+ mice develop spontaneous skin tumors and are highly sensitive to tumor-promoting DMBA/TPA induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying 14-3-3σ regulation of epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and tumor formation have not been well elucidated. In the present study, we found that Er/Er keratinocytes failed to sequester Yap1 in the cytoplasm, leading to its nuclear localization during epidermal development in vivo and under differentiation-inducing culture conditions in vitro. In addition, enhanced Yap1 nuclear localization was also evident in DMBA/TPA-induced tumors from Er/+ skin. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Yap1 expression in Er/Er keratinocytes inhibited their proliferation, suggesting that YAP1 functions as a downstream effector of 14-3-3σ controlling epidermal proliferation. We then demonstrated that keratinocytes express all seven 14-3-3 protein isoforms, some of which form heterodimers with 14-3-3σ, either full-length WT or the mutant form found in Er/Er mice. However Er 14-3-3σ does not interact with Yap1, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. We conclude that Er 14-3-3σ disrupts the interaction between 14-3-3 and Yap1, thus fails to block Yap1 nuclear transcriptional function, causing continued progenitor expansion and inhibition of differentiation in Er/Er epidermis. PMID:25668240

  13. c-Myc and AMPK Control Cellular Energy Levels by Cooperatively Regulating Mitochondrial Structure and Function.

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    Lia R Edmunds

    Full Text Available The c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK regulate glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (Oxphos although often for different purposes. Because Myc over-expression depletes ATP with the resultant activation of AMPK, we explored the potential co-dependency of and cross-talk between these proteins by comparing the consequences of acute Myc induction in ampk+/+ (WT and ampk-/- (KO murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs. KO MEFs showed a higher basal rate of glycolysis than WT MEFs and an appropriate increase in response to activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor (MycER fusion protein. However, KO MEFs had a diminished ability to increase Oxphos, mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species in response to MycER activation. Other differences between WT and KO MEFs, either in the basal state or following MycER induction, included abnormalities in electron transport chain function, levels of TCA cycle-related oxidoreductases and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox states. Transcriptional profiling of pathways pertinent to glycolysis, Oxphos and mitochondrial structure and function also uncovered significant differences between WT and KO MEFs and their response to MycER activation. Finally, an unbiased mass-spectrometry (MS-based survey capable of quantifying ~40% of all mitochondrial proteins, showed about 15% of them to be AMPK- and/or Myc-dependent in their steady state. Significant differences in the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, which dictate pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A abundance, were also differentially responsive to Myc and AMPK and could account for some of the differences in basal metabolite levels that were also detected by MS. Thus, Myc and AMPK are highly co-dependent and appear to engage in significant cross-talk across numerous pathways which support metabolic and ATP-generating functions.

  14. LRRK2 and RAB7L1 coordinately regulate axonal morphology and lysosome integrity in diverse cellular contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Tomoki; Inoue, Keiichi; D'Agati, Vivette D; Fujimoto, Tetta; Eguchi, Tomoya; Saha, Shamol; Wolozin, Benjamin; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Abeliovich, Asa

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been linked to several clinical disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD), Crohn's disease, and leprosy. Furthermore in rodents, LRRK2 deficiency or inhibition leads to lysosomal pathology in kidney and lung. Here we provide evidence that LRRK2 functions together with a second PD-associated gene, RAB7L1, within an evolutionarily conserved genetic module in diverse cellular contexts. In C. elegans neurons, orthologues of LRRK2 and RAB7L1 act coordinately in an ordered genetic pathway to regulate axonal elongation. Further genetic studies implicated the AP-3 complex, which is a known regulator of axonal morphology as well as of intracellular protein trafficking to the lysosome compartment, as a physiological downstream effector of LRRK2 and RAB7L1. Additional cell-based studies implicated LRRK2 in the AP-3 complex-related intracellular trafficking of lysosomal membrane proteins. In mice, deficiency of either RAB7L1 or LRRK2 leads to prominent age-associated lysosomal defects in kidney proximal tubule cells, in the absence of frank CNS pathology. We hypothesize that defects in this evolutionarily conserved genetic pathway underlie the diverse pathologies associated with LRRK2 in humans and in animal models. PMID:27424887

  15. Revolutionary non-migratory migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    In the migratory behaviour of the Barnacle Goose Branta leucopsis several changes have occurred over the past few decades. Barnacle geese breeding in Russia have delayed the commencement of spring migration with approximately one month since

  16. Revolutionary non-migratory migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    In the migratory behaviour of the Barnacle Goose Branta leucopsis several changes have occurred over the past few decades. Barnacle geese breeding in Russia have delayed the commencement of spring migration with approximately one month since

  17. Regulation of HTLV-1 tax stability, cellular trafficking and NF-κB activation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorgna, Alfonso; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-10-23

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that infects CD4+ T cells and causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 3%-5% of infected individuals after a long latent period. HTLV-1 Tax is a trans-activating protein that regulates viral gene expression and also modulates cellular signaling pathways to enhance T-cell proliferation and cell survival. The Tax oncoprotein promotes T-cell transformation, in part via constitutive activation of the NF-κB transcription factor; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Ubiquitination is a type of post-translational modification that occurs in a three-step enzymatic cascade mediated by E1, E2 and E3 enzymes and regulates protein stability as well as signal transduction, protein trafficking and the DNA damage response. Emerging studies indicate that Tax hijacks the ubiquitin machinery to activate ubiquitin-dependent kinases and downstream NF-κB signaling. Tax interacts with the E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and is conjugated on C-terminal lysine residues with lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Tax K63-linked polyubiquitination may serve as a platform for signaling complexes since this modification is critical for interactions with NEMO and IKK. In addition to NF-κB signaling, mono- and polyubiquitination of Tax also regulate its subcellular trafficking and stability. Here, we review recent advances in the diverse roles of ubiquitin in Tax function and how Tax usurps the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to promote oncogenesis.

  18. Regulation of cellular behaviors of fibroblasts related to wound healing by sol-gel derived bioactive glass particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weihan; Chen, Xiaofeng; Miao, Guohou; Tang, Jieying; Fu, Xiaoling

    2016-10-01

    Sol-gel derived bioactive glass (BG) holds great potential in the application of skin repair. However, the specific regulation of BG on skin cells is still unclear and demands more investigation. Herein, we synthesized sol-gel derived BGs with different compositions (60S, 70S, 80S, and 90S) and found 90S BGs (90 mol % SiO2 , 6 mol % CaO, 4 mol % P2 O5 ) exhibited the best supportiveness for the proliferation of normal human foreskin fibroblasts. Thus, 90S BG particles were used as a model to systematically study the wound healing related cellular response of fibroblasts to BGs. Time-lapse imaging revealed a promoted fibroblast motility stimulated by 90S BG particles. Results on the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) related genes illustrated that 90S BG particles modulated the synthesis capacity for critical ECM molecules including type I collagen, type III collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin-C. Moreover, the myofibroblastic differentiation of fibroblasts was greatly inhibited by 90S BG particles. Further analysis on the intracellular signaling pathways demonstrated that 90S BG particles down-regulated the collagen synthesis and fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation via TGF-β1-Smad2 signaling, evidenced by the decreased expression levels of TGF-β receptor I and its downstream effector Smad2. Our study provided a further understanding of the specific regulation of 90S BG particles on fibroblasts, which may guide the future design of BG based wound dressing and benefit the clinical application of BG particles in skin repair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2420-2429, 2016. PMID:27177533

  19. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  20. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  1. 50 CFR 20.109 - Extended seasons, limits, and hours for taking migratory game birds by falconry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... regulatory schedules for this section, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... taking migratory game birds by falconry. 20.109 Section 20.109 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH... taking migratory game birds by falconry. This section provides annual regulations by which falconers...

  2. Hyperphosphatemia induces cellular senescence in human aorta smooth muscle cells through integrin linked kinase (ILK) up-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyano, Nuria; Nogal, María Del; Mora, Inés; Diaz-Naves, Manuel; Lopez-Carrillo, Natalia; Sosa, Patricia; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Olmos, Gemma; Ruiz-Torres, María P

    2015-12-01

    Aging is conditioned by genetic and environmental factors. Hyperphosphatemia is related to some pathologies, affecting to vascular cells behavior. This work analyze whether high concentration of extracellular phosphate induces vascular smooth muscle cells senescence, exploring the intracellular mechanisms and highlighting the in vivo relevance of this phenomenon. Human aortic smooth muscle cells treated with β-Glycerophosphate (BGP, 10mM) suffered cellular senescence by increasing p53, p21 and p16 expression and the senescence associated β-galactosidase activity. In parallel, BGP induced ILK overexpression, dependent on the IGF-1 receptor activation, and oxidative stress. Down-regulating ILK expression prevented BGP-induced senescence and oxidative stress. Aortic rings from young rats treated with 10mM BGP for 48h, showed increased p53, p16 and ILK expression and SA-β-gal activity. Seven/eight nephrectomized rats feeding a hyperphosphatemic diet and fifteenth- month old mice showed hyperphosphatemia and aortic ILK, p53 and p16 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high extracellular concentration of phosphate induced senescence in cultured smooth muscle through the activation of IGF-1 receptor and ILK overexpression and provided solid evidences for the in vivo relevance of these results since aged animals showed high levels of serum phosphate linked to increased expression of ILK and senescence genes. PMID:26467393

  3. Shroom3 functions downstream of planar cell polarity to regulate myosin II distribution and cellular organization during neural tube closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M. McGreevy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube closure is a critical developmental event that relies on actomyosin contractility to facilitate specific processes such as apical constriction, tissue bending, and directional cell rearrangements. These complicated processes require the coordinated activities of Rho-Kinase (Rock, to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and actomyosin contractility, and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP pathway, to direct the polarized cellular behaviors that drive convergent extension (CE movements. Here we investigate the role of Shroom3 as a direct linker between PCP and actomyosin contractility during mouse neural tube morphogenesis. In embryos, simultaneous depletion of Shroom3 and the PCP components Vangl2 or Wnt5a results in an increased liability to NTDs and CE failure. We further show that these pathways intersect at Dishevelled, as Shroom3 and Dishevelled 2 co-distribute and form a physical complex in cells. We observed that multiple components of the Shroom3 pathway are planar polarized along mediolateral cell junctions in the neural plate of E8.5 embryos in a Shroom3 and PCP-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that Shroom3 mutant embryos exhibit defects in planar cell arrangement during neural tube closure, suggesting a role for Shroom3 activity in CE. These findings support a model in which the Shroom3 and PCP pathways interact to control CE and polarized bending of the neural plate and provide a clear illustration of the complex genetic basis of NTDs.

  4. The cellular prion protein negatively regulates phagocytosis and cytokine expression in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrP(C is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored glycoprotein on the cell surface. Previous studies have demonstrated contradictory roles for PrP(C in connection with the phagocytic ability of macrophages. In the present work, we investigated the function of PrP(C in phagocytosis and cytokine expression in bone marrow-derived macrophages infected with Escherichia coli. E. coli infection induced an increase in the PRNP mRNA level. Knockout of PrP(C promoted bacterial uptake; upregulated Rab5, Rab7, and Eea1 mRNA expression; and increased the recruitment of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 to phagosomes, suggesting enhanced microbicidal activity. Remarkably, knockout of PrP(C suppressed the proliferation of internalized bacteria and increased the expression of cytokines such as interleukin-1β. Collectively, our data reveal an important role of PrP(C as a negative regulator for phagocytosis, phagosome maturation, cytokine expression, and macrophage microbicidal activity.

  5. BRD4 Phosphorylation Regulates HPV E2-Mediated Viral Transcription, Origin Replication, and Cellular MMP-9 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Nin, Dawn Sijin; Lee, A-Young; Simanski, Scott; Kodadek, Thomas; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Post-translational modification can modulate protein conformation and alter binding partner recruitment within gene regulatory regions. Here, we report that bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4), a transcription co-factor and chromatin regulator, uses a phosphorylation-induced switch mechanism to recruit E2 protein encoded by cancer-associated human papillomavirus (HPV) to viral early gene and cellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) promoters. Enhanced MMP-9 expression, induced upon keratinocyte differentiation, occurs via BRD4-dependent recruitment of active AP-1 and NF-κB to their target sequences. This is triggered by replacement of AP-1 family members JunB and JunD by c-Jun and by re-localization of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. In addition, BRD4 phosphorylation is critical for E2- and origin-dependent HPV DNA replication. A class of phospho-BRD4-targeting compounds, distinct from the BET bromodomain inhibitors, effectively blocks BRD4 phosphorylation-specific functions in transcription and factor recruitment. PMID:27477287

  6. Cellular Redox Status Regulates Emodin-Induced Radiosensitization of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaxin Hou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report that regulation of cellular redox status is required for radiosensitization of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC cells by emodin. We evaluated emodin’s radiosensitivity-enhancing ability by using NPC cells in vitro and xenografts in vivo. A clonogenic assay was performed to evaluate NPC cell survival and to determine dose modification factors. Flow cytometry, western blot analysis, and in vivo radiation-induced tumor regrowth delay assays were performed to characterize emodin’s effects. Exposure of CNE-1 NPC cells to emodin enhanced their radiosensitivity. HIF-1α expression significantly increased under hypoxic conditions but did not change after treatment with emodin alone. Emodin downregulated mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α. Cells exposed to radiation and emodin underwent significant cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. The percentage of apoptotic cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels were significantly higher in the group exposed to emodin and radiation hypoxic group than in the other groups. Compared to the CNE-1 xenografts exposed to radiation alone, CNE-1 xenografts exposed to radiation with emodin showed significantly enhanced radiation effects. Our data suggest that emodin effectively enhanced the radiosensitivity of CNE-1 cells in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism appears to involve ROS generation and ROS-mediated inhibition of HIF-1α expression.

  7. C/EBPγ Is a Critical Regulator of Cellular Stress Response Networks through Heterodimerization with ATF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Christopher J; Mayekar, Manasi K; Martin, Nancy; Saylor, Karen L; Gonit, Mesfin; Jailwala, Parthav; Kasoji, Manjula; Haines, Diana C; Quiñones, Octavio A; Johnson, Peter F

    2015-12-14

    The integrated stress response (ISR) controls cellular adaptations to nutrient deprivation, redox imbalances, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ISR genes are upregulated in stressed cells, primarily by the bZIP transcription factor ATF4 through its recruitment to cis-regulatory C/EBP:ATF response elements (CAREs) together with a dimeric partner of uncertain identity. Here, we show that C/EBPγ:ATF4 heterodimers, but not C/EBPβ:ATF4 dimers, are the predominant CARE-binding species in stressed cells. C/EBPγ and ATF4 associate with genomic CAREs in a mutually dependent manner and coregulate many ISR genes. In contrast, the C/EBP family members C/EBPβ and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were largely dispensable for induction of stress genes. Cebpg(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) proliferate poorly and exhibit oxidative stress due to reduced glutathione levels and impaired expression of several glutathione biosynthesis pathway genes. Cebpg(-/-) mice (C57BL/6 background) display reduced body size and microphthalmia, similar to ATF4-null animals. In addition, C/EBPγ-deficient newborns die from atelectasis and respiratory failure, which can be mitigated by in utero exposure to the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Cebpg(-/-) mice on a mixed strain background showed improved viability but, upon aging, developed significantly fewer malignant solid tumors than WT animals. Our findings identify C/EBPγ as a novel antioxidant regulator and an obligatory ATF4 partner that controls redox homeostasis in normal and cancerous cells.

  8. Social learning of migratory performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas; O'Hara, Robert B.; Converse, Sarah; Urbanek, Richard P.; Fagan, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Successful bird migration can depend on individual learning, social learning, and innate navigation programs. Using 8 years of data on migrating whooping cranes, we were able to partition genetic and socially learned aspects of migration. Specifically, we analyzed data from a reintroduced population wherein all birds were captive bred and artificially trained by ultralight aircraft on their first lifetime migration. For subsequent migrations, in which birds fly individually or in groups but without ultralight escort, we found evidence of long-term social learning, but no effect of genetic relatedness on migratory performance. Social learning from older birds reduced deviations from a straight-line path, with 7 years of experience yielding a 38% improvement in migratory accuracy.

  9. Impact of pnpR, a LysR-type regulator-encoding gene, on the cellular processes of Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiongzhen; Tu, Hui; Huang, Fei; Wang, Yicheng; Dong, Weiliang; Wang, Wenhui; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Fei; Cui, Zhongli

    2016-06-01

    LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs) regulate various cellular processes in bacteria. pnpR is an LTTR-encoding gene involved in the regulation of hydroquinone (HQ) degradation, and its effects on the cellular processes of Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4 were investigated at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that pnpR positively regulated its own expression and that of the pnpC1C2DECX1X2 operon; additionally, pnpR partially regulated the expression of pnpA when P. putida was grown on para-nitrophenol (PNP) or HQ. Strains DLL-E4 and DLL-ΔpnpR exhibited similar cellular morphologies and growth rates. Transcriptome analysis revealed that pnpR regulated the expression of genes in addition to those involved in PNP degradation. A total of 20 genes were upregulated and 19 genes were downregulated by at least 2-fold in strain DLL-ΔpnpR relative to strain DLL-E4. Bioinformatic analysis revealed putative PnpR-binding sites located in the upstream regions of genes involved in PNP degradation, carbon catabolite repression and other cellular processes. The utilization of L-aspartic acid, L-histidine, L-pyroglutamic acid, L-serine, γ-aminobutyric acid, D,L-lactic acid, D-saccharic acid, succinic acid and L-alaninamide was increased at least 1.3-fold in strain DLL-ΔpnpR as shown by BIOLOG assays, indicating that pnpR plays a potential negative regulation role in the utilization of carbon sources. PMID:27190157

  10. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    , these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer.......Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key...... regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active...

  11. Pair bonds: arrival synchrony in migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, T G; Gill, J A; Sigurbjörnsson, T; Sutherland, W J

    2004-10-01

    Synchronous arrival of pairs of migratory birds at their breeding grounds is important for maintaining pair bonds and is achieved by pairs that remain together all year round. Here we show that arrival is also synchronized in paired individuals of a migratory shorebird, the black-tailed godwit (Limosa limosa islandica), even though they winter hundreds of kilometres apart and do not migrate together. The mechanisms required to achieve this synchrony and prevent 'divorce' illustrate the complexity of migratory systems. PMID:15470417

  12. Regulation of Ras exchange factors and cellular localization of Ras activation by lipid messengers in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse E. Jun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and SOS-family GEFs.Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood.One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of Ras-GEFs´functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells.

  13. Healthy aging: regulation of the metabolome by cellular redox modulation and prooxidant signaling systems: the essential roles of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnane, Anthony William; Kios, Michael; Vitetta, Luis

    2007-10-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) has long been proposed as leading to random deleterious modification of macromolecules with an associated progressive development of age associated systemic disease. ROS and RNS formation has been posited as a major contributor to the aging process. On the contrary, this review presents evidence that superoxide anion (and hydrogen peroxide) and nitric oxide (and peroxynitrite) constitute regulated prooxidant second messenger systems, with specific sub-cellular locales of production and are essential for normal metabolome and physiological function. The role of these second messengers in the regulation of the metabolome is discussed in terms of radical formation as an essential contributor to the physiologically normal regulation of sub-cellular bioenergy systems; proteolysis regulation; transcription activation; enzyme activation; mitochondrial DNA changes; redox regulation of metabolism and cell differentiation; the concept that orally administered small molecule antioxidant therapy is a chimera. The formation of superoxide anion/hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide do not conditionally lead to random macromolecular damage; under normal physiological conditions their production is actually regulated consistent with their second messenger roles.

  14. Mapping global diversity patterns for migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somveille, Marius; Manica, Andrea; Butchart, Stuart H M; Rodrigues, Ana S L

    2013-01-01

    Nearly one in five bird species has separate breeding and overwintering distributions, and the regular migrations of these species cause a substantial seasonal redistribution of avian diversity across the world. However, despite its ecological importance, bird migration has been largely ignored in studies of global avian biodiversity, with few studies having addressed it from a macroecological perspective. Here, we analyse a dataset on the global distribution of the world's birds in order to examine global spatial patterns in the diversity of migratory species, including: the seasonal variation in overall species diversity due to migration; the contribution of migratory birds to local bird diversity; and the distribution of narrow-range and threatened migratory birds. Our analyses reveal a striking asymmetry between the Northern and Southern hemispheres, evident in all of the patterns investigated. The highest migratory bird diversity was found in the Northern Hemisphere, with high inter-continental turnover in species composition between breeding and non-breeding seasons, and extensive regions (at high latitudes) where migratory birds constitute the majority of the local avifauna. Threatened migratory birds are concentrated mainly in Central and Southern Asia, whereas narrow-range migratory species are mainly found in Central America, the Himalayas and Patagonia. Overall, global patterns in the diversity of migratory birds indicate that bird migration is mainly a Northern Hemisphere phenomenon. The asymmetry between the Northern and Southern hemispheres could not have easily been predicted from the combined results of regional scale studies, highlighting the importance of a global perspective. PMID:23951037

  15. Mapping global diversity patterns for migratory birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Somveille

    Full Text Available Nearly one in five bird species has separate breeding and overwintering distributions, and the regular migrations of these species cause a substantial seasonal redistribution of avian diversity across the world. However, despite its ecological importance, bird migration has been largely ignored in studies of global avian biodiversity, with few studies having addressed it from a macroecological perspective. Here, we analyse a dataset on the global distribution of the world's birds in order to examine global spatial patterns in the diversity of migratory species, including: the seasonal variation in overall species diversity due to migration; the contribution of migratory birds to local bird diversity; and the distribution of narrow-range and threatened migratory birds. Our analyses reveal a striking asymmetry between the Northern and Southern hemispheres, evident in all of the patterns investigated. The highest migratory bird diversity was found in the Northern Hemisphere, with high inter-continental turnover in species composition between breeding and non-breeding seasons, and extensive regions (at high latitudes where migratory birds constitute the majority of the local avifauna. Threatened migratory birds are concentrated mainly in Central and Southern Asia, whereas narrow-range migratory species are mainly found in Central America, the Himalayas and Patagonia. Overall, global patterns in the diversity of migratory birds indicate that bird migration is mainly a Northern Hemisphere phenomenon. The asymmetry between the Northern and Southern hemispheres could not have easily been predicted from the combined results of regional scale studies, highlighting the importance of a global perspective.

  16. Proposal to regulate human exposure limits to electromagnetic fields produced by cellular telephony systems in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern society has presented an epic technology development in recent years, driven strongly by communications networks: from micro environments such as personal area networks passing by cell phone to the global Internet network. The communications established in real-time are increasingly, a necessary input. However, the growing demand for communications services and in particularly mobile phone, has meant that the environment is altered by the large number of signals generated by electromagnetic fields that transmit high volumes of energy, which saturate the electromagnetic spectrum, these waves of energy called no ionizing energy. The World Health Organization, through the International Energy Agency Nonionizing (ICNIRP for its acronym in English), has conducted in recent years researches on the effects of the health of people exposed to nonionizing energy; also, have existed proposals regulating these exposure levels. Nonionizing electromagnetic fields are investigated, focusing on transmitting equipment for mobile phone systems in Costa Rica and electromagnetic safety criteria of exposure, both occupational as of general public. The electromagnetism basic concepts and parameters related with nonionizing radiations research are referenced, among them can be mentioned the relationship between the electric field E, the magnetic field H and the power density S. Other concepts such as near-field region, far-field region, exposure zones and specified absorption rate SAR, are also defined. A mathematical fundament is presented showing the relationships between the concepts explained. Guidelines for calculating the power density are provided by means of a theoretical estimate from parameters of transmitting equipment. Also, the procedures for calculating the spatial and temporal averaging are set out and a brief overview is made of epidemiological and biological effects caused by radio frequency radiation. The existing rules at the international level are analyzed to

  17. Alternative oxidase pathway optimizes photosynthesis during osmotic and temperature stress by regulating cellular ROS, malate valve and antioxidative systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DINAKAR eCHALLABATHULA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 µmoles m-2 s-1 at 25 oC under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 M to 1.0M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 oC to 10 oC to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25 OC, the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10 OC, while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Nevertheless, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, the observed changes in NaHCO3 dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(PH/NAD(P and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the

  18. Migratory properties of cultured olfactory ensheathing cells by single-cell migration assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-hui Huang; Ying Wang; Li Cao; Zhi-da Su; Yan-ling Zhu; Yi-zhang Chen; Xiao-bing Yuan; Cheng He

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a unique type of glial cells that have axonal growth-promoting properties. OEC transplantation has emerged as a promising experimental therapy of axonal injuries and demyelinating diseases. However, some fundamental cellular properties of OECs remain unclear. In this study, we found that the distinct OEC subpopulations exhibited different migratory properties based on time-lapse imaging of single isolated cells, possibly due to their different cytoskeletal organizations. Moreover, OEC subpopulations displayed different attractive migratory responses to a gradient of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in single-cell migration assays. Finally, we found that OEC subpopulations transformed into each other spontaneously. Together, these results demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that distinct OEC subpopulations display different migratory properties in vitro and provide new evidence to support the notion of OECs as a single cell type with malleable functional phenotypes.

  19. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Garcia, Cristiana B.; Matos-Silva, Flavia A. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Curti, Carlos [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leopoldino, Andréia M., E-mail: andreiaml@usp.br [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • hnRNPK is a new target of SET. • SET regulates hnRNPK. • SET and hnRNPK accumulation promotes tumorigenesis. • SET accumulation is a potential model to study genes regulated by SET-hnRNPK. - Abstract: SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET–hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  20. Failure to interact with Brd4 alters the ability of HPV16 E2 to regulate host genome expression and cellular movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauson, Elaine J; Wang, Xu; Dornan, Edward S; Herzyk, Pawel; Bristol, Molly; Morgan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    The E2 protein of the carcinogen human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) regulates replication and transcription of the viral genome in association with viral and cellular proteins. Our previous work demonstrated that E2 can regulate transcription from the host genome. E2 can activate transcription from adjacent promoters when located upstream using E2 DNA binding sequences and this activation is dependent upon the cellular protein Brd4; this report demonstrates that a Brd4 binding E2 mutant alters host genome expression differently from wild type E2. Of particular note is that highly down regulated genes are mostly not affected by failure to interact with Brd4 suggesting that the E2-Brd4 interaction is more responsible for the transcriptional activation of host genes rather than repression. Therefore failure to interact efficiently with Brd4, or altered levels of Brd4, would alter the ability of E2 to regulate the host genome and could contribute to determining the outcome of infection. PMID:26365679

  1. 50 CFR 20.20 - Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program... IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.20 Migratory Bird Harvest... information will be used to provide a sampling frame for the national Migratory Bird Harvest Survey....

  2. 50 CFR 20.40 - Gift of migratory game birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gift of migratory game birds. 20.40... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.40 Gift of migratory game birds. No person may receive, possess, or give to another, any freshly killed migratory game birds as a...

  3. Profiling human protein degradome delineates cellular responses to proteasomal inhibition and reveals a feedback mechanism in regulating proteasome homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Tao; Tao, Yonghui; Yang, Meiqiang; Chen, Peng; Gao, XiaoBo; Zhang, Yanbo; Zhang,Tao; Chen, Zi; Hou, Jian; Zhang, Yan; Ruan, Kangcheng; Wang, Hongyan; Hu, Ronggui

    2014-01-01

    Global change in protein turnover (protein degradome) constitutes a central part of cellular responses to intrinsic or extrinsic stimuli. However, profiling protein degradome remains technically challenging. Recently, inhibition of the proteasome, e.g., by using bortezomib (BTZ), has emerged as a major chemotherapeutic strategy for treating multiple myeloma and other human malignancies, but systematic understanding of the mechanisms for BTZ drug action and tumor drug resistance is yet to be a...

  4. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kirjavainen; Maarja Laos; Tommi Anttonen; Ulla Pirvola

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC) of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubul...

  5. Problems confronting migratory birds in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We describe in this paper problems affecting the well-being of Alaska's migratory birds in the belief that recognition of these problems is a step towards finding...

  6. Migratory Bird Disease Contingency Plan: Louisa NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Migratory Bird Disease Contingency Plan for Louisa National Wildlife Refuge is intended to serve as a ready reference for background information, an inventory...

  7. Down-regulation of BTG1 by miR-454-3p enhances cellular radiosensitivity in renal carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B cell translocation gene 1 (BTG1) has long been recognized as a tumor suppressor gene. Recent reports demonstrated that BTG1 plays an important role in progression of cell cycle and is involved in cellular response to stressors. However, the microRNAs mediated regulatory mechanism of BTG1 expression has not been reported so far. MicroRNAs can effectively influence tumor radiosensitivity by preventing cell cycle progression, resulting in enhancement of the cytotoxicity of radiotherapy efficacy. This study aimed to demonstrating the effects of microRNAs on the BTG1 expression and cellular radiosensitivity. The human renal carcinoma 786-O cells were treated with 5 Gy of X-rays. Expressions of BTG1 gene and miR-454-3p, which was predicted to target BTG1 by software algorithm, were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Protein expressions were assessed by Western blot. Luciferase assays were used to quantify the interaction between BTG1 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) and miR-454-3p. The radiosensitivity was quantified by the assay of cell viability, colony formation and caspase-3 activity. The expression of the BTG1 gene in 786-O cells was significantly elevated after treatments with X-ray irradiation, DMSO, or serum starvation. The up-regulation of BTG1 after irradiation reduced cellular radiosensitivity as demonstrated by the enhanced cell viability and colony formation, as well as the repressed caspase-3 activity. In comparison, knock down of BTG1 by siRNA led to significantly enhanced cellular radiosensitivity. It was found that miR-454-3p can regulate the expression of BTG1 through a direct interaction with the 3′-UTR of BTG1 mRNA. Decreasing of its expression level correlates well with BTG1 up-regulation during X-ray irradiation. Particularly, we observed that over-expression of miR-454-3p by transfection inhibited the BTG1 expression and enhanced the radiosensitivity. In addition, cell cycle analysis showed that over-expression of miR-454-3p

  8. Migratory diversity predicts population declines in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, James J; Gill, Jennifer A; Butchart, Stuart H M; Jones, Victoria R; Franco, Aldina M A

    2016-03-01

    Declines in migratory species are a pressing concern worldwide, but the mechanisms underpinning these declines are not fully understood. We hypothesised that species with greater within-population variability in migratory movements and destinations, here termed 'migratory diversity', might be more resilient to environmental change. To test this, we related map-based metrics of migratory diversity to recent population trends for 340 European breeding birds. Species that occupy larger non-breeding ranges relative to breeding, a characteristic we term 'migratory dispersion', were less likely to be declining than those with more restricted non-breeding ranges. Species with partial migration strategies (i.e. overlapping breeding and non-breeding ranges) were also less likely to be declining than full migrants or full residents, an effect that was independent of migration distance. Recent rates of advancement in Europe-wide spring arrival date were greater for partial migrants than full migrants, suggesting that migratory diversity may also help facilitate species responses to climate change. PMID:26807694

  9. Curcumin inhibits cellular cholesterol accumulation by regulating SREBP-1/caveolin-1 signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-yu YUAN; Shuang-yu KUANG; Xing ZHENG; Hong-yan LING; Yun-bo YANG; Peng-ke YAN; Kai LI; Duan-fang LIAO

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective effect and the possible mechanism of curcumin on anti-atherosclerosis. Methods: Morphological changes of atherosclerotic le-sions taken from apoE knockout (apoE-/-) mice were determined by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Intracellular lipid droplets and lipid levels were assayed by oil red O staining and HPLC. The protein expression of caveolin-1 was quantified by West-ern blotting. Translocation and the expression of sterol response element-bind-ing protein-1 (SREBP-1) were indirectly detected by an immunofluorescence analysis. Results: The administration of 20 mg.kg-1.d-1 curcumin to apoE-/1 mice for 4 months induced a 50% reduction of atherosclerotic lesions and yielded a 5-fold increase in the caveolin-1 expression level as compared to the model group. Rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) pretreated with 50 mg.L-1 ox-lipid den-sity lipoprotein(ox-LDL) for 48 h increased cellular lipid contents, and stimulated SREBP-1 translocation, but decreased the caveolin-1 expression level. Lipid-loaded cells exposed to curcumin at various concentrations (12.5, 25, and 50 μmol.L-1) for different durations (0, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h) significantly diminished the number and area of cellular lipid droplets, total cholesterol, cholesterol ester, and free choles-terol accompanying the elevation of the caveolin-1 expression level (approximately 3-fold); the translocation of SREBP-1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was inhibited compared with the models. Lipid-loaded VSMC exposed to N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-norleucinal, a SREBP-1 protease inhibitor, showed increased nuclear trans-location of SREBP-1, reduced caveolin-1 expression level, and upregulated cellu-lar lipid levels. Conclusion: Curcumin inhibits ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accu-mulation in cultured VSMC through increasing the caveolin-1 expression via the inhibition of nuclear translocation of SREBP-1.

  10. p53 isoforms, Δ133p53 and p53β, are endogenous regulators of replicative cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Kaori; Mondal, Abdul M.; Horikawa, Izumi; Nguyen, Giang H.; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Sohn, Jane J.; Bowman, Elise D.; Mathe, Ewy A.; Schetter, Aaron J.; Pine, Sharon R.; Ji, Helen; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Lane, David P; Harris, Curtis C.

    2009-01-01

    The finite proliferative potential of normal human cells leads to replicative cellular senescence, which is a critical barrier to tumour progression in vivo1–3. We show that human p53 isoforms (Δ133p53 and p53β)4 constitute an endogenous regulatory mechanism for p53-mediated replicative senescence. Induced p53β and diminished Δ133p53 were associated with replicative senescence, but not oncogene-induced senescence, in normal human fibroblasts. The replicatively senescent fibroblasts also expre...

  11. The CPT1C 5'UTR contains a repressing upstream open reading frame that is regulated by cellular energy availability and AMPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lohse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Translational control is utilized as a means of regulating gene expression in many species. In most cases, posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms play an important role in stress response pathways and can lead to dysfunctional physiology if blocked by mutations. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 C (CPT1C, the brain-specific member of the CPT 1 family, has previously been shown to be involved in regulating metabolism in situations of energy surplus. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sequence analysis of the CPT1C mRNA revealed that it contains an upstream open reading frame (uORF in the 5' UTR of its mRNA. Using CPT1C 5' UTR/luciferase constructs, we investigated the role of the uORF in translational regulation. The results presented here show that translation from the CPT1C main open reading frame (mORF is repressed by the presence of the uORF, that this repression is relieved in response to specific stress stimuli, namely glucose deprivation and palmitate-BSA treatment, and that AMPK inhibition can relieve this uORF-dependent repression. SIGNIFICANCE: The fact that the mORF regulation is relieved in response to a specific set of stress stimuli rather than general stress response, hints at an involvement of CPT1C in cellular energy-sensing pathways and provides further evidence for a role of CPT1C in hypothalamic regulation of energy homeostasis.

  12. Lactoferrin from bovine colostrum regulates prolyl hydroxylase 2 activity and prevents prion protein-mediated neuronal cell damage via cellular prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y-G; Moon, J-H; Park, S-Y

    2014-08-22

    Prion disorders are associated with the conversion of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) to the abnormal scrapie isoform of prion protein (PrPsc). Recent studies have shown that expression of normal PrPc is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), and that lactoferrin increases full-length PrPc on the cell surface. Lactoferrin is an 80-kDa iron-binding glycoprotein with various biological activities, including iron-chelating ability. HIF-1α and the associated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway are regulated by HIF prolyl-hydroxylases 2 (PHD2). We hypothesized that lactoferrin regulates PHD2 expression and enzymatic activity, and the PHD2 regulation promotes HIF-1α stability and prevention of neuronal cell death mediated by prion protein (PrP) residues (106-126). Lactoferrin prevented PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity by the induction of PrPc expression via promoting HIF-1α stability in neuronal cells. Our results demonstrated that lactoferrin prevented PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity via the up-regulation of HIF-1α stability determined by PHD2 expression and enzymatic activity. These findings suggest that possible therapies such as PHD2 inhibition, or promotion of lactoferrin secretion, may have clinical benefits in neurodegenerative diseases, including prion disease. PMID:24875174

  13. Achieving Informed Consent for Cellular Therapies: A Preclinical Translational Research Perspective on Regulations versus a Dose of Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Aileen J; Cummings, Brian J

    2016-09-01

    A central principle of bioethics is "subject autonomy," the acknowledgement of the primacy of the informed consent of the subject of research. Autonomy requires informed consent - the assurance that the research participant is informed about the possible risks and benefits of the research. In fact, informed consent is difficult when a single drug is being tested, although subjects have a baseline understanding of the testing of a pharmacological agent and the understanding that they can stop taking the drug if there were an adverse event. However, informed consent is even less easily achieved in the modern arena of complex new molecular and cellular therapies. In this article, we argue that as science confronts new issues such as transplantation of stem cell products, which may live within the participant for the rest of their lives, researchers must carefully consider and constantly re-examine how they properly inform subjects considering participation trials of these novel therapeutic strategies.For example, the manufacture of a vial of a cell product that consists of a collection of growing cells is very different than the production of a vial of identical pills, which can be presumed to be identical. The scientific concepts on which these cellular approaches are based may seem alien and incomprehensible to a research subject, who thinks of a clinical trial as simply the selection and testing of the most efficacious pharmaceutical agent already proven to work in preclinical animal studies. The research subject would be wrong. PMID:27587445

  14. 78 FR 67183 - Proposed Information Collection; Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program and Migratory Bird...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Information Collection; Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program and Migratory Bird Surveys AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; request for... Bird Treaty Act (16 U.S.C. 703-711) and the Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 (16 U.S.C. 742d)...

  15. Modeling the Geography of Migratory Pathways and Stopover Habitats for Neotropical Migratory Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Orvis

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Intact migratory routes are critical for the stability of forest-dwelling, neotropical, migratory bird populations, and mortality along migratory pathways may be significant. Yet we know almost nothing about the geography of available stopovers or the possible migratory pathways that connect optimal stopovers. We undertake a spatial analysis of stopover habitat availability and then model potential migratory pathways between optimal stopovers in the eastern United States. Using models of fixed orientation and fixed nightly flight distance between stopovers during spring migration, we explore whether a simple endogenous migratory program is sufficient to ensure successful migration across the modern landscape. Our model runs suggest that the modern distribution of optimum stopovers in the eastern United States can be adequately exploited by birds following migratory pathways defined by fixed-orientation and fixed-distance nightly flights. Longer flight distances may increase the chances of success by enabling migrants to bypass locales offering little habitat. Our results also suggest that most southwest–northeast migratory pathways through the Appalachian mountains are intact. Lack of optimal habitat at key locations in the Southeast causes many modeled pathways to fail. We present a speculative view of regional migration patterns implied by predominant ideas found in stopover ecology literature, and demonstrate the need for broad-scale migration research, in the hope that our approach will foster other continental- and regional-scale projects.

  16. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luciana O; Garcia, Cristiana B; Matos-Silva, Flavia A; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2014-02-28

    SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET-hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  17. Compound C prevents Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein stabilization by regulating the cellular oxygen availability via interaction with Mitochondrial Complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Thilo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α is a master regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen concentration. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated kinase, has been reported to inhibit hypoxia dependent Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α activation via a mechanism that is independent of AMP-activated kinase but dependent on its interaction with the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study is to characterize the interaction of Compound C with the mitochondrial electron transport chain and to determine the mechanism through which the drug influences the stability of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein. We found that Compound C functions as an inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as demonstrated by its effect on mitochondrial respiration. It also prevents hypoxia-induced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stabilization in a dose dependent manner. In addition, Compound C does not have significant effects on reactive oxygen species production from complex I via both forward and reverse electron flux. This study provides evidence that similar to other mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitors, Compound C regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stability by controlling the cellular oxygen concentration.

  18. Pivotal Role of AKAP12 in the Regulation of Cellular Adhesion Dynamics: Control of Cytoskeletal Architecture, Cell Migration, and Mitogenic Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Akakura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular dynamics are controlled by key signaling molecules such as cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA and protein kinase C (PKC. AKAP12/SSeCKS/Gravin (AKAP12 is a scaffold protein for PKA and PKC which controls actin-cytoskeleton reorganization in a spatiotemporal manner. AKAP12 also acts as a tumor suppressor which regulates cell-cycle progression and inhibits Src-mediated oncogenic signaling and cytoskeletal pathways. Reexpression of AKAP12 causes cell flattening, reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, and the production of normalized focal adhesion structures. Downregulation of AKAP12 induces the formation of thickened, longitudinal stress fibers and the proliferation of adhesion complexes. AKAP12-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit hyperactivation of PKC, premature cellular senescence, and defects in cytokinesis, relating to the loss of PKC scaffolding activity by AKAP12. AKAP12-null mice exhibit increased cell senescence and increased susceptibility to carcinogen-induced oncogenesis. The paper describes the regulatory and scaffolding functions of AKAP12 and how it regulates cell adhesion, signaling, and oncogenic suppression.

  19. Phorbol ester promotes a sustained down-regulation of endothelin receptors and cellular responses to endothelin in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resink, T J; Scott-Burden, T; Weber, E; Bühler, F R

    1990-02-14

    The effect of phorbol ester pretreatment of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC) was studied with respect to regulation of endothelin (ET)-receptor binding and cellular responses to ET. The capacity of hVSMC to bind ET was decreased (by approximately 50% at maximum) after phorbol exposure, and this reductive effect was both rapid (t 1/2 approximately 10 min.) and sustained (for up to 24 hrs. of chronic phorbol exposure). Phorbol pretreatment inhibited both inositol phosphate and diacylclycerol production responses of hVSMC to ET in a manner that was time-dependent and sustained. Phorbol pretreatment also produced a persistent reduction in the ability of ET to release isotopically-labelled arachidonic and/or its metabolites from hVSMC, but importantly ionomycin-stimulated release was similarly negatively affected. Furthermore, ET-induced accumulation of the phospholipase A2/phospholipase B-derived inositol phospholipid metabolite, glycerophosphoinositol, was not different between control and phorbol-treated hVMSC. The mechanism whereby phorbol exerts differential, but notably sustained inhibitory effects on ET-promoted signal transduction pathways are thus complex and illustrative of the selectivity of protein kinase C in regulating cellular responses. PMID:2154974

  20. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  1. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E.; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  2. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  3. A New Flow-Regulating Cell Type in the Demosponge Tethya wilhelma – Functional Cellular Anatomy of a Leuconoid Canal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Jörg U.; Nickel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Demosponges possess a leucon-type canal system which is characterized by a highly complex network of canal segments and choanocyte chambers. As sponges are sessile filter feeders, their aquiferous system plays an essential role in various fundamental physiological processes. Due to the morphological and architectural complexity of the canal system and the strong interdependence between flow conditions and anatomy, our understanding of fluid dynamics throughout leuconoid systems is patchy. This paper provides comprehensive morphometric data on the general architecture of the canal system, flow measurements and detailed cellular anatomical information to help fill in the gaps. We focus on the functional cellular anatomy of the aquiferous system and discuss all relevant cell types in the context of hydrodynamic and evolutionary constraints. Our analysis is based on the canal system of the tropical demosponge Tethya wilhelma, which we studied using scanning electron microscopy. We found a hitherto undescribed cell type, the reticuloapopylocyte, which is involved in flow regulation in the choanocyte chambers. It has a highly fenestrated, grid-like morphology and covers the apopylar opening. The minute opening of the reticuloapopylocyte occurs in an opened, intermediate and closed state. These states permit a gradual regulation of the total apopylar opening area. In this paper the three states are included in a theoretical study into flow conditions which aims to draw a link between functional cellular anatomy, the hydrodynamic situation and the regular body contractions seen in T. wilhelma. This provides a basis for new hypotheses regarding the function of bypass elements and the role of hydrostatic pressure in body contractions. Our study provides insights into the local and global flow conditions in the sponge canal system and thus enhances current understanding of related physiological processes. PMID:25409176

  4. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  5. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  6. 76 FR 82057 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... in the management unit for the FMP. The overfishing status of these stocks is unknown, except that... regulation as the status quo. As set forth fully in Amendment 18, landings data for all four species proposed... the Gulf and Atlantic migratory groups are either administrative or allow status quo harvest...

  7. 77 FR 66406 - Migratory Bird Permits; Delegating Falconry Permitting Authority to Seven States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... Federal Register on October 8, 2008 (73 FR 59448), to revise our regulations governing falconry in the..., 1994, ``Government-to-Government Relations with Native American Tribal Governments'' (59 FR 22951... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AZ16 Migratory Bird Permits; Delegating...

  8. 78 FR 72830 - Migratory Bird Permits; Delegating Falconry Permitting Authority to 17 States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ... October 8, 2008 (73 FR 59448), to revise our regulations governing falconry in the United States, found in..., 1994, ``Government-to-Government Relations with Native American Tribal Governments'' (59 FR 22951... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-BA01 Migratory Bird Permits; Delegating...

  9. Novel metastasis-related gene CIM functions in the regulation of multiple cellular stress-response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Arima, Chinatsu; Tomida, Shuta; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Shimada, Yukako; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Osada, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    Various stresses of the tumor microenvironment produced by insufficient nutrients, pH, and oxygen can contribute to the generation of altered metabolic and proliferative states that promote the survival of metastatic cells. Among many cellular stress-response pathways activated under such conditions are the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway and the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is elicited as a response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In this study, we report the identification of a novel cancer invasion and metastasis-related gene (hereafter referred to as CIM, also called ERLEC1), which influences both of these stress-response pathways to promote metastasis. CIM was identified by comparing the gene expression profile of a highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line with its weakly metastatic parental clone. We showed that CIM is critical for metastatic properties in this system. Proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed that CIM has multifaceted roles in controlling the response to hypoxia and ER stress. Specifically, CIM sequestered OS-9 from the HIF-1α complex and PHD2, permitting HIF-1α accumulation by preventing its degradation. Ectopic expression of CIM in lung cancer cells increased their tolerance to hypoxia. CIM also modulated UPR through interaction with the key ER stress protein BiP, influencing cell proliferation under ER stress conditions. Our findings shed light on how tolerance to multiple cellular stresses at a metastatic site can be evoked by an integrated mechanism involving CIM, which can function to coordinate those responses in a manner that promotes metastatic cell survival. PMID:21118962

  10. Cellular stress-induced up-regulation of FMRP promotes cell survival by modulating PI3K-Akt phosphorylation cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells David

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS, the most commonly inherited mental retardation and single gene cause of autistic spectrum disorder, occurs when the Fmr1 gene is mutated. The product of Fmr1, fragile X linked mental retardation protein (FMRP is widely expressed in HeLa cells, however the roles of FMRP within HeLa cells were not elucidated, yet. Interacting with a diverse range of mRNAs related to cellular survival regulatory signals, understanding the functions of FMRP in cellular context would provide better insights into the role of this interesting protein in FXS. Using HeLa cells treated with etoposide as a model, we tried to determine whether FMRP could play a role in cell survival. Methods Apoptotic cell death was induced by etoposide treatment on Hela cells. After we transiently modulated FMRP expression (silencing or enhancing by using molecular biotechnological methods such as small hairpin RNA virus-induced knock down and overexpression using transfection with FMRP expression vectors, cellular viability was measured using propidium iodide staining, TUNEL staining, and FACS analysis along with the level of activation of PI3K-Akt pathway by Western blot. Expression level of FMRP and apoptotic regulator BcL-xL was analyzed by Western blot, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results An increased FMRP expression was measured in etoposide-treated HeLa cells, which was induced by PI3K-Akt activation. Without FMRP expression, cellular defence mechanism via PI3K-Akt-Bcl-xL was weakened and resulted in an augmented cell death by etoposide. In addition, FMRP over-expression lead to the activation of PI3K-Akt signalling pathway as well as increased FMRP and BcL-xL expression, which culminates with the increased cell survival in etoposide-treated HeLa cells. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that FMRP expression is an essential part of cellular survival mechanisms through the modulation of PI3K, Akt, and Bcl-xL signal

  11. Hormonal and cellular regulation of Sertoli cell anti-Müllerian hormone production in the postnatal mouse.

    OpenAIRE

    al-Attar, L.; Noël, K; Dutertre, M; Belville, C; Forest, M G; Burgoyne, P. S.; Josso, N; Rey, R.

    1997-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is secreted by immature testicular Sertoli cells. Clinical studies have demonstrated a negative correlation between serum AMH and testosterone in puberty but not in the neonatal period. We investigated AMH regulation using mouse models mimicking physiopathological situations observed in humans. In normal mice, intratesticular, not serum, testosterone repressed AMH synthesis, explaining why AMH is downregulated in early puberty when serum testosterone is still low....

  12. Versatile assays for high throughput screening for activators or inhibitors of intracellular proteases and their cellular regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Intracellular proteases constitute a class of promising drug discovery targets. Methods for high throughput screening against these targets are generally limited to in vitro biochemical assays that can suffer many technical limitations, as well as failing to capture the biological context of proteases within the cellular pathways that lead to their activation. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026;We describe here a versatile system for reconstituting protease activation networks in yeast and assaying the activity of these pathways using a cleavable transcription factor substrate in conjunction with reporter gene read-outs. The utility of these versatile assay components and their application for screening strategies was validated for all ten human Caspases, a family of intracellular proteases involved in cell death and inflammation, including implementation of assays for high throughput screening (HTS of chemical libraries and functional screening of cDNA libraries. The versatility of the technology was also demonstrated for human autophagins, cysteine proteases involved in autophagy.Altogether, the yeast-based systems described here for monitoring activity of ectopically expressed mammalian proteases provide a fascile platform for functional genomics and chemical library screening.

  13. Notch and presenilin regulate cellular expansion and cytokine secretion but cannot instruct Th1/Th2 fate acquisition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Tong Ong

    Full Text Available Recent reports suggested that Delta1, 4 and Jagged1, 2 possessed the ability to instruct CD4(+ T cell into selection of Th1 or Th2 fates, respectively, although the underlying mechanism endowing the cleaved Notch receptor with memory of ligand involved in its activation remains elusive. To examine this, we prepared artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing either DLL1 or Jag1. Although both ligands were efficient in inducing Notch2 cleavage and activation in CD4(+ T or reporter cells, the presence of Lunatic Fringe in CD4(+ T cells inhibited Jag1 activation of Notch1 receptor. Neither ligand could induce Th1 or Th2 fate choice independently of cytokines or redirect cytokine-driven Th1 or Th2 development. Instead, we find that Notch ligands only augment cytokine production during T cell differentiation in the presence of polarizing IL-12 and IL-4. Moreover, the differentiation choices of naïve CD4(+ T cells lacking gamma-secretase, RBP-J, or both in response to polarizing cytokines revealed that neither presenilin proteins nor RBP-J were required for cytokine-induced Th1/Th2 fate selection. However, presenilins facilitate cellular proliferation and cytokine secretion in an RBP-J (and thus, Notch independent manner. The controversies surrounding the role of Notch and presenilins in Th1/Th2 polarization may reflect their role as genetic modifiers of T-helper cells differentiation.

  14. Regulation of cellular adhesion molecule expression in murine oocytes,peri-implantation and post-implantation embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAVID; P; LU; LINA; TIAN; CHRIS; O'; NEILL; NICHOLAS; JC; KING

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the adhesion molecules, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, NCAM, CD44, CD49d (VLA-4, α chain),and CD11a (LFA-1, α chain) on mouse oocytes, and pre- and peri-implantation stage embryos was exam-ined by quantitative indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. ICAM-1 was most strongly expressed at theoocyte stage, gradually declining almost to undetectable levels by the expanded blastocyst stage. NCAM,also expressed maximally on the oocyte, declined to undetectable levels beyond the morula stage. On theother hand, CD44 declined from highest expression at the oocyte stage to show a second maximum at thecompacted 8-cell/morula. This molecule exhibited high expression around contact areas between trophecto-derm and zona pellucida during blastocyst hatching. CD49d was highly expressed in the oocyte, remainedsignificantly expressed throughout and after blastocyst hatching was expressed on the polar trophecto-derm. Like CD44, CD49d declined to undetectable levels at the blastocyst outgrowth stage. Expression ofboth VCAM-1 and CD11a was undetectable throughout. The diametrical temporal expression pattern ofICAM-1 and NCAM compared to CD44 and CD49d suggest that dynamic changes in expression of adhesionmolecules may be important for interaction of the embryo with the maternal cellular environment as wellas for continuing development and survival of the early embryo.

  15. Down-regulation of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (Long Form contributes to apoptosis induced by Hsp90 inhibition in human lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qilin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular FLICE-Inhibitory Protein (long form, c-FLIPL is a critical negative regulator of death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Overexpression of c-FLIPL has been reported in many cancer cell lines and is associated with chemoresistance. In contrast, down-regulation of c-FLIP may drive cancer cells into cellular apoptosis. This study aims to demonstrate that inhibition of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 either by inhibitors geldanamycin/17-N-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (GA/17-AAG or siRNA technique in human lung cancer cells induces c-FLIPL degradation and cellular apoptosis through C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP-mediated mechanisms. Methods Calu-1 and H157 cell lines (including H157-c-FLIPL overexpressing c-FLIPL and control cell H157-lacZ were treated with 17-AAG and the cell lysates were prepared to detect the given proteins by Western Blot and the cell survival was assayed by SRB assay. CHIP and Hsp90 α/β proteins were knocked down by siRNA technique. CHIP and c-FLIPL plasmids were transfected into cells and immunoprecipitation experiments were performed to testify the interactions between c-FLIPL, CHIP and Hsp90. Results c-FLIPL down-regulation induced by 17-AAG can be reversed with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, which suggested that c-FLIPL degradation is mediated by a ubiquitin-proteasome system. Inhibition of Hsp90α/β reduced c-FLIPL level, whereas knocking down CHIP expression with siRNA technique inhibited c-FLIPL degradation. Furthermore, c-FLIPL and CHIP were co-precipitated in the IP complexes. In addition, overexpression of c-FLIPL can rescue cancer cells from apoptosis. When 17-AAG was combined with an anti-cancer agent celecoxib(CCB, c-FLIPL level declined further and there was a higher degree of caspase activation. Conclusion We have elucidated c-FLIPL degradation contributes to apoptosis induced by Hsp90 inhibition, suggesting c-FLIP and Hsp90 may be the promising combined targets

  16. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Procházková; František Škanta; Radka Roubalová; Marcela Šilerová; Jiří Dvořák; Martin Bilej

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely f...

  17. Bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transcriptional regulators directly bind two cellular transcription factors, TFIID and TFIIB.

    OpenAIRE

    Rank, N M; Lambert, P F

    1995-01-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) E2 translational open reading frame encodes three proteins that regulate viral transcription and DNA replication: the E2 transcriptional activator (E2TA), the E2 transcriptional repressor (E2TR) and the E8/E2 transcriptional repressor (E8/E2TR). E2TA is a strong activator of papillomaviral promoters and is required for viral DNA replication. E2TR and E8/E2TR inhibit the activities of E2TA but also possess weak transactivational properties of their own....

  18. Cellular RNA binding proteins NS1-BP and hnRNP K regulate influenza A virus RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Ling; Chiou, Ni-Ting; Kuss, Sharon; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Lynch, Kristen W; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major human pathogen with a genome comprised of eight single-strand, negative-sense, RNA segments. Two viral RNA segments, NS1 and M, undergo alternative splicing and yield several proteins including NS1, NS2, M1 and M2 proteins. However, the mechanisms or players involved in splicing of these viral RNA segments have not been fully studied. Here, by investigating the interacting partners and function of the cellular protein NS1-binding protein (NS1-BP), we revealed novel players in the splicing of the M1 segment. Using a proteomics approach, we identified a complex of RNA binding proteins containing NS1-BP and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), among which are hnRNPs involved in host pre-mRNA splicing. We found that low levels of NS1-BP specifically impaired proper alternative splicing of the viral M1 mRNA segment to yield the M2 mRNA without affecting splicing of mRNA3, M4, or the NS mRNA segments. Further biochemical analysis by formaldehyde and UV cross-linking demonstrated that NS1-BP did not interact directly with viral M1 mRNA but its interacting partners, hnRNPs A1, K, L, and M, directly bound M1 mRNA. Among these hnRNPs, we identified hnRNP K as a major mediator of M1 mRNA splicing. The M1 mRNA segment generates the matrix protein M1 and the M2 ion channel, which are essential proteins involved in viral trafficking, release into the cytoplasm, and budding. Thus, reduction of NS1-BP and/or hnRNP K levels altered M2/M1 mRNA and protein ratios, decreasing M2 levels and inhibiting virus replication. Thus, NS1-BP-hnRNPK complex is a key mediator of influenza A virus gene expression.

  19. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP1) can regulate E2F1 transcription factor-mediated control of cyclin transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-07-29

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity. PMID:21653699

  20. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP1) can regulate E2F1 transcription factor-mediated control of cyclin transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-07-29

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity.

  1. Greater migratory propensity in hosts lowers pathogen transmission and impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Richard J; Altizer, Sonia; Bartel, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Animal migrations are spectacular and migratory species have been shown to transmit pathogens that pose risks to human health. Although migration is commonly assumed to enhance pathogen dispersal, empirical work indicates that migration can often have the opposite effect of lowering disease risk.Key to assessing disease threats to migratory species is the ability to predict how migratory behaviour influences pathogen invasion success and impacts on migratory hosts, thus motivating a mechanist...

  2. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signalling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha D Pauls

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunogloblulin isotype switch, germinal center responses and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  3. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Samantha D; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  4. DRhoGEF2 regulates cellular tension and cell pulsations in the Amnioserosa during Drosophila dorsal closure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Azevedo

    Full Text Available Coordination of apical constriction in epithelial sheets is a fundamental process during embryogenesis. Here, we show that DRhoGEF2 is a key regulator of apical pulsation and constriction of amnioserosal cells during Drosophila dorsal closure. Amnioserosal cells mutant for DRhoGEF2 exhibit a consistent decrease in amnioserosa pulsations whereas overexpression of DRhoGEF2 in this tissue leads to an increase in the contraction time of pulsations. We probed the physical properties of the amnioserosa to show that the average tension in DRhoGEF2 mutant cells is lower than wild-type and that overexpression of DRhoGEF2 results in a tissue that is more solid-like than wild-type. We also observe that in the DRhoGEF2 overexpressing cells there is a dramatic increase of apical actomyosin coalescence that can contribute to the generation of more contractile forces, leading to amnioserosal cells with smaller apical surface than wild-type. Conversely, in DRhoGEF2 mutants, the apical actomyosin coalescence is impaired. These results identify DRhoGEF2 as an upstream regulator of the actomyosin contractile machinery that drives amnioserosa cells pulsations and apical constriction.

  5. 77 FR 60381 - Migratory Bird Conservation; Executive Order 13186

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC148 Migratory Bird Conservation; Executive Order... the U.S. Fish and ] Wildlife Service (FWS) to promote the conservation of migratory birds. DATES: This... Migratory Birds''. One of the requirements of E.O. 13186 is that each Federal agency taking actions...

  6. Protein kinase CK2 localizes to sites of DNA double-strand break regulating the cellular response to DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Birgitte B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK is a nuclear complex composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs and a heterodimeric DNA-targeting subunit Ku. DNA-PK is a major component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ repair mechanism, which is activated in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species and radiomimetic drugs. We have recently reported that down-regulation of protein kinase CK2 by siRNA interference results in enhanced cell death specifically in DNA-PKcs-proficient human glioblastoma cells, and this event is accompanied by decreased autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at S2056 and delayed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Results In the present study, we show that CK2 co-localizes with phosphorylated histone H2AX to sites of DNA damage and while CK2 gene knockdown is associated with delayed DNA damage repair, its overexpression accelerates this process. We report for the first time evidence that lack of CK2 destabilizes the interaction of DNA-PKcs with DNA and with Ku80 at sites of genetic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CK2 regulates the phosphorylation levels of DNA-PKcs only in response to direct induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions Taken together, these results strongly indicate that CK2 plays a prominent role in NHEJ by facilitating and/or stabilizing the binding of DNA-PKcs and, possibly other repair proteins, to the DNA ends contributing to efficient DNA damage repair in mammalian cells.

  7. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  8. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fields Joshua A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previously, we reported data illustrating the requirement for CsrA in several virulence related phenotypes of C. jejuni strain 81–176, indicating that the Csr pathway is important for Campylobacter pathogenesis. Results We compared the Escherichia coli and C. jejuni orthologs of CsrA and characterized the ability of the C. jejuni CsrA protein to functionally complement an E. coli csrA mutant. Phylogenetic comparison of E. coli CsrA to orthologs from several pathogenic bacteria demonstrated variability in C. jejuni CsrA relative to the known RNA binding domains of E. coli CsrA and in several amino acids reported to be involved in E. coli CsrA-mediated gene regulation. When expressed in an E. coli csrA mutant, C. jejuni CsrA succeeded in recovering defects in motility, biofilm formation, and cellular morphology; however, it failed to return excess glycogen accumulation to wild type levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that C. jejuni CsrA is capable of efficiently binding some E. coli CsrA binding sites, but not others, and provide insight into the biochemistry of C. jejuni CsrA.

  9. Enhanced cellular responses and distinct gene profiles in human fetoplacental artery endothelial cells under chronic low oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Wang, Kai; Li, Yan; Dai, Cai-Feng; Wang, Ping; Kendziorski, Christina; Chen, Dong-Bao; Zheng, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Fetoplacental endothelial cells are exposed to oxygen levels ranging from 2% to 8% in vivo. However, little is known regarding endothelial function within this range of oxygen because most laboratories use ambient air (21% O2) as a standard culture condition (SCN). We asked whether human umbilical artery endothelial cells (HUAECs) that were steadily exposed to the physiological chronic normoxia (PCN, 3% O2) for ∼20-25 days differed in their proliferative and migratory responses to FGF2 and VEGFA as well as in their global gene expression compared with those in the SCN. We observed that PCN enhanced FGF2- and VEGFA-stimulated cell proliferation and migration. In oxygen reversal experiments (i.e., when PCN cells were exposed to SCN for 24 h and vice versa), we found that preexposure to 21% O2 decreased the migratory ability, but not the proliferative ability, of the PCN-HUAECs in response to FGF2 and VEGFA. These PCN-enhanced cellular responses were associated with increased protein levels of HIF1A and NOS3, but not FGFR1, VEGFR1, and VEGFR2. Microarray analysis demonstrated that PCN up-regulated 74 genes and down-regulated 86, 14 of which were directly regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors as evaluated using in silico analysis. Gene function analysis further indicated that the PCN-regulated genes were highly related to cell proliferation and migration, consistent with the results from our functional assays. Given that PCN significantly alters cellular responses to FGF2 and VEGFA as well as transcription in HUAECs, it is likely that we may need to reexamine the current cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling fetoplacental endothelial functions, which were largely derived from endothelial models established under ambient O2.

  10. Expression, cellular localization, and involvement of the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes in the regulation of ram sperm capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, C; Serrano, E; Domingo, J; Casao, A; Pérez-Pé, R; Cebrián-Pérez, J A; Muiño-Blanco, T

    2016-08-01

    Spermatozoa require substantially more ATP than other cells, not only for sustaining sperm motility but also for regulating protein phosphorylation during capacitation. In this study, we have reported for the first time the presence of the two key enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in ovine spermatozoa by indirect immunofluorescence, Western blotting, in-gel activity, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. We found that the activity of both enzymes significantly increased after in vitro capacitation in the presence of high-cAMP levels, with a concomitant increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation and in the proportion of sperm-capacitated pattern assessed by the chlortetracycline staining. These results suggest that PPP is related with the progress of capacitation and that a relationship between calcium compartmentalization, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and PPP seems to exist. This is the first report that shows a connection between the PPP, cAMP/PKA signaling pathways and sperm capacitation. These findings can be of high-biological importance to improve our knowledge of the biochemical mechanisms involved in the acquisition of mammalian sperm functional competence and, ultimately, fertility.

  11. The response of migratory populations to phenological change: a Migratory Flow Network modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Caz M; Laughlin, Andrew J; Hall, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Declines in migratory species have been linked to anthropogenic climate change through phenological mismatch, which arises due to asynchronies between the timing of life-history events (such as migration) and the phenology of available resources. Long-distance migratory species may be particularly vulnerable to phenological change in their breeding ranges, since the timing of migration departure is based on environmental cues at distant non-breeding sites. Migrants may, however, be able to adjust migration speed en route to the breeding grounds, and thus, ability of migrants to update their timing of migration may depend critically on stopover frequency during migration; however, understanding how migratory strategy influences population dynamics is hindered by a lack of predictive models explicitly linking habitat quality to demography and movement patterns throughout the migratory cycle. Here, we present a novel modelling framework, the Migratory Flow Network (MFN), in which the seasonally varying attractiveness of breeding, winter and stopover regions drives the direction and timing of migration based on a simple general flux law. We use the MFN to investigate how populations respond to shifts in breeding site phenology based on their frequency of stopover and ability to detect and adapt to these changes. With perfect knowledge of advancing phenology, 'jump' migrants (low-frequency stopover) require more adaptation for populations to recover than 'hop' and 'skip' (high or medium frequency stopover) migrants. If adaptation depends on proximity, hop and skip migrants' populations can recover but jump migrants cannot adjust and decline severely. These results highlight the importance of understanding migratory strategies and maintaining high-quality stopover habitat to buffer migratory populations from climate-induced mismatch. We discuss how MFNs could be applied to diverse migratory taxa and highlight the potential of MFNs as a tool for exploring how migrants

  12. A quantitative measure of migratory connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrosini, Roberto; Møller, Anders Pape; Saino, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative measure of migratory connectivity correspondence: Corresponding author. Tel.: +390264483464; fax: +390264483565. (Ambrosini, Roberto) (Ambrosini, Roberto) (M?ller, Anders Pape) (Saino, Nicola) Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca - piazza della Scienza 2--> , I-20126 Milano--> - ITALY...

  13. Expression of human papilloma virus type 16 E5 protein in amelanotic melanoma cells regulates endo-cellular pH and restores tyrosinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coccia Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanin synthesis, the elective trait of melanocytes, is regulated by tyrosinase activity. In tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas this rate limiting enzyme is inactive because of acidic endo-melanosomal pH. The E5 oncogene of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 is a small transmembrane protein with a weak transforming activity and a role during the early steps of viral infections. E5 has been shown to interact with 16 kDa subunit C of the trans-membrane Vacuolar ATPase proton pump ultimately resulting in its functional suppressions. However, the cellular effects of such an interaction are still under debate. With this work we intended to explore whether the HPV16 E5 oncoprotein does indeed interact with the vacuolar ATPase proton pump once expressed in intact human cells and whether this interaction has functional consequences on cell metabolism and phenotype. Methods The expression of the HPV16-E5 oncoproteins was induced in two Tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas (the cell lines FRM and M14 by a retroviral expression construct. Modulation of the intracellular pH was measured with Acridine orange and fluorescence microscopy. Expression of tyrosinase and its activity was followed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and enzyme assay. The anchorage-independence growth and the metabolic activity of E5 expressing cells were also monitored. Results We provide evidence that in the E5 expressing cells interaction between E5 and V-ATPase determines an increase of endo-cellular pH. The cellular alkalinisation in turn leads to the post-translational activation of tyrosinase, melanin synthesis and phenotype modulation. These effects are associated with an increased activation of tyrosine analogue anti-blastic drugs. Conclusion Once expressed within intact human cells the HPV16-E5 oncoprotein does actually interact with the vacuolar V-ATPase proton pump and this interaction induces a number of functional effects. In amelanotic melanomas these

  14. Regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced cellular response during chronic hypoxia in differentiated rat PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of chronic hypoxia on N-methyl-D-aspartate-mediated cellular responses in differentiated PC12 cells. PC12 cells were differentiated by treatment with nerve growth factor. Patch-clamp analysis in differentiated PC12 cells showed that extracellularly applied N-methyl-D-aspartate induced an inward current that was abolished by the presence of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801. Results from Ca(2+) imaging experiments showed that N-methyl-D-aspartate induced an elevation in intracellular free Ca(2+) which was also abolished by MK-801. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced current in nerve growth factor-treated cells. We found that the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced inward current and the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced elevation in intracellular free Ca(2+) were markedly attenuated by chronic hypoxia. We next examined the possibility that the reduced N-methyl-D-aspartate responsiveness was due to down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor levels. Northern blot and immunoblot analyses showed that both messenger RNA and protein levels for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 were markedly decreased during hypoxia. However, the messenger RNA for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2C was increased, whereas the protein level for subunit 2C did not change. Our results indicate that differentiated PC12 cells express functional N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and that chronic exposure to hypoxia attenuates the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced Ca(2+) accumulation in these cells via down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1. This mechanism may play an important role in protecting PC12 cells against hypoxic stress. PMID:11113364

  15. Photoperiodic regulation of cellular retinol binding protein, CRBP1 [corrected] and nestin in tanycytes of the third ventricle ependymal layer of the Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Perry; Ivanova, Elena; Graham, E Scott; Ross, Alexander W; Wilson, Dana; Plé, Helene; Mercer, Julian G; Ebling, Francis J; Schuhler, Sandrine; Dupré, Sandrine M; Loudon, Andrew; Morgan, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Tanycytes in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle act both as a barrier and a communication gateway between the cerebrospinal fluid, brain and portal blood supply to the pituitary gland. However, the range, importance and mechanisms involved in the function of tanycytes remain to be explored. In this study, we have utilized a photoperiodic animal to examine the expression of three unrelated gene sequences in relation to photoperiod-induced changes in seasonal physiology and behaviour. We demonstrate that cellular retinol binding protein [corrected] (CRBP1), a retinoic acid transport protein, GPR50, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor and nestin, an intermediate filament protein, are down-regulated in short-day photoperiods. The distribution of the three sequences is very similar, with expression located in cells with tanycyte morphology in the region of the ependymal layer where tanycytes are located. Furthermore, CRBP1 expression in the ependymal layer is shown to be independent of a circadian clock and altered testosterone levels associated with testicular regression in short photo-period. Pinealectomy of Siberian hamsters demonstrates CRBP1 expression is likely to be dependent on melatonin output from the pineal gland. This provides evidence that tanycytes are seasonally responsive cells and are likely to be an important part of the mechanism to facilitate seasonal physiology and behaviour in the Siberian hamster.

  16. Overseas seed dispersal by migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Duarte S; Gangoso, Laura; Bouten, Willem; Figuerola, Jordi

    2016-01-13

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) promotes the colonization of isolated and remote habitats, and thus it has been proposed as a mechanism for explaining the distributions of many species. Birds are key LDD vectors for many sessile organisms such as plants, yet LDD beyond local and regional scales has never been directly observed nor quantified. By sampling birds caught while in migratory flight by GPS-tracked wild falcons, we show that migratory birds transport seeds over hundreds of kilometres and mediate dispersal from mainland to oceanic islands. Up to 1.2% of birds that reached a small island of the Canary Archipelago (Alegranza) during their migration from Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa carried seeds in their guts. The billions of birds making seasonal migrations each year may then transport millions of seeds. None of the plant species transported by the birds occurs in Alegranza and most do not occur on nearby Canary Islands, providing a direct example of the importance of environmental filters in hampering successful colonization by immigrant species. The constant propagule pressure generated by these LDD events might, nevertheless, explain the colonization of some islands. Hence, migratory birds can mediate rapid range expansion or shifts of many plant taxa and determine their distribution.

  17. 76 FR 44729 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... in 1996 (61 FR 49232, September 18, 1996) was to introduce youth to the concepts of ethical... in the Federal Register (76 FR 19876) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a... published in the Federal Register (76 FR 36508) a second document providing supplemental proposals for...

  18. 75 FR 18764 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Federal Register citation August 16, 2002 67 FR 53511. July 21, 2003 68 FR 43010. April 2, 2004 69 FR 17318. April 8, 2005 70 FR 18244. February 28, 2006 71 FR 10404. April 11, 2007 72 FR 18318. March 14, 2008 73 FR 13788. May 19, 2009 74 FR 23336. These documents, which are all final rules setting...

  19. 76 FR 19875 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2011-12 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... regulatory process, in the March 14, 1990, Federal Register (55 FR 9618). Regulatory Schedule for 2011-12... (67 FR 53511) a final rule that established procedures for incorporating subsistence management into...-11 final frameworks (see August 30, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 52873) for early seasons...

  20. 75 FR 32872 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ..., 2010, we published in the Federal Register (75 FR 27144) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The..., 1988 (53 FR 22582). We published our Record of Decision on August 18, 1988 (53 FR 31341). In addition... (70 FR 53376), we announced our intent to develop a new Supplemental Environmental Impact...

  1. 76 FR 54051 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... (76 FR 19876) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a background and overview of... Register (76 FR 36508) a second document providing supplemental proposals for early- and late-season... in the Federal Register (76 FR 44730) a third document specifically dealing with the...

  2. 77 FR 49679 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the April 17, 2012, Federal Register (77 FR 23094), we requested proposals from... season, under the guidelines described in the June 4, 1985, Federal Register (50 FR 23467). In this... adequately and, therefore, we made them final beginning with the 1988-89 hunting season (53 FR 31612,...

  3. 77 FR 29515 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... 2012 On April 17, 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 23094) a proposal to amend 50 CFR... Register (75 FR 53536), we finalized new guidelines for duck zones and split seasons for use by States in..., proposed rule (77 FR 23094): National Environmental Policy Act; Endangered Species Act;...

  4. 78 FR 45375 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Schedule for 2013 On April 9, 2013, we published in the Federal Register (78 FR 21200) a proposal to amend... discontinuous and appear incomplete. On June 14, 2013, we published in the Federal Register (78 FR 35844) a... FR 45838). Special September teal/wood duck seasons in Florida, Tennessee and Kentucky have...

  5. 78 FR 52657 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... (78 FR 21200) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a background and overview of... Register (78 FR 35844) a second document providing supplemental proposals for early- and late-season... in the Federal Register (78 FR 45376) a third document specifically dealing with the...

  6. 75 FR 27143 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2010-11 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... in and the factors affecting the regulatory process, in the March 14, 1990, Federal Register (55 FR... August 16, 2002, we published in the Federal Register (67 FR 53511) a final rule that established..., Federal Register (74 FR 43008) for early seasons and September 24, 2009, Federal Register (74 FR...

  7. 75 FR 65599 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... following Federal Register documents: Date Federal Register Citation August 16, 2002 67 FR 53511 July 21, 2003 68 FR 43010 April 2, 2004 69 FR 17318 April 8, 2005 70 FR 18244 February 28, 2006 71 FR 10404 April 11, 2007 72 FR 18318 March 14, 2008 73 FR 13788 May 19, 2009 74 FR 23336 April 13, 2010 75...

  8. 78 FR 75321 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... 16, 2002 (67 FR 53511) and most recently on February 21, 2013 (78 FR 11988). Recent Federal Register... 9, 2013 (78 FR 21200), to amend 50 CFR part 20. While that proposed rule dealt primarily with the... FR 16405; March 28, 2000), we identified 7 to 12 partner organizations (Alaska Native nonprofits...

  9. 77 FR 53117 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Final Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... the Federal Register (77 FR 23094) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a... Federal Register (77 FR 29516) a second document providing supplemental proposals for early- and late... Council meetings. On June 12, 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 34931) a third...

  10. 78 FR 35844 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... (78 FR 21200) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a background and overview of... discussions to frame this important issue (75 FR 58250; September 23, 2010). We also stated that we believed... possession limits are assigned (e.g., light geese), beginning in the 2013-14 season (77 FR 58444;...

  11. 78 FR 47135 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ..., 2013, Federal Register (78 FR 21200), we requested proposals from Indian Tribes wishing to establish... in the June 4, 1985, Federal Register (50 FR 23467). In this supplemental proposed rule, we propose... hunting season (53 FR 31612, August 18, 1988). We should stress here, however, that use of the...

  12. 77 FR 49867 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Frameworks for Late-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... the Federal Register (77 FR 23094) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a... discontinuous and appear incomplete. On May 17, 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 29516) a... published in the Federal Register (77 FR 34931) a third document revising our previously announced dates...

  13. 76 FR 17353 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... following Federal Register documents: Date Federal Register citation August 16, 2002 67 FR 53511 July 21, 2003 68 FR 43010 April 2, 2004 69 FR 17318 April 8, 2005 70 FR 18244 February 28, 2006 71 FR 10404 April 11, 2007 72 FR 18318 March 14, 2008 73 FR 13788 May 19, 2009 74 FR 23336 April 13, 2010 75...

  14. 75 FR 52397 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Frameworks for Late-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... Schedule for 2010 On May 13, 2010, we published in the Federal Register (75 FR 27144) a proposal to amend... published in the Federal Register (75 FR 32872) a second document providing supplemental proposals for early... seasons. On July 29, 2010, we published in the Federal Register (75 FR 44856) a third...

  15. 77 FR 23093 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2012-13 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... regulatory process, in the March 14, 1990, Federal Register (55 FR 9618). Regulatory Schedule for 2012-13... August 16, 2002, we published in the Federal Register (67 FR 53511) a final rule that established..., Federal Register (76 FR 54052) for early seasons and September 21, 2011, Federal Register (76 FR...

  16. 75 FR 44855 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ..., 2010, we published in the Federal Register (75 FR 27144) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The... Register (75 FR 32872) a second document providing supplemental proposals for early- and late-season... the impacts of our recent decision (see July 24, 2010, Federal Register, 73 FR 432190) regarding...

  17. 77 FR 42919 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Frameworks for Early-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... published in the Federal Register (77 FR 23094) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a... published in the Federal Register (77 FR 29516) a second document providing supplemental proposals for early..., 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 34931) a third document revising our...

  18. Importance of reservoir tributaries to spawning of migratory fish in the upper Paraná River

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, P.S.; Makrakis, Maristela Cavicchioli; Miranda, Leandro E.; Makrakis, Sergio; Assumpcao, L.; Paula, S.; Dias, João Henrique Pinheiro; Marques, H.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of rivers by dams transforms previously lotic reaches above the dam into lentic ones and limits or prevents longitudinal connectivity, which impairs access to suitable habitats for the reproduction of many migratory fish species. Frequently, unregulated tributaries can provide important habitat heterogeneity to a regulated river and may mitigate the influence of impoundments on the mainstem river. We evaluated the importance of tributaries to spawning of migratory fish species over three spawning seasons, by comparing several abiotic conditions and larval fish distributions in four rivers that are tributaries to an impounded reach of the Upper Parana River, Brazil. Our study confirmed reproduction of at least 8 long-distance migrators, likely nine, out of a total of 19 occurring in the Upper Parana River. Total larval densities and percentage species composition differed among tributaries, but the differences were not consistent among spawning seasons and unexpectedly were not strongly related to annual differences in temperature and hydrology. We hypothesize that under present conditions, densities of larvae of migratory species may be better related to efficiency of fish passage facilities than to temperature and hydrology. Our study indicates that adult fish are finding suitable habitat for spawning in tributaries, fish eggs are developing into larvae, and larvae are finding suitable rearing space in lagoons adjacent to the tributaries. Our findings also suggest the need for establishment of protected areas in unregulated and lightly regulated tributaries to preserve essential spawning and nursery habitats.

  19. Escaping peril: perceived predation risk affects migratory propensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulthén, Kaj; Chapman, Ben B.; Nilsson, P. Anders;

    2015-01-01

    to record the migration of individual roach (Rutilus rutilus), a partially migratory fish, in the wild following exposure to manipulation of direct (predator presence/absence) and indirect (high/low roach density) perceived predation risk in experimental mesocosms. Following exposure, we released fish......) affected timing but not propensity showing that elevated risk carried over to alter migratory behaviour in the wild. Our key finding demonstrates predator-driven migratory plasticity, highlighting the powerful role of predation risk for migratory decision-making and dynamics....

  20. Genomewide transcriptional signatures of migratory flight activity in a globally invasive insect pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher M; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Mironidis, George K; Vontas, John; Yang, Yihua; Lim, Ka S; Oakeshott, John G; Bass, Chris; Chapman, Jason W

    2015-10-01

    Migration is a key life history strategy for many animals and requires a suite of behavioural, morphological and physiological adaptations which together form the 'migratory syndrome'. Genetic variation has been demonstrated for many traits that make up this syndrome, but the underlying genes involved remain elusive. Recent studies investigating migration-associated genes have focussed on sampling migratory and nonmigratory populations from different geographic locations but have seldom explored phenotypic variation in a migratory trait. Here, we use a novel combination of tethered flight and next-generation sequencing to determine transcriptomic differences associated with flight activity in a globally invasive moth pest, the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. By developing a state-of-the-art phenotyping platform, we show that field-collected H. armigera display continuous variation in flight performance with individuals capable of flying up to 40 km during a single night. Comparative transcriptomics of flight phenotypes drove a gene expression analysis to reveal a suite of expressed candidate genes which are clearly related to physiological adaptations required for long-distance flight. These include genes important to the mobilization of lipids as flight fuel, the development of flight muscle structure and the regulation of hormones that influence migratory physiology. We conclude that the ability to express this complex set of pathways underlines the remarkable flexibility of facultative insect migrants to respond to deteriorating conditions in the form of migratory flight and, more broadly, the results provide novel insights into the fundamental transcriptional changes required for migration in insects and other taxa. PMID:26331997

  1. Regulatory mechanisms for the development of the migratory phenotype: roles for photoperiod and the gonad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramenofsky, Marilyn; Németh, Zoltán

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". Male white-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii, were studied to investigate roles of natural day length and the testes in regulating development and expression of the vernal migration phenotype. Previous work suggested that a pulse of androgen during winter months followed by the vernal increase in photoperiod promotes fueling (fat deposition) to support long distance flight; however, other traits required for successful migration remain untested. To investigate these points, birds were captured on their wintering grounds and castrated prior to winter solstice following Mattocks (1976). A subset of the castrates received 8mm Silastic implants of testosterone (T-castrates) and others blank implants (Blank-castrates) for 16 days in February. Shams were surgical controls. Migratory traits measured were as follows: 24h locomotor activity, prenuptial molt, body mass, fat score, flight muscle profile, cloacal protuberance (CPL) and plasma androgens measured over 28 weeks divided into 3 experimental periods (pre-implant, implant, and post-implant). Under short day lengths, castration increased diurnal locomotor activity over Shams. Testosterone implants temporarily enhanced CPL, plasma androgens and flight muscle enlargement, but failed to induce migratory restlessness. Whereas all groups exhibited seasonal increases in mass, fat score and muscle profile, only Shams showed timely onset and completion of prenuptial molt and migratory restlessness. Thus, for castrated males exposed to naturally increasing day lengths, the organizational effects of a transient testosterone surge were not sufficient to actuate a timely spring molt and migratory behavior. A fully functional testis that can organize central processes is required for the entire expression of the spring migratory phenotype. PMID:24780144

  2. When and where does mortality occur in migratory birds? Direct evidence from long- term satellite tracking of raptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Raymond H. G.; Hake, Mikael; Strandberg, Roine; Koks, Ben J.; Trierweiler, Christiane; Exo, Klaus-Michael; Bairlein, Franz; Alerstam, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Information about when and where animals die is important to understand population regulation. In migratory animals, mortality might occur not only during the stationary periods (e.g. breeding and wintering) but also during the migration seasons. However, the relative importance of population limiti

  3. Cellular Telephone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨周

    1996-01-01

    Cellular phones, used in automobiles, airliners, and passenger trains, are basically low-power radiotelephones. Calls go through radio transmitters that are located within small geographical units called cells. Because each cell’s signals are too weak to interfere with those of other cells operating on the same fre-

  4. Current selection for lower migratory activity will drive the evolution of residency in a migratory bird population

    OpenAIRE

    F Pulido; Berthold, P

    2010-01-01

    Global warming is impacting biodiversity by altering the distribution, abundance, and phenology of a wide range of animal and plant species. One of the best documented responses to recent climate change is alterations in the migratory behavior of birds, but the mechanisms underlying these phenotypic adjustments are largely unknown. This knowledge is still crucial to predict whether populations of migratory birds will adapt to a rapid increase in temperature. We monitored migratory behavior in...

  5. 75 FR 48723 - Meeting Announcement: Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Advisory Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Meeting Announcement: Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Advisory Group... the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA) grants program (Advisory Group) will meet in.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Recognizing the importance of conserving migratory birds, the U.S. Congress...

  6. Fluoxetine up-regulates expression of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein and inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis in hippocampus-derived neural stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant compound which inhibits the reuptake of serotonin in the central nervous system. Recent studies have shown that fluoxetine can promote neurogenesis and improve the survival rate of neurons. However, whether fluoxetine modulates the proliferation or neuroprotection effects of neural stem cells (NSCs) needs to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that 20 μM fluoxetine can increase the cell proliferation of NSCs derived from the hippocampus of adult rats by MTT test. The up-regulated expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and the cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) in fluoxetine-treated NSCs was detected by real-time RT-PCR. Our results further showed that fluoxetine protects the lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in NSCs, in part, by activating the expression of c-FLIP. Moreover, c-FLIP induction by fluoxetine requires the activation of the c-FLIP promoter region spanning nucleotides -414 to -133, including CREB and SP1 sites. This effect appeared to involve the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent pathway. Furthermore, fluoxetine treatment significantly inhibited the induction of proinflammatory factor IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the culture medium of LPS-treated NSCs (p < 0.01). The results of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection further confirmed that fluoxentine increased the functional production of serotonin in NSCs. Together, these data demonstrate the specific activation of c-FLIP by fluoxetine and indicate the novel role of fluoxetine for neuroprotection in the treatment of depression

  7. MiRNA-205 modulates cellular invasion and migration via regulating zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Shunichi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is often diagnosed at later stages until they are incurable. MicroRNA (miR is a small, non-coding RNA that negatively regulates gene expression mainly via translational repression. Accumulating evidence indicates that deregulation of miR is associated with human malignancies including ESCC. The aim of this study was to identify miR that could be specifically expressed and exert distinct biological actions in ESCC. Methods Total RNA was extracted from ESCC cell lines, OE21 and TE10, and a non-malignant human esophageal squamous cell line, Het-1A, and subjected to microarray analysis. Expression levels of miR that showed significant differences between the 2 ESCC and Het-1A cells based on the comprehensive analysis were analyzed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR method. Then, functional analyses, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis and Matrigel invasion and the wound healing assay, for the specific miR were conducted. Using ESCC tumor samples and paired surrounding non-cancerous tissue obtained endoscopically, the association with histopathological differentiation was examined with quantitative RT-PCR. Results Based on the miR microarray analysis, there were 14 miRs that showed significant differences (more than 2-fold in expression between the 2 ESCC cells and non-malignant Het-1A. Among the significantly altered miRs, miR-205 expression levels were exclusively higher in 5 ESCC cell lines examined than any other types of malignant cell lines and Het-1A. Thus, miR-205 could be a specific miR in ESCC. Modulation of miR-205 expression by transfection with its precursor or anti-miR-205 inhibitor did not affect ESCC cell proliferation and apoptosis, but miR-205 was found to be involved in cell invasion and migration. Western blot revealed that knockdown of miR-205 expression in ESCC cells substantially enhanced expression of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2

  8. 78 FR 27927 - Migratory Bird Permits; Depredation Order for Migratory Birds in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... the United States (76 FR 66370, October 26, 2011), and a subspecies of conservation concern in... FR 22951), Executive Order 13175, and 512 DM 2, we have determined that there are no potential... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AY65 Migratory Bird Permits; Depredation Order...

  9. Are Migratory Animals Superspreaders of Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche McKay, Alexa; Hoye, Bethany J

    2016-08-01

    Migratory animals are simultaneously challenged by the physiological demands of long-distance movements and the need to avoid natural enemies including parasites and pathogens. The potential for animal migrations to disperse pathogens across large geographic areas has prompted a growing body of research investigating the interactions between migration and infection. However, the phenomenon of animal migration is yet to be incorporated into broader theories in disease ecology. Because migrations may expose animals to a greater number and diversity of pathogens, increase contact rates between hosts, and render them more susceptible to infection via changes to immune function, migration has the potential to generate both "superspreader species" and infection "hotspots". However, migration has also been shown to reduce transmission in some species, by facilitating parasite avoidance ("migratory escape") and weeding out infected individuals ("migratory culling"). This symposium was convened in an effort to characterize more broadly the role that animal migrations play in the dynamics of infectious disease, by integrating a range of approaches and scales across host taxa. We began with questions related to within-host processes, focusing on the consequences of nutritional constraints and strenuous movement for individual immune capability, and of parasite infection for movement capacity. We then scaled-up to between-host processes to identify what types, distances, or patterns of host movements are associated with the spread of infectious agents. Finally, we discussed landscape-scale relationships between migration and infectious disease, and how these may be altered as a result of anthropogenic changes to climate and land use. We are just beginning to scratch the surface of the interactions between infection and animal migrations; yet, with so many migrations now under threat, there is an urgent need to develop a holistic understanding of the potential for migrations to

  10. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  11. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  12. Influence of electric field on cellular migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Cells have the ability to detect continuous current electric fields (EFs) and respond to them with a directed migratory movement. Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d.) cells, a key model organism for the study of eukaryotic chemotaxis, orient and migrate toward the cathode under the influence of an EF. The underlying sensing mechanism and whether it is shared by the chemotactic response pathway remains unknown. Whereas genes and proteins that mediate the electric sensing as well as that define the migration direction have been previously investigated in D.d. cells, a deeper knowledge about the cellular kinematic effects caused by the EF is still lacking. Here we show that besides triggering a directional bias the electric field influences the cellular kinematics by accelerating the movement of cells along their path. We found that the migratory velocity of the cells in an EF increases linearly with the exposure time. Through the analysis of the PI3K and Phg2 distribution in the cytosol and of the cellular adherence to the substrate we aim at elucidating whereas this speed up effect in the electric field is due to either a molecular signalling or the interaction with the substrate. This work is part of the MaxSynBio Consortium which is jointly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany and the Max Planck Society.

  13. REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT ON DOMESTIC MIGRATORY FARM LABOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MITCHELL, JAMES P.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THE PRESIDENT'S COMMITTEE ON MIGRATORY LABOR ARE TO BRING ABOUT IMPROVED CONDITIONS FOR MIGRATORY WORKERS TO MIGRATE BY STABILIZING AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT. EFFORTS HAVE BEEN DIRECTED TOWARD RESOLVING PROBLEMS OF CAMP HOUSING, SAFE TRANSPORTATION, ADEQUATE EDUCATION AND HEALTH SERVICES, EXTENSION OF LABOR LAWS TO AGRICULTURAL…

  14. Is there a "migratory syndrome" common to all migrant birds?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, T; Perez-Tris, J; Mouritsen, H; Bauchinger, U; Bairlein, F; Bauchinger, U; Goymann, W; JenniEiermann, S

    2005-01-01

    Bird migration has been assumed, mostly implicitly, to represent a distinct class of animal behavior, with deep and strong homologies in the various phenotypic expressions of migratory behavior between different taxa. Here the evidence for the existence of what could be called a "migratory syndrome,

  15. Migratory birds reinforce local circulation of avian influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josanne H Verhagen

    Full Text Available Migratory and resident hosts have been hypothesized to fulfil distinct roles in infectious disease dynamics. However, the contribution of resident and migratory hosts to wildlife infectious disease epidemiology, including that of low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV in wild birds, has largely remained unstudied. During an autumn H3 LPAIV epizootic in free-living mallards (Anas platyrhynchos - a partially migratory species - we identified resident and migratory host populations using stable hydrogen isotope analysis of flight feathers. We investigated the role of migratory and resident hosts separately in the introduction and maintenance of H3 LPAIV during the epizootic. To test this we analysed (i H3 virus kinship, (ii temporal patterns in H3 virus prevalence and shedding and (iii H3-specific antibody prevalence in relation to host migratory strategy. We demonstrate that the H3 LPAIV strain causing the epizootic most likely originated from a single introduction, followed by local clonal expansion. The H3 LPAIV strain was genetically unrelated to H3 LPAIV detected both before and after the epizootic at the study site. During the LPAIV epizootic, migratory mallards were more often infected with H3 LPAIV than residents. Low titres of H3-specific antibodies were detected in only a few residents and migrants. Our results suggest that in this LPAIV epizootic, a single H3 virus was present in resident mallards prior to arrival of migratory mallards followed by a period of virus amplification, importantly associated with the influx of migratory mallards. Thus migrants are suggested to act as local amplifiers rather than the often suggested role as vectors importing novel strains from afar. Our study exemplifies that a multifaceted interdisciplinary approach offers promising opportunities to elucidate the role of migratory and resident hosts in infectious disease dynamics in wildlife.

  16. Juvenile hormone regulation of longevity in the migratory monarch butterfly.

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, W. S.; Tatar, M.

    2001-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) of eastern North America are well known for their long-range migration to overwintering roosts in south-central Mexico. An essential feature of this migration involves the exceptional longevity of the migrant adults; individuals persist from August/September to March while their summer counterparts are likely to live less than two months as adults. Migrant adults persist during a state of reproductive diapause in which both male and female reproductive d...

  17. Protein accounting in the cellular economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the copy number of cellular proteins is critical for understanding cell physiology. By being able to measure the absolute synthesis rates of the majority of cellular proteins, Li et al. (2014) gain insights into key aspects of translation regulation and fundamental principles of cellular strategies to adjust protein synthesis according to the needs. PMID:24766801

  18. Greater migratory propensity in hosts lowers pathogen transmission and impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Richard J; Altizer, Sonia; Bartel, Rebecca A

    2014-09-01

    Animal migrations are spectacular and migratory species have been shown to transmit pathogens that pose risks to human health. Although migration is commonly assumed to enhance pathogen dispersal, empirical work indicates that migration can often have the opposite effect of lowering disease risk. Key to assessing disease threats to migratory species is the ability to predict how migratory behaviour influences pathogen invasion success and impacts on migratory hosts, thus motivating a mechanistic understanding of migratory host-pathogen interactions. Here, we develop a quantitative framework to examine pathogen transmission in animals that undergo two-way directed migrations between wintering and breeding grounds annually. Using the case of a pathogen transmitted during the host's breeding season, we show that a more extreme migratory strategy (defined by the time spent away from the breeding site and the total distance migrated) lowers the probability of pathogen invasion. Moreover, if migration substantially lowers the survival probability of infected animals, then populations that spend comparatively less time at the breeding site or that migrate longer distances are less vulnerable to pathogen-induced population declines. These findings provide theoretical support for two non-exclusive mechanisms proposed to explain how seasonal migration can lower infection risk: (i) escape from habitats where parasite transmission stages have accumulated and (ii) selective removal of infected hosts during strenuous journeys. Our work further suggests that barriers to long-distance movement could increase pathogen prevalence for vulnerable species, an effect already seen in some animal species undergoing anthropogenically induced migratory shifts. PMID:24460702

  19. Greater migratory propensity in hosts lowers pathogen transmission and impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Richard J; Altizer, Sonia; Bartel, Rebecca A

    2014-09-01

    Animal migrations are spectacular and migratory species have been shown to transmit pathogens that pose risks to human health. Although migration is commonly assumed to enhance pathogen dispersal, empirical work indicates that migration can often have the opposite effect of lowering disease risk. Key to assessing disease threats to migratory species is the ability to predict how migratory behaviour influences pathogen invasion success and impacts on migratory hosts, thus motivating a mechanistic understanding of migratory host-pathogen interactions. Here, we develop a quantitative framework to examine pathogen transmission in animals that undergo two-way directed migrations between wintering and breeding grounds annually. Using the case of a pathogen transmitted during the host's breeding season, we show that a more extreme migratory strategy (defined by the time spent away from the breeding site and the total distance migrated) lowers the probability of pathogen invasion. Moreover, if migration substantially lowers the survival probability of infected animals, then populations that spend comparatively less time at the breeding site or that migrate longer distances are less vulnerable to pathogen-induced population declines. These findings provide theoretical support for two non-exclusive mechanisms proposed to explain how seasonal migration can lower infection risk: (i) escape from habitats where parasite transmission stages have accumulated and (ii) selective removal of infected hosts during strenuous journeys. Our work further suggests that barriers to long-distance movement could increase pathogen prevalence for vulnerable species, an effect already seen in some animal species undergoing anthropogenically induced migratory shifts.

  20. Migratory Prostitution with Emphasis on Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M&oring;rdh; Genç

    1995-03-01

    In many European countries, foreigners constitute the majority of certain groups of prostitutes, e.g., approximately 90% of the window prostitutes in the red light district of Amsterdam are not native to the Netherlands. The same is true for prostitutes working in bars in Vienna. In cities where registered prostitution is legal, unregistered prostitutes, most of whom are foreigners, often outnumber the registered ones. Central European countries often receive "sex workers" from eastern Europe, e.g., from Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, and Romania, whereas the majority of migratory prostitutes in Great Britain and continental western Europe come from Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. In northern Europe, women from Russia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, and the Baltic states are prostituting themselves in increasing numbers. Scandinavia has so far been affected relatively less by this mobility. In Spain, France, and Italy, women from Arabic and subSaharan countries are common among prostitutes. Foreign prostitutes move into Turkey along two main routes: women from the Balkan countries come to the western part of the country, whereas those from the former Soviet Union cross the border from Georgia, where they usually operate at resorts along the eastern Black Sea coast. Prostitutes are also mobile within the former communist bloc. For instance, women from Russia prostitute themselves in Lithuania, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. the customers are locals, particularly those with "hard currency", such as businessmen and "sex tourists" from the West. Following the outbreak of civil war in the former Yugoslavia, women from that country are now more frequently seen among the population of migratory prostitutes in Europe.

  1. Glioma cells on the run – the migratory transcriptome of 10 human glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holz David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary intracranial tumor and despite recent advances in treatment regimens, prognosis for affected patients remains poor. Active cell migration and invasion of GBM cells ultimately lead to ubiquitous tumor recurrence and patient death. To further understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the ability of glioma cells to migrate, we compared the matched transcriptional profiles of migratory and stationary populations of human glioma cells. Using a monolayer radial migration assay, motile and stationary cell populations from seven human long term glioma cell lines and three primary GBM cultures were isolated and prepared for expression analysis. Results Gene expression signatures of stationary and migratory populations across all cell lines were identified using a pattern recognition approach that integrates a priori knowledge with expression data. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed two discriminating patterns between migrating and stationary glioma cells: i global down-regulation and ii global up-regulation profiles that were used in a proband-based rule function implemented in GABRIEL to find subsets of genes having similar expression patterns. Genes with up-regulation pattern in migrating glioma cells were found to be overexpressed in 75% of human GBM biopsy specimens compared to normal brain. A 22 gene signature capable of classifying glioma cultures based on their migration rate was developed. Fidelity of this discovery algorithm was assessed by validation of the invasion candidate gene, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF. siRNA mediated knockdown yielded reduced in vitro migration and ex vivo invasion; immunohistochemistry on glioma invasion tissue microarray confirmed up-regulation of CTGF in invasive glioma cells. Conclusion Gene expression profiling of migratory glioma cells induced to disperse in vitro affords discovery of genomic signatures; selected

  2. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  3. Actual problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kaupov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides review of cellular technologies used incardiology, describes types of cellular preparations depending onsources of cells and types of compounding cells. The generalmechanisms of therapies with stem cells applications are described.Use of cellular preparations for treatment of cardiovascular diseasesand is improvement of the forecast at patients with heartinsufficiency of various genesis is considered as alternative topractice with organ transplantations. Efforts of biotechnologicallaboratories are directed on search of optimum population of cellsfor application in cardiology and studying of mechanisms andfactors regulating function of cardiac stem cells.

  4. Monthly Report (February): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  5. Monthly Report (June): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  6. Monthly Report (August): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge is located just south of the Canadian border in North Dakota....

  7. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge: Annual narrative report: 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  8. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge : Migratory Bird Disease Contingency Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Disease Contingency Plan for Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge provides background information on migratory bird disease surveillance; an inventory of Refuge...

  9. Narrative report: July, 1937: Medicine Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This monthly narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR summarizes weather conditions, water conditions, field crops, grazing, haying, visitors, flood damage, migratory...

  10. Sod house news [Malheur Migratory Bird Refuge, July 1938

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is report written by the CCC personnel about the Sod House Camp on Malheur Migratory Bird Refuge. Topics covered include sports, technical services, camp...

  11. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge: Narrative report: 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1973 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  12. Management of grasslands 1996 : Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge [Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a summary of grassland management for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Utah, which has recently began acquiring new grassland habitat that will...

  13. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Summary of biological data 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of biological data collected at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge for the year 1992. Data is summarized in tables, charts, graphs and written summaries. Data...

  14. Annual report : 1938-1939 : Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the 1939 fiscal year. Wildlife populations, artificial islands, haying, share cropping,...

  15. Environmental Assessment : Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge Hunt Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Assessment (EA) is designed to evaluate possible actions for modifying the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge (Refuge) public hunt plan. The hunt...

  16. Bear River Migratory Bird National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan provides a long-term vision and specific guidance on managing habitats for the...

  17. Monthly Report (July): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  18. Monthly Report (January): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  19. Monthly Report (August): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  20. Monthly Report (September): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge is located just south of the Canadian border in North Dakota....

  1. Monthly Report (April): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge is located just south of the Canadian border in North Dakota....

  2. Waterfowl spring migration records on the Seney Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to compare the numbers of migratory waterfowl using the Seney Refuge area during the spring of 1937 with the numbers recorded during...

  3. Migratory Bird Disease Contingency Plan: Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1938 to provide habitat and protection for migratory birds. Management objectives have since been expanded to...

  4. Monthly Report (March): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge is located just south of the Canadian border in North Dakota....

  5. Monthly Report (July): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge is located just south of the Canadian border in North Dakota....

  6. Monthly Report (October): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  7. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge: Comprehensive Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge...

  8. Monthly Report (November): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  9. Monthly Report: November 1935: Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  10. Monthly Report (May): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  11. [Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge : Narrative report : 1935

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report covers activities on Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge during 1935. The road construction, dam construction, food and cover,...

  12. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge: Annual narrative report: 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  13. Crescent Lake Migratory Bird Refuge First quarter, fiscal year 1932

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes wildlife, grazing, protection, improvements, developments, public relations, and disease on Crescent Lake Migratory Bird Refuge...

  14. Monthly Report (April): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  15. [Narrative report : Pea Island Migratory Wildfowl Refuge : Year 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This 1941 narrative report for Pea Island Migratory Wildfowl Refuge lists wildlife observed on the refuge and compares it with 1940 data. Water conditions,...

  16. Monthly Report (December): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  17. Monthly Report (September): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  18. Annual report : 1936-'37 : Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report covers activities on Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge during the 1937 fiscal year. Weather conditions, water levels, wildlife,...

  19. Monthly Report: April 1936: Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge is located just south of the Canadian border in North Dakota....

  20. Monthly Report (March): Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  1. Narrative report : Pea Island Migratory Wildfowl Refuge : Year 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This 1940 narrative report for Pea Island Migratory Wildfowl Refuge provides a roster of army personnel and service personnel, a summary of education, information...

  2. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Fields Joshua A; Thompson Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previou...

  3. Intermolecular masking of the HIV-1 Rev NLS by the cellular protein HIC: novel insights into the regulation of Rev nuclear import.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gu, Lili

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which is essential for viral replication, mediates the nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts. Rev nuclear function requires active nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and Rev nuclear import is mediated by the recognition of its Nuclear Localisation Signal (NLS) by multiple import factors, which include transportin and importin β. However, it remains unclear which nuclear import pathway(s) predominate in vivo, and the cellular environment that modulates Rev nucleocytoplasmic shuttling remains to be characterised.

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatase is possibly involved in cellular signal transduction and the regulation of ABA accumulation in response to water deficit in Maize L. coleoptile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Water deficit-induced ABA accumulation is an ideal model or "stimulus-response" system to investigate cellular stress signaling in plant cells, using such a model the cellular stress signaling triggered by water deficit was investigated in Maize L. coleoptile. Water deficit-induced ABA accumulation was sensitively blocked by NaVO3, a potent inhibitor both to plasma membrane H+-ATPase (PM-H+- ATPase) and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase). However, while PM- H+-ATPase activity was unaffected under water deficit and PM- H+-ATPase activator did not induce an ABA accumulation instead of water deficit, water deficit induced an increase in the protein phosphatase activity, and furthermore, ABA accumulation was inhibited by PAO, a specific inhibitor of PTPase. These results indicate that protein phosphtases may be involved in the cellular signaling in response to water deficit. Further studies identified at least four species of protein phosphtase as assayed by using pNPP as substrate, among which one component was especially sensitive to NaVO3. The NaVO3-sensitive enzyme was purified and finally showed a protein band about 66 kD on SDS/PAGE. The purified enzyme showed a great activity to some specific PTPase substrates at pH 6.0. In addition to NaVO3, the enzyme was also sensitive to some other PTPase inhibitors such as Zn2+ and MO33+, but not to Ca2+ and Mg2+, indicating that it might be a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Interestingly, the purified enzyme could be deactivated by some reducing agent DTT, which was previously proved to be an inhibitor of water deficit-induced ABA accumulation. This result further proved that PTPase might be involved in the cellular signaling of ABA accumulation in response to water deficit.

  5. Migration costs drive convergence of threshold traits for migratory tactics

    OpenAIRE

    Sahashi, Genki; Morita, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Partial migration of some, but not all, members of a population is a common form of migration. We evaluated how migration costs influence which members migrate in 10 populations of two salmonid species. The migratory patterns of both species were evaluated based on the size at maturity for resident males, which is the threshold trait that determines the migratory tactics used within a population. In both species, this size was smaller in males located further from the sea, where migration cos...

  6. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation.......Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...

  7. Multiplex profiling of cellular invasion in 3D cell culture models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Burgstaller

    Full Text Available To-date, most invasion or migration assays use a modified Boyden chamber-like design to assess migration as single-cell or scratch assays on coated or uncoated planar plastic surfaces. Here, we describe a 96-well microplate-based, high-content, three-dimensional cell culture assay capable of assessing invasion dynamics and molecular signatures thereof. On applying our invasion assay, we were able to demonstrate significant effects on the invasion capacity of fibroblast cell lines, as well as primary lung fibroblasts. Administration of epidermal growth factor resulted in a substantial increase of cellular invasion, thus making this technique suitable for high-throughput pharmacological screening of novel compounds regulating invasive and migratory pathways of primary cells. Our assay also correlates cellular invasiveness to molecular events. Thus, we argue of having developed a powerful and versatile toolbox for an extensive profiling of invasive cells in a 96-well format. This will have a major impact on research in disease areas like fibrosis, metastatic cancers, or chronic inflammatory states.

  8. Orientation of migratory birds under ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Munro, Ursula; Ford, Hugh; Stapput, Katrin; Thalau, Peter; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    In view of the finding that cryptochrome 1a, the putative receptor molecule for the avian magnetic compass, is restricted to the ultraviolet single cones in European Robins, we studied the orientation behaviour of robins and Australian Silvereyes under monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) light. At low intensity UV light of 0.3 mW/m(2), birds showed normal migratory orientation by their inclination compass, with the directional information originating in radical pair processes in the eye. At 2.8 mW/m(2), robins showed an axial preference in the east-west axis, whereas silvereyes preferred an easterly direction. At 5.7 mW/m(2), robins changed direction to a north-south axis. When UV light was combined with yellow light, robins showed easterly 'fixed direction' responses, which changed to disorientation when their upper beak was locally anaesthetised with xylocaine, indicating that they were controlled by the magnetite-based receptors in the beak. Orientation under UV light thus appears to be similar to that observed under blue, turquoise and green light, albeit the UV responses occur at lower light levels, probably because of the greater light sensitivity of the UV cones. The orientation under UV light and green light suggests that at least at the level of the retina, magnetoreception and vision are largely independent of each other.

  9. Intermolecular masking of the HIV-1 Rev NLS by the cellular protein HIC: Novel insights into the regulation of Rev nuclear import.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gu, Lili

    2011-03-14

    Abstract Background The HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which is essential for viral replication, mediates the nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts. Rev nuclear function requires active nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and Rev nuclear import is mediated by the recognition of its Nuclear Localisation Signal (NLS) by multiple import factors, which include transportin and importin β. However, it remains unclear which nuclear import pathway(s) predominate in vivo, and the cellular environment that modulates Rev nucleocytoplasmic shuttling remains to be characterised. Results In our study, we have identified the cellular protein HIC (Human I-mfa domain-Containing protein) as a novel interactor of HIV-1 Rev. We demonstrate that HIC selectively interferes with Rev NLS interaction with importin β and impedes its nuclear import and function, but does not affect Rev nuclear import mediated by transportin. Hence, the molecular determinants mediating Rev-NLS recognition by importin β and transportin appear to be distinct. Furthermore, we have employed HIC and M9 M, a peptide specifically designed to inhibit the transportin-mediated nuclear import pathway, to characterise Rev nuclear import pathways within different cellular environments. Remarkably, we could show that in 293T, HeLa, COS7, Jurkat, U937, THP-1 and CEM cells, Rev nuclear import is cell type specific and alternatively mediated by transportin or importin β, in a mutually exclusive fashion. Conclusions Rev cytoplasmic sequestration by HIC may represent a novel mechanism for the control of Rev function. These studies highlight that the multivalent nature of the Rev NLS for different import receptors enables Rev to adapt its nuclear trafficking strategy.

  10. Intermolecular masking of the HIV-1 Rev NLS by the cellular protein HIC: Novel insights into the regulation of Rev nuclear import

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehy Noreen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which is essential for viral replication, mediates the nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts. Rev nuclear function requires active nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and Rev nuclear import is mediated by the recognition of its Nuclear Localisation Signal (NLS by multiple import factors, which include transportin and importin β. However, it remains unclear which nuclear import pathway(s predominate in vivo, and the cellular environment that modulates Rev nucleocytoplasmic shuttling remains to be characterised. Results In our study, we have identified the cellular protein HIC (Human I-mfa domain-Containing protein as a novel interactor of HIV-1 Rev. We demonstrate that HIC selectively interferes with Rev NLS interaction with importin β and impedes its nuclear import and function, but does not affect Rev nuclear import mediated by transportin. Hence, the molecular determinants mediating Rev-NLS recognition by importin β and transportin appear to be distinct. Furthermore, we have employed HIC and M9 M, a peptide specifically designed to inhibit the transportin-mediated nuclear import pathway, to characterise Rev nuclear import pathways within different cellular environments. Remarkably, we could show that in 293T, HeLa, COS7, Jurkat, U937, THP-1 and CEM cells, Rev nuclear import is cell type specific and alternatively mediated by transportin or importin β, in a mutually exclusive fashion. Conclusions Rev cytoplasmic sequestration by HIC may represent a novel mechanism for the control of Rev function. These studies highlight that the multivalent nature of the Rev NLS for different import receptors enables Rev to adapt its nuclear trafficking strategy.

  11. The human angiotensin AT(1) receptor supports G protein-independent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and cellular proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Aplin, Mark; Hansen, Jonas Tind;

    2008-01-01

    (1) receptor actions. However, it is currently unknown whether the human angiotensin AT(1) receptor can signal through G protein-independent mechanisms - and if so, what the physiological impact of such signalling is. We have performed a detailed pharmacological analysis of the human angiotensin AT(1......) receptor using a battery of angiotensin analogues and registered drugs targeting this receptor. We show that the human angiotensin AT(1) receptor signals directly through G protein-independent pathways and supports NIH3T3 cellular proliferation. The realization of G protein-independent signalling...

  12. Both viral E2 protein and the cellular factor PEBP2 regulate transcription via E2 consensus sites within the bovine papillomavirus type 4 long control region.

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, M E; Campo, M. S.

    1995-01-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 4 (BPV4) long control region (LCR) contains three consensus binding sites, E2(1), E2(2), and E2(3) (ACCN6GGT), for the viral E2 transcription factor and a fourth degenerate site, dE2 (ATCN6GGT), which lies 3 bp upstream of E2(3). The E2(2) site was found to bind the cellular transcription factor PEBP2, and mutations at this site reduced basal promoter activity by as much as 60%, indicating an important role for PEBP2 in LCR function. Mutation of the E2(3) or dE2...

  13. A cellular stress response (CSR) that interacts with NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) is a new regulator of hypoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Ami; Koyama, Chika; Xu, Jing; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-02-28

    NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) was previously found to contribute to the hypoxic response of cells, but the mechanism was not clarified. In this study, we identified a cellular stress response (CSR) as a new factor interacting with NPR by a yeast two-hybrid system. Overexpression of CSR enhanced the induction of erythropoietin and hypoxia response element (HRE) activity under hypoxia in human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (Hep3B), while knockdown of CSR suppressed them. This new finding regarding the interaction of NPR with CSR provides insight into the function of NPR in hypoxic response.

  14. Rapid Disruption of Cellular Integrity of Zinc-treated Astroglia Is Regulated by p38 MAPK and Ca2+-dependent Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Im, Joo-Young; Joo, Hyo-Jin; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2011-01-01

    Cultured cortical primary astroglia treated with zinc died while rapidly detached from culture plates, a distinct part of zinc-treated astroglia. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the rapid change in the morphologic integrity of zinc-treated astroglia. Among the early cellular events occurring in zinc-treated astroglia, strong activation of p38 MAPK and JNK was evident. Although inhibitors of p38 (SB203580 and SB202190) or JNK (SP600125) did not protect zinc-insul...

  15. A cellular stress response (CSR) that interacts with NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) is a new regulator of hypoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Ami; Koyama, Chika; Xu, Jing; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-02-28

    NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) was previously found to contribute to the hypoxic response of cells, but the mechanism was not clarified. In this study, we identified a cellular stress response (CSR) as a new factor interacting with NPR by a yeast two-hybrid system. Overexpression of CSR enhanced the induction of erythropoietin and hypoxia response element (HRE) activity under hypoxia in human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (Hep3B), while knockdown of CSR suppressed them. This new finding regarding the interaction of NPR with CSR provides insight into the function of NPR in hypoxic response. PMID:24491563

  16. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 infection in a long-distance migrant shorebird under migratory and non-migratory states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie A Reperant

    Full Text Available Corticosterone regulates physiological changes preparing wild birds for migration. It also modulates the immune system and may lead to increased susceptibility to infection, with implications for the spread of pathogens, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5N1. The red knot (Calidris canutus islandica displays migratory changes in captivity and was used as a model to assess the effect of high plasma concentration of corticosterone on HPAIV H5N1 infection. We inoculated knots during pre-migration (N = 6, fueling (N = 5, migration (N = 9 and post-migration periods (N = 6. Knots from all groups shed similar viral titers for up to 5 days post-inoculation (dpi, peaking at 1 to 3 dpi. Lesions of acute encephalitis, associated with virus replication in neurons, were seen in 1 to 2 knots per group, leading to neurological disease and death at 5 to 11 dpi. Therefore, the risk of HPAIV H5N1 infection in wild birds and of potential transmission between wild birds and poultry may be similar at different times of the year, irrespective of wild birds' migratory status. However, in knots inoculated during the migration period, viral shedding levels positively correlated with pre-inoculation plasma concentration of corticosterone. Of these, knots that did not become productively infected had lower plasma concentration of corticosterone. Conversely, elevated plasma concentration of corticosterone did not result in an increased probability to develop clinical disease. These results suggest that birds with elevated plasma concentration of corticosterone at the time of migration (ready to migrate may be more susceptible to acquisition of infection and shed higher viral titers--before the onset of clinical disease--than birds with low concentration of corticosterone (not ready for take-off. Yet, they may not be more prone to the development of clinical disease. Therefore, assuming no effect of sub-clinical infection on the

  17. Moving across the border: modeling migratory bat populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscena, Wiederholt; López-Hoffman, Laura; Cline, Jon; Medellin, Rodrigo; Cryan, Paul M.; Russell, Amy; McCracken, Gary; Diffendorfer, Jay; Semmens, Darius J.

    2013-01-01

    The migration of animals across long distances and between multiple habitats presents a major challenge for conservation. For the migratory Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana), these challenges include identifying and protecting migratory routes and critical roosts in two countries, the United States and Mexico. Knowledge and conservation of bat migratory routes is critical in the face of increasing threats from climate change and wind turbines that might decrease migratory survival. We employ a new modeling approach for bat migration, network modeling, to simulate migratory routes between winter habitat in southern Mexico and summer breeding habitat in northern Mexico and the southwestern United States. We use the model to identify key migratory routes and the roosts of greatest conservation value to the overall population. We measure roost importance by the degree to which the overall bat population declined when the roost was removed from the model. The major migratory routes—those with the greatest number of migrants—were between winter habitat in southern Mexico and summer breeding roosts in Texas and the northern Mexican states of Sonora and Nuevo Leon. The summer breeding roosts in Texas, Sonora, and Nuevo Leon were the most important for maintaining population numbers and network structure – these are also the largest roosts. This modeling approach contributes to conservation efforts by identifying the most influential areas for bat populations, and can be used as a tool to improve our understanding of bat migration for other species. We anticipate this approach will help direct coordination of habitat protection across borders.

  18. Comprehensive Small RNA-Seq of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV)-Infected Human Cells Detects Patterns of Novel, Non-Coding AAV RNAs in the Absence of Cellular miRNA Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutika, Catrin; Mietzsch, Mario; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Weger, Stefan; Sohn, Madlen; Chen, Wei; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses express small regulatory RNAs, which interfere with viral or cellular gene expression. For adeno-associated virus (AAV), a small ssDNA virus with a complex biphasic life cycle miRNAs or other small regulatory RNAs have not yet been described. This is the first comprehensive Illumina-based RNA-Seq analysis of small RNAs expressed by AAV alone or upon co-infection with helper adenovirus or HSV. Several hotspots of AAV-specific small RNAs were detected mostly close to or within the AAV-ITR and apparently transcribed from the newly identified anti-p5 promoter. An additional small RNA hotspot was located downstream of the p40 promoter, from where transcription of non-coding RNAs associated with the inhibition of adenovirus replication were recently described. Parallel detection of known Ad and HSV miRNAs indirectly validated the newly identified small AAV RNA species. The predominant small RNAs were analyzed on Northern blots and by human argonaute protein-mediated co-immunoprecipitation. None of the small AAV RNAs showed characteristics of bona fide miRNAs, but characteristics of alternative RNA processing indicative of differentially regulated AAV promoter-associated small RNAs. Furthermore, the AAV-induced regulation of cellular miRNA levels was analyzed at different time points post infection. In contrast to other virus groups AAV infection had virtually no effect on the expression of cellular miRNA, which underscores the long-established concept that wild-type AAV infection is apathogenic. PMID:27611072

  19. Comprehensive Small RNA-Seq of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV)-Infected Human Cells Detects Patterns of Novel, Non-Coding AAV RNAs in the Absence of Cellular miRNA Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutika, Catrin; Mietzsch, Mario; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Weger, Stefan; Sohn, Madlen; Chen, Wei; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses express small regulatory RNAs, which interfere with viral or cellular gene expression. For adeno-associated virus (AAV), a small ssDNA virus with a complex biphasic life cycle miRNAs or other small regulatory RNAs have not yet been described. This is the first comprehensive Illumina-based RNA-Seq analysis of small RNAs expressed by AAV alone or upon co-infection with helper adenovirus or HSV. Several hotspots of AAV-specific small RNAs were detected mostly close to or within the AAV-ITR and apparently transcribed from the newly identified anti-p5 promoter. An additional small RNA hotspot was located downstream of the p40 promoter, from where transcription of non-coding RNAs associated with the inhibition of adenovirus replication were recently described. Parallel detection of known Ad and HSV miRNAs indirectly validated the newly identified small AAV RNA species. The predominant small RNAs were analyzed on Northern blots and by human argonaute protein-mediated co-immunoprecipitation. None of the small AAV RNAs showed characteristics of bona fide miRNAs, but characteristics of alternative RNA processing indicative of differentially regulated AAV promoter-associated small RNAs. Furthermore, the AAV-induced regulation of cellular miRNA levels was analyzed at different time points post infection. In contrast to other virus groups AAV infection had virtually no effect on the expression of cellular miRNA, which underscores the long-established concept that wild-type AAV infection is apathogenic. PMID:27611072

  20. Stochastic Nature in Cellular Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 刘圣君; 王祺; 晏世伟; 耿轶钊; SAKATA Fumihiko; GAO Xing-Fa

    2011-01-01

    The importance of stochasticity in cellular processes is increasingly recognized in both theoretical and experimental studies. General features of stochasticity in gene regulation and expression are briefly reviewed in this article, which include the main experimental phenomena, classification, quantization and regulation of noises. The correlation and transmission of noise in cascade networks are analyzed further and the stochastic simulation methods that can capture effects of intrinsic and extrinsic noise are described.

  1. BubR1 Acts as a Promoter in Cellular Motility of Human Oral Squamous Cancer Cells through Regulating MMP-2 and MMP-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou-Kit Chou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BubR1 is a critical component of spindle assembly checkpoint, ensuring proper chromatin segregation during mitosis. Recent studies showed that BubR1 was overexpressed in many cancer cells, including oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC. However, the effect of BubR1 on metastasis of OSCC remains unclear. This study aimed to unravel the role of BubR1 in the progression of OSCC and confirm the expression of BubR1 in a panel of malignant OSCC cell lines with different invasive abilities. The results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that the mRNA level of BubR1 was markedly increased in four OSCC cell lines, Ca9-22, HSC3, SCC9 and Cal-27 cells, compared to two normal cells, normal human oral keratinocytes (HOK and human gingival fibroblasts (HGF. Moreover, the expression of BubR1 in these four OSCC cell lines was positively correlated with their motility. Immunofluorescence revealed that BubR1 was mostly localized in the cytosol of human gingival carcinoma Ca9-22 cells. BubR1 knockdown significantly decreased cellular invasion but slightly affect cellular proliferation on both Ca9-22 and Cal-27 cells. Consistently, the activities of metastasis-associated metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 were attenuated in BubR1 knockdown Ca9-22 cells, suggesting the role of BubR1 in promotion of OSCC migration. Our present study defines an alternative pathway in promoting metastasis of OSCC cells, and the expression of BubR1 could be a prognostic index in OSCC patients.

  2. Evolutionary divergence in brain size between migratory and resident birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sol

    Full Text Available Despite important recent progress in our understanding of brain evolution, controversy remains regarding the evolutionary forces that have driven its enormous diversification in size. Here, we report that in passerine birds, migratory species tend to have brains that are substantially smaller (relative to body size than those of resident species, confirming and generalizing previous studies. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on Bayesian Markov chain methods suggest an evolutionary scenario in which some large brained tropical passerines that invaded more seasonal regions evolved migratory behavior and migration itself selected for smaller brain size. Selection for smaller brains in migratory birds may arise from the energetic and developmental costs associated with a highly mobile life cycle, a possibility that is supported by a path analysis. Nevertheless, an important fraction (over 68% of the correlation between brain mass and migratory distance comes from a direct effect of migration on brain size, perhaps reflecting costs associated with cognitive functions that have become less necessary in migratory species. Overall, our results highlight the importance of retrospective analyses in identifying selective pressures that have shaped brain evolution, and indicate that when it comes to the brain, larger is not always better.

  3. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M;

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  4. Migration costs drive convergence of threshold traits for migratory tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahashi, Genki; Morita, Kentaro

    2013-12-22

    Partial migration of some, but not all, members of a population is a common form of migration. We evaluated how migration costs influence which members migrate in 10 populations of two salmonid species. The migratory patterns of both species were evaluated based on the size at maturity for resident males, which is the threshold trait that determines the migratory tactics used within a population. In both species, this size was smaller in males located further from the sea, where migration costs are presumably higher. Moreover, the threshold sizes at maturity in males were correlated between both species. Our results suggest that migration costs are a significant convergent selective force on migratory tactics and life-history traits in nature. PMID:24197418

  5. Migratory Passerine Birds as Reservoirs of Lyme Borreliosis in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstedt, Pär; Bergström, Sven; Olsen, Björn; Garpmo, Ulf; Marjavaara, Lisette; Mejlon, Hans; Barbour, Alan G.

    2006-01-01

    To define the role of birds as reservoirs and disseminators of Borrelia spirochetes, we characterized tick infestation and reservoir competence of migratory passerine birds in Sweden. A total of 1,120 immature Ixodes ricinus ticks were removed from 13,260 birds and assayed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Borrelia, followed by DNA sequencing for species and genotype identification. Distributions of ticks on birds were aggregated, presumably because of varying encounters with ticks along migratory routes. Lyme borreliosis spirochetes were detected in 160 (14%) ticks. Borrelia garinii was the most common species in PCR-positive samples and included genotypes associated with human infections. Infestation prevalence with infected ticks was 5 times greater among ground-foraging birds than other bird species, but the 2 groups were equally competent in transmitting Borrelia. Migratory passerine birds host epidemiologically important vector ticks and Borrelia species and vary in effectiveness as reservoirs on the basis of their feeding behavior. PMID:16836825

  6. Shape up or ship out: Migratory behaviour predicts morphology across spatial scale in a freshwater fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, B.B.; Hulthén, K.; Brönmark, C.;

    2015-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon, with powerful ecological and evolutionary consequences. Morphological adaptations to reduce the energetic costs associated with migratory transport are commonly documented for migratory species. However, few studies have investigated whether variation in body...

  7. Lesion simulating disease1, enhanced disease susceptibility1, and phytoalexin deficient4 conditionally regulate cellular signaling homeostasis, photosynthesis, water use efficiency, and seed yield in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wituszynska, Weronika; Slesak, Ireneusz; Vanderauwera, Sandy; Szechynska-Hebda, Magdalena; Kornas, Andrzej; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Mühlenbock, Per; Karpinska, Barbara; Mackowski, Sebastian; Van Breusegem, Frank; Karpinski, Stanislaw

    2013-04-01

    There is growing evidence that for a comprehensive insight into the function of plant genes, it is crucial to assess their functionalities under a wide range of conditions. In this study, we examined the role of lesion simulating disease1 (LSD1), enhanced disease susceptibility1 (EDS1), and phytoalexin deficient4 (PAD4) in the regulation of photosynthesis, water use efficiency, reactive oxygen species/hormonal homeostasis, and seed yield in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) grown in the laboratory and in the field. We demonstrate that the LSD1 null mutant (lsd1), which is known to exhibit a runaway cell death in nonpermissive conditions, proves to be more tolerant to combined drought and high-light stress than the wild type. Moreover, depending on growing conditions, it shows variations in water use efficiency, salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, photosystem II maximum efficiency, and transcription profiles. However, despite these changes, lsd1 demonstrates similar seed yield under all tested conditions. All of these traits depend on EDS1 and PAD4. The differences in the pathways prevailing in the lsd1 in various growing environments are manifested by the significantly smaller number of transcripts deregulated in the field compared with the laboratory, with only 43 commonly regulated genes. Our data indicate that LSD1, EDS1, and PAD4 participate in the regulation of various molecular and physiological processes that influence Arabidopsis fitness. On the basis of these results, we emphasize that the function of such important regulators as LSD1, EDS1, and PAD4 should be studied not only under stable laboratory conditions, but also in the environment abounding in multiple stresses.

  8. EGF-induced expansion of migratory cells in the rostral migratory stream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle R Lindberg

    Full Text Available The presence of neural stem cells in the adult brain is currently widely accepted and efforts are made to harness the regenerative potential of these cells. The dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation, and the subventricular zone (SVZ of the anterior lateral ventricles, are considered the main loci of adult neurogenesis. The rostral migratory stream (RMS is the structure funneling SVZ progenitor cells through the forebrain to their final destination in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, extensive proliferation occurs in the RMS. Some evidence suggest the presence of stem cells in the RMS, but these cells are few and possibly of limited differentiation potential. We have recently demonstrated the specific expression of the cytoskeleton linker protein radixin in neuroblasts in the RMS and in oligodendrocyte progenitors throughout the brain. These cell populations are greatly altered after intracerebroventricular infusion of epidermal growth factor (EGF. In the current study we investigate the effect of EGF infusion on the rat RMS. We describe a specific increase of radixin(+/Olig2(+ cells in the RMS. Negative for NG2 and CNPase, these radixin(+/Olig2(+ cells are distinct from typical oligodendrocyte progenitors. The expanded Olig2(+ population responds rapidly to EGF and proliferates after only 24 hours along the entire RMS, suggesting local activation by EGF throughout the RMS rather than migration from the SVZ. In addition, the radixin(+/Olig2(+ progenitors assemble in chains in vivo and migrate in chains in explant cultures, suggesting that they possess migratory properties within the RMS. In summary, these results provide insight into the adaptive capacity of the RMS and point to an additional stem cell source for future brain repair strategies.

  9. Interannual variation and long-term trends in proportions of resident individuals in partially migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Kalle; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Hokkanen, Tatu; Rintala, Jukka; Piha, Markus; Lehikoinen, Aleksi

    2016-03-01

    Partial migration - a part of a population migrates and another part stays resident year-round on the breeding site - is probably the most common type of migration in the animal kingdom, yet it has only lately garnered more attention. Theoretical studies indicate that in partially migratory populations, the proportion of resident individuals (PoR) should increase in high latitudes in response to the warming climate, but empirical evidence exists for few species. We provide the first comprehensive overview of the environmental factors affecting PoR and the long-term trends in PoR by studying 27 common partially migratory bird species in Finland. The annual PoR values were calculated by dividing the winter bird abundance by the preceding breeding abundance. First, we analysed whether early-winter temperature, winter temperature year before or the abundance of tree seeds just before overwintering explains the interannual variation in PoR. Secondly, we analysed the trends in PoR between 1987 and 2011. Early-winter temperature explained the interannual variation in PoR in the waterbirds (waterfowl and gulls), most likely because the temperature affects the ice conditions and thereby the feeding opportunities for the waterbirds. In terrestrial species, the abundance of seeds was the best explanatory variable. Previous winter's temperature did not explain PoR in any species, and thus, we conclude that the variation in food availability caused the interannual variation in PoR. During the study period, PoR increased in waterbirds, but did not change in terrestrial birds. Partially migratory species living in physically contrasting habitats can differ in their annual and long-term population-level behavioural responses to warming climate, possibly because warm winter temperatures reduce ice cover and improve the feeding possibilities of waterbirds but do not directly regulate the food availability for terrestrial birds. PMID:26718017

  10. Dexamethasone and azathioprine promote cytoskeletal changes and affect mesenchymal stem cell migratory behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Schneider

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive drugs are commonly used to treat inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, and despite a few improvements, the remission of IBD is still difficult to maintain. Due to their immunomodulatory properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have emerged as regulators of the immune response, and their viability and activation of their migratory properties are essential for successful cell therapy. However, little is known about the effects of immunosuppressant drugs used in IBD treatment on MSC behavior. The aim of this study was to evaluate MSC viability, nuclear morphometry, cell polarity, F-actin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK distribution, and cell migratory properties in the presence of the immunosuppressive drugs azathioprine (AZA and dexamethasone (DEX. After an initial characterization, MSCs were treated with DEX (10 μM or AZA (1 μM for 24 hrs or 7 days. Neither drug had an effect on cell viability or nuclear morphometry. However, AZA treatment induced a more elongated cell shape, while DEX was associated with a more rounded cell shape (P < 0.05 with a higher presence of ventral actin stress fibers (P < 0.05 and a decrease in protrusion stability. After 7 days of treatment, AZA improved the cell spatial trajectory (ST and increased the migration speed (24.35%, P < 0.05, n = 4, while DEX impaired ST and migration speed after 24 hrs and 7 days of treatment (-28.69% and -25.37%, respectively; P < 0.05, n = 4. In conclusion, our data suggest that these immunosuppressive drugs each affect MSC morphology and migratory capacity differently, possibly impacting the success of cell therapy.

  11. Migratory preparation associated alterations in pectoralis muscle biochemistry and proteome in Palearctic-Indian emberizid migratory finch, red-headed bunting, Emberiza bruniceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Somanshu; Chaturvedi, Chandra Mohini

    2016-03-01

    Avian migration is an exceptionally high-energy-demanding process, which is met by the accumulation and utilization of fuel stores as well as the alterations in muscle physiology prior to their flight. Pre-migratory fattening coupled with changes in flight muscle metabolic enzymes and proteome is required to provide the necessary fuel and muscle performance required for migration. We studied how the serum metabolites (urea, uric acid, and creatinine), pectoralis muscle metabolites (glycogen, glucose, and cholesterol), muscle metabolic enzymes (CPT, HOAD, CS, MDH, CCO, CK, LDH, PFK, MLPL, and PK), liver lipogenic enzyme (FAS), and pectoralis muscle proteins get altered in pre-migratory and non-migratory buntings. Significantly increased pectoralis muscle fatty acid oxidation (CPT and HOAD activity), aerobic/anaerobic capacity (CS, CCO, and MDH activity), glycolytic capacity (PFK and PK activity), lipolysis (muscle LPL), and burst power (CK activity) were observed prior to the spring migration in pre-migratory buntings, whereas significantly increased pectoralis muscle anaerobic capacity (LDH activity) was observed in non-migratory buntings. Significant increase in the liver FAS showed profound lipogenesis prior to the spring migration. In this study, we have also investigated whether muscle has differential protein content during the pre-migratory and non-migratory phases of the annual migratory cycle. Twenty-nine proteins are identified and well characterized varying in expression significantly during the pre-migratory and non-migratory phases. These findings indicate that significant pre-migratory fattening and alterations in flight (pectoralis) muscle biochemistry and proteome in between the non- and pre-migratory phases may play a significant role in pre-migratory flight muscle preparation in these long-route migrants. PMID:26656601

  12. Modulation of p53β and p53γ expression by regulating the alternative splicing of TP53 gene modifies cellular response

    OpenAIRE

    Marcel, V; Fernandes, K; Terrier, O; LANE, D. P.; Bourdon, J-C

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the tumor suppressor p53 protein, also termed p53α, the TP53 gene produces p53β and p53γ through alternative splicing of exons 9β and 9γ located within TP53 intron 9. Here we report that both TG003, a specific inhibitor of Cdc2-like kinases (Clk) that regulates the alternative splicing pre-mRNA pathway, and knockdown of SFRS1 increase expression of endogenous p53β and p53γ at mRNA and protein levels. Development of a TP53 intron 9 minigene shows that TG003 treatment and knockdo...

  13. E2F1-mediated upregulation of p19INK4d determines its periodic expression during cell cycle and regulates cellular proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel L Carcagno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A central aspect of development and disease is the control of cell proliferation through regulation of the mitotic cycle. Cell cycle progression and directionality requires an appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators whose expression must fluctuate in a coordinated manner. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, has a unique feature that distinguishes it from the remaining INK4 and makes it a likely candidate for contributing to the directionality of the cell cycle. p19INK4d mRNA and protein levels accumulate periodically during the cell cycle under normal conditions, a feature reminiscent of cyclins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we demonstrate that p19INK4d is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1 through two response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter. Ablation of this regulation reduced p19 levels and restricted its expression during the cell cycle, reflecting the contribution of a transcriptional effect of E2F1 on p19 periodicity. The induction of p19INK4d is delayed during the cell cycle compared to that of cyclin E, temporally separating the induction of these proliferative and antiproliferative target genes. Specific inhibition of the E2F1-p19INK4d pathway using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that block E2F1 binding on p19 promoter, stimulated cell proliferation and increased the fraction of cells in S phase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results described here support a model of normal cell cycle progression in which, following phosphorylation of pRb, free E2F induces cyclin E, among other target genes. Once cyclinE/CDK2 takes over as the cell cycle driving kinase activity, the induction of p19 mediated by E2F1 leads to inhibition of the CDK4,6-containing complexes, bringing the G1 phase to an end. This regulatory mechanism constitutes a new negative feedback loop that terminates the G1 phase proliferative signal, contributing to the proper coordination of the cell

  14. 78 FR 33857 - Meeting Announcements: North American Wetlands Conservation Council; Neotropical Migratory Bird...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ...; Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Advisory Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (Commission). This meeting is open to the public. The Advisory Group for the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA) grants program (Advisory Group) will...

  15. 76 FR 5820 - Meeting Announcements: North American Wetlands Conservation Council; Neotropical Migratory Bird...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ...; Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Advisory Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (Commission). This meeting is open to the public. The Advisory Group for the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA) grants program (Advisory Group) will...

  16. 77 FR 39983 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Application for Approval of Fluoropolymeric Shot Coatings as Nontoxic for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 RIN 1018-AY66 Migratory Bird Hunting; Application for Approval... INFORMATION CONTACT: George Allen, at 703-358-1825. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 (Act) (16 U.S.C. 703-712 and 16 U.S.C. 742 a-j) implements migratory bird...

  17. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  18. WNT16B is a new marker of cellular senescence that regulates p53 activity and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binet, Romuald; Ythier, Damien; Robles, Ana I; Collado, Manuel; Larrieu, Delphine; Fonti, Claire; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Serrano, Manuel; Harris, Curtis C; Pedeux, Rémy

    2009-12-15

    Senescence is a tumor suppression mechanism that is induced by several stimuli, including oncogenic signaling and telomere shortening, and controlled by the p53/p21(WAF1) signaling pathway. Recently, a critical role for secreted factors has emerged, suggesting that extracellular signals are necessary for the onset and maintenance of senescence. Conversely, factors secreted by senescent cells may promote tumor growth. By using expression profiling techniques, we searched for secreted factors that were overexpressed in fibroblasts undergoing replicative senescence. We identified WNT16B, a member of the WNT family of secreted proteins. We found that WNT16B is overexpressed in cells undergoing stress-induced premature senescence and oncogene-induced senescence in both MRC5 cell line and the in vivo murine model of K-Ras(V12)-induced senescence. By small interfering RNA experiments, we observed that both p53 and WNT16B are necessary for the onset of replicative senescence. WNT16B expression is required for the full transcriptional activation of p21(WAF1). Moreover, WNT16B regulates activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. Overall, we identified WNT16B as a new marker of senescence that regulates p53 activity and the PI3K/AKT pathway and is necessary for the onset of replicative senescence.

  19. Synthesis of furans and pyrroles via migratory and double migratory cycloisomerization reactions of homopropargylic aldehydes and imines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroodi, Roohollah Kazem; Vera, Claudia I. Rivera; Dudnik, Alexander S.; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    A novel gold-catalyzed divergent sysnthesis of furans and pyrroles employing readily available homopropargylic aldehydes and imines have been developed. The regiochemical outcome of this reaction is dependent on the substituent on the terminal alkyne of substrate. Thus, substrates possessing alkyl and aryl substituent at the alkyne moiety produce 2,3,5-substituted furans and pyrroles via a migratory cycloisomerizaton reaction. Whereas, their silicon analogues are capable to undergo a double migratory process leading to 2,3,4-substituted heterocycles. PMID:26185336

  20. Distinct migratory and non-migratory ecotypes of an endemic New Zealand eleotrid (Gobiomorphus cotidianus – implications for incipient speciation in island freshwater fish species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Mark I

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many postglacial lakes contain fish species with distinct ecomorphs. Similar evolutionary scenarios might be acting on evolutionarily young fish communities in lakes of remote islands. One process that drives diversification in island freshwater fish species is the colonization of depauperate freshwater environments by diadromous (migratory taxa, which secondarily lose their migratory behaviour. The loss of migration limits dispersal and gene flow between distant populations, and, therefore, is expected to facilitate local morphological and genetic differentiation. To date, most studies have focused on interspecific relationships among migratory species and their non-migratory sister taxa. We hypothesize that the loss of migration facilitates intraspecific morphological, behavioural, and genetic differentiation between migratory and non-migratory populations of facultatively diadromous taxa, and, hence, incipient speciation of island freshwater fish species. Results Microchemical analyses of otolith isotopes (88Sr, 137Ba and 43Ca differentiated migratory and non-migratory stocks of the New Zealand endemic Gobiomorphus cotidianus McDowall (Eleotridae. Samples were taken from two rivers, one lake and two geographically-separated outgroup locations. Meristic analyses of oculoscapular lateral line canals documented a gradual reduction of these structures in the non-migratory populations. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP fingerprints revealed considerable genetic isolation between migratory and non-migratory populations. Temporal differences in reproductive timing (migratory = winter spawners, non-migratory = summer spawners; as inferred from gonadosomatic indices provide a prezygotic reproductive isolation mechanism between the two ecotypes. Conclusion This study provides a holistic look at the role of diadromy in incipient speciation of island freshwater fish species. All four analytical approaches (otolith

  1. 77 FR 70551 - Highly Migratory Species; Atlantic Shark Management Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... annual gross revenues from non- blacknose SCS landings would be the same as the status quo in the short... status quo in the short- term. However, this Alternative Suite could have minor negative direct and... Part 635 Highly Migratory Species; Atlantic Shark Management Measures; Proposed Rule...

  2. 75 FR 9314 - Migratory Bird Permits; Control of Purple Swamphens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... (71 FR 50194, August 24, 2006) to revise the list of migratory birds found at 50 CFR 10.13. We... Proposed Rule We received two comments on the proposed rule published on August 22, 2008 (70 FR 49631-49634... Native American Tribal Governments'' (59 FR 22951), Executive Order 13175, and 512 DM 2, we...

  3. Otolith microchemistry of tropical diadromous fishes: spatial and migratory dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William E.; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Otolith microchemistry was applied to quantify migratory variation and the proportion of native Caribbean stream fishes that undergo full or partial marine migration. Strontium and barium water chemistry in four Puerto Rico, U.S.A., rivers was clearly related to a salinity gradient; however, variation in water barium, and thus fish otoliths, was also dependent on river basin. Strontium was the most accurate index of longitudinal migration in tropical diadromous fish otoliths. Among the four species examined, bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor, mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola, sirajo goby Sicydium spp. and river goby Awaous banana, most individuals were fully amphidromous, but 9-12% were semi-amphidromous as recruits, having never experienced marine or estuarine conditions in early life stages and showing no evidence of marine elemental signatures in their otolith core. Populations of one species, G. dormitor, may have contained a small contingent of semi-amphidromous adults, migratory individuals that periodically occupied marine or estuarine habitats (4%); however, adult migratory elemental signatures may have been confounded with those related to diet and physiology. These findings indicate the plasticity of migratory strategies of tropical diadromous fishes, which may be more variable than simple categorization might suggest.

  4. Otolith microchemistry of tropical diadromous fishes: spatial and migratory dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W E; Kwak, T J

    2014-04-01

    Otolith microchemistry was applied to quantify migratory variation and the proportion of native Caribbean stream fishes that undergo full or partial marine migration. Strontium and barium water chemistry in four Puerto Rico, U.S.A., rivers was clearly related to a salinity gradient; however, variation in water barium, and thus fish otoliths, was also dependent on river basin. Strontium was the most accurate index of longitudinal migration in tropical diadromous fish otoliths. Among the four species examined, bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor, mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola, sirajo goby Sicydium spp. and river goby Awaous banana, most individuals were fully amphidromous, but 9-12% were semi-amphidromous as recruits, having never experienced marine or estuarine conditions in early life stages and showing no evidence of marine elemental signatures in their otolith core. Populations of one species, G. dormitor, may have contained a small contingent of semi-amphidromous adults, migratory individuals that periodically occupied marine or estuarine habitats (4%); however, adult migratory elemental signatures may have been confounded with those related to diet and physiology. These findings indicate the plasticity of migratory strategies of tropical diadromous fishes, which may be more variable than simple categorization might suggest.

  5. Variation in candidate genes CLOCK and ADCYAP1 does not consistently predict differences in migratory behavior in the songbird genus Junco [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/11p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Peterson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies exploring the molecular genetic basis for migratory variation in animals have identified polymorphisms in two genes (CLOCK and ADCYAP1 that are linked to circadian rhythms and correlate with migratory propensity and phenology among individuals and populations. Results from these initial studies are mixed, however, and additional data are needed to assess the generality and diversity of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of migration. We sequenced CLOCK and ADCYAP1 in 15 populations across the two species of the avian genus Junco, a North American lineage in which multiple recently diverged subspecies and populations range from sedentary to long-distance migrants. We found no consistent associations between allele length and migratory status across the genus for either CLOCK or ADCYAP1. However, within two subspecies groups, populations that migrate longer distances have longer CLOCK alleles on average. Additionally, there was a positive relationship between ADCYAP1 allele length and migratory restlessness (zugunruhe among individuals within one of two captive populations studied—a result similar to those reported previously within captive blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla. We conclude that, while both ADCYAP1 and CLOCK may correlate with migratory propensity within or among certain populations or species, previously identified relationships between migratory behavior and sequence variants cannot be easily generalized across taxa.

  6. Fixed and flexible: coexistence of obligate and facultative migratory strategies in a freshwater fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Jakob; Chapman, Ben B.; Nilsson, P. Anders;

    2014-01-01

    influence, dictating individual consistency in migratory patterns. Unfortunately, field tests of individual consistency compared to the importance of individual condition on migratory propensity are rare. Here we analyse 6 years of field data on roach migration, gathered by tagging almost 3000 individual...... fish and monitoring their seasonal migrations over extended periods of time. Our aims were to provide a field test of the role of condition in wild fish for migratory decisions, and also to assess individual consistency in migratory tendency. Our analyses reveal that (1) migratory strategy, in terms...

  7. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Preservation ® and “ rapid recovery of cellular activity post stress ” pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    substantiation of a health claim related to Preservation® and “rapid recovery of cellular activity post stress”. The Panel considers that Preservation®, which contains an extract of prickly pear cactus Opuntia ficus-indica, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect is “rapid recovery of cellular activity...... laid down in Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013...

  8. Impact of silicon on Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) root traits by regulating growth parameters, cellular antioxidants and stress modulators under arsenic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chandana; Khan, Ehasanullah; Panthri, Medha; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Gupta, Meetu

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic (As) is an emerging pollutant causing inhibition in growth and development of plants resulting into phytotoxicity. On the other hand, silicon (Si) has been suggested as a modulator in abiotic and biotic stresses that, enhances plant's physiological adaptations in response to several stresses including heavy metal stress. In this study, we used roots of hydroponically grown 14 day old seedlings of Brassica juncea var. Varuna treated with 150 μM As, 1.5 mM Si and both in combination for 96 h duration. Application of Si modulated the effect of As by improving morphological traits of root along with the development of both primary and lateral roots. Changes observed in root traits showed positive correlation with As induced cell death, accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular superoxide radicals (O2(-)). Addition of 1.5 mM Si during As stress increased accumulation of As in roots. Mineral nutrient analysis was done using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique and positively correlated with increased cysteine, proline, MDA, H2O2 and activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT and APX). The results obtained from the above biochemical approaches support the protective and active role of Si in the regulation of As stress through the changes in root developmental process. PMID:27038600

  9. MicroRNA regulation of stem cell differentiation and diseases of the bone and adipose tissue: Perspectives on miRNA biogenesis and cellular transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E C; Qureshi, A T; Dasa, V; Freitas, M A; Gimble, J M; Davis, T A

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression through targeting and suppression of mRNAs. miRNAs have been under investigation for the past twenty years and there is a large breadth of information on miRNAs in diseases such as cancer and immunology. Only more recently have miRNAs shown promise as a mechanism for intervention with respect to diseases of the bone and adipose tissue. In mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation, alterations in miRNA expression patterns can differentially promote an osteogenic, adipogenic, or myogenic phenotype. This manuscript reviews the current literature with respect to miRNAs in the context of MSC function with a particular focus on novel avenues for the examination of miRNA associated with bone and adipose tissue biology and disease. Specifically we highlight the need for a greater depth of investigation on MSCs with respect to miRNA biogenesis, processing, strand selection, and heterogeneity. We discuss how these mechanisms facilitate both altered miRNA expression and function.

  10. The Fruits of Wampee Inhibit H2O2-Induced Apoptosis in PC12 Cells via the NF-κB Pathway and Regulation of Cellular Redox Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Zeng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wampee (Clausena lansium fruits (CLS, whose pulp can be used to prepare fruit cups, desserts, jam, or jelly, can be eaten along with the peel. In this study, a PC12 cell model was built to observe the protective effect of CLS against H2O2-induced oxidative stress. We found that pretreatment with CLS increased cell viability and inhibited cytotoxicity, caspase-3 activity and DNA condensation. CLS also attenuated the increase in ROS production and MMP reduction. Moreover, we attempted to determine whether CLS suppressed the expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB. Western blot and immunostaining assay revealed that CLS inhibited H2O2-induced up-regulation of NF-κB p65 and pNF-κB p65. And CLS significantly suppressed the translocation of NF-κB p65 and pNF-κB p65 from cytoplasm to nuclear. Also, seven major compounds including a new flavanoid, luteolin-4'-O-β-d-gluco-pyranoside (3 and six known compounds 1,2, 4–7 were isolated and identified from CLS. Their antioxidative and H2O2-induced PC12 cell apoptosis-reversing activity were determined. These findings suggest that CLS and its major constituents (flavanoids may be potential antioxidant agents and should encourage further research into their use as a functional food for neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Wet season range fidelity in a tropical migratory ungulate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas A; Bolger, Douglas T

    2012-05-01

    1. In migratory populations, the degree of fidelity and dispersal among seasonal ranges is an important population process with consequences for demography, management, sensitivity to habitat change and adaptation to local environmental conditions. 2. Characterizing patterns of range fidelity in ungulates, however, has remained challenging because of the difficulties of following large numbers of marked individuals across multiple migratory cycles and of identifying the appropriate scale of analysis. 3. We examined fidelity to wet season (i.e. breeding) ranges in a recently declining population of wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus Burchell in northern Tanzania across 3 years. We used computer-assisted photographic identification and capture-recapture to characterize return patterns to three wet season ranges that were ecologically discrete and topographically isolated from one another. 4. Among 2557 uniquely identified adult wildebeest, we observed 150 recaptures across consecutive wet seasons. Between the two migratory subpopulations, the probability of remaining faithful to wet season areas ranged between 0·82 and 1·00. Animals from a non-migratory segment of the population (near Lake Manyara National Park) were rarely observed in other wet season ranges, despite proximity to one of the migratory pathways. 5. We found no effect of sex on an individuals' probability of switching wet season ranges. However, the breeding status of females in year i had a strong influence on patterns of range selection in year i + 1, with surviving breeders over three times as likely to switch ranges as non-breeders. 6. Social-group associations between pairs of recaptured animals were random with respect to an individual's wet season range during the previous or forthcoming wet seasons, suggesting that an individual's herd identity during the dry season does not predict wet season range selection. 7. Examining fidelity and dispersal in terrestrial migrations improves

  12. Environmentalism in the crosshairs: Perspectives on migratory bird hunting and poaching conflicts in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Barca

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Migratory bird hunting has a long tradition in the Mediterranean, but remains a highly controversial issue. Here we examine the Mediterranean migratory bird hunting controversies through the case of Italy. We interviewed key informants and carried out participant observation on both legal and illegal migratory bird hunting and migratory bird protection, in four key migratory bird hunting sites in Italy. In many cases, both migratory bird hunters and bird protection activists consider themselves as the stewards of nature. Environmentalists accuse hunters of illegal practices, while hunters believe anti-poaching activists aim to threaten the existence of hunting itself. Yet surprisingly, the legality of specific hunting practices emerges as peripheral to the concerns of both groups. The lack of dialogue and increasingly polarized positions on both sides make it difficult to assure compliance with EU and national migratory bird hunting laws, and hinders finding shared solutions that consider differing values in a rapidly changing society.

  13. 75 FR 58993 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Late Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Certain Migratory Game Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... Register (75 FR 52398) the proposed frameworks for the 2010-11 late-season migratory bird hunting... published in the Federal Register (75 FR 27144) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a... FR 32872) a second document providing supplemental proposals for early- and late-season...

  14. 75 FR 53226 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Early Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Certain Migratory Game...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... published in the Federal Register (75 FR 27144) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a... FR 32872) a second document providing supplemental proposals for early- and late-season migratory... in the Federal Register (75 FR 44856) a third document specifically dealing with the...

  15. 76 FR 59271 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Late Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Certain Migratory Game Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ..., 2011 Federal Register (76 FR 53536). We published final late-season frameworks for migratory game bird... (76 FR 19876) a proposal to amend 50 CFR part 20. The proposal provided a background and overview of... attention. On June 22, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 36508) a second document...

  16. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen‐Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism. PMID:26953791

  17. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Bolte

    Full Text Available Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins, we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula, migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe and pigeons (Columba livia. In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism.

  18. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism.

  19. Analysis of expression, cellular localization, and function of three inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs from Litopenaeus vannamei during WSSV infection and in regulation of antimicrobial peptide genes (AMPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hui Wang

    . Taken together, these results reveal that LvIAP1 and LvIAP3 might participate in the host defense against WSSV infection, and LvIAP2 might be involved in the regulation of shrimp AMPs.

  20. Shape up or ship out: migratory behaviour predicts morphology across spatial scale in a freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Ben B; Hulthén, Kaj; Brönmark, Christer; Nilsson, P Anders; Skov, Christian; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Brodersen, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    1. Migration is a widespread phenomenon, with powerful ecological and evolutionary consequences. Morphological adaptations to reduce the energetic costs associated with migratory transport are commonly documented for migratory species. However, few studies have investigated whether variation in body morphology can be explained by variation in migratory strategy within a species. 2. We address this question in roach Rutilus rutilus, a partially migratory freshwater fish that migrates from lakes into streams during winter. We both compare body shape between populations that differ in migratory opportunity (open vs. closed lakes), and between individuals from a single population that vary in migratory propensity (migrants and residents from a partially migratory population). Following hydrodynamic theory, we posit that migrants should have a more shallow body depth, to reduce the costs associated with migrating into streams with higher flow conditions than the lakes the residents occupy all year round. 3. We find evidence both across and within populations to support our prediction, with individuals from open lakes and migrants from the partially migratory population having a more slender, shallow-bodied morphology than fish from closed lakes and all-year residents. 4. Our data suggest that a shallow body morphology is beneficial to migratory individuals and our study is one of the first to link migratory strategy and intraspecific variation in body shape. PMID:25823702

  1. Defining behavioral and molecular differences between summer and migratory monarch butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanginakudru Sriramana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the fall, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus undergo a magnificent long-range migration. In contrast to spring and summer butterflies, fall migrants are juvenile hormone deficient, which leads to reproductive arrest and increased longevity. Migrants also use a time-compensated sun compass to help them navigate in the south/southwesterly direction en route for Mexico. Central issues in this area are defining the relationship between juvenile hormone status and oriented flight, critical features that differentiate summer monarchs from fall migrants, and identifying molecular correlates of behavioral state. Results Here we show that increasing juvenile hormone activity to induce summer-like reproductive development in fall migrants does not alter directional flight behavior or its time-compensated orientation, as monitored in a flight simulator. Reproductive summer butterflies, in contrast, uniformly fail to exhibit directional, oriented flight. To define molecular correlates of behavioral state, we used microarray analysis of 9417 unique cDNA sequences. Gene expression profiles reveal a suite of 40 genes whose differential expression in brain correlates with oriented flight behavior in individual migrants, independent of juvenile hormone activity, thereby molecularly separating fall migrants from summer butterflies. Intriguing genes that are differentially regulated include the clock gene vrille and the locomotion-relevant tyramine beta hydroxylase gene. In addition, several differentially regulated genes (37.5% of total are not annotated. We also identified 23 juvenile hormone-dependent genes in brain, which separate reproductive from non-reproductive monarchs; genes involved in longevity, fatty acid metabolism, and innate immunity are upregulated in non-reproductive (juvenile-hormone deficient migrants. Conclusion The results link key behavioral traits with gene expression profiles in brain that

  2. Sensitivity to the photoperiod and potential migratory features of neuroblasts in the adult sheep hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batailler, Martine; Derouet, Laura; Butruille, Lucile; Migaud, Martine

    2016-07-01

    Adult neurogenesis, a process that consists in the generation of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, represents a remarkable illustration of the brain structural plasticity abilities. The hypothalamus, a brain region that plays a key role in the neuroendocrine regulations including reproduction, metabolism or food intake, houses neural stem cells located within a hypothalamic neurogenic niche. In adult sheep, a seasonal mammalian species, previous recent studies have revealed photoperiod-dependent changes in the hypothalamic cell proliferation rate. In addition, doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in immature migrating neurons, is highly present in the vicinity of the hypothalamic neurogenic niche. With the aim to further explore the mechanism underlying adult sheep hypothalamic neurogenesis, we first show that new neuron production is also seasonally regulated since the density of DCX-positive cells changes according to the photoperiodic conditions at various time points of the year. We then demonstrate that cyclin-dependant kinase-5 (Cdk5) and p35, two proteins involved in DCX phosphorylation and known to be critically involved in migration processes, are co-expressed with DCX in young hypothalamic neurons and are capable of in vivo interaction. Finally, to examine the migratory potential of these adult-born neurons, we reveal the rostro-caudal extent of DCX labeling on hypothalamic sagittal planes. DCX-positive cells are found in the most rostral nuclei of the hypothalamus, including the preoptic area many of which co-expressed estrogen receptor-α. Thus, beyond the confirmation of the high level of neuron production during short photoperiod in sheep, our results bring new and compelling elements in support of the existence of a hypothalamic migratory path that is responsive to seasonal stimuli. PMID:26336953

  3. Migratory waterbirds at artificial ponds in NW Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Beneharo; Rodríguez, Airam

    2011-01-01

    Human settlements have mainly destroyed natural habitat but also led to the creation of new ones, some of them suitable for wildlife. In this line, the construction of artificial ponds for irrigation of agricultural land or on golf courses may also provide new habitats for waterbirds. Large freshwater wetlands are absent or very scarce on the Canary Islands, so both migratory and resident waterbirds usually use artificial water bodies as feeding or nesting sites. We compared monthly censuses ...

  4. Necrolytic Migratory Erythema as the First Manifestation of Glucagonoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Afsharfard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrolytic migratory erythma (NME as a rare skin disorder that can affected Perineum, distal extremities, lower abdomen and face are the most commonly affected sites.It can be as a part of Glucagonoma syndrome that is defined as an association of glucagonoma with NME, hyperglucagonemia, glucose intolerance, anemia and weight loss. Here, Authors describe a woman admitted to the dermatology ward with NME which was later found to be associated with glucagonoma and multiple hepatic lesions.

  5. Biocomplexity in a highly migratory pelagic marine fish, Atlantic herring

    OpenAIRE

    Ruzzante, Daniel E.; Mariani, Stefano; Bekkevold, Dorte; André, Carl; Mosegaard, Henrik; Clausen, Lotte A.W; Thomas G Dahlgren; Hutchinson, William F.; HATFIELD Emma M. C.; Torstensen, Else; Brigham, Jennifer; Simmonds, E. John; Laikre, Linda; Larsson, Lena C; Stet, René J.M

    2006-01-01

    The existence of biologically differentiated populations has been credited with a major role in conferring sustainability and in buffering overall productivity of anadromous fish population complexes where evidence for spatial structure is uncontroversial. Here, we describe evidence of correlated genetic and life history (spawning season linked to spawning location) differentiation in an abundant and highly migratory pelagic fish, Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus, in the North Sea (NS) and a...

  6. Epigenetics, cellular memory and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henikoff, Steven; Greally, John M

    2016-07-25

    The field described as 'epigenetics' has captured the imagination of scientists and the lay public. Advances in our understanding of chromatin and gene regulatory mechanisms have had impact on drug development, fueling excitement in the lay public about the prospects of applying this knowledge to address health issues. However, when describing these scientific advances as 'epigenetic', we encounter the problem that this term means different things to different people, starting within the scientific community and amplified in the popular press. To help researchers understand some of the misconceptions in the field and to communicate the science accurately to each other and the lay audience, here we review the basis for many of the assumptions made about what are currently referred to as epigenetic processes. PMID:27458904

  7. Hypoxia. 2. Hypoxia regulates cellular metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wheaton, William W.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptation to lowering oxygen levels (hypoxia) requires coordinated downregulation of metabolic demand and supply to prevent a mismatch in ATP utilization and production that might culminate in a bioenergetic collapse. Hypoxia diminishes ATP utilization by downregulating protein translation and the activity of the Na-K-ATPase. Hypoxia diminishes ATP production in part by lowering the activity of the electron transport chain through activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible fact...

  8. The insect cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael R. Strand

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system of insects is divided into humoral defenses that include the production of soluble effector molecules and cellular defenses like phagocytosis and encapsulation that are mediated by hemocytes. This review summarizes current understanding of the cellular immune response. Insects produce several terminally differentiated types of hemocytes that are distinguished by morphology, molecular and antigenic markers, and function. The differentiated hemocytes that circulate in larval or nymphal stage insects arise from two sources: progenitor cells produced during embryogenesis and mesodermally derived hematopoietic organs. Regulation of hematopoiesis and hemocyte differentiation also involves several different signaling pathways. Phagocytosis and encapsulation require that hemocytes first recognize a given target as foreign followed by activation of downstream signaling and effector responses. A number of humoral and cellular receptors have been identified that recognize different microbes and multicellular parasites. In turn, activation of these receptors stimulates a number of signaling pathways that regulate different hemocyte functions. Recent studies also identify hemocytes as important sources of a number of humoral effector molecules required for killing different foreign invaders.

  9. EVOLUTION OF CONCEPTION OF INTEGRAL BIRDS AREAL: ANALYSIS OF MIGRATORY FLYWAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepelova I. A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Data on distribution and abundance of Ukraine migratory birds have nonsystematic character. Up to now there is no integrated evaluation of migratory bird populations’ status. The available information is of regional importance or it covers limited time period. Therefore, it is obvious to unite all the relevant information in order to establish monitoring program and work out the methodic on migratory birds abundance estimation concerning the Black-Mediterranean Sea Flyway.

  10. On the Behavior Characteristics of Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jin-cai; ZHANG Jiang-ling; FENG Dan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the inherent relationships between the running regulations and behavior characteristics of cellular automata are presented; an imprecise taxonomy of such systems is put forward; the three extreme cases of stable systems are discussed; and the illogicalness of evolutional strategies of cellular automata is analyzed. The result is suitable for the emulation and prediction of behavior of discrete dynamics systems; especially it can be taken as an important analysis means of dynamic performance of complex networks.

  11. THE INTERACTION OF MIGRATORY BIRDS AND DOMESTIC POULTRY AND ITS ROLE IN SUSTAINING AVIAN INFLUENZA

    OpenAIRE

    Bourouiba, L.; Gourley, SA; Liu, RS; Wu, JH

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the role of migratory birds in the spread of H5N1 avian influenza, focusing on the interaction of a migratory bird species with nonmigratory poultry. The model is of patch type and is derived with the aid of reaction-advection equations for the migratory birds in the air along the flyways. Poultry may reside at some or all of the four patches of the model, which consist of the breeding patch for the migratory birds, their Winter feeding patch, and two stopover patches where bir...

  12. Modeling vector-borne disease risk in migratory animals under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Richard J; Brown, Leone M; Altizer, Sonia

    2016-08-01

    Recent theory suggests that animals that migrate to breed at higher latitudes may benefit from reduced pressure from natural enemies, including pathogens ("migratory escape"), and that migration itself weeds out infected individuals and lowers infection prevalence ("migratory culling"). The distribution and activity period of arthropod disease vectors in temperate regions is expected to respond rapidly to climate change, which could reduce the potential for migratory escape. However, climate change could have the opposite effect of reducing transmission if differential responses in the phenology and distribution of migrants and disease vectors reduce their overlap in space and time. Here we outline a simple modeling framework for exploring the influence of climate change on vector-borne disease dynamics in a migratory host. We investigate two scenarios under which pathogen transmission dynamics might be mediated by climate change: (1) vectors respond more rapidly than migrants to advancing phenology at temperate breeding sites, causing peak susceptible host density and vector emergence to diverge ("migratory mismatch") and (2) reduced migratory propensity allows increased nonbreeding survival of infected hosts and larger breeding-site epidemics (loss of migratory culling, here referred to as "sedentary amplification"). Our results highlight the need for continued surveillance of climate-induced changes to migratory behavior and vector activity to predict pathogen prevalence and its impacts on migratory animals. PMID:27252225

  13. Modeling vector-borne disease risk in migratory animals under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Richard J; Brown, Leone M; Altizer, Sonia

    2016-08-01

    Recent theory suggests that animals that migrate to breed at higher latitudes may benefit from reduced pressure from natural enemies, including pathogens ("migratory escape"), and that migration itself weeds out infected individuals and lowers infection prevalence ("migratory culling"). The distribution and activity period of arthropod disease vectors in temperate regions is expected to respond rapidly to climate change, which could reduce the potential for migratory escape. However, climate change could have the opposite effect of reducing transmission if differential responses in the phenology and distribution of migrants and disease vectors reduce their overlap in space and time. Here we outline a simple modeling framework for exploring the influence of climate change on vector-borne disease dynamics in a migratory host. We investigate two scenarios under which pathogen transmission dynamics might be mediated by climate change: (1) vectors respond more rapidly than migrants to advancing phenology at temperate breeding sites, causing peak susceptible host density and vector emergence to diverge ("migratory mismatch") and (2) reduced migratory propensity allows increased nonbreeding survival of infected hosts and larger breeding-site epidemics (loss of migratory culling, here referred to as "sedentary amplification"). Our results highlight the need for continued surveillance of climate-induced changes to migratory behavior and vector activity to predict pathogen prevalence and its impacts on migratory animals.

  14. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progression. This review focuses on new findings that enhance understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis, the characteristics of myofibroblasts, their progenitors, and molecular pathways regulating both fibrogenesis and its resolution. PMID:24892703

  15. Cellular Signaling Pathways and Their Clinical Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ceren Sumer-Turanligil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling pathways have important roles in cellular growth, differentiation, inflammatory response and apoptosis and in regulation of cellular responses under various chemical stimulators. Different proteins which belong to these pathways may be exposed to loss-of-function or gain-of-function mutations; this may lead to many clinical phenotypes including primarily cancer. In this review information about basic working principles of these pathways and diseases related to them are included. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(3.000: 180-191

  16. Cellular functions of the microprocessor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Sara; Cordiner, Ross A; Cáceres, Javier F

    2013-08-01

    The microprocessor is a complex comprising the RNase III enzyme Drosha and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 gene) that catalyses the nuclear step of miRNA (microRNA) biogenesis. DGCR8 recognizes the RNA substrate, whereas Drosha functions as an endonuclease. Recent global analyses of microprocessor and Dicer proteins have suggested novel functions for these components independent of their role in miRNA biogenesis. A HITS-CLIP (high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation) experiment designed to identify novel substrates of the microprocessor revealed that this complex binds and regulates a large variety of cellular RNAs. The microprocessor-mediated cleavage of several classes of RNAs not only regulates transcript levels, but also modulates alternative splicing events, independently of miRNA function. Importantly, DGCR8 can also associate with other nucleases, suggesting the existence of alternative DGCR8 complexes that may regulate the fate of a subset of cellular RNAs. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of the diverse functional roles of the microprocessor.

  17. Climate and density influence annual survival and movement in a migratory songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Ann E; Reudink, Matthew W; Marra, Peter P; Ratcliffe, Laurene M; Wilson, Scott

    2015-12-01

    Assessing the drivers of survival across the annual cycle is important for understanding when and how population limitation occurs in migratory animals. Density-dependent population regulation can occur during breeding and nonbreeding periods, and large-scale climate cycles can also affect survival throughout the annual cycle via their effects on local weather and vegetation productivity. Most studies of survival use mark-recapture techniques to estimate apparent survival, but true survival rates remain obscured due to unknown rates of permanent emigration. This is especially problematic when assessing annual survival of migratory birds, whose movement between breeding attempts, or breeding dispersal, can be substantial. We used a multistate approach to examine drivers of annual survival and one component of breeding dispersal (habitat-specific movements) in a population of American redstarts (Setophaga ruticilla) over 11 years in two adjacent habitat types. Annual survival displayed a curvilinear relation to the Southern Oscillation Index, with lower survival during La Niña and El Niño conditions. Although redstart density had no impact on survival, habitat-specific density influenced local movements between habitat types, with redstarts being less likely to disperse from their previous year's breeding habitat as density within that habitat increased. This finding was strongest in males and may be explained by conspecific attraction influencing settlement decisions. Survival was lowest in young males, but movement was highest in this group, indicating that apparent survival rates were likely biased low due to permanent emigration. Our findings demonstrate the utility of examining breeding dispersal in mark-recapture studies and complement recent work using spatially explicit models of dispersal probability to obtain greater accuracy in survival estimates.

  18. Anoxic stress and rapid cold hardening enhance cold tolerance of the migratory locust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Feng; Wang, Hongsheng; Zhang, Hanying; Kang, Le

    2014-10-01

    Anoxia and rapid cold hardening (RCH) can increase the cold tolerance of many animals. However, mechanisms underlying these two kinds of stresses remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the relationship of acclimation to cold stress with acclimation to anoxic stress in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. RCH at 0°C for 3h promoted the survival of cold stress-exposed locusts. Anoxic hypercapnia (CO2 anoxic treatment) for 40 min exerted an effect similar to that of RCH. Anoxic hypercapnia within 1h can all promote the cold hardiness of locusts. We investigated the transcript levels of six heat shock protein (Hsp) genes, namely, Hsp20.5, Hsp20.6, Hsp20.7, Hsp40, Hsp70, and Hsp90. Four genes, namely, Hsp90, Hsp40, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7, showed differential responses to RCH and anoxic hypercapnia treatments. Under cold stress, locusts exposed to the two regimens showed different responses for Hsp90, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7. However, the varied responses disappeared after recovery from cold stress. Compared with the control group, the transcript levels of six Hsp genes were generally downregulated in locusts subjected to anoxic hypercapnia or/and RCH. These results indicate that anoxic stress and RCH have different mechanisms of regulating the transcription of Hsp family members even if the two treatments exerted similar effects on cold tolerance of the migratory locust. However, Hsps may not play a major role in the promotion of cold hardiness by the two treatments.

  19. Modelling cellular behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  20. Reversible quantum cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Schumacher, B

    2004-01-01

    We define quantum cellular automata as infinite quantum lattice systems with discrete time dynamics, such that the time step commutes with lattice translations and has strictly finite propagation speed. In contrast to earlier definitions this allows us to give an explicit characterization of all local rules generating such automata. The same local rules also generate the global time step for automata with periodic boundary conditions. Our main structure theorem asserts that any quantum cellular automaton is structurally reversible, i.e., that it can be obtained by applying two blockwise unitary operations in a generalized Margolus partitioning scheme. This implies that, in contrast to the classical case, the inverse of a nearest neighbor quantum cellular automaton is again a nearest neighbor automaton. We present several construction methods for quantum cellular automata, based on unitaries commuting with their translates, on the quantization of (arbitrary) reversible classical cellular automata, on quantum c...

  1. The generation of oligodendroglial cells is preserved in the rostral migratory stream during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian eCapilla-Gonzalez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The subventricular zone (SVZ is the largest source of newly generated cells in the adult mammalian brain. SVZ-derived neuroblasts migrate via the rostral migratory stream (RMS to the olfactory bulb (OB, where they differentiate into mature neurons. Additionally, a small proportion of SVZ-derived cells contribute to the generation of myelinating oligodendrocytes. The production of new cells in the SVZ decreases during aging, affecting the incorporation of new neurons into the OB. However, the age-related changes that occur across the RMS are not fully understood. In this study we evaluate how aging affects the cellular organization of migrating neuroblast chains, the proliferation, and the fate of the newly generated cells in the SVZ-OB system. By using electron microscopy and immunostaining, we found that the RMS path becomes discontinuous and its cytoarchitecture is disorganized in aged mice (24-month-old mice. Subsequently, OB neurogenesis was impaired in the aged brain while the production of oligodendrocytes was not compromised. These findings provide new insight into oligodendrocyte preservation throughout life. Further exploration of this matter could help the development of new strategies to prevent neurological disorders associated with senescence.

  2. Atlantic leatherback migratory paths and temporary residence areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Fossette

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sea turtles are long-distance migrants with considerable behavioural plasticity in terms of migratory patterns, habitat use and foraging sites within and among populations. However, for the most widely migrating turtle, the leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea, studies combining data from individuals of different populations are uncommon. Such studies are however critical to better understand intra- and inter-population variability and take it into account in the implementation of conservation strategies of this critically endangered species. Here, we investigated the movements and diving behaviour of 16 Atlantic leatherback turtles from three different nesting sites and one foraging site during their post-breeding migration to assess the potential determinants of intra- and inter-population variability in migratory patterns. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using satellite-derived behavioural and oceanographic data, we show that turtles used Temporary Residence Areas (TRAs distributed all around the Atlantic Ocean: 9 in the neritic domain and 13 in the oceanic domain. These TRAs did not share a common oceanographic determinant but on the contrary were associated with mesoscale surface oceanographic features of different types (i.e., altimetric features and/or surface chlorophyll a concentration. Conversely, turtles exhibited relatively similar horizontal and vertical behaviours when in TRAs (i.e., slow swimming velocity/sinuous path/shallow dives suggesting foraging activity in these productive regions. Migratory paths and TRAs distribution showed interesting similarities with the trajectories of passive satellite-tracked drifters, suggesting that the general dispersion pattern of adults from the nesting sites may reflect the extent of passive dispersion initially experienced by hatchlings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Intra- and inter-population behavioural variability may therefore be linked with initial hatchling drift scenarios

  3. Key features of intertidal food webs that support migratory shorebirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanche Saint-Béat

    Full Text Available The migratory shorebirds of the East Atlantic flyway land in huge numbers during a migratory stopover or wintering on the French Atlantic coast. The Brouage bare mudflat (Marennes-Oléron Bay, NE Atlantic is one of the major stopover sites in France. The particular structure and function of a food web affects the efficiency of carbon transfer. The structure and functioning of the Brouage food web is crucial for the conservation of species landing within this area because it provides sufficient food, which allows shorebirds to reach the north of Europe where they nest. The aim of this study was to describe and understand which food web characteristics support nutritional needs of birds. Two food-web models were constructed, based on in situ measurements that were made in February 2008 (the presence of birds and July 2008 (absence of birds. To complete the models, allometric relationships and additional data from the literature were used. The missing flow values of the food web models were estimated by Monte Carlo Markov Chain--Linear Inverse Modelling. The flow solutions obtained were used to calculate the ecological network analysis indices, which estimate the emergent properties of the functioning of a food-web. The total activities of the Brouage ecosystem in February and July are significantly different. The specialisation of the trophic links within the ecosystem does not appear to differ between the two models. In spite of a large export of carbon from the primary producer and detritus in winter, the higher recycling leads to a similar retention of carbon for the two seasons. It can be concluded that in February, the higher activity of the ecosystem coupled with a higher cycling and a mean internal organization, ensure the sufficient feeding of the migratory shorebirds.

  4. Wetland suitability and connectivity for trans-Saharan migratory waterbirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Merken

    Full Text Available To complete their life cycle waterbirds rely on patchily distributed and often ephemeral wetlands along their migration route in a vast unsuitable matrix. However, further loss and degradation of remaining wetland habitats might lead to a configuration and size of stopovers that is no longer sufficient to ensure long-term survival of waterbird populations. By identifying optimal conservation targets to maintain overall habitat availability en route, we can accommodate an as yet absent functional connectivity component in larger management frameworks for migratory waterbirds, such as the Ramsar Convention and the EU Natura 2000 Network. Using a graph-based habitat availability metric (Equivalent Connected Area we determine the functional connectivity of wetland networks for seven migratory waterbirds with divergent habitat requirements. Analyses are performed at two spatial extents both spanning the Mediterranean Sea and centered around Greece (Balkan-Cyrenaica and Greece-Cyrenaica. We create species-specific suitable habitat maps and account for human disturbance by species-specific disturbance buffers, based on expert estimates of Flight Initiation Distances. At both spatial extents we quantitatively determine the habitat networks' overall functional connectivity and identify wetland sites that are crucial for maintaining a well-connected network. We show that the wetland networks for both spatial extents are relatively well connected and identify several wetland sites in Greece and Libya as important for maintaining connectivity. The application of disturbance buffers results in wetland site-specific reduction of suitable habitat area (0.90-7.36% and an overall decrease of the network's connectivity (0.65-6.82%. In addition, we show that the habitat networks of a limited set of species can be combined into a single network which accounts for their autoecological requirements. We conclude that targeted management in few but specific wetland

  5. When and where does mortality occur in migratory birds? Direct evidence from long-term satellite tracking of raptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Raymond H G; Hake, Mikael; Strandberg, Roine; Koks, Ben J; Trierweiler, Christiane; Exo, Klaus-Michael; Bairlein, Franz; Alerstam, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Information about when and where animals die is important to understand population regulation. In migratory animals, mortality might occur not only during the stationary periods (e.g. breeding and wintering) but also during the migration seasons. However, the relative importance of population limiting factors during different periods of the year remains poorly understood, and previous studies mainly relied on indirect evidence. Here, we provide direct evidence about when and where migrants die by identifying cases of confirmed and probable deaths in three species of long-distance migratory raptors tracked by satellite telemetry. We show that mortality rate was about six times higher during migration seasons than during stationary periods. However, total mortality was surprisingly similar between periods, which can be explained by the fact that risky migration periods are shorter than safer stationary periods. Nevertheless, more than half of the annual mortality occurred during migration. We also found spatiotemporal patterns in mortality: spring mortality occurred mainly in Africa in association with the crossing of the Sahara desert, while most mortality during autumn took place in Europe. Our results strongly suggest that events during the migration seasons have an important impact on the population dynamics of long-distance migrants. We speculate that mortality during spring migration may account for short-term annual variation in survival and population sizes, while mortality during autumn migration may be more important for long-term population regulation (through density-dependent effects).

  6. CSP and takeout genes modulate the switch between attraction and repulsion during behavioral phase change in the migratory locust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    Full Text Available Behavioral plasticity is the most striking trait in locust phase transition. However, the genetic basis for behavioral plasticity in locusts is largely unknown. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the behavioral phase change in the migratory locust Locusta migratoria, the gene expression patterns over the time courses of solitarization and gregarization were compared by oligonucleotide microarray analysis. Data analysis revealed that several gene categories relevant to peripheral olfactory perception are strongly regulated in a total of 1,444 differentially expressed genes during both time courses. Among these candidate genes, several CSP (chemosensory protein genes and one takeout gene, LmigTO1, showed higher expression in gregarious and solitarious locusts, respectively, and displayed opposite expression trends during solitarization and gregarization. qRT-PCR experiments revealed that most CSP members and LmigTO1 exhibited antenna-rich expressions. RNA interference combined with olfactory behavioral experiments confirmed that the CSP gene family and one takeout gene, LmigTO1, are involved in the shift from repulsion to attraction between individuals during gregarization and in the reverse transition during solitarization. These findings suggest that the response to locust-emitted olfactory cues regulated by CSP and takeout genes is involved in the behavioral phase change in the migratory locust and provide a previously undescribed molecular mechanism linked to the formation of locust aggregations.

  7. Quarterly narrative report : August, September, October, 1939 for Des Lacs Migratory Waterfowl Refuge, Lostwood Migratory Waterfowl Refuge, & Easement Refuges in District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs Migratory Waterfowl Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from August through October of 1939. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Quarterly narrative report : November, December, 1939, January, 1940 for Des Lacs Migratory Waterfowl Refuge, Lostwood Migratory Waterfowl Refuge, & Easement Refuges in District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs & Lostwood Migratory Waterfowl Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from November 1939 through January of 1940. The report...

  9. Consequences of habitat loss at migratory stopover sites: a theoretical investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, T.P.; Houston, A.L.; Ens, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    We use a dynamic optimization model to assess the consequences of habitat loss at migratory stopover sites. We emphasize costs birds face during stopover (e.g. costs of gaining energy), the timing of site use and the behavioural rules birds might use to implement migratory strategies. Behavioural ru

  10. The morphological development of the locomotor and cardiac muscles of the migratory barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bishop, CM; Butler, PJ; ElHaj, AJ; Egginton, S; Loonen, MJJE

    1996-01-01

    The masses of the locomotor and cardiac muscles of wild barnacle goose goslings, from a migratory population, were examined systematically during development and their values compared to those of pre-migratory geese. Pre-flight development was typified by approximately linear increases of body, leg,

  11. 50 CFR 92.10 - Alaska Migratory Bird Co-management Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... arrangements for the meeting rooms and associated logistics related to Co-management Council meetings; (2... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Migratory Bird Co-management... Structure § 92.10 Alaska Migratory Bird Co-management Council. (a) Establishment. The U.S. Fish and...

  12. Migratory Recovery from Infection as a Selective Pressure for the Evolution of Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Allison K; Binning, Sandra A

    2016-04-01

    Migration, a widespread animal behavior, can influence how individuals acquire and transmit pathogens. Past work has demonstrated that migration can reduce the costs of pathogen or parasite infection through two processes: migratory escape from infected areas or individuals and migratory culling of infected individuals. Here, we propose a third process: migratory recovery, where infected individuals lose their parasites and recover from infection during migration. Recovery can occur when parasites and/or their intermediate hosts cannot support changes in the migratory host's internal or external environment during migration. Thus, parasite mortality increases with migration. Although migratory recovery is likely widespread across species, it remains challenging to empirically test it as a selective force promoting migration. We develop a model and determine the conditions under which migratory recovery theoretically favors the evolution of migration. We show that incorporating migratory recovery into a model of migratory escape increases the range of biologically realistic conditions favoring migration and leads to scenarios where partial migration can evolve. Motivated by empirical estimates of infection costs, our model shows how recovery from infection could drive the evolution of migration. We suggest a number of future directions for both theoretical and empirical research in this area.

  13. Is There a “Migratory Syndrome” Common to All Migrant Birds?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, Theunis; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Mouritsen, Henrik; Bauchinger, Ulf; Bairlein, Franz

    2005-01-01

    Bird migration has been assumed, mostly implicitly, to represent a distinct class of animal behavior, with deep and strong homologies in the various phenotypic expressions of migratory behavior between different taxa. Here the evidence for the existence of what could be called a “migratory syndrome,

  14. 50 CFR 20.25 - Wanton waste of migratory game birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wanton waste of migratory game birds. 20.25 Section 20.25 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... game birds. No person shall kill or cripple any migratory game bird pursuant to this part...

  15. 50 CFR 92.6 - Use and possession of migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... have a valid permit issued under 50 CFR 21.27 for scientific research or education, and consistent with... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use and possession of migratory birds. 92... Provisions § 92.6 Use and possession of migratory birds. You may not sell, offer for sale, purchase, or...

  16. "Migratory Literature": A "Third Place" for Intercultural Teaching and Learning of Chinese as a Second Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Trevor; Wang, Yongyang

    2010-01-01

    This paper, drawing upon multidisciplinary studies such as critical and cultural studies, literary criticism, intercultural communication and second language acquisition, suggests a specific literary genre--"migratory literature"--to support intercultural competence for learners of Chinese. We begin by elucidating key terms--"migratory,"…

  17. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  18. 78 FR 66327 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species (HMS); 2006 Consolidated Highly Migratory Species Fishery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). On August 21, 2013 (78 FR 52032) NMFS published proposed regulations... recommendations adopted by ICCAT at its November 2013 meeting (78 FR 57340; September 18, 2013). Status of Public...; Gloucester, MA; Manteo, NC; Charleston, SC; Belle Chasse, LA; Portland, ME; and Panama City, FL. NMFS...

  19. 78 FR 65576 - Migratory Bird Permits; Definition of “Hybrid” Migratory Bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... MBTA prior to 2008, when the falconry regulations were substantially revised (73 FR 59448-59477... ``hybrid'' at 50 CFR 21.3 (76 FR 69223-69225). The change was intended to make it clear that the offspring... requested by the commenter. III. Changes From the Proposed Rule On November 8, 2011, at 76 FR 69223,...

  20. 76 FR 69223 - Migratory Bird Permits; Definition of “Hybrid” Migratory Bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... prior to 2008, when the falconry regulations were substantially revised (73 FR 59448-59477, October 8... 1983 (48 FR 31600, July 8, 1983), the Service recognized that CITES and the MBTA cover hybrid species... Governments'' (59 FR 22951), Executive Order 13175, and 512 DM 2, we have determined that there are...

  1. Provider's and user's perspective about immunization coverage among migratory and non-migratory population in slums and construction sites of Chandigarh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Amarjeet; Sharma, Vijaylakshmi

    2015-04-01

    Strengthening routine immunization is a corner stone for countries to achieve the United Nations Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4) which aims to reduce under-five mortality by two-thirds and MDG 5 improving maternal health compared to 1990 estimates by 2015. The poor urban newborns are more vulnerable to many health and nutrition problems compared to the non-poor urban counterparts. Therefore there is a need to strengthen health system to cater the needs of urban poor. Standardized WHO30*7 cluster sampling for slums and convenience sampling for construction sites. In depth interviews were conducted for user's as well as provider's perspective about immunization coverage. Two hundred ten children and 210 mothers were enrolled in slums and 100 were sampled from construction sites. The slum workers are considered as non-migratory groups whereas construction site workers are considered as migratory population. Among children, 23 % were fully immunized, 73 % were partially immunized and 3 % were unimmunized in non-migratory population whereas 3 % were fully immunized, 91 % were partially immunized and 6 % were unimmunized in migratory population. Among mothers, 43 and 39 % were fully immunized, 13 and 15 % partially immunized and 43 and 46 % were unimmunized in non-migratory and migratory population, respectively. The various reasons attributed for low coverage are (a) dissatisfaction of the users with the service delivery and procedural delays (bureaucracy), (b) lack of faith in health workers,

  2. Migratory connectivity and effects of winter temperatures on migratory behaviour of the European robin Erithacus rubecula: a continent-wide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Roberto; Cuervo, José Javier; du Feu, Chris; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Musitelli, Federica; Rubolini, Diego; Sicurella, Beatrice; Spina, Fernando; Saino, Nicola; Møller, Anders Pape

    2016-05-01

    Many partially migratory species show phenotypically divergent populations in terms of migratory behaviour, with climate hypothesized to be a major driver of such variability through its differential effects on sedentary and migratory individuals. Based on long-term (1947-2011) bird ringing data, we analysed phenotypic differentiation of migratory behaviour among populations of the European robin Erithacus rubecula across Europe. We showed that clusters of populations sharing breeding and wintering ranges varied from partial (British Isles and Western Europe, NW cluster) to completely migratory (Scandinavia and north-eastern Europe, NE cluster). Distance migrated by birds of the NE (but not of the NW) cluster decreased through time because of a north-eastwards shift in the wintering grounds. Moreover, when winter temperatures in the breeding areas were cold, individuals from the NE cluster also migrated longer distances, while those of the NW cluster moved over shorter distances. Climatic conditions may therefore affect migratory behaviour of robins, although large geographical variation in response to climate seems to exist. PMID:26820488

  3. 77 FR 36980 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Application for Approval of Copper-Clad Iron Shot as Nontoxic for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 RIN 1018-AY61 Migratory Bird Hunting; Application for Approval.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 (Act) (16 U.S.C. 703-712 and 16 U.S.C. 742 a-j) implements migratory bird treaties between the United States and Great Britain...

  4. 50 CFR 21.42 - Authority to issue depredating orders to permit the killing of migratory game birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... permit the killing of migratory game birds. 21.42 Section 21.42 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH... permit the killing of migratory game birds. Upon the receipt of evidence clearly showing that migratory game birds have accumulated in such numbers in a particular area as to cause or about to cause...

  5. A distinct role for interleukin-6 as a major mediator of cellular adjustment to an altered culture condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hwa-Kyung; Park, Iha; Kim, Jue Young; Kim, Do Kyeong; Illeperuma, Rasika P; Bae, Jung Yoon; Lee, Doo Young; Oh, Eun-Sang; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Kim, Jin

    2015-11-01

    Tissue microenvironment adjusts biological properties of different cells by modulating signaling pathways and cell to cell interactions. This study showed that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)/ mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) can be modulated by altering culture conditions. HPV E6/E7-transfected immortalized oral keratinocytes (IHOK) cultured in different media displayed reversible EMT/MET accompanied by changes in cell phenotype, proliferation, gene expression at transcriptional, and translational level, and migratory and invasive activities. Cholera toxin, a major supplement to culture medium, was responsible for inducing the morphological and biological changes of IHOK. Cholera toxin per se induced EMT by triggering the secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6) from IHOK. We found IL-6 to be a central molecule that modulates the reversibility of EMT based not only on the mRNA level but also on the level of secretion. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IL-6, a cytokine whose transcription is activated by alterations in culture conditions, is a key molecule for regulating reversible EMT/MET. This study will contribute to understand one way of cellular adjustment for surviving in unfamiliar conditions.

  6. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  7. Cellular Cardiomyoplasty: Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Chachques, J. (J.); Acar, C; J. Herreros; Trainini, J. (Jorge); Prosper, F.; D’Attellis, N. (N.); Fabiani, J. N.; Carpentier, A

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration can be induced with the implantation of a variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types. More than 150 patients have been treated with cellular cardiomyoplasty worldwide, 18 patients have been treated by our group. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit postischemic remodelling, and restore regional myocardial contractility. Techniques for skeletal myoblasts culture and ex vivo expansion using auto...

  8. Review: putative roles for the macrophage migratory inhibitory factor at the maternal fetal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, E; Paulesu, L; Ferro, E A V; Ietta, F; Faria, M R; Lorenzon, A R; Costa, A F; Martucci, M

    2014-02-01

    Complex and dynamic networks of molecules participate in the essential interactions between maternal organism, placenta and fetus in a healthy and successful pregnancy. Macrophage migratory inhibitory factor (MIF) is one of several molecules produced at implantation sites; MIF is mostly expressed by trophoblast cells. This has led to expectations of MIF's relevance as a partner in the maternal/fetal dialog. MIF is known by its biological interactions and functional roles as an activator of innate immunity, regulating subsequent adaptive responses, which include inhibition of migration of mononuclear cells in vitro, antagonism of glucocorticoids, and regulation of expression of Toll-like receptor 4. Beyond roles in the inflammatory response, MIF can interfere with proliferative activities in different cell types, as well as with cell death pathways. This intriguing factor found at the human, porcine, ovine, bovine and rodent maternal-fetal interfaces is present in a time- and spatially-dependent manner, indicating regulatory roles in the process of embryo implantation, placental development, maintenance of pregnancy and birth. Here, we will review MIF participation in placental physiology, including new evidence for a dialog with uterine cells, and a potential role in protection of uterine decidual cells. PMID:24215782

  9. [Adaptive increase of serotonergic system activity in tissues of half-migratory and migratory fish at increased water salinity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with studies of the serotoninergic system activity in different tissues of half-migratory fish--the Caspian roach (Rutilus rutilus caspicus) and carpbream (Abramis brama orientalis)--and migratory fish--shemaya (Chalcalburnus chalcoides) caught in fresh and brackish waters, as well as in the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) tissues under effect of brackish water in model experiments. Using indirect solid-phase ELISA-test, the serotoninergic system activity was evaluated by measuring in the tissues of the studied fish the serotonin-modulated anticonsolidation protein (SMAP) which is in linear relationship with serotonin level. There was found a significant elevation of the SMAP levels in the brain of the Caspian roach, carpbream, shemaya, and the common carp under effect of increased water sainity. The revealed increase of the SMAP content in brains of the Caspian roach, carpbream, shemaya, and the common carp under action of increased water salinity reflects the corresponding elevated activity of the serotoninergic system and indicates involvement of adaptive readjustments in the animals' body. PMID:25509051

  10. Loss of migratory behaviour increases infection risk for a butterfly host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Dara A; Maerz, John C; Altizer, Sonia

    2015-02-22

    Long-distance animal migrations have important consequences for infectious disease dynamics. In some cases, migration lowers pathogen transmission by removing infected individuals during strenuous journeys and allowing animals to periodically escape contaminated habitats. Human activities are now causing some migratory animals to travel shorter distances or form sedentary (non-migratory) populations. We focused on North American monarch butterflies and a specialist protozoan parasite to investigate how the loss of migratory behaviours affects pathogen spread and evolution. Each autumn, monarchs migrate from breeding grounds in the eastern US and Canada to wintering sites in central Mexico. However, some monarchs have become non-migratory and breed year-round on exotic milkweed in the southern US. We used field sampling, citizen science data and experimental inoculations to quantify infection prevalence and parasite virulence among migratory and sedentary populations. Infection prevalence was markedly higher among sedentary monarchs compared with migratory monarchs, indicating that diminished migration increases infection risk. Virulence differed among parasite strains but was similar between migratory and sedentary populations, potentially owing to high gene flow or insufficient time for evolutionary divergence. More broadly, our findings suggest that human activities that alter animal migrations can influence pathogen dynamics, with implications for wildlife conservation and future disease risks. PMID:25589600

  11. Migratory corridors of adult female Kemp’s ridley turtles in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Donna J.; Hart, Kristen M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Rubio, Cynthia; Sartain-Iverson, Autumn R.; Pena, Jaime; Gamez, Daniel Gomez; Gonzales Diaz Miron, Raul de Jesus; Burchfield, Patrick M.; Martinez, Hector J.; Ortiz, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    For many marine species, locations of migratory pathways are not well defined. We used satellite telemetry and switching state-space modeling (SSM) to define the migratory corridor used by Kemp's ridley turtles (Lepidochelys kempii) in the Gulf of Mexico. The turtles were tagged after nesting at Padre Island National Seashore, Texas, USA from 1997 to 2014 (PAIS; n = 80); Rancho Nuevo, Tamaulipas, Mexico from 2010 to 2011 (RN; n = 14); Tecolutla, Veracruz, Mexico from 2012 to 2013 (VC; n = 13); and Gulf Shores, Alabama, USA during 2012 (GS; n = 1). The migratory corridor lies in nearshore Gulf of Mexico waters in the USA and Mexico with mean water depth of 26 m and a mean distance of 20 km from the nearest mainland coast. Migration from the nesting beach is a short phenomenon that occurs from late-May through August, with a peak in June. There was spatial similarity of post-nesting migratory pathways for different turtles over a 16 year period. Thus, our results indicate that these nearshore Gulf waters represent a critical migratory habitat for this species. However, there is a gap in our understanding of the migratory pathways used by this and other species to return from foraging grounds to nesting beaches. Therefore, our results highlight the need for tracking reproductive individuals from foraging grounds to nesting beaches. Continued tracking of adult females from PAIS, RN, and VC nesting beaches will allow further study of environmental and bathymetric components of migratory habitat and threats occurring within our defined corridor. Furthermore, the existence of this migratory corridor in nearshore waters of both the USA and Mexico demonstrates that international cooperation is necessary to protect essential migratory habitat for this imperiled species.

  12. [Health risks linked to recent migratory patterns: myth or reality?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durieux-Paillard, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    The migratory crisis currently faced by Europe is of exceptional magnitude since the Second World War. It is mainly related to the conflict in Syria, as well as recurring violations of human rights in other regions of the world. Widely relayed by the media, the unusual number of refugee applicants and the precariousness of their migration routes raise the question of the health risk. From the old concept of quarantine to the new paradigm of migrants' health, it is important to contextualize the screening measures, taking into account the epidemiology of communicable diseases in the countries of origin and of the regions crossed, the ruptures of access to treatments for chronic diseases, but also the impact of multiple trauma (war, violence) on the mental health of refugees. PMID:27323478

  13. Visceral larva migrans: migratory pattern of Toxocara canis in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helwigh, Birgitte; Lind, Peter; Nansen, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The migratory pattern of Toxocara canis was investigated following infection of pigs with 60 000 infective eggs. Groups of six pigs were slaughtered at 7, 14 and 28 days after infection (p.i.), and the number of larvae in selected organs and muscles was determined by digestion. A group...... of uninfected pigs was used as negative controls for blood parameters and weight gain. Toxocara canis migrated well in the pig, although the relative numbers of larvae recovered decreased significantly during the experiment. On day 7 p.i., high numbers of larvae were recovered from the lymph nodes around...... towards T. canis L2/L3 ES products was observed from day 14 p.i. until termination of the experiment, and the maximum eosinophil response was observed 14 days p.i. The pig is a useful non-primate model for human visceral larva migrans, since T. canis migrate well and induce a strong immunological response...

  14. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  15. Centrosomal AKAP350 and CIP4 act in concert to define the polarized localization of the centrosome and Golgi in migratory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonucci, Facundo M.; Hidalgo, Florencia; Ferretti, Anabela; Almada, Evangelina; Favre, Cristián; Goldenring, James R.; Kaverina, Irina; Kierbel, Arlinet; Larocca, M. Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acquisition of a migratory phenotype is central in processes as diverse as embryo differentiation and tumor metastasis. An early event in this phenomenon is the generation of a nucleus–centrosome–Golgi back-to-front axis. AKAP350 (also known as AKAP9) is a Golgi and centrosome scaffold protein that is involved in microtubule nucleation. AKAP350 interacts with CIP4 (also known as TRIP10), a cdc42 effector that regulates actin dynamics. The present study aimed to characterize the participation of centrosomal AKAP350 in the acquisition of migratory polarity, and the involvement of CIP4 in the pathway. The decrease in total or in centrosomal AKAP350 led to decreased formation of the nucleus–centrosome–Golgi axis and defective cell migration. CIP4 localized at the centrosome, which was enhanced in migratory cells, but inhibited in cells with decreased centrosomal AKAP350. A decrease in the CIP4 expression or inhibition of the CIP4–AKAP350 interaction also led to defective cell polarization. Centrosome positioning, but not nuclear movement, was affected by loss of CIP4 or AKAP350 function. Our results support a model in which AKAP350 recruits CIP4 to the centrosome, providing a centrosomal scaffold to integrate microtubule and actin dynamics, thus enabling centrosome polarization and ensuring cell migration directionality. PMID:26208639

  16. Tracking climate impacts on the migratory monarch butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, Elise F.; Ries, Leslie; Reeves, Rick; Regetz, James; Oberhauser, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of climate on migratory species is complicated by the fact that these species travel through several climates that may be changing in diverse ways throughout their complete migratory cycle. Most studies are not designed to tease out the direct and indirect effects of climate at various stages along the migration route. We assess the impacts of spring and summer climate conditions on breeding monarch butterflies, a species that completes its annual migration cycle over several generations. No single, broad-scale climate metric can explain summer breeding phenology or the substantial year-to-year fluctuations observed in population abundances. As such, we built a Poisson regression model to help explain annual arrival times and abundances in the Midwestern United States. We incorporated the climate conditions experienced both during a spring migration/breeding phase in Texas as well as during subsequent arrival and breeding during the main recruitment period in Ohio. Using data from a state-wide butterfly monitoring network in Ohio, our results suggest that climate acts in conflicting ways during the spring and summer seasons. High spring precipitation in Texas is associated with the largest annual population growth in Ohio and the earliest arrival to the summer breeding ground, as are intermediate spring temperatures in Texas. On the other hand, the timing of monarch arrivals to the summer breeding grounds is not affected by climate conditions within Ohio. Once in Ohio for summer breeding, precipitation has minimal impacts on overall abundances, whereas warmer summer temperatures are generally associated with the highest expected abundances, yet this effect is mitigated by the average seasonal temperature of each location in that the warmest sites receive no benefit of above average summer temperatures. Our results highlight the complex relationship between climate and performance for a migrating species and suggest that attempts to

  17. Cell biology of the future: Nanometer-scale cellular cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraska, Justin W

    2015-10-26

    Understanding cellular structure is key to understanding cellular regulation. New developments in super-resolution fluorescence imaging, electron microscopy, and quantitative image analysis methods are now providing some of the first three-dimensional dynamic maps of biomolecules at the nanometer scale. These new maps--comprehensive nanometer-scale cellular cartographies--will reveal how the molecular organization of cells influences their diverse and changeable activities.

  18. Advancing migratory bird conservation and management by using radar: An interagency collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Janet M.; Barrow, Wylie C.; Sojda, Richard S.; Dawson, Deanna K.; Diehl, Robert H.; Manville, Albert; Green, Michael T.; Krueper, David J.; Johnston, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Migratory birds face many changes to the landscapes they traverse and the habitats they use. Wind turbines and communications towers, which pose hazards to birds and bats in flight, are being erected or proposed across the United States and offshore. Human activities can also destroy or threaten habitats critical to birds during migratory passage, and climate change appears to be altering migratory patterns. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and other agencies are under increasing pressure to identify and evaluate movement patterns and habitats used during migration and other times.

  19. THE BIODIVERSITY AT SANDI BIRD SANCTUARY, HARDOI WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO MIGRATORY BIRDS

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Kumar; Meena Srivastav

    2013-01-01

    Indian subcontinent plays host to a number of migratory birds in summers as well as winters. It is estimated that over hundred species of migratory birds fly to India, either in search of feeding grounds or to escape the severe winter of their native habitat. Sandi bird sanctuary was created in 1990 in order to protect and conserve the natural habitation and surroundings and also the marine vegetation for the migratory birds, as well as for the local people of the region. The term migration i...

  20. The importance of volume exclusion in modelling cellular migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Louise; Baker, Ruth E

    2015-09-01

    The modelling of collective migration has traditionally been undertaken in a continuous framework, with little reference to the individual-level mechanisms that give rise to such a concerted movement. One factor whose importance is now coming to light is that the individuals themselves occupy space in the domain, thus obstructing others from moving past them (volume exclusion). In this work, we systematically derive continuous descriptions of cellular migration with volume exclusion for a wide range of individual-based mechanisms and in one, two and three dimensions. We also consider subpopulations of migrating individuals, which may have different characteristics, such as differing sizes and speeds of migration. We demonstrate that volume exclusion is of particular importance when biased movement is included, and thus conclude that volume exclusion may have its greatest effect when considering directed migratory mechanisms such as chemotaxis.

  1. Cellular trafficking of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul A ST JOHN

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play critical roles throughout the body. Precise regulation of the cellular location and availability of nAChRs on neurons and target cells is critical to their proper function. Dynamic, post-translational regulation of nAChRs, particularly control of their movements among the different compartments of cells, is an important aspect of that regulation. A combination of new information and new techniques has the study of nAChR trafficking poised for new breakthroughs.

  2. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  3. The cellular decision between apoptosis and autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Jun Fan; Wei-Xing Zong

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis and autophagy are important molecular processes that maintain organismal and cellular homeostasis,respectively.While apoptosis fulfills its role through dismantling damaged or unwanted cells,autophagy maintains cellular homeostasis through recycling selective intracellular organelles and molecules.Yet in some conditions,autophagy can lead to cell death.Apoptosis and autophagy can be stimulated by the same stresses.Emerging evidence indicates an interplay between the core proteins in both pathways,which underlies the molecular mechanism of the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy.This review summarizes recent literature on molecules that regulate both the apoptotic and autophagic processes.

  4. Cellular Response to Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bo; YAN Shi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    To explore the nonlinear activities of the cellular signaling system composed of one transcriptional arm and one protein-interaction arm, we use an irradiation-response module to study the dynamics of stochastic interactions.It is shown that the oscillatory behavior could be described in a unified way when the radiation-derived signal and noise are incorporated.

  5. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  6. Cellular Delivery of RNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlea, Lorena; Puri, Anu; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Bindewald, Eckart; Zakrevsky, Paul; Satterwhite, Emily; Joseph, Kenya; Afonin, Kirill A; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2016-09-12

    RNA nanostructures can be programmed to exhibit defined sizes, shapes and stoichiometries from naturally occurring or de novo designed RNA motifs. These constructs can be used as scaffolds to attach functional moieties, such as ligand binding motifs or gene expression regulators, for nanobiology applications. This review is focused on four areas of importance to RNA nanotechnology: the types of RNAs of particular interest for nanobiology, the assembly of RNA nanoconstructs, the challenges of cellular delivery of RNAs in vivo, and the delivery carriers that aid in the matter. The available strategies for the design of nucleic acid nanostructures, as well as for formulation of their carriers, make RNA nanotechnology an important tool in both basic research and applied biomedical science. PMID:27509068

  7. Cellular modelling using P systems and process algebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco J.Romero-Campero; Marian Gheorghe; Gabriel Ciobanu; John M. Auld; Mario J. Pérez-Jiménez

    2007-01-01

    In this paper various molecular chemical interactions are modelled under different computational paradigms. P systems and π-calculus are used to describe intra-cellular reactions like protein-protein interactions and gene regulation control.

  8. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1981 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  9. Restoration and Expansion of Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, Brigham City, Utah, Environmental Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    1991-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment is designed to evaluate possible actions for preserving and managing the wetland habitat on Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge (Refuge) and to consider additional wetlands for protection of environmental, wildlife, and recreational values.

  10. Quarterly report including the months of May, June and July 1938 : Chautauqua Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines water levels, migratory birds, mammals, maintenance, and fishing on the Refuge between May and July of 1938.

  11. Hampered foraging and migratory performance in swans infected with low-pathogenic avian influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan A van Gils

    Full Text Available It is increasingly acknowledged that migratory birds, notably waterfowl, play a critical role in the maintenance and spread of influenza A viruses. In order to elucidate the epidemiology of influenza A viruses in their natural hosts, a better understanding of the pathological effects in these hosts is required. Here we report on the feeding and migratory performance of wild migratory Bewick's swans (Cygnus columbianus bewickii Yarrell naturally infected with low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI A viruses of subtypes H6N2 and H6N8. Using information on geolocation data collected from Global Positioning Systems fitted to neck-collars, we show that infected swans experienced delayed migration, leaving their wintering site more than a month after uninfected animals. This was correlated with infected birds travelling shorter distances and fuelling and feeding at reduced rates. The data suggest that LPAI virus infections in wild migratory birds may have higher clinical and ecological impacts than previously recognised.

  12. Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge : Quarterly report : August, September, October, 1938

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from August through October of 1938. The report begins by summarizing...

  13. Narrative report: Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge: July 1973 - June 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1974 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Quarterly narrative report : August, September, and October, 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from August through October of 1940. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Medicine Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge: Quarterly narrative report: February - March - April 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from February through April of 1940. The report begins by...

  16. Medicine Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge: Quarterly narrative report: February - March - April 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from February through April of 1939. The report begins by...

  17. Quarterly Narrative Report for August, September and October 1939: Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  18. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period September, October, November, and December, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing...

  19. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to...

  1. Narrative report : Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : For the period January 1 to December 31, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  2. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : January 1 - December 31, 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : January 1 - December 31, 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  4. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : January 1 - December 31, 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  5. Ground Survey for Wintering, Migratory Waterfowl on Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge: November 26, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The ground waterfowl surveys document the number of wintering, migratory waterfowl by species for each management unit on the Pungo Unit of Pocosin Lakes National...

  6. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  7. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1980 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  8. Quarterly Narrative Report for November, December and January 1939 to 1940: Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  9. Quarterly Narrative Report for November, December and January 1938 and 1939: Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  10. Effects of cattail management on invertebrate production and migratory bird use of Cheyenne Bottoms, KS

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Dense monotypic cattail Tvpha spp. stands are a management problem in many prairie wetlands as they exclude desirable plants and migratory wetland birds. Cheyenne...

  11. Quarterly Narrative Report for August, September and October 1938: Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  12. Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge : Quarterly narrative report : November 1, 1939 to January 31, 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from November, 1939 through January, 1940. The report begins by...

  13. Quarterly report of Upper Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge for May, June and July, 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1939. Wildlife- including migratory birds...

  14. Quarterly Narrative Report for May, June and July 1939: Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge (now known as the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge) is located just south of the Canadian border in North...

  15. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge trumperter swan translocation project : Issues/action items

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Background information and current issues regarding the trumpeter swan translocation project at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge. Major issues include harvesting of...

  16. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  17. A visual pathway links brain structures active during magnetic compass orientation in migratory birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Heyers

    Full Text Available The magnetic compass of migratory birds has been suggested to be light-dependent. Retinal cryptochrome-expressing neurons and a forebrain region, "Cluster N", show high neuronal activity when night-migratory songbirds perform magnetic compass orientation. By combining neuronal tracing with behavioral experiments leading to sensory-driven gene expression of the neuronal activity marker ZENK during magnetic compass orientation, we demonstrate a functional neuronal connection between the retinal neurons and Cluster N via the visual thalamus. Thus, the two areas of the central nervous system being most active during magnetic compass orientation are part of an ascending visual processing stream, the thalamofugal pathway. Furthermore, Cluster N seems to be a specialized part of the visual wulst. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that migratory birds use their visual system to perceive the reference compass direction of the geomagnetic field and that migratory birds "see" the reference compass direction provided by the geomagnetic field.

  18. A visual pathway links brain structures active during magnetic compass orientation in migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyers, Dominik; Manns, Martina; Luksch, Harald; Güntürkün, Onur; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2007-09-26

    The magnetic compass of migratory birds has been suggested to be light-dependent. Retinal cryptochrome-expressing neurons and a forebrain region, "Cluster N", show high neuronal activity when night-migratory songbirds perform magnetic compass orientation. By combining neuronal tracing with behavioral experiments leading to sensory-driven gene expression of the neuronal activity marker ZENK during magnetic compass orientation, we demonstrate a functional neuronal connection between the retinal neurons and Cluster N via the visual thalamus. Thus, the two areas of the central nervous system being most active during magnetic compass orientation are part of an ascending visual processing stream, the thalamofugal pathway. Furthermore, Cluster N seems to be a specialized part of the visual wulst. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that migratory birds use their visual system to perceive the reference compass direction of the geomagnetic field and that migratory birds "see" the reference compass direction provided by the geomagnetic field.

  19. A survey of North American migratory waterfowl for duck plague (duck virus enteritis) virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christopher J.; Docherty, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of migratory waterfowl for duck plague (DP) virus was conducted in the Mississippi and Central flyways during 1982 and in the Atlantic and Pacific flyways during 1983. Cloacal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from 3,169 migratory waterfowl in these four flyways, principally mallards (Anas platyrhynchos L.), black ducks (Anas rubripes Brewster), and pintails (Anas acuta L). In addition 1,033 birds were sampled from areas of recurrent DP outbreaks among nonmigratory and captive waterfowl, and 590 from Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, the site of the only known major DP outbreak in migratory waterfowl. Duck plague virus was not found in any of the samples. Results support the hypothesis that DP is not established in North American migratory waterfowl as an enzootic disease.

  20. Aerial Survey for Wintering, Migratory Waterfowl on Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge: December 13, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The aerial waterfowl surveys document the number of wintering, migratory waterfowl by species for management units on Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Lake...