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Sample records for cellular metabolic structure

  1. Elements of the Cellular Metabolic Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso Martínez De La Fuente

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies have shown the existence of metabolic covalent modifications in different molecular structures, able to store biochemical information that is not encoded by the DNA. Some of these covalent mark patterns can be transmitted across generations (epigenetic changes. Recently, the emergence of Hopfield-like attractor dynamics has been observed in the self-organized enzymatic networks, which have the capacity to store functional catalytic patterns that can be correctly recovered by the specific input stimuli. The Hopfield-like metabolic dynamics are stable and can be maintained as a long-term biochemical memory. In addition, specific molecular information can be transferred from the functional dynamics of the metabolic networks to the enzymatic activity involved in the covalent post-translational modulation so that determined functional memory can be embedded in multiple stable molecular marks. Both the metabolic dynamics governed by Hopfield-type attractors (functional processes and the enzymatic covalent modifications of determined molecules (structural dynamic processes seem to represent the two stages of the dynamical memory of cellular metabolism (metabolic memory. Epigenetic processes appear to be the structural manifestation of this cellular metabolic memory. Here, a new framework for molecular information storage in the cell is presented, which is characterized by two functionally and molecularly interrelated systems: a dynamic, flexible and adaptive system (metabolic memory and an essentially conservative system (genetic memory. The molecular information of both systems seems to coordinate the physiological development of the whole cell.

  2. Global self-regulation of the cellular metabolic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso M De la Fuente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different studies have shown that cellular enzymatic activities are able to self-organize spontaneously, forming a metabolic core of reactive processes that remain active under different growth conditions while the rest of the molecular catalytic reactions exhibit structural plasticity. This global cellular metabolic structure appears to be an intrinsic characteristic common to all cellular organisms. Recent work performed with dissipative metabolic networks has shown that the fundamental element for the spontaneous emergence of this global self-organized enzymatic structure could be the number of catalytic elements in the metabolic networks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate the factors that may affect the catalytic dynamics under a global metabolic structure characterized by the presence of metabolic cores we have studied different transitions in catalytic patterns belonging to a dissipative metabolic network. The data were analyzed using non-linear dynamics tools: power spectra, reconstructed attractors, long-term correlations, maximum Lyapunov exponent and Approximate Entropy; and we have found the emergence of self-regulation phenomena during the transitions in the metabolic activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The analysis has also shown that the chaotic numerical series analyzed correspond to the fractional Brownian motion and they exhibit long-term correlations and low Approximate Entropy indicating a high level of predictability and information during the self-regulation of the metabolic transitions. The results illustrate some aspects of the mechanisms behind the emergence of the metabolic self-regulation processes, which may constitute an important property of the global structure of the cellular metabolism.

  3. Quantitative analysis of cellular metabolic dissipative, self-organized structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ildefonso Martínez de la Fuente

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important goals of the postgenomic era is understanding the metabolic dynamic processes and the functional structures generated by them. Extensive studies during the last three decades have shown that the dissipative self-organization of the functional enzymatic associations, the catalytic reactions produced during the metabolite channeling, the microcompartmentalization of these metabolic processes and the emergence of dissipative networks are the fundamental elements of the ...

  4. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  5. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  6. Engineering Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-03-10

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds, and pharmaceuticals. However, making cells into efficient factories is challenging because cells have evolved robust metabolic networks with hard-wired, tightly regulated lines of communication between molecular pathways that resist efforts to divert resources. Here, we will review the current status and challenges of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  8. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  9. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  10. Cellular automata: structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ollinger, Nicolas

    2002-01-01

    Jury : François Blanchard (Rapporteur), Marianne Delorme (Directeur), Jarkko Kari (Président), Jacques Mazoyer (Directeur), Dominique Perrin, Géraud Sénizergues (Rapporteur); Cellular automata provide a uniform framework to study an important problem of "complex systems" theory: how and why do system with a easily understandable -- local -- microscopic behavior can generate a more complicated -- global -- macroscopic behavior? Since its introduction in the 40s, a lot of work has been done to ...

  11. Translation Factors Specify Cellular Metabolic State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of Cell Reports, Shah et al. present evidence that a subcomplex of the eIF3 translation initiation factor regulates translation of mRNAs encoding components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and glycolytic enzymes, thus linking translational control with energy metabolism.

  12. Computational model of cellular metabolic dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yanjun; Solomon, Thomas; Haus, Jacob M

    2010-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms by which insulin regulates glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle is critical to understanding the etiology of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Our knowledge of these mechanisms is limited by the difficulty of obtaining in vivo intracellular data. To quantitativel...

  13. A Cellular Perspective on Brain Energy Metabolism and Functional Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy demands of the brain are high: they account for at least 20% of the body\\'s energy consumption. Evolutionary studies indicate that the emergence of higher cognitive functions in humans is associated with an increased glucose utilization and expression of energy metabolism genes. Functional brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and PET, which are widely used in human neuroscience studies, detect signals that monitor energy delivery and use in register with neuronal activity. Recent technological advances in metabolic studies with cellular resolution have afforded decisive insights into the understanding of the cellular and molecular bases of the coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism and pointat a key role of neuron-astrocyte metabolic interactions. This article reviews some of the most salient features emerging from recent studies and aims at providing an integration of brain energy metabolism across resolution scales. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Hierarchical Cellular Structures in High-Capacity Cellular Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, R K; Agrawal, N K

    2011-01-01

    In the prevailing cellular environment, it is important to provide the resources for the fluctuating traffic demand exactly in the place and at the time where and when they are needed. In this paper, we explored the ability of hierarchical cellular structures with inter layer reuse to increase the capacity of mobile communication network by applying total frequency hopping (T-FH) and adaptive frequency allocation (AFA) as a strategy to reuse the macro and micro cell resources without frequency planning in indoor pico cells [11]. The practical aspects for designing macro- micro cellular overlays in the existing big urban areas are also explained [4]. Femto cells are inducted in macro / micro / pico cells hierarchical structure to achieve the required QoS cost effectively.

  15. Interplay of drug metabolizing enzymes with cellular transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Riha, Juliane; Brenner, Stefan; Höferl, Martina; Jäger, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic substances and their metabolites are substrates for drug metabolizing enzymes and cellular transporters. These proteins may not only contribute to bioavailability of molecules but also to uptake into organs and, consequently, to overall elimination. The coordinated action of uptake transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and efflux pumps, therefore, is a precondition for detoxification and elimination of drugs. As the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to predict alterations in drug disposal, adverse drug reactions and, finally, drug-drug interactions, this review illustrates the interplay between selected uptake/efflux transporters and phase I/II metabolizing enzymes.

  16. ATM Couples Replication Stress and Metabolic Reprogramming during Cellular Senescence

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    Katherine M. Aird

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Replication stress induced by nucleotide deficiency plays an important role in cancer initiation. Replication stress in primary cells typically activates the cellular senescence tumor-suppression mechanism. Senescence bypass correlates with development of cancer, a disease characterized by metabolic reprogramming. However, the role of metabolic reprogramming in the cellular response to replication stress has been little explored. Here, we report that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM plays a central role in regulating the cellular response to replication stress by shifting cellular metabolism. ATM inactivation bypasses senescence induced by replication stress triggered by nucleotide deficiency. This was due to restoration of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP levels through both upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway via increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD activity and enhanced glucose and glutamine consumption. These phenotypes were mediated by a coordinated suppression of p53 and upregulation of c-MYC downstream of ATM inactivation. Our data indicate that ATM status couples replication stress and metabolic reprogramming during senescence.

  17. From prebiotic chemistry to cellular metabolism--the chemical evolution of metabolism before Darwinian natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez-Hevia, Enrique; Montero-Gómez, Nancy; Montero, Francisco

    2008-06-07

    It is generally assumed that the complex map of metabolism is a result of natural selection working at the molecular level. However, natural selection can only work on entities that have three basic features: information, metabolism and membrane. Metabolism must include the capability of producing all cellular structures, as well as energy (ATP), from external sources; information must be established on a material that allows its perpetuity, in order to safeguard the goals achieved; and membranes must be able to preserve the internal material, determining a selective exchange with external material in order to ensure that both metabolism and information can be individualized. It is not difficult to understand that protocellular entities that boast these three qualities can evolve through natural selection. The problem is rather to explain the origin of such features under conditions where natural selection could not work. In the present work we propose that these protocells could be built by chemical evolution, starting from the prebiotic primordial soup, by means of chemical selection. This consists of selective increases of the rates of certain specific reactions because of the kinetic or thermodynamic features of the process, such as stoichiometric catalysis or autocatalysis, cooperativity and others, thereby promoting their prevalence among the whole set of chemical possibilities. Our results show that all chemical processes necessary for yielding the basic materials that natural selection needs to work may be achieved through chemical selection, thus suggesting a way for life to begin.

  18. Complement-Mediated Regulation of Metabolism and Basic Cellular Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-08-16

    Complement is well appreciated as a critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and works by directly destroying them through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental cellular processes, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Newly identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription-factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings.

  19. Cellular metabolic and autophagic pathways: traffic control by redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-10-01

    It has been established that the key metabolic pathways of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are intimately related to redox biology through control of cell signaling. Under physiological conditions glucose metabolism is linked to control of the NADH/NAD redox couple, as well as providing the major reductant, NADPH, for thiol-dependent antioxidant defenses. Retrograde signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus or cytosol controls cell growth and differentiation. Under pathological conditions mitochondria are targets for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and are critical in controlling apoptotic cell death. At the interface of these metabolic pathways, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway functions to maintain mitochondrial quality and generally serves an important cytoprotective function. In this review we will discuss the autophagic response to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated from perturbations of cellular glucose metabolism and bioenergetic function.

  20. Persistent cellular metabolic changes after hemithyroidectomy for benign euthyroid goiter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft Kristensen, Tina; Larsen, Jacob; Pedersen, Palle Lyngsie;

    2014-01-01

    persistently increased TSH and decreased fT4, sustained mitochondrial hyperpolarization and increased V˙O2. Our results demonstrate a decrease after hemithyroidectomy of the metabolic state to which the individual is adapted, with persistent cellular metabolic changes in a hemithyroidectomized patient group......BACKGROUND: The significance of perturbations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormones within the laboratory reference ranges after hemithyroidectomy is unknown. Our aim was to examine changes in TSH and thyroid hormones after hemithyroidectomy for benign euthyroid goiter, focusing...

  1. 'Biomoleculas': cellular metabolism didactic software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menghi, M L [Chair of Physiology and Biophysics, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, CC 57 Suc 3, Parana 3100, Entre Rios (Argentina); Novella, L P [Chair of Physiology and Biophysics, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, CC 57 Suc 3, Parana 3100, Entre Rios (Argentina); Siebenlist, M R [Chair of Physiology and Biophysics, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, CC 57 Suc 3, Parana 3100, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    'Biomoleculas' is a software that deals with topics such as the digestion, cellular metabolism and excretion of nutrients. It is a pleasant, simple and didactic guide, made by and for students. In this program, each biomolecule (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) is accompanied until its degradation and assimilation by crossing and interrelating the different metabolic channels to finally show the destination of the different metabolites formed and the way in which these are excreted. It is used at present as a teaching-learning process tool by the chair of Physiology and Biophysics at the Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios.

  2. Integrating cellular metabolism into a multiscale whole-body model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Krauss

    Full Text Available Cellular metabolism continuously processes an enormous range of external compounds into endogenous metabolites and is as such a key element in human physiology. The multifaceted physiological role of the metabolic network fulfilling the catalytic conversions can only be fully understood from a whole-body perspective where the causal interplay of the metabolic states of individual cells, the surrounding tissue and the whole organism are simultaneously considered. We here present an approach relying on dynamic flux balance analysis that allows the integration of metabolic networks at the cellular scale into standardized physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models at the whole-body level. To evaluate our approach we integrated a genome-scale network reconstruction of a human hepatocyte into the liver tissue of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of a human adult. The resulting multiscale model was used to investigate hyperuricemia therapy, ammonia detoxification and paracetamol-induced toxication at a systems level. The specific models simultaneously integrate multiple layers of biological organization and offer mechanistic insights into pathology and medication. The approach presented may in future support a mechanistic understanding in diagnostics and drug development.

  3. Cellular metabolism in colorectal carcinogenesis: Influence of lifestyle, gut microbiome and metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagland, Hanne R; Søreide, Kjetil

    2015-01-28

    The interconnectivity between diet, gut microbiota and cell molecular responses is well known; however, only recently has technology allowed the identification of strains of microorganisms harbored in the gastrointestinal tract that may increase susceptibility to cancer. The colonic environment appears to play a role in the development of colon cancer, which is influenced by the human metabolic lifestyle and changes in the gut microbiome. Studying metabolic changes at the cellular level in cancer be useful for developing novel improved preventative measures, such as screening through metabolic breath-tests or treatment options that directly affect the metabolic pathways responsible for the carcinogenicity.

  4. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular structures...

  5. A metabolic-transcriptional network links sleep and cellular energetics in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisor, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    This review proposes a mechanistic link between cellular metabolic status, transcriptional regulatory changes and sleep. Sleep loss is associated with changes in cellular metabolic status in the brain. Metabolic sensors responsive to cellular metabolic status regulate the circadian clock transcriptional network. Modifications of the transcriptional activity of circadian clock genes affect sleep/wake state changes. Changes in sleep state reverse sleep loss-induced changes in cellular metabolic status. It is thus proposed that the regulation of circadian clock genes by cellular metabolic sensors is a critical intermediate step in the link between cellular metabolic status and sleep. Studies of this regulatory relationship may offer insights into the function of sleep at the cellular level.

  6. Cellular metabolic network analysis: discovering important reactions in Treponema pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueying; Zhao, Min; Qu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    T. pallidum, the syphilis-causing pathogen, performs very differently in metabolism compared with other bacterial pathogens. The desire for safe and effective vaccine of syphilis requests identification of important steps in T. pallidum's metabolism. Here, we apply Flux Balance Analysis to represent the reactions quantitatively. Thus, it is possible to cluster all reactions in T. pallidum. By calculating minimal cut sets and analyzing topological structure for the metabolic network of T. pallidum, critical reactions are identified. As a comparison, we also apply the analytical approaches to the metabolic network of H. pylori to find coregulated drug targets and unique drug targets for different microorganisms. Based on the clustering results, all reactions are further classified into various roles. Therefore, the general picture of their metabolic network is obtained and two types of reactions, both of which are involved in nucleic acid metabolism, are found to be essential for T. pallidum. It is also discovered that both hubs of reactions and the isolated reactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolisms play important roles in T. pallidum. These reactions could be potential drug targets for treating syphilis.

  7. Crack Propagation in Bamboo's Hierarchical Cellular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Meisam K.; Lu, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well.

  8. Using NMR to Identify Structural Features of Lin28-Regulated miRNAs and mRNAs and as a Tool for Comparing Differences in Cellular Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    O'Day, Elizabeth Mary

    2013-01-01

    Part 1 of this thesis seeks to identify shared structural features of Lin28-regulated miRNAs and mRNAs. Lin28 is an evolutionarily conserved, RNA binding protein, highly expressed in stem cells and poorly differentiated cancers, that inhibits differentiation and helps maintain stem cell properties. Lin28 binds to both the loops of let-7 precursors to block let-7 biogenesis and to Lin28 responsive elements (LREs) in mRNAs either to enhance or inhibit translation. Lin28 RNA binding properties a...

  9. Light weight cellular structures based on aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, O. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India); Embury, J.D.; Sinclair, C. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Sang, H. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada); Silvetti, P. [Cordoba Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Fisicas y Naturales

    1997-02-01

    An interesting form of lightweight material which has emerged in the past 2 decades is metallic foam. This paper deals with the basic concepts of making metallic foams and a detailed study of foams produced from Al-SiC. In addition, some aspects of cellular solids based on honeycomb structures are outlined including the concept of producing both two-phase foams and foams with composite walls.

  10. Cellular Metabolic Rate Is Influenced by Life-History Traits in Tropical and Temperate Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Gabriela Jimenez; James Van Brocklyn; Matthew Wortman; Williams, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    In general, tropical birds have a "slow pace of life," lower rates of whole-animal metabolism and higher survival rates, than temperate species. A fundamental challenge facing physiological ecologists is the understanding of how variation in life-history at the whole-organism level might be linked to cellular function. Because tropical birds have lower rates of whole-animal metabolism, we hypothesized that cells from tropical species would also have lower rates of cellular metabolism than cel...

  11. [Cellular structure of propionibacteria during their multiplication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, E; Kocoń, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the structure of bacterial cells from Propionibacterium genus as well as their structure during the cellular division. On the basis of the observations made in the electron transmission microscope, in uranyl-acetates-tained preparations of ultra-thin specimens of bacteria, it was stated that propionic bacteria appeared in a shape of short rods, possessing regular profiles of cell walls as opposed to Gram-negative bacteria with a very creased edge line. Besides, it was observed that division of cells had place by formation of septum, most probably preceded by the division of mezosome, which is a signal for creating the divisional wall. In the conducted studies, the following phenomena were started: presence of membraneous structure of mezosomes, which is linked with the chain of circular DNA in bacterial cell, appearance of numerous ribosomes in the regions of tangled threads of nucleic acids, and existence of other undefinite elements. Mezosome present in the cell of propionic bacteria is probably linked with the cell wall at least in two places and on the surface of external cell wall at the site of its linking; it causes the change in electronic density, demonstrated by the undefined holes or scars in cell wall. This finding gives the possibility of distinguishing this genus of Propionibacterium, in the respect of morphology, from other bacteria what, in the opinion of the authors, is a new achievement in the studies on the structure of propionic bacteria.

  12. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort will continue to develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular...

  13. Evolutionary principles underlying structure and response dynamics of cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacher, Arno; Soyer, Orkun S

    2012-01-01

    The network view in systems biology, in conjunction with the continuing development of experimental technologies, is providing us with the key structural and dynamical features of both cell-wide and pathway-level regulatory, signaling and metabolic systems. These include for example modularity and presence of hub proteins at the structural level and ultrasensitivity and feedback control at the level of dynamics. The uncovering of such features, and the seeming commonality of some of them, makes many systems biologists believe that these could represent design principles that underpin cellular systems across organisms. Here, we argue that such claims on any observed feature requires an understanding of how it has emerged in evolution and how it can shape subsequent evolution. We review recent and past studies that aim to achieve such evolutionary understanding for observed features of cellular networks. We argue that this evolutionary framework could lead to deciphering evolutionary origin and relevance of proposed design principles, thereby allowing to predict their presence or absence in an organism based on its environment and biochemistry and their effect on its future evolution.

  14. Interactions between mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cellular glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liemburg-Apers, D.C.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Grefte, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and detoxification are tightly balanced. Shifting this balance enables ROS to activate intracellular signaling and/or induce cellular damage and cell death. Increased mitochondrial ROS production is observed in a number of pathological condit

  15. From Ancient Pathways to Aging Cells-Connecting Metabolism and Cellular Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Christopher D; Campisi, Judith

    2016-06-14

    Cellular senescence is a complex stress response that permanently arrests the proliferation of cells at risk for oncogenic transformation. However, senescent cells can also drive phenotypes associated with aging. Although the senescence-associated growth arrest prevents the development of cancer, and the metabolism of cancer cells has been studied in depth, the metabolic causes and consequences of cellular senescence were largely unexplored until recently. New findings reveal key roles for several aspects of cellular metabolism in the establishment and control of senescent phenotypes. These discoveries have important implications for both cancer and aging. In this review, we highlight some of the recent links between metabolism and phenotypes that are commonly associated with senescent cells.

  16. The anticancer plant triterpenoid, avicin D, regulates glucocorticoid receptor signaling: implications for cellular metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsala Haridas

    Full Text Available Avicins, a family of apoptotic triterpene electrophiles, are known to regulate cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis, by targeting the mitochondria. Having evolved from "ancient hopanoids," avicins bear a structural resemblance with glucocorticoids (GCs, which are the endogenous regulators of metabolism and energy balance. These structural and functional similarities prompted us to compare the mode of action of avicin D with dexamethasone (Dex, a prototypical GC. Using cold competition assay, we show that Avicin D competes with Dex for binding to the GC receptor (GR, leading to its nuclear translocation. In contrast to Dex, avicin-induced nuclear translocation of GR does not result in transcriptional activation of GC-dependent genes. Instead we observe a decrease in the expression of GC-dependent metabolic proteins such as PEPCK and FASN. However, like Dex, avicin D treatment does induce a transrepressive effect on the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. While avicin's ability to inhibit NF-κB and its downstream targets appear to be GR-dependent, its pro-apoptotic effects were independent of GR expression. Using various deletion mutants of GR, we demonstrate the requirement of both the DNA and ligand binding domains of GR in mediating avicin D's transrepressive effects. Modeling of avicin-GR interaction revealed that avicin molecule binds only to the antagonist confirmation of GR. These findings suggest that avicin D has properties of being a selective GR modulator that separates transactivation from transrepression. Since the gene-activating properties of GR are mainly linked to its metabolic effects, and the negative interference with the activity of transcription factors to its anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effects, the identification of such a dissociated GR ligand could have great potential for therapeutic use.

  17. The anticancer plant triterpenoid, avicin D, regulates glucocorticoid receptor signaling: implications for cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Valsala; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Kitchen, Doug; Jiang, Anna; Michels, Peter; Gutterman, Jordan U

    2011-01-01

    Avicins, a family of apoptotic triterpene electrophiles, are known to regulate cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis, by targeting the mitochondria. Having evolved from "ancient hopanoids," avicins bear a structural resemblance with glucocorticoids (GCs), which are the endogenous regulators of metabolism and energy balance. These structural and functional similarities prompted us to compare the mode of action of avicin D with dexamethasone (Dex), a prototypical GC. Using cold competition assay, we show that Avicin D competes with Dex for binding to the GC receptor (GR), leading to its nuclear translocation. In contrast to Dex, avicin-induced nuclear translocation of GR does not result in transcriptional activation of GC-dependent genes. Instead we observe a decrease in the expression of GC-dependent metabolic proteins such as PEPCK and FASN. However, like Dex, avicin D treatment does induce a transrepressive effect on the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. While avicin's ability to inhibit NF-κB and its downstream targets appear to be GR-dependent, its pro-apoptotic effects were independent of GR expression. Using various deletion mutants of GR, we demonstrate the requirement of both the DNA and ligand binding domains of GR in mediating avicin D's transrepressive effects. Modeling of avicin-GR interaction revealed that avicin molecule binds only to the antagonist confirmation of GR. These findings suggest that avicin D has properties of being a selective GR modulator that separates transactivation from transrepression. Since the gene-activating properties of GR are mainly linked to its metabolic effects, and the negative interference with the activity of transcription factors to its anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effects, the identification of such a dissociated GR ligand could have great potential for therapeutic use.

  18. Regulation of cellular metabolism by the Notch receptor signalling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Seven genes involved in metabolism were tested as direct targets of the Notch signalling pathway. For each gene the occupancy of its enhancers by Su(H), its transcriptional response to Notch pathway and its biological functionality was verified in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Cellular metabolic rate is influenced by life-history traits in tropical and temperate birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Van Brocklyn, James; Wortman, Matthew; Williams, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    In general, tropical birds have a "slow pace of life," lower rates of whole-animal metabolism and higher survival rates, than temperate species. A fundamental challenge facing physiological ecologists is the understanding of how variation in life-history at the whole-organism level might be linked to cellular function. Because tropical birds have lower rates of whole-animal metabolism, we hypothesized that cells from tropical species would also have lower rates of cellular metabolism than cells from temperate species of similar body size and common phylogenetic history. We cultured primary dermal fibroblasts from 17 tropical and 17 temperate phylogenetically-paired species of birds in a common nutritive and thermal environment and then examined basal, uncoupled, and non-mitochondrial cellular O2 consumption (OCR), proton leak, and anaerobic glycolysis (extracellular acidification rates [ECAR]), using an XF24 Seahorse Analyzer. We found that multiple measures of metabolism in cells from tropical birds were significantly lower than their temperate counterparts. Basal and uncoupled cellular metabolism were 29% and 35% lower in cells from tropical birds, respectively, a decrease closely aligned with differences in whole-animal metabolism between tropical and temperate birds. Proton leak was significantly lower in cells from tropical birds compared with cells from temperate birds. Our results offer compelling evidence that whole-animal metabolism is linked to cellular respiration as a function of an animal's life-history evolution. These findings are consistent with the idea that natural selection has uniquely fashioned cells of long-lived tropical bird species to have lower rates of metabolism than cells from shorter-lived temperate species.

  20. Cellular metabolic rate is influenced by life-history traits in tropical and temperate birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gabriela Jimenez

    Full Text Available In general, tropical birds have a "slow pace of life," lower rates of whole-animal metabolism and higher survival rates, than temperate species. A fundamental challenge facing physiological ecologists is the understanding of how variation in life-history at the whole-organism level might be linked to cellular function. Because tropical birds have lower rates of whole-animal metabolism, we hypothesized that cells from tropical species would also have lower rates of cellular metabolism than cells from temperate species of similar body size and common phylogenetic history. We cultured primary dermal fibroblasts from 17 tropical and 17 temperate phylogenetically-paired species of birds in a common nutritive and thermal environment and then examined basal, uncoupled, and non-mitochondrial cellular O2 consumption (OCR, proton leak, and anaerobic glycolysis (extracellular acidification rates [ECAR], using an XF24 Seahorse Analyzer. We found that multiple measures of metabolism in cells from tropical birds were significantly lower than their temperate counterparts. Basal and uncoupled cellular metabolism were 29% and 35% lower in cells from tropical birds, respectively, a decrease closely aligned with differences in whole-animal metabolism between tropical and temperate birds. Proton leak was significantly lower in cells from tropical birds compared with cells from temperate birds. Our results offer compelling evidence that whole-animal metabolism is linked to cellular respiration as a function of an animal's life-history evolution. These findings are consistent with the idea that natural selection has uniquely fashioned cells of long-lived tropical bird species to have lower rates of metabolism than cells from shorter-lived temperate species.

  1. Alkalizing reactions streamline cellular metabolism in acidogenic microorganisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Arioli

    Full Text Available An understanding of the integrated relationships among the principal cellular functions that govern the bioenergetic reactions of an organism is necessary to determine how cells remain viable and optimise their fitness in the environment. Urease is a complex enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbonic acid. While the induction of urease activity by several microorganisms has been predominantly considered a stress-response that is initiated to generate a nitrogen source in response to a low environmental pH, here we demonstrate a new role of urease in the optimisation of cellular bioenergetics. We show that urea hydrolysis increases the catabolic efficiency of Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium that is widely used in the industrial manufacture of dairy products. By modulating the intracellular pH and thereby increasing the activity of β-galactosidase, glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase, urease increases the overall change in enthalpy generated by the bioenergetic reactions. A cooperative altruistic behaviour of urease-positive microorganisms on the urease-negative microorganisms within the same environment was also observed. The physiological role of a single enzymatic activity demonstrates a novel and unexpected view of the non-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that govern the bioenergetics of a bacterial cell, highlighting a new role for cytosol-alkalizing biochemical pathways in acidogenic microorganisms.

  2. Alkalizing Reactions Streamline Cellular Metabolism in Acidogenic Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arioli, Stefania; Ragg, Enzio; Scaglioni, Leonardo; Fessas, Dimitrios; Signorelli, Marco; Karp, Matti; Daffonchio, Daniele; De Noni, Ivano; Mulas, Laura; Oggioni, Marco; Guglielmetti, Simone; Mora, Diego

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the integrated relationships among the principal cellular functions that govern the bioenergetic reactions of an organism is necessary to determine how cells remain viable and optimise their fitness in the environment. Urease is a complex enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbonic acid. While the induction of urease activity by several microorganisms has been predominantly considered a stress-response that is initiated to generate a nitrogen source in response to a low environmental pH, here we demonstrate a new role of urease in the optimisation of cellular bioenergetics. We show that urea hydrolysis increases the catabolic efficiency of Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium that is widely used in the industrial manufacture of dairy products. By modulating the intracellular pH and thereby increasing the activity of β-galactosidase, glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase, urease increases the overall change in enthalpy generated by the bioenergetic reactions. A cooperative altruistic behaviour of urease-positive microorganisms on the urease-negative microorganisms within the same environment was also observed. The physiological role of a single enzymatic activity demonstrates a novel and unexpected view of the non-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that govern the bioenergetics of a bacterial cell, highlighting a new role for cytosol-alkalizing biochemical pathways in acidogenic microorganisms. PMID:21152088

  3. Structural modeling of sandwich structures with lightweight cellular cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Liu; Z. C. Deng; T. J. Lu

    2007-01-01

    An effective single layered finite element (FE) computational model is proposed to predict the structural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels having two dimensional (2D) prismatic or three dimensional (3D) truss cores.Three different types of cellular core topology are considered: pyramidal truss core (3D), Kagome truss core (3D) and corrugated core (2D), representing three kinds of material anisotropy: orthotropic, monoclinic and general anisotropic. A homogenization technique is developed to obtain the homogenized macroscopic stiffness properties of the cellular core. In comparison with the results obtained by using detailed FE model, the single layered computational model cangive acceptable predictions for both the static and dynamic behaviors of orthotropic truss core sandwich panels. However, for non-orthotropic 3D truss cores, the predictions are not so well. For both static and dynamic behaviors of a 2D corrugated core sandwich panel, the predictions derived by the single layered computational model is generally acceptable when the size of the unit cell varies within a certain range, with the predictions for moderately strong or strong corrugated cores more accurate than those for weak cores.

  4. Structural modeling of sandwich structures with lightweight cellular cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Deng, Z. C.; Lu, T. J.

    2007-10-01

    An effective single layered finite element (FE) computational model is proposed to predict the structural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels having two dimensional (2D) prismatic or three dimensional (3D) truss cores. Three different types of cellular core topology are considered: pyramidal truss core (3D), Kagome truss core (3D) and corrugated core (2D), representing three kinds of material anisotropy: orthotropic, monoclinic and general anisotropic. A homogenization technique is developed to obtain the homogenized macroscopic stiffness properties of the cellular core. In comparison with the results obtained by using detailed FE model, the single layered computational model can give acceptable predictions for both the static and dynamic behaviors of orthotropic truss core sandwich panels. However, for non-orthotropic 3D truss cores, the predictions are not so well. For both static and dynamic behaviors of a 2D corrugated core sandwich panel, the predictions derived by the single layered computational model is generally acceptable when the size of the unit cell varies within a certain range, with the predictions for moderately strong or strong corrugated cores more accurate than those for weak cores.

  5. Effects of cellular fine structure on scattered light pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Caigen; Capjack, Clarence E

    2006-06-01

    Biological cells are complex in both morphological and biochemical structure. The effects of cellular fine structure on light scattered from cells are studied by employing a three-dimensional code named AETHER which solves the full set of Maxwell equations by using the finite-difference time-domain method. It is shown that changes in cellular fine structure can cause significant changes in the scattered light pattern over particular scattering angles. These changes potentially provide the possibility for distinguishability of cellular intrastructures. The effects that features of different intrastructure have on scattered light are discussed from the viewpoint of diagnosing cellular fine structure. Finally, we discuss scattered light patterns for lymphocyte-like cells and basophil-like cells.

  6. GIM3E: Condition-specific Models of Cellular Metabolism Developed from Metabolomics and Expression Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Brian; Ebrahim, Ali; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernard O.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

    2013-11-15

    Motivation: Genome-scale metabolic models have been used extensively to investigate alterations in cellular metabolism. The accuracy of these models to represent cellular metabolism in specific conditions has been improved by constraining the model with omics data sources. However, few practical methods for integrating metabolomics data with other omics data sources into genome-scale models of metabolism have been reported. Results: GIMMME (Gene Inactivation Moderated by Metabolism, Metabolomics, and Expression) is an algorithm that enables the development of condition-specific models based on an objective function, transcriptomics, and intracellular metabolomics data. GIMMME establishes metabolite utilization requirements with metabolomics data, uses model-paired transcriptomics data to find experimentally supported solutions, and also provides calculations of the turnover (production / consumption) flux of metabolites. GIMMME was employed to investigate the effects of integrating additional omics datasets to create increasingly constrained solution spaces of Salmonella Typhimurium metabolism during growth in both rich and virulence media. This integration proved to be informative and resulted in a requirement of additional active reactions (12 in each case) or metabolites (26 or 29, respectively). The addition of constraints from transcriptomics also impacted the allowed solution space, and the cellular metabolites with turnover fluxes that were necessarily altered by the change in conditions increased from 118 to 271 of 1397. Availability: GIMMME has been implemented in Python and requires a COBRApy 0.2.x. The algorithm and sample data described here are freely available at: http://opencobra.sourceforge.net/

  7. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  8. Coordinated remodeling of cellular metabolism during iron deficiency through targeted mRNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Sergi; Askeland, Eric; Thiele, Dennis J

    2005-01-14

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for virtually all organisms and serves as a cofactor for a wide variety of vital cellular processes. Although Fe deficiency is the primary nutritional disorder in the world, cellular responses to Fe deprivation are poorly understood. We have discovered a posttranscriptional regulatory process controlled by Fe deficiency, which coordinately drives widespread metabolic reprogramming. We demonstrate that, in response to Fe deficiency, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cth2 protein specifically downregulates mRNAs encoding proteins that participate in many Fe-dependent processes. mRNA turnover requires the binding of Cth2, an RNA binding protein conserved in plants and mammals, to specific AU-rich elements in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs targeted for degradation. These studies elucidate coordinated global metabolic reprogramming in response to Fe deficiency and identify a mechanism for achieving this by targeting specific mRNA molecules for degradation, thereby facilitating the utilization of limited cellular Fe levels.

  9. Cross Talk between Cellular Redox Status, Metabolism, and p53 in Neural Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Kirsi; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the importance of the cellular redox status for neural stem cell (NSC) homeostasis has become increasingly clear. Similarly, the transcription factor and tumor suppressor p53 has been implicated in the regulation of cell metabolism, in antioxidant response, and in stem cell quiescence and fate commitment. Here, we explore the known and putative functions of p53 in antioxidant response and metabolic control and examine how reactive oxygen species, p53, and related cellular signaling may regulate NSC homeostasis, quiescence, and differentiation. We also discuss the role that PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling plays in NSC biology and oxidative signaling and how p53 contributes to the regulation of this signaling cascade. Finally, we invite reflection on the several unanswered questions of the role that p53 plays in NSC biology and metabolism, anticipating future directions.

  10. Cellular regulation of the structure and function of aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail El-Hamamsy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic valve was long considered a passive structure that opens and closes in response to changes in transvalvular pressure. Recent evidence suggests that the aortic valve performs highly sophisticated functions as a result of its unique microscopic structure. These functions allow it to adapt to its hemodynamic and mechanical environment. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in normal valve physiology is essential to elucidate the mechanisms behind valve disease. We here review the structure and developmental biology of aortic valves; we examine the role of its cellular parts in regulating its function and describe potential pathophysiological and clinical implications.

  11. Bioinspired Cellular Structures: Additive Manufacturing and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, J.; Pettermann, H. E.; Liska, R.

    Biological materials (e.g., wood, trabecular bone, marine skeletons) rely heavily on the use of cellular architecture, which provides several advantages. (1) The resulting structures can bear the variety of "real life" load spectra using a minimum of a given bulk material, featuring engineering lightweight design principles. (2) The inside of the structures is accessible to body fluids which deliver the required nutrients. (3) Furthermore, cellular architectures can grow organically by adding or removing individual struts or by changing the shape of the constituting elements. All these facts make the use of cellular architectures a reasonable choice for nature. Using additive manufacturing technologies (AMT), it is now possible to fabricate such structures for applications in engineering and biomedicine. In this chapter, we present methods that allow the 3D computational analysis of the mechanical properties of cellular structures with open porosity. Various different cellular architectures including disorder are studied. In order to quantify the influence of architecture, the apparent density is always kept constant. Furthermore, it is shown that how new advanced photopolymers can be used to tailor the mechanical and functional properties of the fabricated structures.

  12. FIH Regulates Cellular Metabolism through Hydroxylation of the Deubiquitinase OTUB1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten C Scholz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The asparagine hydroxylase, factor inhibiting HIF (FIH, confers oxygen-dependence upon the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, a master regulator of the cellular adaptive response to hypoxia. Studies investigating whether asparagine hydroxylation is a general regulatory oxygen-dependent modification have identified multiple non-HIF targets for FIH. However, the functional consequences of this outside of the HIF pathway remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the deubiquitinase ovarian tumor domain containing ubiquitin aldehyde binding protein 1 (OTUB1 is a substrate for hydroxylation by FIH on N22. Mutation of N22 leads to a profound change in the interaction of OTUB1 with proteins important in cellular metabolism. Furthermore, in cultured cells, overexpression of N22A mutant OTUB1 impairs cellular metabolic processes when compared to wild type. Based on these data, we hypothesize that OTUB1 is a target for functional hydroxylation by FIH. Additionally, we propose that our results provide new insight into the regulation of cellular energy metabolism during hypoxic stress and the potential for targeting hydroxylases for therapeutic benefit.

  13. Inhibition of HIV by Legalon-SIL is independent of its effect on cellular metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, Janela [Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Margineantu, Daciana H. [Department of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Sweet, Ian R. [Department of Medicine (Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Nutrition), University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Polyak, Stephen J., E-mail: polyak@uw.edu [Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-01-20

    In this report, we further characterized the effects of silibinin (SbN), derived from milk thistle extract, and Legalon-SIL (SIL), a water-soluble derivative of SbN, on T cell metabolism and HIV infection. We assessed the effects of SbN and SIL on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and CEM-T4 cells in terms of cellular growth, ATP content, metabolism, and HIV infection. SIL and SbN caused a rapid and reversible (upon removal) decrease in cellular ATP levels, which was associated with suppression of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis. SbN, but not SIL inhibited glucose uptake. Exposure of T cells to SIL (but not SbN or metabolic inhibitors) during virus adsorption blocked HIV infection. Thus, both SbN and SIL rapidly perturb T cell metabolism in vitro, which may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects that arise with prolonged exposure of cells. However, the metabolic effects are not involved in SIL's unique ability to block HIV entry. - Highlights: • Silibinin (SbN) and Legalon-SIL (SIL) are cytoprotective mixtures of natural products. • SbN and SIL reduce T cell oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in vitro. • SIL but not SbN blocks entry of multiple HIV isolates into T cells in vitro. • SIL's suppression of HIV appears independent of its effects on T cell metabolism. • Metabolic effects of SIL and SbN may be relevant in inflammatory diseases.

  14. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Horniblow

    Full Text Available Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05 and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease.

  15. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  16. Control of Cellular Structural Networks Through Unstructured Protein Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    structural and mechanical networks in cells. The research plan seeks to determine the role of molecular­scale steric forces on the assembly, mechanics...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 01-07-2016 1-Oct-2009 30-Sep-2015 Final Report: WHITEPAPER; Research Area 8; Control of cellular structural networks ...any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggesstions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate

  17. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids in energy metabolism: the cellular perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Peter; Wojtczak, Lech

    2016-06-01

    Short- and medium-chain fatty acids (SCFAs and MCFAs), independently of their cellular signaling functions, are important substrates of the energy metabolism and anabolic processes in mammals. SCFAs are mostly generated by colonic bacteria and are predominantly metabolized by enterocytes and liver, whereas MCFAs arise mostly from dietary triglycerides, among them milk and dairy products. A common feature of SCFAs and MCFAs is their carnitine-independent uptake and intramitochondrial activation to acyl-CoA thioesters. Contrary to long-chain fatty acids, the cellular metabolism of SCFAs and MCFAs depends to a lesser extent on fatty acid-binding proteins. SCFAs and MCFAs modulate tissue metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, as manifested by a mostly inhibitory effect on glycolysis and stimulation of lipogenesis or gluconeogenesis. SCFAs and MCFAs exert no or only weak protonophoric and lytic activities in mitochondria and do not significantly impair the electron transport in the respiratory chain. SCFAs and MCFAs modulate mitochondrial energy production by two mechanisms: they provide reducing equivalents to the respiratory chain and partly decrease efficacy of oxidative ATP synthesis.

  18. Multiphoton microscopy for skin wound healing study in terms of cellular metabolism and collagen regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Okano, Kazunori; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy was employed to study normal skin wound healing in live rats noninvasively. Wound healing is a process involving series of biochemical events. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic activity during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), respectively. In eukaryotic cells ATP is the molecule that holds the energy for cellular functioning. Whereas NADH is an electron donor in the metabolic pathways, required to generate ATP. Fluorescence lifetime of NADH free to protein bound ratio was evaluated to determine the relative metabolic activity. The FLIM data were acquired by a TCSPC system using SPCM software and analyzed by SPCImage software. Additionally, polarization resolved SHG signals were also collected to observe the changes in optical birefringence and hence the anisotropy of regenerated collagens from rat wound biopsy samples. Mat lab programming was used to process the data to construct the anisotropy images. Results indicated that, cells involved in healing had higher metabolic activity during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually and become equivalent to normal skin upon healing completes. A net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase and net regeneration starting from day 5 were observed in terms of SHG signal intensity change. Polarization resolved SHG imaging of the wound biopsy sample indicates higher value of anisotropy in proliferative phase, from day 4th to 8th, of wound formation; however the anisotropy decreases upon healing.

  19. Multiple steady states with distinct cellular metabolism in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Europa, A F; Gambhir, A; Fu, P C; Hu, W S

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian cells have the ability to proliferate under different nutrient environments by utilizing different combinations of the nutrients, especially glucose and the amino acids. Under the conditions often used in in vitro cultivation, the cells consume glucose and amino acids in great excess of what is needed for making up biomass and products. They also produce large amounts of metabolites with lactate, ammonia, and some non-essential amino acids such as alanine as the most dominant ones. By controlling glucose and glutamine at low levels, cellular metabolism can be altered and can result in reduced glucose and glutamine consumption as well as in reduced metabolite formation. Using a fed-batch reactor to manipulate glucose at a low level (as compared to a typical batch culture), cell metabolism was altered to a state with substantially reduced lactate production. The culture was then switched to a continuous mode and allowed to reach a steady-state. At this steady-state, the concentrations of cells and antibody were substantially higher than a control culture that was initiated from a batch culture without first altering cellular metabolism. The lactate and other metabolite concentrations were also substantially reduced as compared to the control culture. This newly observed steady-state was achieved at the same dilution rate and feed medium as the control culture. The paths leading to the two steady-states, however, were different. These results demonstrate steady-state multiplicity. At this new steady-state, not only was glucose metabolism altered, but the metabolism of amino acids was altered as well. The amino acid metabolism in the new steady-state was more balanced, and the excretion of non-essential amino acids and ammonia was substantially lower. This approach of reaching a more desirable steady-state with higher concentrations of cells and product opens a new avenue for high-density- and high-productivity-cell culture.

  20. Modeling rice metabolism: from elucidating environmental effects on cellular phenotype to guiding crop improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyappan Lakshmanan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Crop productivity is severely limited by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, it is highly needed to understand the underlying mechanisms of environmental stress response and tolerance in plants, which could be addressed by systems biology approach. To this end, high-throughput omics profiling and in silico modeling can be considered to explore the environmental effects on phenotypic states and metabolic behaviors of rice crops at the systems level. Especially, the advent of constraint-based metabolic reconstruction and analysis paves a way to characterize the plant cellular physiology under various stresses by combining the mathematical network models with multi-omics data. Rice metabolic networks have been reconstructed since 2013 and currently 6 such networks are available, where 5 are at genome-scale. Since their publication, these models have been utilized to systematically elucidate the rice abiotic stress responses and identify agronomic traits for crop improvement. In this review, we summarize the current status of the existing rice metabolic networks and models with their applications. Furthermore, we also highlight future directions of rice modeling studies, particularly stressing how these models can be used to contextualize the affluent multi-omics data that are readily available in the public domain. Overall, we envisage a number of studies in the future, exploiting the available metabolic models to enhance the yield and quality of rice and other food crops.

  1. Mitochondrial proteomics on human fibroblasts for identification of metabolic imbalance and cellular stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bross Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial proteins are central to various metabolic activities and are key regulators of apoptosis. Disturbance of mitochondrial proteins is therefore often associated with disease. Large scale protein data are required to capture the mitochondrial protein levels and mass spectrometry based proteomics is suitable for generating such data. To study the relative quantities of mitochondrial proteins in cells from cultivated human skin fibroblasts we applied a proteomic method based on nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of iTRAQ-labeled peptides. Results When fibroblast cultures were exposed to mild metabolic stress – by cultivation in galactose medium- the amount of mitochondria appeared to be maintained whereas the levels of individual proteins were altered. Proteins of respiratory chain complex I and IV were increased together with NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of the citric acid cycle illustrating cellular strategies to cope with altered energy metabolism. Furthermore, quantitative protein data, with a median standard error below 6%, were obtained for the following mitochondrial pathways: fatty acid oxidation, citric acid cycle, respiratory chain, antioxidant systems, amino acid metabolism, mitochondrial translation, protein quality control, mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis. Conclusion The robust analytical platform in combination with a well-defined compendium of mitochondrial proteins allowed quantification of single proteins as well as mapping of entire pathways. This enabled characterization of the interplay between metabolism and stress response in human cells exposed to mild stress.

  2. Role of SUMO-specific protease 2 in reprogramming cellular glucose metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Tang

    Full Text Available Most cancer cells exhibit a shift in glucose metabolic strategy, displaying increased glycolysis even with adequate oxygen supply. SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs de-SUMOylate substrates including HIF1α and p53,two key regulators in cancer glucose metabolism, to regulate their activity, stability and subcellular localization. However, the role of SENPs in tumor glucose metabolism remains unclear. Here we report that SUMO-specific protease 2 (SENP2 negatively regulates aerobic glycolysis in MCF7 and MEF cells. Over-expression of SENP2 reduces the glucose uptake and lactate production, increasing the cellular ATP levels in MCF7 cells, while SENP2 knockout MEF cells show increased glucose uptake and lactate production along with the decreased ATP levels. Consistently, the MCF7 cells over-expressing SENP2 exhibit decreased expression levels of key glycolytic enzymes and an increased rate of glucose oxidation compared with control MCF7 cells, indicating inhibited glycolysis but enhanced oxidative mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, SENP2 over-expressing MCF7 cells demonstrated a reduced amount of phosphorylated AKT, whereas SENP2 knockout MEFs exhibit increased levels of phosphorylated AKT. Furthermore, inhibiting AKT phosphorylation by LY294002 rescued the phenotype induced by SENP2 deficiency in MEFs. In conclusion, SENP2 represses glycolysis and shifts glucose metabolic strategy, in part through inhibition of AKT phosphorylation. Our study reveals a novel function of SENP2 in regulating glucose metabolism.

  3. Freeform inkjet printing of cellular structures with bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kyle; Xu, Changxue; Chai, Wenxuan; Zhang, Zhengyi; Fu, Jianzhong; Huang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Organ printing offers a great potential for the freeform layer-by-layer fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) living organs using cellular spheroids or bioinks as building blocks. Vascularization is often identified as a main technological barrier for building 3D organs. As such, the fabrication of 3D biological vascular trees is of great importance for the overall feasibility of the envisioned organ printing approach. In this study, vascular-like cellular structures are fabricated using a liquid support-based inkjet printing approach, which utilizes a calcium chloride solution as both a cross-linking agent and support material. This solution enables the freeform printing of spanning and overhang features by providing a buoyant force. A heuristic approach is implemented to compensate for the axially-varying deformation of horizontal tubular structures to achieve a uniform diameter along their axial directions. Vascular-like structures with both horizontal and vertical bifurcations have been successfully printed from sodium alginate only as well as mouse fibroblast-based alginate bioinks. The post-printing fibroblast cell viability of printed cellular tubes was found to be above 90% even after a 24 h incubation, considering the control effect.

  4. Structural mechanisms of plant glucan phosphatases in starch metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekins, David A; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Gentry, Matthew S

    2016-07-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered class of enzymes that dephosphorylate starch and glycogen, thereby regulating energy metabolism. Plant genomes encode two glucan phosphatases, called Starch EXcess4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2), that regulate starch metabolism by selectively dephosphorylating glucose moieties within starch glucan chains. Recently, the structures of both SEX4 and LSF2 were determined, with and without phosphoglucan products bound, revealing the mechanism for their unique activities. This review explores the structural and enzymatic features of the plant glucan phosphatases, and outlines how they are uniquely adapted to perform their cellular functions. We outline the physical mechanisms used by SEX4 and LSF2 to interact with starch glucans: SEX4 binds glucan chains via a continuous glucan-binding platform comprising its dual-specificity phosphatase domain and carbohydrate-binding module, while LSF2 utilizes surface binding sites. SEX4 and LSF2 both contain a unique network of aromatic residues in their catalytic dual-specificity phosphatase domains that serve as glucan engagement platforms and are unique to the glucan phosphatases. We also discuss the phosphoglucan substrate specificities inherent to SEX4 and LSF2, and outline structural features within the active site that govern glucan orientation. This review defines the structural mechanism of the plant glucan phosphatases with respect to phosphatases, starch metabolism and protein-glucan interaction, thereby providing a framework for their application in both agricultural and industrial settings.

  5. Periodic Cellular Structure Technology for Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edward Y.

    2015-01-01

    Shape memory alloys are being considered for a wide variety of adaptive components for engine and airframe applications because they can undergo large amounts of strain and then revert to their original shape upon heating or unloading. Transition45 Technologies, Inc., has developed an innovative periodic cellular structure (PCS) technology for shape memory alloys that enables fabrication of complex bulk configurations, such as lattice block structures. These innovative structures are manufactured using an advanced reactive metal casting technology that offers a relatively low cost and established approach for constructing near-net shape aerospace components. Transition45 is continuing to characterize these structures to determine how best to design a PCS to better exploit the use of shape memory alloys in aerospace applications.

  6. Antidiabetic Drugs: Mechanisms of Action and Potential Outcomes on Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Maria J; Silva, Branca M; Sousa, Mário; Sá, Rosália; Oliveira, Pedro F; Alves, Marco G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases and has been a leading cause of death in the last decades. Thus, methods to detect, prevent or delay this disease and its co-morbidities have long been a matter of discussion. Nowadays, DM patients, particularly those suffering with type 2 DM, are advised to alter their diet and physical exercise regimens and then proceed progressively from monotherapy, dual therapy, and multi-agent therapy to insulin administration, as the disease becomes more severe. Although progresses have been made, the pursuit for the "perfect" antidiabetic drug still continues. The complexity of DM and its impact on whole body homeodynamics are two of the main reasons why there is not yet such a drug. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms by which DM can be controlled are still under an intense debate. As the associated risks, disadvantages, side effects and mechanisms of action vary from drug to drug, the choice of the most suitable therapy needs to be thoroughly investigated. Herein we propose to discuss the different classes of antidiabetic drugs available, their applications and mechanisms of action, particularly those of the newer and/or most widely prescribed classes. A special emphasis will be made on their effects on cellular metabolism, since these drugs affect those pathways in several cellular systems and organs, promoting metabolic alterations responsible for either deleterious or beneficial effects. This is a crucial property that needs to be carefully investigated when prescribing an antidiabetic.

  7. Embryonic MicroRNA-369 Controls Metabolic Splicing Factors and Urges Cellular Reprograming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamitsu Konno

    Full Text Available Noncoding microRNAs inhibit translation and lower the transcript stability of coding mRNA, however miR-369 s, in aberrant silencing genomic regions, stabilizes target proteins under cellular stress. We found that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells led to chromatin methylation of histone H3K4 at the miR-369 region on chromosome 12qF in mice, which is expressed in embryonic cells and is critical for pluripotency. Proteomic analyses revealed that miR-369 stabilized translation of pyruvate kinase (Pkm2 splicing factors such as HNRNPA2B1. Overexpression of miR-369 stimulated Pkm2 splicing and enhanced induction of cellular reprogramming by induced pluripotent stem cell factors, whereas miR-369 knockdown resulted in suppression. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the Argonaute complex contained the fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 and HNRNPA2B1 in a miR-369-depedent manner. Our findings demonstrate a unique role of the embryonic miR-369-HNRNPA2B1 axis in controlling metabolic enzyme function, and suggest a novel pathway linking epigenetic, transcriptional, and metabolic control in cell reprogramming.

  8. Metabolic Discrimination of Select List Agents by Monitoring Cellular Responses in a Multianalyte Microphysiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wikswo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the potential of cells as complex biosensors promises the potential to create sensitive and selective detectors for discrimination of biodefense agents. Here we present toxin detection and suggest discrimination using cells in a multianalyte microphysiometer (MMP that is capable of simultaneously measuring flux changes in four extracellular analytes (acidification rate, glucose uptake, oxygen uptake, and lactate production in real-time. Differential short-term cellular responses were observed between botulinum neurotoxin A and ricin toxin with neuroblastoma cells, alamethicin and anthrax protective antigen with RAW macrophages, and cholera toxin, muscarine, 2,4-dinitro-phenol, and NaF with CHO cells. These results and the post exposure dynamics and metabolic recovery observed in each case suggest the usefulness of cell-based detectors to discriminate between specific analytes and classes of compounds in a complex matrix, and furthermore to make metabolic inferences on the cellular effects of the agents. This may be particularly valuable for classifying unknown toxins.

  9. Arctigenin preferentially induces tumor cell death under glucose deprivation by inhibiting cellular energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Qi, Chunting; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhang, Haohao; Hu, Lihong; Yuan, Junying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-08-15

    Selectively eradicating cancer cells with minimum adverse effects on normal cells is a major challenge in the development of anticancer therapy. We hypothesize that nutrient-limiting conditions frequently encountered by cancer cells in poorly vascularized solid tumors might provide an opportunity for developing selective therapy. In this study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanisms of a natural compound, arctigenin, in regulating tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that arctigenin selectively promoted glucose-starved A549 tumor cells to undergo necrosis by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. In doing so, arctigenin elevated cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocked cellular energy metabolism in the glucose-starved tumor cells. We also demonstrated that cellular ROS generation was caused by intracellular ATP depletion and played an essential role in the arctigenin-induced tumor cell death under the glucose-limiting condition. Furthermore, we combined arctigenin with the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and examined their effects on tumor cell growth. Interestingly, this combination displayed preferential cell-death inducing activity against tumor cells compared to normal cells. Hence, we propose that the combination of arctigenin and 2DG may represent a promising new cancer therapy with minimal normal tissue toxicity.

  10. Hydroxyl Radical Induced Apoptosis Is Closely Related to Changes in Cellular Energy/Redox Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺雨虹; 陈晶; 任建国; 隋森芳; 蔡国平

    2003-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the hydroxyl radical (·OH), are known to be potential modulators of apoptosis.However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying apoptosis induced by·OH, namely how the radical induces a cell to die, are poorly understood.The present work highlights the changes of the energy/redox status during apoptosis by exogenous· OH-treatment.HeLa cells were induced to undergo typical apoptosis by·OH generated directly via the Fe2+-mediated Fenton reaction.The thermodynamics study indicated that the· OH-treatment increased the cellular heat output in the first hours, and then the cellular thermodynamics shifted to endothermic.The data demonstrates that the mitochondria are actively involved in· OH-treatment induced apoptosis, with the cellular oxygen consumption rapidly decreasing after the·OH-treatment for only 0.5 h.But DNA fragmentation, which is the major characteristic of apoptosis, took place 16 h after · OH-treatment.The results suggest that alteration of the energy/redox metabolism and the energy/redox status may be the primary causes among the early events of· OH-induced apoptosis.

  11. Overview of Cellular Transplantation in Diabetes Mellitus: Focus on the Metabolic Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livio Luzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease possible to treat via several different therapeutic approaches. Since the advent of insulin in 1922, type 1 diabetes mellitus has become a chronic treatable disease. Nonetheless, type 1 diabetes mellitus can be a devastating disease when the macro- and microangiopathic complications take place after several years of illness. Starting from the eighties, pancreas/islet transplantation has become a potential innovative treatment of diabetes mellitus. The major advantage of pancreas/islet transplantation is the restoration of c-peptide cosecretion along with insulin; the major disadvantage is the need to administer immunosuppressive drugs which are diabetogenic themselves. Islet transplantation is the progenitor of more recent forms of cellular and stem cell therapies which will be reviewed herein. Cellular therapies for diabetes mellitus are still an experimental procedure. Herein we present the actual current achievements and an outlook of close future possible advancements in the area of cellular transplantation for the cure of diabetes mellitus.

  12. New structural and functional defects in polyphosphate deficient bacteria: A cellular and proteomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chávez Francisco P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP, a polymer of tens or hundreds of phosphate residues linked by ATP-like bonds, is found in all organisms and performs a wide variety of functions. PolyP is synthesized in bacterial cells by the actions of polyphosphate kinases (PPK1 and PPK2 and degraded by exopolyphosphatase (PPX. Bacterial cells with polyP deficiencies due to knocking out the ppk1 gene are affected in many structural and important cellular functions such as motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence among others. The cause of this pleiotropy is not entirely understood. Results The overexpression of exopolyphosphatase in bacteria mimicked some pleitropic defects found in ppk1 mutants. By using this approach we found new structural and functional defects in the polyP-accumulating bacteria Pseudomonas sp. B4, which are most likely due to differences in the polyP-removal strategy. Colony morphology phenotype, lipopolysaccharide (LPS structure changes and cellular division malfunction were observed. Finally, we used comparative proteomics in order to elucidate the cellular adjustments that occurred during polyP deficiency in this bacterium and found some clues that helped to understand the structural and functional defects observed. Conclusions The results obtained suggest that during polyP deficiency energy metabolism and particularly nucleoside triphosphate (NTP formation were affected and that bacterial cells overcame this problem by increasing the flux of energy-generating metabolic pathways such as tricarboxilic acid (TCA cycle, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation and by reducing energy-consuming ones such as active transporters and amino acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, our results suggest that a general stress response also took place in the cell during polyP deficiency.

  13. Prediction of useful casting structure applying Cellular Automaton method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ignaszak

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of simulation investigations of primary casting’s structure made of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloy using the Calcosoft system with CAFE 3D (Cellular Automaton Finite Element module are presented. CAFE 3-D module let to predict the structure formation of complete castings indicating the spatial distribution of columnar and equiaxed grains. That simplified model concerns only hypoeutectic phase. Simulation investigations of structure concern the useful casting of camshaft which solidified in high-insulation mould with properly chills distribution. These conditions let to apply the expedient locally different simplified the grains blocs geometry which are called by the authors as pseudo-crystals. The mechanical properties in selected cross-sections of casing are estimated.

  14. Investigating the Cellular and Metabolic Responses of World-Class Canoeists Training: A Sportomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Santos Coelho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: We have been using the Sportomics approach to evaluate biochemical and hematological changes in response to exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic and hematologic responses of world-class canoeists during a training session; (2 Methods: Blood samples were taken at different points and analyzed for their hematological properties, activities of selected enzymes, hormones, and metabolites; (3 Results: Muscle stress biomarkers were elevated in response to exercise which correlated with modifications in the profile of white blood cells, where a leukocyte rise was observed after the canoe session. These results were accompanied by an increase in other exercise intensity parameters such as lactatemia and ammonemia. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol increased during the exercise sessions. The acute rise in both erythrocytes and white blood profile were probably due to muscle cell damage, rather than hepatocyte integrity impairment; (4 Conclusion: The cellular and metabolic responses found here, together with effective nutrition support, are crucial to understanding the effects of exercise in order to assist in the creation of new training and recovery planning. Also we show that Sportomics is a primal tool for training management and performance improvement, as well as to the understanding of metabolic response to exercise.

  15. Investigating the Cellular and Metabolic Responses of World-Class Canoeists Training: A Sportomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Wagner Santos; Viveiros de Castro, Luis; Deane, Elizabeth; Magno-França, Alexandre; Bassini, Adriana; Cameron, Luiz-Claudio

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: We have been using the Sportomics approach to evaluate biochemical and hematological changes in response to exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic and hematologic responses of world-class canoeists during a training session; (2) Methods: Blood samples were taken at different points and analyzed for their hematological properties, activities of selected enzymes, hormones, and metabolites; (3) Results: Muscle stress biomarkers were elevated in response to exercise which correlated with modifications in the profile of white blood cells, where a leukocyte rise was observed after the canoe session. These results were accompanied by an increase in other exercise intensity parameters such as lactatemia and ammonemia. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol increased during the exercise sessions. The acute rise in both erythrocytes and white blood profile were probably due to muscle cell damage, rather than hepatocyte integrity impairment; (4) Conclusion: The cellular and metabolic responses found here, together with effective nutrition support, are crucial to understanding the effects of exercise in order to assist in the creation of new training and recovery planning. Also we show that Sportomics is a primal tool for training management and performance improvement, as well as to the understanding of metabolic response to exercise. PMID:27845704

  16. Composition, structure and mechanical properties of several natural cellular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The stem piths of sunflower, kaoliang and corn are natural cellular materials. In this paper, the contents of the compositions of these piths are determined and their cell shapes and structures are examined through scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Further research is conducted in the effects of the compositions and structures of the piths on the mechanical properties after testing the partial mechanical properties. The results show that the total cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin content of each sample approaches 75% of the dry mass of its primary cell walls. With the fall of R value, a parameter relative to the contents of the main compositions, the flexibilities of the cellular piths descend while their stresses and rigidities increase. The basic cell shape making up the sunflower pith is approximately a tetrakaidehedron. The stem piths of kaoliang and corn are made up of cells close to hexangular prisms and a few tubular ones which can observably reinforce their mechanical properties in the axial directions.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by frataxin deficiency is associated with cellular senescence and abnormal calcium metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantxa eBolinches-Amorós

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is considered a neurodegenerative disorder involving both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG are the major target tissue structures. This neuropathy is caused by mutations in the FXN gene that encodes frataxin. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial and cell consequences of frataxin depletion in a cellular model based on frataxin silencing in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, a cell line that has been used widely as in vitro models for studies on neurological diseases. We showed that the reduction of frataxin induced mitochondrial dysfunction due to a bioenergetic deficit and abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in the mitochondria that were associated with oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses. The depletion of frataxin did not cause cell death but increased autophagy, which may have a cytoprotective effect against cellular insults such as oxidative stress. Frataxin silencing provoked slow cell growth associated with cellular senescence, as demonstrated by increased SA-βgal activity and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. We postulate that cellular senescence might be related to a hypoplastic defect in the DRG during neurodevelopment, as suggested by necropsy studies.

  18. Polyethylenimine architecture-dependent metabolic imprints and perturbation of cellular redox homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Parhamifar, Ladan; Lange, Marina Krarup

    2015-01-01

    demonstrate that the central mechanisms of PEI architecture- and size-dependent perturbations of integrated cellular metabolomics involve destabilization of plasma membrane and mitochondrial membranes with consequences on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), glycolytic flux and redox homeostasis...... oxygen species (ROS). The differences in metabolic and redox imprints were further reflected in the transfection performance of the polycations, but co-treatment with the GSH precursor N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) counteracted redox dysregulation and increased the number of viable transfected cells....... Integrated biomembrane integrity and metabolomic analysis provides a rapid approach for mechanistic understanding of multifactorial polycation-mediated cytotoxicity, and could form the basis for combinatorial throughput platforms for improved design and selection of safer polymeric vectors....

  19. Differential contribution of key metabolic substrates and cellular oxygen in HIF signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhdanov, Alexander V., E-mail: a.zhdanov@ucc.ie [School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cavanagh Pharmacy Building, College Road, Cork (Ireland); Waters, Alicia H.C. [School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cavanagh Pharmacy Building, College Road, Cork (Ireland); Golubeva, Anna V. [Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Bioscience Institute, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Papkovsky, Dmitri B. [School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cavanagh Pharmacy Building, College Road, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-01-01

    Changes in availability and utilisation of O{sub 2} and metabolic substrates are common in ischemia and cancer. We examined effects of substrate deprivation on HIF signalling in PC12 cells exposed to different atmospheric O{sub 2}. Upon 2–4 h moderate hypoxia, HIF-α protein levels were dictated by the availability of glutamine and glucose, essential for deep cell deoxygenation and glycolytic ATP flux. Nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α dramatically decreased upon inhibition of glutaminolysis or glutamine deprivation. Elevation of HIF-2α levels was transcription-independent and associated with the activation of Akt and Erk1/2. Upon 2 h anoxia, HIF-2α levels strongly correlated with cellular ATP, produced exclusively via glycolysis. Without glucose, HIF signalling was suppressed, giving way to other regulators of cell adaptation to energy crisis, e.g. AMPK. Consequently, viability of cells deprived of O{sub 2} and glucose decreased upon inhibition of AMPK with dorsomorphin. The capacity of cells to accumulate HIF-2α decreased after 24 h glucose deprivation. This effect, associated with increased AMPKα phosphorylation, was sensitive to dorsomorphin. In chronically hypoxic cells, glutamine played no major role in HIF-2α accumulation, which became mainly glucose-dependent. Overall, the availability of O{sub 2} and metabolic substrates intricately regulates HIF signalling by affecting cell oxygenation, ATP levels and pathways involved in production of HIF-α. - Highlights: • Gln and Glc regulate HIF levels in hypoxic cells by maintaining low O{sub 2} and high ATP. • HIF-α levels under anoxia correlate with cellular ATP and critically depend on Glc. • Gln and Glc modulate activity of Akt, Erk and AMPK, regulating HIF production. • HIF signalling is differentially inhibited by prolonged Glc and Gln deprivation. • Unlike Glc, Gln plays no major role in HIF signalling in chronically hypoxic cells.

  20. Hepatotoxicity and metabolic effects of cellular extract of cyanobacterium Radiocystis fernandoi containing microcystins RR and YR on neotropical fish (Hoplias malabaricus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Marcelo Gustavo; Rossi, Priscila Adriana; Venturini, Francine Perri; Tavares, Driele; Elisabete da Silva Souza, Naiara; Sakuragui, Marise Margareth; Moraes, Gilberto; Terezan, Ana Paula; Fernandes, João Batista; Giani, Alessandra; Fernandes, Marisa Narciso

    2017-05-01

    The toxicological effect of cellular extract of cyanobacterium Radiocystis fernandoi strain R28 containing RR and YR microcystins was analyzed in the fish Hoplias malabaricus with emphasis on the liver structure and energetic metabolism, after short-term exposure. Fish were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with 100 μg of equivalent MC-LR kg(-1) body mass containing in the cellular extract of R. fernandoi strain R28. Twelve and 96 h post-injection, the plasma, liver and white muscle were sampled for biochemical analyses and liver was also sampled for morphological analyses. After i.p. injection, the activity of acid phosphatase (ACP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and direct bilirubin increased in the plasma, while ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) decreased in the liver. Glucose, lactate and pyruvate increased while protein decreased in the plasma; glycogen, pyruvate and lactate decreased in the liver; and glycogen and glucose increased in the muscle. Ammonia increased in the plasma, liver and muscle. The hepatocyte cell shape changed from polyhedral to round after cellular extract injection; there was loss of biliary canaliculus organization, but the biliary duct morphology was conserved in the liver parenchyma. In conclusion, microcystins present in the cellular extract of R. fernandoi strain R28 affect the liver structure of H. malabaricus, but the liver was able to continuously produce energy by adjusting its intermediate metabolism; glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis maintained glucose homeostasis and energy supply.

  1. Monitoring intra-cellular lipid metabolism in macrophages by Raman- and CARS-microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Christian; Bergner, Gero; Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Lorkowski, Stefan; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-04-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role in lipid metabolism in vessel wall tissues. Macrophages can take up lipids by various mechanisms. As phagocytes, macrophages are important for the decomposition of lipid plaques within arterial walls that contribute to arteriosclerosis. Of special interest are uptake dynamics and intra-cellular fate of different individual types of lipids as, for example, fatty acids, triglycerides or free and esterified cholesterol. Here we utilize Raman microscopy to image the metabolism of such lipids and follow subsequent storage or degradation patterns. The combination of optical microscopy with Raman spectroscopy allows visualization at the diffraction limit of the employed laser light and biochemical characterization through the associated spectral information. Relatively long measuring times, due to the weakness of Raman scattering can be overcome by non-linear effects such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). With this contribution we introduce first results to monitor the incorporation of lipid components into individual cells employing Raman and CARS microscopy.

  2. Iron-dependent changes in cellular energy metabolism: influence on citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oexle, H; Gnaiger, E; Weiss, G

    1999-11-10

    Iron modulates the expression of the critical citric acid cycle enzyme aconitase via a translational mechanism involving iron regulatory proteins. Thus, the present study was undertaken to investigate the consequences of iron perturbation on citric acid cycle activity, oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial respiration in the human cell line K-562. In agreement with previous data iron increases the activity of mitochondrial aconitase while it is reduced upon addition of the iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO). Interestingly, iron also positively affects three other citric acid cycle enzymes, namely citrate synthase, isocitric dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase, while DFO decreases the activity of these enzymes. Consequently, iron supplementation results in increased formation of reducing equivalents (NADH) by the citric acid cycle, and thus in increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP formation via oxidative phosphorylation as shown herein. This in turn leads to downregulation of glucose utilization. In contrast, all these metabolic pathways are reduced upon iron depletion, and thus glycolysis and lactate formation are significantly increased in order to compensate for the decrease in ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in the presence of DFO. Our results point to a complex interaction between iron homeostasis, oxygen supply and cellular energy metabolism in human cells.

  3. IN ABSENCE OF THE CELLULAR PRION PROTEIN, ALTERATIONS IN COPPER METABOLISM AND COPPER-DEPENDENT OXIDASE ACTIVITY AFFECT IRON DISTRIBUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Gasperini; Elisa Meneghetti; Giuseppe Legname; Federico Benetti

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defin...

  4. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defin...

  5. A structural and functional homolog supports a general role for frataxin in cellular iron chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenbin; Cowan, J A

    2010-02-01

    Bacillus subtilis YdhG lacks sequence homology, but demonstrates structural and functional similarity to the frataxin family, supporting a general cellular role for frataxin-type proteins in cellular iron homeostasis.

  6. The Metabolic Core and Catalytic Switches Are Fundamental Elements in the Self-Regulation of the Systemic Metabolic Structure of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Perez-Pinilla, Martin B.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Vicente; Veguillas, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Background Experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a metabolic core formed by a set of enzymatic reactions which are always active under all environmental conditions, while the rest of catalytic processes are only intermittently active. The reactions of the metabolic core are essential for biomass formation and to assure optimal metabolic performance. The on-off catalytic reactions and the metabolic core are essential elements of a Systemic Metabolic Structure which seems to be a key feature common to all cellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the functional importance of the metabolic core we have studied different catalytic patterns of a dissipative metabolic network under different external conditions. The emerging biochemical data have been analysed using information-based dynamic tools, such as Pearson's correlation and Transfer Entropy (which measures effective functionality). Our results show that a functional structure of effective connectivity emerges which is dynamical and characterized by significant variations of bio-molecular information flows. Conclusions/Significance We have quantified essential aspects of the metabolic core functionality. The always active enzymatic reactions form a hub –with a high degree of effective connectivity- exhibiting a wide range of functional information values being able to act either as a source or as a sink of bio-molecular causal interactions. Likewise, we have found that the metabolic core is an essential part of an emergent functional structure characterized by catalytic modules and metabolic switches which allow critical transitions in enzymatic activity. Both, the metabolic core and the catalytic switches in which also intermittently-active enzymes are involved seem to be fundamental elements in the self-regulation of the Systemic

  7. Redox Modulation of Cellular Signaling and Metabolism Through Reversible Oxidation of Methionine Sensors in Calcium Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-01-17

    Adaptive responses associated with environmental stressors are critical to cell survival. These involve the modulation of central signaling protein functions through site-specific and enzymatically reversible oxidative modifications of methionines to coordinate cellular metabolism, energy utilization, and calcium signaling. Under conditions when cellular redox and antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, the selective oxidation of critical methionines within selected protein sensors functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, these functional changes within protein sensors take advantage of the helix-breaking character of methionine sulfoxide. Thus, depending on either the ecological niche of the organism or the cellular milieu of different organ systems, cellular metabolism can be fine-tuned to maintain optimal function in the face of variable amounts of collateral oxidative damage. The sensitivity of several calcium regulatory proteins to oxidative modification provides cellular sensors that link oxidative stress to cellular response and recovery. Calmodulin (CaM) is one such critical calcium regulatory protein, which is functionally sensitive to methionine oxidation. Helix destabilization resulting from the oxidation of either Met{sup 144} or Met{sup 145} results in the nonproductive association between CaM and target proteins. The ability of oxidized CaM to stabilize its target proteins in an inhibited state with an affinity similar to that of native (unoxidized) CaM permits this central regulatory protein to function as a cellular rheostat that down-regulates energy metabolism in response to oxidative stress. Likewise, oxidation of a methionine within a critical switch region of the regulatory protein phospholamban is expected to destabilize the phosphorylationdependent helix formation necessary for the release of enzyme inhibition, resulting in a down-regulation of the Ca-ATPase in

  8. Holistic design and implementation of pressure actuated cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramüller, B.; Köke, H.; Hühne, C.

    2015-12-01

    Providing the possibility to develop energy-efficient, lightweight adaptive components, pressure-actuated cellular structures (PACS) are primarily conceived for aeronautics applications. The realization of shape-variable flaps and even airfoils provides the potential to safe weight, increase aerodynamic efficiency and enhance agility. The herein presented holistic design process points out and describes the necessary steps for designing a real-life PACS structure, from the computation of truss geometry to the manufacturing and assembly. The already published methods for the form finding of PACS are adjusted and extended for the exemplary application of a variable-camber wing. The transfer of the form-finding truss model to a cross-sectional design is discussed. The end cap and sealing concept is described together with the implementation of the integral fluid flow. Conceptual limitations due to the manufacturing and assembly processes are discussed. The method’s efficiency is evaluated by finite element method. In order to verify the underlying methods and summarize the presented work a modular real-life demonstrator is experimentally characterized and validates the numerical investigations.

  9. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  10. IAPP modulates cellular autophagy, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix metabolism in human intervertebral disc cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinghuo; Song, Yu; Liu, Wei; Wang, Kun; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuai; Duan, Zhenfeng; Shao, Zengwu; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenic process of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is characterized by imbalance in the extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism. Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells have important roles in maintaining the proper structure and tissue homeostasis of disc ECM. These cells need adequate supply of glucose and oxygen. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) exerts its biological effects by regulating glucose metabolism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of IAPP in degenerated IVD tissue, and IAPP modulation of ECM metabolism in human NP cells, especially the crosstalk mechanism between apoptosis and autophagy in these cells. We found that the expression of IAPP and Calcr-RAMP decreased considerably during IDD progression, along with the decrease in the expression of AG, BG, and Col2A1. Induction of IAPP in NP cells by transfection with pLV-IAPP enhanced the synthesis of aggrecan and Col2A1 and attenuated the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1. Upregulation of IAPP also affected the expression of the catabolic markers—matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 3, 9 and 13 and ADAMTS 4 and 5. Downregulation of IAPP by siRNA inhibited the expression of anabolic genes but increased the expression of catabolic genes and inflammatory factors. The expressions of autophagic and apoptotic markers in NP cells transfected with pLV-IAPP were upregulated, including BECLIN1, ATG5, ATG7, LC3 II/I and Bcl-2, while significantly increase in the expression of Bax and Caspase-3 in NP cells transfected with pLV-siIAPP. Mechanistically, PI3K/AKT-mTOR and p38/JNK MAPK signal pathways were involved. We propose that IAPP might play a pivotal role in the development of IDD, by regulating ECM metabolism and controlling the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy in NP, thus potentially offering a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of IDD.

  11. Variable modulus cellular structures using pneumatic artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontecorvo, Michael E.; Niemiec, Robert J.; Gandhi, Farhan S.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a novel variable modulus cellular structure based on a hexagonal unit cell with pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) inclusions. The cell considered is pin-jointed, loaded in the horizontal direction, with three PAMs (one vertical PAM and two horizontal PAMs) oriented in an "H" configuration between the vertices of the cell. A method for calculation of the hexagonal cell modulus is introduced, as is an expression for the balance of tensile forces between the horizontal and vertical PAMs. An aluminum hexagonal unit cell is fabricated and simulation of the hexagonal cell with PAM inclusions is then compared to experimental measurement of the unit cell modulus in the horizontal direction with all three muscles pressurized to the same value over a pressure range up to 758 kPa. A change in cell modulus by a factor of 1.33 and a corresponding change in cell angle of 0.41° are demonstrated experimentally. A design study via simulation predicts that differential pressurization of the PAMs up to 2068 kPa can change the cell modulus in the horizontal direction by a factor of 6.83 with a change in cell angle of only 2.75°. Both experiment and simulation show that this concept provides a way to decouple the length change of a PAM from the change in modulus to create a structural unit cell whose in-plane modulus in a given direction can be tuned based on the orientation of PAMs within the cell and the pressure supplied to the individual muscles.

  12. Combinatorics of feedback in cellular uptake and metabolism of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-12-26

    We analyze the connection between structure and function for regulatory motifs associated with cellular uptake and usage of small molecules. Based on the boolean logic of the feedback we suggest four classes: the socialist, consumer, fashion, and collector motifs. We find that the socialist motif is good for homeostasis of a useful but potentially poisonous molecule, whereas the consumer motif is optimal for nutrition molecules. Accordingly, examples of these motifs are found in, respectively, the iron homeostasis system in various organisms and in the uptake of sugar molecules in bacteria. The remaining two motifs have no obvious analogs in small molecule regulation, but we illustrate their behavior using analogies to fashion and obesity. These extreme motifs could inspire construction of synthetic systems that exhibit bistable, history-dependent states, and homeostasis of flux (rather than concentration).

  13. Alteration of cellular lipids and lipid metabolism markers in RTL-W1 cells exposed to model endocrine disrupters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Giorgio; Córdoba, Marlon; Navarro, Isabel; Jáuregui, Olga; Porte, Cinta

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates the suitability of the rainbow trout liver cell line (RTL-W1) as an in-vitro model to study the ability of model endocrine disrupters, namely TBT, TPT, 4-NP, BPA and DEHP, to act as metabolic disrupters by altering cellular lipids and markers of lipid metabolism. Among the tested compounds, BPA and DEHP significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAGs), while all the compounds -apart from TPT-, altered membrane lipids - phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and plasmalogen PCs - indicating a strong interaction of the toxicants with cell membranes and cell signaling. RTL-W1 expressed a number of genes involved in lipid metabolism that were modulated by exposure to BPA, TBT and TPT (up-regulation of FATP1 and FAS) and 4-NP and DEHP (down-regulation of FAS and LPL). Multiple and complex modes of action of these chemicals were observed in RTL-W1 cells, both in terms of expression of genes related to lipid metabolism and alteration of cellular lipids. Although further characterization is needed, this might be a useful model for the detection of chemicals leading to steatosis or other diseases associated with lipid metabolism in fish.

  14. Cellular metabolic energy modulation by tangeretin in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a) anthracene-induced breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Periyasamy, Kuppusamy; Sivabalan, Venkatachalam; Baskaran, Kuppusamy; Kasthuri, Kannayiram; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer is the leading cause of death among women worldwide. Chemoprevention and chemotherapy play beneficial roles in reducing the incidence and mortality of cancer. Epidemiological and experimental studies showed that naturally-occurring antioxidants present in the diet may act as anticancer agents. Identifying the abnormalities of cellular energy metabolism facilitates early detection and management of breast cancer. The present study evaluated the effect of tangeretin on ce...

  15. Structure and dynamics of modulated traveling waves in cellular flames

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, A; Riecke, H

    1994-01-01

    We describe spatial and temporal patterns in cylindrical premixed flames in the cellular regime, $Le < 1$, where the Lewis number $Le$ is the ratio of thermal to mass diffusivity of a deficient component of the combustible mixture. A transition from stationary, axisymmetric flames to stationary cellular flames is predicted analytically if $Le$ is decreased below a critical value. We present the results of numerical computations to show that as $Le$ is further decreased traveling waves (TWs) along the flame front arise via an infinite-period bifurcation which breaks the reflection symmetry of the cellular array. Upon further decreasing $Le$ different kinds of periodically modulated traveling waves (MTWs) as well as a branch of quasiperiodically modulated traveling waves (QPMTWs) arise. These transitions are accompanied by the development of different spatial and temporal symmetries including period doublings and period halvings. We also observe the apparently chaotic temporal behavior of a disordered cellul...

  16. Emergence of linguistic-like structures in one-dimensional cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertacchini, Francesca; Bilotta, Eleonora; Caldarola, Fabio; Pantano, Pietro; Bustamante, Leonardo Renteria

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we give a summary of some empirical investigations which show high analogies between Cellular Automata and linguistic structures. In particular we show as coupling regular domains of Cellular Automata we find complex emerging structures similar to combination of words, phonemes and morphemes in natural languages.

  17. Cellular structures using U_q-tilting modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Stroppel, Catharina; Tubbenhauer, Daniel

    We use the theory of Uq-tilting modules to construct cellular bases for centralizer algebras. Our methods are quite general and work for any quantum group Uq attached to a Cartan matrix and include the non semi-simple cases for q being a root of unity and ground fields of positive characteristic...

  18. Glucose metabolism in small subcortical structures in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Hansen, Søren B; Eggers, Carsten;

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from experimental animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) suggests a characteristic pattern of metabolic perturbation in discrete, very small basal ganglia structures. These structures are generally too small to allow valid investigation by conventional positron emission tomography (PET...

  19. Effects of some iridoids from plant origin on arachidonic acid metabolism in cellular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo Benito, P; Díaz Lanza, A M; Silván Sen, A M; De Santos Galindez, J; Fernandez Matellano, L; Sanz Gómez, A; Abad Martínez, M J

    2000-05-01

    Seven iridoid glycosides isolated from different extracts of Scrophularia scorodonia L., namely bartsioside, aucubin, harpagide, harpagoside, 8-acetylharpagide, scorodioside and scropolioside B, had been evaluated for their in vitro anti-inflammatory activity in cellular systems generating COX and LOX metabolites. Structure-activity relationships obtained from in vitro screening results were discussed. Most compounds assayed did not exhibit any significant effect on PGE2- and LTC4-release from calcium ionophore-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages. In the LTC4-assay, only aucubin showed a significant effect, with an IC50 value of 72 microM. Harpagoside and harpagide also inhibited release of LTC4, but neither effect reached statistical significance. The release of PGE2 by mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with calcium ionophore was inhibited by harpagoside and 8-acetylharpagide, but this effect is not statistically significant. However, most iridoids assayed showed a significant effect on TXB2-release from calcium ionophorestimulated human platelets, with inhibition percentages slightly lower than the reference drug ibuprofen. Only harpagide, scorodioside and scropolioside B had no significant effect on TXB2-release. Our results indicate that selective inhibition of the TX-synthase enzyme may be the primary target of action of most of these iridoids, and one of the mechanisms through which they exert their anti-inflammatory effects.

  20. Aluminium-induced excessive ROS causes cellular damage and metabolic shifts in black gram Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowra, Umakanta; Yanase, Emiko; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Aluminium-induced oxidative damage caused by excessive ROS production was evaluated in black gram pulse crop. Black gram plants were treated with different aluminium (Al(3+)) concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μM with pH 4.7) and further the effects of Al(3+) were characterised by means of root growth inhibition, histochemical assay, ROS content analysis, protein carbonylation quantification and (1)H-NMR analysis. The results showed that aluminium induces excessive ROS production which leads to cellular damage, root injury, stunt root growth and other metabolic shifts. In black gram, Al(3+) induces cellular damage at the earliest stage of stress which was characterised from histochemical analysis. From this study, it was observed that prolonged stress can activate certain aluminium detoxification defence mechanism. Probably excessive ROS triggers such defence mechanism in black gram. Al(3+) can induce excessive ROS initially in the root region then transported to other parts of the plant. As much as the Al(3+) concentration increases, the rate of cellular injury and ROS production also increases. But after 72 h of stress, plants showed a lowered ROS level and cellular damage which indicates the upregulation of defensive mechanisms. Metabolic shift analysis also showed that the black gram plant under stress has less metabolic content after 24 h of treatment, but gradually, it was increased after 72 h of treatment. It was assumed that ROS played the most important role as a signalling molecule for aluminium stress in black gram.

  1. Interface Pattern Selection Criterion for Cellular Structures in Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, R.; Tewari, S. N.; Kurtze, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to establish key scientific concepts that govern the selection of cellular and dendritic patterns during the directional solidification of alloys. We shall first address scientific concepts that are crucial in the selection of interface patterns. Next, the results of ground-based experimental studies in the Al-4.0 wt % Cu system will be described. Both experimental studies and theoretical calculations will be presented to establish the need for microgravity experiments.

  2. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments.

  3. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  4. Differential Effects of Hormones on Cellular Metabolism in Keratoconus In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Tina B.; Hjortdal, Jesper; Sejersen, Henrik; Karamichos, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a corneal thinning disease with an onset commonly immediately post-puberty and stabilization by 40 to 50 years of age. The role of hormones in regulating corneal tissue structure in homeostatic and pathological conditions is unknown. Our group recently linked altered hormone levels to KC. Our current study sought to investigate and delineate the effects of exogenous hormones, such as androgen, luteotropin, and estrogen, on corneal stroma bioenergetics. We utilized our established 3D in vitro model to characterize the effects of DHEA, prolactin, 17β-estradiol on insulin-growth factor-1 and -2 (IGF-1, -2) signaling and metabolic function in primary corneal fibroblasts from healthy controls (HCFs) and KC patients (HKCs). Our data showed that exogenous DHEA significantly downregulated IGF-1 and its receptor in both HCFs and HKCs with HKCs showing consistently lower basal pentose phosphate flux. Prolactin caused no significant change in IGF-1 levels and an increase in IGF-2 in HKCs correlating with an increase in ATP and NADH levels. 17β-estradiol led to a significant upregulation in pentose phosphate flux and glycolytic intermediates in HCFs. Our results identified hormone-specific responses regulated in HKCs compared to HCFs revealing a novel role for hormones on bioenergetics in KC. PMID:28211546

  5. Interactions between vertebrate hemoglobins and red cell proteins: Possible roles in regulating cellular metabolism and rheology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a vital role in vertebrate metabolism. Tissue O2 delivery depends on their O2 transporting properties and rheology, an integral determinant of tissue perfusion. The mechanical characteristics and key metabolic characteristics of RBCs (such as glycolysis rate, pentose...

  6. Effects of in vitro Brevetoxin Exposure on Apoptosis and Cellular Metabolism in a Leukemic T Cell Line (Jurkat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Sleasman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce red tide toxins, or brevetoxins. Significant health effects associated with red tide toxin exposure have been reported in sea life and in humans, with brevetoxins documented within immune cells from many species. The objective of this research was to investigate potential immunotoxic effects of brevetoxins using a leukemic T cell line (Jurkat as an in vitro model system. Viability, cell proliferation, and apoptosis assays were conducted using brevetoxin congeners PbTx-2, PbTx-3, and PbTx-6. The effects of in vitro brevetoxin exposure on cell viability and cellular metabolism or proliferation were determined using trypan blue and MTT (1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-3,5- diphenylformazan, respectively. Using MTT, cellular metabolic activity was decreased in Jurkat cells exposed to 5 - 10 μg/ml PbTx-2 or PbTx-6. After 3 h, no significant effects on cell viability were observed with any toxin congener in concentrations up to 10 μg/ml. Viability decreased dramatically after 24 h in cells treated with PbTx-2 or -6. Apoptosis, as measured by caspase-3 activity, was significantly increased in cells exposed to PbTx-2 or PbTx-6. In summary, brevetoxin congeners varied in effects on Jurkat cells, with PbTx-2 and PbTx-6 eliciting greater cellular effects compared to PbTx-3.

  7. Community structure, cellular rRNA content, and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in marine Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravenschlag, K.; Sahm, K.; Knoblauch, C.;

    2000-01-01

    The community structure of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) of a marine Arctic sediment (Smeerenburg-fjorden, Svalbard) a-as characterized by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and rRNA slot blot hybridization by using group- and genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes...... that FISH and rRNA slot blot hybridization gave comparable results. Furthermore, a combination of the two methods allowed us to calculate specific cellular rRNA contents with respect to localization in the sediment profile. The rRNA contents of Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cells were highest in the first 5...... mm of the sediment (0.9 and 1.4 fg, respectively) and decreased steeply with depth, indicating that maximal metabolic activity occurred close to the surface, Based on SRB cell numbers, cellular sulfate reduction rates were calculated. The rates were highest in the surface layer (0.14 fmol cell(-1...

  8. Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Toxic Metabolic Perturbations that Lead to Cellular Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenky, Peter; Ye, Jonathan D; Porter, Caroline B M; Cohen, Nadia R; Lobritz, Michael A; Ferrante, Thomas; Jain, Saloni; Korry, Benjamin J; Schwarz, Eric G; Walker, Graham C; Collins, James J

    2015-11-03

    Understanding how antibiotics impact bacterial metabolism may provide insight into their mechanisms of action and could lead to enhanced therapeutic methodologies. Here, we profiled the metabolome of Escherichia coli after treatment with three different classes of bactericidal antibiotics (?-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones). These treatments induced a similar set of metabolic changes after 30 min that then diverged into more distinct profiles at later time points. The most striking changes corresponded to elevated concentrations of central carbon metabolites, active breakdown of the nucleotide pool, reduced lipid levels, and evidence of an elevated redox state. We examined potential end-target consequences of these metabolic perturbations and found that antibiotic-treated cells exhibited cytotoxic changes indicative of oxidative stress, including higher levels of protein carbonylation, malondialdehyde adducts, nucleotide oxidation, and double-strand DNA breaks. This work shows that bactericidal antibiotics induce a complex set of metabolic changes that are correlated with the buildup of toxic metabolic by-products.

  9. "Parking-garage" structures in nuclear astrophysics and cellular biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, D. K.; Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.; Huber, Greg; Schneider, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    A striking shape was recently observed for the endoplasmic reticulum, a cellular organelle consisting of stacked sheets connected by helical ramps [Terasaki et al., Cell 154, 285 (2013), 10.1016/j.cell.2013.06.031]. This shape is interesting both for its biological function, to synthesize proteins using an increased surface area for ribosome factories, and its geometric properties that may be insensitive to details of the microscopic interactions. In the present work, we find very similar shapes in our molecular dynamics simulations of the nuclear pasta phases of dense nuclear matter that are expected deep in the crust of neutron stars. There are dramatic differences between nuclear pasta and terrestrial cell biology. Nuclear pasta is 14 orders of magnitude denser than the aqueous environs of the cell nucleus and involves strong interactions between protons and neutrons, while cellular-scale biology is dominated by the entropy of water and complex assemblies of biomolecules. Nonetheless, the very similar geometry suggests both systems may have similar coarse-grained dynamics and that the shapes are indeed determined by geometrical considerations, independent of microscopic details. Many of our simulations self-assemble into flat sheets connected by helical ramps. These ramps may impact the thermal and electrical conductivities, viscosity, shear modulus, and breaking strain of neutron star crust. The interaction we use, with Coulomb frustration, may provide a simple model system that reproduces many biologically important shapes.

  10. Adaptive cellular structures and devices with internal features for enhanced structural performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontecorvo, Michael Eugene

    This dissertation aims to develop a family of cellular and repeatable devices that exhibit a variety of force-displacement behaviors. It is envisioned that these cellular structures might be used either as stand-alone elements, or combined and repeated to create multiple types of structures (i.e. buildings, ship hulls, vehicle subfloors, etc.) with the ability to passively or actively perform multiple functions (harmonic energy dissipation, impact mitigation, modulus change) over a range of loading types, amplitudes, and frequencies. To accomplish this goal, this work combines repeatable structural frameworks, such as that provided by a hexagonal cellular structure, with internal structural elements such as springs, viscous dampers, buckling plates, bi-stable von Mises trusses (VMTs), and pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs). The repeatable framework serves to position damping and load carrying elements throughout the structure, and the configuration of the internal elements allow each cell to be tuned to exhibit a desired force-displacement response. Therefore, gradient structures or structures with variable load paths can be created for an optimal global response to a range of loads. This dissertation focuses on the development of cellular structures for three functions: combined load-carrying capability with harmonic energy dissipation, impact mitigation, and cell modulus variation. One or more conceptual designs are presented for devices that can perform each of these functions, and both experimental measurements and simulations are used to gain a fundamental understanding of each device. Chapter 2 begins with a presentation of a VMT model that is the basis for many of the elements. The equations of motion for the VMT are derived and the static and dynamic behavior of the VMT are discussed in detail. Next, two metrics for the energy dissipation of the VMT - hysteresis loop area and loss factor - are presented. The responses of the VMT to harmonic displacement

  11. Multiple Applications of Alamar Blue as an Indicator of Metabolic Function and Cellular Health in Cell Viability Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sephra N. Rampersad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of the adverse effects of test compounds on living systems, detection of toxic thresholds, and expansion of experimental data sets to include multiple toxicity end-point analysis are required for any robust screening regime. Alamar Blue is an important redox indicator that is used to evaluate metabolic function and cellular health. The Alamar Blue bioassay has been utilized over the past 50 years to assess cell viability and cytotoxicity in a range of biological and environmental systems and in a number of cell types including bacteria, yeast, fungi, protozoa and cultured mammalian and piscine cells. It offers several advantages over other metabolic indicators and other cytotoxicity assays. However, as with any bioassay, suitability must be determined for each application and cell model. This review seeks to highlight many of the important considerations involved in assay use and design in addition to the potential pitfalls.

  12. Cellular metabolic, stress, and histological response on exposure to acute toxicity of endosulfan in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Sharma, Rupam; Tripathi, Gayatri; Kumar, Kundan; Dalvi, Rishikesh S; Krishna, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Endosulfan is one of the most hazardous organochlorines pesticides responsible for environmental pollution, as it is very persistent and shows bio-magnification. This study evaluated the impact of acute endosulfan toxicity on metabolic enzymes, lysozyme activities, heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 expression, and histopathology in Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Among the indicators that were induced in dose dependent manner were the enzymes of amino acid metabolism (serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase), carbohydrate metabolism (serum lactate dehydrogenase), pentose phosphate pathway (Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) as well as lysozyme and Hsp70 in liver and gill, while liver and gill Isocitrate dehydrogenase (TCA cycle enzyme) and marker of general energetics (Total adenosine triphosphatase) were inhibited. Histopathological alterations in gill were clubbing of secondary gill lamellae, marked hyperplasia, complete loss of secondary lamellae and atrophy of primary gill filaments. Whereas in liver, swollen hepatocyte, and degeneration with loss of cellular boundaries were distinctly noticed. Overall results clearly demonstrated the unbalanced metabolism and damage of the vital organs like liver and gill in Tilapia due to acute endosulfan exposure.

  13. Three-Dimensional Cellular Structures Enhanced By Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, Michael V.; Krause, David L.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Baker, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    This research effort explored lightweight structural concepts married with advanced smart materials to achieve a wide variety of benefits in airframe and engine components. Lattice block structures were cast from an aerospace structural titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V and a NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA), and preliminary properties have been measured. A finite element-based modeling approach that can rapidly and accurately capture the deformation response of lattice architectures was developed. The Ti-6-4 and SMA material behavior was calibrated via experimental tests of ligaments machined from the lattice. Benchmark testing of complete lattice structures verified the main aspects of the model as well as demonstrated the advantages of the lattice structure. Shape memory behavior of a sample machined from a lattice block was also demonstrated.

  14. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  15. Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Toxic Metabolic Perturbations that Lead to Cellular Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Belenky

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how antibiotics impact bacterial metabolism may provide insight into their mechanisms of action and could lead to enhanced therapeutic methodologies. Here, we profiled the metabolome of Escherichia coli after treatment with three different classes of bactericidal antibiotics (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones. These treatments induced a similar set of metabolic changes after 30 min that then diverged into more distinct profiles at later time points. The most striking changes corresponded to elevated concentrations of central carbon metabolites, active breakdown of the nucleotide pool, reduced lipid levels, and evidence of an elevated redox state. We examined potential end-target consequences of these metabolic perturbations and found that antibiotic-treated cells exhibited cytotoxic changes indicative of oxidative stress, including higher levels of protein carbonylation, malondialdehyde adducts, nucleotide oxidation, and double-strand DNA breaks. This work shows that bactericidal antibiotics induce a complex set of metabolic changes that are correlated with the buildup of toxic metabolic by-products.

  16. Identification of Circular RNAs From the Parental Genes Involved in Multiple Aspects of Cellular Metabolism in Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz eDarbani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RNA circularization made by head-to-tail back-splicing events is involved in the regulation of gene expression from transcriptional to post-translational levels. By exploiting RNA-Seq data and down-stream analysis, we shed light on the importance of circular RNAs in plants. The results introduce circular RNAs as novel interactors in the regulation of gene expression in plants and imply the comprehensiveness of this regulatory pathway by identifying circular RNAs for a diverse set of genes. These genes are involved in several aspects of cellular metabolism as hormonal signaling, intracellular protein sorting, carbohydrate metabolism and cell-wall biogenesis, respiration, amino acid biosynthesis, transcription and translation, and protein ubiquitination. Additionally, these parental loci of circular RNAs, from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, encode for different transcript classes including protein coding transcripts, microRNA, rRNA, and long non-coding/microprotein coding RNAs. The results shed light on the mitochondrial exonic circular RNAs and imply the importance of circular RNAs for regulation of mitochondrial genes. Importantly, we introduce circular RNAs in barley and elucidate their cellular-level alterations across tissues and in response to micronutrients iron and zinc. In further support of circular RNAs' functional roles in plants, we report several cases where fluctuations of circRNAs do not correlate with the levels of their parental-loci encoded linear transcripts.Keywords: circular RNAs, coding and non-coding transcripts, leaves, seeds, transfer cells, micronutrients, mitochondria

  17. Structural ceramic coatings in composite microtruss cellular materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bele, E.; Bouwhuis, B.A.; Codd, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hibbard, G.D., E-mail: glenn.hibbard@utoronto.ca [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: The compressive strength increase per unit sleeve thickness of Al cores reinforced with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sleeves is lower than the corresponding strength increase when the same cores are reinforced with nanocrystalline Ni (n-Ni) sleeves (left). However, because anodizing is a transformative surface treatment, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was able to achieve this performance increase with little overall weight penalty (right). Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} A new type of metal/ceramic microtruss cellular composite has been created. {yields} Reinforcing sleeves of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were deposited on low density Al microtruss cores. {yields} Significant compressive strength increases were seen at virtually no weight penalty. {yields} Failure mechanisms were studied by electron microscopy and finite element analysis. {yields} Buckling, sleeve wrinkling, and coating fracture dictated the compressive strength. - Abstract: In the present study, anodizing was used to produce Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings in a conventional 3003 aluminum alloy microtruss core; a 38.5 {mu}m thick anodic coating provided a 143% increase in compressive strength. Finite-element analyses were used to illustrate the dependence of the compressive strength and failure mechanism on the thickness of the anodic coating. At low thicknesses the microtruss strength is dictated by global bucking of the internal struts. However, at higher thicknesses the compressive strength is controlled by coating fracture and local deformation in the hinge region of the struts. Regardless of the failure mechanism, the compressive strength of the composite microtruss increased with increasing anodic coating thickness, with very little corresponding weight penalty.

  18. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways--structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Pär

    2010-05-21

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging.

  19. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways-Structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welin, Martin [Structural Genomics Consortium, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Nordlund, Paer, E-mail: Par.Nordlund@ki.se [Structural Genomics Consortium, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Division of Biophysics, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-05-21

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging.

  20. The Molecular and Cellular Effect of Homocysteine Metabolism Imbalance on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrieta Škovierová

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is a sulfur-containing non-proteinogenic amino acid derived in methionine metabolism. The increased level of Hcy in plasma, hyperhomocysteinemia, is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardio and cerebrovascular diseases. However, it is still not clear if Hcy is a marker or a causative agent of diseases. More and more research data suggest that Hcy is an important indicator for overall health status. This review represents the current understanding of molecular mechanism of Hcy metabolism and its link to hyperhomocysteinemia-related pathologies in humans. The aberrant Hcy metabolism could lead to the redox imbalance and oxidative stress resulting in elevated protein, nucleic acid and carbohydrate oxidation and lipoperoxidation, products known to be involved in cytotoxicity. Additionally, we examine the role of Hcy in thiolation of proteins, which results in their molecular and functional modifications. We also highlight the relationship between the imbalance in Hcy metabolism and pathogenesis of diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurological and psychiatric disorders, chronic kidney disease, bone tissue damages, gastrointestinal disorders, cancer, and congenital defects.

  1. Silencing of nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase impairs cellular redox homeostasis and energy metabolism in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Cadenas, Enrique

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondrial NADPH generation is largely dependent on the inner-membrane nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT), which catalyzes the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH utilizing the proton gradient as the driving force and NADH as the electron donor. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of NNT in PC12 cells results in decreased cellular NADPH levels, altered redox status of the cell in terms of decreased GSH/GSSG ratios and increased H(2)O(2) levels, thus leading to an increased redox potential (a more oxidized redox state). NNT knockdown results in a decrease of oxidative phosphorylation while anaerobic glycolysis levels remain unchanged. Decreased oxidative phosphorylation was associated with a) inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) activity; b) reduction of NADH availability, c) decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, and d) decrease of ATP levels. Moreover, the alteration of redox status actually precedes the impairment of mitochondrial bioenergetics. A possible mechanism could be that the activation of the redox-sensitive c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and its translocation to the mitochondrion leads to the inhibition of PDH (upon phosphorylation) and induction of intrinsic apoptosis, resulting in decreased cell viability. This study supports the notion that oxidized cellular redox state and decline in cellular bioenergetics - as a consequence of NNT knockdown - cannot be viewed as independent events, but rather as an interdependent relationship coordinated by the mitochondrial energy-redox axis. Disruption of electron flux from fuel substrates to redox components due to NNT suppression induces not only mitochondrial dysfunction but also cellular disorders through redox-sensitive signaling.

  2. Topology optimization of adaptive fluid-actuated cellular structures with arbitrary polygonal motor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jun; Tang, Liang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Hongwu

    2016-05-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the fast and efficient design method for plant bioinspired fluidic cellular materials and structures composed of polygonal motor cells. Here we developed a novel structural optimization method with arbitrary polygonal coarse-grid elements based on multiscale finite element frameworks. The fluidic cellular structures are meshed with irregular polygonal coarse-grid elements according to their natural size and the shape of the imbedded motor cells. The multiscale base functions of solid displacement and hydraulic pressure are then constructed to bring the small-scale information of the irregular motor cells to the large-scale simulations on the polygonal coarse-grid elements. On this basis, a new topology optimization method based on the resulting polygonal coarse-grid elements is proposed to determine the optimal distributions or number of motor cells in the smart cellular structures. Three types of optimization problems are solved according to the usages of the fluidic cellular structures. Firstly, the proposed optimization method is utilized to minimize the system compliance of the load-bearing fluidic cellular structures. Second, the method is further extended to design biomimetic compliant actuators of the fluidic cellular materials due to the fact that non-uniform volume expansions of fluid in the cells can induce elastic action. Third, the optimization problem focuses on the weight minimization of the cellular structure under the constraints for the compliance of the whole system. Several representative examples are investigated to validate the effectiveness of the proposed polygon-based topology optimization method of the smart materials.

  3. Structural Basis of Cargo Recognition by Unconventional Myosins in Cellular Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianchao; Lu, Qing; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-08-01

    Unconventional myosins are a superfamily of actin-based molecular motors playing diverse roles including cellular trafficking, mechanical supports, force sensing and transmission, etc. The variable neck and tail domains of unconventional myosins function to bind to specific cargoes including proteins and lipid vesicles and thus are largely responsible for the diverse cellular functions of myosins in vivo. In addition, the tail regions, together with their cognate cargoes, can regulate activities of the motor heads. This review outlines the advances made in recent years on cargo recognition and cargo binding-induced regulation of the activity of several unconventional myosins including myosin-I, V, VI and X in cellular trafficking. We approach this topic by describing a series of high-resolution structures of the neck and tail domains of these unconventional myosins either alone or in complex with their specific cargoes, and by discussing potential implications of these structural studies on cellular trafficking of these myosin motors.

  4. The complex and important cellular and metabolic functions of saturated fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Legrand, Philippe; Rioux, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes recent findings on the metabolism and biological functions of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Some of these findings show that SFA may have important and specific roles in the cells. Elucidated biochemical mechanisms like protein acylation (N-myristoylation, S-palmitoylation) and regulation of gene transcription are presented. In terms of physiology, SFA are involved for instance in lipogenesis, fat deposition, polyunsaturated fatty acids bioavailability and apoptosis. The...

  5. Three-dimensional detonation cellular structures in rectangular ducts using an improved CESE scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Shen, Hua; Liu, Kai-Xin; Chen, Pu; Zhang, De-Liang

    2016-11-01

    The three-dimensional premixed H2-O2 detonation propagation in rectangular ducts is simulated using an in-house parallel detonation code based on the second-order space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) scheme. The simulation reproduces three typical cellular structures by setting appropriate cross-sectional size and initial perturbation in square tubes. As the cross-sectional size decreases, critical cellular structures transforming the rectangular or diagonal mode into the spinning mode are obtained and discussed in the perspective of phase variation as well as decreasing of triple point lines. Furthermore, multiple cellular structures are observed through examples with typical aspect ratios. Utilizing the visualization of detailed three-dimensional structures, their formation mechanism is further analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10732010 and 10972010).

  6. Three-dimensional detonation cellular structures in rectangular ducts using an improved CESE scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Yang

    2016-11-01

    The three-dimensional premixed H2-O2 detonation propagation in rectangular ducts is simulated using an in-house parallel detonation code based on the second-order space–time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) scheme. The simulation reproduces three typical cellular structures by setting appropriate cross-sectional size and initial perturbation in square tubes. As the cross-sectional size decreases, critical cellular structures transforming the rectangular or diagonal mode into the spinning mode are obtained and discussed in the perspective of phase variation as well as decreasing of triple point lines. Furthermore, multiple cellular structures are observed through examples with typical aspect ratios. Utilizing the visualization of detailed three-dimensional structures, their formation mechanism is further analyzed.

  7. Strength analysis and modeling of cellular lattice structures manufactured using selective laser melting for tooling applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahshid, Rasoul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Loft Højbjerre, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is rapidly developing and gaining popularity for direct metal fabrication systems like selective laser melting (SLM). The technology has shown significant improvement for high-quality fabrication of lightweight design-efficient structures such as conformal cooling channels...... in injection molding tools and lattice structures. This research examines the effect of cellular lattice structures on the strength of workpieces additively manufactured from ultra high-strength steel powder. Two commercial SLM machines are used to fabricate cellular samples based on four architectures— solid...

  8. Thermal stability of the cellular structure of an austenitic alloy after selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaleeva, K. O.; Tsvetkova, E. V.; Balakirev, E. V.; Yadroitsev, I. A.; Smurov, I. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The thermal stability of the cellular structure of an austenitic Fe-17% Cr-12% Ni-2% Mo-1% Mn-0.7% Si-0.02% C alloy produced by selective laser melting in the temperature range 20-1200°C is investigated. Metallographic analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy show that structural changes in the alloy begin at 600-700°C and are fully completed at ~1150°C. Differential scanning calorimetry of the alloy with a cellular structure reveals three exothermic processes occurring upon annealing within the temperature ranges 450-650, 800-1000, and 1050-1200°C.

  9. Analysis of information gain and Kolmogorov complexity for structural evaluation of cellular automata configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri Javid, Mohammad Ali; Blackwell, Tim; Zimmer, Robert; Majid al-Rifaie, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Shannon entropy fails to discriminate structurally different patterns in two-dimensional images. We have adapted information gain measure and Kolmogorov complexity to overcome the shortcomings of entropy as a measure of image structure. The measures are customised to robustly quantify the complexity of images resulting from multi-state cellular automata (CA). Experiments with a two-dimensional multi-state cellular automaton demonstrate that these measures are able to predict some of the structural characteristics, symmetry and orientation of CA generated patterns.

  10. Non-heme induction of heme oxygenase-1 does not alter cellular iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftel, Alex D; Kim, Sangwon F; Ponka, Prem

    2007-04-06

    The catabolism of heme is carried out by members of the heme oxygenase (HO) family. The products of heme catabolism by HO-1 are ferrous iron, biliverdin (subsequently converted to bilirubin), and carbon monoxide. In addition to its function in the recycling of hemoglobin iron, this microsomal enzyme has been shown to protect cells in various stress models. Implicit in the reports of HO-1 cytoprotection to date are its effects on the cellular handling of heme/iron. However, the limited amount of uncommitted heme in non-erythroid cells brings to question the source of substrate for this enzyme in non-hemolytic circumstances. In the present study, HO-1 was induced by either sodium arsenite (reactive oxygen species producer) or hemin or overexpressed in the murine macrophage-like cell line, RAW 264.7. Both of the inducers elicited an increase in active HO-1; however, only hemin exposure caused an increase in the synthesis rate of the iron storage protein, ferritin. This effect of hemin was the direct result of the liberation of iron from heme by HO. Cells stably overexpressing HO-1, although protected from oxidative stress, did not display elevated basal ferritin synthesis. However, these cells did exhibit an increase in ferritin synthesis, compared with untransfected controls, in response to hemin treatment, suggesting that heme levels, and not HO-1, limit cellular heme catabolism. Our results suggest that the protection of cells from oxidative insult afforded by HO-1 is not due to the catabolism of significant amounts of cellular heme as thought previously.

  11. Structural Systems Biology Evaluation of Metabolic Thermotolerance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Roger L.; Andrews, Kathleen; Kim, Donghyuk

    2013-01-01

    Improve the System A "systems biology" approach may clarify, for example, how particular proteins determine sensitivity of bacteria to extremes of temperature. Chang et al. (p. 1220) integrated information on protein structure with a model of metabolism, thus associating the protein structure of ...

  12. Tribological behavior of Ti6Al4V cellular structures produced by Selective Laser Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomeu, F; Sampaio, M; Carvalho, O; Pinto, E; Alves, N; Gomes, J R; Silva, F S; Miranda, G

    2017-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies enable the fabrication of innovative structures with complex geometries not easily manufactured by traditional processes. Regarding metallic cellular structures with tailored/customized mechanical and wear performance aiming to biomedical applications, Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a remarkable solution for their production. Focusing on prosthesis and implants, in addition to a suitable Young's modulus it is important to assess the friction response and wear resistance of these cellular structures in a natural environment. In this sense, five cellular Ti6Al4V structures with different open-cell sizes (100-500µm) were designed and produced by SLM. These structures were tribologicaly tested against alumina using a reciprocating sliding ball-on-plate tribometer. Samples were submerged in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) fluid at 37°C, in order to mimic in some extent the human body environment. The results showed that friction and wear performance of Ti6Al4V cellular structures is influenced by the structure open-cell size. The higher wear resistance was obtained for structures with 100µm designed open-cell size due to the higher apparent area of contact to support tribological loading.

  13. Phase-field simulation of formation of cellular dendrites and fine cellular structures at high growth velocities during directional solidification of Ti56Al44 alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-zhong; GUO Jing-jie; SU Yan-qing; WU Shi-ping; FU Heng-zhi

    2005-01-01

    A phase-field model whose free energy of the solidification system derived from the Calphad thermodynamic modeling of phase diagram was used to simulate formation of cellular dendrites and fine cellular structures of Ti56Al44 alloy during directional solidification at high growth velocities. The liquid-solid phase transition of L→β was chosen. The dynamics of breakdown of initially planar interfaces into cellular dendrites and fine cellular structures were shown firstly at two growth velocities. Then the unidirectional free growths of two initial nucleations evolving to fine cellular dendrites were investigated. The tip splitting phenomenon is observed and the negative temperature gradient in the liquid represents its supercooling directional solidification. The simulation results show the realistic evolution of interfaces and microstructures and they agree with experimental one.

  14. Flux balance analysis of plant metabolism: the effect of biomass composition and model structure on model predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili eYuan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biomass composition represented in constraint-based metabolic models is a key component for predicting cellular metabolism using flux balance analysis (FBA. Despite major advances in analytical technologies, it is often challenging to obtain a detailed composition of all major biomass components experimentally. Studies examining the influence of the biomass composition on the predictions of metabolic models have so far mostly been done on models of microorganisms. Little is known about the impact of varying biomass composition on flux prediction in FBA models of plants, whose metabolism is very versatile and complex because of the presence of multiple subcellular compartments. Also, the published metabolic models of plants differ in size and complexity. In this study, we examined the sensitivity of the predicted fluxes of plant metabolic models to biomass composition and model structure. These questions were addressed by evaluating the sensitivity of predictions of growth rates and central carbon metabolic fluxes to varying biomass compositions in three different genome-/large-scale metabolic models of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results showed that fluxes through the central carbon metabolism were robust to changes in biomass composition. Nevertheless, comparisons between the predictions from three models using identical modelling constraints and objective function showed that model predictions were sensitive to the structure of the models, highlighting large discrepancies between the published models.

  15. Enzymes of yeast polyphosphate metabolism: structure, enzymology and biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimaitė, Rūta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is found in all living organisms. The known polyP functions in eukaryotes range from osmoregulation and virulence in parasitic protozoa to modulating blood coagulation, inflammation, bone mineralization and cellular signalling in mammals. However mechanisms of regulation and even the identity of involved proteins in many cases remain obscure. Most of the insights obtained so far stem from studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we provide a short overview of the properties and functions of known yeast polyP metabolism enzymes and discuss future directions for polyP research.

  16. Multi-cellular 3D human primary liver cell culture elevates metabolic activity under fluidic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Mandy B; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Wang, Ying I; Miller, Paula; Llamas-Vidales, Jose Ricardo; Naughton, Brian A; Applegate, Dawn R; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-05-21

    We have developed a low-cost liver cell culture device that creates fluidic flow over a 3D primary liver cell culture that consists of multiple liver cell types, including hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (fibroblasts, stellate cells, and Kupffer cells). We tested the performance of the cell culture under fluidic flow for 14 days, finding that hepatocytes produced albumin and urea at elevated levels compared to static cultures. Hepatocytes also responded with induction of P450 (CYP1A1 and CYP3A4) enzyme activity when challenged with P450 inducers, although we did not find significant differences between static and fluidic cultures. Non-parenchymal cells were similarly responsive, producing interleukin 8 (IL-8) when challenged with 10 μM bacterial lipoprotein (LPS). To create the fluidic flow in an inexpensive manner, we used a rocking platform that tilts the cell culture devices at angles between ±12°, resulting in a periodically changing hydrostatic pressure drop between reservoirs and the accompanying periodically changing fluidic flow (average flow rate of 650 μL min(-1), and a maximum shear stress of 0.64 dyne cm(-2)). The increase in metabolic activity is consistent with the hypothesis that, similar to unidirectional fluidic flow, primary liver cell cultures increase their metabolic activity in response to fluidic flow periodically changes direction. Since fluidic flow that changes direction periodically drastically changes the behavior of other cells types that are shear sensitive, our findings support the theory that the increase in hepatic metabolic activity associated with fluidic flow is either activated by mechanisms other than shear sensing (for example increased opportunities for gas and metabolite exchange), or that it follows a shear sensing mechanism that does not depend on the direction of shear. Our mode of device operation allows us to evaluate drugs under fluidic cell culture conditions and at low device manufacturing and operation

  17. The complex and important cellular and metabolic functions of saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Philippe; Rioux, Vincent

    2010-10-01

    This review summarizes recent findings on the metabolism and biological functions of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Some of these findings show that SFA may have important and specific roles in the cells. Elucidated biochemical mechanisms like protein acylation (N-myristoylation, S-palmitoylation) and regulation of gene transcription are presented. In terms of physiology, SFA are involved for instance in lipogenesis, fat deposition, polyunsaturated fatty acids bioavailability and apoptosis. The variety of their functions demonstrates that SFA should no longer be considered as a single group.

  18. Anticancer Properties of PPARα-Effects on Cellular Metabolism and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Grabacka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs have lately attracted much attention as therapeutic targets. Previously, PPAR ligands were associated with the treatment of diabetes, hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular diseases, as they modulate the expression of genes regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Recently, PPAR ligands have been also considered as potential anticancer agents, with relatively low systemic toxicity. The emerging evidence for antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiinflammatory and potential antimetastatic properties of PPARα ligands prompted us to discuss possible roles of PPARα in tumor suppression. PPARα activation can target cancer cells energy balance by blocking fatty acid synthesis and by promoting fatty acid β-oxidation. In the state of limited nutrient availability, frequently presents in the tumor microenvironment, PPARα cooperates with AMP-dependent protein kinase in: (i repressing oncogenic Akt activity, (ii inhibiting cell proliferation, and (iii forcing glycolysis-dependent cancer cells into “metabolic catastrophe.” Other potential anticancer effects of PPARα include suppression of inflammation, and upregulation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs, which attenuates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and cell proliferation. In conclusion, there are strong premises that the low-toxic and well-tolerated PPAR ligands should be considered as new therapeutic agents to fight disseminating cancer, which represents the major challenge for modern medicine and basic research.

  19. Anticancer Properties of PPARalpha-Effects on Cellular Metabolism and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabacka, Maja; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have lately attracted much attention as therapeutic targets. Previously, PPAR ligands were associated with the treatment of diabetes, hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular diseases, as they modulate the expression of genes regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Recently, PPAR ligands have been also considered as potential anticancer agents, with relatively low systemic toxicity. The emerging evidence for antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiinflammatory and potential antimetastatic properties of PPARalpha ligands prompted us to discuss possible roles of PPARalpha in tumor suppression. PPARalpha activation can target cancer cells energy balance by blocking fatty acid synthesis and by promoting fatty acid beta-oxidation. In the state of limited nutrient availability, frequently presents in the tumor microenvironment, PPARalpha cooperates with AMP-dependent protein kinase in: (i) repressing oncogenic Akt activity, (ii) inhibiting cell proliferation, and (iii) forcing glycolysis-dependent cancer cells into "metabolic catastrophe." Other potential anticancer effects of PPARalpha include suppression of inflammation, and upregulation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which attenuates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and cell proliferation. In conclusion, there are strong premises that the low-toxic and well-tolerated PPAR ligands should be considered as new therapeutic agents to fight disseminating cancer, which represents the major challenge for modern medicine and basic research.

  20. Temporal and fluoride control of secondary metabolism regulates cellular organofluorine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark C; Wen, Miao; Weeks, Amy M; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2012-09-21

    Elucidating mechanisms of natural organofluorine biosynthesis is essential for a basic understanding of fluorine biochemistry in living systems as well as for expanding biological methods for fluorine incorporation into small molecules of interest. To meet this goal we have combined massively parallel sequencing technologies, genetic knockout, and in vitro biochemical approaches to investigate the fluoride response of the only known genetic host of an organofluorine-producing pathway, Streptomyces cattleya. Interestingly, we have discovered that the major mode of S. cattleya's resistance to the fluorinated toxin it produces, fluoroacetate, may be due to temporal control of production rather than the ability of the host's metabolic machinery to discriminate between fluorinated and non-fluorinated molecules. Indeed, neither the acetate kinase/phosphotransacetylase acetate assimilation pathway nor the TCA cycle enzymes (citrate synthase and aconitase) exclude fluorinated substrates based on in vitro biochemical characterization. Furthermore, disruption of the fluoroacetate resistance gene encoding a fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase (FlK) does not appear to lead to an observable growth defect related to organofluorine production. By showing that a switch in central metabolism can mediate and control molecular fluorine incorporation, our findings reveal a new potential strategy toward diversifying simple fluorinated building blocks into more complex products.

  1. Measuring metabolism and biophysical flux in the tissue, cellular and sub-cellular domains: recent developments in self-referencing amperometry for physiological sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, D Marshall

    2007-02-15

    Ultimately, advances in genomics, proteomics and metabolomics will be realized by combining these approaches with biophysical sensors for understanding the functional and structural (physiological) aspects of sub-cellular systems (cytomics). Therefore, the emergence of the new fields of cytomics and physiomics will require new technologies to probe the functional realm of living cells. While amperometric sensors have been used, their sensitivity and reliability are significantly improved through the development of new strategies and data acquisition systems for the operation of the sensors. This includes the application of the principles of the vibrating or self-referencing microsensor to the operation of amperometric sensors. The development of self-referencing amperometry (SRA) is significant because it effectively converts static concentration sensors into dynamic biophysical sensors that directly monitor physiological flux. SRA has been developed for analytes such as O2, NO, H2O2 and ascorbate. These sensors have been validated against non-biological microscopic flux sources that were theoretically modeled, before being applied to biological research. This new sensor technology has been shown, through research in a wide variety of biological and biomedical research projects, to be an important new tool in the arsenal of the cell biologist. SRA technology has been adapted through SRA-H2O2 and SRA-NADH sensors, for electrochemically coupled enzyme based self-referencing biosensors (SRB) for glucose, glutamate and ethanol. These developments in self-referencing sensor technologies offer great promise in extending electroanalytical chemistry and biosensor technologies from the micro to the nanoscale where researchers can study physiology at the sub-cellular and organellar levels.

  2. Alterations in cellular energy metabolism associated with the antiproliferative effects of the ATM inhibitor KU-55933 and with metformin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahvash Zakikhani

    Full Text Available KU-55933 is a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of the protein encoded by Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, an important tumor suppressor gene with key roles in DNA repair. Unexpectedly for an inhibitor of a tumor suppressor gene, KU-55933 reduces proliferation. In view of prior preliminary evidence suggesting defective mitochondrial function in cells of patients with Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT, we examined energy metabolism of cells treated with KU-55933. The compound increased AMPK activation, glucose uptake and lactate production while reducing mitochondrial membrane potential and coupled respiration. The stimulation of glycolysis by KU-55933 did not fully compensate for the reduction in mitochondrial functions, leading to decreased cellular ATP levels and energy stress. These actions are similar to those previously described for the biguanide metformin, a partial inhibitor of respiratory complex I. Both compounds decreased mitochondrial coupled respiration and reduced cellular concentrations of fumarate, malate, citrate, and alpha-ketogluterate. Succinate levels were increased by KU-55933 levels and decreased by metformin, indicating that the effects of ATM inhibition and metformin are not identical. These observations suggest a role for ATM in mitochondrial function and show that both KU-55933 and metformin perturb the TCA cycle as well as oxidative phosphorylation.

  3. Cesium reversibly suppresses HeLa cell proliferation by inhibiting cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kakinouchi, Kei; Nagae, Tomoki; Nagai, Toshihiko; Shimura, Kiyohito; Hazama, Akihiro

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of Cs(+) on cultured human cells. We find that HeLa cell growth is suppressed by the addition of 10 mm CsCl into the culture media. In the Cs(+) -treated cells, the intracellular Cs(+) and K(+) concentrations are increased and decreased, respectively. This leads to a decrease in activity of the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase, which uses K(+) as a cofactor. Cs(+) -treated cells show an intracellular pH shift towards alkalization. Based on these results, CsCl presumably suppresses HeLa cell proliferation by inducing an intracellular cation imbalance that affects cell metabolism. Our findings may have implications for the use of Cs(+) in cancer therapy.

  4. Studying of a wave activity condition and cellular metabolism of tissues in patients with perioral dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grashkin V.A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Perioral dermatitis is a facial skin disease with insuffciently studied ethiology and pathogenetic mechanisms, being one of actual problems of dermatology. It is a chronic relapsing facial skin disease mainly in women of young and middle age (in men and children meets less often. The disease has an independent clinical picture which is different from rosacea, demodecosis, seborrheic dermatitis, etc. The standard diagnostic criterion is a visual estimation of expression of an infammation on the basis of signs of exudative reaction which has a subjective character. Possibilities of a radiometric method for an objective estimation of a facial skin functional condition and indicators of an intracellular metabolism in patients with a perioral dermatitis were frst studied.

  5. Cellular uptake of PET tracers of glucose metabolism and hypoxia and their linkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busk, Morten; Horsman, Michael R.; Overgaard, Jens [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Jakobsen, Steen [Aarhus University Hospital, PET Centre, Aarhus (Denmark); Bussink, Johan; Kogel, Albert van der [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    Tumour hypoxia and elevated glycolysis (Warburg effect) predict poor prognosis. Each parameter is assessable separately with positron emission tomography, but they are linked through anaerobic glycolysis (Pasteur effect). Here, we compare the oxygenation-dependent retention of fluoroazomycin arabinoside ([{sup 18}F]FAZA), a promising but not well-characterised hypoxia-specific tracer, and fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) in four carcinoma cell lines. Cells seeded on coverslips were positioned in modified Petri dishes that allow physically separated cells to share the same tracer-containing medium pool. Following oxic, hypoxic or anoxic tracer incubation, coverslips were analysed for radioactivity ([{sup 18}F]FDG+[{sup 18}F]FAZA) or re-incubated in tracer-free oxygenated medium and then measured ([{sup 18}F]FAZA). Next, we tested the reliability of [{sup 18}F]FDG as a relative measure of glucose metabolic rate. Finally, from two cell lines, xenografts were established in mice, and the tracer distribution between hypoxic and well-oxygenated areas were deduced from tissue sections. Three hours of anoxia strongly stimulated [{sup 18}F]FAZA retention with anoxic-to-oxic uptake ratios typically above 30. Three out of four cell lines displayed similar selectivity of [{sup 18}F]FDG versus glucose, but oxic uptake and anoxic-to-oxic uptake ratio of [{sup 18}F]FDG varied considerably. Although less pronounced, [{sup 18}F]FAZA also showed superior in vivo hypoxia specificity compared with [{sup 18}F]FDG. [{sup 18}F]FAZA displays excellent in vitro characteristics for hypoxia imaging including modest cell-to-cell line variability and no binding in oxic cells. In contrast, the usability of [{sup 18}F]FDG as a surrogate marker for hypoxia is questionable due to large variations in baseline (oxic) glucose metabolism and magnitudes of the Pasteur effects. (orig.)

  6. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell.

  7. Atrial metabolism and tissue perfusion as determinants of electrical and structural remodelling in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opacic, Dragan; van Bragt, Kelly A; Nasrallah, Hussein M; Schotten, Ulrich; Verheule, Sander

    2016-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common tachyarrhythmia in clinical practice. Over decades of research, a vast amount of knowledge has been gathered about the causes and consequences of AF related to cellular electrophysiology and features of the tissue structure that influence the propagation of fibrillation waves. Far less is known about the role of myocyte metabolism and tissue perfusion in the pathogenesis of AF. However, the rapid rates of electrical activity and contraction during AF must present an enormous challenge to the energy balance of atrial myocytes. This challenge can be met by scaling back energy demand and by increasing energy supply, and there are several indications that both phenomena occur as a result of AF. Still, there is ample evidence that these adaptations fall short of redressing this imbalance, which may represent a driving force for atrial electrical as well as structural remodelling. In addition, several 'metabolic diseases' such as diabetes, obesity, and abnormal thyroid function precipitate some well-known 'culprits' of the AF substrate such as myocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis, while some other AF risk factors, such as heart failure, affect atrial metabolism. This review provides an overview of metabolic and vascular alterations in AF and their involvement in its pathogenesis.

  8. Astrocyte glycogenolysis is triggered by store-operated calcium entry and provides metabolic energy for cellular calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Margit S; Fox, Rebecca; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse K

    2014-04-01

    Astrocytic glycogen, the only storage form of glucose in the brain, has been shown to play a fundamental role in supporting learning and memory, an effect achieved by providing metabolic support for neurons. We have examined the interplay between glycogenolysis and the bioenergetics of astrocytic Ca(2+) homeostasis, by analyzing interdependency of glycogen and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a mechanism in cellular signaling that maintains high endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration and thus provides the basis for store-dependent Ca(2+) signaling. We stimulated SOCE in primary cultures of murine cerebellar and cortical astrocytes, and determined glycogen content to investigate the effects of SOCE on glycogen metabolism. By blocking glycogenolysis, we tested energetic dependency of SOCE-related Ca(2+) dynamics on glycogenolytic ATP. Our results show that SOCE triggers astrocytic glycogenolysis. Upon inhibition of adenylate cyclase with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, glycogen content was no longer significantly different from that in unstimulated control cells, indicating that SOCE triggers astrocytic glycogenolysis in a cAMP-dependent manner. When glycogenolysis was inhibited in cortical astrocytes by 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol, the amount of Ca(2+) loaded into ER via sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2)-ATPase (SERCA) was reduced, which suggests that SERCA pumps preferentially metabolize glycogenolytic ATP. Our study demonstrates SOCE as a novel pathway in stimulating astrocytic glycogenolysis. We also provide first evidence for a new functional role of brain glycogen, in providing local ATP to SERCA, thus establishing the bioenergetic basis for astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling. This mechanism could offer a novel explanation for the impact of glycogen on learning and memory.

  9. Subcellular compartmentation of sugar signalling: Links among carbon cellular status, route of sucrolysis, sink-source allocation, and metabolic partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eTiessen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that both subcellular compartmentation and route of sucrolysis are important for plant development, growth, and yield. Signalling effects are dependent on the tissue, cell type and stage of development. Downstream effects also depend on the amount and localisation of hexoses and disaccharides. All enzymes of sucrose metabolism (e.g. invertase, hexokinase, fructokinase, sucrose synthase, and sucrose 6-phosphate synthase are not produced from single genes, but from paralogue families in plant genomes. Each paralogue has unique expression across plant organs and developmental stages. Multiple isoforms can be targeted to different cellular compartments (e.g. plastids, mitochondria, nuclei, and cytosol. Many of the key enzymes are regulated by post-transcriptional modifications and associate in multimeric protein complexes. Some isoforms have regulatory functions, either in addition to or in replacement of their catalytic activity. This explains why some isozymes are not redundant, but also complicates elucidation of their specific involvement in sugar signalling. The subcellular compartmentation of sucrose metabolism forces refinement of some of the paradigms of sugar signalling during physiological processes. For example, the catalytic and signalling functions of diverse paralogues needs to be more carefully analysed in the context of post-genomic biology. It is important to note that it is the differential localization of both the sugars themselves as well as the sugar-metabolizing enzymes that ultimately led to sugar signalling. We conclude that a combination of subcellular complexity and gene duplication/subfunctionalization gave rise to sugar signalling as a regulatory mechanism in plant cells.

  10. Alterations in phosphate metabolism during cellular recovery of radiation damage in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holahan, P.K.; Knizner, S.A.; Gabriel, C.M.; Swenberg, C.E.

    1988-10-01

    The authors examined alterations in phosphate pools during cellular recovery from radiation damage in intact, wild-type diploid yeast cells using /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Concurrent cell survival analysis was determined following exposure to /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-irradiation. Cells held in citrate-buffered saline (CBS) showed increased survival with increasing time after irradiation (liquid holding recovery, LHR) with no further recovery beyond 48 h. Addition of 100 mmol dm/sup -3/ glucose to the recovery medium resulted in greater recovery. In the presence of 5 mmol dm/sup /-/sup 3/ 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), LHR was completely inhibited. NMR analyses were done on cells perfused in agarose threads and maintained under conditions similar to those in the survival studies. ATP was observable by NMR only when glucose was present in the recovery medium. In control cells, ATP concentrations increased and plateaued with increasing recovery time. With increasing radiation dose the increase in ATP was of lesser magnitude, and after 2000 Gy no increase was observed.

  11. Alterations in phosphate metabolism during cellular recovery of radiation damage in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holahan, P.K.; Knizner, S.A.; Gabriel, C.M.; Swenberg, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    Alterations were examined in phosphate pools during cellular recovery from radiation damage in intact, wild-type diploid yeast cells using phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Concurrent cell survival analysis was determined following exposure to cobalt 60 gamma radiation. Cells held in citrate-buffered saline (CBS) showed increased survival with increasing time after irradiation (liquid holding recovery, LHR) with no further recovery beyond 48 h. Addition of 100 mmol/cu. dm glucose to the recovery medium resulted in greater recovery. In the presence of 5 mmol/cu. dm 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), LHR was completely inhibited. ATP was observable by NMR only when glucose was present in the recovery medium. In control cells, ATP concentrations increased and plateaued with increasing recovery time. With increasing radiation dose, the increase in ATP was of lesser magnitude, and after 2000 Gy no increase was observed. The observations suggest that either the production of ATP in irradiated cells is suppressed, or there is enhanced ATP utilization for repair of radiation damage. In CBS with 100 mmol/cu. dm glucose, a dose-dependent decrease in polyphosphate (polyP) was detectable with no concurrent increase in inorganic phosphate (p sub i). When 2-DG was present in the recovery medium, polyP decreased, but there was a simultaneous increase in p sub i with increasing radiation dose and recovery time. This suggests that the polyP are hydrolyzed as a source of phosphates for repair of radiation damage.

  12. [Lipid mobilization and energy metabolism: impact of molecular and cellular approaches on the treatment of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontan, M; Berlan, M; Galitzky, J

    2000-12-01

    There is strong evidence that reduced sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is involved in the etiology of obesity in several animal models of obesity. In humans the situation is more complex but humans with low SNS activity, reduced beta-adrenergic sensitivity, reduced lipid mobilizing efficacy of catecholamines have lowered energy expenditure and are at greater risk of obesity. The SNS with its effect on food intake, lipid mobilization and energy expenditure has a major potential as a target for novel pharmacotherapies in weight reducing strategies. Extended cellular and molecular knowledge about the nature, the distribution and the role of the adrenergic receptors (beta(1)-, beta(2)-, beta(3)-, alpha(2)- and alpha(1)-) existing in tissue effectors involved in the control of lipid mobilization (adipose tissue) and energy expenditure (brown adipose tissue, skeletal muscle) has opened new pathways for pharmacological strategies. In this manuscript, after a summary of current knowledge on the regulation of lipid mobilization and energy expenditure in humans, we briefly review the putative targets and the most recent attempts to develop agents acting at various adrenergic receptor types in SNS effectors or on SNS activity. These include major questions about putative utilization of beta(3)-agonists, alpha(2)-antagonists and beta-antagonists in pharmacotherapy and/or prevention of obesity in humans.

  13. Bioenergetics Race: Teaching Cellular Metabolism to High School Students Through an Educational Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.E.P. Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry is a science that deals with complex and abstract topics, which are often not understood by high school students, thus interfering in theteaching/learning process. The educational teaching game isa methodology advocated by several educators. The aim of this study was to develop a pedagogical practice to assist in the teaching/learning of high school students. Inthis context we designed a game about Metabolism, which was named "Bioenergetics Race". The game issimple, uses low cost materials and have easy access. The game consists of a board, chips, and a list with 100 multiple questions. Operation of the game: Selected questions lead the students to draw a card and move the corresponding number of squares on the board. The one who reachesthe finish line first is the winner. To consolidate the proposal information, every answer was discussed. At the end of the game the students answered a questionnaire. According to 77.5% of players the level of difficulty was large and 83% rated the game as good for educational proposal. It was found that 100% of students had neverparticipated in such activity in the classroom. It is notable the interest of students andthe abstract and complex topics are better assimilated.

  14. Structural, biochemical, cellular, and functional changes in skeletal muscle extracellular matrix with aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Kjaer, M; Mackey, A L

    2011-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of skeletal muscle is critical for force transmission and for the passive elastic response of skeletal muscle. Structural, biochemical, cellular, and functional changes in skeletal muscle ECM contribute to the deterioration in muscle mechanical properties with aging...

  15. Differential Effects of Hormones on Cellular Metabolism in Keratoconus In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKay, Tina B; Hjortdal, Jesper; Sejersen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a corneal thinning disease with an onset commonly immediately post-puberty and stabilization by 40 to 50 years of age. The role of hormones in regulating corneal tissue structure in homeostatic and pathological conditions is unknown. Our group recently linked altered hormone...

  16. Apolipoprotein E: structure and function in lipid metabolism, neurobiology, and Alzheimer's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yadong; Mahley, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E is a multifunctional protein with central roles in lipid metabolism, neurobiology, and neurodegenerative diseases. It has three major isoforms (apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4) with different effects on lipid and neuronal homeostasis. A major function of apoE is to mediate the binding of lipoproteins or lipid complexes in the plasma or interstitial fluids to specific cell-surface receptors. These receptors internalize apoE-containing lipoprotein particles; thus, apoE participates in the distribution/redistribution of lipids among various tissues and cells of the body. In addition, intracellular apoE may modulate various cellular processes physiologically or pathophysiologically, including cytoskeletal assembly and stability, mitochondrial integrity and function, and dendritic morphology and function. Elucidation of the functional domains within this protein and of the three-dimensional structure of the major isoforms of apoE has contributed significantly to our understanding of its physiological and pathophysiological roles at a molecular level. It is likely that apoE, with its multiple cellular origins and multiple structural and biophysical properties, is involved widely in processes of lipid metabolism and neurobiology, possibly encompassing a variety of disorders of neuronal repair, remodeling, and degeneration by interacting with different factors through various pathways.

  17. Simulation of the Crashing of Sandwich Structures under Impact Loads by Movable Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG De-wu; HUANG Hai; SONG Yi; A I Dmitriev; E V Shilko; S G Psakhie

    2005-01-01

    Movable cellular automata (MCA) method is applied in the analysis of dynamic characters of ceramic armor composite structures under impact loading. As a new approach, MCA is different from the traditional numerical methods such as the finite element method and boundary element method. Based on the theory of particle mechanics, MCA is applied as a powerful tool in solving specific structural analysis of materials loss and penetrating damages. In this paper the method is used to study responses of multi-layered ceramic plates as a base of armor structures under impact loading, thus assisting further investigations in the crashing process and to improve ceramic armor structures.

  18. Organic synthetic environmental endocrine disruptors: structural classes and metabolic fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jan; Peterlin-Mašič, Lucija

    2012-12-01

    Endocrine disruption is the modification of the endocrine system causing harmful effects in healthy subjects or their offspring. Physiological endocrine hormones act at very low plasma concentrations, and certain chemicals known as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are suspected of modifying endocrine function at similarly low concentrations. In our review we focus mainly on the structural classes of organic synthetic environmental endocrine disruptors and their common structural elements that enable them to interact with estrogen signalling. EDCs can affect estrogenic signalling directly through interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) or indirectly through transcription factors such as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or by modulation of critical metabolic enzymes engaged in estrogen biosynthesis and metabolism. However, some structural elements can also pose a great risk of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, especially after biotransformation to reactive metabolites.

  19. Physiological enzymology: The next frontier in understanding protein structure and function at the cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Irene; Berdis, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the study of proteins has relied heavily on characterizing the activity of a single purified protein isolated from other cellular components. This classic approach allowed scientists to unambiguously define the intrinsic kinetic and chemical properties of that protein. The ultimate hope was to extrapolate this information toward understanding how the enzyme or receptor behaves within its native cellular context. These types of detailed in vitro analyses were necessary to reduce the innate complexities of measuring the singular activity and biochemical properties of a specific enzyme without interference from other enzymes and potential competing substrates. However, recent developments in fields encompassing cell biology, molecular imaging, and chemical biology now provide the unique chemical tools and instrumentation to study protein structure, function, and regulation in their native cellular environment. These advancements provide the foundation for a new field, coined physiological enzymology, which quantifies the function and regulation of enzymes and proteins at the cellular level. In this Special Edition, we explore the area of Physiological Enzymology and Protein Function through a series of review articles that focus on the tools and techniques used to measure the cellular activity of proteins inside living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions.

  20. Metabolic Effects of Berries with Structurally Diverse Anthocyanins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overall, John; Bonney, Sierra A.; Wilson, Mickey; Beermann, Arnold; Grace, Mary H.; Esposito, Debora; Lila, Mary Ann; Komarnytsky, Slavko

    2017-01-01

    Overconsumption of energy dense foods and sedentary lifestyle are considered as major causes of obesity-associated insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. Results from both cohort studies and randomized trials suggested that anthocyanins from berries may lower metabolic risks, however these reports are equivocal. The present study was designed to examine effects of six berries with structurally diverse anthocyanin profiles (normalized to 400 µg/g total anthocyanin content) on development of metabolic risk factors in the C57BL/6 mouse model of polygenic obesity. Diets supplemented with blackberry (mono-glycosylated cyanidins), black raspberry (acylated mono-glycosylated cyanidins), blackcurrant (mono- and di-glycosylated cyanidins and delphinidins), maqui berry (di-glycosylated delphinidins), Concord grape (acylated mono-glycosylated delphinidins and petunidins), and blueberry (mono-glycosylated delphinidins, malvidins, and petunidins) showed a prominent discrepancy between biological activities of delphinidin/malvidin-versus cyanidin-type anthocyanins that could be explained by differences in their structure and metabolism in the gut. Consumption of berries also resulted in a strong shift in the gastrointestinal bacterial communities towards obligate anaerobes that correlated with decrease in the gastrointestinal luminal oxygen and oxidative stress. Further work is needed to understand mechanisms that lead to nearly anoxic conditions in the gut lumens, including the relative contributions of host, diet and/or microbial oxidative activity, and their implication to human health. PMID:28212306

  1. Metabolic Effects of Berries with Structurally Diverse Anthocyanins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Overall

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Overconsumption of energy dense foods and sedentary lifestyle are considered as major causes of obesity-associated insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. Results from both cohort studies and randomized trials suggested that anthocyanins from berries may lower metabolic risks, however these reports are equivocal. The present study was designed to examine effects of six berries with structurally diverse anthocyanin profiles (normalized to 400 µg/g total anthocyanin content on development of metabolic risk factors in the C57BL/6 mouse model of polygenic obesity. Diets supplemented with blackberry (mono-glycosylated cyanidins, black raspberry (acylated mono-glycosylated cyanidins, blackcurrant (mono- and di-glycosylated cyanidins and delphinidins, maqui berry (di-glycosylated delphinidins, Concord grape (acylated mono-glycosylated delphinidins and petunidins, and blueberry (mono-glycosylated delphinidins, malvidins, and petunidins showed a prominent discrepancy between biological activities of delphinidin/malvidin-versus cyanidin-type anthocyanins that could be explained by differences in their structure and metabolism in the gut. Consumption of berries also resulted in a strong shift in the gastrointestinal bacterial communities towards obligate anaerobes that correlated with decrease in the gastrointestinal luminal oxygen and oxidative stress. Further work is needed to understand mechanisms that lead to nearly anoxic conditions in the gut lumens, including the relative contributions of host, diet and/or microbial oxidative activity, and their implication to human health.

  2. Use of Lightweight Cellular Mats to Reduce the Settlement of Structure on Soft Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganasan, R.; Lim, A. J. M. S.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Construction of structures on soft soils gives rise to some difficulties in Malaysia and other country especially in settlement both in short and long term. The focus of this research is to minimize the differential and non-uniform settlement on peat soil with the use of an innovative cellular mat. The behaviour and performance of the lightweight geo-material (in block form) is critically investigated and in particular the use as a fill in embankment on soft ground. Hemic peat soil, sponge and innovative cellular mat will be used as the main material in this study. The monitoring in settlement behavior from this part of research will be done as laboratory testing only. The uneven settlement in this problem was uniquely monitored photographically using spot markers. In the end of the research, it is seen that the innovative cellular mat has reduce the excessive and differential settlement up to 50% compare to flexible and rigid foundations. This had improve the stiffness of soils as well as the porous contain in cellular structure which help in allowing water/moisture to flow through in or out thus resulting in prevent the condition of floating.

  3. Imaging secondary metabolism of Streptomyces sp. Mg1 during cellular lysis and colony degradation of competing Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Sarah R; Hoefler, B Chris; Cubillos-Ruiz, Andrés; Russell, William K; Russell, David H; Straight, Paul D

    2012-10-01

    Soil streptomycetes are saprotrophic bacteria that secrete numerous secondary metabolites and enzymes for extracellular functions. Many streptomycetes produce antibiotics thought to protect vegetative mycelia from competing organisms. Here we report that an organism isolated from soil, Streptomyces sp. Mg1, actively degrades colonies and causes cellular lysis of Bacillus subtilis when the organisms are cultured together. We predicted that the inhibition and degradation of B. subtilis colonies in this competition depends upon a combination of secreted factors, including small molecule metabolites and enzymes. To begin to unravel this complex competitive phenomenon, we use a MALDI imaging mass spectrometry strategy to map the positions of metabolites secreted by both organisms. In this report, we show that Streptomyces sp. Mg1 produces the macrolide antibiotic chalcomycin A, which contributes to inhibition of B. subtilis growth in combination with other, as yet unidentified factors. We suggest that efforts to understand competitive and cooperative interactions between bacterial species benefit from assays that pair living organisms and probe the complexity of metabolic exchanges between them.

  4. Coupled pulsating and cellular structure in the propagation of globally planar detonations in free space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wenhu [Center for Combustion Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gao, Yang, E-mail: gaoyang-00@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Wang, Cheng [Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Law, Chung K. [Center for Combustion Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The globally planar detonation in free space is numerically simulated, with particular interest to understand and quantify the emergence and evolution of the one-dimensional pulsating instability and the two-dimensional cellular structure which is inherently also affected by pulsating instability. It is found that the pulsation includes three stages: rapid decay of the overdrive, approach to the Chapman-Jouguet state and emergence of weak pulsations, and the formation of strong pulsations; while evolution of the cellular structure also exhibits distinct behavior at these three stages: no cell formation, formation of small-scale, irregular cells, and formation of regular cells of a larger scale. Furthermore, the average shock pressure in the detonation front consists of fine-scale oscillations reflecting the collision dynamics of the triple-shock structure and large-scale oscillations affected by the global pulsation. The common stages of evolution between the cellular structure and the pulsating behavior, as well as the existence of shock-front pressure oscillation, suggest highly correlated mechanisms between them. Detonations with period doubling, period quadrupling, and chaotic amplitudes were also observed and studied for progressively increasing activation energies.

  5. Structural enzymology of sulphur metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Robert; Schneider, Gunter

    2010-05-21

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis poses a serious threat to human health and has led to world-wide efforts focusing on the development of novel vaccines and antibiotics against this pathogen. Sulphur metabolism in this organism has been linked to essential processes such as virulence and redox defence. The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is up-regulated in models of persistent M. tuberculosis infections and provides potential targets for novel anti-mycobacterial agents, directed specifically toward the pathogen in its persistent phase. Functional and structural characterization of enzymes from sulfur metabolism establishes a necessary framework for the design of strong binding inhibitors that might be developed into new drugs. This review summarizes recent progress in the elucidation of the structural enzymology of the sulphate reduction and cysteine biosynthesis pathways.

  6. Integrating protein structures and precomputed genealogies in the Magnum database: Examples with cellular retinoid binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Michael E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When accurate models for the divergent evolution of protein sequences are integrated with complementary biological information, such as folded protein structures, analyses of the combined data often lead to new hypotheses about molecular physiology. This represents an excellent example of how bioinformatics can be used to guide experimental research. However, progress in this direction has been slowed by the lack of a publicly available resource suitable for general use. Results The precomputed Magnum database offers a solution to this problem for ca. 1,800 full-length protein families with at least one crystal structure. The Magnum deliverables include 1 multiple sequence alignments, 2 mapping of alignment sites to crystal structure sites, 3 phylogenetic trees, 4 inferred ancestral sequences at internal tree nodes, and 5 amino acid replacements along tree branches. Comprehensive evaluations revealed that the automated procedures used to construct Magnum produced accurate models of how proteins divergently evolve, or genealogies, and correctly integrated these with the structural data. To demonstrate Magnum's capabilities, we asked for amino acid replacements requiring three nucleotide substitutions, located at internal protein structure sites, and occurring on short phylogenetic tree branches. In the cellular retinoid binding protein family a site that potentially modulates ligand binding affinity was discovered. Recruitment of cellular retinol binding protein to function as a lens crystallin in the diurnal gecko afforded another opportunity to showcase the predictive value of a browsable database containing branch replacement patterns integrated with protein structures. Conclusion We integrated two areas of protein science, evolution and structure, on a large scale and created a precomputed database, known as Magnum, which is the first freely available resource of its kind. Magnum provides evolutionary and structural

  7. Linking community size structure and ecosystem functioning using metabolic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Allen, Andrew P

    2012-11-05

    Understanding how biogeochemical cycles relate to the structure of ecological communities is a central research question in ecology. Here we approach this problem by focusing on body size, which is an easily measured species trait that has a pervasive influence on multiple aspects of community structure and ecosystem functioning. We test the predictions of a model derived from metabolic theory using data on ecosystem metabolism and community size structure. These data were collected as part of an aquatic mesocosm experiment that was designed to simulate future environmental warming. Our analyses demonstrate significant linkages between community size structure and ecosystem functioning, and the effects of warming on these links. Specifically, we show that carbon fluxes were significantly influenced by seasonal variation in temperature, and yielded activation energies remarkably similar to those predicted based on the temperature dependencies of individual-level photosynthesis and respiration. We also show that community size structure significantly influenced fluxes of ecosystem respiration and gross primary production, particularly at the annual time-scale. Assessing size structure and the factors that control it, both empirically and theoretically, therefore promises to aid in understanding links between individual organisms and biogeochemical cycles, and in predicting the responses of key ecosystem functions to future environmental change.

  8. Rapid construction of mechanically- confined multi- cellular structures using dendrimeric intercellular linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xuejun; Li, Qiushi; Yi Lui, Lena Wai; Zheng, Baixue; Kang, Chiang Huen; Nugraha, Bramasta; Yue, Zhilian; Jia, Rui Rui; Fu, Hong Xia; Choudhury, Deepak; Arooz, Talha; Yan, Jie; Lim, Chwee Teck; Shen, Shali; Hong Tan, Choon; Yu, Hanry

    2010-10-01

    Tissue constructs that mimic the in vivo cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions are especially useful for applications involving the cell- dense and matrix- poor internal organs. Rapid and precise arrangement of cells into functional tissue constructs remains a challenge in tissue engineering. We demonstrate rapid assembly of C3A cells into multi- cell structures using a dendrimeric intercellular linker. The linker is composed of oleyl- polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives conjugated to a 16 arms- polypropylenimine hexadecaamine (DAB) dendrimer. The positively charged multivalent dendrimer concentrates the linker onto the negatively charged cell surface to facilitate efficient insertion of the hydrophobic oleyl groups into the cellular membrane. Bringing linker- treated cells into close proximity to each other via mechanical means such as centrifugation and micromanipulation enables their rapid assembly into multi- cellular structures within minutes. The cells exhibit high levels of viability, proliferation, three- dimensional (3D) cell morphology and other functions in the constructs. We constructed defined multi- cellular structures such as rings, sheets or branching rods that can serve as potential tissue building blocks to be further assembled into complex 3D tissue constructs for biomedical applications.

  9. Simulation Based Optimization of Complex Monolithic Composite Structures Using Cellular Core Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, Curtis W.

    Cellular core tooling is a new technology which has the capability to manufacture complex integrated monolithic composite structures. This novel tooling method utilizes thermoplastic cellular cores as inner tooling. The semi-rigid nature of the cellular cores makes them convenient for lay-up, and under autoclave temperature and pressure they soften and expand providing uniform compaction on all surfaces including internal features such as ribs and spar tubes. This process has the capability of developing fully optimized aerospace structures by reducing or eliminating assembly using fasteners or bonded joints. The technology is studied in the context of evaluating its capabilities, advantages, and limitations in developing high quality structures. The complex nature of these parts has led to development of a model using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software Abaqus and the plug-in COMPRO Common Component Architecture (CCA) provided by Convergent Manufacturing Technologies. This model utilizes a "virtual autoclave" technique to simulate temperature profiles, resin flow paths, and ultimately deformation from residual stress. A model has been developed simulating the temperature profile during curing of composite parts made with the cellular core technology. While modeling of composites has been performed in the past, this project will look to take this existing knowledge and apply it to this new manufacturing method capable of building more complex parts and develop a model designed specifically for building large, complex components with a high degree of accuracy. The model development has been carried out in conjunction with experimental validation. A double box beam structure was chosen for analysis to determine the effects of the technology on internal ribs and joints. Double box beams were manufactured and sectioned into T-joints for characterization. Mechanical behavior of T-joints was performed using the T-joint pull-off test and compared to traditional

  10. Short-term cigarette smoke exposure induces reversible changes in energy metabolism and cellular redox status independent of inflammatory responses in mouse lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit R; Zhao, Liqin; Sancheti, Harsh; Sundar, Isaac K; Rahman, Irfan; Cadenas, Enrique

    2012-11-15

    Cigarette smoking leads to alteration in cellular redox status, a hallmark in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study examines the role of cigarette smoke (CS) exposure in the impairment of energy metabolism and, consequently, mitochondrial dysfunction. Male A/J mice were exposed to CS generated by a smoking machine for 4 or 8 wk. A recovery group was exposed to CS for 8 wk and allowed to recover for 2 wk. Acute CS exposure altered lung glucose metabolism, entailing a decrease in the rate of glycolysis and an increase in the pentose phosphate pathway, as evidenced by altered expression and activity of GAPDH and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, respectively. Impairment of GAPDH was found to be due to glutathionylation of its catalytic site cysteines. Metabolic changes were associated with changes in cellular and mitochondrial redox status, assessed in terms of pyridine nucleotides and glutathione. CS exposure elicited an upregulation of the expression of complexes II, III, IV, and V and of the activity of complexes II, IV, and V. Microarray analysis of gene expression in mouse lungs after exposure to CS for 8 wk revealed upregulation of a group of genes involved in metabolism, electron transfer chain, oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial transport and dynamics, and redox regulation. These changes occurred independently of inflammatory responses. These findings have implications for the early onset of alterations in energy and redox metabolism upon acute lung exposure to CS.

  11. The influence of cellular structures on flow stress of high strength components manufactured using SLM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahshid, Rasoul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Loft Højbjerre, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing has shown significant improvement in material and machines for high-quality solid freeform fabrication processes such as selective laser melting (SLM). In particular, manufacturing lattice structures using the SLM procedure is of interest. This research examines the effect...... of cellular materials on compression strength. The specimens are manufactured additively using industrial 3D printing systems from high-strength alloy. The material has the right mechanical properties for manufacturing tool components. This includes samples with solid and lattice structures. The Compression...

  12. Is individual nasal sensitivity related to cellular metabolism of formaldehyde and susceptibility towards formaldehyde-induced genotoxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Jasmin; Ulrich, Alexandra; Mueller, Joerg U; Riegert, Clarissa; Neuss, Simone; Bruckner, Thomas; Triebig, Gerhard; Speit, Günter

    2011-07-14

    Forty-one volunteers (male non-smokers, aged 32 ± 9.6yrs) were tested for susceptibility towards unspecific nasal irritation (sensitivity towards CO(2)) in order to define subgroups of hypersensitive and hyposensitive subjects. Blood samples were taken and the expression (mRNA level) of the GSH-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase gene (FDH, identical to alcohol dehydrogenase 5, ADH5; EC 1.2.1.46) was measured in leukocytes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR with TaqMan probes. FDH is the most important enzyme for the metabolic inactivation of FA. Blood samples were exposed to 150μM formaldehyde (FA) for 2h and the induction of DNA-protein crosslinks (DPX) in leukocytes was measured by means of a modification of the alkaline comet assay (i.e., by assessing the reduction of DNA migration induced by γ-radiation). Removal of DPX was determined by the abolition of FA-induced reduction in DNA migration within 4h after the end of the exposure. Furthermore, the induction of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in cultured lymphocytes was studied after treatment of whole blood cultures with FA (150μM). A correlation analysis was performed for all parameters tested for the whole study group and for hypersensitive and hyposensitive subgroups. The results indicate that despite large differences in CO(2)-sensitivity, the susceptibility towards nasal irritation was not related to the induction of genotoxic effects (DPX, SCE) in peripheral blood or to the protection of blood cells against FA-induced effects (expression of FDH, repair capacity for FA-induced DPX). There was no correlation between CO(2)-sensitivity and the expression of FDH. There was also no close correlation between the various indicators of cellular sensitivity towards FA-induced genotoxic effects and no subgroups were identified with particular mutagen sensitivity towards FA.

  13. Predictive modeling of multicellular structure formation by using Cellular Particle Dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Matthew; Shafiee, Ashkan; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2014-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is an effective computational method for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multicellular systems. A typical example is the fusion of spheroidal bioink particles during post bioprinting structure formation. In CPD cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short-range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through integration of their equations of motion. CPD was successfully applied to describe and predict the fusion of 3D tissue construct involving identical spherical aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that CPD can also predict tissue formation involving uneven spherical aggregates whose volumes decrease during the fusion process. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  14. Characterization of 316L Steel Cellular Dodecahedron Structures Produced by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The compression behavior of different 316L steel cellular dodecahedron structures with different density values were studied. The 316L steel structures produced using the selective laser melting process has four different geometries: single unit cells with and without the addition of base plates beneath and on top, and sandwich structures with multiple unit cells with different unit cell sizes. The relation between the relative compressive strength and the relative density was compared using different Gibson-Ashby models and with other published reports. The different aspects of the deformation and the mechanical properties were evaluated and the deformation at distinct loading levels was recorded. Finite element method (FEM simulations were carried out with the defined structures and the mechanical testing results were compared. The calculated theory, simulation estimation, and the observed experimental results are in good agreement.

  15. Glutamate Metabolism in Brain Structures in Experimental Hemorrhagic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Jakovlev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study glutamate metabolism characteristics in phylogenetically different parts of the mammalian brain in experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock (HS in cats.Material and methods. Experiments were performed on 76 cats. HS was induced by intermittent bloodletting from femoral artery at a rate of 10ml/kg•10 minutes, with the average volume of 24±0.8 ml/kg. The bloodletting was discontinued after arterial pressure (BP drop to 60.0±1.5 mmHg. We studied ammonia, glutamate (Gt, and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG levels and glutaminase (GS and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDG activity in specimens harvested from phylogenetically different parts of the brain (cortex, limbic system, diencephalon, and medulla oblongata.Results. In intact animals, the peak GDG activity was found in the medulla oblongata (phylogenetically the oldest part of the brain and the peak GS activity was registered in the sensorimotor cortex (phylogenetically the youngest part of the brain; the glutaminase activity did not depend on the phylogenetic age of brain structures.In the case of HS, Gt metabolism changes began in the sensorimotor cortex manifested by decreased GS activity, which progresses by the 70th minute of the post%hemorrhagic period (PHP accompanied by delayed increase in the GDG and glutaminase activity, as well as Gt accumulation. In the limbic system and diencephalon the Gt metabolism was changing (impaired glutamine synthesis, stimuled Gt synthesis with glutamine desamidization and α%KG amination when developed by the 70th minute of the PHP. Similarly to sensorimotor cortex, changes were associated with Gt accumulation. During the agony, α%KG deficiency developed in all parts of the brain as a result of its increased contribution to Gt synthesis. At the same period of time, in the sensorimotor cortex, limbic system and diencephalon the Gt synthesis from glutamine was stimulated, however, the Gt contribution tothe formation of glutamine was decreased. The

  16. Complex network perspective on structure and function of Staphylococcus aureus metabolic network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Ying; D W Ding

    2013-02-01

    With remarkable advances in reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks, uncovering complex network structure and function from these networks is becoming one of the most important topics in system biology. This work aims at studying the structure and function of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) metabolic network by complex network methods. We first generated a metabolite graph from the recently reconstructed high-quality S. aureus metabolic network model. Then, based on `bow tie' structure character, we explain and discuss the global structure of S. aureus metabolic network. The functional significance, global structural properties, modularity and centrality analysis of giant strong component in S. aureus metabolic networks are studied.

  17. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  18. New features on the environmental regulation of metabolism revealed by modeling the cellular proteomic adaptations induced by light, carbon and inorganic nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Gérin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle and protein metabolism. The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview

  19. Simple and Flexible Self-Reproducing Structures in Asynchronous Cellular Automata and Their Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Lee, Jia; Yang, Rui-Long; Zhu, Qing-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Self-reproduction on asynchronous cellular automata (ACAs) has attracted wide attention due to the evident artifacts induced by synchronous updating. Asynchronous updating, which allows cells to undergo transitions independently at random times, might be more compatible with the natural processes occurring at micro-scale, but the dark side of the coin is the increment in the complexity of an ACA in order to accomplish stable self-reproduction. This paper proposes a novel model of self-timed cellular automata (STCAs), a special type of ACAs, where unsheathed loops are able to duplicate themselves reliably in parallel. The removal of sheath cannot only allow various loops with more flexible and compact structures to replicate themselves, but also reduce the number of cell states of the STCA as compared to the previous model adopting sheathed loops [Y. Takada, T. Isokawa, F. Peper and N. Matsui, Physica D227, 26 (2007)]. The lack of sheath, on the other hand, often tends to cause much more complicated interactions among loops, when all of them struggle independently to stretch out their constructing arms at the same time. In particular, such intense collisions may even cause the emergence of a mess of twisted constructing arms in the cellular space. By using a simple and natural method, our self-reproducing loops (SRLs) are able to retract their arms successively, thereby disentangling from the mess successfully.

  20. Directed self-assembly of large scaffold-free multi-cellular honeycomb structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejavibulya, Nalin; Youssef, Jacquelyn; Bao, Brian; Ferruccio, Toni-Marie; Morgan, Jeffrey R, E-mail: Jeffrey_Morgan@Brown.edu [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology and Biotechnology, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Brown University, G-B 393, Biomed Center, 171 Meeting St, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    A significant challenge to the field of biofabrication is the rapid construction of large three-dimensional (3D) living tissues and organs. Multi-cellular spheroids have been used as building blocks. In this paper, we create large multi-cellular honeycomb building blocks using directed self-assembly, whereby cell-to-cell adhesion, in the context of the shape and obstacles of a micro-mold, drives the formation of a 3D structure. Computer-aided design, rapid prototyping and replica molding were used to fabricate honeycomb-shaped micro-molds. Nonadhesive hydrogels cast from these micro-molds were equilibrated in the cell culture medium and seeded with two types of mammalian cells. The cells settled into the honeycomb recess were unable to attach to the nonadhesive hydrogel and so cell-to-cell adhesion drove the self-assembly of a large multi-cellular honeycomb within 24 h. Distinct morphological changes occurred to the honeycomb and its cells indicating the presence of significant cell-mediated tension. Unlike the spheroid, whose size is constrained by a critical diffusion distance needed to maintain cell viability, the overall size of the honeycomb is not limited. The rapid production of the honeycomb building unit, with its multiple rings of high-density cells and open lumen spaces, offers interesting new possibilities for biofabrication strategies.

  1. Cardiac troponin and tropomyosin: structural and cellular perspectives to unveil the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra de A. Marques

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Inherited myopathies affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle and are commonly associated with genetic dysfunctions, leading to the production of anomalous proteins. In cardiomyopathies, mutations frequently occur in sarcomeric genes, but the cause-effect scenario between genetic alterations and pathological processes remains elusive. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM was the first cardiac disease associated with a genetic background. Since the discovery of the first mutation in the β-myosin heavy chain, more than 1,400 new mutations in 11 sarcomeric genes have been reported, awarding HCM the title of the disease of the sarcomere. The most common macroscopic phenotypes are left ventricle and interventricular septal thickening, but because the clinical profile of this disease is quite heterogeneous, these phenotypes are not suitable for an accurate diagnosis. The development of genomic approaches for clinical investigation allows for diagnostic progress and understanding at the molecular level. Meanwhile, the lack of accurate in vivo models to better comprehend the cellular events triggered by this pathology has become a challenge. Notwithstanding, the imbalance of Ca2+ concentrations, altered signaling pathways, induction of apoptotic factors, and heart remodeling leading to abnormal anatomy have already been reported. Of note, a misbalance of signaling biomolecules, such as kinases and tumor suppressors (e.g., Akt and p53, seems to participate in apoptotic and fibrotic events. In HCM, structural and cellular information about defective sarcomeric proteins and their altered interactome is emerging but still represents a bottleneck for developing new concepts in basic research and for future therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on the structural and cellular alterations triggered by HCM-causing mutations in troponin and tropomyosin proteins and how structural biology can aid in the discovery of new platforms for therapeutics. We

  2. Enzyme oscillation can enhance the thermodynamic efficiency of cellular metabolism: Consequence of anti-phase coupling between reaction flux and affinity

    CERN Document Server

    Himeoka, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Cells generally convert nutrient resources to useful products via energy transduction. Accordingly, the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion process is one of the most essential characteristics of living organisms. However, although these processes occur under conditions of dynamic metabolism, most studies of cellular thermodynamic efficiency have been restricted to examining steady states; thus, the relevance of dynamics to this efficiency has not yet been elucidated. Here, we develop a simple model of metabolic reactions with anabolism-catabolism coupling catalysed by enzymes. Through application of external oscillation in the enzyme abundances, the thermodynamic efficiency of metabolism was found to be improved. This result is in strong contrast with that observed in the oscillatory input, in which the efficiency always decreased with oscillation. This improvement was effectively achieved by separating the anabolic and catabolic reactions, which tend to disequilibrate each other, and taking advantag...

  3. Structural, cellular and molecular aspects of immune privilege in the testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eLi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The testis presents a special immunological environment, considering its property of immune privilege that tolerates allo- and auto-antigens. Testicular immune privilege was once believed to be mainly based on the sequestration of antigens from the immune system by the blood-testis barrier in the seminiferous epithelium. Substantial evidence supports the view that the combination of physical structure, testicular cells, and cytokines controls immune responses in the testis to preserve the structural and functional integrity of testicular immune privilege. Both systemic immune tolerance and local immunosuppression help maintain the immune privilege status. Constitutive expression of anti-inflammatory factors in testicular cells is critical for local immunosuppression. However, the testis locally generates an efficient innate immune system against pathogens. Disruption of these mechanisms may lead to orchitis and impair fertility. This review article highlights the current understanding of structural, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the unique immune environment of the testis, particularly its immune privilege status.

  4. Structure of the measles virus hemagglutinin bound to its cellular receptor SLAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Takao; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kubota, Marie; Maita, Nobuo; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2011-02-01

    Measles virus, a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide, predominantly infects immune cells using signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as a cellular receptor. Here we present crystal structures of measles virus hemagglutinin (MV-H), the receptor-binding glycoprotein, in complex with SLAM. The MV-H head domain binds to a β-sheet of the membrane-distal ectodomain of SLAM using the side of its β-propeller fold. This is distinct from attachment proteins of other paramyxoviruses that bind receptors using the top of their β-propeller. The structure provides templates for antiviral drug design, an explanation for the effectiveness of the measles virus vaccine, and a model of the homophilic SLAM-SLAM interaction involved in immune modulations. Notably, the crystal structures obtained show two forms of the MV-H-SLAM tetrameric assembly (dimer of dimers), which may have implications for the mechanism of fusion triggering.

  5. On the effects of geometry, defects, and material asymmetry on the mechanical response of shape memory alloy cellular lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamooz Ravari, M. R.; Nasr Esfahani, S.; Taheri Andani, M.; Kadkhodaei, M.; Ghaei, A.; Karaca, H.; Elahinia, M.

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloy (such as NiTi) cellular lattice structures are a new class of advanced materials with many potential applications. The cost of fabrication of these structures however is high. It is therefore necessary to develop modeling methods to predict the functional behavior of these alloys before fabrication. The main aim of the present study is to assess the effects of geometry, microstructural imperfections and material asymmetric response of dense shape memory alloys on the mechanical response of cellular structures. To this end, several cellular and dense NiTi samples are fabricated using a selective laser melting process. Both cellular and dense specimens were tested in compression in order to obtain their stress-strain response. For modeling purposes, a three -dimensional (3D) constitutive model based on microplane theory which is able to describe the material asymmetry was employed. Five finite element models based on unit cell and multi-cell methods were generated to predict the mechanical response of cellular lattices. The results show the considerable effects of the microstructural imperfections on the mechanical response of the cellular lattice structures. The asymmetric material response of the bulk material also affects the mechanical response of the corresponding cellular structure.

  6. Neurodynamics of abnormalities in cerebral metabolism and structure in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, J L

    1993-01-01

    Much evidence points to the importance of intrauterine events in the etiology of schizophrenia and suggests a complex interplay between dysfunctional and intact neurons in the pathophysiology of the disorder. This article contrasts what is known of the topographies of metabolic and structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia at differing stages of the illness. From these contrasts, a schema is elaborated by which subtle neurodevelopmental perturbation in early to middle gestation might give rise to functional and structural abnormalities that ultimately release the diagnostic symptoms of schizophrenia. An interaction between those mechanisms mediating the expression of psychosis and the initially subtle stages of normal aging is posited to act on the substrate of a brain that is already developmentally compromised. Such a process might masquerade as "progression" in the absence of any active disease directly attributable to the original etiological event.

  7. Cuttlebone-like V2O5 Nanofibre Scaffolds – Advances in Structuring Cellular Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöller, Andrea; Runčevski, Tomče; Dinnebier, Robert E.; Bill, Joachim; Burghard, Zaklina

    2017-02-01

    The synthesis of ceramic materials combining high porosity and permeability with good mechanical stability is challenging, as optimising the latter requires compromises regarding the first two properties. Nonetheless, significant progress can be made in this direction by taking advantage of the structural design principles evolved by nature. Natural cellular solids achieve good mechanical stability via a defined hierarchical organisation of the building blocks they are composed of. Here, we report the first synthetic, ceramic-based scaffold whose architecture closely mimics that of cuttlebone –a structural biomaterial whose porosity exceeds that of most other natural cellular solids, whilst preserving an excellent mechanical strength. The nanostructured, single-component scaffold, obtained by ice-templated assembly of V2O5 nanofibres, features a highly sophisticated and elaborate architecture of equally spaced lamellas, which are regularly connected by pillars as lamella support. It displays an unprecedented porosity of 99.8 %, complemented by an enhanced mechanical stability. This novel bioinspired, functional material not only displays mechanical characteristics similar to natural cuttlebone, but the multifunctionality of the V2O5 nanofibres also renders possible applications, including catalysts, sensors and electrodes for energy storage.

  8. Cellular Oxygen Sensing: Crystal Structure of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase (PHD2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonough,M.; Li, V.; Flashman, E.; Chowdhury, R.; Mohr, C.; Lienard, B.; Zondlo, J.; Oldham, N.; Clifton, I.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular and physiological responses to changes in dioxygen levels in metazoans are mediated via the posttranslational oxidation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF). Hydroxylation of conserved prolyl residues in the HIF-{alpha} subunit, catalyzed by HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), signals for its proteasomal degradation. The requirement of the PHDs for dioxygen links changes in dioxygen levels with the transcriptional regulation of the gene array that enables the cellular response to chronic hypoxia; the PHDs thus act as an oxygen-sensing component of the HIF system, and their inhibition mimics the hypoxic response. We describe crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human PHD2, an important prolyl-4-hydroxylase in the human hypoxic response in normal cells, in complex with Fe(II) and an inhibitor to 1.7 Angstroms resolution. PHD2 crystallizes as a homotrimer and contains a double-stranded {beta}-helix core fold common to the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependant dioxygenase family, the residues of which are well conserved in the three human PHD enzymes (PHD 1-3). The structure provides insights into the hypoxic response, helps to rationalize a clinically observed mutation leading to familial erythrocytosis, and will aid in the design of PHD selective inhibitors for the treatment of anemia and ischemic disease.

  9. Structure and Cellular Roles of the RMI Core Complex from the Bloom Syndrome Dissolvasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoadley, Kelly A.; Xu, Dongyi; Xue, Yutong; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Wang, Weidong; Keck, James L. (NIH); (UW-MED)

    2010-11-11

    BLM, the protein product of the gene mutated in Bloom syndrome, is one of five human RecQ helicases. It functions to separate double Holliday junction DNA without genetic exchange as a component of the dissolvasome, which also includes topoisomerase III{alpha} and the RMI (RecQ-mediated genome instability) subcomplex (RMI1 and RMI2). We describe the crystal structure of the RMI core complex, comprising RMI2 and the C-terminal OB domain of RMI1. The overall RMI core structure strongly resembles two-thirds of the trimerization core of the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA-binding protein, Replication Protein A. Immunoprecipitation experiments with RMI2 variants confirm key interactions that stabilize the RMI core interface. Disruption of this interface leads to a dramatic increase in cellular sister chromatid exchange events similar to that seen in BLM-deficient cells. The RMI core interface is therefore crucial for BLM dissolvasome assembly and may have additional cellular roles as a docking hub for other proteins.

  10. Structure and cellular roles of the RMI core complex from the bloom syndrome dissolvasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Kelly A; Xu, Dongyi; Xue, Yutong; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Wang, Weidong; Keck, James L

    2010-09-08

    BLM, the protein product of the gene mutated in Bloom syndrome, is one of five human RecQ helicases. It functions to separate double Holliday junction DNA without genetic exchange as a component of the "dissolvasome," which also includes topoisomerase IIIα and the RMI (RecQ-mediated genome instability) subcomplex (RMI1 and RMI2). We describe the crystal structure of the RMI core complex, comprising RMI2 and the C-terminal OB domain of RMI1. The overall RMI core structure strongly resembles two-thirds of the trimerization core of the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA-binding protein, Replication Protein A. Immunoprecipitation experiments with RMI2 variants confirm key interactions that stabilize the RMI core interface. Disruption of this interface leads to a dramatic increase in cellular sister chromatid exchange events similar to that seen in BLM-deficient cells. The RMI core interface is therefore crucial for BLM dissolvasome assembly and may have additional cellular roles as a docking hub for other proteins.

  11. Asymmetric segregation of damaged cellular components in spatially structured multicellular organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Strandkvist

    Full Text Available The asymmetric distribution of damaged cellular components has been observed in species ranging from fission yeast to humans. To study the potential advantages of damage segregation, we have developed a mathematical model describing ageing mammalian tissue, that is, a multicellular system of somatic cells that do not rejuvenate at cell division. To illustrate the applicability of the model, we specifically consider damage incurred by mutations to mitochondrial DNA, which are thought to be implicated in the mammalian ageing process. We show analytically that the asymmetric distribution of damaged cellular components reduces the overall damage level and increases the longevity of the cell population. Motivated by the experimental reports of damage segregation in human embryonic stem cells, dividing symmetrically with respect to cell-fate, we extend the model to consider spatially structured systems of cells. Imposing spatial structure reduces, but does not eliminate, the advantage of asymmetric division over symmetric division. The results suggest that damage partitioning could be a common strategy for reducing the accumulation of damage in a wider range of cell types than previously thought.

  12. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G. (LNLS)

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  13. Granular gel support-enabled extrusion of three-dimensional alginate and cellular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yifei; Compaan, Ashley; Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Huang, Yong

    2016-06-03

    Freeform fabrication of soft structures has been of great interest in recent years. In particular, it is viewed as a critical step toward the grand vision of organ printing--the on-demand design and fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) human organ constructs for implantation and regenerative medicine. The objective of this study is to develop a novel granular gel support material-enabled, two-step gelation-based 'printing-then-gelation' approach to fabricate 3D alginate structures using filament extrusion. Specifically, a granular Carbopol microgel bath holds the ungelled alginate structure being extruded, avoiding the instantaneous gelation of each printed layer as well as resultant surface tension-induced nozzle clogging. Since Carbopol microgels react with multivalent cations, which are needed for alginate crosslinking, gelatin is introduced as a sacrificial material to make an alginate and gelatin bioink for extrusion, which gels thermally (step-one gelation) to initially stabilize the printed structure for removal from Carbopol. Then gelatin is melted and diffused away while alginate is ionically crosslinked in a 37 °C calcium chloride bath (step-two gelation), resulting in an alginate structure. The proposed 'printing-then-gelation' approach works for alginate structure fabrication, and it is also applicable for the printing of cellular constructs and other similar homogeneous soft structures using a two-step or even multi-step approach. The main conclusions are: (1) 0.8% (w/v) Carbopol bath with a neutral pH value may be most suitable for soft structure printing; (2) it is most effective to use a 0.9% (w/v) NaCl solution to facilitate the removal of residual Carbopol; and (3) alginate structures fabricated using the proposed approach demonstrate better mechanical properties than those fabricated using the conventional 'gelation-while-printing' approach.

  14. A structural basis for cellular uptake of GST-fold proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie J Morris

    Full Text Available It has recently emerged that glutathione transferase enzymes (GSTs and other structurally related molecules can be translocated from the external medium into many different cell types. In this study we aim to explore in detail, the structural features that govern cell translocation and by dissecting the human GST enzyme GSTM2-2 we quantatively demonstrate that the α-helical C-terminal domain (GST-C is responsible for this property. Attempts to further examine the constituent helices within GST-C resulted in a reduction in cell translocation efficiency, indicating that the intrinsic GST-C domain structure is necessary for maximal cell translocation capacity. In particular, it was noted that the α-6 helix of GST-C plays a stabilising role in the fold of this domain. By destabilising the conformation of GST-C, an increase in cell translocation efficiency of up to ∼2-fold was observed. The structural stability profiles of these protein constructs have been investigated by circular dichroism and differential scanning fluorimetry measurements and found to impact upon their cell translocation efficiency. These experiments suggest that the globular, helical domain in the 'GST-fold' structural motif plays a role in influencing cellular uptake, and that changes that affect the conformational stability of GST-C can significantly influence cell translocation efficiency.

  15. PACS—Realization of an adaptive concept using pressure actuated cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramüller, B.; Boblenz, J.; Hühne, C.

    2014-10-01

    A biologically inspired concept is investigated which can be utilized to develop energy efficient, lightweight and applicational flexible adaptive structures. Building a real life morphing unit is an ambitious task as the numerous works in the particular field show. Summarizing fundamental demands and barriers regarding shape changing structures, the basic challenges of designing morphing structures are listed. The concept of Pressure Actuated Cellular Structures (PACS) is arranged within the recent morphing activities and it is shown that it complies with the underlying demands. Systematically divided into energy-related and structural subcomponents the working principle is illuminated and relationships between basic design parameters are expressed. The analytical background describing the physical mechanisms of PACS is presented in concentrated manner. This work focuses on the procedure of dimensioning, realizing and experimental testing of a single cell and a single row cantilever made of PACS. The experimental outcomes as well as the results from the FEM computations are used for evaluating the analytical methods. The functionality of the basic principle is thus validated and open issues are determined pointing the way ahead.

  16. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  17. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  18. Beyond co-localization: inferring spatial interactions between sub-cellular structures from microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grégory

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-cellular structures interact in numerous direct and indirect ways in order to fulfill cellular functions. While direct molecular interactions crucially depend on spatial proximity, other interactions typically result in spatial correlations between the interacting structures. Such correlations are the target of microscopy-based co-localization analysis, which can provide hints of potential interactions. Two complementary approaches to co-localization analysis can be distinguished: intensity correlation methods capitalize on pattern discovery, whereas object-based methods emphasize detection power. Results We first reinvestigate the classical co-localization measure in the context of spatial point pattern analysis. This allows us to unravel the set of implicit assumptions inherent to this measure and to identify potential confounding factors commonly ignored. We generalize object-based co-localization analysis to a statistical framework involving spatial point processes. In this framework, interactions are understood as position co-dependencies in the observed localization patterns. The framework is based on a model of effective pairwise interaction potentials and the specification of a null hypothesis for the expected pattern in the absence of interaction. Inferred interaction potentials thus reflect all significant effects that are not explained by the null hypothesis. Our model enables the use of a wealth of well-known statistical methods for analyzing experimental data, as demonstrated on synthetic data and in a case study considering virus entry into live cells. We show that the classical co-localization measure typically under-exploits the information contained in our data. Conclusions We establish a connection between co-localization and spatial interaction of sub-cellular structures by formulating the object-based interaction analysis problem in a spatial statistics framework based on nearest-neighbor distance

  19. SIRT1 and energy metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoling Li

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is the most conserved mammalian NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that has emerged as a key metabolic sensor in various metabolic tissues.In response to different environmental stimuli,SIRT1 directly links the cellular metabolic status to the chromatin structure and the regulation of gene expression,thereby modulating a variety of cellular processes such as energy metabolism and stress response.Recent studies have shown that SIRT1 controls both glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver,promotes fat mobilization and stimulates brown remodeling of the white fat in white adipose tissue,controls insulin secretion in the pancreas,senses nutrient availability in the hypothalamus,influences obesityinduced inflammation in macrophages,and modulates the activity of circadian clock in metabolic tissues.This review focuses on the role of SIRT1 in regulating energy metabolism at different metabolic tissues.

  20. A study on the cellular structure during stress solicitation induced by BioMEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fior, Raffaella; Maggiolino, Stefano; Codan, Barbara; Lazzarino, Marco; Sbaizero, Orfeo

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of single cells is a topic in continuous evolution. The complexity of the cellular matrix, the huge variety of cells, the interaction of one cell with the other are all factors that must be taken into consideration in the study of the cellular structure and mechanics. In this project, we developed different types of bioMEMS for cell's stretching, both transparent devices based on silicon nitride and non-transparent silicon based. While the use of silicon devices is limited to reflection microscopes, transparent bioMEMS can be used with transmission and reflection microscopes but can also be easily coupled with other tools such as patch clamp analyzers or atomic force microscope. This improvement will open brand new possibilities in the biological investigation field. We used these two BioMEMS to stretch a single cell in a controlled way and, as a first investigation, we focused on its morphology. We noticed that during a controlled stretch, cells react to the applied deformation. A hysteretic behavior on the ratio between area and perimeter has been highlighted.

  1. Intragranular cellular segregation network structure strengthening 316L stainless steel prepared by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Leifeng; Wikman, Stefan; Cui, Daqing; Shen, Zhijian

    2016-03-01

    A feasibility study was performed to fabricate ITER In-Vessel components by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) supported by Fusion for Energy (F4E). Almost fully dense 316L stainless steel (SS316L) components were prepared from gas-atomized powder and with optimized SLM processing parameters. Tensile tests and Charpy-V tests were carried out at 22 °C and 250 °C and the results showed that SLM SS316L fulfill the RCC-MR code. Microstructure characterization reveals the presence of hierarchical macro-, micro- and nano-structures in as-built samples that were very different from SS316L microstructures prepared by other established methods. The formation of a characteristic intragranular cellular segregation network microstructure appears to contribute to the increase of yield strength without losing ductility. Silicon oxide nano-inclusions were formed during the SLM process that generated a micro-hardness fluctuation in the building direction. The combined influence of a cellular microstructure and the nano-inclusions constraints the size of ductile dimples to nano-scale. The crack propagation is hindered by a pinning effect that improves the defect-tolerance of the SLM SS316L. This work proves that it was possible to manufacture SS316L with properties suitable for ITER First Wall panels. Further studies on irradiation properties of SLM SS316L and manufacturing of larger real-size components are needed.

  2. BICD2, dynactin, and LIS1 cooperate in regulating dynein recruitment to cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splinter, Daniël; Razafsky, David S.; Schlager, Max A.; Serra-Marques, Andrea; Grigoriev, Ilya; Demmers, Jeroen; Keijzer, Nanda; Jiang, Kai; Poser, Ina; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; King, Stephen J.; Akhmanova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is the major microtubule minus-end–directed cellular motor. Most dynein activities require dynactin, but the mechanisms regulating cargo-dependent dynein–dynactin interaction are poorly understood. In this study, we focus on dynein–dynactin recruitment to cargo by the conserved motor adaptor Bicaudal D2 (BICD2). We show that dynein and dynactin depend on each other for BICD2-mediated targeting to cargo and that BICD2 N-terminus (BICD2-N) strongly promotes stable interaction between dynein and dynactin both in vitro and in vivo. Direct visualization of dynein in live cells indicates that by itself the triple BICD2-N–dynein–dynactin complex is unable to interact with either cargo or microtubules. However, tethering of BICD2-N to different membranes promotes their microtubule minus-end–directed motility. We further show that LIS1 is required for dynein-mediated transport induced by membrane tethering of BICD2-N and that LIS1 contributes to dynein accumulation at microtubule plus ends and BICD2-positive cellular structures. Our results demonstrate that dynein recruitment to cargo requires concerted action of multiple dynein cofactors. PMID:22956769

  3. Click chemistry for the conservation of cellular structures and fluorescent proteins: ClickOx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löschberger, Anna; Niehörster, Thomas; Sauer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide, are known to cause structural damage not only in living, but also in fixed, cells. Copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click chemistry) is known to produce ROS. Therefore, fluorescence imaging of cellular structures, such as the actin cytoskeleton, remains challenging when combined with click chemistry protocols. In addition, the production of ROS substantially weakens the fluorescence signal of fluorescent proteins. This led us to develop ClickOx, which is a new click chemistry protocol for improved conservation of the actin structure and better conservation of the fluorescence signal of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins. Herein we demonstrate that efficient oxygen removal by addition of an enzymatic oxygen scavenger system (ClickOx) considerably reduces ROS-associated damage during labeling of nascent DNA with ATTO 488 azide by Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. Standard confocal and super-resolution fluorescence images of phalloidin-labeled actin filaments and GFP/yellow fluorescent protein-labeled cells verify the conservation of the cytoskeleton microstructure and fluorescence intensity, respectively. Thus, ClickOx can be used advantageously for structure preservation in conventional and most notably in super-resolution microscopy methods.

  4. At the intersection of non-coding transcription, DNA repair, chromatin structure, and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke eOhsawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that non-coding RNAs play a critical role in regulating gene expression. Recent paradigm-setting studies are now revealing that non-coding RNAs, other than microRNAs, also play intriguing roles in the maintenance of chromatin structure, in the DNA damage response, and in adult human stem cell aging. In this review, we will discuss the complex inter-dependent relationships among non-coding RNA transcription, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and adult stem cell senescence. DNA damage-induced non-coding RNAs transcribed in the vicinity of the DNA break regulate recruitment of the DNA damage machinery and DNA repair efficiency. We will discuss the correlation between non-coding RNAs and DNA damage repair efficiency and the potential role of changing chromatin structures around double-strand break sites. On the other hand, induction of non-coding RNA transcription from the repetitive Alu elements occurs during human stem cell aging and hinders efficient DNA repair causing entry into senescence. We will discuss how this fine balance between transcription and genomic instability may be regulated by the dramatic changes to chromatin structure that accompany cellular senescence.

  5. Pericytopathy: Oxidative Stress and Impaired Cellular Longevity in the Pancreas and Skeletal Muscle in Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin R. Hayden

    2010-01-01

    early pharmacotherapy in addition to lifestyle changes targeted to maintaining pericyte integrity. In conclusion, we have provided a review of current knowledge regarding the pericyte and novel ultrastructural findings regarding its role in metabolic syndrome and T2DM.

  6. Finiteness due to cellular structure of R[sup N] I. Quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehagias, A.A. (Inst. of Theoretical Physics, Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Zoupanos, G. (Dept. of Physics, National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece))

    1994-04-01

    We construct a cellular space which has as a continuous limit the Euclidean space R[sup N]. We consider quantum mechanics on this cellular space and we examine in particular an harmonic oscillator and a free particle on the cellular R[sup 1], R[sup 2] respectively. In both cases we find that the energy spectrum is bounded from above. (orig.)

  7. Enzyme oscillation can enhance the thermodynamic efficiency of cellular metabolism: consequence of anti-phase coupling between reaction flux and affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeoka, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-04-01

    Cells generally convert nutrient resources to products via energy transduction. Accordingly, the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion process is one of the most essential characteristics of living organisms. However, although these processes occur under conditions of dynamic metabolism, most studies of cellular thermodynamic efficiency have been restricted to examining steady states; thus, the relevance of dynamics to this efficiency has not yet been elucidated. Here, we develop a simple model of metabolic reactions with anabolism-catabolism coupling catalyzed by enzymes. Through application of external oscillation in the enzyme abundances, the thermodynamic efficiency of metabolism was found to be improved. This result is in strong contrast with that observed in the oscillatory input, in which the efficiency always decreased with oscillation. This improvement was effectively achieved by separating the anabolic and catabolic reactions, which tend to disequilibrate each other, and taking advantage of the temporal oscillations so that each of the antagonistic reactions could progress near equilibrium. In this case, anti-phase oscillation between the reaction flux and chemical affinity through oscillation of enzyme abundances is essential. This improvement was also confirmed in a model capable of generating autonomous oscillations in enzyme abundances. Finally, the possible relevance of the improvement in thermodynamic efficiency is discussed with respect to the potential for manipulation of metabolic oscillations in microorganisms.

  8. Emerging roles for the amyloid precursor protein and derived peptides in the regulation of cellular and systemic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeczor, Juliane K; McGee, Sean L

    2017-03-28

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein that can be cleaved by proteases through two different pathways to yield a number of small peptides, each with distinct physiological properties and functions. It has been extensively studied in the context of Alzheimer's disease, with the APP-derived amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide being a major constituent of the amyloid plaques observed in this disease. It has been known for some time that APP can regulate neuronal metabolism, however this review will examine evidence that APP and its peptides can also regulate key metabolic processes such as insulin action, lipid synthesis and storage and mitochondrial function in peripheral tissues. This review will present a hypothesis that amyloidogenic processing of APP in peripheral tissues plays a key role in the response to nutrient excess and that this could contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. High resolution simulations of energy absorption in dynamically loaded cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, R. E.; Cotton, M.; Harris, E. J.; Eakins, D. E.; McShane, G.

    2017-03-01

    Cellular materials have potential application as absorbers of energy generated by high velocity impact. CTH, a Sandia National Laboratories Code which allows very severe strains to be simulated, has been used to perform very high resolution simulations showing the dynamic crushing of a series of two-dimensional, stainless steel metal structures with varying architectures. The structures are positioned to provide a cushion between a solid stainless steel flyer plate with velocities ranging from 300 to 900 m/s, and an initially stationary stainless steel target. Each of the alternative architectures under consideration was formed by an array of identical cells each of which had a constant volume and a constant density. The resolution of the simulations was maximised by choosing a configuration in which one-dimensional conditions persisted for the full period over which the specimen densified, a condition which is most readily met by impacting high density specimens at high velocity. It was found that the total plastic flow and, therefore, the irreversible energy dissipated in the fully densified energy absorbing cell, increase (a) as the structure becomes more rodlike and less platelike and (b) as the impact velocity increases. Sequential CTH images of the deformation processes show that the flow of the cell material may be broadly divided into macroscopic flow perpendicular to the compression direction and jetting-type processes (microkinetic flow) which tend to predominate in rod and rodlike configurations and also tend to play an increasing role at increased strain rates. A very simple analysis of a configuration in which a solid flyer impacts a solid target provides a baseline against which to compare and explain features seen in the simulations. The work provides a basis for the development of energy absorbing structures for application in the 200-1000 m/s impact regime.

  10. In silico analyses of dystrophin Dp40 cellular distribution, nuclear export signals and structure modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Martínez-Herrera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophin Dp40 is the shortest protein encoded by the DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene. This protein is unique since it lacks the C-terminal end of dystrophins. In this data article, we describe the subcellular localization, nuclear export signals and the three-dimensional structure modeling of putative Dp40 proteins using bioinformatics tools. The Dp40 wild type protein was predicted as a cytoplasmic protein while the Dp40n4 was predicted to be nuclear. Changes L93P and L170P are involved in the nuclear localization of Dp40n4 protein. A close analysis of Dp40 protein scored that amino acids 93LEQEHNNLV101 and 168LLLHDSIQI176 could function as NES sequences and the scores are lost in Dp40n4. In addition, the changes L93/170P modify the tertiary structure of putative Dp40 mutants. The analysis showed that changes of residues 93 and 170 from leucine to proline allow the nuclear localization of Dp40 proteins. The data described here are related to the research article entitled “EF-hand domains are involved in the differential cellular distribution of dystrophin Dp40” (J. Aragón et al. Neurosci. Lett. 600 (2015 115–120 [1].

  11. Attractor metabolic networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso M De la Fuente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a Systemic Metabolic Structure in the cell, characterized by a set of different enzymatic reactions always locked into active states (metabolic core while the rest of the catalytic processes are only intermittently active. This global metabolic structure was verified for Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and it seems to be a common key feature to all cellular organisms. In concordance with these observations, the cell can be considered a complex metabolic network which mainly integrates a large ensemble of self-organized multienzymatic complexes interconnected by substrate fluxes and regulatory signals, where multiple autonomous oscillatory and quasi-stationary catalytic patterns simultaneously emerge. The network adjusts the internal metabolic activities to the external change by means of flux plasticity and structural plasticity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to research the systemic mechanisms involved in the regulation of the cellular enzymatic activity we have studied different catalytic activities of a dissipative metabolic network under different external stimuli. The emergent biochemical data have been analysed using statistical mechanic tools, studying some macroscopic properties such as the global information and the energy of the system. We have also obtained an equivalent Hopfield network using a Boltzmann machine. Our main result shows that the dissipative metabolic network can behave as an attractor metabolic network. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have found that the systemic enzymatic activities are governed by attractors with capacity to store functional metabolic patterns which can be correctly recovered from specific input stimuli. The network attractors regulate the catalytic patterns

  12. Astrocyte glycogenolysis is triggered by store-operated calcium entry and provides metabolic energy for cellular calcium homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Margit S; Fox, Rebecca; Schousboe, Arne;

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glycogen, the only storage form of glucose in the brain, has been shown to play a fundamental role in supporting learning and memory, an effect achieved by providing metabolic support for neurons. We have examined the interplay between glycogenolysis and the bioenergetics of astrocytic...... cultures of murine cerebellar and cortical astrocytes, and determined glycogen content to investigate the effects of SOCE on glycogen metabolism. By blocking glycogenolysis, we tested energetic dependency of SOCE-related Ca(2+) dynamics on glycogenolytic ATP. Our results show that SOCE triggers astrocytic...... glycogenolysis. Upon inhibition of adenylate cyclase with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, glycogen content was no longer significantly different from that in unstimulated control cells, indicating that SOCE triggers astrocytic glycogenolysis in a cAMP-dependent manner. When glycogenolysis was inhibited in cortical...

  13. Quantitative prediction of cellular metabolism with constraint-based models: the COBRA Toolbox v2.0

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, a growing community of researchers has emerged around the use of COnstraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) methods to simulate, analyze and predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes using genome-scale models. The COBRA Toolbox, a MATLAB package for implementing COBRA methods, was presented earlier. Here we present a significant update of this in silico ToolBox. Version 2.0 of the COBRA Toolbox expands the scope of computations by including in silico analysis m...

  14. Organ-specific rates of cellular respiration in developing sunflower seedlings and their bearing on metabolic scaling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J

    2012-10-01

    Fifty years ago Max Kleiber described what has become known as the "mouse-to-elephant" curve, i.e., a log-log plot of basal metabolic rate versus body mass. From these data, "Kleiber's 3/4 law" was deduced, which states that metabolic activity scales as the three fourths-power of body mass. However, for reasons unknown so far, no such "universal scaling law" has been discovered for land plants (embryophytes). Here, we report that the metabolic rates of four different organs (cotyledons, cotyledonary hook, hypocotyl, and roots) of developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings grown in darkness (skotomorphogenesis) and in white light (photomorphogenesis) differ by a factor of 2 to 5 and are largely independent of light treatment. The organ-specific respiration rate (oxygen uptake per minute per gram of fresh mass) of the apical hook, which is composed of cells with densely packaged cytoplasm, is much higher than that of the hypocotyl, an organ that contains vacuolated cells. Data for cell length, cell density, and DNA content reveal that (1) hook opening in white light is caused by a stimulation of cell elongation on the inside of the curved organ, (2) respiration, cell density and DNA content are much higher in the hook than in the stem, and (3) organ-specific respiration rates and the DNA contents of tissues are statistically correlated. We conclude that, due to the heterogeneity of the plant body caused by the vacuolization of the cells, Kleiber's law, which was deduced using mammals as a model system, cannot be applied to embryophytes. In plants, this rule may reflect scaling phenomena at the level of the metabolically active protoplasmic contents of the cells.

  15. Cellular imaging of deep organ using two-photon Bessel light-sheet nonlinear structured illumination microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Han; Li, Yu; Ashok, Amit; Liang, Rongguang; Zhou, Weibin; Peng, Leilei

    2014-05-01

    In vivo fluorescent cellular imaging of deep internal organs is highly challenging, because the excitation needs to penetrate through strong scattering tissue and the emission signal is degraded significantly by photon diffusion induced by tissue-scattering. We report that by combining two-photon Bessel light-sheet microscopy with nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (SIM), live samples up to 600 microns wide can be imaged by light-sheet microscopy with 500 microns penetration depth, and diffused background in deep tissue light-sheet imaging can be reduced to obtain clear images at cellular resolution in depth beyond 200 microns. We demonstrate in vivo two-color imaging of pronephric glomeruli and vasculature of zebrafish kidney, whose cellular structures located at the center of the fish body are revealed in high clarity by two-color two-photon Bessel light-sheet SIM.

  16. Modulating cellular recombination potential through alterations in RecA structure and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhlanova, Irina V; Dudkina, Alexandra V; Baitin, Dima M; Knight, Kendall L; Cox, Michael M; Lanzov, Vladislav A

    2010-12-01

    The wild-type Escherichia coli RecA protein is a recombinase platform with unrealized recombination potential. We have explored the factors affecting recombination during conjugation with a quantitative assay. Regulatory proteins that affect RecA function have the capacity to increase or decrease recombination frequencies by factors up to sixfold. Autoinhibition by the RecA C-terminus can affect recombination frequency by factors up to fourfold. The greatest changes in recombination frequency measured here are brought about by point mutations in the recA gene. RecA variants can increase recombination frequencies by more than 50-fold. The RecA protein thus possesses an inherently broad functional range. The RecA protein of E. coli (EcRecA) is not optimized for recombination function. Instead, much of the recombination potential of EcRecA is structurally suppressed, probably reflecting cellular requirements. One point mutation in EcRecA with a particularly dramatic effect on recombination frequency, D112R, exhibits an enhanced capacity to load onto SSB-coated ssDNA, overcome the effects of regulatory proteins such as PsiB and RecX, and to pair homologous DNAs. Comparisons of key RecA protein mutants reveal two components to RecA recombination function - filament formation and the inherent DNA pairing activity of the formed filaments.

  17. Cellular automata segmentation of the boundary between the compacta of vertebral bodies and surrounding structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Nimsky, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Due to the aging population, spinal diseases get more and more common nowadays; e.g., lifetime risk of osteoporotic fracture is 40% for white women and 13% for white men in the United States. Thus the numbers of surgical spinal procedures are also increasing with the aging population and precise diagnosis plays a vital role in reducing complication and recurrence of symptoms. Spinal imaging of vertebral column is a tedious process subjected to interpretation errors. In this contribution, we aim to reduce time and error for vertebral interpretation by applying and studying the GrowCut - algorithm for boundary segmentation between vertebral body compacta and surrounding structures. GrowCut is a competitive region growing algorithm using cellular automata. For our study, vertebral T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans were first manually outlined by neurosurgeons. Then, the vertebral bodies were segmented in the medical images by a GrowCut-trained physician using the semi-automated GrowCut-algorithm. Afterwards, results of both segmentation processes were compared using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and the Hausdorff Distance (HD) which yielded to a DSC of 82.99+/-5.03% and a HD of 18.91+/-7.2 voxel, respectively. In addition, the times have been measured during the manual and the GrowCut segmentations, showing that a GrowCutsegmentation - with an average time of less than six minutes (5.77+/-0.73) - is significantly shorter than a pure manual outlining.

  18. Influence of processing conditions on strut structure and compressive properties of cellular lattice structures fabricated by selective laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Chunlei, E-mail: c.qiu@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Yue, Sheng [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Adkins, Nicholas J.E.; Ward, Mark; Hassanin, Hany [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lee, Peter D., E-mail: peter.lee@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Withers, Philip J., E-mail: p.j.withers@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Attallah, Moataz M., E-mail: m.m.attallah@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-25

    AlSi10Mg cellular lattice structures have been fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM) using a range of laser scanning speeds and powers. The as-fabricated strut size, morphology and internal porosity were investigated using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) and correlated to the compressive properties of the structure. Strut diameter was found to increase monotonically with laser power while the porosity was largest at intermediate powers. Laser scanning speed was found to thicken the struts only at slow rates while the porosity was largest at intermediate speeds. High speed imaging showed the melt pool to be larger at high laser powers. Further the melt pool shape was found to vary cyclically over time, steadily growing before becoming increasingly instable and irregularly shaped before abruptly falling in size due to splashing of molten materials and the process repeating. Upon compressive loading, lattice deformation was homogeneous prior to the peak stress before falling sharply due to the creation of a (one strut wide) shear band at around 45° to the compression axis. The specific yield strength expressed as the yield stress/(yield stress of the aluminium × relative density) is not independent of processing conditions, suggesting that further improvements in properties can be achieved by process optimisation. Lattice struts failed near nodes by a mixture of ductile and brittle fracture.

  19. Perturbations of amino acid metabolism associated with glyphosate-dependent inhibition of shikimic acid metabolism affect cellular redox homeostasis and alter the abundance of proteins involved in photosynthesis and photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P; Bulman, Christopher A; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H

    2011-09-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway.

  20. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  1. Structural Development, Cellular Differentiation and Proliferation of the Respiratory Epithelium in the Bovine Fetal Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowska, J; Cousens, C; Finlayson, J; Collie, D; Dagleish, M P

    2016-01-01

    Fetal bovine lung samples of 11 different gestational ages were assigned to a classical developmental stage based on histological morphology. Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize the morphology of forming airways, proliferation rate of airway epithelium and the presence of epithelial cell types (i.e. ciliated cells, club cells, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and type II pneumocytes). Typical structural organization of pseudoglandular (84-98 days gestational age [DGA]), canalicular (154-168 DGA) and alveolar (224-266 DGA) stages was recognized. In addition, transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular (112-126 DGA) and canalicular-saccular (182 DGA) morphologies were present. The embryonic stage was not observed. A significantly (P epithelium, on average 5.5% and 4.4% in bronchi and bronchioles, respectively, was present in the transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular phase (112-126 DGA) compared with all other phases, while from 8 weeks before term (224-266 DGA) proliferation had almost ceased. The first epithelial cells identified by specific marker proteins in the earliest samples available for study (84 DGA) were ciliated cells and NECs. Club cells were present initially at 112 DGA and type II pneumocytes at 224 DGA. At the latest time points (224-226 DGA) these latter cell types were still present at a much lower percentage compared with adult cattle. This study characterized bovine fetal lung development by histological morphology and cellular composition of the respiratory epithelium and suggests that the apparent structural anatomical maturity of the bovine lung at term is not matched by functional maturity of the respiratory epithelium.

  2. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 1: structure-activity relationships, assessments of selectivity and cellular potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J

    2009-08-15

    Identification of potent benzothiophene inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, selectivity assessments against CDK2, cellular potency and mechanism of action are presented. Crystallographic data provide a rationale for the observed MK2 potency as well as selectivity over CDK2 for this class of inhibitors.

  3. Size structure, not metabolic scaling rules, determines fisheries reference points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Beyer, Jan

    2015-01-01

    that even though small species have a higher productivity than large species their resilience towards fishing is lower than expected from metabolic scaling rules. Further, we show that the fishing mortality leading to maximum yield per recruit is an ill-suited reference point. The theory can be used...... these empirical relations is lacking. Here, we combine life-history invariants, metabolic scaling and size-spectrum theory to develop a general size- and trait-based theory for demography and recruitment of exploited fish stocks. Important concepts are physiological or metabolic scaled mortalities and flux...... of individuals or their biomass to size. The theory is based on classic metabolic relations at the individual level and uses asymptotic size W∞ as a trait. The theory predicts fundamental similarities and differences between small and large species in vital rates and response to fishing. The central result...

  4. Metabolic fate of saturated and monounsaturated dietary fats: the Mediterranean diet revisited from epidemiological evidence to cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Momken, Iman; Schoeller, Dale A; Simon, Chantal; Blanc, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates favourable effects of the Mediterranean diet, partly associated to its monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) content on both obesity and diabetes. However, neither the underlying mechanisms by which the Mediterranean diet exerts its protective effect, nor the interplay with other environmental factors (i.e. physical activity), are fully characterised. In this review, we examined recent data on how the metabolic fate of MUFA and saturated fatty acids (SFA) differs. Because of differential packaging into lipoproteins, hydrolysis of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins by lipoprotein lipase and transport into oxidative tissues, MUFA are oxidised more than SFA. This high MUFA oxidation favour lipid oxidation and according to the oxidative balance concept reduces the risk of obesity. It also improves the intra-muscular triacylglycerol turnover, which mitigates the SFA-induced accumulation of diacylglycerol and ceramides, and thus protects the insulin sensitivity and cell viability. Finally, physical activity through its action on the energy turnover differentially regulates the metabolism of SFA and MUFA. The putative combined role of AMP-activated kinase and mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate transferase on the intra-muscular partitioning of MUFA and SFA provides new areas of research to better understand the beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet and physical activity on obesity and diabetes.

  5. Working memory dysfunction associated with brain functional deficits and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chung-Man; Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Choi, Nam-Gil; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-08-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with brain functional and morphological changes in connected with emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit. This study dealt with the neural functional deficits and metabolic abnormalities in working memory (WM) task with emotion-inducing distractors in patients with GAD. Fourteen patients with GAD and 14 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3T. In response to the emotional distractors in WM tasks, the patients concurrently showed higher activity in the hippocampus and lower activities in the superior occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and precentral gyrus compared to the controls. MRS revealed significantly lower choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC. In particular, the Cho ratios were positively correlated with the brain activities based on blood oxygenation level-dependent signal change in the DLPFC. This study provides the first evidence for the association between the metabolic alterations and functional deficit in WM processing with emotion-inducing distractors in GAD. These findings will be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction in connection with WM impairment in GAD.

  6. Quantitative prediction of cellular metabolism with constraint-based models: the COBRA Toolbox v2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Jan; Que, Richard; Fleming, Ronan M T; Thiele, Ines; Orth, Jeffrey D; Feist, Adam M; Zielinski, Daniel C; Bordbar, Aarash; Lewis, Nathan E; Rahmanian, Sorena; Kang, Joseph; Hyduke, Daniel R; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2011-08-04

    Over the past decade, a growing community of researchers has emerged around the use of constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) methods to simulate, analyze and predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes using genome-scale models. The COBRA Toolbox, a MATLAB package for implementing COBRA methods, was presented earlier. Here we present a substantial update of this in silico toolbox. Version 2.0 of the COBRA Toolbox expands the scope of computations by including in silico analysis methods developed since its original release. New functions include (i) network gap filling, (ii) (13)C analysis, (iii) metabolic engineering, (iv) omics-guided analysis and (v) visualization. As with the first version, the COBRA Toolbox reads and writes systems biology markup language-formatted models. In version 2.0, we improved performance, usability and the level of documentation. A suite of test scripts can now be used to learn the core functionality of the toolbox and validate results. This toolbox lowers the barrier of entry to use powerful COBRA methods.

  7. Methanogenesis: Syntrophic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieber, J.R.; McInerney, M.J.; Plugge, C.M.; Schink, B.; Gunsales, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    "Water is life!" All active cellular systems require water as the medium and solvent of their metabolic activities. Hydrophobic compounds and structures, which tend to exclude water, though providing inter alia excellent sources of energy and a means of biological compartmentalization, present probl

  8. Leaf Rolling and Stem Fasciation in Grass Pea (Lathyrus sativus L. Mutant Are Mediated through Glutathione-Dependent Cellular and Metabolic Changes and Associated with a Metabolic Diversion through Cysteine during Phenotypic Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibyendu Talukdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Lathyrus sativus L. mutant isolated in ethylmethane sulfonate-treated M2 progeny of mother variety BioL-212 and designated as rlfL-1 was characterized by inwardly rolled-leaf and stem and bud fasciations. The mutant exhibited karyomorphological peculiarities in both mitosis and meiosis with origin of aneuploidy. The mitosis was vigorous with high frequency of divisional cells and their quick turnover presumably steered cell proliferations. Significant transcriptional upregulations of cysteine and glutathione synthesis and concomitant stimulations of glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense helped rlfL-1 mutant to maintain balanced reactive oxygen species (ROS metabolisms, as deduced by ROS-imaging study. Glutathione synthesis was shut down in buthionine sulfoximine- (BSO- treated mother plant and mutant, and leaf-rolling and stems/buds fasciations in the mutant were reversed, accompanied by normalization of mitotic cell division process. Antioxidant defense was downregulated under low glutathione-redox but cysteine-desulfurations and photorespiratory glycolate oxidase transcripts were markedly overexpressed, preventing cysteine overaccumulation but resulted in excess H2O2 in BSO-treated mutant. This led to oxidative damage in proliferating cells, manifested by severe necrosis in rolled-leaf and fasciated stems. Results indicated vital role of glutathione in maintaining abnormal proliferations in plant organs, and its deficiency triggered phenotypic reversal through metabolic diversions of cysteine and concomitant cellular and metabolic modulations.

  9. Sub-cellular structure studied by combined atomic force-fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, Andreea

    2009-03-01

    A novel experimental technique that integrates atomic force microscopy (AFM) with fluorescence imaging was used to study the role of extracellular matrix proteins in cellular organization. To understand the mechanism by which living cells sense mechanical forces, and how they respond and adapt to their environment, we developed a new technology able to investigate cellular behavior at sub-cellular level that integrates an AFM with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and fast-spinning disk (FSD) confocal microscopy. Live smooth muscle cells exhibited differences in focal adhesions and actin pattern depending on the extracellular matrix used for substrate coating. Data obtained by using the AFM-optical imaging integrated technique offer novel quantitative information that allows understanding the fundamental processes of cellular reorganization in response to extracellular matrix modulation. The integrated microscope presented here is broadly applicable across a wide range of molecular dynamic studies in any adherent live cells.

  10. Manifestation of the shape-memory effect in polyetherurethane cellular plastics, fabric composites, and sandwich structures under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaevskii, P. G.; Kozlov, N. A.; Agapov, I. G.; Reznichenko, G. M.; Churilo, N. V.; Churilo, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    The results of experiments that were performed to test the feasibility of creating sandwich structures (consisting of thin-layer sheaths of polymer composites and a cellular polymer core) with the shapememory effect as models of the transformable components of space structures have been given. The data obtained indicate that samples of sandwich structures under microgravity conditions on board the International Space Station have recovered their shape to almost the same degree as under terrestrial conditions, which makes it possible to recommend them for creating components of transformable space structures on their basis.

  11. Cellular parameters for track structure modelling of radiation hazard in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmark, M.; Lind, B.; Gudowska, I.; Waligorski, M.

    Based on irradiation with 45 MeV/u N and B ions and with Co-60 gamma rays, track structure cellular parameters have been fitted for V 79-379A Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts and for human melanoma cells (AA wtp53). These sets of parameters will be used to develop a calculation of radiation hazard in deep space, based on the system for evaluating, summing and reporting occupational exposures proposed in 1967 by subcommittee of the NCRP, but never issued as an NCRP report. The key concepts of this system were: i) expression of the risk from all radiation exposures relative to that from a whole-body exposure to Co-60 radiation; ii) relating the risk from any exposure to that of the standard (Co-60) radiation through an "effectiveness factor" (ef), a product of sub-factors representing radiation quality, body region irradiated, and depth of penetration of radiation; the product of absorbed dose by ef being termed the "exposure record unit" (eru); iii) development of ef values and a cumulative eru record for external and internal emitters. Application of this concept should provide a better description of the Gy -equivalent presently in use by NASA for evaluating risk in deep space than the equivalent dose, following ICRP-60 recommendations. Dose and charged particle fluence levels encountered in space, particularly after Solar Particle Events, require that deterministic rather than stochastic effects be considered. Also, synergistic effects due to simultaneous multiple charged particle transfers, may have to be considered. Thus, models applicable in radiotherapy, where the Gy -equivalent is also applied, in conjunction with transport calculations performed using, e.g. the ADAM and EVA phantoms, along the concepts of the 1967 NCRP system, may be more appropriate for evaluating the radiation hazard from external fields with a large flux and a major high-LET component.

  12. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E.;

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we intr...

  13. Structural analysis and mutant growth properties reveal distinctive enzymatic and cellular roles for the three major L-alanine transaminases of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Soler, Esther; Fernandez, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Garces, Fernando; Richardson, Andrew J; Quintana, Juan F; Rudd, Kenneth E; Coll, Miquel; Vega, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA). Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation.

  14. Structural analysis and mutant growth properties reveal distinctive enzymatic and cellular roles for the three major L-alanine transaminases of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Peña-Soler

    Full Text Available In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA. Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation.

  15. Structural Analysis and Mutant Growth Properties Reveal Distinctive Enzymatic and Cellular Roles for the Three Major L-Alanine Transaminases of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Estepa, Miguel; Garces, Fernando; Richardson, Andrew J.; Quintana, Juan F.; Rudd, Kenneth E.; Coll, Miquel; Vega, M. Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA). Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation. PMID:25014014

  16. Mathematical model of uptake and metabolism of arsenic(III in human hepatocytes - Incorporation of cellular antioxidant response and threshold-dependent behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isukapalli Sastry S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is an environmental pollutant, potent human toxicant, and oxidative stress agent with a multiplicity of health effects associated with both acute and chronic exposures. A semi-mechanistic cellular-level toxicokinetic (TK model was developed in order to describe the uptake, biotransformation and clearance of arsenical species in human hepatocytes. Notable features of this model are the incorporation of arsenic-glutathione complex formation and a "switch-like" formulation to describe the antioxidant response of hepatocytes to arsenic exposure. Results The cellular-level TK model applies mass action kinetics in order to predict the concentrations of trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals in hepatocytes. The model simulates uptake of arsenite (iAsIII via aquaporin isozymes 9 (AQP9s, glutathione (GSH conjugation, methylation by arsenic methyltransferase (AS3MT, efflux through multidrug resistant proteins (MRPs and the induced antioxidant response via thioredoxin reductase (TR activity. The model was parameterized by optimization of model estimates for arsenite (iAsIII, monomethylated (MMA and dimethylated (DMA arsenicals concentrations with time-course experimental data in human hepatocytes for a time span of 48 hours, and dose-response data at 24 hours for a range of arsenite concentrations from 0.1 to 10 μM. Global sensitivity analysis of the model showed that at low doses the transport parameters had a dominant role, whereas at higher doses the biotransformation parameters were the most significant. A parametric comparison of the TK model with an analogous model developed for rat hepatocytes from the literature demonstrated that the biotransformation of arsenite (e.g. GSH conjugation has a large role in explaining the variation in methylation between rats and humans. Conclusions The cellular-level TK model captures the temporal modes of arsenical accumulation in human hepatocytes. It highlighted the key biological

  17. METABOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine the allele frequencies of genetic variants 373 Ala→Pro and 451 Arg→Gln of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and to explore their potential impacts on serum lipid metabolism. Methods: The genotypes in CETP codon 373 and 451 in 91 German healthy students and 409 an-

  18. Metabolic biotransformation of copper-benzo[a]pyrene combined pollutant on the cellular interface of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuona; Yin, Hua; Tang, Shaoyu; Peng, Hui; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that Stenotrophomonas maltophilia can bind an appreciable amount of Cu(II) and degrade BaP. However, the removal mechanisms of Cu(II) coexisted with BaP by S. maltophilia are still unclear. In this study, the micro-interaction of contaminants on the cellular surface was investigated. The results indicated that carboxyl groups played an important role in the binding of copper to the thallus and that the cell walls were the main adsorption sites. Nevertheless, these reactive groups had no obvious effect on the uptake of BaP. Instead, the disruption and modification of cell walls accelerated transportation of BaP across the membrane into cells. The observation of SEM-EDS confirmed that Cu(II) would be adsorbed and precipitated onto the cell surface but would also be removed by extracellular precipitation when BaP coexisted. And the XPS analysis reflected that part of Cu(II) bound onto biosorbents changed into Cu(I) and Cu.

  19. c-Myc and AMPK Control Cellular Energy Levels by Cooperatively Regulating Mitochondrial Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia R Edmunds

    Full Text Available The c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK regulate glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (Oxphos although often for different purposes. Because Myc over-expression depletes ATP with the resultant activation of AMPK, we explored the potential co-dependency of and cross-talk between these proteins by comparing the consequences of acute Myc induction in ampk+/+ (WT and ampk-/- (KO murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs. KO MEFs showed a higher basal rate of glycolysis than WT MEFs and an appropriate increase in response to activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor (MycER fusion protein. However, KO MEFs had a diminished ability to increase Oxphos, mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species in response to MycER activation. Other differences between WT and KO MEFs, either in the basal state or following MycER induction, included abnormalities in electron transport chain function, levels of TCA cycle-related oxidoreductases and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox states. Transcriptional profiling of pathways pertinent to glycolysis, Oxphos and mitochondrial structure and function also uncovered significant differences between WT and KO MEFs and their response to MycER activation. Finally, an unbiased mass-spectrometry (MS-based survey capable of quantifying ~40% of all mitochondrial proteins, showed about 15% of them to be AMPK- and/or Myc-dependent in their steady state. Significant differences in the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, which dictate pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A abundance, were also differentially responsive to Myc and AMPK and could account for some of the differences in basal metabolite levels that were also detected by MS. Thus, Myc and AMPK are highly co-dependent and appear to engage in significant cross-talk across numerous pathways which support metabolic and ATP-generating functions.

  20. X-ray structural studies of the entire extra-cellular region of the Ser/Thr kinase PrkC from Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggiero, Alessia; Squeglia, Flavia; Marasco, Daniela; Marchetti, Roberta; Molinaro, Antonio; Berisio, Rita

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial Ser/Thr kinases modulate a wide number of cellular processes. PrkC kinase from human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus was also shown to induce germination of Bacillus subtilis spores, in response to cell-wall muropeptides. The presence of muropeptides in the bacterial extra-cellular milieu is a strong signal that growing conditions are promising. We report here the x-ray structure of the entire extra-cellular region of PrkC from Staphylococcus aureus. This structur...

  1. Rutin as a Mediator of Lipid Metabolism and Cellular Signaling Pathways Interactions in Fibroblasts Altered by UVA and UVB Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybałtowska-Kawałko, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Background. Rutin is a natural nutraceutical that is a promising compound for the prevention of UV-induced metabolic changes in skin cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of rutin on redox and endocannabinoid systems, as well as proinflammatory and proapoptotic processes, in UV-irradiated fibroblasts. Methods. Fibroblasts exposed to UVA and UVB radiation were treated with rutin. The activities and levels of oxidants/antioxidants and endocannabinoid system components, as well as lipid, DNA, and protein oxidation products, and the proinflammatory and pro/antiapoptotic proteins expression were measured. Results. Rutin reduced UV-induced proinflammatory response and ROS generation and enhanced the activity/levels of antioxidants (SOD, GSH-Px, vitamin E, GSH, and Trx). Rutin also normalized UV-induced Nrf2 expression. Its biological activity prevented changes in the levels of the lipid mediators: MDA, 4-HNE, and endocannabinoids, as well as the endocannabinoid receptors CB1/2, VR1, and GPR55 expression. Furthermore, rutin prevented the protein modifications (tyrosine derivatives formation in particular) and decreased the levels of the proapoptotic markers—caspase-3 and cytochrome c. Conclusion. Rutin prevents UV-induced inflammation and redox imbalance at protein and transcriptional level which favors lipid, protein, and DNA protection. In consequence rutin regulates endocannabinoid system and apoptotic balance. PMID:28168010

  2. Rutin as a Mediator of Lipid Metabolism and Cellular Signaling Pathways Interactions in Fibroblasts Altered by UVA and UVB Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gęgotek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rutin is a natural nutraceutical that is a promising compound for the prevention of UV-induced metabolic changes in skin cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of rutin on redox and endocannabinoid systems, as well as proinflammatory and proapoptotic processes, in UV-irradiated fibroblasts. Methods. Fibroblasts exposed to UVA and UVB radiation were treated with rutin. The activities and levels of oxidants/antioxidants and endocannabinoid system components, as well as lipid, DNA, and protein oxidation products, and the proinflammatory and pro/antiapoptotic proteins expression were measured. Results. Rutin reduced UV-induced proinflammatory response and ROS generation and enhanced the activity/levels of antioxidants (SOD, GSH-Px, vitamin E, GSH, and Trx. Rutin also normalized UV-induced Nrf2 expression. Its biological activity prevented changes in the levels of the lipid mediators: MDA, 4-HNE, and endocannabinoids, as well as the endocannabinoid receptors CB1/2, VR1, and GPR55 expression. Furthermore, rutin prevented the protein modifications (tyrosine derivatives formation in particular and decreased the levels of the proapoptotic markers—caspase-3 and cytochrome c. Conclusion. Rutin prevents UV-induced inflammation and redox imbalance at protein and transcriptional level which favors lipid, protein, and DNA protection. In consequence rutin regulates endocannabinoid system and apoptotic balance.

  3. PEG-induced osmotic stress in Mentha x piperita L.: Structural features and metabolic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Búfalo, Jennifer; Rodrigues, Tatiane Maria; de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; Tozin, Luiz Ricardo Dos Santos; Marques, Marcia Ortiz Mayo; Boaro, Carmen Silvia Fernandes

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated whether osmotic stress induced by the exposure of peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) to moderate and severe stress for short periods of time changes the plant's physiological parameters, leaf anatomy and ultrastructure and essential oil. Plants were exposed to two levels of polyethyleneglycol (50 g L(-1) and 100 g L(-1) of PEG) in a hydroponic experiment. The plants exposed to 50 g L(-1) maintained metabolic functions similar to those of the control group (0 g L(-1)) without changes in gas exchange or structural characteristics. The increase in antioxidant enzyme activity reduced the presence of free radicals and protected membranes, including chloroplasts and mitochondria. In contrast, the osmotic stress caused by 100 g L(-1) of PEG inhibited leaf gas exchange, reduced the essential oil content and changed the oil composition, including a decrease in menthone and an increase in menthofuran. These plants also showed an increase in peroxidase activity, but this increase was not sufficient to decrease the lipid peroxidation level responsible for damaging the membranes of organelles. Morphological changes were correlated with the evaluated physiological features: plants exposed to 100 g L(-1) of PEG showed areas with collapsed cells, increases in mesophyll thickness and the area of the intercellular space, cuticle shrinkage, morphological changes in plastids, and lysis of mitochondria. In summary, our results revealed that PEG-induced osmotic stress in M. x piperita depends on the intensity level of the osmotic stress applied; severe osmotic stress changed the structural characteristics, caused damage at the cellular level, and reduced the essential oil content and quality.

  4. Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin is a novel structural component of human erythrocytes and a biomarker of cellular stress and senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna H Antonelou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secretory Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin (sCLU is a ubiquitously expressed chaperone that has been functionally implicated in several pathological conditions of increased oxidative injury, including aging. Nevertheless, the biological role of sCLU in red blood cells (RBCs remained largely unknown. In the current study we identified sCLU as a component of human RBCs and we undertook a detailed analysis of its cellular topology. Moreover, we studied the erythrocytic membrane sCLU content during organismal aging, in conditions of increased organismal stress and accelerated RBCs senescence, as well as during physiological in vivo cellular senescence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a combination of molecular, biochemical and high resolution microscopical methods we found that sCLU is a novel structural component of RBCs extra- and intracellular plasma membrane and cytosol. We observed that the RBCs membrane-associated sCLU decreases during organismal aging or exposure to acute stress (e.g. smoking, in patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, as well as during RBCs in vivo senescence. In all cases, sCLU reduction paralleled the expression of typical cellular senescence, redox imbalance and erythrophagocytosis markers which are also indicative of the senescence- and oxidative stress-mediated RBCs membrane vesiculation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that sCLU at the mature RBCs is not a silent remnant of the erythroid precursors, but an active component being functionally implicated in the signalling mechanisms of cellular senescence and oxidative stress-responses in both healthy and diseased organism. The reduced sCLU protein levels in the RBCs membrane following cell exposure to various endogenous or exogenous stressors closely correlates to the levels of cellular senescence and redox imbalance markers, suggesting the usefulness of sCLU as a sensitive biomarker of senescence and cellular stress.

  5. Regulation of lipid metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng LI

    2011-01-01

    @@ Lipids including cholesterol, phospholipids, fatty acids and triacylglycerols are important cellular constituents involved in membrane structure, energy homeostasis and many biological processes such as signal transduction, organelle development and cell differentiation.Recently, the area of lipid metabolism has drawn a great deal of attention due to its emerging role in the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis and liver steatosis.We decided to organize a special issue of Frontiers in Biology focusing on our current understanding of lipid metabolism.

  6. Effects of cellular structure and cell wall components on water holding capacity of mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paudel, Ekaraj; Boom, Remko M.; Haaren, van Els; Siccama, Joanne; Sman, van der Ruud G.M.

    2016-01-01

    In a sequel of papers we have investigated effects of different physical contributions to the water holding capacity of foods by considering the common white button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus). In the current paper of our sequel, we consider individual contributions of the cellular phase to wate

  7. BICD2, dynactin, and LIS1 cooperate in regulating dynein recruitment to cellular structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Splinter (Daniël); D.S. Razafsky (David); M.A. Schlager (Max); A. Serra-Marques (Andrea); I. Grigoriev (Ilya); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); N. Keijzer (Nanda); K. Jiang (Kai); S. Poser; A. Hyman (Anthony); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); S.J. King (Stephen); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCytoplasmic dynein is the major microtubule minus-end-directed cellular motor. Most dynein activities require dynactin, but the mechanisms regulating cargo-dependent dynein-dynactin interaction are poorly understood. In this study, we focus on dynein-dynactin recruitment to cargo by the

  8. Chromatin structure and cellular radiosensitivity : A comparison of two human tumour cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, EC; Roesink, JM; Rosemann, M; Brunsting, JF; Driessen, C; Orta, T; Konings, AWT; Peacock, JH; Kampinga, HH

    1996-01-01

    The role of variation in susceptibility to DNA damage induction was studied as a determinant for cellular radiosensitivity. Comparison of the radiosensitive HX142 and radioresistant RT112 cell lines previously revealed higher susceptibility to X-ray-induced DNA damage in the sensitive cell line usin

  9. Applications of the Cellular Automata Paradigm in Structural Analysis and Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdalla, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent is een techniek ontstaan voor de aanpak van gecombineerde automatische analyse en ontwerp van een- of meerdimensionale elastische systemen in een omgeving van meervoudig parallel rekenen. De aanpak is gebaseerd op het paradigma van âcellular automata (CA)â. De implementatie van deze techniek

  10. Low Density Nanocellular Polymers Based on PMMA Produced by Gas Dissolution Foaming: Fabrication and Cellular Structure Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Martín-de León

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the processing conditions needed to produce low density nanocellular polymers based on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA with relative densities between 0.45 and 0.25, cell sizes between 200 and 250 nm and cell densities higher than 1014 cells/cm3. To produce these nanocellular polymers, the foaming parameters of the gas dissolution foaming technique using CO2 as blowing agent have been optimized. Taking into account previous works, the amount of CO2 uptake was maintained constant (31% by weight for all the materials. Foaming parameters were modified between 40 °C and 110 °C for the foaming temperature and from 1 to 5 min for the foaming time. Foaming temperatures in the range of 80 to 100 °C and foaming times of 2 min allow for production of nanocellular polymers with relative densities as low as 0.25. Cellular structure has been studied in-depth to obtain the processing-cellular structure relationship. In addition, it has been proved that the glass transition temperature depends on the cellular structure. This effect is associated with a confinement of the polymer in the cell walls, and is one of the key reasons for the improved properties of nanocellular polymers.

  11. The structure of wheat bread influences the postprandial metabolic response in healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eelderink, Coby; Noort, Martijn W J; Sozer, Nesli;

    2015-01-01

    with a similar composition were created using different processing conditions. The postprandial glucose kinetics and metabolic response to bread with a compact structure (flat bread, FB) was compared to bread with a porous structure (control bread, CB) in a randomized, crossover study with ten healthy male...... or insulin-independent glucose disposal. These results demonstrate that the structure of wheat bread can influence the postprandial metabolic response, with a more compact structure being more beneficial for health. Bread-making technology should be further explored to create healthier products....

  12. RETRACTED: The Nonlinear Compressive Response and Deformation of an Auxetic Cellular Structure under In-Plane Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the request of the Author, the following article Zhang, W, Hou, W, Hu, Ping and Ma, Z (2014 The Nonlinear Compressive Response and Deformation of an Auxetic Cellular Structure under In-Plane Loading Advances in Mechanical Engineering published 17 November 2014. doi: 10.1155/2014/214681has been retracted due to errors discovered by the authors. On Page 3, the definition of component force in Equation 4 is incorrect. (2 On Page 4, the definition of component force in Equation 11 is incorrect. Moreover this equation should not have parameterM(length of cell wall, because a mistake was made in the process of calculation. Because of the above reasons, the conclusion obtained from the mechanical model is incorrect and should instead state that the Elastic Buckling and Plastic Collapse are both yield modes of this structure (3 On Page 5, the FEA model used in this article is not appropriate, because the deformation of single cell is not homogeneous, which means that the geometrical non-linear effect on single cell model is greater. So in the actual whole structure we may not obtain the results that were described in Page 6 Paragraph 2. (4 The data in figures 8 (page 6 and 9 (page 7 is incorrect and the values of effective Young’s modulus and plateau stress are much larger than reasonable values. The definition of effective stress is wrong in the FEA model, which means the effective stress should be calculated by the total width of cell instead of length of horizontal cell wall. For example, in Figure 8, the plateau stress can reach 140Mpa, this is not reasonable because there are many holes in this cellular structure, and its mechanical properties should be much lower than material properties of cell wall. The reasonable plateau stress should be around 2Mpa. The authors takes responsibility for these errors and regret the publication of invalid results. The nonlinear compressive response and deformation of an auxetic cellular structure that has

  13. Materials Research Society, Symposium Proceedings, Volume 521. Porous and Cellular Materials for Structural Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    blowing agent at 680°C. After stirring, the molten material is cured to expand and fill up the mold for about 15 minutes. Then, the foamed molten...closed cell cellular solids. A "perfect" model is first discussed and shown to predict the behavior of PVC foams well. However, this model over...variations (Section VI), and non-uniform cell shapes (Section VII). Fig. 1. Micro graphs of Divinycell [7] HI30 expanded PVC (left) and Alporas [8

  14. Structural elucidation and cellular antioxidant activity evaluation of major antioxidant phenolics in lychee pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongxiao; Ti, Huihui; Zhang, Ruifen; Zhang, Mingwei; Wei, Zhengchen; Deng, Yuanyuan; Guo, Jinxin

    2014-09-01

    Lychee pulp contains phenolic compounds that are strong antioxidants, but the identities of the major antioxidants present are unknown. In the present study, the major contributors to the antioxidant activity of fresh lychee pulp were identified and their cellular antioxidant activities were investigated. Aqueous acetone extracts of lychee pulp were fractionated on polyamide resin, and those fractions with the largest antioxidant and radical scavenging activities were selected using cellular antioxidant activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity assays. Three compounds that were major contributors to the antioxidant activity in these fractions were obtained by reverse-phase preparative HPLC and identified as quercetin 3-O-rutinoside-7-O-α-L-rhamnosidase (quercetin 3-rut-7-rha), quercetin 3-O-rutinoside (rutin) and (-)-epicatechin using NMR spectroscopy, HMBC, and ESI-MS spectrometry. The concentration of quercetin 3-rut-7-rha was 17.25mg per 100g of lychee pulp fresh weight. This is the first report of the identification and cellular antioxidant activity of quercetin 3-rut-7-rha from lychee pulp.

  15. Cellular Energy Absorbing TRIP-Steel/Mg-PSZ Composite: Honeycomb Structures Fabricated by a New Extrusion Powder Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Martin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight linear cellular composite materials on basis of austenite stainless TRIP- (TRansformation Induced Plasticity- steel as matrix with reinforcements of MgO partially stabilized zirconia (Mg-PSZ are described. Two-dimensional cellular materials for structural applications are conventionally produced by sheet expansion or corrugation processes. The presented composites are fabricated by a modified ceramic extrusion powder technology. Characterization of the microstructure in as-received and deformed conditions was carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Magnetic balance measurements and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD were used to identify the deformation-induced martensite evolution in the cell wall material. The honeycomb composite samples exhibit an increased strain hardening up to a certain engineering compressive strain and an extraordinary high specific energy absorption per unit mass and unit volume, respectively. Based on improved property-to-weight ratio such linear cellular structures will be of interest as crash absorbers or stiffened core materials for aerospace, railway, or automotive applications.

  16. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus selectively reverses dopamine denervation-induced cellular defects in the output structures of the basal ganglia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, Pascal; Manrique, Christine; Forni, Claude; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2002-06-15

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is now recognized as an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease, but the molecular basis of its effects remains unknown. This study examined the effects of unilateral STN HFS (2 hr of continuous stimulation) in intact and hemiparkinsonian awake rats on STN neuron metabolic activity and on neurotransmitter-related gene expression in the basal ganglia, by means of in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunocytochemistry. In both intact and hemiparkinsonian rats, this stimulation was found to induce c-fos protein expression but to decrease cytochrome oxidase subunit I mRNA levels in STN neurons. STN HFS did not affect the dopamine lesion-mediated overexpression of enkephalin mRNA or the decrease in substance P in the ipsilateral striatum. The lesion-induced increases in intraneuronal glutamate decarboxylase 67 kDa isoform (GAD67) mRNA levels on the lesion side were reversed by STN HFS in the substantia nigra, partially antagonized in the entopeduncular nucleus but unaffected in the globus pallidus. The stimulation did not affect neuropeptide or GAD67 mRNA levels in the side contralateral to the dopamine lesion or in intact animals. These data furnish the first evidence that STN HFS decreases the metabolic activity of STN neurons and antagonizes dopamine lesion-mediated cellular defects in the basal ganglia output structures. They provide molecular substrate to the therapeutic effects of this stimulation consistent with the current hypothesis that HFS blocks STN neuron activity. However, the differential impact of STN HFS on the effects of dopamine lesion among structures receiving direct STN inputs suggests that this stimulation may not cause simply interruption of STN outflow.

  17. Revealing the cellular metabolism and microstructural changes in vivo in senescing Acer saccharum leaves using two-photon FLIM and full-field OCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Anna, Tulsi; Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Chiou, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Seasonal as well as climate changes have immense effect on bud burst, leaf color and leaf abscission. Autumn phenology of leaves is clearly distinguishable in deciduous plant leaves where the leaf color changes from green to red (leaf senescence). In this work, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) and full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM) were applied to study mitochondrial activity and microstructural changes, respectively, in the senescence of Acer saccharum (Sugar maple) leaves. Fluorescence lifetime of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] was recorded using 2P-FLIM to quantify the cellular metabolic changes. Compared to the green leaves, the red leaves showed a 19% increase (P face sectional images at 0.8 μm axial resolutions of the green and the red color Acer saccharum leaves via FF-OCM using white light emitting diode (WLED) showed a well-defined microstructure of epicuticular waxy layer in green leaves as compared to red leaves where disintegrated microstructure was observed. Our approach can potentially be used to correlate mitochondrial activity with epicuticular microstructural changes in senescing leaves and other biological tissues.

  18. Proteomic screen in the simple metazoan Hydra identifies 14-3-3 binding proteins implicated in cellular metabolism, cytoskeletal organisation and Ca2+ signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imhof Axel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 14-3-3 proteins have been implicated in many signalling mechanisms due to their interaction with Ser/Thr phosphorylated target proteins. They are evolutionarily well conserved in eukaryotic organisms from single celled protozoans and unicellular algae to plants and humans. A diverse array of target proteins has been found in higher plants and in human cell lines including proteins involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, cytoskeletal organisation, secretion and Ca2+ signalling. Results We found that the simple metazoan Hydra has four 14-3-3 isoforms. In order to investigate whether the diversity of 14-3-3 target proteins is also conserved over the whole animal kingdom we isolated 14-3-3 binding proteins from Hydra vulgaris using a 14-3-3-affinity column. We identified 23 proteins that covered most of the above-mentioned groups. We also isolated several novel 14-3-3 binding proteins and the Hydra specific secreted fascin-domain-containing protein PPOD. In addition, we demonstrated that one of the 14-3-3 isoforms, 14-3-3 HyA, interacts with one Hydra-Bcl-2 like protein in vitro. Conclusion Our results indicate that 14-3-3 proteins have been ubiquitous signalling components since the start of metazoan evolution. We also discuss the possibility that they are involved in the regulation of cell numbers in response to food supply in Hydra.

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of a neurotoxigenic Clostridium species using partial genome sequence: Phylogenetic analysis of a few conserved proteins involved in cellular processes and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Dixit, Aparna; Tomar, Arvind; Singh, Lokendra

    2010-04-01

    Clostridial organisms produce neurotoxins, which are generally regarded as the most potent toxic substances of biological origin and potential biological warfare agents. Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin and is responsible for the fatal tetanus disease. In spite of the extensive immunization regimen, the disease is an important cause of death especially among neonates. Strains of C. tetani have not been genetically characterized except the complete genome sequencing of strain E88. The present study reports the genetic makeup and phylogenetic affiliations of an environmental strain of this bacterium with respect to C. tetani E88 and other clostridia. A shot gun library was constructed from the genomic DNA of C. tetani drde, isolated from decaying fish sample. Unique clones were sequenced and sequences compared with its closest relative C. tetani E88. A total of 275 clones were obtained and 32,457 bases of non-redundant sequence were generated. A total of 150 base changes were observed over the entire length of sequence obtained, including, additions, deletions and base substitutions. Of the total 120 ORFs detected, 48 exhibited closest similarity to E88 proteins of which three are hypothetical proteins. Eight of the ORFs exhibited similarity with hypothetical proteins from other organisms and 10 aligned with other proteins from unrelated organisms. There is an overall conservation of protein sequences among the two strains of C. tetani and. Selected ORFs involved in cellular processes and metabolism were subjected to phylogenetic analysis.

  20. Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus c92 Protein Responsible for the Formation of Pyramid-Like Cellular Lysis Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snyder, Jamie C; Brumfield, Susan K; Peng, Nan;

    2011-01-01

    Host cells infected by Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) have been shown to produce unusual pyramid-like structures on the cell surface. These structures represent a virus-induced lysis mechanism that is present in Archaea and appears to be distinct from the holin/endolysin system...... described for DNA bacteriophages. This study investigated the STIV gene products required for pyramid formation in its host Sulfolobus solfataricus. Overexpression of STIV open reading frame (ORF) c92 in S. solfataricus alone is sufficient to produce the pyramid-like lysis structures in cells. Gene...... disruption of c92 within STIV demonstrates that c92 is an essential protein for virus replication. Immunolocalization of c92 shows that the protein is localized to the cellular membranes forming the pyramid-like structures....

  1. Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus c92 protein responsible for the formation of pyramid-like cellular lysis structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jamie C; Brumfield, Susan K; Peng, Nan; She, Qunxin; Young, Mark J

    2011-07-01

    Host cells infected by Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) have been shown to produce unusual pyramid-like structures on the cell surface. These structures represent a virus-induced lysis mechanism that is present in Archaea and appears to be distinct from the holin/endolysin system described for DNA bacteriophages. This study investigated the STIV gene products required for pyramid formation in its host Sulfolobus solfataricus. Overexpression of STIV open reading frame (ORF) c92 in S. solfataricus alone is sufficient to produce the pyramid-like lysis structures in cells. Gene disruption of c92 within STIV demonstrates that c92 is an essential protein for virus replication. Immunolocalization of c92 shows that the protein is localized to the cellular membranes forming the pyramid-like structures.

  2. The structure of wheat bread influences the postprandial metabolic response in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eelderink, Coby; Noort, Martijn W. J.; Sozer, Nesli; Koehorst, Martijn; Holst, Jens J.; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Rehfeld, Jens F.; Poutanen, Kaisa; Vonk, Roel J.; Oudhuis, Lizette; Priebe, Marion G.

    2015-01-01

    Postprandial high glucose and insulin responses after starchy food consumption, associated with an increased risk of developing several metabolic diseases, could possibly be improved by altering food structure. We investigated the influence of a compact food structure; different wheat products with

  3. Origin of structural difference in metabolic networks with respect to temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akutsu Tatsuya

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolism is believed to adaptively shape-shift with changing environment. In recent years, a structural difference with respect to temperature, which is an environmental factor, has been revealed in metabolic networks, implying that metabolic networks transit with temperature. Subsequently, elucidatation of the origin of these structural differences due to temperature is important for understanding the evolution of life. However, the origin has yet to be clarified due to the complexity of metabolic networks. Results Consequently, we propose a simple model with a few parameters to explain the transitions. We first present mathematical solutions of this model using mean-field approximation, and demonstrate that this model can reproduce structural properties, such as heterogeneous connectivity and hierarchical modularity, in real metabolic networks both qualitatively and quantitatively. We next show that the model parameters correlate with optimal growth temperature. In addition, we present a relationship between multiple cyclic properties and optimal growth temperature in metabolic networks. Conclusion From the proposed model, we find that such structural properties are determined by the emergence of a short-cut path, which reduces the minimum distance between two nodes on a graph. Furthermore, we investigate correlations between model parameters and growth temperature; as a result, we find that the emergence of the short-cut path tends to be inhibited with increasing temperature. In addition, we also find that the short-cut path bypasses a relatively long path at high temperature when the emergence of the new path is not inhibited. Even further, additional network analysis provides convincing evidence of the reliability of the proposed model and its conclusions on the possible origins of differences in metabolic network structure.

  4. Membrane plasmalogen composition and cellular cholesterol regulation: a structure activity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Myat Khine K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupted cholesterol regulation leading to increased circulating and membrane cholesterol levels is implicated in many age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and cancer. In vitro and ex vivo cellular plasmalogen deficiency models have been shown to exhibit impaired intra- and extra-cellular processing of cholesterol. Furthermore, depleted brain plasmalogens have been implicated in AD and serum plasmalogen deficiencies have been linked to AD, CVD, and cancer. Results Using plasmalogen deficient (NRel-4 and plasmalogen sufficient (HEK293 cells we investigated the effect of species-dependent plasmalogen restoration/augmentation on membrane cholesterol processing. The results of these studies indicate that the esterification of cholesterol is dependent upon the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA-containing ethanolamine plasmalogen (PlsEtn present in the membrane. We further elucidate that the concentration-dependent increase in esterified cholesterol observed with PUFA-PlsEtn was due to a concentration-dependent increase in sterol-O-acyltransferase-1 (SOAT1 levels, an observation not reproduced by 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. Conclusion The present study describes a novel mechanism of cholesterol regulation that is consistent with clinical and epidemiological studies of cholesterol, aging and disease. Specifically, the present study describes how selective membrane PUFA-PlsEtn enhancement can be achieved using 1-alkyl-2-PUFA glycerols and through this action reduce levels of total and free cholesterol in cells.

  5. Global metabolic optimality in the structure of the coronary arteries

    CERN Document Server

    Keelan, Jonathan; Hague, James P

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the large coronary arteries is both heritable and reasonably consistent between individuals, but the extent to which this results from evolutionary pressure towards an energy-efficient, globally-optimal, structure is unknown. We present an algorithm for the determination of an energetically globally optimal arterial tree in arbitrary tissue geometries. We demonstrate through application of the algorithm that it is possible to generate in-silico vasculatures that closely match porcine anatomical data on all length scales. We therefore conclude that evolutionary pressure has resulted in a near globally optimal structure of the larger coronary arteries. We also examine the effect of changing length scales, predicting that the structures of the coronary arteries can change from a meandering form for small animals to very straight vessels for large animals. The method presented here is not limited to hearts, and represents a major advance in modeling the arterial vasculature, that could have impor...

  6. Development of a Cell-penetrating Peptide that Exhibits Responsive Changes in its Secondary Structure in the Cellular Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Kato, Takuma; Oba, Makoto; Misawa, Takashi; Hattori, Takayuki; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Tanaka, Masakazu; Naito, Mikihiko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are received a lot of attention as an intracellular delivery tool for hydrophilic molecules such as drugs, proteins, and DNAs. We designed and synthesized nona-arginine analogues 1–5 [FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-Pro)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (1), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-ProNH2)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (2), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-ProGu)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (3), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)2-(l-ProGu)2-(l-Arg)4-l-ProGu-(Gly)3-NH2 (4), and FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)6-(l-ProGu)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (5)] containing l-proline (l-Pro) or cationic proline derivatives (l-ProNH2 and l-ProGu), and investigated their cell-penetrating abilities. Interestingly, only peptide 3 having the side-chain guanidinyl l-ProGu exhibited a secondary structural change in cellular environment. Specifically, peptide 3 formed a random structure in hydrophilic conditions, whereas it formed a helical structure under amphipathic conditions. Furthermore, during cellular permeability tests, peptide 3 demonstrated greater cell-penetrating activity than other peptides and effectively transported plasmid DNA into HeLa cells. Thus, l-ProGu-containing peptide 3 may be a useful candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:27609319

  7. Numerical analysis on mechanical behaviors of hierarchical cellular structures with negative Poisson’s ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Yin, Jianhua; Dong, Liang; Lakes, Roderic S.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional hierarchical re-entrant honeycomb structures were designed and the mechanical behaviors of the structures were studied using a finite element method. Hierarchical re-entrant structure of order n (n ≥ 1) was constructed by replacing each vertex of a lower order (n - 1) hierarchical re-entrant structure with a smaller re-entrant hexagon with identical strut aspect ratio. The Poisson’s ratio and energy absorption capacity of re-entrant structures of different hierarchical orders were studied under different compression velocities. The results showed that the Poisson’s ratio of the first and second order hierarchical structures can reach -1.36 and -1.33 with appropriate aspect ratio, 13.8% and 12.1% lower than that of the zeroth order hierarchical structure. The energy absorption capacity of the three models increased with an increasing compression velocity; the second order hierarchical structure exhibited the highest rate of increase in energy absorption capacity with an increasing compression velocity. The plateau stresses of the first and second order hierarchical structures were slightly lower than that of the zeroth order hierarchical structure; however the second order hierarchical structure exhibited the highest energy absorption capacity at high compression velocity (60 m s-1).

  8. Minimal model for complex dynamics in cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suguna, C; Chowdhury, K K; Sinha, S

    1999-11-01

    Cellular functions are controlled and coordinated by the complex circuitry of biochemical pathways regulated by genetic and metabolic feedback processes. This paper aims to show, with the help of a minimal model of a regulated biochemical pathway, that the common nonlinearities and control structures present in biomolecular interactions are capable of eliciting a variety of functional dynamics, such as homeostasis, periodic, complex, and chaotic oscillations, including transients, that are observed in various cellular processes.

  9. HAMLET kills tumor cells by apoptosis: structure, cellular mechanisms, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Pettersson, Jenny; Fischer, Walter; Aronsson, Annika; Svanborg, Catharina

    2005-05-01

    New cancer treatments should aim to destroy tumor cells without disturbing normal tissue. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) offers a new molecular approach to solving this problem, because it induces apoptosis in tumor cells but leaves normal differentiated cells unaffected. After partial unfolding and binding to oleic acid, alpha-lactalbumin forms the HAMLET complex, which enters tumor cells and freezes their metabolic machinery. The cells proceed to fragment their DNA, and they disintegrate with apoptosis-like characteristics. HAMLET kills a wide range of malignant cells in vitro and maintains this activity in vivo in patients with skin papillomas. In addition, HAMLET has striking effects on human glioblastomas in a rat xenograft model. After convection-enhanced delivery, HAMLET diffuses throughout the brain, selectively killing tumor cells and controlling tumor progression without apparent tissue toxicity. HAMLET thus shows great promise as a new therapeutic with the advantage of selectivity for tumor cells and lack of toxicity.

  10. Genome-wide functional annotation and structural verification of metabolic ORFeome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Changyu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in the field of metabolic engineering have been expedited by the availability of genome sequences and metabolic modelling approaches. The complete sequencing of the C. reinhardtii genome has made this unicellular alga a good candidate for metabolic engineering studies; however, the annotation of the relevant genes has not been validated and the much-needed metabolic ORFeome is currently unavailable. We describe our efforts on the functional annotation of the ORF models released by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI, prediction of their subcellular localizations, and experimental verification of their structural annotation at the genome scale. Results We assigned enzymatic functions to the translated JGI ORF models of C. reinhardtii by reciprocal BLAST searches of the putative proteome against the UniProt and AraCyc enzyme databases. The best match for each translated ORF was identified and the EC numbers were transferred onto the ORF models. Enzymatic functional assignment was extended to the paralogs of the ORFs by clustering ORFs using BLASTCLUST. In total, we assigned 911 enzymatic functions, including 886 EC numbers, to 1,427 transcripts. We further annotated the enzymatic ORFs by prediction of their subcellular localization. The majority of the ORFs are predicted to be compartmentalized in the cytosol and chloroplast. We verified the structure of the metabolism-related ORF models by reverse transcription-PCR of the functionally annotated ORFs. Following amplification and cloning, we carried out 454FLX and Sanger sequencing of the ORFs. Based on alignment of the 454FLX reads to the ORF predicted sequences, we obtained more than 90% coverage for more than 80% of the ORFs. In total, 1,087 ORF models were verified by 454 and Sanger sequencing methods. We obtained expression evidence for 98% of the metabolic ORFs in the algal cells grown under constant light in the presence of acetate. Conclusions We functionally

  11. Polyphenols from Bee Pollen: Structure, Absorption, Metabolism and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rzepecka-Stojko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bee pollen constitutes a natural source of antioxidants such as phenolic acids and flavonoids, which are responsible for its biological activity. Research has indicated the correlation between dietary polyphenols and cardioprotective, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anticancerogenic, immunostimulating, antianaemic effects, as well as their beneficial influence on osseous tissue. The beneficial effects of bee pollen on health result from the presence of phenolic acids and flavonoids which possess anti-inflammatory properties, phytosterol and linolenic acid which play an anticancerogenic role, and polysaccharides which stimulate immunological activity. Polyphenols are absorbed in the alimentary tract, metabolised by CYP450 enzymes, and excreted with urine and faeces. Flavonoids and phenolic acids are characterised by high antioxidative potential, which is closely related to their chemical structure. The high antioxidant potential of phenolic acids is due to the presence and location of hydroxyl groups, a carboxyl group in the immediate vicinity of ortho-diphenolic substituents, and the ethylene group between the phenyl ring and the carboxyl group. As regards flavonoids, essential structural elements are hydroxyl groups at the C5 and C7 positions in the A ring, and at the C3′ and C4′ positions in the B ring, and a hydroxyl group at the C3 position in the C ring. Furthermore, both, the double bond between C2 and C3, and a ketone group at the C4 position in the C ring enhance the antioxidative potential of these compounds. Polyphenols have an ideal chemical structure for scavenging free radicals and for creating chelates with metal ions, which makes them effective antioxidants in vivo.

  12. Polyphenols from Bee Pollen: Structure, Absorption, Metabolism and Biological Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepecka-Stojko, Anna; Stojko, Jerzy; Kurek-Górecka, Anna; Górecki, Michał; Kabała-Dzik, Agata; Kubina, Robert; Moździerz, Aleksandra; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-12-04

    Bee pollen constitutes a natural source of antioxidants such as phenolic acids and flavonoids, which are responsible for its biological activity. Research has indicated the correlation between dietary polyphenols and cardioprotective, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anticancerogenic, immunostimulating, antianaemic effects, as well as their beneficial influence on osseous tissue. The beneficial effects of bee pollen on health result from the presence of phenolic acids and flavonoids which possess anti-inflammatory properties, phytosterol and linolenic acid which play an anticancerogenic role, and polysaccharides which stimulate immunological activity. Polyphenols are absorbed in the alimentary tract, metabolised by CYP450 enzymes, and excreted with urine and faeces. Flavonoids and phenolic acids are characterised by high antioxidative potential, which is closely related to their chemical structure. The high antioxidant potential of phenolic acids is due to the presence and location of hydroxyl groups, a carboxyl group in the immediate vicinity of ortho-diphenolic substituents, and the ethylene group between the phenyl ring and the carboxyl group. As regards flavonoids, essential structural elements are hydroxyl groups at the C5 and C7 positions in the A ring, and at the C3' and C4' positions in the B ring, and a hydroxyl group at the C3 position in the C ring. Furthermore, both, the double bond between C2 and C3, and a ketone group at the C4 position in the C ring enhance the antioxidative potential of these compounds. Polyphenols have an ideal chemical structure for scavenging free radicals and for creating chelates with metal ions, which makes them effective antioxidants in vivo.

  13. Fibres and cellular structures preserved in 75-million-year-old dinosaur specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzo, Sergio; Maidment, Susannah C R; Kallepitis, Charalambos; Fearn, Sarah; Stevens, Molly M; Xie, Hai-nan

    2015-06-09

    Exceptionally preserved organic remains are known throughout the vertebrate fossil record, and recently, evidence has emerged that such soft tissue might contain original components. We examined samples from eight Cretaceous dinosaur bones using nano-analytical techniques; the bones are not exceptionally preserved and show no external indication of soft tissue. In one sample, we observe structures consistent with endogenous collagen fibre remains displaying ∼ 67 nm banding, indicating the possible preservation of the original quaternary structure. Using ToF-SIMS, we identify amino-acid fragments typical of collagen fibrils. Furthermore, we observe structures consistent with putative erythrocyte remains that exhibit mass spectra similar to emu whole blood. Using advanced material characterization approaches, we find that these putative biological structures can be well preserved over geological timescales, and their preservation is more common than previously thought. The preservation of protein over geological timescales offers the opportunity to investigate relationships, physiology and behaviour of long extinct animals.

  14. A comparison between track-structure, condensed-history Monte Carlo simulations and MIRD cellular S-values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik-Mansoury, M. A.; Rajabi, H.; Mazdarani, H.

    2017-03-01

    The S-value is a standard measure in cellular dosimetry. S-values are calculated by applying analytical methods or by Monte Carlo simulation. In Monte Carlo simulation, particles are either tracked individually event-by-event or close events are condensed and processed collectively in different steps. Both of these methods have been employed for estimation of cellular S-values, but there is no consistency between the published results. In the present paper, we used the Geant4-DNA track-structure physics model as the reference to estimate the cellular S-values. We compared the results with the corresponding values obtained from the following three condensed-history physics models of Geant4: Penelope, Livermore and standard. The geometry and source were exactly the same in all the simulations. We utilized mono-energetic electrons with an initial kinetic energy in the range 1–700 keV as the source of radiation. We also compared our results with the MIRD S-values. We first drew an overall comparison between different data series and then compared the dependence of results on the energy of particles and the size of scoring compartments. The overall comparison indicated a very good linear correlation (R 2  >  91%) and small bias (3%) between the results of the track-structure model and the condensed-history physics model. The bias between MIRD and the results of Monte Carlo track-structure simulation was considerable (‑8%). However, the point-by-point comparison revealed differences of up to 28% between the condensed-history and the track-structure MC codes for self-absorption S-values in the 10–50 keV energy range. For the cross-absorption S-values, the difference was up to 34%. In this energy range, the difference between the MIRD S-values and the Geant4-DNA results was up to 68%. Our findings suggest that the consistency/inconsistency of the results obtained with different MC simulations depends on the size of the scoring volumes, the energy of the

  15. Cellular Dynamics Drives the Emergence of Supracellular Structure in the Cyanobacterium, Phormidium sp. KS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Sato

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Motile filamentous cyanobacteria, such as Oscillatoria, Phormidium and Arthrospira, are ubiquitous in terrestrial and aquatic environments. As noted by Nägeli in 1860, many of them form complex three-dimensional or two-dimensional structures, such as biofilm, weed-like thalli, bundles of filaments and spirals, which we call supracellular structures. In all of these structures, individual filaments incessantly move back and forth. The structures are, therefore, macroscopic, dynamic structures that are continuously changing their microscopic arrangement of filaments. In the present study, we analyzed quantitatively the movement of individual filaments of Phormidium sp. KS grown on agar plates. Junctional pores, which have been proposed to drive cell movement by mucilage/slime secretion, were found to align on both sides of each septum. The velocity of movement was highest just after the reversal of direction and, then, attenuated exponentially to a final value before the next reversal of direction. This kinetics is compatible with the “slime gun” model. A higher agar concentration restricts the movement more severely and, thus, resulted in more spiral formation. The spiral is a robust form compatible with non-homogeneous movements of different parts of a long filament. We propose a model of spiral formation based on the microscopic movement of filaments.

  16. Digital Morphing Wing: Active Wing Shaping Concept Using Composite Lattice-Based Cellular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Calisch, Sam; Cellucci, Daniel; Cramer, Nick; Gershenfeld, Neil; Swei, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We describe an approach for the discrete and reversible assembly of tunable and actively deformable structures using modular building block parts for robotic applications. The primary technical challenge addressed by this work is the use of this method to design and fabricate low density, highly compliant robotic structures with spatially tuned stiffness. This approach offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional methods for constructing compliant robots. The discrete assembly reduces manufacturing complexity, as relatively simple parts can be batch-produced and joined to make complex structures. Global mechanical properties can be tuned based on sub-part ordering and geometry, because local stiffness and density can be independently set to a wide range of values and varied spatially. The structure's intrinsic modularity can significantly simplify analysis and simulation. Simple analytical models for the behavior of each building block type can be calibrated with empirical testing and synthesized into a highly accurate and computationally efficient model of the full compliant system. As a case study, we describe a modular and reversibly assembled wing that performs continuous span-wise twist deformation. It exhibits high performance aerodynamic characteristics, is lightweight and simple to fabricate and repair. The wing is constructed from discrete lattice elements, wherein the geometric and mechanical attributes of the building blocks determine the global mechanical properties of the wing. We describe the mechanical design and structural performance of the digital morphing wing, including their relationship to wind tunnel tests that suggest the ability to increase roll efficiency compared to a conventional rigid aileron system. We focus here on describing the approach to design, modeling, and construction as a generalizable approach for robotics that require very lightweight, tunable, and actively deformable structures. PMID:28289574

  17. Intravital Multiphoton Imaging of the Kidney: Tubular Structure and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David M; Sanchez, Washington Y; Gobe, Glenda C

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) allows the visualization of dynamic pathophysiological events in real time in live animals. Intravital imaging can be applied to investigate novel mechanisms and treatments of different forms of kidney disease as well as improve our understanding of normal kidney physiology. Using rodent models, in conjunction with endogenous fluorescence and infused exogenous fluorescent dyes, measurement can be made of renal processes such as glomerular permeability, juxtaglomerular apparatus function, interactions of the tubulointerstitium, tubulovascular interactions, vascular flow rate, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Subcellular processes including mitochondrial dynamics, reactive oxygen species production, cytosolic ion concentrations, and death processes of apoptosis and necrosis can also be seen and measured by MPM. The current methods chapter presents an overview of MPM with a focus on techniques for intravital kidney imaging and gives examples of instances where intravital MPM has been utilized to study renal pathophysiology. Suggestions are provided for MPM methods within the confines of intravital microscopy and selected kidney structure. MPM is undoubtedly a powerful new technique for application in experimental nephrology, and we believe it will continue to create new paradigms for understanding and treating kidney disease.

  18. Multigrid Implementation of Cellular Automata for Topology Optimisation of Continuum Structures with Design Dependent loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakhama, R.

    2009-01-01

    Topology optimisation of continuum structures has become mature enough to be often applied in industry and continues to attract the attention of researchers and software companies in various engineering fields. Traditionally, most available algorithms for solving topology optimisation problems are b

  19. Structural, biochemical, cellular, and functional changes in skeletal muscle extracellular matrix with aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, T W; Kjaer, M; Mackey, A L

    2011-01-01

    . Structural changes include an increase in the collagen concentration, a change in the elastic fiber system, and an increase in fat infiltration of skeletal muscle. Biochemical changes include a decreased turnover of collagen with potential accumulation of enzymatically mediated collagen cross...

  20. Auxetic shape memory alloy cellular structures for deployable satellite antennas: design, manufacture and testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Maio D.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the production development and experimental tests related to an hybrid honeycomb-truss made of shape memory alloy (Ni48Ti46Cu6, and used as a demonstrator for a deployable antenna in deep-space missions. Specific emphasis is placed on the modal analysis techniques used to test the lightweight SMA structure.

  1. Constraint-based Hybrid Cellular Automaton Topology Optimization for Advanced Lightweight Blast Resistant Structure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    the desired model. 20 5. References 1. Goetz, J. C.; Tan, H.; Renaud, J. E.; Tovar , A. Structural Topology Optimization for Blast Mitigation...Stander, N. A Topology Optimization Tool for LS-DYNA Users: LS- OPT/Topology. The 7th European LS-DYNA Conference, 2009. 10. Tovar , A.; Patel, N

  2. A TEM study on pre—excystment cellular structures of Euplotes encysticus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUTUKANG; JUNMEIXU

    1995-01-01

    Right before the excystment of an Euplotes encysticus sawtooth-like folds appeared among the pellicle plasmalemma,the inner and outer alveolar membranes were still sticking together,and were not distinguishable.Microtubular layers already formed at the sites beneath the dorsal cortical pellicle corresponding to vegetative cells,but they still proceed to be organized on the ventral structures.Cristae,highly-tangled with tubular-type structures,appeared on the mitochondria,and were morphologically similar to that of vegetative cells.In the cortical ciliatures,such as ciliary shafts,kinetosomes,surrounding fibrillar cirral baskets,and attached structures of ciliatures,etc.,they are different from those in resting cysts which are degenerated or lost.All the ciliature microtubules of ciliary shafts are of the 9+2 pattern,but the microtubule-like structure aggregates at tripletmicrotubule centers of many kinetosmes,are still under various stages of differentiation.Microtubules beneath the kinetosomal rows are of a developmentally elongated stage;crowded chromatins of various shapes and sizes are found in macronucleus,but there are no nuclear pores (formed by nuclear membrane as in resting cysts) on the nuclear membrane where these chromatins attached.

  3. Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Cellular Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Beheshte; Wilson, James; Masood, Samina

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of organisms with environmental magnetic fields at the cellular level is well documented, yet not fully understood. We review the existing experimental results to understand the physics behind the effects of ambient magnetic fields on the growth, metabolism, and proliferation of in vitro cell cultures. Emphasis is placed on identifying the underlying physical principles responsible for alterations to cell structure and behavior.

  4. [Structural and metabolic aspects of heterogenicity of the ventricular cardiac myocytes in coronary insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrish, A S; Blagodarov, V N; Verbitskiĭ, V V; Danilishina, M V

    2003-01-01

    The paper shows comparative analysis of structural-metabolic changes of the ventricular cardiac hystiocytes during transitional restriction of blood supply, which leads to relapsing myocardium hypoperfusion, ischemia and even to cardiac infarction. We have established that an increase of the myocardium arrhythmogenicity, damage of myocardium electrophysiological activity and coronary deficiency are caused by pathologically intensified structural-metabolic heterogeneity of cardiomyocites. The chronic ischemic heart disease is worsening the situation by gradual accumulation of the metastructure changes of heart's working cells. It is possible to connect adaptable hypertrophy of cardiomyocites with compensatory redistribution of loading among them, what is accompanied with the deep reorganization of their metabolism and metastructure under the influence of neurohumoral factors, inadequate transport-trophic maintenance of the function, nonequal edema and fibrosis of the interstitium. The data obtained describe the formation of "prereadiness" of the myocardium to the fatal rhythm disturbance determined by interconnected structural-metabolic changes. Each of these pathological changes separately doesn't induce an impairment of myocardium electric stability but represents a necessary part in origin and development of the pathological process.

  5. Structural Aberrations of Cellular Sialic Acids and TheirFunctions in Cancer Metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sialic acids (neuraminic acids) are a special series of 9-carbon ring negatively charged carbohydrates, which has been found to be selectively changed in malignant cells from structures (both synthesis and structure modifications) to functions (up and down regulation in cells). Sialic acids, in single forms or conjugates, have been systematically studied both in lab and in clinics by GC, GCMS, NMR, HPTLC, HPLC and other modern analytical means. Sialic acids and related conjugates are predicted to be used in cancer diagnosis, cancer prognostic forecasting, designing of cancer chemotherapy regimens, uncovering carcinogenetic processes and neoplasm metastasis. Tumor cell regulative systems and pathways are correlated with sialic acids, which can be applied to prognostic evaluation of cancer patients, and antimetastatic chemotherapy by sialic acid derivatives and analogues. Searching for new biological characteristics of sialic acids in cells have also been extensively studied these days. In this paper, main stream discoveries and advancements are provided , also discussions of possible mechanisms and hypotheses are invoked.

  6. Increased power to weight ratio of piezoelectric energy harvesters through integration of cellular honeycomb structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, N.; Thompson, L. L.

    2016-04-01

    The limitations posed by batteries have compelled the need to investigate energy harvesting methods to power small electronic devices that require very low operational power. Vibration based energy harvesting methods with piezoelectric transduction in particular has been shown to possess potential towards energy harvesters replacing batteries. Current piezoelectric energy harvesters exhibit considerably lower power to weight ratio or specific power when compared to batteries the harvesters seek to replace. To attain the goal of battery-less self-sustainable device operation the power to weight ratio gap between piezoelectric energy harvesters and batteries need to be bridged. In this paper the potential of integrating lightweight honeycomb structures with existing piezoelectric device configurations (bimorph) towards achieving higher specific power is investigated. It is shown in this study that at low excitation frequency ranges, replacing the solid continuous substrate of conventional bimorph with honeycomb structures of the same material results in a significant increase in power to weight ratio of the piezoelectric harvester. At higher driving frequency ranges it is shown that unlike the traditional piezoelectric bimorph with solid continuous substrate, the honeycomb substrate bimorph can preserve optimum global design parameters through manipulation of honeycomb unit cell parameters. Increased operating lifetime and design flexibility of the honeycomb core piezoelectric bimorph is demonstrated as unit cell parameters of the honeycomb structures can be manipulated to alter mass and stiffness properties of the substrate, resulting in unit cell parameter significantly influencing power generation.

  7. Cellular and molecular mechanisms activating the cell death processes by chalcones: Critical structural effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champelovier, Pierre; Chauchet, Xavier; Hazane-Puch, Florence; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Garrel, Catherine; Laporte, François; Boutonnat, Jean; Boumendjel, Ahcène

    2013-12-01

    Chalcones are naturally occurring compounds with diverse pharmacological activities. Chalcones derive from the common structure: 1,3-diphenylpropenone. The present study aims to better understand the mechanistic pathways triggering chalcones anticancer effects and providing evidences that minor structural difference could lead to important difference in mechanistic effect. We selected two recently investigated chalcones (A and B) and investigated them on glioblastoma cell lines. It was found that chalcone A induced an apoptotic process (type I PCD), via the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Chalcone A also increased CDK1/cyclin B ratios and decreased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). Chalcone B induced an autophagic cell death process (type II PCD), ROS-related but independent of both caspases and protein synthesis. Both chalcones increased Bax/Bcl2 ratios and decreased Ki67 and CD71 antigen expressions. The present investigation reveals that despite the close structure of chalcones A and B, significant differences in mechanism of effect were found.

  8. Sponge cell reaggregation: Cellular structure and morphogenetic potencies of multicellular aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Andrey I; Kosevich, Igor A

    2016-02-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are one of the most ancient extant multicellular animals and can provide valuable insights into origin and early evolution of Metazoa. High plasticity of cell differentiations and anatomical structure is characteristic feature of sponges. Present study deals with sponge cell reaggregation after dissociation as the most outstanding case of sponge plasticity. Dynamic of cell reaggregation and structure of multicellular aggregates of three demosponge species (Halichondria panicea (Pallas, 1766), Haliclona aquaeductus (Sсhmidt, 1862), and Halisarca dujardinii Johnston, 1842) were studied. Sponge tissue dissociation was performed mechanically. Resulting cell suspensions were cultured at 8-10°C for at least 5 days. Structure of multicellular aggregates was studied by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Studied species share common stages of cell reaggregation-primary multicellular aggregates, early-stage primmorphs and primmorphs, but the rate of reaggregation varies considerably among species. Only cells of H. dujardinii are able to reconstruct functional and viable sponge after primmorphs formation. Sponge reconstruction in this species occurs due to active cell locomotion. Development of H. aquaeductus and H. panicea cells ceases at the stages of early primmorphs and primmorphs, respectively. Development of aggregates of these species is most likely arrested due to immobility of the majority of cells inside them. However, the inability of certain sponge species to reconstruct functional and viable individuals during cell reaggregation may be not a permanent species-specific characteristic, but depends on various factors, including the stage of the life cycle and experimental conditions.

  9. Impact of network structure and cellular response on spike time correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Trousdale

    Full Text Available Novel experimental techniques reveal the simultaneous activity of larger and larger numbers of neurons. As a result there is increasing interest in the structure of cooperative--or correlated--activity in neural populations, and in the possible impact of such correlations on the neural code. A fundamental theoretical challenge is to understand how the architecture of network connectivity along with the dynamical properties of single cells shape the magnitude and timescale of correlations. We provide a general approach to this problem by extending prior techniques based on linear response theory. We consider networks of general integrate-and-fire cells with arbitrary architecture, and provide explicit expressions for the approximate cross-correlation between constituent cells. These correlations depend strongly on the operating point (input mean and variance of the neurons, even when connectivity is fixed. Moreover, the approximations admit an expansion in powers of the matrices that describe the network architecture. This expansion can be readily interpreted in terms of paths between different cells. We apply our results to large excitatory-inhibitory networks, and demonstrate first how precise balance--or lack thereof--between the strengths and timescales of excitatory and inhibitory synapses is reflected in the overall correlation structure of the network. We then derive explicit expressions for the average correlation structure in randomly connected networks. These expressions help to identify the important factors that shape coordinated neural activity in such networks.

  10. Predicting effects of structural stress in a genome-reduced model bacterial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güell, Oriol; Sagués, Francesc; Serrano, M. Ángeles

    2012-08-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen recently proposed as a genome-reduced model for bacterial systems biology. Here, we study the response of its metabolic network to different forms of structural stress, including removal of individual and pairs of reactions and knockout of genes and clusters of co-expressed genes. Our results reveal a network architecture as robust as that of other model bacteria regarding multiple failures, although less robust against individual reaction inactivation. Interestingly, metabolite motifs associated to reactions can predict the propagation of inactivation cascades and damage amplification effects arising in double knockouts. We also detect a significant correlation between gene essentiality and damages produced by single gene knockouts, and find that genes controlling high-damage reactions tend to be expressed independently of each other, a functional switch mechanism that, simultaneously, acts as a genetic firewall to protect metabolism. Prediction of failure propagation is crucial for metabolic engineering or disease treatment.

  11. Imaging the fine-scale structure of the cellular actin cytoskeleton by Single Particle Tracking and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustata, Gina-Mirela

    It has been proposed that diffusion in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells it is compartmentalized due to the interaction with the underlying actin-based membrane skeleton that comes into close proximity to the lipid bilayer. The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that maintains cell shape, enables cell motion, and plays important roles in both intra-cellular transport and cellular division. We show here the evidence of plasma membrane compartmentalization using Single Particle Tracking (SPT) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging. SPT of Quantum dot labeled lipid in the plasma membrane of live normal rat kidney cells show compartments ranging from 325 nm to 391 nm depending on the sampling time. Using AFM imaging of live NRK cell in the presence of phalloidin, the membrane compartmentalization it is visible with the average size of the compartments of 325 +/- 10 nm (the main peak is centered at 260 nm). Further, the underlying membrane skeleton in fixed cells was directly imaged after partial removal of the plasma membrane to reveal size of the membrane skeleton meshwork of 339 +/- 10 nm. A new method of measuring the characteristics of the actin meshwork was proposed. Probing the local compliance of the plasma membrane through the deflection of a soft AFM cantilever we can expect that the stiffness of the membrane will be higher at locations directly above a cortical actin. This new method provided information about the structure of the skeletal meshwork of neuronal cell body predicting an average compartment size of about 132 nm. This was confirmed through SPT of QD-lipid incorporated into the neuronal cell membrane.

  12. Structural basis of evasion of cellular adaptive immunity by HIV-1 Nef

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Xiaofei; Singh, Rajendra; Homann, Stefanie; Yang, Haitao; Guatelli, John; Xiong, Yong (Yale); (VA); (UCSD)

    2012-10-24

    The HIV-1 protein Nef inhibits antigen presentation by class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I). We determined the mechanism of this activity by solving the crystal structure of a protein complex comprising Nef, the MHC-I cytoplasmic domain (MHC-I CD) and the {mu}1 subunit of the clathrin adaptor protein complex 1. A ternary, cooperative interaction clamps the MHC-I CD into a narrow binding groove at the Nef-{mu}1 interface, which encompasses the cargo-recognition site of {mu}1 and the proline-rich strand of Nef. The Nef C terminus induces a previously unobserved conformational change in {mu}1, whereas the N terminus binds the Nef core to position it optimally for complex formation. Positively charged patches on {mu}1 recognize acidic clusters in Nef and MHC-I. The structure shows how Nef functions as a clathrin-associated sorting protein to alter the specificity of host membrane trafficking and enable viral evasion of adaptive immunity.

  13. Mitochondrial hexokinase II (HKII) and phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PEA15) form a molecular switch governing cellular fate depending on the metabolic state

    OpenAIRE

    Mergenthaler, P.; Kahl, A.; Kamitz, A.; van Laak, V.; Stohlmann, K.; Thomsen, S.; Klawitter, H.; Przesdzing, I.; Neeb, L.; Freyer, D.; Priller, J.; Collins, T. J.; Megow, D.; Dirnagl, U; Andrews, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic state of a cell is a key determinant in the decision to live and proliferate or to die. Consequently, balanced energy metabolism and the regulation of apoptosis are critical for the development and maintenance of differentiated organisms. Hypoxia occurs physiologically during development or exercise and pathologically in vascular disease, tumorigenesis, and inflammation, interfering with homeostatic metabolism. Here, we show that the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1–regulated gl...

  14. Structure of cellular ESCRT-III spirals and their relationship to HIV budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashikar, Anil G; Shim, Soomin; Roth, Robyn; Maldazys, Michael R; Heuser, John E; Hanson, Phyllis I

    2014-05-30

    The ESCRT machinery along with the AAA+ ATPase Vps4 drive membrane scission for trafficking into multivesicular bodies in the endocytic pathway and for the topologically related processes of viral budding and cytokinesis, but how they accomplish this remains unclear. Using deep-etch electron microscopy, we find that endogenous ESCRT-III filaments stabilized by depleting cells of Vps4 create uniform membrane-deforming conical spirals which are assemblies of specific ESCRT-III heteropolymers. To explore functional roles for ESCRT-III filaments, we examine HIV-1 Gag-mediated budding of virus-like particles and find that depleting Vps4 traps ESCRT-III filaments around nascent Gag assemblies. Interpolating between the observed structures suggests a new role for Vps4 in separating ESCRT-III from Gag or other cargo to allow centripetal growth of a neck constricting ESCRT-III spiral.

  15. Design, synthesis, biochemical studies, cellular characterization, and structure-based computational studies of small molecules targeting the urokinase receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Eric Knabe, W; Li, Liwei; Jo, Inha; Mani, Timmy; Roehm, Hartmut; Oh, Kyungsoo; Li, Jing; Khanna, May; Meroueh, Samy O

    2012-08-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) serves as a docking site to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to promote extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and tumor invasion and metastasis. Previously, we had reported a small molecule inhibitor of the uPAR·uPA interaction that emerged from structure-based virtual screening. Here, we measure the affinity of a large number of derivatives from commercial sources. Synthesis of additional compounds was carried out to probe the role of various groups on the parent compound. Extensive structure-based computational studies suggested a binding mode for these compounds that led to a structure-activity relationship study. Cellular studies in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines that include A549, H460 and H1299 showed that compounds blocked invasion, migration and adhesion. The effects on invasion of active compounds were consistent with their inhibition of uPA and MMP proteolytic activity. These compounds showed weak cytotoxicity consistent with the confined role of uPAR to metastasis.

  16. Molecular recognition of CYP26A1 binding pockets and structure-activity relationship studies for design of potent and selective retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bin; Song, Shuai; Hao, Chen-Zhou; Huang, Wan-Xu; Liu, Chun-Chi; Xie, Hong-Lei; Lin, Bin; Cheng, Mao-Sheng; Zhao, Dong-Mei

    2015-03-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), the biologically most active metabolite of vitamin A, plays a major role in the regulation of cellular differentiation and proliferation, and it is also an important pharmacological agent particularly used in the treatment of cancer, skin, neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. However, ATRA is very easy to be metabolized into 4-hydroxyl-RA in vivo by CYP26A1, an inducible cytochrome P450 enzyme, eventually into more polar metabolites. Therefore, it is vital to develop specific retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) to inhibit the metabolic enzyme CYP26A1 in the treatment of relevant diseases aforementioned. In this study, CYP26A1 and its interactions with retinoic acid-competitive metabolism blocking agents were investigated by a combined ligand- and structure-based approach. First, since the crystal structure of CYP26A1 protein has not been determined, we constructed the 3D structure of CYP26A1 using homology modeling. In order to achieve a deeper insight into the mode of action of RAMBAs in the active site, the molecular superimposition model and the common feature pharmacophore model were constructed, and molecular docking was performed. The molecular superimposition model is composed of three features: the main chain groups, side chain groups, and azole groups. The common feature pharmacophore model consists of five chemical features: four hydrophobic groups and one hydrogen acceptor (HHHHA). The results of molecular docking show that the characteristic groups of RAMBAs were mapped into three different active pockets, respectively. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) was obtained by a combination of the molecular superimposition and docking results with the pharmacophore model. This study gives more insight into the interaction model inside the CYP26A1 active site and provides guidance for the design of more potent and possibly more selective RAMBAs.

  17. The structure of wheat bread influences the postprandial metabolic response in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eelderink, Coby; Noort, Martijn W J; Sozer, Nesli; Koehorst, Martijn; Holst, Jens J; Deacon, Carolyn F; Rehfeld, Jens F; Poutanen, Kaisa; Vonk, Roel J; Oudhuis, Lizette; Priebe, Marion G

    2015-10-01

    Postprandial high glucose and insulin responses after starchy food consumption, associated with an increased risk of developing several metabolic diseases, could possibly be improved by altering food structure. We investigated the influence of a compact food structure; different wheat products with a similar composition were created using different processing conditions. The postprandial glucose kinetics and metabolic response to bread with a compact structure (flat bread, FB) was compared to bread with a porous structure (control bread, CB) in a randomized, crossover study with ten healthy male volunteers. Pasta (PA), with a very compact structure, was used as the control. The rate of appearance of exogenous glucose (RaE), endogenous glucose production, and glucose clearance rate (GCR) was calculated using stable isotopes. Furthermore, postprandial plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, several intestinal hormones and bile acids were analyzed. The structure of FB was considerably more compact compared to CB, as confirmed by microscopy, XRT analysis (porosity) and density measurements. Consumption of FB resulted in lower peak glucose, insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (ns) responses and a slower initial RaE compared to CB. These variables were similar to the PA response, except for RaE which remained slower over a longer period after PA consumption. Interestingly, the GCR after FB was higher than expected based on the insulin response, indicating increased insulin sensitivity or insulin-independent glucose disposal. These results demonstrate that the structure of wheat bread can influence the postprandial metabolic response, with a more compact structure being more beneficial for health. Bread-making technology should be further explored to create healthier products.

  18. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses: Glass design, structure, bioactivity, cellular interactions, and recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Furqan A

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive glasses (BGs) are known to bond to both hard and soft tissues. Upon exposure to an aqueous environment, BG undergoes ion exchange, hydrolysis, selective dissolution and precipitation of an apatite layer on their surface, which elicits an interfacial biological response resulting in bioactive fixation, inhibiting further dissolution of the glass, and preventing complete resorption of the material. Fluorine is considered one of the most effective in-vivo bone anabolic factors. In low concentrations, fluoride ions (F(-)) increase bone mass and mineral density, improve the resistance of the apatite structure to acid attack, and have well documented antibacterial properties. F(-) ions may be incorporated into the glass in the form of calcium fluoride (CaF2) either by part-substitution of network modifier oxides, or by maintaining the ratios of the other constituents relatively constant. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses (FBGs) enhance and control osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and mineralisation. And with their ability to release fluoride locally, FBGs make interesting candidates for various clinical applications, dentinal tubule occlusion in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. This paper reviews the chemistry of FBGs and the influence of F(-) incorporation on the thermal properties, bioactivity, and cytotoxicity; and novel glass compositions for improved mechanical properties, processing, and bioactive potential.

  19. A bulk metal/ceramic composite material with a cellular structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhankui; YAO Kefu; LI Jingfeng

    2006-01-01

    A bulk metal/ceramic composite material with a honeycomb-like micro-cell structure has been prepared by sintering the spherical Al90Mn9Ce1 alloy powders clad by Al2O3 nano-powder with the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The as-prepared material consists of Al90Mn9Ce1 alloy cell and closed Al2O3 ceramic cell wall. The diameter of the cells is about 20―40 μm, while a thickness of the cell wall is about 1―2 μm. The ultimate compressive strength of the as-sintered materials is about 514 MPa, while its fracture strain is up to about 0.65 %. This composite material might possess good anti-corrosion, thermal endurance and other potential properties due to its unique microstructure. The result shows that the Al90Mn9Ce1/Al2O3 composite powders can be sintered by spark plasma sintering technique despite the large difference in their sintering temperature. This work offers a way of designing and preparing metal/ceramic composite material with functional property.

  20. Nanosilicon carbide/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites: structural, mechanical and in vitro cellular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, Saeed; Ebadzadeh, Touraj; Ahmadzadeh-Asl, Shaghayegh

    2010-07-01

    In this study, bioceramic nanocomposites were synthesized by sintering compacted bodies of hydroxyapatite (HA) mixed with 5 or 15 wt% nanosilicon carbide at 1,100 or 1,200 degrees C in a reducing atmosphere. Pure hydroxyapatite was also prepared for comparison. Phase compositions, structural and physical properties of the composites were studied using appropriate techniques. Some in vitro biological properties of the composites were also investigated by using newrat calvaria osteoblastic cells. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that tricalcium phosphate (TCP) comprising negligible alpha-TCP and considerable beta-TCP were formed in composites during sintering meanwhile hydroxyapatite and silicon carbide (SiC) were also existed in the composition. Based on the results, that composite made of 5 wt% nanosilicon carbide exhibited higher bending strength, fracture toughness and bulk density than pure HA and composite with 15 wt% silicon carbide. The scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis revealed that the addition of nanosilicon carbide suppressed the grain growth and yielded a feature of island-type clusters consisting of blistered calcium phosphate (HA and TCP) and SiC grains. Also, in this study, better proliferation rate and alkaline phosphatase activity were observed for the osteoblastic cells seeded on top of the composites compared to pure HA. Overall, the results indicated that the composite of 95 wt% hydroxyapatite and 5 wt% SiC exhibited better mechanical and biological properties than pure HA and further addition of SiC failed strength and toughness.

  1. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses: Glass design, structure, bioactivity, cellular interactions, and recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Furqan A., E-mail: furqan.ali.shah@biomaterials.gu.se

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive glasses (BGs) are known to bond to both hard and soft tissues. Upon exposure to an aqueous environment, BG undergoes ion exchange, hydrolysis, selective dissolution and precipitation of an apatite layer on their surface, which elicits an interfacial biological response resulting in bioactive fixation, inhibiting further dissolution of the glass, and preventing complete resorption of the material. Fluorine is considered one of the most effective in-vivo bone anabolic factors. In low concentrations, fluoride ions (F{sup −}) increase bone mass and mineral density, improve the resistance of the apatite structure to acid attack, and have well documented antibacterial properties. F{sup −} ions may be incorporated into the glass in the form of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) either by part-substitution of network modifier oxides, or by maintaining the ratios of the other constituents relatively constant. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses (FBGs) enhance and control osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and mineralisation. And with their ability to release fluoride locally, FBGs make interesting candidates for various clinical applications, dentinal tubule occlusion in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. This paper reviews the chemistry of FBGs and the influence of F{sup −} incorporation on the thermal properties, bioactivity, and cytotoxicity; and novel glass compositions for improved mechanical properties, processing, and bioactive potential. - Highlights: • Fluoride ions form charged CaF{sup +} species rather than Si–F bonds. • Fluoride incorporation lowers glass transition and crystallisation temperatures. • Oxynitride and oxyfluoronitride glasses with superior mechanical properties • Mixed-alkali and alkali-free compositions with better processing characteristics.

  2. Cellular immunostimulation by CpG-sequence-coated DNA origami structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, Verena J; Heidegger, Simon; Sandholzer, Nadja; Nickels, Philipp C; Suhartha, Nina A; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Liedl, Tim

    2011-12-27

    To investigate the potential of DNA origami constructs as programmable and noncytotoxic immunostimulants, we tested the immune responses induced by hollow 30-helix DNA origami tubes covered with up to 62 cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sequences in freshly isolated spleen cells. Unmethylated CpG sequences that are highly specific for bacterial DNA are recognized by a specialized receptor of the innate immune system localized in the endosome, the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). When incubated with oligonucleotides containing CpGs, immune cells are stimulated through TLR9 to produce and secrete cytokine mediators such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70), a process associated with the initiation of an immune response. In our studies, the DNA origami tube built from an 8634 nt long variant of the commonly used single-stranded DNA origami scaffold M13mp18 and 227 staple oligonucleotides decorated with 62 CpG-containing oligonucleotides triggered a strong immune response, characterized by cytokine production and immune cell activation, which was entirely dependent on TLR9 stimulation. Such decorated origami tubes also triggered higher immunostimulation than equal amounts of CpG oligonucleotides associated with a standard carrier system such as Lipofectamine. In the absence of CpG oligonucleotides, cytokine production induced by the origami tubes was low and was not related to TLR9 recognition. Fluorescent microscopy revealed localization of CpG-containing DNA origami structures in the endosome. The DNA constructs showed in contrast to Lipofectamine no detectable toxicity and did not affect the viability of splenocytes. We thus demonstrate that DNA origami constructs represent a delivery system for CpG oligonucleotides that is both efficient and nontoxic.

  3. Metabolic activation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids: insights into the structural and enzymatic basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jianqing; Yang, Mengbi; Fu, Peter; Ye, Yang; Lin, Ge

    2014-06-16

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are natural toxins widely distributed in plants. The toxic potencies of different PAs vary significantly. PAs are mono- or diesters of necine acids with a necine base. On the basis of the necine bases, PAs are classified into three types: retronecine-type, otonecine-type, and platynecine-type. Hepatotoxic PAs contain an unsaturated necine base. PAs exert hepatotoxicity through metabolic activation by hepatic cytochromes P450s (CYPs) to generate reactive intermediates which form pyrrole-protein adducts. These adducts provide a mechanism-based biomarker to assess PA toxicity. In the present study, metabolic activation of 12 PAs from three structural types was investigated first in mice to demonstrate significant variations in hepatic metabolic activation of different PAs. Subsequently, the structural and enzymatic factors affecting metabolic activation of these PAs were further investigated by using human liver microsomes and recombinant human CYPs. Pyrrole-protein adducts were detected in the liver and blood of mice and the in vitro systems treated with toxic retronecine-type and otonecine-type PAs having unsaturated necine bases but not with a platynecine-type PA containing a saturated necine base. Retronecine-type PAs produced more pyrrole-protein adducts than otonecine-type PAs with similar necine acids, demonstrating that the structure of necine base affected PA toxic potency. Among retronecine-type PAs, open-ring diesters generated the highest amount of pyrrole-protein adducts, followed by macrocyclic diesters, while monoesters produced the least. Only CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 activated otonecine-type PAs, while all 10 CYPs studied showed the ability to activate retronecine-type PAs. Moreover, the contribution of major CYPs involved also varied significantly among retronecine-type PAs. In conclusion, our findings provide a scientific basis for predicting the toxicities of individual PAs in biological systems based on PA structural

  4. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli knockouts: lessons from the Keio collection and future outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-08-01

    Cellular metabolic and regulatory systems are of fundamental interest to biologists and engineers. Incomplete understanding of these complex systems remains an obstacle to progress in biotechnology and metabolic engineering. An established method for obtaining new information on network structure, regulation and dynamics is to study the cellular system following a perturbation such as a genetic knockout. The Keio collection of all viable Escherichia coli single-gene knockouts is facilitating a systematic investigation of the regulation and metabolism of E. coli. Of all omics measurements available, the metabolic flux profile (the fluxome) provides the most direct and relevant representation of the cellular phenotype. Recent advances in (13)C-metabolic flux analysis are now permitting highly precise and accurate flux measurements for investigating cellular systems and guiding metabolic engineering efforts.

  5. Relationships between brain metabolism decrease in normal aging and changes in structural and functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chételat, Gaël; Landeau, Brigitte; Salmon, Eric; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Mézenge, Florence; Perrotin, Audrey; Bastin, Christine; Manrique, Alain; Scheurich, Armin; Scheckenberger, Mathias; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    Normal aging is characterized by brain glucose metabolism decline predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. The goal of the present study was to assess whether this change was associated with age-related alteration of white matter (WM) structural integrity and/or functional connectivity. FDG-PET data from 40 young and 57 elderly healthy participants from two research centers (n=49/48 in Center 1/2) were analyzed. WM volume from T1-weighted MRI (Center 1), fractional anisotropy from diffusion-tensor imaging (Center 2), and resting-state fMRI data (Center 1) were also obtained. Group comparisons were performed within each imaging modality. Then, positive correlations were assessed, within the elderly, between metabolism in the most affected region and the other neuroimaging modalities. Metabolism decline in the elderly predominated in the left inferior frontal junction (LIFJ). LIFJ hypometabolism was significantly associated with macrostructural and microstructural WM disturbances in long association fronto-temporo-occipital fibers, while no relationship was found with functional connectivity. The findings offer new perspectives to understand normal aging processes and open avenues for future studies to explore causality between age-related metabolism and connectivity changes.

  6. 2009 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function Gordon Research Conference - February 1- 6 ,2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent D. Chapman

    2009-02-06

    The Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism and Function' has been instituted to accelerate research productivity in the field of plant lipids. This conference will facilitate wide dissemination of research breakthroughs, support recruitment of young scientists to the field of plant lipid metabolism and encourage broad participation of the plant lipid community in guiding future directions for research in plant lipids. This conference will build upon the strengths of the successful, previous biannual meetings of the National Plant Lipid Cooperative (www.plantlipids.org) that began in 1993, but will reflect a broader scope of topics to include the biochemistry, cell biology, metabolic regulation, and signaling functions of plant acyl lipids. Most importantly, this conference also will serve as a physical focal point for the interaction of the plant lipid research community. Applications to attend this conference will be open to all researchers interested in plant lipids and will provide a venue for the presentation of the latest research results, networking opportunities for young scientists, and a forum for the development and exchange of useful lipid resources and new ideas. By bringing together senior- and junior-level scientists involved in plant lipid metabolism, a broad range of insights will be shared and the community of plant lipid researchers will function more as a network of vested partners. This is important for the vitality of the research community and for the perceived value that will encourage conference attendance into the future.

  7. Common links in the structure and cellular localization of Rhizobium chitolipooligosaccharides and general Rhizobium membrane phospholipid and glycolipid components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, R A; Lee, J; Ross, K L; Hollingsworth, R I

    1995-04-04

    Several common links between the structural chemistry of the chitolipooligosaccharides of Rhizobium and the general rhizobial membrane lipid and lipopolysaccharide chemistry of these bacteria have been uncovered. Aspects of common chemistry include sulfation, methylation, and the position and extent of fatty acyl chain unsaturation. We find that bacteria which are known to synthesize sulfated chitolipooligosaccharides (such as Rhizobium meliloti strains and the broad-host-range Rhizobium species strain NGR234) also have sulfated lipopolysaccharides. Their common origins of sulfation have been demonstrated by using mutants which are known to be impaired in sulfating their chitolipooligosaccharides. In such cases, there is a corresponding diminution or complete lack of sulfation of the lipopolysaccharides. The structural diversity of the fatty acids observed in the chitolipooligosaccharides is also observed in the other membrane lipids. For instance, the doubly unsaturated fatty acids which are known to be predominant components of R. meliloti chitolipooligosaccharides were also found in the usual phospholipids and glycolipids. Also, the known functionalization of the chitolipooligosaccharides of R. sp. NGR234 by O- and N-methylation was also reflected in the lipopolysaccharide of this organism. The common structural features of chitolipooligosaccharides and membrane components are consistent with a substantial degree of biosynthetic overlap and a large degree of cellular, spatial overlap between these molecules. The latter aspect is clearly demonstrated here since we show that the chitolipooligosaccharides are, in fact, normal membrane components of Rhizobium. This increases the importance of understanding the role of the bacterial cell surface chemistry in the Rhizobium/legume symbiosis and developing a comprehensive understanding of the highly integrated membrane lipid and glycolipid chemistry of Rhizobium.

  8. Starch Granule Re-Structuring by Starch Branching Enzyme and Glucan Water Dikinase Modulation Affects Caryopsis Physiology and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaik, Shahnoor S.; Obata, Toshihiro; Hebelstrup, Kim H

    2016-01-01

    Starch is of fundamental importance for plant development and reproduction and its optimized molecular assembly is potentially necessary for correct starch metabolism. Re-structuring of starch granules in-planta can therefore potentially affect plant metabolism. Modulation of granule micro...

  9. Structural contributions of antipsychotic drugs to their therapeutic profiles and metabolic side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Somayeh; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2012-02-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have various neuropharmacological properties as a result of their structural diversity. Despite their therapeutic benefits, most of the prescribed atypical antipsychotics can induce severe side effects, including weight gain, type II diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular diseases. Among the developed atypical antipsychotic agents, tetracyclic dibenzodiazepine and thienobenzodiazepine compounds, particularly clozapine and olanzapine, are associated with the greatest weight gain and metabolic disturbances. However, the unique chemical structure of these compounds causes the low risk of side effects reported for typical antipsychotics (e.g. extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia). This report reviews the recent discovery of the potential role of the chemical structure of antipsychotics in their therapeutic properties and metabolic disturbances. By developing structure-activity relationship studies for atypical antipsychotics, we will improve our understanding of the structural modifications of these chemical classes that lead to reduced weight gain, which will be an invaluable step toward the discovery of the next generation of atypical antipsychotics. In this review, we suggest that a novel dibenzodiazepine or thienobenzodiazepine antipsychotic drug with lower affinity for H(1) receptors may significantly advance schizophrenia therapy.

  10. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  11. Reversible quantum cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Schumacher, B

    2004-01-01

    We define quantum cellular automata as infinite quantum lattice systems with discrete time dynamics, such that the time step commutes with lattice translations and has strictly finite propagation speed. In contrast to earlier definitions this allows us to give an explicit characterization of all local rules generating such automata. The same local rules also generate the global time step for automata with periodic boundary conditions. Our main structure theorem asserts that any quantum cellular automaton is structurally reversible, i.e., that it can be obtained by applying two blockwise unitary operations in a generalized Margolus partitioning scheme. This implies that, in contrast to the classical case, the inverse of a nearest neighbor quantum cellular automaton is again a nearest neighbor automaton. We present several construction methods for quantum cellular automata, based on unitaries commuting with their translates, on the quantization of (arbitrary) reversible classical cellular automata, on quantum c...

  12. Metabolic and structural response of hyporheic microbial communities to variations in supply of dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, S.E.G.; Sinsabaugh, R. L.; Sobczak, W.V.; Hoostal, M.

    2003-01-01

    Hyporheic sediment bacterial communities were exposed to dissolved organic matter (DOM) from a variety of sources to assess the interdependence of bacterial metabolism and community composition. Experiments ranged from small-scale core perfusions with defined compounds (glucose, bovine serum albumin) to mesocosms receiving natural leaf leachate or water from different streams. Response variables included bacterial production, oxygen consumption, extracellular enzyme activity, and community similarity as manifest by changes in banding patterns of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). All DOM manipulations generated responses in at least one metabolic variable. Additions of both labile and recalcitrant materials increased either oxygen consumption, production, or both depending on background DOM. Enzyme activities were affected by both types of carbon addition with largest effects from the labile mixture. Cluster analysis of RAPD data showed strong divergence of communities exposed to labile versus recalcitrant DOM. Additions of leaf leachate to mesocosms representing hyporheic flow-paths caused increases in oxygen consumption and some enzyme activities with weaker effects on production. Community structure yeas strongly affected; samples from the leachate-amended mesocosms clustered separately from the control samples. In mesocosms receiving water from streams ranging in DOC (0.5-4.5 mg L-1), there were significant differences in bacterial growth, oxygen consumption, and enzyme activities. RAPD analysis showed strongest clustering of samples by stream type with more subtle effects of position along the flowpaths. Responses in community metabolism were always accompanied by shifts in community composition, suggesting carbon supply affects both functional and structural attributes of hyporheic bacterial communities.

  13. Coevolution trumps pleiotropy: carbon assimilation traits are independent of metabolic network structure in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opulente, Dana A; Morales, Christopher M; Carey, Lucas B; Rest, Joshua S

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic traits may be gained and lost together because of pleiotropy, the involvement of common genes and networks, or because of simultaneous selection for multiple traits across environments (multiple-trait coevolution). However, the extent to which network pleiotropy versus environmental coevolution shapes shared responses has not been addressed. To test these alternatives, we took advantage of the fact that the genus Saccharomyces has variation in habitat usage and diversity in the carbon sources that a given strain can metabolize. We examined patterns of gain and loss in carbon utilization traits across 488 strains of Saccharomyces to investigate whether the structure of metabolic pathways or selection pressure from common environments may have caused carbon utilization traits to be gained and lost together. While most carbon sources were gained and lost independently of each other, we found four clusters that exhibit non-random patterns of gain and loss across strains. Contrary to the network pleiotropy hypothesis, we did not find that these patterns are explained by the structure of metabolic pathways or shared enzymes. Consistent with the hypothesis that common environments shape suites of phenotypes, we found that the environment a strain was isolated from partially predicts the carbon sources it can assimilate.

  14. Coevolution trumps pleiotropy: carbon assimilation traits are independent of metabolic network structure in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A Opulente

    Full Text Available Phenotypic traits may be gained and lost together because of pleiotropy, the involvement of common genes and networks, or because of simultaneous selection for multiple traits across environments (multiple-trait coevolution. However, the extent to which network pleiotropy versus environmental coevolution shapes shared responses has not been addressed. To test these alternatives, we took advantage of the fact that the genus Saccharomyces has variation in habitat usage and diversity in the carbon sources that a given strain can metabolize. We examined patterns of gain and loss in carbon utilization traits across 488 strains of Saccharomyces to investigate whether the structure of metabolic pathways or selection pressure from common environments may have caused carbon utilization traits to be gained and lost together. While most carbon sources were gained and lost independently of each other, we found four clusters that exhibit non-random patterns of gain and loss across strains. Contrary to the network pleiotropy hypothesis, we did not find that these patterns are explained by the structure of metabolic pathways or shared enzymes. Consistent with the hypothesis that common environments shape suites of phenotypes, we found that the environment a strain was isolated from partially predicts the carbon sources it can assimilate.

  15. Structure of modified [epsilon]-polylysine micelles and their application in improving cellular antioxidant activity of curcuminoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hailong; Li, Ji; Shi, Ke; Huang, Qingrong (Rutgers)

    2015-10-15

    The micelle structure of octenyl succinic anhydride modified {var_epsilon}-polylysine (M-EPL), an anti-microbial surfactant prepared from natural peptide {var_epsilon}-polylysine in aqueous solution has been studied using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our results revealed that M-EPLs formed spherical micelles with individual size of 24-26 {angstrom} in aqueous solution which could further aggregate to form a larger dimension with averaged radius of 268-308 {angstrom}. Furthermore, M-EPL micelle was able to encapsulate curcuminoids, a group of poorly-soluble bioactive compounds from turmeric with poor oral bioavailability, and improve their water solubility. Three loading methods, including solvent evaporation, dialysis, and high-speed homogenization were compared. The results indicated that the dialysis method generated the highest loading capacity and curcuminoids water solubility. The micelle encapsulation was confirmed as there were no free curcuminoid crystals detected in the differential scanning calorimetry analysis. It was also demonstrated that M-EPL encapsulation stabilized curcuminoids against hydrolysis at pH 7.4 and the encapsulated curcuminoids showed elevated cellular antioxidant activity compared with free curcuminoids. This work suggested that M-EPL could be used as new biopolymer micelles for delivering poorly soluble drugs/phytochemicals and improving their bioactivities.

  16. Structural and Metabolic Effects of Obesity on the Myocardium and the Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver J. Rider

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity per se is a recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease exerting independent adverse effects on the cardiovascular system. Despite this well documented link, the mechanisms by which obesity modulates cardiovascular risk are not well understood. Obesity is linked to a wide variety of cardiac changes, from subclinical diastolic dysfunction to end stage systolic heart failure. In addition, obesity causes changes in cardiac metabolism that make ATP production and utilization less efficient producing functional consequences that are linked to the increased rate of heart failure in this population. This review focuses on the cardiovascular structural and metabolic remodelling that occurs in obesity with and without co-morbidities and the potential links to increased mortality in this population.

  17. [Beta-3 adrenergic receptor--structure and role in obesity and metabolic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiejak, J; Wyroba, E

    1999-01-01

    Structure and essential motifs of beta 3-adrenergic receptor (known previously as atypical beta-AR), which plays a central role in regulation of lipid metabolism have been described. Obesity results from an imbalance between caloric intake and energy expenditure. The consequence of catecholamine activation of beta 3-AR is increased mobilization of fatty acids from triglyceride stores (lipolysis) in brown and white adipose tissue as well as increased fatty acid beta-oxidation and heat-production via UCP-1 (thermogenesis) in brown adipose tissue. A pharmacokinetic effects of beta 3-agonists and putative involvement of Trp/Arg mutation in beta 3-AR gene in obesity and another metabolic disorders have been discussed.

  18. An integrated study to analyze soil microbial community structure and metabolic potential in two forest types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Zhang

    Full Text Available Soil microbial metabolic potential and ecosystem function have received little attention owing to difficulties in methodology. In this study, we selected natural mature forest and natural secondary forest and analyzed the soil microbial community and metabolic potential combing the high-throughput sequencing and GeoChip technologies. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequencing showed that one known archaeal phylum and 15 known bacterial phyla as well as unclassified phylotypes were presented in these forest soils, and Acidobacteria, Protecobacteria, and Actinobacteria were three of most abundant phyla. The detected microbial functional gene groups were related to different biogeochemical processes, including carbon degradation, carbon fixation, methane metabolism, nitrogen cycling, phosphorus utilization, sulfur cycling, etc. The Shannon index for detected functional gene probes was significantly higher (P<0.05 at natural secondary forest site. The regression analysis showed that a strong positive (P<0.05 correlation was existed between the soil microbial functional gene diversity and phylogenetic diversity. Mantel test showed that soil oxidizable organic carbon, soil total nitrogen and cellulose, glucanase, and amylase activities were significantly linked (P<0.05 to the relative abundance of corresponded functional gene groups. Variance partitioning analysis showed that a total of 81.58% of the variation in community structure was explained by soil chemical factors, soil temperature, and plant diversity. Therefore, the positive link of soil microbial structure and composition to functional activity related to ecosystem functioning was existed, and the natural secondary forest soil may occur the high microbial metabolic potential. Although the results can't directly reflect the actual microbial populations and functional activities, this study provides insight into the potential activity of the microbial community and associated feedback

  19. Cryo-EM structure of respiratory complex I reveals a link to mitochondrial sulfur metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Imprima, Edoardo; Mills, Deryck J; Parey, Kristian; Brandt, Ulrich; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Zickermann, Volker; Vonck, Janet

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is a 1MDa membrane protein complex with a central role in aerobic energy metabolism. The bioenergetic core functions are executed by 14 central subunits that are conserved from bacteria to man. Despite recent progress in structure determination, our understanding of the function of the ~30 accessory subunits associated with the mitochondrial complex is still limited. We have investigated the structure of complex I from the aerobic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica by cryo-electron microscopy. Our density map at 7.9Å resolution closely matches the 3.6-3.9Å X-ray structure of the Yarrowia lipolytica complex. However, the cryo-EM map indicated an additional subunit on the side of the matrix arm above the membrane surface, pointing away from the membrane arm. The density, which is not present in any previously described complex I structure and occurs in about 20 % of the particles, was identified as the accessory sulfur transferase subunit ST1. The Yarrowia lipolytica complex I preparation is active in generating H2S from the cysteine derivative 3-mercaptopyruvate, catalyzed by ST1. We thus provide evidence for a link between respiratory complex I and mitochondrial sulfur metabolism.

  20. Multiscale structures of lipids in foods as parameters affecting fatty acid bioavailability and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, M C; Genot, C; Gayet, C; Lopez, C; Fine, F; Joffre, F; Vendeuvre, J L; Bouvier, J; Chardigny, J M; Raynal-Ljutovac, K

    2013-10-01

    On a nutritional standpoint, lipids are now being studied beyond their energy content and fatty acid (FA) profiles. Dietary FA are building blocks of a huge diversity of more complex molecules such as triacylglycerols (TAG) and phospholipids (PL), themselves organised in supramolecular structures presenting different thermal behaviours. They are generally embedded in complex food matrixes. Recent reports have revealed that molecular and supramolecular structures of lipids and their liquid or solid state at the body temperature influence both the digestibility and metabolism of dietary FA. The aim of the present review is to highlight recent knowledge on the impact on FA digestion, absorption and metabolism of: (i) the intramolecular structure of TAG; (ii) the nature of the lipid molecules carrying FA; (iii) the supramolecular organization and physical state of lipids in native and formulated food products and (iv) the food matrix. Further work should be accomplished now to obtain a more reliable body of evidence and integrate these data in future dietary recommendations. Additionally, innovative lipid formulations in which the health beneficial effects of either native or recomposed structures of lipids will be taken into account can be foreseen.

  1. Correlating structure and function of drug-metabolizing enzymes: progress and ongoing challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric F; Connick, J Patrick; Reed, James R; Backes, Wayne L; Desai, Manoj C; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S; Scott, Emily E

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches.

  2. High-to-low CO2 acclimation reveals plasticity of the photorespiratory pathway and indicates regulatory links to cellular metabolism of Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Timm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photorespiratory carbon metabolism was long considered as an essentially closed and nonregulated pathway with little interaction to other metabolic routes except nitrogen metabolism and respiration. Most mutants of this pathway cannot survive in ambient air and require CO(2-enriched air for normal growth. Several studies indicate that this CO(2 requirement is very different for individual mutants, suggesting a higher plasticity and more interaction of photorespiratory metabolism as generally thought. To understand this better, we examined a variety of high- and low-level parameters at 1% CO(2 and their alteration during acclimation of wild-type plants and selected photorespiratory mutants to ambient air. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The wild type and four photorespiratory mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis were grown to a defined stadium at 1% CO(2 and then transferred to normal air (0.038% CO(2. All other conditions remained unchanged. This approach allowed unbiased side-by-side monitoring of acclimation processes on several levels. For all lines, diel (24 h leaf growth, photosynthetic gas exchange, and PSII fluorescence were monitored. Metabolite profiling was performed for the wild type and two mutants. During acclimation, considerable variation between the individual genotypes was detected in many of the examined parameters, which correlated with the position of the impaired reaction in the photorespiratory pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Photorespiratory carbon metabolism does not operate as a fully closed pathway. Acclimation from high to low CO(2 was typically steady and consistent for a number of features over several days, but we also found unexpected short-term events, such as an intermittent very massive rise of glycine levels after transition of one particular mutant to ambient air. We conclude that photorespiration is possibly exposed to redox regulation beyond known substrate-level effects. Additionally, our data

  3. Autophagy in the light of sphingolipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvald, Eva Bang; Olsen, Anne Sofie Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2015-01-01

    , has over the past decade been recognized as an essential part of metabolism. Autophagy not only rids the cell of excessive or damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and invading microorganisms, it also provides nutrients to maintain crucial cellular functions. Besides serving as essential structural......Maintenance of cellular homeostasis requires tight and coordinated control of numerous metabolic pathways, which are governed by interconnected networks of signaling pathways and energy-sensing regulators. Autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway by which the cell self-digests its own components...

  4. Investigations of Structure and Metabolism within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Majors, Paul D.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-07-01

    Biofilms are known to possess spatially and temporally varying metabolite concentration profiles at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. This results in varying growth environments within that may ultimately drive species diversity, determine biofilm structure and also the spatial arrangement of the community members. Using noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopic imaging/spectroscopy and confocal imaging, we investigated anaerobic reduction kinetics, structural variation, and the stratification of metabolism within live biofilms of the facultative anaerobic dissimilatory metal-reducing Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Biofilms were pregrown using a defined minimal media in a homebuilt constant depth film fermenter and subsequently transferred to an in-magnet sample chamber under laminar flow for NMR measurements. The sample was subjected to various, rapidly switched substrate/ anaerobic electron acceptor combinations (fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and nitrate electron acceptors). Localized NMR spectroscopy was used to non-invasively monitored the spectra of hydrogen-containing metabolites at high temporal resolution (4.5 min) under oxygen-limited conditions. Anaerobic reduction was immediately observed upon switching feed solutions indicate that no gene induction (transcriptional response) was needed for MR-1 to switch between fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and nitrate electron acceptors. In parallel experiments, confocal microscopy was used with constitutively expressed fluorescent reporters to independently investigate structural changes in response to the availability of electron acceptor and also the outcome of metabolic competition under oxygen-limited conditions. A clearer understanding of the metabolic diversity and plasticity of the biofilm mode of growth as well as how this possibly translates to the environmental fitness is made possible through the use of non-invasive and non-destructive techniques such as described here.

  5. Physical exercise in overweight to obese individuals induces metabolic- and neurotrophic-related structural brain plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eMueller

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous cross-sectional studies on body-weight-related alterations in brain structure revealed profound changes in the gray matter (GM and white matter (WM that resemble findings obtained from individuals with advancing age. This suggests that obesity may lead to structural brain changes that are comparable with brain aging. Here, we asked whether weight-loss-dependent improved metabolic and neurotrophic functioning parallels the reversal of obesity-related alterations in brain structure. To this end we applied magnetic resonance imaging together with voxel-based morphometry and diffusion-tensor imaging in overweight to obese individuals who participated in a fitness course with intensive physical training three days per week over a period of three months. After the fitness course, participants presented, with inter-individual heterogeneity, a reduced body mass index (BMI, reduced serum leptin concentrations, elevated high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, and alterations of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentrations suggesting changes of metabolic and neurotrophic function. Exercise-dependent changes in BMI and serum concentration of BDNF, leptin, and HDL-C were related to an increase in GM density in the left hippocampus, the insular cortex, and the left cerebellar lobule. We also observed exercise-dependent changes of diffusivity parameters in surrounding WM structures as well as in the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that weight-loss due to physical exercise in overweight to obese participants induces profound structural brain plasticity, not primarily of sensorimotor brain regions involved in physical exercise, but of regions previously reported to be structurally affected by an increased body weight and functionally implemented in gustation and cognitive processing.

  6. Convergent evolution of modularity in metabolic networks through different community structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Wanding

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that the modularity of metabolic networks of bacteria is closely related to the variability of their living habitats. However, given the dependency of the modularity score on the community structure, it remains unknown whether organisms achieve certain modularity via similar or different community structures. Results In this work, we studied the relationship between similarities in modularity scores and similarities in community structures of the metabolic networks of 1021 species. Both similarities are then compared against the genetic distances. We revisited the association between modularity and variability of the microbial living environments and extended the analysis to other aspects of their life style such as temperature and oxygen requirements. We also tested both topological and biological intuition of the community structures identified and investigated the extent of their conservation with respect to the taxomony. Conclusions We find that similar modularities are realized by different community structures. We find that such convergent evolution of modularity is closely associated with the number of (distinct enzymes in the organism’s metabolome, a consequence of different life styles of the species. We find that the order of modularity is the same as the order of the number of the enzymes under the classification based on the temperature preference but not on the oxygen requirement. Besides, inspection of modularity-based communities reveals that these communities are graph-theoretically meaningful yet not reflective of specific biological functions. From an evolutionary perspective, we find that the community structures are conserved only at the level of kingdoms. Our results call for more investigation into the interplay between evolution and modularity: how evolution shapes modularity, and how modularity affects evolution (mainly in terms of fitness and evolvability. Further, our results

  7. Sensitivity of chemical reaction networks: a structural approach. 1. Examples and the carbon metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Atsushi; Fiedler, Bernold

    2015-02-21

    In biological cells, chemical reaction pathways lead to complex network systems like metabolic networks. One experimental approach to the dynamics of such systems examines their "sensitivity": each enzyme mediating a reaction in the system is increased/decreased or knocked out separately, and the responses in the concentrations of chemicals or their fluxes are observed. In this study, we present a mathematical method, named structural sensitivity analysis, to determine the sensitivity of reaction systems from information on the network alone. We investigate how the sensitivity responses of chemicals in a reaction network depend on the structure of the network, and on the position of the perturbed reaction in the network. We establish and prove some general rules which relate the sensitivity response to the structure of the underlying network. We describe a hierarchical pattern in the flux response which is governed by branchings in the network. We apply our method to several hypothetical and real life chemical reaction networks, including the metabolic network of the Escherichia coli TCA cycle.

  8. Brain morphological alterations and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: A combined DARTEL-based VBM and (1)H-MRS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chung-Man; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit in conjunction with brain morphometric and metabolic alterations. This study assessed the combined neural morphological deficits and metabolic abnormality in patients with GAD. Thirteen patients with GAD and 13 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and education level underwent high-resolution T1-weighted MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3Tesla. In this study, the combination of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and (1)H-MRS was used to assess the brain morphometric and metabolic alterations in GAD. The patients showed significantly reduced white matter (WM) volumes in the midbrain (MB), precentral gyrus (PrG), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC) compared to the controls. In MRS study, the choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC were significantly lower in the patients. Particularly, the WM volume variation of the DLPFC was positively correlated with both of the Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios in patients with GAD. This study provides an evidence for the association between the morphometric deficit and metabolic changes in GAD. This finding would be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction and pathogenesis in connection with cognitive impairments in GAD.

  9. In vivo monitoring of cellular energy metabolism using SoNar, a highly responsive sensor for NAD(+)/NADH redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Su, Ni; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    NADH and its oxidized form NAD(+) have a central role in energy metabolism, and their concentrations are often considered to be among the most important readouts of metabolic state. Here, we present a detailed protocol to image and monitor NAD(+)/NADH redox state in living cells and in vivo using a highly responsive, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor known as SoNar (sensor of NAD(H) redox). The chimeric SoNar protein was initially developed by inserting circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into the NADH-binding domain of Rex protein from Thermus aquaticus (T-Rex). It functions by binding to either NAD(+) or NADH, thus inducing protein conformational changes that affect its fluorescent properties. We first describe steps for how to establish SoNar-expressing cells, and then discuss how to use the system to quantify the intracellular redox state. This approach is sensitive, accurate, simple and able to report subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time. We also detail the application of SoNar to high-throughput chemical screening of candidate compounds targeting cell metabolism in a microplate-reader-based assay, along with in vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenografts expressing SoNar in mice. Typically, the approximate time frame for fluorescence imaging of SoNar is 30 min for living cells and 60 min for living mice. For high-throughput chemical screening in a 384-well-plate assay, the whole procedure generally takes no longer than 60 min to assess the effects of 380 compounds on cell metabolism.

  10. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N; Bibby, Kyle J; Stolz, Donna B; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F

    2015-12-15

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogenesis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes.

  11. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N.; Bibby, Kyle J.; Stolz, Donna B.; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L.; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogeneis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10 weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes. PMID:26529668

  12. Discovery of new enzymes and metabolic pathways by using structure and genome context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Suwen; Kumar, Ritesh; Sakai, Ayano; Vetting, Matthew W; Wood, B McKay; Brown, Shoshana; Bonanno, Jeffery B; Hillerich, Brandan S; Seidel, Ronald D; Babbitt, Patricia C; Almo, Steven C; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Gerlt, John A; Cronan, John E; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2013-10-31

    Assigning valid functions to proteins identified in genome projects is challenging: overprediction and database annotation errors are the principal concerns. We and others are developing computation-guided strategies for functional discovery with 'metabolite docking' to experimentally derived or homology-based three-dimensional structures. Bacterial metabolic pathways often are encoded by 'genome neighbourhoods' (gene clusters and/or operons), which can provide important clues for functional assignment. We recently demonstrated the synergy of docking and pathway context by 'predicting' the intermediates in the glycolytic pathway in Escherichia coli. Metabolite docking to multiple binding proteins and enzymes in the same pathway increases the reliability of in silico predictions of substrate specificities because the pathway intermediates are structurally similar. Here we report that structure-guided approaches for predicting the substrate specificities of several enzymes encoded by a bacterial gene cluster allowed the correct prediction of the in vitro activity of a structurally characterized enzyme of unknown function (PDB 2PMQ), 2-epimerization of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline betaine (tHyp-B) and cis-4-hydroxy-D-proline betaine (cHyp-B), and also the correct identification of the catabolic pathway in which Hyp-B 2-epimerase participates. The substrate-liganded pose predicted by virtual library screening (docking) was confirmed experimentally. The enzymatic activities in the predicted pathway were confirmed by in vitro assays and genetic analyses; the intermediates were identified by metabolomics; and repression of the genes encoding the pathway by high salt concentrations was established by transcriptomics, confirming the osmolyte role of tHyp-B. This study establishes the utility of structure-guided functional predictions to enable the discovery of new metabolic pathways.

  13. DAG tales: the multiple faces of diacylglycerol--stereochemistry, metabolism, and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Thomas Oliver; Lass, Achim

    2015-10-01

    The neutral lipids diacylglycerols (DAGs) are involved in a plethora of metabolic pathways. They function as components of cellular membranes, as building blocks for glycero(phospho)lipids, and as lipid second messengers. Considering their central role in multiple metabolic processes and signaling pathways, cellular DAG levels require a tight regulation to ensure a constant and controlled availability. Interestingly, DAG species are versatile in their chemical structure. Besides the different fatty acid species esterified to the glycerol backbone, DAGs can occur in three different stereo/regioisoforms, each with unique biological properties. Recent scientific advances have revealed that DAG metabolizing enzymes generate and distinguish different DAG isoforms, and that only one DAG isoform holds signaling properties. Herein, we review the current knowledge of DAG stereochemistry and their impact on cellular metabolism and signaling. Further, we describe intracellular DAG turnover and its stereochemistry in a 3-pool model to illustrate the spatial and stereochemical separation and hereby the diversity of cellular DAG metabolism.

  14. Identifying quantitative operation principles in metabolic pathways: a systematic method for searching feasible enzyme activity patterns leading to cellular adaptive responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorribas Albert

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimization methods allow designing changes in a system so that specific goals are attained. These techniques are fundamental for metabolic engineering. However, they are not directly applicable for investigating the evolution of metabolic adaptation to environmental changes. Although biological systems have evolved by natural selection and result in well-adapted systems, we can hardly expect that actual metabolic processes are at the theoretical optimum that could result from an optimization analysis. More likely, natural systems are to be found in a feasible region compatible with global physiological requirements. Results We first present a new method for globally optimizing nonlinear models of metabolic pathways that are based on the Generalized Mass Action (GMA representation. The optimization task is posed as a nonconvex nonlinear programming (NLP problem that is solved by an outer-approximation algorithm. This method relies on solving iteratively reduced NLP slave subproblems and mixed-integer linear programming (MILP master problems that provide valid upper and lower bounds, respectively, on the global solution to the original NLP. The capabilities of this method are illustrated through its application to the anaerobic fermentation pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We next introduce a method to identify the feasibility parametric regions that allow a system to meet a set of physiological constraints that can be represented in mathematical terms through algebraic equations. This technique is based on applying the outer-approximation based algorithm iteratively over a reduced search space in order to identify regions that contain feasible solutions to the problem and discard others in which no feasible solution exists. As an example, we characterize the feasible enzyme activity changes that are compatible with an appropriate adaptive response of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to heat shock Conclusion Our results

  15. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  16. Impact of type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome on myocardial structure and microvasculature of men with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yii Michael

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome are associated with impaired diastolic function and increased heart failure risk. Animal models and autopsy studies of diabetic patients implicate myocardial fibrosis, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, altered myocardial microvascular structure and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome are associated with altered myocardial structure, microvasculature, and expression of AGEs and receptor for AGEs (RAGE in men with coronary artery disease. Methods We performed histological analysis of left ventricular biopsies from 13 control, 10 diabetic and 23 metabolic syndrome men undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery who did not have heart failure or atrial fibrillation, had not received loop diuretic therapy, and did not have evidence of previous myocardial infarction. Results All three patient groups had similar extent of coronary artery disease and clinical characteristics, apart from differences in metabolic parameters. Diabetic and metabolic syndrome patients had higher pulmonary capillary wedge pressure than controls, and diabetic patients had reduced mitral diastolic peak velocity of the septal mitral annulus (E', consistent with impaired diastolic function. Neither diabetic nor metabolic syndrome patients had increased myocardial interstitial fibrosis (picrosirius red, or increased immunostaining for collagen I and III, the AGE Nε-(carboxymethyllysine, or RAGE. Cardiomyocyte width, capillary length density, diffusion radius, and arteriolar dimensions did not differ between the three patient groups, whereas diabetic and metabolic syndrome patients had reduced perivascular fibrosis. Conclusions Impaired diastolic function of type 2 diabetic and metabolic syndrome patients was not dependent on increased myocardial fibrosis, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, alteration of the

  17. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p flow cytometry, despite there being differences in the absolute number of cells detected. The combined approach of flow cytometric CRP measurement and cell sorting allowed an in situ analysis of microbial cell vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells.

  18. Effects of flow intermittency and pharmaceutical exposure on the structure and metabolism of stream biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoll, Natàlia; Casellas, Maria; Huerta, Belinda; Guasch, Helena; Acuña, Vicenç; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Serra-Compte, Albert; Barceló, Damià; Sabater, Sergi

    2015-01-15

    Increasing concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds occur in many rivers, but their environmental risk remains poorly studied in stream biofilms. Flow intermittency shapes the structure and functions of ecosystems, and may enhance their sensitivity to toxicants. This study evaluates the effects of a long-term exposure of biofilm communities to a mixture of pharmaceutical compounds at environmental concentrations on biofilm bioaccumulation capacity, the structure and metabolic processes of algae and bacteria communities, and how their potential effects were enhanced or not by the occurrence of flow intermittency. To assess the interaction between those two stressors, an experiment with artificial streams was performed. Stream biofilms were exposed to a mixture of pharmaceuticals, as well as to a short period of flow intermittency. Results indicate that biofilms were negatively affected by pharmaceuticals. The algal biomass and taxa richness decreased and unicellular green algae relatively increased. The structure of the bacterial (based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplified 16S rRNA genes) changed and showed a reduction of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) richness. Exposed biofilms showed higher rates of metabolic processes, such as primary production and community respiration, attributed to pharmaceuticals stimulated an increase of green algae and heterotrophs, respectively. Flow intermittency modulated the effects of chemicals on natural communities. The algal community became more sensitive to short-term exposure of pharmaceuticals (lower EC50 value) when exposed to water intermittency, indicating cumulative effects between the two assessed stressors. In contrast to algae, the bacterial community became less sensitive to short-term exposure of pharmaceuticals (higher EC50) when exposed to water intermittency, indicating co-tolerance phenomena. According to the observed effects, the environmental risk of pharmaceuticals in nature is high

  19. Clinical and Biochemical Markers of Cardiovascular Structure and Function in Women With the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, Gladys P; Sherazi, Saadia; Kraemer, Dale F; Bravo-Jaimes, Katia; Butterfield, Ryan; Amico, Tonja; Steinmetz, Sherry D; Guzman, Maricela; Martin, Dale; Dodani, Sunita; Smith, Brian H

    2015-12-01

    The pathobiological impact of individual components of the metabolic syndrome (MS) on cardiac structural and functional parameters in women with isolated MS is not known. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare biochemical (prothrombotic, lipogenic, and inflammatory) and imaging (carotid intima-media thickening and basic cardiac structural measurements) markers in women with and without MS and (2) to examine if any of these markers associated or predicted cardiac structural differences between the 2 groups. This cross-sectional pilot study included 88 women with MS and 35 women without it. MS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Patients with diagnosis of diabetes were excluded. Compared with healthy subjects, women with MS had higher levels of intercellular adhesion molecule, myeloperoxidase, C-reactive protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, leptin, apolipoprotein-B, and lower levels of apolipoprotein-A1 (p women with isolated MS compared with those without. Waist circumference and systolic BP had the strongest association with cardiac structural differences in this group of women.

  20. Metabolic disease network and its implication for disease comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deok-Sun; Oltvai, Zoltan; Christakis, Nicholas; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    Given that most diseases are the result of the breakdown of some cellular processes, a key aim of modern medicine is to establish the relationship between disease phenotypes and the various disruptions in the underlying cellular networks. Here we show that our current understanding of the structure of the human metabolic network can provide insight into potential relationships among often distinct disease phenotypes. Using the known enzyme-disease associations, we construct a human metabolic disease network in which nodes are diseases and two diseases are linked if the enzymes associated with them catalyze adjacent metabolic reactions. We find that the more connected a disease is, the higher is its prevalence and the chance that it is associated with a high mortality. The results indicate that the cellular network-level relationships between metabolic pathways and the associated disease provide insights into disease comorbidity, with potential important consequences on disease diagnosis and prevention.

  1. Development of quantitative structure-metabolism (QSMR) relationships for substituted anilines based on computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athersuch, Toby J; Wilson, Ian D; Keun, Hector C; Lindon, John C

    2013-09-01

    A novel stepwise classification approach for predicting the metabolic fate of substituted anilines, based on calculated physicochemical parameters of the parent anilines, was developed. Based on multivariate pattern recognition methods (PLS-DA or soft independent modelling of class analogy [SIMCA]), these models allowed prediction of N-acetylation and subsequent N-oxanilic acid formation. These classification methods provided an improved classification success when compared with existing quantitative structure-metabolism relationship models for substituted anilines. Modelling the physicochemical properties of the N-acetylated compounds was considered as an addition to the stepwise model. Inclusion of parameters describing the N-acetyl moiety had little effect on the predictive ability of a stepwise parent to N-acetyl to N-oxanilic acid PLS-DA model, and had a negative impact on that of SIMCA models. This was attributed to the relatively small contribution to the total parameter variance caused by differences arising as a result of N-acetylation compared to the contribution made by the substituent effects. Calculation of physicochemical properties incorporating the effect of solvation using ab initio methods improved the classification model in terms of both the visual separation in multivariate projections and prediction accuracy.

  2. Understanding the structure-function relationship between FGF19 and its mitogenic and metabolic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2012-01-01

    FGF19 differs from the classical FGFs in that it has a much-reduced heparan sulfate proteoglycan binding affinity that allows it to act as endocrine hormone. Although FGF19 regulates several different metabolic activities, it still activates downstream signaling pathways through FGF receptors, in a similar manner to that seen in classical FGFs. Aberrant FGF signaling has been implicated in tumor development, and mouse models have confirmed that FGF19 has the potential to induce hepatocellular carcinoma. Treatment with anti-FGF19 antibody suppressed tumor progression in both FGF19 transgenic mice and colon cancer cell xenograft models. FGFR4, the predominant FGF receptor expressed in the liver, may play an important role in FGF19-mediated tumorigenesis. This review reports the current advances in understanding the structure-function relationship between FGF19 and its interactions with FGFRs, its physiological activities, and its differences from FGF21. The review also discusses strategies to separate the mitogenic and metabolic activities for the development of potential therapeutic molecules based on FGF19.

  3. Bidirectional Expression of Metabolic, Structural, and Immune Pathways in Early Myopia and Hyperopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Riddell

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Myopia (short-sightedness affects 1.45 billion people worldwide, many of whom will develop sight-threatening secondary disorders. Myopic eyes are characterized by excessive size while hyperopic (long-sighted eyes are typically small. The biological and genetic mechanisms underpinning the retina’s local control of these growth patterns remain unclear. In the present study, we used RNA sequencing to examine gene expression in the retina/RPE/choroid across 3 days of optically-induced myopia and hyperopia induction in chick. Data were analysed for differential expression of single genes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA was used to identify gene sets correlated with ocular axial length and refraction across lens groups. Like previous studies, we found few single genes that were differentially-expressed in a sign-of-defocus dependent manner (only BMP2 at 1 day. Using GSEA, however, we are the first to show that more subtle shifts in structural, metabolic, and immune pathway expression are correlated with the eye size and refractive changes induced by lens defocus. Our findings link gene expression with the morphological characteristics of refractive error, and suggest that physiological stress arising from metabolic and inflammatory pathway activation could increase the vulnerability of myopic eyes to secondary pathologies

  4. Cellular Telephone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨周

    1996-01-01

    Cellular phones, used in automobiles, airliners, and passenger trains, are basically low-power radiotelephones. Calls go through radio transmitters that are located within small geographical units called cells. Because each cell’s signals are too weak to interfere with those of other cells operating on the same fre-

  5. Starch Granule Re-Structuring by Starch Branching Enzyme and Glucan Water Dikinase Modulation Affects Caryopsis Physiology and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaik, Shahnoor S.; Obata, Toshihiro; Hebelstrup, Kim H;

    2016-01-01

    Starch is of fundamental importance for plant development and reproduction and its optimized molecular assembly is potentially necessary for correct starch metabolism. Re-structuring of starch granules in-planta can therefore potentially affect plant metabolism. Modulation of granule micro......-structure was achieved by decreasing starch branching and increasing starch-bound phosphate content in the barley caryopsis starch by RNAi suppression of all three Starch Branching Enzyme (SBE) isoforms or overexpression of potato Glucan Water Dikinase (GWD). The resulting lines displayed Amylose-Only (AO) and Hyper......-Phosphorylated (HP) starch chemotypes, respectively. We studied the influence of these alterations on primary metabolism, grain composition, starch structural features and starch granule morphology over caryopsis development at 10, 20 and 30 days after pollination (DAP) and at grain maturity. While HP showed...

  6. Demonstration of metabolic and cellular effects of portal vein ligation using multi-modal PET/MRI measurements in healthy rat liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Fülöp

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In the early recognition of portal vein ligation (PVL induced tumor progression, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI could improve diagnostic accuracy of conventionally used methods. It is unknown how PVL affects metabolic patterns of tumor free hepatic tissues. The aim of this preliminary study is to evaluate the effect of PVL on glucose metabolism, using PET/MRI imaging in healthy rat liver. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Wistar rats (n=30 underwent PVL. 2-deoxy-2-(18Ffluoro-D-glucose (FDG PET/MRI imaging (nanoScan PET/MRI and morphological/histological examination were performed before (Day 0 and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after PVL. Dynamic PET data were collected and the standardized uptake values (SUV for ligated and non-ligated liver lobes were calculated in relation to cardiac left ventricle (SUVVOI/SUVCLV and mean liver SUV (SUVVOI/SUVLiver. RESULTS: PVL induced atrophy of ligated lobes, while non-ligated liver tissue showed compensatory hypertrophy. Dynamic PET scan revealed altered FDG kinetics in both ligated and non-ligated liver lobes. SUVVOI/SUVCLV significantly increased in both groups of lobes, with a maximal value at the 2nd postoperative day and returned near to the baseline 7 days after the ligation. After PVL, ligated liver lobes showed significantly higher tracer uptake compared to the non-ligated lobes (significantly higher SUVVOI/SUVLiver values were observed at postoperative day 1, 2 and 3. The homogenous tracer biodistribution observed before PVL reappeared by 7th postoperative day. CONCLUSION: The observed alterations in FDG uptake dynamics should be taken into account during the assessment of PET data until the PVL induced atrophic and regenerative processes are completed.

  7. Diverse control of metabolism and other cellular processes in Streptomyces coelicolor by the PhoP transcription factor: genome-wide identification of in vivo targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenby, Nicholas E E; Laing, Emma; Bucca, Giselda; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Smith, Colin P

    2012-10-01

    Streptomycetes sense and respond to the stress of phosphate starvation via the two-component PhoR-PhoP signal transduction system. To identify the in vivo targets of PhoP we have undertaken a chromatin-immunoprecipitation-on-microarray analysis of wild-type and phoP mutant cultures and, in parallel, have quantified their transcriptomes. Most (ca. 80%) of the previously in vitro characterized PhoP targets were identified in this study among several hundred other putative novel PhoP targets. In addition to activating genes for phosphate scavenging systems PhoP was shown to target two gene clusters for cell wall/extracellular polymer biosynthesis. Furthermore PhoP was found to repress an unprecedented range of pathways upon entering phosphate limitation including nitrogen assimilation, oxidative phosphorylation, nucleotide biosynthesis and glycogen catabolism. Moreover, PhoP was shown to target many key genes involved in antibiotic production and morphological differentiation, including afsS, atrA, bldA, bldC, bldD, bldK, bldM, cdaR, cdgA, cdgB and scbR-scbA. Intriguingly, in the PhoP-dependent cpk polyketide gene cluster, PhoP accumulates substantially at three specific sites within the giant polyketide synthase-encoding genes. This study suggests that, following phosphate limitation, Streptomyces coelicolor PhoP functions as a 'master' regulator, suppressing central metabolism, secondary metabolism and developmental pathways until sufficient phosphate is salvaged to support further growth and, ultimately, morphological development.

  8. Alteration of the interconversion of pyruvate and malate in the plastid or cytosol of ripening tomato fruit invokes diverse consequences on sugar but similar effects on cellular organic acid, metabolism, and transitory starch accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Sonia; Vallarino, José G; Szecowka, Marek; Ufaz, Shai; Tzin, Vered; Angelovici, Ruthie; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of decreased cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and plastidic NADP-dependent malic enzyme (ME) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) ripening. Transgenic tomato plants with strongly reduced levels of PEPCK and plastidic NADP-ME were generated by RNA interference gene silencing under the control of a ripening-specific E8 promoter. While these genetic modifications had relatively little effect on the total fruit yield and size, they had strong effects on fruit metabolism. Both transformants were characterized by lower levels of starch at breaker stage. Analysis of the activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase correlated with the decrease of starch in both transformants, which suggests that it is due to an altered cellular redox status. Moreover, metabolic profiling and feeding experiments involving positionally labeled glucoses of fruits lacking in plastidic NADP-ME and cytosolic PEPCK activities revealed differential changes in overall respiration rates and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux. Inactivation of cytosolic PEPCK affected the respiration rate, which suggests that an excess of oxaloacetate is converted to aspartate and reintroduced in the TCA cycle via 2-oxoglutarate/glutamate. On the other hand, the plastidic NADP-ME antisense lines were characterized by no changes in respiration rates and TCA cycle flux, which together with increases of pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities indicate that pyruvate is supplied through these enzymes to the TCA cycle. These results are discussed in the context of current models of the importance of malate during tomato fruit ripening.

  9. Calcium and ascorbic acid affect cellular structure and water mobility in apple tissue during osmotic dehydration in sucrose solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Maria A; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Tylewicz, Urszula; Tappi, Silvia; Laghi, Luca; Rocculi, Pietro; Rosa, Marco Dalla

    2016-03-15

    The effects of the addition of calcium lactate and ascorbic acid to sucrose osmotic solutions on cell viability and microstructure of apple tissue were studied. In addition, water distribution and mobility modification of the different cellular compartments were observed. Fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) were respectively used to evaluate cell viability and microstructural changes during osmotic dehydration. Tissues treated in a sucrose-calcium lactate-ascorbic acid solution did not show viability. Calcium lactate had some effects on cell walls and membranes. Sucrose solution visibly preserved the protoplast viability and slightly influenced the water distribution within the apple tissue, as highlighted by TD-NMR, which showed higher proton intensity in the vacuoles and lower intensity in cytoplasm-free spaces compared to other treatments. The presence of ascorbic acid enhanced calcium impregnation, which was associated with permeability changes of the cellular wall and membranes.

  10. Construction and structural analysis of integrated cellular network of Corynebacterium glutamicum%谷氨酸棒状杆菌集成细胞网络的构建与结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜金国; 宋理富; 郑平; 贾士儒; 孙际宾

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is one of the most important traditional industrial microorganisms and receiving more and more attention towards a novel cellular factory due to the recently rapid development in genomics aad genetic operation toolboxes for Corynebacterium. However, compared to other model organisms such as Escherichia coli, there were few studies on its metabolic regulation, especially a genome-scale integrated cellular network model currently missing for Corynebacterium, which hindered the systematic study of Corynebacterium glutamicum and large-scale rational design and optimization for strains. Here, by gathering relevant information from a number of public databases, we successfully constructed an integrated cellular network, which was composed of 1 384 reactions, 1 276 metabolites, 88 transcriptional factors and 999 pairs of transcriptional regulatory relationships. The transcriptional regulatory sub-network could be arranged into five layers and the metabolic sub-network presented a clear bow-tie structure. We proposed a new method to extract complex metabolic and regulatory sub-network for product-orientated study taking lysine biosynthesis as an example. The metabolic and regulatory sub-network extracted by our method was more close to the real functional network than the simplex biochemical pathways. The results would be greatly helpful for understanding the high-yielding biomechanism for amino acids and the re-design of the industrial strains.%谷氨酸棒状杆菌是一种重要的传统工业微生物,其基因组学和分子遗传操作工具的快速发展使得谷氨酸棒状杆菌具备了作为新型细胞工厂的潜力.但是,相对于大肠杆菌等模式生物,对于棒杆菌的代谢调控研究较少,特别是目前还缺乏谷氨酸棒状杆菌集成细胞网络的研究,这一现状阻碍了谷氨酸棒状杆菌的系统生物学研究和大规模菌种理性设计优化.文中综合应用公共数据库、文献数据库资源,

  11. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  12. Structural basis for the entrance into the phenylpropanoid metabolism catalyzed by phenylalanine ammonia-lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Holger; Schulz, Georg E

    2004-12-01

    Because of its key role in secondary phenylpropanoid metabolism, Phe ammonia-lyase is one of the most extensively studied plant enzymes. To provide a basis for detailed structure-function studies, the enzyme from parsley (Petroselinum crispum) was crystallized, and the structure was elucidated at 1.7-A resolution. It contains the unusual electrophilic 4-methylidene-imidazole-5-one group, which is derived from a tripeptide segment in two autocatalytic dehydration reactions. The enzyme resembles His ammonia-lyase from the general His degradation pathway but contains 207 additional residues, mainly in an N-terminal extension rigidifying a domain interface and in an inserted alpha-helical domain restricting the access to the active center. Presumably, Phe ammonia-lyase developed from His ammonia-lyase when fungi and plants diverged from the other kingdoms. A pathway of the catalyzed reaction is proposed in agreement with established biochemical data. The inactivation of the enzyme by a nucleophile is described in detail.

  13. Early Changes in Soil Metabolic Diversity and Bacterial Community Structure in Sugarcane under Two Harvest Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Carvalho Basilio Azevedo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Preharvest burning is widely used in Brazil for sugarcane cropping. However, due to environmental restrictions, harvest without burning is becoming the predominant option. Consequently, changes in the microbial community are expected from crop residue accumulation on the soil surface, as well as alterations in soil metabolic diversity as of the first harvest. Because biological properties respond quickly and can be used to monitor environmental changes, we evaluated soil metabolic diversity and bacterial community structure after the first harvest under sugarcane management without burning compared to management with preharvest burning. Soil samples were collected under three sugarcane varieties (SP813250, SP801842 and RB72454 and two harvest management systems (without and with preharvest burning. Microbial biomass C (MBC, carbon (C substrate utilization profiles, bacterial community structure (based on profiles of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, and soil chemical properties were determined. MBC was not different among the treatments. C-substrate utilization and metabolic diversity were lower in soil without burning, except for the evenness index of C-substrate utilization. Soil samples under the variety SP801842 showed the greatest changes in substrate utilization and metabolic diversity, but showed no differences in bacterial community structure, regardless of the harvest management system. In conclusion, combined analysis of soil chemical and microbiological data can detect early changes in microbial metabolic capacity and diversity, with lower values in management without burning. However, after the first harvest, there were no changes in the soil bacterial community structure detected by PCR-DGGE under the sugarcane variety SP801842. Therefore, the metabolic profile is a more sensitive indicator of early changes in the soil microbial community caused by the harvest management system.

  14. Identification of Human N-Myristoylated Proteins from Human Complementary DNA Resources by Cell-Free and Cellular Metabolic Labeling Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamitsu, Emi; Otsuka, Motoaki; Haebara, Tatsuki; Yano, Manami; Matsuzaki, Kanako; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Moriya, Koko; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    To identify physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins, 90 cDNA clones predicted to encode human N-myristoylated proteins were selected from a human cDNA resource (4,369 Kazusa ORFeome project human cDNA clones) by two bioinformatic N-myristoylation prediction systems, NMT-The MYR Predictor and Myristoylator. After database searches to exclude known human N-myristoylated proteins, 37 cDNA clones were selected as potential human N-myristoylated proteins. The susceptibility of these cDNA clones to protein N-myristoylation was first evaluated using fusion proteins in which the N-terminal ten amino acid residues were fused to an epitope-tagged model protein. Then, protein N-myristoylation of the gene products of full-length cDNAs was evaluated by metabolic labeling experiments both in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system and in transfected human cells. As a result, the products of 13 cDNA clones (FBXL7, PPM1B, SAMM50, PLEKHN, AIFM3, C22orf42, STK32A, FAM131C, DRICH1, MCC1, HID1, P2RX5, STK32B) were found to be human N-myristoylated proteins. Analysis of the role of protein N-myristoylation on the intracellular localization of SAMM50, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, revealed that protein N-myristoylation was required for proper targeting of SAMM50 to mitochondria. Thus, the strategy used in this study is useful for the identification of physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins from human cDNA resources. PMID:26308446

  15. Old age and the associated impairment of bones' adaptation to loading are associated with transcriptomic changes in cellular metabolism, cell-matrix interactions and the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Gabriel L; Meakin, Lee B; Harris, Marie A; Delisser, Peter J; Lanyon, Lance E; Harris, Stephen E; Price, Joanna S

    2017-01-30

    In old animals, bone's ability to adapt its mass and architecture to functional load-bearing requirements is diminished, resulting in bone loss characteristic of osteoporosis. Here we investigate transcriptomic changes associated with this impaired adaptive response. Young adult (19-week-old) and aged (19-month-old) female mice were subjected to unilateral axial tibial loading and their cortical shells harvested for microarray analysis between 1h and 24h following loading (36 mice per age group, 6 mice per loading group at 6 time points). In non-loaded aged bones, down-regulated genes are enriched for MAPK, Wnt and cell cycle components, including E2F1. E2F1 is the transcription factor most closely associated with genes down-regulated by ageing and is down-regulated at the protein level in osteocytes. Genes up-regulated in aged bone are enriched for carbohydrate metabolism, TNFα and TGFβ superfamily components. Loading stimulates rapid and sustained transcriptional responses in both age groups. However, genes related to proliferation are predominantly up-regulated in the young and down-regulated in the aged following loading, whereas those implicated in bioenergetics are down-regulated in the young and up-regulated in the aged. Networks of inter-related transcription factors regulated by E2F1 are loading-responsive in both age groups. Loading regulates genes involved in similar signalling cascades in both age groups, but these responses are more sustained in the young than aged. From this we conclude that cells in aged bone retain the capability to sense and transduce loading-related stimuli, but their ability to translate acute responses into functionally relevant outcomes is diminished.

  16. Effects of low-dose fractionated external irradiation on metabolic and structural characteristics of rat thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadolnik, L.; Niatsetskaya, Z. [Institute of Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Grodno (Belarus)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The problem of thyroid radiosensitivity to the effect of low dose external ionizing irradiation presently seems to be the least studied, and the experimental findings - the most contradictory. The aim of the work was to study the effects of long-term low-dose fractionated irradiation on the iodide metabolism and structure of the thyroid. Female Wistar rats weighing 140-160 g were irradiated 20 times (5 times a week, for 4 weeks) using a 60 Co installation. The single absorbed doses were 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 Gy and the total ones - 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 Gy, respectively. The animals were decapitated after 1 day, 4 and 24 weeks following the last irradiation. The thyroid tissue was used to assay for thyro-peroxidase (T.P.O.) activity as well as total, protein -bound and free iodide concentrations. Microscopic and morphometric examination of histologic thyroid preparations was carried out. Blood was assayed for thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations. After a day following the irradiation, the thyroid showed a pronounced increase in the concentration of total iodide (30.0-54.4%) as well in that of free (32.1-60.8%) and protein-bound ones (24.4-37.4%). The most pronounced iodide concentration elevation was noted in the 0.1 -Gy animals, with thyroid T.P.O. activity being raised by 48.0%. Only the 0.5 Gy-group had 1.4-1.5-fold reduced thyroid hormone levels. Four weeks after the irradiation, studied parameters of irradiated rats were brought back to the control values, except for the 0.5 Gy-group. However, after 24-weeks, the 0.5-and 0.25- irradiated rats experienced a 12-20% thyroid weight elevation in comparison with the control. The thyroid of these animals demonstrated reduced contents of total and free iodide as well as T.P.O. activity by 24.5 and 34.8%. The 0.1 Gy-group had a 1.7-fold increased T.P.O. activity. The concentration of the thyroid hormones was maintained diminished only in the 0.5 Gy -irradiated group. However

  17. Analysis by numerical calculations of the depth and dynamics of the penetration of ordered cellular structure made by casting from AlSi10Mg eutectic alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Małysza

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing to high plastic deformability while maintaining stress values constant and relatively low, ordered cellular structures arecharacterised by excellent properties and the ability to dissipate the impact energy. Due to the low weight, structures of this type can beused, among others, for different parts of motor vehicles. For tests, a trapezoidal ordered cellular structure of 50.8 x 50.8 x 25.4 (mmoverall dimensions was selected. It was made as an investment casting from AlSi9Mg eutectic alloy by the method of Rapid Prototyping(RP. During FEM computations using an Abaqus programme, it was assumed that the material is isotropic and exhibits the features of anelastic – plastic body, introducing to calculations the, listed in a table, values of the stress-strain curve obtained in tensile tests performedon a MTS testing machine (10T. The computations used Johnson - Cook model, which is usually sufficiently accurate when modelling thephenomena of penetration of an element by an object of high initial velocity. The performed numerical calculations allowed identification

  18. Mathematical modelling of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gombert, Andreas Karoly; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Mathematical models of the cellular metabolism have a special interest within biotechnology. Many different kinds of commercially important products are derived from the cell factory, and metabolic engineering can be applied to improve existing production processes, as well as to make new processes...... availability of genomic information and powerful analytical techniques, mathematical models also serve as a tool for understanding the cellular metabolism and physiology....... available. Both stoichiometric and kinetic models have been used to investigate the metabolism, which has resulted in defining the optimal fermentation conditions, as well as in directing the genetic changes to be introduced in order to obtain a good producer strain or cell line. With the increasing...

  19. Product structure metrics as an indicator of demand-supply chain efficiency : case study in the cellular network industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kaski, Timo

    2002-01-01

    Product structure affects demand-supply chain performance, this is almost self-evident. But how to develop better product structures? Which design alternative is the best among several options? Markets define the number of product variants needed. Therefore, limiting product variations is not a feasible solution. This research made an effort to develop a method to guide product structure development and to quantify comparison of alternative design implementations. The study aimed at reducing ...

  20. Construction of robust dynamic genome-scale metabolic model structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through iterative re-parameterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Benjamín J; Pérez-Correa, José R; Agosin, Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA) has been widely employed in metabolic engineering to predict the effect of genetic modifications and environmental conditions in the cell׳s metabolism during dynamic cultures. However, the importance of the model parameters used in these methodologies has not been properly addressed. Here, we present a novel and simple procedure to identify dFBA parameters that are relevant for model calibration. The procedure uses metaheuristic optimization and pre/post-regression diagnostics, fixing iteratively the model parameters that do not have a significant role. We evaluated this protocol in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae dFBA framework calibrated for aerobic fed-batch and anaerobic batch cultivations. The model structures achieved have only significant, sensitive and uncorrelated parameters and are able to calibrate different experimental data. We show that consumption, suboptimal growth and production rates are more useful for calibrating dynamic S. cerevisiae metabolic models than Boolean gene expression rules, biomass requirements and ATP maintenance.

  1. Structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09410 (DUF2006) reveals a structural signature of the calycin superfamily that suggests a role in lipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Skerra, Arne; Lomize, Andrei; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (SLAC); (Michigan); (TU Munchen)

    2015-10-15

    The first structural representative of the domain of unknown function DUF2006 family, also known as Pfam family PF09410, comprises a lipocalin-like fold with domain duplication. The finding of the calycin signature in the N-terminal domain, combined with remote sequence similarity to two other protein families (PF07143 and PF08622) implicated in isoprenoid metabolism and the oxidative stress response, support an involvement in lipid metabolism. Clusters of conserved residues that interact with ligand mimetics suggest that the binding and regulation sites map to the N-terminal domain and to the interdomain interface, respectively.

  2. Recent advance on crosstalk between iron metabolism and cellular protein ubiquitylation and degradation%铁代谢与蛋白质泛素化-降解调控研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈佳; 王福俤; 胡荣贵

    2012-01-01

    铁元素为几乎所有的生命体所必需,维持铁代谢稳态对机体的正常功能至关重要.铁代谢紊乱与人类多种疾病的发生和发展有关.已知铁代谢稳态受到一系列参与铁代谢环节的关键蛋白质,如IRP2等的精确调节.这些重要蛋白质的稳定性、生理活性的动态变化及其协调作用是细胞维持铁代谢平衡的分子基础.除了转录和转录后水平的调控,泛素化等翻译后修饰方式和蛋白质降解是细胞精确调控参与铁代谢的蛋白质的水平及功能普遍而有效的方式之一;同时,细胞的铁代谢状态也影响细胞内参与泛素化等翻译后修饰途径的酶类的活性和稳定性,从而在铁代谢和蛋白质修饰-降解途径之间形成反馈机制,实时和动态地完成对细胞内铁代谢水平的精确调控.就相关领域的最新进展作简要综述.%As iron is one of the essential metal elements for life, maintaining homeostasis of iron metabolism is crucial for any cell to survive and function normally. Perturbed iron metabolism has been a known cause of many human diseases. Delicate regulatory mechanisms have been evolved to maintain iron homeostasis at both organism and cell level. Previously, we and others have shown that heme, as a major form of iron existing in cell, regulates folding, ubiquitylation and/ or degradation of heme-binding proteins, such as IRP2 and ATE1 etc. in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. There were now most recent reports that FBXL5, an F-box ubiquitin ligase, ubiquitylates iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) in an iron-dependent manner, while FBXL5 itself is stabilized by iron at elevated level. Here we review advances and present our perspectives of research into crosstalk between iron metabolism and cellular protein ubiquitylation and proteolysis.

  3. Characterization of the microchemical structure of seed endosperm within a cellular dimension among six barley varieties with distinct degradation kinetics, using ultraspatially resolved synchrotron-based infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Yu, Peiqiang

    2010-07-14

    Barley varieties have similar chemical composition but exhibit different rumen degradation kinetics and nutrient availability. These biological differences may be related to molecular, structural, and chemical makeup among the seed endosperm tissue. No detailed study was carried out. The objectives of this study were: (1) to use a molecular spectroscopy technique, synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SFTIRM), to determine the microchemical-structural features in seed endosperm tissue of six developed barley varieties; (2) to study the relationship among molecular-structural characteristics, degradation kinetics, and nutrient availability in six genotypes of barley. The results showed that inherent microchemical-structural differences in the endosperm among the six barley varieties were detected by the synchrotron-based analytical technique, SFTIRM, with the univariate molecular spectral analysis. The SFTIRM spectral profiles differed (P degradation). Weak correlations may indicate that limited variations of these six barley varieties might not be sufficient to interpret the relationship between spectroscopic information and the nutrient value of barley grain, although significant differences in biodegradation kinetics were observed. In conclusion, the studies demonstrated the potential of ultraspatially resolved synchrotron based technology (SFTIRM) to reveal the structural and chemical makeup within cellular and subcellular dimensions without destruction of the inherent structure of cereal grain tissue.

  4. Metabolism at Evolutionary Optimal States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraes Rabbers

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism is generally required for cellular maintenance and for the generation of offspring under conditions that support growth. The rates, yields (efficiencies, adaptation time and robustness of metabolism are therefore key determinants of cellular fitness. For biotechnological applications and our understanding of the evolution of metabolism, it is necessary to figure out how the functional system properties of metabolism can be optimized, via adjustments of the kinetics and expression of enzymes, and by rewiring metabolism. The trade-offs that can occur during such optimizations then indicate fundamental limits to evolutionary innovations and bioengineering. In this paper, we review several theoretical and experimental findings about mechanisms for metabolic optimization.

  5. Cellular mechanotransduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang H. Goldmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion and cell–cell contacts are pre-requisites for proper metabolism, protein synthesis, cell survival, and cancer metastasis. Major transmembrane receptors are the integrins, which are responsible for cell matrix adhesions, and the cadherins, which are important for cell-cell adhesions.  Adherent cells are anchored via focal adhesions (FAs to the extracellular matrix, while cell-cell contacts are connected via focal adherens junctions (FAJs. Force transmission over considerable distances and stress focusing at these adhesion sites make them prime candidates for mechanosensors. Exactly which protein(s within FAs and FAJs or which membrane component of ion channels sense, transmit, and respond to mechano-chemical signaling is currently strongly debated and numerous candidates have been proposed.

  6. On the quasi-one dimensional structure of the cellular detonation in a two-dimensional duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyeda, C. M.; Kurosaka, M.; Ferrante, A.

    2015-11-01

    We performed numerical simulations of cellular detonations in a 2D duct to establish the validity of the one-dimensional ZND model. The detonation was simulated by solving the Euler equations with a WENO-TCD numerical method using adaptive mesh refinement and a detailed chemical reaction mechanism. The results show that the properties of the ZND model of a 2H2-O2-7Ar reaction are very close to the results of the simulations initiated using three different methods for the area-averaged properties and the properties of particles tracked along their pathlines. Disagreements between the particle properties and the ZND model are greatest near the detonation front where the transverse wave and Mach stem introduce larger jumps in the flow properties than the ZND model predicts. The particle pathlines also exhibit a quasi one-dimensional motion downstream from the detonation front which is supported by the quick decay in the particles' velocity ratio of the vertical to horizontal velocity components, in the reference frame attached to the detonation front. These findings show the quasi one-dimensional nature of 2D detonations and the applicability of the ZND model.

  7. Coupled Effects of Hyporheic Flow Structure and Metabolic Pattern on Reach-scale Nutrient Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Bolster, D.; Tank, J. L.; Packman, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Co-injections of conservative tracers and nutrients are commonly used to assess net reach-scale nutrient transformation rates and benthic/hyporheic uptake parameters. However, little information is available on spatial metabolic patterns in the benthic and hyporheic regions. Based on observations from real systems, we used particle tracking simulations to explore the effects of localized metabolism on estimates of reach-scale nutrient uptake rates. Metabolism locally depletes nutrient concentrations relative to conservative tracers, causing their concentration profiles of injected nutrients and conservative tracers to diverge. At slow rates of hyporheic exchange relative to rates of metabolism, overall hyporheic nutrient uptake is limited by delivery from the stream, and effective reach-scale nutrient uptake parameters will be controlled by the hyporheic exchange rate. At high rates of hyporheic exchange relative to rates of metabolism, the injected tracer can propagate beyond regions of high microbial activity, which commonly occur near the streambed surface. In this case, the injected tracer may not adequately capture timescales of nutrient replenishment in the most bioactive regions. Reach-scale nutrients uptake rate increases with increasing heterogeneity in local metabolic patterns, altering the shape of breakthrough curves downstream. More observations of hyporheic rates and metabolic patterns are needed to understand how flow heterogeneity and reaction heterogeneity interact to control nutrient dynamics at reach-scale.

  8. The effect of natural and synthetic fatty acids on membrane structure, microdomain organization, cellular functions and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarguren, Maitane; López, David J; Escribá, Pablo V

    2014-06-01

    This review deals with the effects of synthetic and natural fatty acids on the biophysical properties of membranes, and on their implication on cell function. Natural fatty acids are constituents of more complex lipids, like triacylglycerides or phospholipids, which are used by cells to store and obtain energy, as well as for structural purposes. Accordingly, natural and synthetic fatty acids may modify the structure of the lipid membrane, altering its microdomain organization and other physical properties, and provoking changes in cell signaling. Therefore, by modulating fatty acids it is possible to regulate the structure of the membrane, influencing the cell processes that are reliant on this structure and potentially reverting pathological cell dysfunctions that may provoke cancer, diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The so-called Membrane Lipid Therapy offers a strategy to regulate the membrane composition through drug administration, potentially reverting pathological processes by re-adapting cell membrane structure. Certain fatty acids and their synthetic derivatives are described here that may potentially be used in such therapies, where the cell membrane itself can be considered as a target to combat disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  9. Intestinal microbiota in metabolic diseases: from bacterial community structure and functions to species of pathophysiological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Thomas; Desmarchelier, Charles; Haller, Dirk; Gérard, Philippe; Rohn, Sascha; Lepage, Patricia; Daniel, Hannelore

    2014-07-01

    The trillions of bacterial cells that colonize the mammalian digestive tract influence both host physiology and the fate of dietary compounds. Gnotobionts and fecal transplantation have been instrumental in revealing the causal role of intestinal bacteria in energy homeostasis and metabolic dysfunctions such as type-2 diabetes. However, the exact contribution of gut bacterial metabolism to host energy balance is still unclear and knowledge about underlying molecular mechanisms is scant. We have previously characterized cecal bacterial community functions and host responses in diet-induced obese mice using omics approaches. Based on these studies, we here discuss issues on the relevance of mouse models, give evidence that the metabolism of cholesterol-derived compounds by gut bacteria is of particular importance in the context of metabolic disorders and that dominant species of the family Coriobacteriaceae are good models to study these functions.

  10. Spinal Fluid Lactate Dehydrogenase Level Differentiates between Structural and Metabolic Etiologies of Altered Mental Status in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid KHOSROSHAHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Khosroshahi N, Alizadeh P, Khosravi M, Salamati P, Kamrani K. Spinal Fluid Lactate Dehydrogenase Level Differentiates between Structural and Metabolic Etiologies of Altered Mental Status in Children. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter;9(1:31-36.AbstractObjectiveAltered mental status is a common cause of intensive care unit admission inchildren. Differentiating structural causes of altered mental status from metabolic etiologies is of utmost importance in diagnostic approach and management of the patients. Among many biomarkers proposed to help stratifying patients with altered mental status, spinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase appears to be the most promising biomarker to predict cellular necrosis.Materials & MethodsIn this cross sectional study we measured spinal fluid level of lactatedehydrogenase in children 2 months to 12 years of age admitted to a single center intensive care unit over one year. Spinal fluid level of lactate dehydrogenase in 40 pediatric cases of febrile seizure was also determined as the control group.ResultsThe study group included 35 boys (58.3% and 25 girls (41.7%. Their meanage was 2.7+/-3 years and their mean spinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase levelwas 613.8+/-190.4 units/liter. The control group included 24 boys (55.8% and19 girls (44.2%. Their mean age was 1.3+/-1.2 years and their mean spinalfluid lactate dehydrogenase level was 18.9+/-7.5 units/liter. The mean spinalfluid lactate dehydrogenase level in children with abnormal head CT scan was246.3+/-351.5 units/liter compared to 164.5+/-705.7 in those with normal CTscan of the head (p=0.001.ConclusionSpinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase level is useful in differentiating structural andmetabolic causes of altered mental status in children. ReferencesFesk SK. Coma and confusional states: emergency diagnosis and management. Neurol Clin 1998; 16: 237- 56.Cucchiara BL, Kanser SE, Wolk DA, et al. Early impairment in consciousness Predicts

  11. Structural basis for the recognition of cellular mRNA export factor REF by herpes viral proteins HSV-1 ICP27 and HVS ORF57.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Richard B; Hautbergue, Guillaume M; Kalra, Priti; Jackson, Brian R; Whitehouse, Adrian; Wilson, Stuart A; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2011-01-06

    The herpesvirus proteins HSV-1 ICP27 and HVS ORF57 promote viral mRNA export by utilizing the cellular mRNA export machinery. This function is triggered by binding to proteins of the transcription-export (TREX) complex, in particular to REF/Aly which directs viral mRNA to the TAP/NFX1 pathway and, subsequently, to the nuclear pore for export to the cytoplasm. Here we have determined the structure of the REF-ICP27 interaction interface at atomic-resolution and provided a detailed comparison of the binding interfaces between ICP27, ORF57 and REF using solution-state NMR. Despite the absence of any obvious sequence similarity, both viral proteins bind on the same site of the folded RRM domain of REF, via short but specific recognition sites. The regions of ICP27 and ORF57 involved in binding by REF have been mapped as residues 104-112 and 103-120, respectively. We have identified the pattern of residues critical for REF/Aly recognition, common to both ICP27 and ORF57. The importance of the key amino acid residues within these binding sites was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. The functional significance of the ORF57-REF/Aly interaction was also probed using an ex vivo cytoplasmic viral mRNA accumulation assay and this revealed that mutants that reduce the protein-protein interaction dramatically decrease the ability of ORF57 to mediate the nuclear export of intronless viral mRNA. Together these data precisely map amino acid residues responsible for the direct interactions between viral adaptors and cellular REF/Aly and provide the first molecular details of how herpes viruses access the cellular mRNA export pathway.

  12. Coral reef microbes : the influences of benthic primary producers, nutrient availability, and anthropogenic stressors on community structure and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Linda Ellen Wegley

    2013-01-01

    Genomic studies of marine microbes have advanced our understanding of community ecology and the vast array of metabolisms microbes utilize for acquiring energy and nutrients in the ocean. The structure of microbial communities overlying coral reefs have been shown to reflect ecosystem health. For example, algal-dominated reefs are inhabited by more pathogen-like microbes. The objective of my PhD thesis was to use metagenomics to investigate the microbial communities associated with the coral ...

  13. Differences in Cellulosic Supramolecular Structure of Compositionally Similar Rice Straw Affect Biomass Metabolism by Paddy Soil Microbiota.

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    Tatsuki Ogura

    Full Text Available Because they are strong and stable, lignocellulosic supramolecular structures in plant cell walls are resistant to decomposition. However, they can be degraded and recycled by soil microbiota. Little is known about the biomass degradation profiles of complex microbiota based on differences in cellulosic supramolecular structures without compositional variations. Here, we characterized and evaluated the cellulosic supramolecular structures and composition of rice straw biomass processed under different milling conditions. We used a range of techniques including solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy followed by thermodynamic and microbial degradability characterization using thermogravimetric analysis, solution-state NMR, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. These measured data were further analyzed using an "ECOMICS" web-based toolkit. From the results, we found that physical pretreatment of rice straw alters the lignocellulosic supramolecular structure by cleaving significant molecular lignocellulose bonds. The transformation from crystalline to amorphous cellulose shifted the thermal degradation profiles to lower temperatures. In addition, pretreated rice straw samples developed different microbiota profiles with different metabolic dynamics during the biomass degradation process. This is the first report to comprehensively characterize the structure, composition, and thermal degradation and microbiota profiles using the ECOMICS toolkit. By revealing differences between lignocellulosic supramolecular structures of biomass processed under different milling conditions, our analysis revealed how the characteristic compositions of microbiota profiles develop in addition to their metabolic profiles and dynamics during biomass degradation.

  14. In-vivo and label-free imaging of cellular and tissue structures in mouse ear skin by using second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eung Jang; Kim, Boram; Ahn, Hong-Gyu; Park, Seung-Han; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Sangyoup

    2015-02-01

    A video-rate multimodal microscope, which can obtain second- and third- harmonic generation (SHG and THG) images simultaneously, is developed for investigating cellular and tissue structures in mouse ear skin. By utilizing in-vivo video-rate epi-detected SHG and THG microscopy, we successfully demonstrate that combined images of subcutaneous cellular components and peripheral nerve fibers, together with the collagen fiber, in the mouse ear pinna can be obtained without employing fluorescent probes. We also show that the flow of red blood cells and the diameter change of arteriole-like blood vessels can be visualized with femtosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 1036 nm. In particular, the epi-THG contrast images of the blood-vessel walls display clearly the difference between the arteriole-like and the venule capillary-like blood-vessel types. We should emphasize that our newly-developed microscope system has a unique feature in that it can produce simultaneous in-vivo label-free SHG and THG images in contrast to the conventional confocal and two-photon microscopes.

  15. [Division of regulatory cellular systems (Lvov)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusen', S I

    1995-01-01

    Two departments of the A. V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine were founded in 1969 in Lviv. These were: the Department of Biochemistry of Cell Differentiation headed by Professor S. I. Kusen and Department of Regulation of Cellular Synthesis of Low Molecular Weight Compounds headed by Professor G. M. Shavlovsky. The Lviv Division of the A. V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine with Professor S. I. Kusen as its chief, was founded in 1974 on the basis of these departments and the Laboratory of Modelling of Regulatory Cellular Systems headed by Professor M. P. Derkach. The above mentioned laboratory which was not the structural unit obtained the status of Structural Laboratory of Cellular Biophysics in 1982 and was headed by O. A. Goida, Candidate of biological sciences. From 1983 the Laboratory of Correcting Therapy of Malignant Tumors and Hemoblastoses at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Chief--S. V. Ivasivka, Candidate of medical sciences) was included in the structure of the Division. That Laboratory was soon transformed into the Department of Carbohydrate Metabolism Regulation headed by Professor I. D. Holovatsky. In 1988 this Department was renamed into the Department of Glycoprotein Biochemistry and headed by M. D. Lutsik, Doctor of biological sciences. In 1982 one more Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics was founded at the Department of Regulation of Cellular Synthesis of Low Molecular Weight Compounds, in 1988 it was transformed into the Department of Biochemical Genetics (Chief--Professor A. A. Sibirny). In 1989 the Laboratory of Anion Transport was taken from A. V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine to Lviv Division of this Institute. This laboratory was headed by Professor M. M. Veliky. One more reorganization in the Division structure took place in 1994. The Department of

  16. Detection of cis- and trans-acting factors in DNA structure-induced genetic instability using in silico and cellular approaches

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    Guliang Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sequences that can adopt alternative DNA structures (i.e. non-B DNA are very abundant in mammalian genomes, and recent studies have revealed many important biological functions of non-B DNA structures in chromatin remodeling, DNA replication, transcription, and genetic instability. Here, we provide results from an in-silico web-based search engine coupled with cell-based experiments to characterize the roles of non-B DNA conformations in genetic instability in eukaryotes. The purpose of this article is to illustrate strategies that can be used to identify and interrogate the biological roles of non-B DNA structures, particularly on genetic instability. We have included unpublished data using a short H-DNA-forming sequence from the human c-MYC promoter region as an example, and identified two different mechanisms of H-DNA-induced genetic instability in yeast and mammalian cells: a DNA replication-related model of mutagenesis; and a replication-independent cleavage model. Further, we identified candidate proteins involved in H-DNA-induced genetic instability by using a yeast genetic screen. A combination of in silico and cellular methods, as described here, should provide further insight into the contributions of non-B DNA structures in biological functions, genetic evolution, and disease development.

  17. Expression pattern, ethanol-metabolizing activities, and cellular localization of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases in human large bowel: association of the functional polymorphisms of ADH and ALDH genes with hemorrhoids and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chien-Ping; Jao, Shu-Wen; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Chen, Pei-Chi; Chung, Chia-Chi; Lee, Shou-Lun; Nieh, Shin; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Functional polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 genes occur among racial populations. The goal of this study was to systematically determine the functional expressions and cellular localization of ADHs and ALDHs in human rectal mucosa, the lesions of adenocarcinoma and hemorrhoid, and the genetic association of allelic variations of ADH and ALDH with large bowel disorders. Twenty-one surgical specimens of rectal adenocarcinoma and the adjacent normal mucosa, including 16 paired tissues of rectal tumor, normal mucosae of rectum and sigmoid colon from the same individuals, and 18 surgical mixed hemorrhoid specimens and leukocyte DNA samples from 103 colorectal cancer patients, 67 hemorrhoid patients, and 545 control subjects recruited in previous study, were investigated. The isozyme/allozyme expression patterns of ADH and ALDH were identified by isoelectric focusing and the activities were assayed spectrophotometrically. The protein contents of ADH/ALDH isozymes were determined by immunoblotting using the corresponding purified class-specific antibodies; the cellular activity and protein localizations were detected by immunohistochemistry and histochemistry, respectively. Genotypes of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms. At 33mM ethanol, pH 7.5, the activity of ADH1C*1/1 phenotypes exhibited 87% higher than that of the ADH1C*1/*2 phenotypes in normal rectal mucosa. The activity of ALDH2-active phenotypes of rectal mucosa was 33% greater than ALDH2-inactive phenotypes at 200μM acetaldehyde. The protein contents in normal rectal mucosa were in the following order: ADH1>ALDH2>ADH3≈ALDH1A1, whereas those of ADH2, ADH4, and ALDH3A1 were fairly low. Both activity and content of ADH1 were significantly decreased in rectal tumors, whereas the ALDH activity remained

  18. Structure and Potential Cellular Targets of HAMLET-like Anti-Cancer Compounds made from Milk Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Emma M; Duff, Anthony P; Håkansson, Anders P; Vacher, Catherine S; Liu, Guo Jun; Knott, Robert B; Church, William Bret

    2015-01-01

    The HAMLET family of compounds (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumours) was discovered during studies on the properties of human milk, and is a class of protein-lipid complexes having broad spectrum anti-cancer, and some specific anti-bacterial properties. The structure of HAMLET-like compounds consists of an aggregation of partially unfolded protein making up the majority of the compound's mass, with fatty acid molecules bound in the hydrophobic core. This is a novel protein-lipid structure and has only recently been derived by small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. The structure is the basis of a novel cytotoxicity mechanism responsible for anti-cancer activity to all of the around 50 different cancer cell types for which the HAMLET family has been trialled. Multiple cytotoxic mechanisms have been hypothesised for the HAMLET-like compounds, but it is not yet clear which of those are the initiating cytotoxic mechanism(s) and which are subsequent activities triggered by the initiating mechanism(s). In addition to the studies into the structure of these compounds, this review presents the state of knowledge of the anti-cancer aspects of HAMLET-like compounds, the HAMLET-induced cytotoxic activities to cancer and non-cancer cells, and the several prospective cell membrane and intracellular targets of the HAMLET family. The emerging picture is that HAMLET-like compounds initiate their cytotoxic effects on what may be a cancer-specific target in the cell membrane that has yet to be identified. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  19. STRUCTURAL ADAPTATIONS OF CELLULAR WALLS OF AQUATIC PLANTS TO THE ACTION OF IONS OF ZINC AND LEAD

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    Grubinko V.V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Main specific and nonspecific cells responses and membrane structures participation in formation of cells resistance in stress conditions, caused by heavy metals (chlorella, waterweed, duckweed in toxic concentrations are analyzed. The cell membranes participation in adaptation to toxicants (formation of growths, multiplication, fluidization, forming of aquaporin, apoptosis, which are first exposed to stressors, is discussed. Found specific and nonspecific reactions in membrane formation are proposed to use as biomarkers of toxicity.

  20. Histone variants and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghesan, Michela; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Oben, Jude; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2014-01-01

    Within nucleosomes, canonical histones package the genome, but they can be opportunely replaced with histone variants. The incorporation of histone variants into the nucleosome is a chief cellular strategy to regulate transcription and cellular metabolism. In pathological terms, cellular steatosis i

  1. Radio-metabolite analysis of carbon-11 biochemical partitioning to non-structural carbohydrates for integrated metabolism and transport studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babst, Benjamin A; Karve, Abhijit A; Judt, Tatjana

    2013-06-01

    Metabolism and phloem transport of carbohydrates are interactive processes, yet each is often studied in isolation from the other. Carbon-11 ((11)C) has been successfully used to study transport and allocation processes dynamically over time. There is a need for techniques to determine metabolic partitioning of newly fixed carbon that are compatible with existing non-invasive (11)C-based methodologies for the study of phloem transport. In this report, we present methods using (11)C-labeled CO2 to trace carbon partitioning to the major non-structural carbohydrates in leaves-sucrose, glucose, fructose and starch. High-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) was adapted to provide multisample throughput, raising the possibility of measuring different tissues of the same individual plant, or for screening multiple plants. An additional advantage of HPTLC was that phosphor plate imaging of radioactivity had a much higher sensitivity and broader range of sensitivity than radio-HPLC detection, allowing measurement of (11)C partitioning to starch, which was previously not possible. Because of the high specific activity of (11)C and high sensitivity of detection, our method may have additional applications in the study of rapid metabolic responses to environmental changes that occur on a time scale of minutes. The use of this method in tandem with other (11)C assays for transport dynamics and whole-plant partitioning makes a powerful combination of tools to study carbohydrate metabolism and whole-plant transport as integrated processes.

  2. Modulating absorption and postprandial handling of dietary fatty acids by structuring fat in the meal: a randomized crossover clinical trial. : Fat structuring modifies postprandial metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: Prolonged postprandial hypertriglyceridemia is a potential risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. In the context of obesity, this is associated with a chronic imbalance of lipid partitioning oriented toward storage and not toward β-oxidation. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that the physical structure of fat in a meal can modify the absorption, chylomicron transport, and further metabolic handling of dietary fatty acids. DESIGN: Nine normal-weight and...

  3. Neonatal seizures: the overlap between diagnosis of metabolic disorders and structural abnormalities. Case report

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    Freitas Alessandra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Inborn metabolic errors (IME and cortical developmental malformations are uncommon etiologies of neonatal seizures, however they may represent treatable causes of refractory epilepsy and for this reason must be considered as possible etiological factors. This case report aims to demonstrate the importance of neuroimaging studies in one patient with neonatal seizures, even when there are clues pointing to a metabolic disorder. CASE REPORT: A previously healthy 14 day-old child started presenting reiterated focal motor seizures (FMS which evolved to status epilepticus. Exams showed high serum levels of ammonia and no other abnormalities. A metabolic investigation was conducted with normal results. During follow-up, the patient presented developmental delay and left side hemiparesia. Seizures remained controlled with anti-epileptic drugs for four months, followed by relapse with repetitive FMS on the left side. Temporary improvement was obtained with anti-epileptic drug adjustment. At the age of 6 months, during a new episode of status epilepticus, high ammonia levels were detected. Other metabolic exams remained normal. The child was referred to a video-electroencephalographic monitoring and continuous epileptiform discharges were recorded over the right parasagittal and midline regions, with predominance over the posterior quadrant. A new neuroimaging study was performed and displayed a malformation of cortical development. Our case illustrates that because newborns are prone to present metabolic disarrangement, an unbalance such as hyperammonemia may be a consequence of acute events and conduct to a misdiagnosis of IME.

  4. Cellular microRNA miR-181b inhibits replication of mink enteritis virus by repression of non-structural protein 1 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-zeng; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Li, Zhili; Yi, Bao; Mao, Yaping; Hou, Qiang; Liu, Weiquan

    2013-01-01

    Mink enteritis virus (MEV) is one of the most important viral pathogens in the mink industry. Recent studies have showed that microRNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding RNAs of length ranging from 18-23 nucleotides (nt) participate in host-pathogen interaction networks; however, whether or not miRNAs are involved in MEV infection has not been reported. Our study revealed that miRNA miR-181b inhibited replication of MEV in the feline kidney (F81) cell line by targeting the MEV non-structural protein 1 (NS1) messenger RNA (mRNA) coding region, resulting in NS1 translational repression, while MEV infection reduced miR-181b expression. This is the first description of cellular miRNAs modulating MEV infection in F81 cells, providing further insight into the mechanisms of viral infection, and may be useful in development of naturally-occurring miRNAs antiviral strategies.

  5. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data.

  6. Metabolic networks: beyond the graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Andrés; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Drugs are devised to enter into the metabolism of an organism in order to produce a desired effect. From the chemical point of view, cellular metabolism is constituted by a complex network of reactions transforming metabolites one in each other. Knowledge on the structure of this network could help to develop novel methods for drug design, and to comprehend the root of known unexpected side effects. Many large-scale studies on the structure of metabolic networks have been developed following models based on different kinds of graphs as the fundamental image of the reaction network. Graphs models, however, comport wrong assumptions regarding the structure of reaction networks that may lead into wrong conclusions if they are not taken into account. In this article we critically review some graph-theoretical approaches to the analysis of centrality, vulnerability and modularity of metabolic networks, analyzing their limitations in estimating these key network properties, consider some proposals explicit or implicitly based on directed hypergraphs regarding their ability to overcome these issues, and review some recent implementation improvements that make the application of these models in increasingly large networks a viable option.

  7. Loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions induce preterm cellular and structural remodeling of the cervix and premature birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Yellon

    Full Text Available A decline in serum progesterone or antagonism of progesterone receptor function results in preterm labor and birth. Whether characteristics of premature remodeling of the cervix after antiprogestins or ovariectomy are similar to that at term was the focus of the present study. Groups of pregnant rats were treated with vehicle, a progesterone receptor antagonist (onapristone or mifepristone, or ovariectomized on day 17 postbreeding. As expected, controls given vehicle delivered at term while rats delivered preterm after progesterone receptor antagonist treatment or ovariectomy. Similar to the cervix before term, the preterm cervix of progesterone receptor antagonist-treated rats was characterized by reduced cell nuclei density, decreased collagen content and structure, as well as a greater presence of macrophages per unit area. Thus, loss of nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated actions promoted structural remodeling of the cervix, increased census of resident macrophages, and preterm birth much like that found in the cervix at term. In contrast to the progesterone receptor antagonist-induced advance in characteristics associated with remodeling, ovariectomy-induced loss of systemic progesterone did not affect hypertrophy, extracellular collagen, or macrophage numbers in the cervix. Thus, the structure and macrophage census in the cervix appear sufficient for premature ripening and birth to occur well before term. With progesterone receptors predominantly localized on cells other than macrophages, the findings suggest that interactions between cells may facilitate the loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions as part of a final common mechanism that remodels the cervix in certain etiologies of preterm and with parturition at term.

  8. [Comparative characteristics of cellular composition of the lymphoid structure of various regions of the human intestine in early childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminova, G G; Grigorenko, D E; Rusina, A K

    1997-01-01

    Using microscopic methods and statistic analysis lymphoid structures of large and small intestine walls and appendix were studied in 4-7 years children. The highest cell reproductive activity was detected in duodenal walls being slightly lower in appendix and group lymphoid vessels. The highest ratio of plasma cells was found in duodenum, ileal lymphoid patches and cecum, where the index was 7-fold higher than index of appendix and ileum. Lamina propria of intestinal mucosa is characterized by small fraction of mitotically dividing cells and undifferentiated cell forms, especially in cecum walls. However, the latter shows the greatest percentage of plasma cells.

  9. Genetic and metabolic engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Yang,Yea-Tyng; Bennett, George N.; San, Ka-yiu

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology techniques, analytical methods and mathematical tools have led to a growing interest in using metabolic engineering to redirect metabolic fluxes for industrial and medical purposes. Metabolic engineering is referred to as the directed improvement of cellular properties through the modification of specific biochemical reactions or the introduction of new ones, with the use of recombinant DNA technology (Stephanopoulos, 1999). This multidisciplinary field dr...

  10. A linear programming approach to reconstructing subcellular structures from confocal images for automated generation of representative 3D cellular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott T; Dean, Brian C; Dean, Delphine

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel computer vision algorithm to analyze 3D stacks of confocal images of fluorescently stained single cells. The goal of the algorithm is to create representative in silico model structures that can be imported into finite element analysis software for mechanical characterization. Segmentation of cell and nucleus boundaries is accomplished via standard thresholding methods. Using novel linear programming methods, a representative actin stress fiber network is generated by computing a linear superposition of fibers having minimum discrepancy compared with an experimental 3D confocal image. Qualitative validation is performed through analysis of seven 3D confocal image stacks of adherent vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) grown in 2D culture. The presented method is able to automatically generate 3D geometries of the cell's boundary, nucleus, and representative F-actin network based on standard cell microscopy data. These geometries can be used for direct importation and implementation in structural finite element models for analysis of the mechanics of a single cell to potentially speed discoveries in the fields of regenerative medicine, mechanobiology, and drug discovery.

  11. A network perspective on metabolic inconsistency

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    Sonnenschein Nikolaus

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrating gene expression profiles and metabolic pathways under different experimental conditions is essential for understanding the coherence of these two layers of cellular organization. The network character of metabolic systems can be instrumental in developing concepts of agreement between expression data and pathways. A network-driven interpretation of gene expression data has the potential of suggesting novel classifiers for pathological cellular states and of contributing to a general theoretical understanding of gene regulation. Results Here, we analyze the coherence of gene expression patterns and a reconstruction of human metabolism, using consistency scores obtained from network and constraint-based analysis methods. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the two measures, demonstrating that a substantial part of inconsistencies between metabolic processes and gene expression can be understood from a network perspective alone. Prompted by this finding, we investigate the topological context of the individual biochemical reactions responsible for the observed inconsistencies. On this basis, we are able to separate the differential contributions that bear physiological information about the system, from the unspecific contributions that unravel gaps in the metabolic reconstruction. We demonstrate the biological potential of our network-driven approach by analyzing transcriptome profiles of aldosterone producing adenomas that have been obtained from a cohort of Primary Aldosteronism patients. We unravel systematics in the data that could not have been resolved by conventional microarray data analysis. In particular, we discover two distinct metabolic states in the adenoma expression patterns. Conclusions The methodology presented here can help understand metabolic inconsistencies from a network perspective. It thus serves as a mediator between the topology of metabolic systems and their dynamical

  12. Evolution of metabolic network organization

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    Bonchev Danail

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of metabolic networks across species is a key to understanding how evolutionary pressures shape these networks. By selecting taxa representative of different lineages or lifestyles and using a comprehensive set of descriptors of the structure and complexity of their metabolic networks, one can highlight both qualitative and quantitative differences in the metabolic organization of species subject to distinct evolutionary paths or environmental constraints. Results We used a novel representation of metabolic networks, termed network of interacting pathways or NIP, to focus on the modular, high-level organization of the metabolic capabilities of the cell. Using machine learning techniques we identified the most relevant aspects of cellular organization that change under evolutionary pressures. We considered the transitions from prokarya to eukarya (with a focus on the transitions among the archaea, bacteria and eukarya, from unicellular to multicellular eukarya, from free living to host-associated bacteria, from anaerobic to aerobic, as well as the acquisition of cell motility or growth in an environment of various levels of salinity or temperature. Intuitively, we expect organisms with more complex lifestyles to have more complex and robust metabolic networks. Here we demonstrate for the first time that such organisms are not only characterized by larger, denser networks of metabolic pathways but also have more efficiently organized cross communications, as revealed by subtle changes in network topology. These changes are unevenly distributed among metabolic pathways, with specific categories of pathways being promoted to more central locations as an answer to environmental constraints. Conclusions Combining methods from graph theory and machine learning, we have shown here that evolutionary pressures not only affects gene and protein sequences, but also specific details of the complex wiring of functional modules

  13. Fatty Aldehyde and Fatty Alcohol Metabolism: Review and Importance for Epidermal Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Normal fatty aldehyde and alcohol metabolism is essential for epidermal differentiation and function. Long-chain aldehydes are produced by catabolism of several lipids including fatty alcohols, sphingolipids, ether glycerolipids, isoprenoid alcohols and certain aliphatic lipids that undergo α- or ω-oxidation. The fatty aldehyde generated by these pathways is chiefly metabolized to fatty acid by fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH, alternately known as ALDH3A2), which also functions to oxidize fatty alcohols as a component of the fatty alcohol:NAD oxidoreductase (FAO) enzyme complex. Genetic deficiency of FALDH/FAO in patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) results in accumulation of fatty aldehydes, fatty alcohols and related lipids (ether glycerolipids, wax esters) in cultured keratinocytes. These biochemical changes are associated with abnormalities in formation of lamellar bodies in the stratum granulosum and impaired delivery of their precursor membranes to the stratum corneum (SC). The defective extracellular SC membranes are responsible for a leaky epidermal water barrier and ichthyosis. Although lamellar bodies appear to be the pathogenic target for abnormal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism in SLS, the precise biochemical mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Nevertheless, studies in SLS highlight the critical importance of FALDH and normal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism for epidermal function. PMID:24036493

  14. Molecular dynamics studies of simple membrane-water interfaces: Structure and functions in the beginnings of cellular life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of the structure and functions of a simple membrane are performed in order to examine whether membranes provide an environment capable of promoting protobiological evolution. Our model membrane is composed of glycerol 1-monooleate. It is found that the bilayer surface fluctuates in time and space, occasionally creating thinning defects in the membrane. These defects are essential for passive transport of simple ions across membranes because they reduce the Born barrier to this process by approximately 40%. Negative ions are transferred across the bilayer more readily than positive ions due to favorable interactions with the electric field at the membrane-water interface. Passive transport of neutral molecules is, in general, more complex than predicted by the solubility-diffusion model. In particular, molecules which exhibit sufficient hydrophilicity and lipophilicity concentrate near membrane surfaces and experience 'interfacial resistance' to transport. The membrane-water interface forms an environment suitable for heterogeneous catalysis. Several possible mechanisms leading to an increase of reaction rates at the interface are discussed. We conclude that vesicles have many properties that make them very good candidates for earliest protocells. Some potentially fruitful directions of experimental and theoretical research on this subject are proposed.

  15. Stochastic models of cellular circadian rhythms in plants help to understand the impact of noise on robustness and clock structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa eGuerriero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic behavior is essential for plants; for example, daily (circadian rhythms control photosynthesis and seasonal rhythms regulate their life cycle. The core of the circadian clock is a genetic network that coordinates the expression of specific clock genes in a circadian rhythm reflecting the 24-hour day/night cycle.Circadian clocks exhibit stochastic noise due to the low copy numbers of clock genes and the consequent cell-to-cell variation: this intrinsic noise plays a major role in circadian clocks by inducing more robust oscillatory behavior. Another source of noise is the environment, which causes variation in temperature and light intensity: this extrinsic noise is part of the requirement for the structural complexity of clock networks.Advances in experimental techniques now permit single-cell measurements and the development of single-cell models. Here we present some modeling studies showing the importance of considering both types of noise in understanding how plants adapt to regular and irregular light variations. Stochastic models have proven useful for understanding the effect of regular variations. By contrast, the impact of irregular variations and the interaction of different noise sources are less studied.

  16. X-ray structure of a minor group human rhinovirus bound to a fragment of its cellular receptor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Fita, Ignacio; Reithmayer, Manuela; Moser, Rosita; Blaas, Dieter

    2004-05-01

    Although many viral receptors have been identified, the ways in which they interact with their cognate viruses are not understood at the molecular level. We have determined the X-ray structure of a complex between calcium-containing modules of the very low-density lipoprotein receptor and the minor group human rhinovirus HRV2. The receptor binds close to the icosahedral five-fold vertex, with only one module per virus protomer. The binding face of this module is defined by acidic calcium-chelating residues and, in particular, by an exposed tryptophan that is highly conserved. The attachment site on the virus involves only residues from VP1, particularly a lysine strictly conserved in all minor group HRVs. The disposition of the attached ligand-binding repeats around the five-fold axis, together with the proximity of the N- and C-terminal ends of adjacent modules, suggests that more than one repeat in a single receptor molecule might attach simultaneously.

  17. Finite element analysis and cellular studies on advanced, controlled porous structures with subsurface continuity in bio-implantable titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, P; Ankem, S; Wyatt, Z; Ferlin, K M; Fisher, J

    2014-01-01

    Highly-porous metallic implant onlay materials (specifically those containing surface pores that intersect beneath the onlay surface) have been investigated recently for their potential to reduce bone resorption and to improve the overall stability of the implant. In the current study, sub-surface interconnectivity of high-aspect-ratio pores was created directly in the substrate of an implant material using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM). This technique was used to produce intersecting pores with diameters of 180-250 μm on a clinically relevant implant material—commercially pure (CP) Grade 4 Ti—with a very high degree of control over pore morphology. These pores resulted in no significant microstructural modification to the surrounding Ti, and the inner pore surfaces could be thermally oxidized to produce a microrough, bioactive TiO2 layer. Finite element analysis of Ti models containing these EDM-attainable intersecting pore geometries suggested they produce higher bone/implant interface strengths and lower susceptibility to stress shielding of the surrounding bone as compared with models containing simpler surface geometries. In vitro experiments using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) demonstrated mineralized tissue ingrowth of ∼ 300 μm into EDM-produced pores. This amount of ingrowth is expected to allow for full interlocking of mineralized tissue and implant given the proper pore structure design.

  18. In Vivo NMR Studies of the Brain with Hereditary or Acquired Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Erica B; Lee, Phil; Choi, In-Young

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic disorders, whether hereditary or acquired, affect the brain, and abnormalities of the brain are related to cellular integrity; particularly in regard to neurons and astrocytes as well as interactions between them. Metabolic disturbances lead to alterations in cellular function as well as microscopic and macroscopic structural changes in the brain with diabetes, the most typical example of metabolic disorders, and a number of hereditary metabolic disorders. Alternatively, cellular dysfunction and degeneration of the brain lead to metabolic disturbances in hereditary neurological disorders with neurodegeneration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques allow us to assess a range of pathophysiological changes of the brain in vivo. For example, magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects alterations in brain metabolism and energetics. Physiological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects accompanying changes in cerebral blood flow related to neurovascular coupling. Diffusion and T1/T2-weighted MRI detect microscopic and macroscopic changes of the brain structure. This review summarizes current NMR findings of functional, physiological and biochemical alterations within a number of hereditary and acquired metabolic disorders in both animal models and humans. The global view of the impact of these metabolic disorders on the brain may be useful in identifying the unique and/or general patterns of abnormalities in the living brain related to the pathophysiology of the diseases, and identifying future fields of inquiry.

  19. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry quantitative method for the cellular analysis of varying structures of gemini surfactants designed as nanomaterial drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkuru, McDonald; Michel, Deborah; Awad, Hanan; Katselis, George; El-Aneed, Anas

    2016-05-13

    Diquaternary gemini surfactants have successfully been used to form lipid-based nanoparticles that are able to compact, protect, and deliver genetic materials into cells. However, what happens to the gemini surfactants after they have released their therapeutic cargo is unknown. Such knowledge is critical to assess the quality, safety, and efficacy of gemini surfactant nanoparticles. We have developed a simple and rapid liquid chromatography electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method for the quantitative determination of various structures of gemini surfactants in cells. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was employed allowing for a short simple isocratic run of only 4min. The lower limit of detection (LLOD) was 3ng/mL. The method was valid to 18 structures of gemini surfactants belonging to two different structural families. A full method validation was performed for two lead compounds according to USFDA guidelines. The HILIC-MS/MS method was compatible with the physicochemical properties of gemini surfactants that bear a permanent positive charge with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic elements within their molecular structure. In addition, an effective liquid-liquid extraction method (98% recovery) was employed surpassing previously used extraction methods. The analysis of nanoparticle-treated cells showed an initial rise in the analyte intracellular concentration followed by a maximum and a somewhat more gradual decrease of the intracellular concentration. The observed intracellular depletion of the gemini surfactants may be attributable to their bio-transformation into metabolites and exocytosis from the host cells. Obtained cellular data showed a pattern that grants additional investigations, evaluating metabolite formation and assessing the subcellular distribution of tested compounds.

  20. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies proposes to develop a unique structural cellular core material to improve mechanical performance, reduce platform weight and lower...

  1. Simultaneous structure-activity studies and arming of natural products by C-H amination reveal cellular targets of eupalmerin acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Cisar, Justin S.; Zhou, Cong-Ying; Vera, Brunilda; Williams, Howard; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Romo, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Natural products have a venerable history of, and enduring potential for the discovery of useful biological activity. To fully exploit this, the development of chemical methodology that can functionalize unique sites within these complex structures is highly desirable. Here, we describe the use of rhodium(II)-catalysed C-H amination reactions developed by Du Bois to carry out simultaneous structure-activity relationship studies and arming (alkynylation) of natural products at ‘unfunctionalized’ positions. Allylic and benzylic C-H bonds in the natural products undergo amination while olefins undergo aziridination, and tertiary amine-containing natural products are converted to amidines by a C-H amination-oxidation sequence or to hydrazine sulfamate zwitterions by an unusual N-amination. The alkynylated derivatives are ready for conversion into cellular probes that can be used for mechanism-of-action studies. Chemo- and site-selectivity was studied with a diverse library of natural products. For one of these—the marine-derived anticancer diterpene, eupalmerin acetate—quantitative proteome profiling led to the identification of several protein targets in HL-60 cells, suggesting a polypharmacological mode of action.

  2. Multiscale approach to description of deformation and fracture of brittle media with hierarchical porous structure on the basis of movable cellular automaton method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Psakhie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An approach to multiscale description of deformation and fracture of brittle porous materials on the basis of movable cellular automaton method was proposed. The material characterized by pore size distribution function having two maxima was considered. The core of the proposed approach consists in finding the automaton effective response function by means of direct numerical simulation of representative volume of the porous material. A hierarchical two-scale model of mechanical behavior of ceramics under compression and shear loading was developed. Zirconia based ceramics with pore size greater than the average grain size was considered. At the first scale of the model only small pores (corresponding to the first maximum of the pore size distribution function were taking into account explicitly (by removing automata from the initial structure. The representative volume and effective elastic properties of the porous material at this scale were evaluated. At the second scale of the model, big pores were taking into account explicitly, the parameters of the matrix corresponded to the ones determined at the first scale. Simulation results showed that the proposed multiscale model allows qualitatively and quantitatively correct describing of deformation and fracture of brittle material with hierarchical porous structure.

  3. Structure-Function of CD36 and Importance of Fatty Acid Signal Transduction in Fat Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Pepino, Marta Yanina; Kuda, Ondrej; Samovski, Dmitri; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2014-01-01

    CD36 is a scavenger receptor that functions in high affinity tissue uptake of long chain fatty acids (FA) and contributes under excessive fat supply to lipid accumulation and metabolic dysfunction. This review describes recent evidence regarding the CD36 FA binding site and a potential mechanism for FA transfer. It also presents the view that CD36 and FA signaling coordinate fat utilization based on newly identified CD36 actions that involve oral fat perception, intestinal fat absorption, sec...

  4. The genome-scale metabolic extreme pathway structure in Haemophilus influenzae shows significant network redundancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papin, Jason A; Price, Nathan D; Edwards, Jeremy S; Palsson B, Bernhard Ø

    2002-03-07

    Genome-scale metabolic networks can be characterized by a set of systemically independent and unique extreme pathways. These extreme pathways span a convex, high-dimensional space that circumscribes all potential steady-state flux distributions achievable by the defined metabolic network. Genome-scale extreme pathways associated with the production of non-essential amino acids in Haemophilus influenzae were computed. They offer valuable insight into the functioning of its metabolic network. Three key results were obtained. First, there were multiple internal flux maps corresponding to externally indistinguishable states. It was shown that there was an average of 37 internal states per unique exchange flux vector in H. influenzae when the network was used to produce a single amino acid while allowing carbon dioxide and acetate as carbon sinks. With the inclusion of succinate as an additional output, this ratio increased to 52, a 40% increase. Second, an analysis of the carbon fates illustrated that the extreme pathways were non-uniformly distributed across the carbon fate spectrum. In the detailed case study, 45% of the distinct carbon fate values associated with lysine production represented 85% of the extreme pathways. Third, this distribution fell between distinct systemic constraints. For lysine production, the carbon fate values that represented 85% of the pathways described above corresponded to only 2 distinct ratios of 1:1 and 4:1 between carbon dioxide and acetate. The present study analysed single outputs from one organism, and provides a start to genome-scale extreme pathways studies. These emergent system-level characterizations show the significance of metabolic extreme pathway analysis at the genome-scale.

  5. Microbial community structure and functional metabolic diversity are associated with organic carbon availability in an agricultural soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Juan; LI Yan-ting; YANG Xiang-dong; ZHANG Jian-jun; LIN Zhi-an; ZHAO Bing-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of soil environmental characteristics governing soil microbial community structure and activity may improve our understanding of biogeochemical processes and soil quality. The impact of soil environmental characteristics especialy organic carbon availability after 15-yr different organic and inorganic fertilizer inputs on soil bacterial community structure and functional metabolic diversity of soil microbial communities were evaluated in a 15-yr fertilizer experiment in Chang-ping County, Beijing, China. The experiment was a wheat-maize rotation system which was established in 1991 including four different fertilizer treatments. These treatments included: a non-amended control (CK), a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer treatment (NPK); a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer with swine manure in-corporated treatment (NPKM), and a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer with maize straw incorporated treatment (NPKS). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the 16S rRNA gene was used to determine the bacterial community structure and single carbon source utilization proifles were determined to characterize the microbial community functional metabolic diversity of different fertilizer treatments using Biolog Eco plates. The results indicated that long-term fertilized treatments signiifcantly increased soil bacterial community structure compared to CK. The use of inorganic fertilizer with organic amendments incorporated for long term (NPKM, NPKS) signiifcantly promoted soil bacterial structure than the application of inorganic fertilizer only (NPK), and NPKM treatment was the most important driver for in-creases in the soil microbial community richness (S) and structural diversity (H). Overal utilization of carbon sources by soil microbial communities (average wel color development, AWCD) and microbial substrate utilization diversity and evenness indices (H’ and E) indicated that long

  6. Metabolic potential and community structure of endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria associated with the roots of the halophyte Aster tripolium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Sonia; Płociniczak, Tomasz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia; Złoch, Michał; Ruppel, Silke; Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The submitted work assumes that the abundance and diversity of endophytic and rhizosphere microorganisms co-existing with the halophytic plant Aster tripolium L. growing in a salty meadow in the vicinity of a soda factory (central Poland) represent unique populations of cultivable bacterial strains. Endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria were (i) isolated and identified based on 16S rDNA sequences; (ii) screened for nifH and acdS genes; and (iii) analyzed based on selected metabolic properties. Moreover, total microbial biomass and community structures of the roots (endophytes), rhizosphere and soil were evaluated using a cultivation-independent technique (PLFA) to characterize plant-microbial interactions under natural salt conditions. The identification of the isolated strains showed domination by Gram-positive bacteria (mostly Bacillus spp.) both in the rhizosphere (90.9%) and roots (72.7%) of A. tripolium. Rhizosphere bacterial strains exhibited broader metabolic capacities, while endophytes exhibited higher specificities for metabolic activity. The PLFA analysis showed that the total bacterial biomass decreased in the following order (rhizospherebacteria in the roots of the halophyte. The described strain collection provides a valuable basis for a subsequent applications of bacteria in improvement of site adaptation of plants in saline soils.

  7. Rational prescription of drugs within similar therapeutic or structural class for gastrointestinal disease treatment: Drug metabolism and its related interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To review and summarize drug metabolism and its related interactions in prescribing drugs within the similar therapeutic or structural class for gastrointestinal disease treatment so as to promote rational use of medicines in clinical practice.METHODS: Relevant literature was identified by performing MEDLINE/Pubmed searches covering the period from 1988 to 2006. RESULTS: Seven classes of drugs were chosen, including gastric proton pump inhibitors, histamine H2-receptor antagonists, benzamide-type gastroprokinetic agents, selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, fluoroquinolones, macrolide antibiotics and azole antifungals. They showed significant differences in metabolic profile (I.e., the fraction of drug metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP), CYP reaction phenotype, impact of CYP genotype on interindividual pharmacokinetics variability and CYP-mediated drug-drug interaction potential). Many events of severe adverse drug reactions and treatment failures were closely related to the ignorance of the above issues. CONCLUSION: Clinicians should acquaint themselves with what kind of drug has less interpatient variability in clearance and whether to perform CYP genotyping prior to initiation of therapy. The relevant CYP knowledge helps clinicians to enhance the management of patients with gastrointestinal disease who may require treatment with polytherapeutic regimens.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of the structural genes regulating defense phenylpropanoid metabolism in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Tsai, Chung-Jui [Michigan Technological University; Harding, Scott A [Michigan Technological University; Lindroth, richard L [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Yuan, Yinan [Michigan Technological University

    2006-01-01

    Salicin-based phenolic glycosides, hydroxycinnamate derivatives and flavonoid-derived condensed tannins comprise up to one-third of Populus leaf dry mass. Genes regulating the abundance and chemical diversity of these substances have not been comprehensively analysed in tree species exhibiting this metabolically demanding level of phenolic metabolism. Here, shikimate-phenylpropanoid pathway genes thought to give rise to these phenolic products were annotated from the Populus genome, their expression assessed by semiquantitative or quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and metabolic evidence for function presented. Unlike Arabidopsis, Populus leaves accumulate an array of hydroxycinnamoyl-quinate esters, which is consistent with broadened function of the expanded hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA transferase gene family. Greater flavonoid pathway diversity is also represented, and flavonoid gene families are larger. Consistent with expanded pathway function, most of these genes were upregulated during wound-stimulated condensed tannin synthesis in leaves. The suite of Populus genes regulating phenylpropanoid product accumulation should have important application in managing phenolic carbon pools in relation to climate change and global carbon cycling.

  9. Failover in cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2010-01-01

    A cellular automata (CA) configuration is constructed that exhibits emergent failover. The configuration is based on standard Game of Life rules. Gliders and glider-guns form the core messaging structure in the configuration. The blinker is represented as the basic computational unit, and it is shown how it can be recreated in case of a failure. Stateless failover using primary-backup mechanism is demonstrated. The details of the CA components used in the configuration and its working are described, and a simulation of the complete configuration is also presented.

  10. Thermodynamic principles governing metabolic operation : inference, analysis, and prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niebel, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    The principles governing metabolic flux are poorly understood. Because diverse organisms show similar metabolic flux patterns, we hypothesized that fundamental thermodynamic constraints might shape cellular metabolism. We developed a constraint-based model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae that included

  11. Soil Microbial Community Structure and Metabolic Activity of Pinus elliottii Plantations across Different Stand Ages in a Subtropical Area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyan Wu

    Full Text Available Soil microbes play an essential role in the forest ecosystem as an active component. This study examined the hypothesis that soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity would vary with the increasing stand ages in long-term pure plantations of Pinus elliottii. The phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA combined with community level physiological profiles (CLPP method was used to assess these characteristics in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii. We found that the soil microbial communities were significantly different among different stand ages of P. elliottii plantations. The PLFA analysis indicated that the bacterial biomass was higher than the actinomycic and fungal biomass in all stand ages. However, the bacterial biomass decreased with the increasing stand ages, while the fungal biomass increased. The four maximum biomarker concentrations in rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii for all stand ages were 18:1ω9c, 16:1ω7c, 18:3ω6c (6,9,12 and cy19:0, representing measures of fungal and gram negative bacterial biomass. In addition, CLPP analysis revealed that the utilization rate of amino acids, polymers, phenolic acids, and carbohydrates of soil microbial community gradually decreased with increasing stand ages, though this pattern was not observed for carboxylic acids and amines. Microbial community diversity, as determined by the Simpson index, Shannon-Wiener index, Richness index and McIntosh index, significantly decreased as stand age increased. Overall, both the PLFA and CLPP illustrated that the long-term pure plantation pattern exacerbated the microecological imbalance previously described in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii, and markedly decreased the soil microbial community diversity and metabolic activity. Based on the correlation analysis, we concluded that the soil nutrient and C/N ratio most significantly contributed to the variation of soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity in different stand

  12. Soil Microbial Community Structure and Metabolic Activity of Pinus elliottii Plantations across Different Stand Ages in a Subtropical Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zeyan; Haack, Stacey Elizabeth; Lin, Wenxiong; Li, Bailian; Wu, Linkun; Fang, Changxun; Zhang, Zhixing

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbes play an essential role in the forest ecosystem as an active component. This study examined the hypothesis that soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity would vary with the increasing stand ages in long-term pure plantations of Pinus elliottii. The phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) combined with community level physiological profiles (CLPP) method was used to assess these characteristics in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii. We found that the soil microbial communities were significantly different among different stand ages of P. elliottii plantations. The PLFA analysis indicated that the bacterial biomass was higher than the actinomycic and fungal biomass in all stand ages. However, the bacterial biomass decreased with the increasing stand ages, while the fungal biomass increased. The four maximum biomarker concentrations in rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii for all stand ages were 18:1ω9c, 16:1ω7c, 18:3ω6c (6,9,12) and cy19:0, representing measures of fungal and gram negative bacterial biomass. In addition, CLPP analysis revealed that the utilization rate of amino acids, polymers, phenolic acids, and carbohydrates of soil microbial community gradually decreased with increasing stand ages, though this pattern was not observed for carboxylic acids and amines. Microbial community diversity, as determined by the Simpson index, Shannon-Wiener index, Richness index and McIntosh index, significantly decreased as stand age increased. Overall, both the PLFA and CLPP illustrated that the long-term pure plantation pattern exacerbated the microecological imbalance previously described in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii, and markedly decreased the soil microbial community diversity and metabolic activity. Based on the correlation analysis, we concluded that the soil nutrient and C/N ratio most significantly contributed to the variation of soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity in different stand ages of P

  13. The Rab GTPase Rab8 as a shared regulator of ciliogenesis and immune synapse assembly: From a conserved pathway to diverse cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrussi, Laura; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rab GTPases, which form the largest branch of the Ras GTPase superfamily, regulate almost every step of vesicle-mediated trafficking. Among them, Rab8 is an essential participant in primary cilium formation. In a report recently published in the Journal of Cell Science, Finetti and colleagues identify Rab8 as a novel player in vesicular traffic in the non-ciliated T lymphocytes, which contributes to the assembly of the specialized signaling platform known as the immune synapse. By interacting with the v-SNARE VAMP-3, Rab8 is indeed responsible for the final docking/fusion step in T cell receptor (TCR) recycling to the immune synapse. A second important take-home message which comes to light from this work is that VAMP-3 also interacts with Rab8 at the base of the cilium in NIH-3T3 cells, where it regulates ciliary growth and targeting of Smoothened at the plasma membrane. Hence the data presented in this report, in addition to identifying Rab8 as a novel player in vesicular traffic to the immune synapse, reveal how both ciliated and non-ciliated cells take advantage of a conserved pathway to build highly specific cellular structures. PMID:26587735

  14. Cellular microRNA miR-181b inhibits replication of mink enteritis virus by repression of non-structural protein 1 translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-zeng Sun

    Full Text Available Mink enteritis virus (MEV is one of the most important viral pathogens in the mink industry. Recent studies have showed that microRNAs (miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs of length ranging from 18-23 nucleotides (nt participate in host-pathogen interaction networks; however, whether or not miRNAs are involved in MEV infection has not been reported. Our study revealed that miRNA miR-181b inhibited replication of MEV in the feline kidney (F81 cell line by targeting the MEV non-structural protein 1 (NS1 messenger RNA (mRNA coding region, resulting in NS1 translational repression, while MEV infection reduced miR-181b expression. This is the first description of cellular miRNAs modulating MEV infection in F81 cells, providing further insight into the mechanisms of viral infection, and may be useful in development of naturally-occurring miRNAs antiviral strategies.

  15. Structure-based drug design of small molecule SIRT1 modulators to treat cancer and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulla, Venkat Koushik; Alvala, Mallika; Sriram, Dinavahi Saketh; Viswanadha, Srikant; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2014-07-01

    Sirtuins comprise a family of deacetylase enzymes that catalyze the removal of an acetyl moiety from the ɛ-amino group of lysine residues within protein targets. Sirtuin 1(SIRT1), a NAD(+) dependent class III histone deacetylase is involved in a variety of human disorders such as obesity, type II diabetes, cancer and aging. Inhibition of SIRT1 could be useful for cancer treatment while activators can be useful for longevity and treating metabolic disorders. Hence we undertook an effort to design both inhibitors and activators using structure-based drug design techniques and report here the biological proof of concept. In this paper, we report diverse small molecule inhibitors with a potential to attenuate cancer growth designed based on high-throughput virtual screening and docking using the crystal structure of SIRT1. And small molecule activators with potential to suppress adipogenesis differentiation indicating their usefulness in obesity control was designed based on a homology model of SIRT1 activator domain.

  16. Biotin deprivation impairs mitochondrial structure and function and has implications for inherited metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Ruiz, Estefanía; Díaz-Ruiz, Rodrigo; Hernández-Vázquez, Alaín de J; Ibarra-González, Isabel; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Rembao, Daniel; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Viollet, Benoit; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Corella, José Ahmed; Velázquez-Arellano, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Certain inborn errors of metabolism result from deficiencies in biotin containing enzymes. These disorders are mimicked by dietary absence or insufficiency of biotin, ATP deficit being a major effect,whose responsible mechanisms have not been thoroughly studied. Here we show that in rats and cultured cells it is the result of reduced TCA cycle flow, partly due to deficient anaplerotic biotin-dependent pyruvate carboxylase. This is accompanied by diminished flow through the electron transport chain, augmented by deficient cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) activity with decreased cytochromes and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. There was also severe mitochondrial damage accompanied by decrease of mitochondria, associated with toxic levels of propionyl CoA as shown by carnitine supplementation studies, which explains the apparently paradoxical mitochondrial diminution in the face of the energy sensor AMPK activation, known to induce mitochondria biogenesis. This idea was supported by experiments on AMPK knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The multifactorial ATP deficit also provides a plausible basis for the cardiomyopathy in patients with propionic acidemia, and other diseases.Additionally, systemic inflammation concomitant to the toxic state might explain our findings of enhanced IL-6, STAT3 and HIF-1α, associated with an increase of mitophagic BNIP3 and PINK proteins, which may further increase mitophagy. Together our results imply core mechanisms of energy deficit in several inherited metabolic disorders.

  17. Structure-guided mutational analysis of gene regulation by the Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine-responsive riboswitch in a cellular context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano-Velázquez, Joan G; Batey, Robert T

    2015-02-13

    Riboswitches are a broadly distributed form of RNA-based gene regulation in Bacteria and, more rarely, Archaea and Eukarya. Most often found in the 5'-leader sequence of bacterial mRNAs, they are generally composed of two functional domains: a receptor (aptamer) domain that binds an effector molecule and a regulatory domain (or expression platform) that instructs the expression machinery. One of the most studied riboswitches is the Bacillus subtilis adenine-responsive pbuE riboswitch, which regulates gene expression at the transcriptional level, up-regulating expression in response to increased intracellular effector concentrations. In this work, we analyzed sequence and structural elements that contribute to efficient ligand-dependent regulatory activity in a co-transcriptional and cellular context. Unexpectedly, we found that the P1 helix, which acts as the antitermination element of the switch in this RNA, supported ligand-dependent activation of a reporter gene over a broad spectrum of lengths from 3 to 10 bp. This same trend was also observed using a minimal in vitro single-turnover transcription assay, revealing that this behavior is intrinsic to the RNA sequence. We also found that the sequences at the distal tip of the terminator not directly involved in alternative secondary structure formation are highly important for efficient regulation. These data strongly support a model in which the switch is highly localized to the P1 helix adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket that likely presents a local kinetic block to invasion of the aptamer by the terminator.

  18. A metabolic link to skeletal muscle wasting and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René eKoopman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to its essential role in movement, insulating the internal organs, generating heat to maintain core body temperature, and acting as a major energy storage depot, any impairment to skeletal muscle structure and function may lead to an increase in both morbidity and mortality. In the context of skeletal muscle, altered metabolism is directly associated with numerous pathologies and disorders, including diabetes, and obesity, while many skeletal muscle pathologies have secondary changes in metabolism, including cancer cachexia, sarcopenia and the muscular dystrophies. Furthermore, the importance of cellular metabolism in the regulation of skeletal muscle stem cells is beginning to receive significant attention. Thus, it is clear that skeletal muscle metabolism is intricately linked to the regulation of skeletal muscle mass and regeneration. The aim of this review is to discuss some of the recent findings linking a change in metabolism to changes in skeletal muscle mass, as well as describing some of the recent studies in developmental, cancer and stem-cell biology that have identified a role for cellular metabolism in the regulation of stem cell function, a process termed ‘metabolic reprogramming’.

  19. Inborn errors of metabolism underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvaneh, Nima; Quartier, Pierre; Rostami, Parastoo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-10-01

    A number of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) have been shown to result in predominantly immunologic phenotypes, manifesting in part as inborn errors of immunity. These phenotypes are mostly caused by defects that affect the (i) quality or quantity of essential structural building blocks (e.g., nucleic acids, and amino acids), (ii) cellular energy economy (e.g., glucose metabolism), (iii) post-translational protein modification (e.g., glycosylation) or (iv) mitochondrial function. Presenting as multisystemic defects, they also affect innate or adaptive immunity, or both, and display various types of immune dysregulation. Specific and potentially curative therapies are available for some of these diseases, whereas targeted treatments capable of inducing clinical remission are available for others. We will herein review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) due to underlying metabolic disorders.

  20. Effects of an eight-week supervised, structured lifestyle modification programme on anthropometric, metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in severely obese adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crowe, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Lifestyle modification is fundamental to obesity treatment, but few studies have described the effects of structured lifestyle programmes specifically in bariatric patients. We sought to describe changes in anthropometric and metabolic characteristics in a cohort of bariatric patients after participation in a nurse-led, structured lifestyle programme.

  1. Bacterial community structure and predicted alginate metabolic pathway in an alginate-degrading bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Akihisa; Miura, Toyokazu; Kawata, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Methane fermentation is one of the effective approaches for utilization of brown algae; however, this process is limited by the microbial capability to degrade alginate, a main polysaccharide found in these algae. Despite its potential, little is known about anaerobic microbial degradation of alginate. Here we constructed a bacterial consortium able to anaerobically degrade alginate. Taxonomic classification of 16S rRNA gene, based on high-throughput sequencing data, revealed that this consortium included two dominant strains, designated HUA-1 and HUA-2; these strains were related to Clostridiaceae bacterium SK082 (99%) and Dysgonomonas capnocytophagoides (95%), respectively. Alginate lyase activity and metagenomic analyses, based on high-throughput sequencing data, revealed that this bacterial consortium possessed putative genes related to a predicted alginate metabolic pathway. However, HUA-1 and 2 did not grow on agar medium with alginate by using roll-tube method, suggesting the existence of bacterial interactions like symbiosis for anaerobic alginate degradation.

  2. Bioinformatics approaches for structural and functional analysis of proteins in secondary metabolism in Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchita; Singh, Swati; Sharma, Ashok

    2014-11-01

    Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) is an affluent storehouse of large number of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites known as withanolides. These secondary metabolites are produced by withanolide biosynthetic pathway. Very less information is available on structural and functional aspects of enzymes involved in withanolides biosynthetic pathways of Withiana somnifera. We therefore performed a bioinformatics analysis to look at functional and structural properties of these important enzymes. The pathway enzymes taken for this study were 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase, 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductase, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, squalene epoxidase, and cycloartenol synthase. The prediction of secondary structure was performed for basic structural information. Three-dimensional structures for these enzymes were predicted. The physico-chemical properties such as pI, AI, GRAVY and instability index were also studied. The current information will provide a platform to know the structural attributes responsible for the function of these protein until experimental structures become available.

  3. Cerebral metabolic and structural alterations in hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum assessed by MRS and DTI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreha-Kulaczewski, Steffi [Georg August University, Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Goettingen (Germany); Georg August University, MR Research in Neurology and Psychiatry, Goettingen (Germany); Dechent, Peter; Helms, Gunther [Georg August University, MR Research in Neurology and Psychiatry, Goettingen (Germany); Frahm, Jens [Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie, Goettingen (Germany); Gaertner, Jutta; Brockmann, Knut [Georg August University, Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum (HSP-TCC) is a complicated form of autosomal-recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia. Characteristic clinical features comprise progressive spastic gait, cognitive impairment, and ataxia. Diagnostic MRI findings include thinning of the corpus callosum and non-progressive white matter (WM) alterations. To study the extent of axonal involvement, we performed localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the cerebral WM and cortical grey matter (GM) in a patient with HSP-TCC at 20 and 25 years of age. The second investigation included diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). While MRS of the GM was normal, affected WM was characterized by major metabolic alterations such as reduced concentrations of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartyl-glutamate, creatine and phosphocreatine, and choline-containing compounds as well as elevated levels of myo-inositol. These abnormalities showed progression over a period of 5 years. DTI revealed increased mean diffusivity as well as reduced fractional anisotropy in periventricular WM. The metabolic and structural findings are consistent with progressive neuroaxonal loss in the WM accompanied by astrocytic proliferation - histopathological changes known to occur in HSP-TCC. Our results are in agreement with the hypothesis that the primary pathological process in HSP-TCC affects the axon, possibly due to impaired axonal trafficking. (orig.)

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in brain tumorCorrelation between structure and metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Min; Chen Niu; Netra Rana; Huanmei Ji; Ming Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging are non-invasive techniques used to detect metabolites and water diffusion in vivo. Previous studies have confirmed a positive correlation of individual fractional anisotropy values with N-acetylaspartate/creatine and N-acetylaspartate/choline ratios in tumors, edema, and normal white matter. This study divided the brain parenchyma into tumor, peritumoral edema, and normal-appearing white matter according to MRI data, and analyzed the correlation of metabolites with water molecular diffusion. Results demonstrated that in normal-appearing white matter, N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratios were positively correlated with fractional anisotropy values, negatively correlated with radial diffusivities, and positively correlated with maximum eigenvalues. Maximum eigenvalues and radial diffusivities in peritumoral edema showed a negative correlation with choline, N-acetylaspartate, and creatine. Radial diffusivities in tumor demonstrated a negative correlation with choline. These data suggest that the relationship between metabolism and structure is markedly changed from normal white matter to peritumoral edema and tumor. Neural metabolism in the peritumoral edema area decreased with expanding extracellular space. The normal relationship of neural function and microstructure disappeared in the tumor region.

  5. THE STRUCTURE, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND METABOLISM OF OSTEOARTHRITIC CARTILAGE - A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKGRAAF, LC; DEBONT, LGM; BOER, G; LIEM, RSB

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To understand the possible significance of the presence of proteases, cytokines, growth factors, and arachidonic acid metabolites in the osteoarthritic temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis (OA) is discussed, based on knowledge of structure, biochemistry and

  6. Glycopattern analysis and structure of the egg extra-cellular matrix in the Apennine yellow-bellied toad, Bombina pachypus (Anura: Bombinatoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Scillitani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the glycopatterns and ultrastructure of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM of the egg of theApennine yellow-bellied toad Bombina pachypus, by light and electron microscopy in order to determine structure,chemical composition and function. Histochemical techniques in light microscopy included PAS and AlcianBlue pH 2.5 and 1.0, performed also after b-elimination. Lectin-binding was tested with nine lectins (AAA,ConA, DBA, HPA, LTA, PNA, SBA, UEA-I, WGA. An inner fertilization envelope (FE and five jelly layers(J1–J5 were observed, differing in histochemical staining, lectin binding and ultrastructure. Most glycans wereO-linked, with many glucosamylated and fucosylated residues. The fertilization envelope presented a perivitellinespace and a fertilization layer, with mostly neutral glycans. The jelly layers consisted of fibers and granules,whose number and orientation differed between layers. Fibers were densely packed in J1 and J4 layers,whereas a looser arrangement was observed in the other layers. Jelly-layer glycans were mostly acidic and particularlyabundant in the J1 and J4 layers. In the J1, J2 and J5 layers, neutral, N-linked glycans were also observed.Mannosylated and/or glucosylated as well as galactosyl/galactosaminylated residues were more abundant in theouter layers. Many microorganisms were observed in the J5 layer. We believe that, apart from their functions inthe fertilization process, acidic and fucosylated glycans could act as a barrier against pathogen penetration.

  7. Influences of cadmium on fine structure and metabolism of Hypnea musciformis (Rhodophyta, Gigartinales) cultivated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzon, Zenilda L; Ferreira, Eduardo C; dos Santos, Rodrigo; Scherner, Fernando; Horta, Paulo A; Maraschin, Marcelo; Schmidt, Eder C

    2012-07-01

    The in vitro effect of cadmium on apical segments of Hypnea musciformis was examined. Over a period of 7 days, the segments were cultivated with different concentrations of cadmium, ranging from 50 to 300 μM. The samples were processed for microscopic and histochemical analysis of growth rates, content of photosynthetic pigments, and photosynthetic performance. Cadmium treatments increased cell wall thickness and the accumulation of plastoglobuli. Destruction of chloroplast internal organization was observed. Compared to controls, algae exposed to cadmium showed growth rate reduction, depigmentation, and blending in the lateral branches. The content of photosynthetic pigments, including chlorophyll a and phycobiliproteins, decreased after exposure to different concentrations of cadmium. These results agree with the decreased photosynthetic performance and relative electron transport rate observed after exposure of algae to cadmium. Taken together, these findings strongly indicate that cadmium negatively affects the architecture and metabolism of the carragenophyte H. musciformis, thus posing a threat to the economic vitality of this red macroalgae.

  8. The compositional and evolutionary logic of metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2013-02-01

    Metabolism is built on a foundation of organic chemistry, and employs structures and interactions at many scales. Despite these sources of complexity, metabolism also displays striking and robust regularities in the forms of modularity and hierarchy, which may be described compactly in terms of relatively few principles of composition. These regularities render metabolic architecture comprehensible as a system, and also suggests the order in which layers of that system came into existence. In addition metabolism also serves as a foundational layer in other hierarchies, up to at least the levels of cellular integration including bioenergetics and molecular replication, and trophic ecology. The recapitulation of patterns first seen in metabolism, in these higher levels, motivates us to interpret metabolism as a source of causation or constraint on many forms of organization in the biosphere. Many of the forms of modularity and hierarchy exhibited by metabolism are readily interpreted as stages in the emergence of catalytic control by living systems over organic chemistry, sometimes recapitulating or incorporating geochemical mechanisms. We identify as modules, either subsets of chemicals and reactions, or subsets of functions, that are re-used in many contexts with a conserved internal structure. At the small molecule substrate level, module boundaries are often associated with the most complex reaction mechanisms, catalyzed by highly conserved enzymes. Cofactors form a biosynthetically and functionally distinctive control layer over the small-molecule substrate. The most complex members among the cofactors are often associated with the reactions at module boundaries in the substrate networks, while simpler cofactors participate in widely generalized reactions. The highly tuned chemical structures of cofactors (sometimes exploiting distinctive properties of the elements of the periodic table) thereby act as ‘keys’ that incorporate classes of organic reactions

  9. Corneal cellular proliferation and wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Lisha

    2000-01-01

    Background. Cellular proliferation plays an important role in both physiological and pathological processes. Epithelial hyperplasia in the epithelium, excessive scar formation in retrocorneal membrane formation and neovascularization are examples of excessive proliferation of cornea cells. Lack of proliferative ability causes corneal degeneration. The degree of proliferative and metabolic activity will directly influence corneal transparency and very evidently refractive res...

  10. In silico exploratory study using structure-activity relationship models and metabolic information for prediction of mutagenicity based on the Ames test and rodent micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, P; Raitano, G; Fernández, A; Rallo, R; Benfenati, E

    2015-12-01

    The mutagenic potential of chemicals is a cause of growing concern, due to the possible impact on human health. In this paper we have developed a knowledge-based approach, combining information from structure-activity relationship (SAR) and metabolic triggers generated from the metabolic fate of chemicals in biological systems for prediction of mutagenicity in vitro based on the Ames test and in vivo based on the rodent micronucleus assay. In the first part of the work, a model was developed, which comprises newly generated SAR rules and a set of metabolic triggers. These SAR rules and metabolic triggers were further externally validated to predict mutagenicity in vitro, with metabolic triggers being used only to predict mutagenicity of chemicals, which were predicted unknown, by SARpy. Hence, this model has a higher accuracy than the SAR model, with an accuracy of 89% for the training set and 75% for the external validation set. Subsequently, the results of the second part of this work enlist a set of metabolic triggers for prediction of mutagenicity in vivo, based on the rodent micronucleus assay. Finally, the results of the third part enlist a list of metabolic triggers to find similarities and differences in the mutagenic response of chemicals in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Application of structure-metabolism relationships in the identification of a selective endothelin A antagonist, BMS-193884, with favourable pharmacokinetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, W G; Obermeier, M T; Barrish, J C; Chong, S; Marino, A M; Murugesan, N; Wang-Iverson, D; Morrison, R A

    2003-11-01

    1. Based on binding affinity, 2'-amino-N-(3,4-dimethyl-5-isoxazolyl)-4'-(2-methylpropyl)[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-sulfonamide (2) was identified as an initial lead in a programme to identify selective endothelin (ET) receptor antagonists. However, the compound was extensively metabolized in preclinical animal species and human in vitro systems due to oxidative biotransformation. 2. To optimize this structural class, the site of metabolism of 2 was determined. This allowed for focussed structure-activity and structure-metabolism studies aimed at finding more metabolically stable analogues that maintained potency. New analogues were screened for their ET binding characteristics and their stability in rat and human liver microsomes. 3. The use of the microsomal stability screen was tested by the determination of the pharmacokinetic parameters of select analogues. A good correlation was found between reduced rates of rat microsomal metabolism and reduced clearance in the rat. 4. N-(3,4-dimethyl-5-isoxazolyl)-4'-(2-oxazolyl)[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-sulfonamide (3) was identified as an analogue with improved in vitro properties and further studies revealed that the compound had improved pharmacokinetic properties. 5. N-[[2'-[[(3,4-dimethyl-5-isoxazolyl)amino]sulfonyl]-4-(2-oxazolyl)[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl]methyl]acetamide (4) was subsequently identified as a compound with superior in vitro properties compared with compound 3, but when tested in vivo it had a substantially increased rate of clearance. Further studies demonstrated that the clearance of this closely related structural analogue was not dictated by metabolic processes, but was mediated by transport-mediated direct biliary excretion. 6. The utility of screening for in vitro liver microsomal stability as part of the lead optimization process for compounds with metabolic liabilities was shown. It was also shown that relatively small molecular changes can dramatically change the disposition of closely related analogues and care

  12. Screening of cellular proteins that interact with the classical swine fever virus non-structural protein 5A by yeast two-hybrid analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chengcheng Zhang; Lei He; Kai Kang; Heng Chen; Lei Xu; Yanming Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), the pathogen of classical swine fever (CSF), causes severe hemorrhagic fever and vascular necrosis in domestic pigs and wild boar. A large number of evidence has proven that non-structural 5A (NS5A) is not only a very important part of viral replication complex, but also can regulate host cell’s function; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the current study, aiming to find more clues in understanding the molecular mechanisms of CSFV NS5A’s function, the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system was adopted to screen for CSFV NS5A interactive proteins in the cDNA library of the swine umbilical vein endothelial cell (SUVEC). Alignment with the NCBI database revealed 16 interactive proteins: DDX5, PSMC3, NAV1, PHF5A, GNB2L1, CSDE1, HSPA8, BRMS1, PPP2R3C, AIP, TMED10, POLR1C, TMEM70, METAP2, CHORDC1 and COPS6. These proteins are mostly related to gene transcription, protein folding, protein degradation and metabolism. The interactions detected by the Y2H system should be considered as preliminary results. Since identifying novel pathways and host targets, which play essential roles during infection, may provide potential targets for therapeutic development. The finding of proteins obtained from the SUVEC cDNA library that interact with the CSFV NS5A protein provide valuable information for better understanding the interactions between this viral protein and the host target proteins.

  13. Protein and energy metabolism of young male Wistar rats fed conjugated linoleic acid as structured triacylglycerol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, H.; Hansen, C. H.; Mu, Huiling;

    2010-01-01

    Twelve 4-week-old male Wistar rats weighing 100 g were fed diets semi-ad libitum for 22 d containing either 1.5% conjugated linoleic acid (CLA-diet) or high oleic sunflower oil (Control-diet). The CLA was structured triacylglycerol with predominantly cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 fatty acid...

  14. Flat Cellular (UMTS) Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.G.P.; Samuel, L.G.; Mullender, S.J.; Polakos, P.; Rittenhouse, G.

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, cellular systems have been built in a hierarchical manner: many specialized cellular access network elements that collectively form a hierarchical cellular system. When 2G and later 3G systems were designed there was a good reason to make system hierarchical: from a cost-perspective i

  15. Cellular fiber–reinforced concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Isachenko S.; Kodzoev M.

    2016-01-01

    Methods disperse reinforcement of concrete matrix using polypropylene, glass, basalt and metal fibers allows to make the construction of complex configuration, solve the problem of frost products. Dispersed reinforcement reduces the overall weight of the structures. The fiber replaces the secondary reinforcement, reducing the volume of use of structural steel reinforcement. Cellular Fiber concretes are characterized by high-performance properties, especially increased bending strength and...

  16. Goadsporin, a chemical substance which promotes secondary metabolism and Morphogenesis in streptomycetes. II. Structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Y; Kan, Y; Fujii, K; Fujita, T; Harada, K; Naoki, H; Tabata, H; Onaka, H; Furumai, T

    2001-12-01

    The structure of goadsporin was determined by using spectroscopic techniques. NMR analysis revealed that goadsporin consists of 19 amino acids, two of which are dehydroalanines (Deala), and six of which are cyclized to oxazoles (Oxz) and thiazoles (Thz) by dehydrative cyclization and dehydrogenation from serine, threonine and cysteine. NMR analysis established seven partial structures, and their sequence was determined by CID-MS/MS. Negative mode FAB-MS/MS gave product ions arising from charge-remote fragmentation that allowed determination of the sequence of the amino acid components as AcNH-Ala-MeOxz-Val-Deala-MeOxz-Ile-Leu-Thz-Ser-Gly-Gly-MeOxz-Leu-Deala-Oxz-Ala-Gly-Thz-Val-OH. The chiral amino acids were determined by the advanced Marfey's method to have L-configurations.

  17. Structure and Characterization of Proteins and Enzymes Involved in Nucleotide Metabolism and Iron-Sulfur Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Ooi, Bee Lean

    extended β-sheet dimers. These dimers were not observed in solution and were likely a result of the high protein concentration in the crystals. WT, A115V and A115G Mt DCD-DUT were successfully purified, and the crystal structure of the A115V variant with dTTP bound was solved. The variants were created...... to investigate the importance of steric hindrance on a water molecule suggested to play a key role in dephosphorylation. However, this water molecule was present in the structure of A115V:dTTP and the variant did not dephosphorylate dTTP. The dTTP pyrimidine moiety in the WT and A115V structures is rotated...... compared with WT:dTTP. dTTP inhibition of WT Mt DCD-DUT at pH 6.8 was confirmed, whereas the WT enzyme proved insensitive to dTTP at pH 8.0. The protonation state of the conserved His112 in the flexible loop is likely to play an important role herein. His112 is completely deprotonated at pH 8.0, where...

  18. The origin of modern metabolic networks inferred from phylogenomic analysis of protein architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Kim, Hee Shin; Mittenthal, Jay E

    2007-05-29

    Metabolism represents a complex collection of enzymatic reactions and transport processes that convert metabolites into molecules capable of supporting cellular life. Here we explore the origins and evolution of modern metabolism. Using phylogenomic information linked to the structure of metabolic enzymes, we sort out recruitment processes and discover that most enzymatic activities were associated with the nine most ancient and widely distributed protein fold architectures. An analysis of newly discovered functions showed enzymatic diversification occurred early, during the onset of the modern protein world. Most importantly, phylogenetic reconstruction exercises and other evidence suggest strongly that metabolism originated in enzymes with the P-loop hydrolase fold in nucleotide metabolism, probably in pathways linked to the purine metabolic subnetwork. Consequently, the first enzymatic takeover of an ancient biochemistry or prebiotic chemistry was related to the synthesis of nucleotides for the RNA world.

  19. Hippocampal structure, metabolism, and inflammatory response after a 6-week intense aerobic exercise in healthy young adults: a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gerd; Herbsleb, Marco; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Schumann, Andy; Brünner, Franziska; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Gussew, Alexander; Puta, Christian; Smesny, Stefan; Gabriel, Holger W; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Interventional studies suggest that changes in physical fitness affect brain function and structure. We studied the influence of high intensity physical exercise on hippocampal volume and metabolism in 17 young healthy male adults during a 6-week exercise program compared with matched controls. We further aimed to relate these changes to hypothesized changes in exercised-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We show profound improvement of physical fitness in most subjects and a positive correlation between the degree of fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels. We unexpectedly observed an average volume decrease of about 2%, which was restricted to right hippocampal subfields CA2/3, subiculum, and dentate gyrus and which correlated with fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels negatively. This result indicates that mainly those subjects who did not benefit from the exercise program show decreased hippocampal volume, reduced BDNF levels, and increased TNF-α concentrations. While spectroscopy results do not indicate any neuronal loss (unchanged N-acetylaspartate levels) decreased glutamate-glutamine levels were observed in the right anterior hippocampus in the exercise group only. Responder characteristics need to be studied in more detail. Our results point to an important role of the inflammatory response after exercise on changes in hippocampal structure.

  20. Effects of ionizing radiation over the structure, metabolism and infectivity of a pathogenic protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii; Efeitos da radiacao ionizante sobre a estrutura, metabolismo e infectividade de um protozoario patogenico, Toxoplasma gondii (Nicole and Manceau, 1908)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramoto, Roberto Mitsuyoshi

    1998-07-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii (Apicomplexa), has as definitive host domestic and wild felines and as intermediate hosts most species of mammals and birds, Including man. The infection in man is usually asymptomatic, but can become a severe and lethal illness in some special groups like the fetus of primoinfected pregnant woman, or in AIDS and transplanted patients. The transmission is due to ingestion of food or water contaminated with oocysts from cat feces as well as raw or rare cooked cyst containing meet. There is no available vaccine against toxoplasmosis, with some reports of the use ionizing radiation in order to attenuate or suppress the parasite. These studies are promising, but more research is needed to optimize the radiation process and to clarify those alterations caused on T gondii.Using a increasing doses of {sup 60} Co irradiation on T.gondii tachyzoites, we studied many parameters such as morphology, both at optical and electron microscopy level, detection of DNA fragmentation, metabolism alterations (cellular oxidative burst, protein, nucleic acids and DNA synthesis), determination of the parasite survival both in in vivo and in vitro models, antigenicity and immunogenicity after the process, cellular invasion and irradiated tachyzoite induced protection. After definition of 200 Gy of {sup 60} Co irradiation as the lower radiation dose that suppress parasite growth in vitro and in vivo, we found no detectable changes in parasite viability, its cell invasion capacity or in its structural proteins. DNA fragmentation like apoptosis or alterations of the parasite metabolism were similarly not affected by radiation. Mice infection with irradiated parasites induce partial protection when these animals were re-inoculated with non irradiated virulent parasites, inducing greater specific IgG levels as well as a longer survival. Irradiated T.gondii maintains its the ability of invasion, even under radiation effects. Based on our results we

  1. Structures and short linear motif of disordered transcription factor regions provide clues to the interactome of the cellular hub Radical-Induced Cell Death1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Shea, Charlotte; Staby, Lasse; Bendsen, Sidsel Krogh;

    2017-01-01

    point to larger networks of interactions, such as with proteins that serve as hubs for essential cellular functions. The stress-associated plant protein Radical-Induced Cell Death1 (RCD1) is one such hub, interacting with many transcription factors via their flexible IDRs. To identify the SLiM bound...

  2. Heterocyclic amine mutagenicity/carcinogenicity: Influence of repair, metabolism, and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J.S.; Wu, R.; Knize, M.G.; Thompson, L.H.; Hatch, F.T.

    1993-01-15

    Cooking, heat processing, and pyrolysis of protein-rich foods induce the formation of structurally related heterocyclic aromatic amines that have been found to be mutagenic in bacteria, mammalian cells in culture and mice. All these compounds are potent mutagens and most are active below 1 ng/plate, in Ames/Salmonella tester strain TA1538 in the presence of S9 liver microsomal preparations from rat, mouse, or hamster. They are also potent in strains TA98, TA97, moderately active in TA1537, weakly active in TA100, and virtually inactive in TA1535 and TA102. Thus, they show powerful frameshift activity in reverting specific GC-rich sequences, but do not cause base substitution mutations or revert an AT-rich sequence. They are 100-fold less active in the uvrB+, repair-proficient strain TA1978, and in the case of IQ, cause insertions and large deletions not seen in TA1538.

  3. Metabolism of olaquindox in rat liver microsomes: structural elucidation of metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoying; Huang, Lingli; Dai, Menghong; Chen, Dongmei; Wang, Yulian; Tao, Yanfei; Yuan, Zonghui

    2008-04-01

    Olaquindox (N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methyl-2-quinoxalincarboxamide-1,4-dioxide) is a growth-promoting feed additive for food-producing animals. Its toxicity is closely related to the metabolism. The complete metabolic pathways of olaquindox are not revealed. To improve studies of the metabolism and toxicity of olaquindox, its biotransformation in rat liver microsomes and the structure of its metabolites using high-performance liquid chromatography combined with ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/MS-ITTOF) were investigated. When olaquindox was incubated with an NADPH-generating system and rat liver microsomes, ten metabolites (M1-M10) were detected. The structures of these metabolites were identified from mass spectra and comparison of their changes in their accurate molecular masses and fragment ions with those of the parent drug. With the high resolution and good mass accuracy achieved by this technique, the elemental compositions of the metabolites and their fragment ions were exactly determined. The results indicate that the N --> O group reduction is the main metabolic pathway of olaquindox metabolism in rat liver microsomes, because abundant 1-desolaquindox (M2), 4-desolaquindox (M1) and bisdesoxyolaquindox (M9) were produced during the incubation step. Seven other minor metabolites were revealed which were considered to be hydroxylation metabolites, based on the position of the quinoxaline ring or 3-methyl group and a carboxylic acid derivative on the side chain at position 2 of the quinoxaline ring. Among the identified metabolites, five new hydroxylated metabolites (M3-M7) were found for the first time in rat liver microsomes. This work will conduce to complete clarification of olaquindox metabolism, and improve the in vivo metabolism of olaquindox in food animals.

  4. Metabolism of Mequindox in Isolated Rat Liver Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guang-hui; SHAN Qi; WANG Jing; LI Ya-fei; GAO Yan; ZENG Zhen-ling

    2014-01-01

    Mequindox (MEQ), 3-methyl-2-quinoxalinacetyl-1,4-dioxide, is widely used in Chinese veterinary medicine as an antimicrobial agent and feed additive. Its toxicity has been reported to be closely related to its metabolism. To understand the pathways underlying MEQ’s metabolism more clearly, we studied its metabolism in isolated rat liver cells by using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization hybrid linear trap quadrupole orbitrap (LC-LTQ-Orbitrap) mass spectrometry. The structures of MEQ metabolites and their product ions were readily and reliably characterized on the basis of accurate MS2 spectra and known structure of MEQ. Eleven metabolites were detected in isolated rat liver cells, two of which were detected for the ifrst time in vitro. The major metabolic pathways reported previously for in vitro metabolism of MEQ in rat microsomes were conifrmed in this study, including N→O group reduction, carbonyl reduction, and methyl monohydroxylation. In addition, we found that acetyl hydroxylation was an important pathway of MEQ metabolism. The results also demonstrate that cellular systems more closely simulate in vivo conditions than do other in vitro systems such as microsomes. Taken together, these data contribute to our understanding of the in vivo metabolism of MEQ.

  5. Soil Parameters Drive the Structure, Diversity and Metabolic Potentials of the Bacterial Communities Across Temperate Beech Forest Soil Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanbille, M; Buée, M; Bach, C; Cébron, A; Frey-Klett, P; Turpault, M P; Uroz, S

    2016-02-01

    Soil and climatic conditions as well as land cover and land management have been shown to strongly impact the structure and diversity of the soil bacterial communities. Here, we addressed under a same land cover the potential effect of the edaphic parameters on the soil bacterial communities, excluding potential confounding factors as climate. To do this, we characterized two natural soil sequences occurring in the Montiers experimental site. Spatially distant soil samples were collected below Fagus sylvatica tree stands to assess the effect of soil sequences on the edaphic parameters, as well as the structure and diversity of the bacterial communities. Soil analyses revealed that the two soil sequences were characterized by higher pH and calcium and magnesium contents in the lower plots. Metabolic assays based on Biolog Ecoplates highlighted higher intensity and richness in usable carbon substrates in the lower plots than in the middle and upper plots, although no significant differences occurred in the abundance of bacterial and fungal communities along the soil sequences as assessed using quantitative PCR. Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons revealed that Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the most abundantly represented phyla. Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Chlamydiae were significantly enriched in the most acidic and nutrient-poor soils compared to the Bacteroidetes, which were significantly enriched in the soils presenting the higher pH and nutrient contents. Interestingly, aluminium, nitrogen, calcium, nutrient availability and pH appeared to be the best predictors of the bacterial community structures along the soil sequences.

  6. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  7. 中小企业单元组织的信息结构及创新机制%SMEs’ Cellular Organizations and their Information Structures and Innovation Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘群慧; 张建林

    2012-01-01

    Information structure is an important issue of corporate governance structure.Different information structures generate different governance mechanisms,which lead to different governance efficiency.The cellular organization is an effective collaborative innovation form for small & medium enterprises(SMEs),and its information structure is closely related to innovation mechanisms.Based on the definition discussion of SMEs’ cellular organization,this paper analyzes the organizational information structure and the innovation mechanisms corresponding to the variety information structure.%信息结构是分析组织治理问题的核心,不同的信息结构会产生相应的治理机制,从而形成不同的治理效率。单元组织模式作为一种中小企业协作创新的有效组织形式,其所表现出来的信息结构与组织的创新机制密切相关。从探讨中小企业单元组织内涵入手,分析单元组织内部成员企业间存在的主要信息结构,能够揭示基于不同信息结构的创新机制。

  8. Cellular bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, David K; Noguchi, Takako

    2012-08-01

    Bioluminescence imaging of live cells has recently been recognized as an important alternative to fluorescence imaging. Fluorescent probes are much brighter than bioluminescent probes (luciferase enzymes) and, therefore, provide much better spatial and temporal resolution and much better contrast for delineating cell structure. However, with bioluminescence imaging there is virtually no background or toxicity. As a result, bioluminescence can be superior to fluorescence for detecting and quantifying molecules and their interactions in living cells, particularly in long-term studies. Structurally diverse luciferases from beetle and marine species have been used for a wide variety of applications, including tracking cells in vivo, detecting protein-protein interactions, measuring levels of calcium and other signaling molecules, detecting protease activity, and reporting circadian clock gene expression. Such applications can be optimized by the use of brighter and variously colored luciferases, brighter microscope optics, and ultrasensitive, low-noise cameras. This article presents a review of how bioluminescence differs from fluorescence, its applications to cellular imaging, and available probes, optics, and detectors. It also gives practical suggestions for optimal bioluminescence imaging of single cells.

  9. Cardiac system bioenergetics: metabolic basis of the Frank-Starling law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saks, Valdur; Dzeja, Petras; Schlattner, Uwe; Vendelin, Marko; Terzic, Andre; Wallimann, Theo

    2006-03-01

    The fundamental principle of cardiac behaviour is described by the Frank-Starling law relating force of contraction during systole with end-diastolic volume. While both work and respiration rates increase linearly with imposed load, the basis of mechano-energetic coupling in heart muscle has remained a long-standing enigma. Here, we highlight advances made in understanding of complex cellular and molecular mechanisms that orchestrate coupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation with ATP utilization for muscle contraction. Cardiac system bioenergetics critically depends on an interrelated metabolic infrastructure regulating mitochondrial respiration and energy fluxes throughout cellular compartments. The data reviewed indicate the significance of two interrelated systems regulating mitochondrial respiration and energy fluxes in cells: (1) the creatine kinase, adenylate kinase and glycolytic pathways that communicate flux changes generated by cellular ATPases within structurally organized enzymatic modules and networks; and (2) a secondary system based on mitochondrial participation in cellular calcium cycle, which adjusts substrate oxidation and energy-transducing processes to meet increasing cellular energy demands. By conveying energetic signals to metabolic sensors, coupled phosphotransfer reactions provide a high-fidelity regulation of the excitation-contraction cycle. Such integration of energetics with calcium signalling systems provides the basis for 'metabolic pacing', synchronizing the cellular electrical and mechanical activities with energy supply processes.

  10. Below-ambient levels of UV induce chloroplast structural change and alter starch metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerberg, W R

    2007-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in the 400-700 nm bandwidth of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) has been established as an important source of energy for photosynthesis and environmental signals regulating many aspects of green-plant life. Above-ambient levels of UV-B radiation (290-320 nm) under high-PAR conditions have been shown to elicit responses in chloroplasts of Brassica napus similar to those of chloroplasts at low-PAR exposure (W. Fagerberg and J. Bornman, Physiol. Plant. 101: 833-844, 1997). The question arises as to whether UV at normal levels can also evoke similar responses. Here we provide evidence that even below-ambient levels of UV-B (1/28 ambient; Durham, N.H., U.S.A., 1200 hours, March) were capable of inducing an increase in thylakoid surface area relative to the chloroplast volume typical of a low-PAR response (shade response) in sunflowers. This response occurred even though leaves were concurrently exposed to PAR levels that normally induce a "sun" or high-PAR response in the absence of UV-B. Subambient levels of UV-B were also associated with a decrease in chloroplast and starch volume. Exposure to levels of UV-A 1/10 of ambient appeared to enhance the high-PAR response of the chloroplast, characterized by an increase in the amounts of stored starch, an increase in chloroplast volume density ratio values, and a decrease in thylakoid surface area density ratios relative to the high-light controls. These effects were opposite to those seen in UV-B-exposed tissue. In a general sense, subambient levels of UV-B evoked a response similar to that elicited by low-PAR irradiance, while subambient UV-A elicited responses similar to those typical of high-PAR irradiance. The fact that below-ambient levels of UV altered a normal chloroplast structural response to PAR provides evidence that UV may be an important environmental signal for plants.

  11. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the “secondary compound hypothesis” and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. PMID:27483244

  12. Impact of wheat aleurone structure on metabolic disorders caused by a high-fat diet in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Natalia Nicole; Pekkinen, Jenna; Zavala, Karla; Fouret, Gilles; Korkmaz, Ayhan; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Atalay, Mustafa; Hanhineva, Kati; Mykkänen, Hannu; Poutanen, Kaisa; Micard, Valérie

    2014-10-15

    The present study investigated the potential of native and structurally modified wheat aleurone, by dry-grinding or enzymatic treatments, to counteract metabolic disorders in mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). C57BL6/J mice were first fed ad libitum with a high-fat diet for 9 weeks to induce obesity, after which the native or treated aleurone fractions were added (13% (w/w)) in the high-fat diets for an additional 8 weeks. The effects of the aleurone-enriched diets were evaluated by assessing body weight gain, adiposity, fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin and leptin, and anti-inflammatory and oxidative stress markers. Enrichment of the diet with native or finely ground aleurone did not improve any parameter analyzed; finely ground aleurone even slightly increased (p = 0.03) body weight gain. Enrichment of the diet with enzymatically treated aleurone only had a tendency toward lower body weight gain, visceral adipose tissue accumulation, fasting plasma insulin, and leptin levels.

  13. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  14. Structural and functional analysis of the yeast N-acetyltransferase Mpr1 involved in oxidative stress tolerance via proline metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuno, Ryo; Hirano, Yoshinori; Itoh, Takafumi; Hakoshima, Toshio; Hibi, Takao; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-07-16

    Mpr1 (sigma1278b gene for proline-analog resistance 1), which was originally isolated as N-acetyltransferase detoxifying the proline analog L-azetidine-2-carboxylate, protects yeast cells from various oxidative stresses. Mpr1 mediates the L-proline and L-arginine metabolism by acetylating L-Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate, leading to the L-arginine-dependent production of nitric oxide, which confers oxidative stress tolerance. Mpr1 belongs to the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, but exhibits poor sequence homology with the GNAT enzymes and unique substrate specificity. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of Mpr1 and its complex with the substrate cis-4-hydroxy-L-proline at 1.9 and 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. Mpr1 is folded into α/β-structure with eight-stranded mixed β-sheets and six α-helices. The substrate binds to Asn135 and the backbone amide of Asn172 and Leu173, and the predicted acetyl-CoA-binding site is located near the backbone amide of Phe138 and the side chain of Asn178. Alanine substitution of Asn178, which can interact with the sulfur of acetyl-CoA, caused a large reduction in the apparent kcat value. The replacement of Asn135 led to a remarkable increase in the apparent Km value. These results indicate that Asn178 and Asn135 play an important role in catalysis and substrate recognition, respectively. Such a catalytic mechanism has not been reported in the GNAT proteins. Importantly, the amino acid substitutions in these residues increased the L-Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate level in yeast cells exposed to heat stress, indicating that these residues are also crucial for its physiological functions. These studies provide some benefits of Mpr1 applications, such as the breeding of industrial yeasts and the development of antifungal drugs.

  15. Metabolic syndrome in patients with atrial fibrillation in the absence of structural heart disease from a tertiary hospital in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ri-bo; MA Chang-sheng; GAO Ling-yun; DONG Jian-zeng; LIU Xiao-hui; LIU Xing-peng; WU Jia-hui; LONG De-yong; YU Rong-hui; DU Xin

    2009-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and atrial fibrillation (AF) are causally related. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of MetS in patients with AF in the absence of structural heart disease from a tertiary hospital in China.Methods In a single center, 741 inpatients with AF in the absence of structural heart disease prior to catheter ablation were retrospectively reviewed. Among them, 588 (79.4%) patients had paroxysmal AF. Subgroup analyses were performed in paroxysmal AF and persistent/permanent AF.Results MetS was found in 343 (46.3%) patients (200 males, 143 females); 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 components of the MetS were found in 59 (8.0%), 140 (18.9%), 199 (26.9%), 203 (27.4%), 103 (13.9%) and 37 (5.0%) patients, respectively. The prevalences of overweight/obesity, high blood pressure, high glucose level, high triglyceride level and low high density lipoproteins cholesterol level were 53.8%, 47.6%, 23.2%, 40.6% and 72.1%, respectively. The prevalence of MetS was not significantly different between the paroxysmal AF group and the persistent/permanent AF group (44.6% vs 52.9%,P=0.064). The five components of MetS except overweight/obesity (69.3% vs 49.8%, P <0.001) were not significantly different between the aforementioned two groups. The left atrium diameter increased with the sum of the MetS components. The left atrium diameter in the MetS group was significantly higher than that in the non-MetS group both in patients with paroxysmal AF and in patients with persistent/permanent AF.Conclusions The prevalence of MetS in patients with AF prior to catheter ablation is high. Further study and prevention are needed.

  16. The impact of oxygen on metabolic evolution: a chemoinformatic investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available The appearance of planetary oxygen likely transformed the chemical and biochemical makeup of life and probably triggered episodes of organismal diversification. Here we use chemoinformatic methods to explore the impact of the rise of oxygen on metabolic evolution. We undertake a comprehensive comparative analysis of structures, chemical properties and chemical reactions of anaerobic and aerobic metabolites. The results indicate that aerobic metabolism has expanded the structural and chemical space of metabolites considerably, including the appearance of 130 novel molecular scaffolds. The molecular functions of these metabolites are mainly associated with derived aspects of cellular life, such as signal transfer, defense against biotic factors, and protection of organisms from oxidation. Moreover, aerobic metabolites are more hydrophobic and rigid than anaerobic compounds, suggesting they are better fit to modulate membrane functions and to serve as transmembrane signaling factors. Since higher organisms depend largely on sophisticated membrane-enabled functions and intercellular signaling systems, the metabolic developments brought about by oxygen benefit the diversity of cellular makeup and the complexity of cellular organization as well. These findings enhance our understanding of the molecular link between oxygen and evolution. They also show the significance of chemoinformatics in addressing basic biological questions.

  17. Cellular Auxin Homeostasis:Gatekeeping Is Housekeeping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michel Ruiz Rosquete; Elke Barbez; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn

    2012-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is essential for plant development and contributes to nearly every aspect of the plant life cycle.The spatio-temporal distribution of auxin depends on a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and cell-to-cell auxin transport.Auxin metabolism and transport are both crucial for plant development;however,it largely remains to be seen how these processes are integrated to ensure defined cellular auxin levels or even gradients within tissues or organs.In this review,we provide a glance at very diverse topics of auxin biology,such as biosynthesis,conjugation,oxidation,and transport of auxin.This broad,but certainly superficial,overview highlights the mutual importance of auxin metabolism and transport.Moreover,it allows pinpointing how auxin metabolism and transport get integrated to jointly regulate cellular auxin homeostasis.Even though these processes have been so far only separately studied,we assume that the phytohormonal crosstalk integrates and coordinates auxin metabolism and transport.Besides the integrative power of the global hormone signaling,we additionally introduce the hypothetical concept considering auxin transport components as gatekeepers for auxin responses.

  18. Maleic Acid--but Not Structurally Related Methylmalonic Acid--Interrupts Energy Metabolism by Impaired Calcium Homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tunç Tuncel

    Full Text Available Maleic acid (MA has been shown to induce Fanconi syndrome via disturbance of renal energy homeostasis, though the underlying pathomechanism is still under debate. Our study aimed to examine the pathomechanism underlying maleic acid-induced nephrotoxicity. Methylmalonic acid (MMA is structurally similar to MA and accumulates in patients affected with methymalonic aciduria, a defect in the degradation of branched-chain amino acids, odd-chain fatty acids and cholesterol, which is associated with the development of tubulointerstitial nephritis resulting in chronic renal failure. We therefore used MMA application as a control experiment in our study and stressed hPTECs with MA and MMA to further validate the specificity of our findings. MMA did not show any toxic effects on proximal tubule cells, whereas maleic acid induced concentration-dependent and time-dependent cell death shown by increased lactate dehydrogenase release as well as ethidium homodimer and calcein acetoxymethyl ester staining. The toxic effect of MA was blocked by administration of single amino acids, in particular L-alanine and L-glutamate. MA application further resulted in severe impairment of cellular energy homeostasis on the level of glycolysis, respiratory chain, and citric acid cycle resulting in ATP depletion. As underlying mechanism we could identify disturbance of calcium homeostasis. MA toxicity was critically dependent on calcium levels in culture medium and blocked by the extra- and intracellular calcium chelators EGTA and BAPTA-AM respectively. Moreover, MA-induced cell death was associated with activation of calcium-dependent calpain proteases. In summary, our study shows a comprehensive pathomechanistic concept for MA-induced dysfunction and damage of human proximal tubule cells.

  19. Metabolic flux ratio analysis and multi-objective optimization revealed a globally conserved and coordinated metabolic response of E. coli to paraquat-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tie; Rui, Bin; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Ximing; Yi, Yin; Wen, Han; Zheng, Haoran; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2013-01-27

    The ability of a microorganism to adapt to changes in the environment, such as in nutrient or oxygen availability, is essential for its competitive fitness and survival. The cellular objective and the strategy of the metabolic response to an extreme environment are therefore of tremendous interest and, thus, have been increasingly explored. However, the cellular objective of the complex regulatory structure of the metabolic changes has not yet been fully elucidated and more details regarding the quantitative behaviour of the metabolic flux redistribution are required to understand the systems-wide biological significance of this response. In this study, the intracellular metabolic flux ratios involved in the central carbon metabolism were determined by fractional (13)C-labeling and metabolic flux ratio analysis (MetaFoR) of the wild-type E. coli strain JM101 at an oxidative environment in a chemostat. We observed a significant increase in the flux through phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malic enzyme (MEZ) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT). We applied an ε-constraint based multi-objective optimization to investigate the trade-off relationships between the biomass yield and the generation of reductive power using the in silico iJR904 genome-scale model of E. coli K-12. The theoretical metabolic redistribution supports that the trans-hydrogenase pathway should not play a direct role in the defence mounted by E. coli against oxidative stress. The agreement between the measured ratio and the theoretical redistribution established the significance of NADPH synthesis as the goal of the metabolic reprogramming that occurs in response to oxidative stress. Our work presents a framework that combines metabolic flux ratio analysis and multi-objective optimization to investigate the metabolic trade-offs that occur under varied environmental conditions. Our results led to the proposal that the metabolic response of E

  20. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-02

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  1. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H.; Dejea, Christine M.; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T.; Santidrian, Antonio F.; Felding, Brunhilde H.; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A.; Pardoll, Drew M.; White, James R.; Patti, Gary J.; Sears, Cynthia L.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N1, N12-diacetylspermine in both biofilm positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N1, N12-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome, to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression. PMID:25959674

  2. Metabolic signals in sleep regulation: recent insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Charu; Basheer, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and energy balance are essential for health. The two processes act in concert to regulate central and peripheral homeostasis. During sleep, energy is conserved due to suspended activity, movement, and sensory responses, and is redirected to restore and replenish proteins and their assemblies into cellular structures. During wakefulness, various energy-demanding activities lead to hunger. Thus, hunger promotes arousal, and subsequent feeding, followed by satiety that promotes sleep via changes in neuroendocrine or neuropeptide signals. These signals overlap with circuits of sleep-wakefulness, feeding, and energy expenditure. Here, we will briefly review the literature that describes the interplay between the circadian system, sleep-wake, and feeding-fasting cycles that are needed to maintain energy balance and a healthy metabolic profile. In doing so, we describe the neuroendocrine, hormonal/peptide signals that integrate sleep and feeding behavior with energy metabolism.

  3. Expanded flux variability analysis on metabolic network of Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Tong; XIE ZhengWei; OUYANG Qi

    2009-01-01

    Flux balance analysis,based on the mass conservation law in a cellular organism,has been extensively employed to study the interplay between structures and functions of cellular metabolic networks.Consequently,the phenotypes of the metabolism can be well elucidated.In this paper,we introduce the Expanded Flux Variability Analysis (EFVA) to characterize the intrinsic nature of metabolic reactions,such as flexibility,modularity and essentiality,by exploring the trend of the range,the maximum and the minimum flux of reactions.We took the metabolic network of Escherichia coli as an example and analyzed the variability of reaction fluxes under different growth rate constraints.The average variability of all reactions decreases dramatically when the growth rate increases.Consider the noise effect on the metabolic system,we thus argue that the microorganism may practically grow under a suboptimal state.Besides,under the EFVA framework,the reactions are easily to be grouped into catabolic and anabolic groups.And the anabolic groups can be further assigned to specific biomass constitute.We also discovered the growth rate dependent essentiality of reactions.

  4. The liver X receptor : Control of cellular lipid homeostasis and beyond Implications for drug design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Grefhorst, Aldo; Groen, Albert K.; Kuipers, Folkert

    2010-01-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) alpha and beta are nuclear receptors that control cellular metabolism. LXRs modulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism in response to changes in cellular cholesterol status. Because of their involvement in cholesterol homeostasis, LXRs have e

  5. Microbial metabolism and community structure in response to bioelectrochemically enhanced remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Huggins, Tyler; Jin, Song; Zuo, Yi; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates that electrodes in a bioelectrochemical system (BES) can potentially serve as a nonexhaustible electron acceptor for in situ bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The deployment of BES not only eliminates aeration or supplement of electron acceptors as in contemporary bioremediation but also significantly shortens the remediation period and produces sustainable electricity. More interestingly, the study reveals that microbial metabolism and community structure distinctively respond to the bioelectrochemically enhanced remediation. Tubular BESs with carbon cloth anode (CCA) or biochar anode (BCA) were inserted into raw water saturated soils containing petroleum hydrocarbons for enhancing in situ remediation. Results show that total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal rate almost doubled in soils close to the anode (63.5-78.7%) than that in the open circuit positive controls (37.6-43.4%) during a period of 64 days. The maximum current density from the BESs ranged from 73 to 86 mA/m(2). Comprehensive microbial and chemical characterizations and statistical analyses show that the residual TPH has a strongly positive correlation with hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (HDM) numbers, dehydrogenase activity, and lipase activity and a negative correlation with soil pH, conductivity, and catalase activity. Distinctive microbial communities were identified at the anode, in soil with electrodes, and soil without electrodes. Uncommon electrochemically active bacteria capable of hydrocarbon degradation such as Comamonas testosteroni, Pseudomonas putida, and Ochrobactrum anthropi were selectively enriched on the anode, while hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria were dominant in soil samples. Results from genus or phylum level characterizations well agree with the data from cluster analysis. Data from this study suggests that a unique constitution of microbial communities may play a key role in BES enhancement of petroleum hydrocarbons

  6. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  7. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In today’s world, three great classes of non-infectious diseases – the metabolic syndromes (such as type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis), the cancers, and the neurodegenerative disorders – have risen to the fore. These diseases, all associated with increasing age of an individual, have proven to be remarkably complex and difficult to treat. This is because, in large measure, when the cellular signaling pathways responsible for maintaining homeostasis and health of the body become dysregulated, they generate equally stable disease states. As a result the body may respond positively to a drug, but only for a while and then revert back to the disease state. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease summarizes our current understanding of these regulatory networks in the healthy and diseased states, showing which molecular components might be prime targets for drug interventions. This is accomplished by presenting models that explain in mechanistic, molecular detail how a particular part of the cellular sign...

  8. [The effect of antitumor polychemotherapy on the structural, metabolic, and functional status of erythrocytes in patients with head and neck tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepovaia, E A; Novitskiĭ, V V; Gol'dberg, V E; Riazantseva, N V; Tkachenko, S B; Kolosova, M V

    2004-01-01

    The structure, metabolic status, and functional properties of erythrocytes in patients with stage III-IV head and neck tumors in the course of antineoplastic cytostatic chemotherapy (platidiam, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate) were studied. In the course of this treatment, disorders of the morphology and functional state of erythrocytes (reduced dry mass, decreased content of sulfohydryl grups and lipoproteins, increased number of transformed cells and the cells with violated ultrastructure, enhanced reversible aggregation of erythrocytes) were retained or became more pronounced.

  9. Metabolic acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acidosis - metabolic ... Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not ... the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ...

  10. Lipids, lipid droplets and lipoproteins in their cellular context; an ultrastructural approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesman, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipids are essential for cellular life, functioning either organized as bilayer membranes to compartmentalize cellular processes, as signaling molecules or as metabolic energy storage. Our current knowledge on lipid organization and cellular lipid homeostasis is mainly based on biochemical data. How

  11. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  12. Utilization of carbon 13-labelled stable isotopes for studying drug toxicity on cellular metabolism; Utilisation d`isotopes stables marques au carbone 13 pour etudier la toxicite de drogues au niveau du metabolisme cellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, M.; Wietzerbin, J.; Tran-Dinh, S. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Biologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire

    1994-12-31

    A new approach for studying the effects of two drugs, amphotericine B (AMB), an anti-fungal antibiotic, and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DG), on the glucose metabolism in brewer yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), is presented; AMB interacts with the membrane sterols, inducing formation of pores through which ions and small molecules can pass. DG may enter in the cytosol, where it is phosphoryled by hexokinase into deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate (DG6P) which disappears very slowly. DG slows down the glycolysis process and induces the formation of new substances. This paper shows the advantages of utilizing carbon 13-labelled substrates combined to the NMR-13C and NMR-1H techniques. 6 figs., 5 refs.

  13. Mass spectrometry based identification of geometric isomers during metabolic stability study of a new cytotoxic sulfonamide derivatives supported by quantitative structure-retention relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Belka

    Full Text Available A set of 15 new sulphonamide derivatives, presenting antitumor activity have been subjected to a metabolic stability study. The results showed that besides products of biotransformation, some additional peaks occurred in chromatograms. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed the same mass and fragmentation pathway, suggesting that geometric isomerization occurred. Thus, to support this hypothesis, quantitative structure-retention relationships were applied. Human liver microsomes were used as an in vitro model of metabolism. The biotransformation reactions were tracked by liquid chromatography assay and additionally, fragmentation mass spectra were recorded. In silico molecular modeling at a semi-empirical level was conducted as a starting point for molecular descriptor calculations. A quantitative structure-retention relationship model was built applying multiple linear regression based on selected three-dimensional descriptors. The studied compounds revealed high metabolic stability, with a tendency to form hydroxylated biotransformation products. However, significant chemical instability in conditions simulating human body fluids was noticed. According to literature and MS data geometrical isomerization was suggested. The developed in sillico model was able to describe the relationship between the geometry of isomer pairs and their chromatographic retention properties, thus it supported the hypothesis that the observed pairs of peaks are most likely geometric isomers. However, extensive structural investigations are needed to fully identify isomers' geometry. An effort to describe MS fragmentation pathways of novel chemical structures is often not enough to propose structures of potent metabolites and products of other chemical reactions that can be observed in compound solutions at early drug discovery studies. The results indicate that the relatively non-expensive and not time- and labor-consuming in sillico approach could be a good supportive

  14. Structure of LP2179, the first representative of Pfam family PF08866, suggests a new fold with a role in amino-acid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S.Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elsliger, Marc-André; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Tien, Henry J.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (Burnham)

    2011-08-17

    The structure of LP2179, a member of the PF08866 (DUF1831) family, suggests a novel {alpha} + {beta} fold comprising two {beta}-sheets packed against a single helix. A remote structural similarity to two other uncharacterized protein families specific to the Bacillus genus (PF08868 and PF08968), as well as to prokaryotic S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases, is consistent with a role in amino-acid metabolism. Genomic neighborhood analysis of LP2179 supports this functional assignment, which might also then be extended to PF08868 and PF08968.

  15. Network-based analysis of the sphingolipid metabolism in hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Mogens; Linneberg, Allan; Jeppesen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    revealed that epistasis does not necessarily reflects the topology of the metabolic pathways i.e., the flow of metabolites. Rather, the enzymes and proteins are integrated in complex cellular substructures where communication flows between the components of the networks, which may be composite in structure......-step procedure is presented in which physiological heterogeneity is disentangled and genetic effects are analyzed by variance decomposition of genetic interactions and by an information theoretical approach including 162 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 84 genes in the sphingolipid metabolism and related...... networks in blood pressure regulation. As expected, almost no genetic main effects were detected. In contrast, two-gene interactions established the entire sphingolipid metabolic and related genetic network to be highly involved in the regulation of blood pressure. The pattern of interaction clearly...

  16. Molecular structure and metabolic characteristics of the proteins and energy in triticale grains and dried distillers grains with solubles for dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; McKinnon, John J; Thacker, Philip; Yu, Peiqiang

    2012-10-10

    To our knowledge, there is no research on the molecular structure of triticale grain in comparison with other types of cereal grains and metabolic characteristics of the protein and energy in this grain and its coproducts, called dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), for dairy cattle. The objective of this study was to identify differences in molecular structures of proteins among grains and their DDGS using a molecular spectroscopy technique, namely, DRIFT, and to determine the nutrient profile and supply to dairy cattle. The protein molecular structure studies showed a difference (P triticale grain and DDGS. There were differences in the protein and carbohydrate subfractions (P triticale grain and DDGS. Triticale grain and DDGS had similar intestinal digestibility of rumen undegraded CP. However, triticale DDGS had higher (P triticale, indicating that triticale DDGS is a superior protein source for dairy cattle as compared with triticale grain. Bioethanol processing induced changes in the protein molecular structure.

  17. Models of Metabolic Community Structure in Martian Habitable Environments: Constraints from a Terrestrial Analog Acid-Sulfate Fumarole Environment, Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K. L.; McCollom, T. M.; Hynek, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial habitability in extreme environments on Earth is described by microscale geochemical conditions that constrain metabolic niches in concert with long-term habitat stability that is governed by dynamic geologic processes. Using terrestrial analogs to identify habitable martian environments requires correlating microscale geochemical constraints with reconstructions of past martian environments that are based on global-scale observations. While past martian environments can be characterized by primary parameters (e.g. pH, redox, mineralogy, thermal history), microbial habitability on Earth is a complex function of both primary and derived parameters (e.g. metabolic reaction energetics, chemical & thermal gradients, flow dynamics). In recent years we have been investigating acid-sulfate fumaroles at the Mars analog site, Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua, where habitability is constrained by steep thermal gradients, spatially- and temporally-variable vent dynamics, and limited water and nutrient availability. The most common niche identified thus far is found in fumaroles that host mixed photosynthetic and chemosynthetic endolithic microbial communities. One such endolith is dominated by acidic red algae (Cyanidiales), aerobic bacterial heterotrophs (Ktedonobacteria), and archaeal thermoacidophiles (Hyperthermus, Caldisphaera, and Thermofilum). An analysis of the metabolic structure suggests that primary production by the red algae supports the growth of heterotrophic thermoacidophiles. Diversification among the chemoheterotrophs with respect to temperature and oxygen tolerance suggests community adaptation to environmental gradients or variable venting dynamics. Furthermore, individual cells within the endolith are silica-encrusted, providing the possibility for biosignature formation and preservation. Putative hydrothermal environments on early Mars with similar conditions could have supported endolithic communities with comparable metabolic strategies. Even

  18. DNA binding, antioxidant, cytotoxicity (MTT, lactate dehydrogenase, NO), and cellular uptake studies of structurally different nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes: synthesis, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, R; Kalaivani, P; Huang, R; Poornima, P; Vijaya Padma, V; Dallemer, F; Natarajan, K

    2013-02-01

    Three new nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes have been synthesized and characterized by analytical, spectral, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In complex 1, the ligand 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydethiosemicarbazone coordinated as a monobasic tridentate donor, whereas in complexes 2 and 3, the ligands salicylaldehyde-4(N)-ethylthiosemicarbazone and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-4(N)-ethylthiosemicarbazone coordinated as a dibasic tridentate donor. The DNA binding ability of the complexes in calf thymus DNA was explored by absorption and emission titration experiments. The antioxidant property of the new complexes was evaluated to test their free-radical scavenging ability. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed for the new complexes in A549 and HepG2 cell lines. The new compounds overcome cisplatin resistance in the A549 cell line and they were also active in the HepG2 cell line. The cellular uptake study showed the accumulation of the complexes in tumor cells depended on the nature of the ligand attached to the nickel ion.

  19. Tandem mass spectrometry approach for the investigation of the steroidal metabolism: structure-fragmentation relationship (SFR) in anabolic steroids and their metabolites by ESI-MS/MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Ali, Arslan; Khan, Naik Tameem; Yousuf, Maria; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Atta-ur-Rahman

    2013-02-01

    Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was used to investigate the effect of different substitutions introduced during metabolism on fragmentation patterns of four anabolic steroids including methyltestosterone, methandrostenolone, cis-androsterone and adrenosterone, along with their metabolites. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis was performed to correlate the major product ions of 19 steroids with structural features. The analysis is done to portray metabolic alteration, such as incorporation or reduction of double bonds, hydroxylations, and/or oxidation of hydroxyl moieties to keto functional group on steroidal skeleton which leads to drastically changed product ion spectra from the respective classes of steroids, therefore, making them difficult to identify. The comparative ESI-MS/MS study also revealed some characteristic peaks to differentiate different steroidal metabolites and can be useful for the unambiguous identification of anabolic steroids in biological fluid. Moreover, LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of fermented extract of methyltestosterone, obtained by Macrophomina phaseolina was also investigated.

  20. Analysis of energy metabolism of HeLa cancer cells in vitro and in vivo using fluorescence lifetime microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, Maria; Shirmanova, Marina; Dudenkova, Varvara; Druzhkova, Irina; Shumilova, Anastasia; Zagaynova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to study energy metabolism in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in vitro and in vivo using two-photon FLIM. Cellular metabolism was examined by monitoring of the fluorescence lifetimes of free and protein-bound forms of NAD(P)H and FAD and their relative contributions. Two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy as well as standard histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin were used to characterize tissue structure. Cellular metabolism was analyzed in cancer cells co-cultured with human fibroblasts and in tumor xenografts transplanted to nude mice. In the HeLa-huFB co-culture we observed a metabolic shift from OXPHOS toward glycolysis in cancer cells, and from glycolysis to OXPHOS in fibroblasts, starting from Day 2 of co-culturing. In the tumor tissue we detected metabolic heterogeneity with more glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells in the stroma-rich zones. The results of the study are of a great importance for understanding metabolic behavior of tumors and for development of anticancer drugs targeted to metabolic pathways.

  1. Stem-loop binding protein is a multifaceted cellular regulator of HIV-1 replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Lynne D.; Asara, John M.; Cheruiyot, Collins K.; Lu, Huafei; Wu, Zhijin J.; Newstein, Michael C.; Dooner, Mark S.; Friedman, Jennifer; Lally, Michelle A.; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    A rare subset of HIV-1–infected individuals is able to maintain plasma viral load (VL) at low levels without antiretroviral treatment. Identifying the mechanisms underlying this atypical response to infection may lead to therapeutic advances for treating HIV-1. Here, we developed a proteomic analysis to compare peripheral blood cell proteomes in 20 HIV-1–infected individuals who maintained either high or low VL with the aim of identifying host factors that impact HIV-1 replication. We determined that the levels of multiple histone proteins were markedly decreased in cohorts of individuals with high VL. This reduction was correlated with lower levels of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which is known to control histone metabolism. Depletion of cellular SLBP increased promoter engagement with the chromatin structures of the host gene high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1) and viral long terminal repeat (LTR), which led to higher levels of HIV-1 genomic integration and proviral transcription. Further, we determined that TNF-α regulates expression of SLBP and observed that plasma TNF-α levels in HIV-1–infected individuals correlated directly with VL levels and inversely with cellular SLBP levels. Our findings identify SLBP as a potentially important cellular regulator of HIV-1, thereby establishing a link between histone metabolism, inflammation, and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27454292

  2. Lysophosphatidylinositol Signalling and Metabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamsul A. Arifin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism is a chemical process used by cells to transform food-derived nutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates and fats, into chemical and thermal energy. Whenever an alteration of this process occurs, the chemical balance within the cells is impaired and this can affect their growth and response to the environment, leading to the development of a metabolic disease. Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several metabolic risk factors such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidaemia, is increasingly common in modern society. Metabolic syndrome, as well as other diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hypertension, are associated with abnormal lipid metabolism. Cellular lipids are the major component of cell membranes; they represent also a valuable source of energy and therefore play a crucial role for both cellular and physiological energy homeostasis. In this review, we will focus on the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the lysophospholipid mediator lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI and its receptor G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55 in metabolic diseases. LPI is a bioactive lipid generated by phospholipase A (PLA family of lipases which is believed to play an important role in several diseases. Indeed LPI can affect various functions such as cell growth, differentiation and motility in a number of cell-types. Recently published data suggest that LPI plays an important role in different physiological and pathological contexts, including a role in metabolism and glucose homeostasis.

  3. Prenylation and Backbone Structure of Flavonoids and Isoflavonoids from Licorice and Hop Influence Their Phase i and II Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Schans, Van Milou G.M.; Bovee, Toine F.H.; Stoopen, Geert M.; Lorist, Marlies; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean Paul

    2015-01-01

    In vitro liver metabolism of 11 prenylated flavonoids and isoflavonoids was investigated by determining their phase I glucuronyl and sulfate metabolites using pork liver preparations. One hundred metabolites were annotated using RP-UHPLC-ESI-MSn. A mass spectrometry-based data interpre

  4. Endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria associated with the roots of the halophyte Salicornia europaea L. - community structure and metabolic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Sonia; Płociniczak, Tomasz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia; Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-11-01

    The main objective of our study was to assess density and diversity of rhizosphere (R) and endophytic (E) microorganisms associated with the halophyte S. europaea. Microorganisms were isolated from two saline sites (S1: 55dSm(-1), anthropogenic origin; S2: 112dSm(-1), natural salinity) located in central Poland and compared with microbial populations in the soil (S) using culture-independent (phospholipid fatty acids analysis, PLFA) and culture-dependent techniques. The endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria were identified and screened for nifH and acdS genes, and their metabolic properties were assessed. Strains with the potential to promote plant growth were selected for further study. PLFA analysis revealed that Gram-negative bacteria were dominant at both saline test sites; the total microbial biomass depended on the site (S1E>S). In contrast, culture-dependent techniques revealed that Gram-positive bacteria (Actinobacteria and Firmicutes) were dominant (S1: E-77.3%, R-86.3% and S2: E-59.1%, R-87.5%). Proteobacteria were observed in the rhizosphere at the lowest frequency (S1: 13.7% and S2: 12.5%). Greater salinity decreased the range and specificity of metabolic activity among the endophytes. These conditions also resulted in a broader spectrum of metabolic abilities in rhizobacteria; however, these metabolic processes were present at lower levels.

  5. Parameters of glucose metabolism and the aging brain: a magnetization transfer imaging study of brain macro- and micro-structure in older adults without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintola, Abimbola A; van den Berg, Annette; Altmann-Schneider, Irmhild; Jansen, Steffy W; van Buchem, Mark A; Slagboom, P Eline; Westendorp, Rudi G; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2015-08-01

    Given the concurrent, escalating epidemic of diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases, two age-related disorders, we aimed to understand the relation between parameters of glucose metabolism and indices of pathology in the aging brain. From the Leiden Longevity Study, 132 participants (mean age 66 years) underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test to assess glucose tolerance (fasted and area under the curve (AUC) glucose), insulin sensitivity (fasted and AUC insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS)) and insulin secretion (insulinogenic index). 3-T brain MRI was used to detect macro-structural damage (atrophy, white matter hyper-intensities, infarcts and/or micro-bleeds) and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) to detect loss of micro-structural homogeneity that remains otherwise invisible on conventional MRI. Macro-structurally, higher fasted glucose was significantly associated with white matter atrophy (P = 0.028). Micro-structurally, decreased magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) peak height in gray matter was associated with higher fasted insulin (P = 0.010), AUCinsulin (P = 0.001), insulinogenic index (P = 0.008) and lower HOMA-IS index (P brain parenchymal homogeneity. These findings offer some insight into the association between different parameters of glucose metabolism (impairment of which is characteristic of diabetes mellitus) and brain aging.

  6. Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 Stimulates Postresection Intestinal Adaptation in Preterm Pigs by Affecting Proteins Related to Protein, Carbohydrate, and Sulphur Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Pingping; Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    cellular structural protei