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Sample records for cellular level euclidean

  1. Energy levels of QED in a Euclidean formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-like energy levels of scalar and spinor QED are calculated using a Euclidean functional approach. The matter field is integrated over. Stationary points of the resulting effective action already yield a hydrogen like level structure for the energy. There is an interesting difference between the scalar and the spinor case. Whereas for spinors the conventional results are reproduced, the calculation for scalars yields a fine structure which is opposite in sign to the conventional one and has no critical singularity at Zα = 1/2. The crucial structural difference between the two cases is that, for scalars, minima for the gauge invariant energy are not extrema of the action, even for time independent fields. (orig.)

  2. Geostatistical analysis of groundwater level using Euclidean and non-Euclidean distance metrics and variable variogram fitting criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridou, Panagiota G.; Karatzas, George P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.; Corzo Perez, Gerald A.

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater level is an important information in hydrological modelling. Geostatistical methods are often employed to map the free surface of an aquifer. In geostatistical analysis using Kriging techniques the selection of the optimal variogram model is very important for the optimal method performance. This work compares three different criteria, the least squares sum method, the Akaike Information Criterion and the Cressie's Indicator, to assess the theoretical variogram that fits to the experimental one and investigates the impact on the prediction results. Moreover, five different distance functions (Euclidean, Minkowski, Manhattan, Canberra, and Bray-Curtis) are applied to calculate the distance between observations that affects both the variogram calculation and the Kriging estimator. Cross validation analysis in terms of Ordinary Kriging is applied by using sequentially a different distance metric and the above three variogram fitting criteria. The spatial dependence of the observations in the tested dataset is studied by fitting classical variogram models and the Matérn model. The proposed comparison analysis performed for a data set of two hundred fifty hydraulic head measurements distributed over an alluvial aquifer that covers an area of 210 km2. The study area is located in the Prefecture of Drama, which belongs to the Water District of East Macedonia (Greece). This area was selected in terms of hydro-geological data availability and geological homogeneity. The analysis showed that a combination of the Akaike information Criterion for the variogram fitting assessment and the Brays-Curtis distance metric provided the most accurate cross-validation results. The Power-law variogram model provided the best fit to the experimental data. The aforementioned approach for the specific dataset in terms of the Ordinary Kriging method improves the prediction efficiency in comparison to the classical Euclidean distance metric. Therefore, maps of the spatial

  3. Quantum information processing at the cellular level. Euclidean approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ogryzko, Vasily

    2009-01-01

    Application of quantum principles to living cells requires a new approximation of the full quantum mechanical description of intracellular dynamics. We discuss what principal elements any such good approximation should contain. As one such element, the notion of "Catalytic force" Cf is introduced. Cf is the effect of the molecular target of catalysis on the catalytic microenvironment that adjusts the microenvironment towards a state that facilitates the catalytic act. This phenomenon is exper...

  4. SISTEM IDENTIFIKASI CITRA KAYU BERDASARKAN TEKSTUR MENGGUNAKAN GRAY LEVEL COOCURRENCE MATRIX (GLCM DENGAN KLASIFIKASI JARAK EUCLIDEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifudin Saifudin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Kayu jati (Tectona Grandis L.F. dan mahoni (Swietenia Mahagoni merupakan 2 jenis kayu yang biasa digunakan untuk bahan perabot rumah tangga. Perabot yang berbahan kayu jati dikenal sebagai produk kwalitas kelas 1 sedangkan perabot dengan bahan kayu mahoni dianggap sebagai produk kwalitas kelas ke 2. Namun secara manual sulit untuk membedakan antara kedua jenis kayu ini. Oleh karenanya penting dibangunnya suatu sistem otomatis yang mampu mengenali perbedaan dari kedua jenis kayu ini. Pada dasarnya citra kayu dapat dianalisis cirinya untuk mendapatkan pola-pola yang menunjukkan jenis kayu. Ekstraksi ciri dari citra kayu dapat dianalisi berdasarkan tekstur atau warnanya.Tulisan ini menjelaskan sistem identifikasi jenis kayu yang telah dikembangkan untuk membedakan antara jenis kayu jati atau mahoni. Sistem ini meliputi proses akusisi data citra, pemrosesan citra, ekstraksi ciri, dan klasifikasi. Ekstraksi ciri menggunakan tekstur Gray Level Co-ocurrence Matrix (GLCM sedangkan pengklasikasi menggunakan metode jarak Euclidean. Hasil eksperimen-eksperimen dengan pengubahan ukuran citra asli menjadi 30x30, 20x20 dan 10x10 berturut-turut menghasilkan akurasi 82,5 %, 65,7 % dan 77,5%. Hasil ini menunjukkan bahwa akurasi tertinggi yang diperoleh layak untuk diimplementasikan ke dalam industri

  5. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M;

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  6. Cellular-based sea level gauge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Joseph, A.

    treaties with greater transparency. Among the various communication technologies used for real-time transmission of sea-level data are the wired telephone connection, VHF/UHF transceivers, satellite transmit terminals and cellular connectivity. Wired... telephone connections are severely susceptible to loss of connectivity during natural disasters such as storm surges, primarily because of telephone line breakage. Communication via VHF/UHF transceivers is limited by line-of-sight distance between...

  7. Euclidean Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    A coincise review about Euclidean (Quantum) Field Theory is presented. It deals with the general structural properties, the connections with Quantum Field Theory, the exploitation in Constructive Quantum Field Theory, and the physical interpretation.

  8. The non-Euclidean revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Trudeau, Richard J

    1986-01-01

    How unique and definitive is Euclidean geometry in describing the "real" space in which we live? Richard Trudeau confronts the fundamental question of truth and its representation through mathematical models in The Non-Euclidean Revolution. First, the author analyzes geometry in its historical and philosophical setting; second, he examines a revolution every bit as significant as the Copernican revolution in astronomy and the Darwinian revolution in biology; third, on the most speculative level, he questions the possibility of absolute knowledge of the world. Trudeau writes in a lively, entertaining, and highly accessible style. His book provides one of the most stimulating and personal presentations of a struggle with the nature of truth in mathematics and the physical world. A portion of the book won the Pólya Prize, a distinguished award from the Mathematical Association of America. "Trudeau meets the challenge of reaching a broad audience in clever ways...(The book) is a good addition to our literature o...

  9. Non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bonola, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    This is an excellent historical and mathematical view by a renowned Italian geometer of the geometries that have risen from a rejection of Euclid's parallel postulate. Students, teachers and mathematicians will find here a ready reference source and guide to a field that has now become overwhelmingly important.Non-Euclidean Geometry first examines the various attempts to prove Euclid's parallel postulate-by the Greeks, Arabs, and mathematicians of the Renaissance. Then, ranging through the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, it considers the forerunners and founders of non-Euclidean geometry, such

  10. Observables of Euclidean Supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancea, Ion V.

    1997-10-01

    The set of constraints under which the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator can play the role of the dynamical variables for Euclidean supergravity is derived. These constraints arise when the gauge invariance of the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator is imposed. They impose conditions which restrict the eigenspinors of the Dirac operator.

  11. Introductory non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Henry Parker

    2013-01-01

    This fine and versatile introduction begins with the theorems common to Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, and then it addresses the specific differences that constitute elliptic and hyperbolic geometry. 1901 edition.

  12. Euclidean distance geometry and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liberti, Leo; Lavor, Carlile; Maculan, Nelson; Mucherino, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Euclidean distance geometry is the study of Euclidean geometry based on the concept of distance. This is useful in several applications where the input data consists of an incomplete set of distances, and the output is a set of points in Euclidean space that realizes the given distances. We survey some of the theory of Euclidean distance geometry and some of the most important applications: molecular conformation, localization of sensor networks and statics.

  13. Graviperception and graviresponse at the cellular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräucker, Richard; Cogoli, Augusto; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    Studies under varied acceleration conditions demonstrated that free living cells such as protists are able to perceive changes of the acceleration conditions. Recent studies favorite the hypothesis that in these systems gravity is perceived either by intracellular receptors (statocyst-like organelles), heavy cell organelles (such as nucleus) and/or by sensing the cell mass by means of ion channels located in the cell membrane. Mammalian cells in microgravity were profoundly influenced. Alteration in the cellular mechanisms and structures in mammalian cells like signal transduction and the cytoskeleton were detected. It can be speculated that the depression of the immune system may become a serious health issue on flights to and from Mars.

  14. Weighted Euclidean biplots

    OpenAIRE

    Greenacre, Michael J.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.

    2013-01-01

    We construct a weighted Euclidean distance that approximates any distance or dissimilarity measure between individuals that is based on a rectangular cases-by-variables data matrix. In contrast to regular multidimensional scaling methods for dissimilarity data, the method leads to biplots of individuals and variables while preserving all the good properties of dimension-reduction methods that are based on the singular-value decomposition. The main benefits are the decomposition of variance in...

  15. Analysis in Euclidean space

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Developed for an introductory course in mathematical analysis at MIT, this text focuses on concepts, principles, and methods. Its introductions to real and complex analysis are closely formulated, and they constitute a natural introduction to complex function theory.Starting with an overview of the real number system, the text presents results for subsets and functions related to Euclidean space of n dimensions. It offers a rigorous review of the fundamentals of calculus, emphasizing power series expansions and introducing the theory of complex-analytic functions. Subsequent chapters cover seq

  16. Modeling cellular deformations using the level set formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Liu; Effler Janet C; Kutscher Brett L; Sullivan Sarah E; Robinson Douglas N; Iglesias Pablo A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Many cellular processes involve substantial shape changes. Traditional simulations of these cell shape changes require that grids and boundaries be moved as the cell's shape evolves. Here we demonstrate that accurate cell shape changes can be recreated using level set methods (LSM), in which the cellular shape is defined implicitly, thereby eschewing the need for updating boundaries. Results We obtain a viscoelastic model of Dictyostelium cells using micropipette aspiratio...

  17. Modeling cellular deformations using the level set formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many cellular processes involve substantial shape changes. Traditional simulations of these cell shape changes require that grids and boundaries be moved as the cell's shape evolves. Here we demonstrate that accurate cell shape changes can be recreated using level set methods (LSM, in which the cellular shape is defined implicitly, thereby eschewing the need for updating boundaries. Results We obtain a viscoelastic model of Dictyostelium cells using micropipette aspiration and show how this viscoelastic model can be incorporated into LSM simulations to recreate the observed protrusion of cells into the micropipette faithfully. We also demonstrate the use of our techniques by simulating the cell shape changes elicited by the chemotactic response to an external chemoattractant gradient. Conclusion Our results provide a simple but effective means of incorporating cellular deformations into mathematical simulations of cell signaling. Such methods will be useful for simulating important cellular events such as chemotaxis and cytokinesis.

  18. Totally indefinite Euclidean quaternion fields

    OpenAIRE

    Cerri, Jean-Paul; Chaubert, Jérôme; Lezowski, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We study the Euclidean property for totally indefinite quaternion fields. In particular, we establish the complete list of norm-Euclidean such fields over imaginary quadratic number fields. This enables us to exhibit an example which gives a negative answer to a question asked by Eichler. The proofs are both theoretical and algorithmic.

  19. On Nearly Euclidean Thurston Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Saenz Maldonado, Edgar Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Nearly Euclidean Thurston maps are simple generalizations of rational Lattes maps. A Thurston map is called nearly Euclidean if its local degree at each critical point is 2 and it has exactly four postcritical points. We investigate when such a map has the property that the associated pullback map on Teichmuller space is constant. We also show that no Thurston map of degree 2 has constant pullback map.

  20. Body composition analysis: Cellular level modeling of body component ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Wang; Heymsfield, S. B.; PI-SUNYER, F.X.; Gallagher, D.; PIERSON, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    During the past two decades, a major outgrowth of efforts by our research group at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital is the development of body composition models that include cellular level models, models based on body component ratios, total body potassium models, multi-component models, and resting energy expenditure-body composition models. This review summarizes these models with emphasis on component ratios that we believe are fundamental to understanding human body composition during growt...

  1. Concepts of dose to soft tissue at the cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation effects begin at the cellular level of biological organization. Radiation dosimetry at the cellular level is particularly important for internally deposited alpha and beta particle emitters. Microdosimetry is a mechanism for studying the dose imparted to microscopic sites, for determining hit probabilities, and for determining the probability that sites are missed. Internal microdosimetry calculations are complex, but can be easily executed using computer programs. The investigator must specify the target and its size, determine the radionuclide activity per unit mass for each region in which targets are located, describe the activity per radioactive particulate, understand the geometrical relationship between the activity and the targets, and account for the biological retention of the activity in the region as a function of time. Internal microdosimetry has many potential applications in radiological protection. Microdosimetry is a special research area designed to provide a better understanding of the importance of microscopic patterns of radiation interaction with cells within the broader framework of biochemistry and radiation biology. Its objective is to provide a methodology that is both consistent and precise for correlating biological response to varying levels and distributions of internal emitters. Microdosimetry may contribute to a more complete understanding of the mechanisms of cancer induction by radiation. The correlation between specific energy density and various biological effects might best be treated statistically, since the effects occur in response of stochastic processes. If applied correctly, these concepts should provide a reliable tool for learning more about the effects of radiation and for setting radiation protection standards

  2. Observables of the Euclidean Supergravity

    OpenAIRE

    Vancea, Ion V.

    1997-01-01

    The set of constraints under which the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator can play the role of the dynamical variables for Euclidean supergravity is derived. These constraints arise when the gauge invariance of the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator is imposed. They impose conditions which restrict the eigenspinors of the Dirac operator.

  3. Electrochemical Biochip for Drug Screening At Cellular Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yu [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Cui Huiang [Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Ye Jianshan [Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Chong Serchoong [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Lim Titmeng [Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Sheu Fwushan [Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Hui Wingcheong [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore)

    2006-04-01

    Drug screening at cellular level has becomes an attractive field of research. Different researchers have tried to record cellular response to drugs by electrical or optical approach using both invasive and non-invasive methods. Silicon-based microelectrode integrated microchips are useful tools for in situ temporal recording of neurotransmitter releasing from neural cells. A microfabricated electrochemical biochip is presented in this paper. Using dopaminergic cells grown on the chip, the dopamine excytosis can be electrochemical amperomatric detected non-invasively from drug incubated dopaminegic cells by the microelectrode integrated on chip. This silicon-based electrochemical chip has been designed with an electrode array located on the cell culture chamber bottom. Each electrode is individually electrical controlled. MN9D and PC12 dopaminergic cell lines have been demonstrated on this chip for drug effects study. This silicon-based electrochemical microchip provides a non-invasive, in situ, temporal detection of dopamine exocytosis from dopaminegic cells, and holds the potential for applications in studying the mechanisms of dopamine exocytosis and drug screening. It is also extendable for other cell culture and drug effects study.

  4. Cellular chromophores and signaling in low level light therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.

    2007-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light (LLLT) for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Originally thought to be a peculiar property of laser light (soft or cold lasers), the subject has now broadened to include photobiomodulation and photobiostimulation using non-coherent light. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. This likely is due to two main reasons; firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. In recent years major advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms that operate at the cellular and tissue levels during LLLT. Mitochondria are thought to be the main site for the initial effects of light and specifically cytochrome c oxidase that has absorption peaks in the red and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum matches the action spectra of LLLT effects. The discovery that cells employ nitric oxide (NO) synthesized in the mitochondria by neuronal nitric oxide synthase, to regulate respiration by competitive binding to the oxygen binding of cytochrome c oxidase, now suggests how LLLT can affect cell metabolism. If LLLT photodissociates inhibitory NO from cytochrome c oxidase, this would explain increased ATP production, modulation of reactive oxygen species, reduction and prevention of apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, increase of blood flow and induction of transcription factors. In

  5. An axiomatization of the Euclidean compromise solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorneveld, M.; Nouweland, A. van den

    2001-01-01

    The Euclidean compromise solution in multicriteria optimization is a solution concept that assigns to a feasible set the alternative with minimal Euclidean distance to the utopia point The purpose of this paper is to provide a characterization of the Euclidean compromise solution

  6. Introduction to non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Harold E

    2012-01-01

    One of the first college-level texts for elementary courses in non-Euclidean geometry, this concise, readable volume is geared toward students familiar with calculus. A full treatment of the historical background explores the centuries-long efforts to prove Euclid's parallel postulate and their triumphant conclusion. Numerous original exercises form an integral part of the book.Topics include hyperbolic plane geometry and hyperbolic plane trigonometry, applications of calculus to the solutions of some problems in hyperbolic geometry, elliptic plane geometry and trigonometry, and the consistenc

  7. Euclidean geometry and its subgeometries

    CERN Document Server

    Specht, Edward John; Calkins, Keith G; Rhoads, Donald H

    2015-01-01

    In this monograph, the authors present a modern development of Euclidean geometry from independent axioms, using up-to-date language and providing detailed proofs. The axioms for incidence, betweenness, and plane separation are close to those of Hilbert. This is the only axiomatic treatment of Euclidean geometry that uses axioms not involving metric notions and that explores congruence and isometries by means of reflection mappings. The authors present thirteen axioms in sequence, proving as many theorems as possible at each stage and, in the process, building up subgeometries, most notably the Pasch and neutral geometries. Standard topics such as the congruence theorems for triangles, embedding the real numbers in a line, and coordinatization of the plane are included, as well as theorems of Pythagoras, Desargues, Pappas, Menelaus, and Ceva. The final chapter covers consistency and independence of axioms, as well as independence of definition properties. There are over 300 exercises; solutions to many of the...

  8. Effects of high let radiation at the cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete evaluation of the impact of nuclear energy technologies on human health requires: identification and characterization of hazardous agents and their effects, which is well advanced; quantitative dose-effect relations for important effects under various conditions of radiation exposure and biological variation, which needs more work but which has been advancing fairly well, particularly in experimental animal research; an understanding of the cellular and tissue mechanisms of the hazardous effects in relation to the microdosimetry of the agents, which has advanced slowly and to a relatively limited degree; and integration of the dose-effect relations and mechanistic knowledge into theories and models which are intended to be predictive for estimation of human health risks at pertinent low levels of exposure. Several theories, hypotheses or models of radiation carcinogenesis, and some for alpha radiation in particular, have been developed on the basis of dose-effect relations in the necessary attempt to predict the hazards of low levels of radiation exposure for purposes of radiation protection in advance of adequate data on dose-effect relations and mchanisms. As such these theories or models have necessarily involved strings of explicit and implicit assumptions concerning mechanisms and the nature of dose-effect relations below the dose regions at which effects have been observed. Nevertheless, they have been useful in stimulating research to test their assumptions and in assuming the interpretation of data

  9. A positive feedback at the cellular level promotes robustness and modulation at the circuit level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethier, Julie; Drion, Guillaume; Franci, Alessio; Sepulchre, Rodolphe

    2015-10-01

    This article highlights the role of a positive feedback gating mechanism at the cellular level in the robustness and modulation properties of rhythmic activities at the circuit level. The results are presented in the context of half-center oscillators, which are simple rhythmic circuits composed of two reciprocally connected inhibitory neuronal populations. Specifically, we focus on rhythms that rely on a particular excitability property, the postinhibitory rebound, an intrinsic cellular property that elicits transient membrane depolarization when released from hyperpolarization. Two distinct ionic currents can evoke this transient depolarization: a hyperpolarization-activated cation current and a low-threshold T-type calcium current. The presence of a slow activation is specific to the T-type calcium current and provides a slow positive feedback at the cellular level that is absent in the cation current. We show that this slow positive feedback is required to endow the network rhythm with physiological modulation and robustness properties. This study thereby identifies an essential cellular property to be retained at the network level in modeling network robustness and modulation. PMID:26311181

  10. Hardware Euclidean Distance Transform Implementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ying-hua; ZENG Pei-feng; TANG Li-ping

    2004-01-01

    Based on an efficient algorithm of Euclidean distance transform for binary images, a circuit of O(N2) size is proposed. With in-place calculation, both the intermediate data storing and the result output use the same memory with the input data. This reduces the amount of memory largely. By replacing multipliers with counters, comparators, and adders, the circuit size is further reduced and its calculation speed is improved also.

  11. Hausdorff operators on Euclidean spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jie-cheng; FAN Da-shan; WANG Si-lei

    2013-01-01

    Hausdorff operator is an important operator raised from the dilation on Euclidean space and rooted in the classical summability of number series and Fourier series. It is also connected to many well known operators in real and complex analysis. This article is a survey of some recent developments and extensions on the Hausdorff operator. Particularly, various boundedness properties of the Hausdorff operators, studied recently by our research group, are addressed.

  12. Higher codimensional Euclidean helix submanifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Di Scala, Antonio J.; Ruiz-Hernández, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    A submanifold of Rn whose tangent space makes constant angle with a fixed direction d is called a helix. Helix submanifolds are related with the eikonal PDE equation. We give a method to find every solution to the eikonal PDE on a Riemannian manifold locally. As a consequence we give a local construction of arbitrary Euclidean helix submanifolds of any dimension and codimension. Also we characterize the ruled helix submanifolds and in particular we describe those which are minimal.

  13. Piracy on the molecular level: human herpesviruses manipulate cellular chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Tanner, Anne; Stutz, Eric W; Poole, Brian D; Berges, Bradford K

    2016-03-01

    Cellular chemotaxis is important to tissue homeostasis and proper development. Human herpesvirus species influence cellular chemotaxis by regulating cellular chemokines and chemokine receptors. Herpesviruses also express various viral chemokines and chemokine receptors during infection. These changes to chemokine concentrations and receptor availability assist in the pathogenesis of herpesviruses and contribute to a variety of diseases and malignancies. By interfering with the positioning of host cells during herpesvirus infection, viral spread is assisted, latency can be established and the immune system is prevented from eradicating viral infection. PMID:26669819

  14. Cellular energy allocation in zebra mussels exposed along a pollution gradient: linking cellular effects to higher levels of biological organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organisms exposed to suboptimal environments incur a cost of dealing with stress in terms of metabolic resources. The total amount of energy available for maintenance, growth and reproduction, based on the biochemical analysis of the energy budget, may provide a sensitive measure of stress in an organism. While the concept is clear, linking cellular or biochemical responses to the individual and population or community level remains difficult. The aim of this study was to validate, under field conditions, using cellular energy budgets [i.e. changes in glycogen-, lipid- and protein-content and mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS)] as an ecologically relevant measurement of stress by comparing these responses to physiological and organismal endpoints. Therefore, a 28-day in situ bioassay with zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) was performed in an effluent-dominated stream. Five locations were selected along the pollution gradient and compared with a nearby (reference) site. Cellular Energy Allocation (CEA) served as a biomarker of cellular energetics, while Scope for Growth (SFG) indicated effects on a physiological level and Tissue Condition Index and wet tissue weight/dry tissue weight ratio were used as endpoints of organismal effects. Results indicated that energy budgets at a cellular level of biological organization provided the fastest and most sensitive response and energy budgets are a relevant currency to extrapolate cellular effects to higher levels of biological organization within the exposed mussels. - Exposure of zebra mussels along a pollution gradient has adverse effects on the cellular energy allocation, and results can be linked with higher levels of biological organization

  15. Conformal Janus on Euclidean Sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Bak, Dongsu; Rey, Soo-Jong

    2016-01-01

    We interpret Janus as an interface in a conformal field theory and study its properties. The Janus is created by an exactly marginal operator and we study its effect on the interface conformal field theory on the Janus. We do this by utilizing the AdS/CFT correspondence. We compute the interface free energy both from leading correction to the Euclidean action in the dual gravity description and from conformal perturbation theory in the conformal field theory. We find that the two results agree each other and that the interface free energy scales precisely as expected from the conformal invariance of the Janus interface.

  16. Euclidean Prize-collecting Steiner Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Bateni, MohammadHossein; Hajiaghayi, Mohammadtaghi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider Steiner forest and its generalizations, prize-collecting Steiner forest and k-Steiner forest, when the vertices of the input graph are points in the Euclidean plane and the lengths are Euclidean distances. First, we present a simpler analysis of the polynomial-time approximation scheme (PTAS) of Borradaile et al. [12] for the Euclidean Steiner forest problem. This is done by proving a new structural property and modifying the dynamic programming by adding a new piec...

  17. Notes on euclidean de Sitter space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss issues relating to the topology of euclidean de Sitter space. We show that in (2+1) dimensions, the euclidean continuation of the 'causal diamond', i.e. the region of spacetime accessible to a timelike observer is a three-hemisphere. However, when de Sitter entropy is computed in a 'stretched horizon' picture, then we argue that the correct euclidean topology is a solid torus. The solid torus shrinks and degenerates into a three-hemisphere as one goes from the 'stretched horizon' to the horizon, giving the euclidean continuation of the causal diamond. We finally comment on generalisation of these results to higher dimensions. (author)

  18. Cellular level loading and heating of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalambur, Venkat S; Longmire, Ellen K; Bischof, John C

    2007-11-20

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) hold promise for a variety of biomedical applications due to their properties of visualization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), heating with radio frequency (rf), and movement in an external magnetic field. In this study, the cellular loading (uptake) mechanism of dextran- and surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs by malignant prostate tumor cells (LNCaP-Pro5) has been studied, and the feasibility of traditional rf treatment and a new laser heating method was evaluated. The kinetics of cell loading was quantified using magnetophoresis and a colorimetric assay. The results showed that loading of surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs with LNCaP-Pro5 was saturable with time (at 24 h) and extracellular concentration (11 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL), indicating that the particles are taken up by an "adsorptive endocytosis" pathway. Dextran-coated NPs, however, were taken up less efficiently (1 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL). Loading did not saturate with concentration suggesting uptake by fluid-phase endocytosis. Magnetophoresis suggests that NP-loaded cells can be held using external magnetic fields in microcirculatory flow velocities in vivo or in an appropriately designed extracorporeal circuit. Loaded cells were heated using traditional rf (260A, 357 kHz) and a new laser method (532 nm, 7 ns pulse duration, 0.03 J/pulse, 20 pulse/s). Iron oxide in water was found to absorb sufficiently strongly at 532 nm such that heating of individual NPs and thus loaded cells (1 pg Fe/cell) was effective (10 pg Fe/cell) and longer duration (30 min) when compared to laser to accomplish cell destruction (50% viability at 10 pg Fe/cell). Scaling calculations show that the pulsed laser method can lead to single-cell (loaded with NPs) treatments (200 degrees C temperature change at the surface of an individual NP) unlike traditional rf heating methods which can be used only for bulk tissue level treatments. In a mixture of normal and NP

  19. Real-time reporting and internet-accessible cellular based coastal sea level gauge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Joseph, A; Agarvadekar, Y.; Mehra, P.; Dabholkar, N.; Parab, A; Gouveia, A; Tengali, S.

    A real-time sea-level reporting system utilizing exiting cellular communication infrastructure is described. Several issues involved in the implementation of internetaccessible sea-level gauge have been addressed. It is anticipated that the growth...

  20. Human more complex than mouse at cellular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E Vinogradov

    Full Text Available The family of transcription factors with the C2H2 zinc finger domain is expanding in the evolution of vertebrates, reaching its highest numbers in the mammals. The question arises: whether an increased amount of these transcription factors is related to embryogenesis, nervous system, pathology or more of them are expressed in individual cells? Among mammals, the primates have a more complex anatomical structure than the rodents (e.g., brain. In this work, I show that a greater number of C2H2-ZF genes are expressed in the human cells than in the mouse cells. The effect is especially pronounced for C2H2-ZF genes accompanied with the KRAB domain. The relative difference between the numbers of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes in the human and mouse cellular transcriptomes even exceeds their difference in the genomes (i.e. a greater subset of existing in the genome genes is expressed in the human cellular transcriptomes compared to the mouse transcriptomes. The evolutionary turnover of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes acts in the direction of the revealed phenomenon, i.e. gene duplication and loss enhances the difference in the relative number of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes between human and mouse cellular transcriptomes. A higher amount of these genes is expressed in the brain and embryonic cells (compared with other tissues, whereas a lower amount--in the cancer cells. It is specifically the C2H2-ZF transcription factors whose repertoire is poorer in the cancer and richer in the brain (other transcription factors taken together do not show this trend. These facts suggest that increase of anatomical complexity is accompanied by a more complex intracellular regulation involving these transcription factors. Malignization is associated with simplification of this regulation. These results agree with the known fact that human cells are more resistant to oncogenic transformation than mouse cells. The list of C2H2-ZF genes whose suppression might be involved in malignization is provided.

  1. β-Amyloid pathogenesis: Chemical properties versus cellular levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    Although genetic Aβ variants cause early-onset Alzheimer's disease, literature reports on Aβ properties are heterogeneous, obscuring molecular mechanisms, as illustrated by recent failures of Aβ-level targeting trials. Thus, we combined available data on Aβ levels and ratios, aggregation propensi...

  2. Atherogenesis and iron: from epidemiology to cellular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ViktóriaJeney

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron accumulates in human atherosclerotic lesions but whether it is a cause or simply a downstream consequence of the atheroma formation has been an open question for decades. According to the so called “iron hypothesis”, iron is believed to be detrimental for the cardiovascular system, thus promoting atherosclerosis development and progression. Iron, in its catalytically active form, can participate in the generation of reactive oxygen species and induce lipid-peroxidation, triggering endothelial activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and macrophage activation; all of these processes are considered to be proatherogenic. On the other hand, the observation that hemochromatotic patients, affected by life-long iron overload, do not show any increased incidence of atherosclerosis is perceived as the most convincing evidence against the “iron hypothesis”. Epidemiological studies and data from animal models provided conflicting evidences about the role of iron in atherogenesis. Therefore more careful studies are needed in which issues like the source and the compartmentalization of iron will be addressed. This review article summarizes what we have learnt about iron and atherosclerosis from epidemiological studies, animal models and cellular systems and highlights the rather contributory than innocent role of iron in atherogenesis.

  3. Using a Virtual Tissue Culture System to Assist Students in Understanding Life at the Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauglin, Jacqueline S.; Seaquist, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    In every biology course ever taught in the nation's classrooms, and in every biology book ever published, students are taught about the "cell." The cell is as fundamental to biology as the atom is to chemistry. Truly, everything an organism does occurs fundamentally at the cellular level. Beyond memorizing the cellular definition, students are not…

  4. Euclidean Prize-collecting Steiner Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Bateni, MohammadHossein

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider Steiner forest and its generalizations, prize-collecting Steiner forest and k-Steiner forest, when the vertices of the input graph are points in the Euclidean plane and the lengths are Euclidean distances. First, we present a simpler analysis of the polynomial-time approximation scheme (PTAS) of Borradaile et al. [12] for the Euclidean Steiner forest problem. This is done by proving a new structural property and modifying the dynamic programming by adding a new piece of information to each dynamic programming state. Next we develop a PTAS for a well-motivated case, i.e., the multiplicative case, of prize-collecting and budgeted Steiner forest. The ideas used in the algorithm may have applications in design of a broad class of bicriteria PTASs. At the end, we demonstrate why PTASs for these problems can be hard in the general Euclidean case (and thus for PTASs we cannot go beyond the multiplicative case).

  5. A Negative Mode About Euclidean Wormhole

    OpenAIRE

    Rubakov, V. A.; Shvedov, O. Yu.

    1996-01-01

    Wormholes -- solutions to the euclidean Einstein equations with non-trivial topology -- are usually assumed to make real contributions to amplitudes in quantum gravity. However, we find a negative mode among fluctuations about the Giddings-Strominger wormhole solution. Hence, the wormhole contribution to the euclidean functional integral is argued to be purely imaginary rather than real, which suggests the interpretation of the wormhole as describing the instability of a large universe agains...

  6. A Euclidean algorithm for integer matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Niels; Thomsen, Jesper Funch

    2015-01-01

    We present a Euclidean algorithm for computing a greatest common right divisor of two integer matrices. The algorithm is derived from elementary properties of finitely generated modules over the ring of integers.......We present a Euclidean algorithm for computing a greatest common right divisor of two integer matrices. The algorithm is derived from elementary properties of finitely generated modules over the ring of integers....

  7. Classical geometry Euclidean, transformational, inversive, and projective

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, I E; Liu, A C F; Tokarsky, G W

    2014-01-01

    Features the classical themes of geometry with plentiful applications in mathematics, education, engineering, and science Accessible and reader-friendly, Classical Geometry: Euclidean, Transformational, Inversive, and Projective introduces readers to a valuable discipline that is crucial to understanding bothspatial relationships and logical reasoning. Focusing on the development of geometric intuitionwhile avoiding the axiomatic method, a problem solving approach is encouraged throughout. The book is strategically divided into three sections: Part One focuses on Euclidean geometry, which p

  8. The Euclidean distribution of Fast Radio Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Oppermann, Niels; Connor, Liam; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-01-01

    We investigate whether current data on the distribution of observed flux densities of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are consistent with a constant source density in Euclidean space. We use the number of FRBs detected in two surveys with different characteristics along with the observed signal-to-noise ratios of the detected FRBs in a formalism similar to a V/V_max-test to constrain the distribution of flux densities. We find consistency between the data and a Euclidean distribution. Any extension ...

  9. Non-Euclidean-normed Statistical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadiotis, George

    2016-03-01

    This analysis introduces a possible generalization of Statistical Mechanics within the framework of non-Euclidean metrics induced by the Lp norms. The internal energy is interpreted by the non-Euclidean Lp-normed expectation value of a given energy spectrum. The presented non-Euclidean adaptation of Statistical Mechanics involves finding the stationary probability distribution in the Canonical Ensemble by maximizing the Boltzmann-Gibbs and Tsallis entropy under the constraint of internal energy. The derived non-Euclidean Canonical probability distributions are respectively given by an exponential, and by a q-deformed exponential, of a power-law dependence on energy states. The case of the continuous energy spectrum is thoroughly examined. The Canonical probability distribution is analytically calculated for a power-law density of energy. The relevant non-Euclidean-normed kappa distribution is also derived. This analysis exposes the possible values of the q- or κ-indices, which are strictly limited to certain ranges, depending on the given Lp-norm. The equipartition of energy in each degree of freedom and the extensivity of the internal energy, are also shown. Surprisingly, the physical temperature coincides with the kinetically defined temperature, similar to the Euclidean case. Finally, the connection with thermodynamics arises through the well-known standard classical formalisms.

  10. A Euclidean bridge to the relativistic constituent quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, T J; Miller, Gerald A

    2016-01-01

    ${\\bf Background}$ Knowledge of nucleon structure is today ever more of a precision science, with heightened theoretical and experimental activity expected in coming years. At the same time, a persistent gap lingers between theoretical approaches grounded in Euclidean methods (e.g., lattice QCD, Dyson-Schwinger Equations [DSEs]) as opposed to traditional Minkowski field theories (such as light-front constituent quark models). ${\\bf Purpose}$ Seeking to bridge these complementary worldviews, we explore the potential of a Euclidean constituent quark model (ECQM). This formalism enables us to study the gluonic dressing of the quark-level axial-vector vertex, which we undertake as a test of the framework. ${\\bf Method}$ To access its indispensable elements with a minimum of inessential detail, we develop our ECQM using the simplified quark $+$ scalar diquark picture of the nucleon. We construct a hyperspherical formalism involving polynomial expansions of diquark propagators to marry our ECQM with the results of ...

  11. Information metric and Euclidean Janus correspondence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsu Bak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider the quantum information metric of a family of CFTs perturbed by an exactly marginal operator, which has the dual description of the Euclidean Janus geometries. We first clarify its two dimensional case dual to the three dimensional Janus geometry, which recently appeared in arXiv:1507.07555 [2]. We generalize this correspondence to higher dimensions and get a precise agreement between the both sides. We also show that the mixed-state information metric of the same family of CFTs has a dual description in the Euclidean version of the Janus time-dependent black hole geometry.

  12. Information metric and Euclidean Janus corresponence

    CERN Document Server

    Bak, Dongsu

    2015-01-01

    We consider the quantum information metric of a family of CFTs perturbed by an exactly marginal operator, which has the dual description of the Euclidean Janus geometries. We first review its two dimensional case dual to the three dimensional Janus geometry, which is recently proposed in arXiv:1507.07555. We generalize this correspondence to higher dimensions and get a precise agreement of the both sides. We also propose that the mixed-state information metric of the same family of CFTs is dual to the Euclidean version of the Janus time-dependent black hole geometry.

  13. Information metric and Euclidean Janus correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Dongsu

    2016-05-01

    We consider the quantum information metric of a family of CFTs perturbed by an exactly marginal operator, which has the dual description of the Euclidean Janus geometries. We first clarify its two dimensional case dual to the three dimensional Janus geometry, which recently appeared in arxiv:arXiv:1507.07555[2]. We generalize this correspondence to higher dimensions and get a precise agreement between the both sides. We also show that the mixed-state information metric of the same family of CFTs has a dual description in the Euclidean version of the Janus time-dependent black hole geometry.

  14. The level of cellular diacylglycerol in the rabbit's spinal cord regions after ischemia/recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of cellular diacylglycerol (DG), measured as DG-dependent incorporation of labelled cytidine diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) into phosphatidylcholine (PC) was studied in the spinal cord regions after 25 min ischemia and 60 min of recirculation. Ischemia alone significantly increased the level of cellular DG in the white matter, whereas that found in the dorsal horns and intermediate zone was significantly lower. A decreased incorporation of CDP-choline into PC of the white and gray matter was found during recirculation. (authors)

  15. Majorization in Euclidean Geometry and Beyond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 466, 1 February (2015), s. 233-240. ISSN 0024-3795 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : Majorization * Doubly stochastic matrix * Euclidean simplex * Star * Regular simplex * Volume of a simplex Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2014

  16. F4 Algorithm For Euclidean Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Sadiq, Afshan

    2010-01-01

    This short note is the generalization of Faugere F4-algorithm for polynomial rings with coefficients in Euclidean rings. This algorithm computes successively a Groebner basis replacing the reduction of one single s-polynomial in Buchberger's algorithm by the simultaneous reduction of several polynomials.

  17. ON SPACELIKE AUSTERE SUBMANIFOLDS IN PSEUDO-EUCLIDEAN SPACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Yuxin; Han Yingbo

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we construct some spacelike austere submanifolds in pseduo- Euclidean spaces. We also get some indefinite special Lagrangian submanifolds by con- structing twisted normal bundle of spacelike austere submanifolds in pseduo-Euclidean spaces.

  18. A `Clicked' Tetrameric Hydroxamic Acid Glycopeptidomimetic Antagonizes Sugar-Lectin Interactions On The Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Lin; Zang, Yi; Xie, Juan; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; He, Xiao-Peng; Tian, He

    2014-07-01

    A tetrameric N-acetyl galactosaminyl (GalNAc) peptidomimetic was constructed by N-acetylation of repeating proline-based hydroxamic acid units, followed by a convergent `click chemistry' coupling. This novel glycopeptidomimetic was determined to effectively antagonize the interaction between a transmembrane hepatic lectin and GalNAc on the cellular level.

  19. Quantum Biology at the Cellular Level - elements of the research program

    OpenAIRE

    Bordonaro, Michael; Ogryzko, Vasily

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Biology is emerging as a new field at the intersection between fundamental physics and biology, promising novel insights into the nature and origin of biological order. We discuss several elements of QBCL (Quantum Biology at Cellular Level), a research program designed to extend the reach of quantum concepts to higher than molecular levels of biological organization. Key words. decoherence, macroscopic superpositions, basis-dependence, formal superposition, non-classical correlations,...

  20. ELF (extremely-low-frequency) field interactions at the animal, tissue and cellular levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1990-10-01

    A description is given of the fundamental physical properties of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, and the mechanisms through which these fields interact with the human body at a macroscopic level. Biological responses to ELF fields at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels are summarized, including new evidence that ELF field exposure produces alterations in gene expression and the cytoplasmic concentrations of specific proteins.

  1. Cellular burdens and biological effects on tissue level caused by inhaled radon progenies

    CERN Document Server

    Madas, Balázs G; Farkas, Árpád; Szőke, István

    2014-01-01

    In the case of radon exposure, the spatial distribution of deposited radioactive particles is highly inhomogeneous in the central airways. The objective of this research is to investigate the consequences of this heterogeneity regarding cellular burdens in the bronchial epithelium and to study the possible biological effects on tissue level. Applying a computational fluid dynamics program, the deposition distribution of inhaled radon daughters has been determined in a bronchial airway model for 23 minutes of work in the New Mexico uranium mine corresponding to 0.0129 WLM exposure. A numerical epithelium model based on experimental data has been utilized in order to quantify cellular hits and doses. Finally, a carcinogenesis model considering cell death induced cell cycle shortening has been applied to assess the biological responses. Computations present, that cellular dose may reach 1.5 Gy, which is several orders of magnitude higher than tissue dose. The results are in agreement with the histological findin...

  2. Physiological enzymology: The next frontier in understanding protein structure and function at the cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Irene; Berdis, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the study of proteins has relied heavily on characterizing the activity of a single purified protein isolated from other cellular components. This classic approach allowed scientists to unambiguously define the intrinsic kinetic and chemical properties of that protein. The ultimate hope was to extrapolate this information toward understanding how the enzyme or receptor behaves within its native cellular context. These types of detailed in vitro analyses were necessary to reduce the innate complexities of measuring the singular activity and biochemical properties of a specific enzyme without interference from other enzymes and potential competing substrates. However, recent developments in fields encompassing cell biology, molecular imaging, and chemical biology now provide the unique chemical tools and instrumentation to study protein structure, function, and regulation in their native cellular environment. These advancements provide the foundation for a new field, coined physiological enzymology, which quantifies the function and regulation of enzymes and proteins at the cellular level. In this Special Edition, we explore the area of Physiological Enzymology and Protein Function through a series of review articles that focus on the tools and techniques used to measure the cellular activity of proteins inside living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. PMID:26277093

  3. Euclidean wormholes with minimally coupled scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed study of quantum and semiclassical Euclidean wormholes for Einstein's theory with a minimally coupled scalar field has been performed for a class of potentials. Massless, constant, massive (quadratic in the scalar field) and inverse (linear) potentials admit the Hawking and Page wormhole boundary condition both in the classically forbidden and allowed regions. An inverse quartic potential has been found to exhibit a semiclassical wormhole configuration. Classical wormholes under a suitable back-reaction leading to a finite radius of the throat, where the strong energy condition is satisfied, have been found for the zero, constant, quadratic and exponential potentials. Treating such classical Euclidean wormholes as an initial condition, a late stage of cosmological evolution has been found to remain unaltered from standard Friedmann cosmology, except for the constant potential which under the back-reaction produces a term like a negative cosmological constant. (paper)

  4. The Euclidean distribution of fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppermann, Niels; Connor, Liam D.; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-09-01

    We investigate whether current data on the distribution of observed flux densities of fast radio bursts (FRBs) are consistent with a constant source density in Euclidean space. We use the number of FRBs detected in two surveys with different characteristics along with the observed signal-to-noise ratios of the detected FRBs in a formalism similar to a V/Vmax-test to constrain the distribution of flux densities. We find consistency between the data and a Euclidean distribution. Any extension of this model is therefore not data-driven and needs to be motivated separately. As a byproduct we also obtain new improved limits for the FRB rate at 1.4 GHz, which had not been constrained in this way before.

  5. The Euclidean distribution of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Oppermann, Niels; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-01-01

    We investigate whether current data on the distribution of observed flux densities of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are consistent with a constant source density in Euclidean space. We use the number of FRBs detected in two surveys with different characteristics along with the observed signal-to-noise ratios of the detected FRBs in a formalism similar to a V/V_max-test to constrain the distribution of flux densities. We find consistency between the data and a Euclidean distribution. Any extension of this model is therefore not data-driven and needs to be motivated separately. As a byproduct we also obtain new improved limits for the FRB rate at 1.4 GHz, which had not been constrained in this way before.

  6. Matrices and Graphs in Euclidean Geometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2005), s. 51-58. E-ISSN 1081-3810 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1030302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Euclidean space * Gram matrix * biorthogonal bases * simplex * interior angle * Steiner circumscribed ellipsoid * right simplex Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.math.technion.ac.il/iic/ela/ela-articles/14.html

  7. Euclidean Approach for Entropy of Black Shells

    CERN Document Server

    S., J Robel Arenas

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the concept of black shell, consisting on a massive thin spherical shell contracting toward its gravitational radius from the point of view of an external observer far from the shell, in order to effectively model the gravitational collapse. Considering complementary description of entanglement entropy of a black shell and according to Gibbons-Hawking Euclidean approach, we calculate the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy retrieving horizon integral and discarding boundary at infinity.

  8. Euclidean Supergravity in Terms of Dirac Eigenvalues

    CERN Document Server

    Vancea, I V

    1998-01-01

    It has been recently shown by Landi and Rovelli that the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator can be considered as dynamical variables of Euclidean gravity. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibility that the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator play the same role in the case of supergravity. It is shown that some constraints on the covariant phase space as well as on the eigenspinors must be imposed to this end.

  9. Euclidean Supergravity in Terms of Dirac Eigenvalues

    OpenAIRE

    Vancea, I. V.

    1997-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator can be considered as dynamical variables of Euclidean gravity. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possiblity that the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator might play the same role in the case of supergravity. It is shown that for this purpose some primary constraints on covariant phase space as well as secondary constraints on the eigenspinors must be imposed. The validity of primary constraints under covariant transp...

  10. Simple Euclidean arrangements with one (>=5)-gon

    CERN Document Server

    Leaños, Jesus; Rivera-Martinez, Luis Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Let L be a simple Euclidean arrangement of n pseudolines. It is shown that if L has exactly one (>=5)=gon P, and k is the number of edges of P that are adjacent to an unbounded cell of the subarrangement of L induced by the pseudolines in P, then L has exactly n-k triangles and k+n(n-5)/2 quadrilaterals. We also prove that if each pseudoline of L is adjacent to P then L is stretchable.

  11. The sharp quantitative Euclidean concentration inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Figalli, Alessio; Maggi, Francesco; Mooney, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The Euclidean concentration inequality states that, among sets with fixed volume, balls have $r$-neighborhoods of minimal volume for every $r>0$. On an arbitrary set, the deviation of this volume growth from that of a ball is shown to control the square of the volume of the symmetric difference between the set and a ball. This estimate is sharp and includes, as a special case, the sharp quantitative isoperimetric inequality proved in \\cite{fuscomaggipratelli}.

  12. Euclidean fields: vector mesons and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free transverse vector fields of mass >= 0 are studied. The model is related to the usual free vector meson and electromagnetic quantum field theories by extension of the field operators from transverse to arbitrary test functions. The one-particle states in transverse gauge and their localization are described. Reflexion positivity is proved and derived are free Feynman-Kac-Nelson formulas. An Euclidean approach to a photon field in a spherical world using dilatation covariance and inversions is given

  13. Fractal and Euclidean geometric diagnostic methodology of uterine cervix cells = Metodología diagnóstica geométrica fractal y euclidiana de células del cuello uterino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Velásquez, Javier Oswaldo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathological interpretation of cellular form in cervical cytology is very important for preven- tion of cervical cancer. The methods most frequently used for assessment of this test have reproducibility and inter-observer variability problems. Objective: To make fractal and Euclidean measure- ments to mathematically diagnose normal and pre- malignant cells of cervical squamous epithelium. Methodology: 21 cells with normal, ASCUS or LSIL diagnosis according to the Bethesda system were assessed. Fractal and Euclidean geometric measures of three mathematical objects were calculated: cyto- plasm, nucleus and whole cell. Mathematical propor- tions between these measurements were calculated in order to compare them with conventional classification methods. Results: It was found that the nuclear border measures calculated with the 2-pixel grill and the surface measures could mathematically and objectively differentiate normal cells from the pre-malignant ones (ASCUS and LSIL. Conclusions: An objective and reproducible diagnos- tic method was developed; it allows to identify the evolution towards malignant cellular states based on simultaneous fractal and Euclidean measures, estab- lishing the severity level of ASCUS and LSIL cells.

  14. Foundation of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries according to F. Klein

    CERN Document Server

    Redei, L; Stark, M

    1968-01-01

    Foundation of Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries according to F. Klein aims to remedy the deficiency in geometry so that the ideas of F. Klein obtain the place they merit in the literature of mathematics.This book discusses the axioms of betweenness, lattice of linear subspaces, generalization of the notion of space, and coplanar Desargues configurations. The central collineations of the plane, fundamental theorem of projective geometry, and lines perpendicular to a proper plane are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the axioms of motion, basic projective configurations, properties

  15. Regulatory nexus of synthesis and degradation deciphers cellular Nrf2 expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Takaya, Kai; Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Tsuta, Koji; Furuta, Koh; Goto, Koichi; Hosoda, Fumie; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-06-01

    Transcription factor Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is essential for oxidative and electrophilic stress responses. While it has been well characterized that Nrf2 activity is tightly regulated at the protein level through proteasomal degradation via Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1)-mediated ubiquitination, not much attention has been paid to the supply side of Nrf2, especially regulation of Nrf2 gene transcription. Here we report that manipulation of Nrf2 transcription is effective in changing the final Nrf2 protein level and activity of cellular defense against oxidative stress even in the presence of Keap1 and under efficient Nrf2 degradation, determined using genetically engineered mouse models. In excellent agreement with this finding, we found that minor A/A homozygotes of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human NRF2 upstream promoter region (rs6721961) exhibited significantly diminished NRF2 gene expression and, consequently, an increased risk of lung cancer, especially those who had ever smoked. Our results support the notion that in addition to control over proteasomal degradation and derepression from degradation/repression, the transcriptional level of the Nrf2 gene acts as another important regulatory point to define cellular Nrf2 levels. These results thus verify the critical importance of human SNPs that influence the levels of transcription of the NRF2 gene for future personalized medicine. PMID:23572560

  16. One-micron resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) in vivo for cellular level imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Dongyao; Liu, Xinyu; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Xiaojun; Sun, Ding; Luo, Yuemei; Gu, Jun; Shum, Ping; Liu, Linbo

    2015-03-01

    We developed a spectral domain OCT system combining two NIR, CW light sources of different spectral range. Its resolving power is validated by visualizing the cellular structures of zebra fish larvae in vivo. An NIR extended illumination from 755-1100 nm is achieved. The axial resolution is 1.27 μm in air, corresponding to 0.93μm in tissue (n=1.36), which is the highest axial resolution using NIR, CW laser sources up to date to the best of our knowledge. In vivo imaging is conducted to demonstrate the resolving power of proposed one-micron resolution OCT system. The top and bottom surfaces of individual disk-like red blood cell is reliably visualized, as well as flat, spindle shaped endothelial cells lining along the luminal surface of the blood vessel wall. This study provides a viable solution for cellular and subcellular level OCT imaging system which is also very competitive in cost.

  17. The effect of cellular carotenoid levels in micrococcus luteus on resistance to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, a biological system was developed to link the cellular carotenoid levels to Gamma radiation resistance in bacteria for the frst time. thus, in a non-photosynrhetic bacterium, in Micrococcus Luteus an inverse relationship was found between the increase in diphenylamine (DPA) concentration (5.25 μg/ml culture) and the polar cellular carotenoid pigments (C-45 and C-50 carotenoids and their glucosides). It was also found that irradiation of cells with different carotenoid concentrations with doses of γ-radiation in the range of (0.2500 gray) under oxic, air and hypoxic conditions showed that carotenoid pigments offer no significant protection as they usually do in case of visible light. (author).15 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Stability Issues in Euclidean Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Modanese, G.

    1998-01-01

    It is known that the action of Euclidean Einstein gravity is not bounded from below and that the metric of flat space does not correspond to a minimum of the action. Nevertheless, perturbation theory about flat space works well. The deep dynamical reasons for this reside in the non perturbative behaviour of the system and have been clarified in part by numerical simulations. Several open issues remain. We treat in particular those zero modes of the action for which R(x) is not identically zer...

  19. Euclidean Quantum Mechanics and Universal Nonlinear Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhashyam Balaji

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in applied science is the continuous nonlinear filtering problem, i.e., the estimation of a Langevin state that is observed indirectly. In this paper, it is shown that Euclidean quantum mechanics is closely related to the continuous nonlinear filtering problem. The key is the configuration space Feynman path integral representation of the fundamental solution of a Fokker-Planck type of equation termed the Yau Equation of continuous-continuous filtering. A corollary is the equivalence between nonlinear filtering problem and a time-varying Schr¨odinger equation.

  20. Information metric and Euclidean Janus correspondence

    OpenAIRE

    Dongsu Bak

    2016-01-01

    We consider the quantum information metric of a family of CFTs perturbed by an exactly marginal operator, which has the dual description of the Euclidean Janus geometries. We first clarify its two dimensional case dual to the three dimensional Janus geometry, which recently appeared in arXiv:1507.07555 [2] . We generalize this correspondence to higher dimensions and get a precise agreement between the both sides. We also show that the mixed-state information metric of the same family of CFTs ...

  1. Exploring Concepts of Geometry not Euclidean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Ambrozi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With this article we intend to propose different situations of teaching and learning, how they can be applied in schools, mediated by the use of concrete materials and Geogebra software, emphasizing the use of technology in the classroom, that this proposal has the role of assisting in the conceptualization and identification of elements of non-Euclidean geometry. In addition, this short course is designed to be a time of current and continuing education for teachers, with activities to be developed with dynamic geometry and based on the theory of Conceptual Fields of Vergnaud.

  2. Euclidean Quantum Mechanics and Universal Nonlinear Filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Balaji, Bhashyam

    2008-01-01

    An important problem in applied science is the continuous nonlinear filtering problem, i.e., the estimation of a Langevin state that is observed indirectly. In this paper, it is shown that Euclidean quantum mechanics is closely related to the continuous nonlinear filtering problem. The key is the configuration space Feynman path integral representation of the fundamental solution of a Fokker-Planck type of equation termed the Yau Equation of continuous-continuous filtering. A corollary is the equivalence between nonlinear filtering problem and a time-varying Schr\\"odinger equation.

  3. Non-Euclidean Geometry and Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroulakis N.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A great deal of misunderstandings and mathematical errors are involved in the currently accepted theory of the gravitational field generated by an isotropic spherical mass. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a short account of the rigorous mathematical theory and exhibit a new formulation of the problem. The solution of the corresponding equations of gravitation points out several new and unusual features of the stationary gravitational field which are related to the non-Euclidean structure of the space. Moreover it precludes the black hole from being a mathematical and physical notion.

  4. High content analysis at single cell level identifies different cellular responses dependent on nanomaterial concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshian, Bella B.; Munck, Sebastian; Agostinis, Patrizia; Himmelreich, Uwe; Soenen, Stefaan J.

    2015-09-01

    A mechanistic understanding of nanomaterial (NM) interaction with biological environments is pivotal for the safe transition from basic science to applied nanomedicine. NM exposure results in varying levels of internalized NM in different neighboring cells, due to variances in cell size, cell cycle phase and NM agglomeration. Using high-content analysis, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of fluorescent quantum dots on cultured cells, where all effects were correlated with the concentration of NMs at the single cell level. Upon binning the single cell data into different categories related to NM concentration, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that quantum dots activate both cytoprotective and cytotoxic mechanisms, resulting in a zero net result on the overall cell population, yet with significant effects in cells with higher cellular NM levels. Our results suggest that future NM cytotoxicity studies should correlate NM toxicity with cellular NM numbers on the single cell level, as conflicting mechanisms in particular cell subpopulations are commonly overlooked using classical toxicological methods.

  5. Statistical mechanics, gravity, and Euclidean theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of computations of free energy for Gibbs states on stationary but not static gravitational and gauge backgrounds is given. On these backgrounds wave equations for free fields are reduced to eigenvalue problems which depend non-linearly on the spectral parameter. We present a method to deal with such problems. In particular, we demonstrate how some results of the spectral theory of second-order elliptic operators, such as heat kernel asymptotics, can be extended to a class of non-linear spectral problems. The method is used to trace down the relation between the canonical definition of the free energy based on summation over the modes and the covariant definition given in Euclidean quantum gravity. As an application, high-temperature asymptotics of the free energy and of the thermal part of the stress-energy tensor in the presence of rotation are derived. We also discuss statistical mechanics in the presence of Killing horizons where canonical and Euclidean theories are related in a non-trivial way

  6. Pengenalan Retina Menggunakan Alihragam Gelombang Singkat dengan Pengukuran Jarak Euclidean Ternormalisasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Wijayanti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of a retinal biometric identification methods with low error rate due to the unique patterns in the retina of blood vessels behind the retina. These patterns can be used as training data for the recognition system is then used for comparison when the identification is done. This study aims to identify the image of the human eye retina, either the left or right side, using image processing techniques and measuring the normalized Euclidean distance. So far, research on biometric systems, particularly with the object of the eye's retina, the eye is done at the owner from the owner's eyes with diverse backgrounds, such as the Messidor database. In this study created a system that can recognize the retinal image using the transformation Haar short waves by measuring the normalized Euclidean distance. Retinal image will be the initial pretreatment process of changing the original image into a gray image, which is then performed using the Haar wavelet feature extraction to obtain the energy that will be used for the normalization of the Euclidean distance, so that the process of recognition by Euclidean values ​​are compared. Testing is done using eye retinal image database taken from Messidor many as 100 of the 300 images taken at random were then stored in a database, the database is one of 100 images stored, the database of 100 images stored 2, and 3 as many as 100 images database stored. Of the best database testing should be done as much as 6 levels of decomposition levels. From the test results have identified the recognition accuracy rate of up to 98%. The greatest degree of familiarity is level 1 that is equal to 98%. Followed usage by 80% level 2, level 3 is 59%, level 4 is 47%, level 5 is 45% and the lowest is the last level 6 that is equal to 37%.   Keywords: Retinal image; Database; Euclidean normalized; Haar Wavelet

  7. Metabolically active portion of fat-free mass: a cellular body composition level modeling analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, ZiMian; Heshka, Stanley; Wang, Jack; Gallagher, Dympna; Deurenberg, Paul; Chen, Zhao; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2006-01-01

    The proportion of fat-free mass (FFM) as body cell mass (BCM) is highly related to whole body resting energy expenditure. However, the magnitude of BCM/FFM may have been underestimated in previous studies. This is because Moore’s equation [BCM (kg) =0.00833 × total body potassium (in mmol)], which was used to predict BCM, underestimates BCM by ~ %. The aims of the present study were to develop a theoretical BCM/FFM model at the cellular level and to explore the influences of sex, age, and adi...

  8. Protein engineering strategies with potential applications for altering clinically relevant cellular pathways at the protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Lynne; Hinrichsen, Michael R; Oi, Curran

    2016-05-01

    All diseases can be fundamentally viewed as the result of malfunctioning cellular pathways. Protein engineering offers the potential to develop new tools that will allow these dysfunctional pathways to be better understood, in addition to potentially providing new routes to restore proper function. Here we discuss different approaches that can be used to change the intracellular activity of a protein by intervening at the protein level: targeted protein sequestration, protein recruitment, protein degradation, and selective inhibition of binding interfaces. The potential of each of these tools to be developed into effective therapeutic treatments will also be discussed, along with any major barriers that currently block their translation into the clinic. PMID:27031866

  9. Supersymmetric solutions to Euclidean Romans supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alday, Luis F.; Fluder, Martin; Gregory, Carolina Matte; Richmond, Paul; Sparks, James

    2016-02-01

    We study Euclidean Romans supergravity in six dimensions with a non-trivial Abelian R-symmetry gauge field. We show that supersymmetric solutions are in one-to-one correspondence with solutions to a set of differential constraints on an SU(2) structure. As an application of our results we (i) show that this structure reduces at a conformal boundary to the five-dimensional rigid supersymmetric geometry previously studied by the authors, (ii) find a general expression for the holographic dual of the VEV of a BPS Wilson loop, matching an exact field theory computation, (iii) construct holographic duals to squashed Sasaki-Einstein backgrounds, again matching to a field theory computation, and (iv) find new analytic solutions.

  10. Cosmological Landscape and Euclidean Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Barvinsky, A O

    2007-01-01

    Quantum creation of the universe is described by the {\\em density matrix} defined by the Euclidean path integral. This yields an ensemble of universes -- a cosmological landscape -- in a mixed quasi-thermal state which is shown to be dynamically more preferable than the pure quantum state of the Hartle-Hawking type. The latter is suppressed by the infinitely large positive action of its instanton, generated by the conformal anomaly of quantum matter. The Hartle-Hawking instantons can be regarded as posing initial conditions for Starobinsky solutions of the anomaly driven deSitter expansion, which are thus dynamically eliminated by infrared effects of quantum gravity. The resulting landscape of hot universes treated within the cosmological bootstrap (the self-consistent back reaction of quantum matter) turns out to be limited to a bounded range of the cosmological constant, which rules out a well-known infrared catastrophe of the vanishing cosmological constant and suggests an ultimate solution to the problem ...

  11. DOMINANT EUCLIDEAN CONFIGURATIONS FOR ALL N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardakci, K.; Caldi, D.G.; Neuberger, H.

    1980-04-01

    The authors identify a class of Euclidean configurations which appear to be dominant in the functional integral of the CP{sup N-1} models. These configurations are point-like topological excitations, and they may be viewed as constituents of instantons, although they are defined independently of instantons through a continuum duality transformation. They show not only that these configurations survive as N {yields} {infinity}, but that in the plasma phase they are responsible for the effects encountered within the 1/N expansion - confinement, {theta}-dependence, and dynamical mass generation. They also discuss the possible types of plasma phase for a statistical mechanical model of the interacting excitations. Possible generalization to QCD is briefly discussed.

  12. Euclidean supergravity in terms of Dirac eigenvalues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancea, Ion V.

    1998-08-01

    It has been recently shown that the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator can be considered as dynamical variables of Euclidean gravity. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibility that the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator might play the same role in the case of supergravity. It is shown that for this purpose some primary constraints on covariant phase space as well as secondary constraints on the eigenspinors must be imposed. The validity of primary constraints under covariant transport is further analyzed. It is shown that in this case restrictions on the tangent bundle and on the spinor bundle of spacetime arise. The form of these restrictions is determined under some simplifying assumptions. It is also shown that manifolds with flat curvature of tangent bundle and spinor bundle satisfy these restrictions and thus they support the Dirac eigenvalues as global observables.

  13. Smoothed analysis of partitioning algorithms for Euclidean functionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bläser, Markus; Manthey, Bodo; Rao, B.V. Raghavendra; Dehne, F.; Iacono, J.; Sack, J.-R.

    2011-01-01

    Euclidean optimization problems such as TSP and minimum-length matching admit fast partitioning algorithms that compute near-optimal solutions on typical instances. We develop a general framework for the application of smoothed analysis to partitioning algorithms for Euclidean optimization problems.

  14. Maintenance of cellular ATP level by caloric restriction correlates chronological survival of budding yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •CR decreases total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide during the chronological aging. •CR does not affect the levels of oxidative damage on protein and DNA. •CR contributes extension of chronological lifespan by maintenance of ATP level -- Abstract: The free radical theory of aging emphasizes cumulative oxidative damage in the genome and intracellular proteins due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is a major cause for aging. Caloric restriction (CR) has been known as a representative treatment that prevents aging; however, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we show that CR extends the chronological lifespan (CLS) of budding yeast by maintaining cellular energy levels. CR reduced the generation of total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide; however, CR did not reduce the oxidative damage in proteins and DNA. Subsequently, calorie-restricted yeast had higher mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and it sustained consistent ATP levels during the process of chronological aging. Our results suggest that CR extends the survival of the chronologically aged cells by improving the efficiency of energy metabolism for the maintenance of the ATP level rather than reducing the global oxidative damage of proteins and DNA

  15. Maintenance of cellular ATP level by caloric restriction correlates chronological survival of budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon-Seok; Lee, Cheol-Koo, E-mail: cklee2005@korea.ac.kr

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •CR decreases total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide during the chronological aging. •CR does not affect the levels of oxidative damage on protein and DNA. •CR contributes extension of chronological lifespan by maintenance of ATP level -- Abstract: The free radical theory of aging emphasizes cumulative oxidative damage in the genome and intracellular proteins due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is a major cause for aging. Caloric restriction (CR) has been known as a representative treatment that prevents aging; however, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we show that CR extends the chronological lifespan (CLS) of budding yeast by maintaining cellular energy levels. CR reduced the generation of total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide; however, CR did not reduce the oxidative damage in proteins and DNA. Subsequently, calorie-restricted yeast had higher mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and it sustained consistent ATP levels during the process of chronological aging. Our results suggest that CR extends the survival of the chronologically aged cells by improving the efficiency of energy metabolism for the maintenance of the ATP level rather than reducing the global oxidative damage of proteins and DNA.

  16. Wolbachia-mediated resistance to dengue virus infection and death at the cellular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca D Frentiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue is currently the most important arthropod-borne viral disease of humans. Recent work has shown dengue virus displays limited replication in its primary vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti, when the insect harbors the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis. Wolbachia-mediated inhibition of virus replication may lead to novel methods of arboviral control, yet the functional and cellular mechanisms that underpin it are unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using paired Wolbachia-infected and uninfected Aedes-derived cell lines and dengue virus, we confirm the phenomenon of viral inhibition at the cellular level. Although Wolbachia imposes a fitness cost to cells via reduced proliferation, it also provides a significant degree of protection from virus-induced mortality. The extent of viral inhibition is related to the density of Wolbachia per cell, with highly infected cell lines showing almost complete protection from dengue infection and dramatically reduced virus titers compared to lines not infected with the bacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have shown that cells infected with Wolbachia display inhibition of dengue virus replication, that the extent of inhibition is related to bacterial density and that Wolbachia infection, although costly, will provide a fitness benefit in some circumstances. Our results parallel findings in mosquitoes and flies, indicating that cell line models will provide useful and experimentally tractable models to study the mechanisms underlying Wolbachia-mediated protection from viruses.

  17. A Mitochondrial RNAi Screen Defines Cellular Bioenergetic Determinants and Identifies an Adenylate Kinase as a Key Regulator of ATP Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J. Lanning

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Altered cellular bioenergetics and mitochondrial function are major features of several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. Given this important link to human health, we sought to define proteins within mitochondria that are critical for maintaining homeostatic ATP levels. We screened an RNAi library targeting >1,000 nuclear-encoded genes whose protein products localize to the mitochondria in multiple metabolic conditions in order to examine their effects on cellular ATP levels. We identified a mechanism by which electron transport chain (ETC perturbation under glycolytic conditions increased ATP production through enhanced glycolytic flux, thereby highlighting the cellular potential for metabolic plasticity. Additionally, we identified a mitochondrial adenylate kinase (AK4 that regulates cellular ATP levels and AMPK signaling and whose expression significantly correlates with glioma patient survival. This study maps the bioenergetic landscape of >1,000 mitochondrial proteins in the context of varied metabolic substrates and begins to link key metabolic genes with clinical outcome.

  18. Human metapneumovirus inhibits IFN-β signaling by downregulating Jak1 and Tyk2 cellular levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junping Ren

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (hMPV, a leading cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, inhibits type I interferon (IFN signaling by an unidentified mechanism. In this study, we showed that infection of airway epithelial cells with hMPV decreased cellular level of Janus tyrosine kinase (Jak1 and tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2, due to enhanced proteosomal degradation and reduced gene transcription. In addition, hMPV infection also reduced the surface expression of type I IFN receptor (IFNAR. These inhibitory mechanisms are different from the ones employed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, which does not affect Jak1, Tyk2 or IFNAR expression, but degrades downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins 2 (STAT2, although both viruses are pneumoviruses belonging to the Paramyxoviridae family. Our study identifies a novel mechanism by which hMPV inhibits STAT1 and 2 activation, ultimately leading to viral evasion of host IFN responses.

  19. Modeling of trophospheric ozone concentrations using genetically trained multi-level cellular neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, H. Kurtulus; Bilgili, Erdem; Sahin, Ulku; Ucan, O. Nuri; Bayat, Cuma

    2007-09-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations, which are an important air pollutant, are modeled by the use of an artificial intelligence structure. Data obtained from air pollution measurement stations in the city of Istanbul are utilized in constituting the model. A supervised algorithm for the evaluation of ozone concentration using a genetically trained multi-level cellular neural network (ML-CNN) is introduced, developed, and applied to real data. A genetic algorithm is used in the optimization of CNN templates. The model results and the actual measurement results are compared and statistically evaluated. It is observed that seasonal changes in ozone concentrations are reflected effectively by the concentrations estimated by the multilevel-CNN model structure, with a correlation value of 0.57 ascertained between actual and model results. It is shown that the multilevel-CNN modeling technique is as satisfactory as other modeling techniques in associating the data in a complex medium in air pollution applications.

  20. MECHANISMS OF DAMAGING EFFECT OF MANGENESE IN TOXIC CONCENTRATIONS ON CELLULAR AND SUBCELLULAR LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharenko A. V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Influence of subtoxic concentration of manganese chloride in dose equal to LD 50 on condition of plasmatic membranes (model: erythrocytes and functional activity of cell power (model: the isolated liver mitochondrion of rats was studied. It was established that manganese chloride in fixed concentration caused authentic augmentation of sorption capacity of erythrocytes towards alcian blue, influenced increasing of their spontaneous haemolysis and activation of peroxide oxidation of lipids. In experiment on the isolated mitochondrion it was proved that manganese chloride caused dissociation of an oxidizing phosphorusling and complete inhibition of respiration in concentrations of 3 and 4,5mM. These dependences testify that subtoxic concentration of manganese can damage the cell energy. Thus, this pilot research indicated damaging effect of manganese on cellular (erythrocytes and subcellular (mitochondrion levels which are realized through external functioning of membrane structures and deprived them from restoration.

  1. Modeling of Trophospheric Ozone Concentrations Using Genetically Trained Multi-Level Cellular Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Kurtulus OZCAN; Erdem BILGILI; Ulku SAHIN; O. Nuri UCAN; Cuma BAYAT

    2007-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations, which are an important air pollutant, are modeled by the use of an artificial intelligence structure. Data obtained from air pollution measurement stations in the city of Istanbul are utilized in constituting the model. A supervised algorithm for the evaluation of ozone concentration using a genetically trained multi-level cellular neural network (ML-CNN) is introduced, developed, and applied to real data. A genetic algorithm is used in the optimization of CNN templates. The model results and the actual measurement results are compared and statistically evaluated. It is observed that seasonal changes in ozone concentrations are reflected effectively by the concentrations estimated by the multilevel-CNN model structure, with a correlation value of 0.57 ascertained between actual and model results. It is shown that the multilevel-CNN modeling technique is as satisfactory as other modeling techniques in associating the data in a complex medium in air pollution applications.

  2. In situ sensing and modeling of molecular events at the cellular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruiguo

    We developed the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based nanorobot in combination with other nanomechanical sensors for the investigation of cell signaling pathways. The AFM nanorobotics hinge on the superior spatial resolution of AFM in imaging and extends it into the measurement of biological processes and manipulation of biological matters. A multiple input single output control system was designed and implemented to solve the issues of nanomanipulation of biological materials, feedback, response frequency and nonlinearity. The AFM nanorobotic system therefore provide the human-directed position, velocity and force control with high frequency feedback, and more importantly it can feed the operator with the real-time imaging of manipulation result from the fast-imaging based local scanning. The use of the system has taken the study of cellular process at the molecular scale into a new level. The cellular response to the physiological conditions can be significantly manifested in cellular mechanics. Dynamic mechanical property has been regarded as biomarkers, sometimes even regulators of the signaling and physiological processes, thus the name mechanobiology. We sought to characterize the relationship between the structural dynamics and the molecular dynamics and the role of them in the regulation of cell behavior. We used the AFM nanorobotics to investigate the mechanical properties in real-time of cells that are stimulated by different chemical species. These reagents could result in similar ion channel responses but distinctive mechanical behaviors. We applied these measurement results to establish a model that describes the cellular stimulation and the mechanical property change, a "two-hit" model that comprises the loss of cell adhesion and the initiation of cell apoptosis. The first hit was verified by functional experiments: depletion of Calcium and nanosurgery to disrupt the cellular adhesion. The second hit was tested by a labeling of apoptotic markers that

  3. Dual transcriptional-translational cascade permits cellular level tuneable expression control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Rosa; Shankar, Jayendra; Robinson, Christopher J; Halliwell, Samantha; Butler, Lisa; Upton, Mathew; Hay, Sam; Micklefield, Jason; Dixon, Neil

    2016-02-18

    The ability to induce gene expression in a small molecule dependent manner has led to many applications in target discovery, functional elucidation and bio-production. To date these applications have relied on a limited set of protein-based control mechanisms operating at the level of transcription initiation. The discovery, design and reengineering of riboswitches offer an alternative means by which to control gene expression. Here we report the development and characterization of a novel tunable recombinant expression system, termed RiboTite, which operates at both the transcriptional and translational level. Using standard inducible promoters and orthogonal riboswitches, a multi-layered modular genetic control circuit was developed to control the expression of both bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and recombinant gene(s) of interest. The system was benchmarked against a number of commonly used E. coli expression systems, and shows tight basal control, precise analogue tunability of gene expression at the cellular level, dose-dependent regulation of protein production rates over extended growth periods and enhanced cell viability. This novel system expands the number of E. coli expression systems for use in recombinant protein production and represents a major performance enhancement over and above the most widely used expression systems. PMID:26405200

  4. Axial level-dependent molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the genesis of the embryonic neural plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Hisato; Takada, Shinji; Takemoto, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    The transcription factor gene Sox2, centrally involved in neural primordial regulation, is activated by many enhancers. During the early stages of embryonic development, Sox2 is regulated by the enhancers N2 and N1 in the anterior neural plate (ANP) and posterior neural plate (PNP), respectively. This differential use of the enhancers reflects distinct regulatory mechanisms underlying the genesis of ANP and PNP. The ANP develops directly from the epiblast, triggered by nodal signal inhibition, and via the combined action of TFs SOX2, OTX2, POU3F1, and ZIC2, which promotes the the ANP development and inhibits other cell lineages. In contrast, the PNP is derived from neuromesodermal bipotential axial stem cells that develop into the neural plate when Sox2 is activated by the N1 enhancer, whereas they develop into the paraxial mesoderm when the N1 enhancer is repressed by the action of TBX6. The axial stem cells are maintained by the activity of WNT3a and T (Brachyury). However, at axial levels more anterior to the 8th somites (cervical levels), the development of both the neural plate and somite proceeds in the absence of WNT3a, T, or TBX6. These observations indicate that distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms determine neural plate genesis based on the axial level, and contradict the classical concept of the term "neural induction," which assumes a pan-neural plate mechanism. PMID:27279156

  5. The symmetry algebras of Euclidean M-theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the Euclidean supersymmetric D = 11 M-algebras. We consider two such D = 11 superalgebras: the first one is N = (1,1) self-conjugate complex-Hermitian, with 32 complex supercharges and 1024 real bosonic charges, the second is N = (1,0) complex-holomorphic, with 32 complex supercharges and 528 bosonic charges, which can be obtained by analytic continuation of known Minkowski M-algebra. Due to the Bott's periodicity, we study at first the generic D = 3 Euclidean supersymmetry case. The role of complex and quaternionic structures for D = 3 and D = 11 Euclidean supersymmetry is elucidated. We show that the additional 1024 - 528 = 496 Euclidean tensorial central charges are related with the quaternionic structure of Euclidean D = 11 supercharges, which in complex notation satisfy SU(2) pseudo-Majorana condition. We consider also the corresponding Osterwalder-Schrader conjugations as implying for N = (1,0) case the reality of Euclidean bosonic charges. Finally, we outline some consequences of our results, in particular for D = 11 Euclidean supergravity. (author)

  6. Dissecting RNA silencing in protoplasts uncovers novel effects of viral suppressors on the silencing pathway at the cellular level

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Yijun; Zhong, Xuehua; Itaya, Asuka; Ding, Biao

    2004-01-01

    Short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated RNA silencing plays an important role in cellular defence against viral infection and abnormal gene expression in multiple organisms. Many viruses have evolved silencing suppressors for counter-defence. We have developed an RNA silencing system in the protoplasts of Nicotiana benthamiana to investigate the functions of viral suppressors at the cellular level. We showed that RNA silencing against a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene in the prot...

  7. Characterization of cellular traction forces at the single-molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    The ability of cells to generate and respond to mechanical cues is an essential aspect of stem cell differentiation, embryonic development, and our senses of touch and hearing. However, our understanding of the roles of mechanical force in cell biology remains in its infancy, due largely to a lack of tools that measure the forces generated by living cells at the molecular scale. Here we describe a new technique termed Molecular Force Microscopy (MFM) that visualizes the forces exerted by single cellular adhesion molecules with nm, pN, and sub-second resolutions. MFM uses novel FRET-based molecular tension sensors that bind to a glass coverslip and present a binding site for integrins, a ubiquitous class of cell adhesion proteins. Cell-generated forces stretch the MFM sensor molecules, resulting in decreased FRET with increasing load that can be imaged at the single-molecule level. Human foreskin fibroblasts adhere to surfaces functionalized with the MFM probes and develop robust focal adhesions. FRET values measured using MFM indicate forces of between 1 and 4 pN per integrin, thus providing the first direct measurement of the tension per integrin molecule necessary to form stable adhesions. The relatively narrow force distribution suggests that mechanical tension is subject to exquisite feedback and control at the molecular level.

  8. Low levels of graphene and graphene oxide inhibit cellular xenobiotic defense system mediated by efflux transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Bing; Yu, Jing; Yu, Haiyan; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Cherr, Gary N

    2016-06-01

    Low levels of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) are considered to be environmentally safe. In this study, we analyzed the potential effects of graphene and GO at relatively low concentrations on cellular xenobiotic defense system mediated by efflux transporters. The results showed that graphene (<0.5 μg/mL) and GO (<20 μg/mL) did not decrease cell viability, generate reactive oxygen species, or disrupt mitochondrial function. However, graphene and GO at the nontoxic concentrations could increase calcein-AM (CAM, an indicator of membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter) activity) accumulation, indicating inhibition of ABC transporters' efflux capabilities. This inhibition was observed even at 0.005 μg/mL graphene and 0.05 μg/mL GO, which are 100 times and 400 times lower than their lowest toxic concentration from cytotoxicity experiments, respectively. The inhibition of ABC transporters significantly increased the toxicity of paraquat and arsenic, known substrates of ABC transporters. The inhibition of ABC transporters was found to be based on graphene and GO damaging the plasma membrane structure and fluidity, thus altering functions of transmembrane ABC transporters. This study demonstrates that low levels of graphene and GO are not environmentally safe since they can significantly make cell more susceptible to other xenobiotics, and this chemosensitizing activity should be considered in the risk assessment of graphene and GO. PMID:26554512

  9. Sulforaphane restores cellular glutathione levels and reduces chronic periodontitis neutrophil hyperactivity in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irundika H K Dias

    Full Text Available The production of high levels of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils is associated with the local and systemic destructive phenotype found in the chronic inflammatory disease periodontitis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of sulforaphane (SFN to restore cellular glutathione levels and reduce the hyperactivity of circulating neutrophils associated with chronic periodontitis. Using differentiated HL60 cells as a neutrophil model, here we show that generation of extracellular O2 (. - by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH oxidase complex is increased by intracellular glutathione depletion. This may be attributed to the upregulation of thiol regulated acid sphingomyelinase driven lipid raft formation. Intracellular glutathione was also lower in primary neutrophils from periodontitis patients and, consistent with our previous findings, patients neutrophils were hyper-reactive to stimuli. The activity of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a master regulator of the antioxidant response, is impaired in circulating neutrophils from chronic periodontitis patients. Although patients' neutrophils exhibit a low reduced glutathione (GSH/oxidised glutathione (GSSG ratio and a higher total Nrf2 level, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear Nrf2 remained unchanged relative to healthy controls and had reduced expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC, and modifier (GCLM subunit mRNAs, compared to periodontally healthy subjects neutrophils. Pre-treatment with SFN increased expression of GCLC and GCM, improved intracellular GSH/GSSG ratios and reduced agonist-activated extracellular O2 (. - production in both dHL60 and primary neutrophils from patients with periodontitis and controls. These findings suggest that a deficiency in Nrf2-dependent pathways may underpin susceptibility to hyper-reactivity in circulating primary neutrophils during chronic periodontitis.

  10. Mechanism of Laser/light beam interaction at cellular and tissue level and study of the influential factors for the application of low level laser therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of laser therapy it was realized it has useful application of wound healing and reduce pain, but due to the poor understanding of the mechanism and dose response this technique remained to be controversial for therapeutic applications. In order to understand the working and effectiveness different experiments were performed to determine the laser beam effect at the cellular and tissue level. This article discusses the mechanism of beam interaction at tissues and cellular l...

  11. Generators of the sister of Euclidean Picard modular group

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    The sister of Eisenstein-Picard modular group was described in [8]. In this paper we give a similar definition of the sister of the Euclidean-Picard modular group and find its generators by using a geometric method.

  12. Quaternionic Similar Curves in 4-dimensional Euclidean Space

    CERN Document Server

    Önder, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the quaternionic similar curves in 4-dimensional Euclidean space. We show that the families of quaternionic curves with vanishing curvatures form the families of quaternionic similar curves.

  13. A High-Precision Micropipette Sensor for Cellular-Level Real-Time Thermal Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonseok Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report herein development of a novel glass micropipette thermal sensor fabricated in a cost-effective manner, which is capable of measuring steady thermal fluctuation at spatial resolution of ~2 µm with an accuracy of ±0.01 °C. We produced and tested various micrometer-sized sensors, ranging from 2 µm to 30 µm. The sensor comprises unleaded low-melting-point solder alloy (Sn-based as a core metal inside a pulled borosilicate glass pipette and a thin film of nickel coating outside, creating a thermocouple junction at the tip. The sensor was calibrated using a thermally insulated calibration chamber, the temperature of which can be controlled with an accuracy of ±0.01 °C, and the thermoelectric power (Seebeck coefficient of the sensor was recorded from 8.46 to 8.86 µV/°C. We have demonstrated the capability of measuring temperatures at a cellular level by inserting our temperature sensor into the membrane of a live retinal pigment epithelium cell subjected to a laser beam with a focal spot of 6 μm. We measured transient temperature profiles and the maximum temperatures were in the range of 38–55 ± 0.5 °C.

  14. Adiponectin corrects premature cellular senescence and normalizes antimicrobial peptide levels in senescent keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Taewon; Kim, Min Jeong; Heo, Won Il; Park, Kui Young; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Hong, Seung-Phil; Kim, Seong-Jin; Im, Myung; Moon, Nam Ju; Seo, Seong Jun

    2016-09-01

    Stress-induced premature senescence or aging causes dysfunction in the human somatic system. Adiponectin (Acrp30) plays a role in functional recovery, especially with adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1). Acrp30 stimulation reduced the premature senescence positive ratio induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and restituted human β-defensin 2 (hBD-2) levels in senescent keratinocytes. Acrp30 recovered AMPK activity in senescent keratinocytes and increased SIRT1 deacetylation activity. As a result, FoxO1 and FoxO3 transcription activity was recovered. Additionally, Acrp30 stimulation suppresses NFκB p65, which induces abnormal expression of hBD-2 induced by H2O2. In the present study, we have shown that Acrp30 reduces premature senescence and recovers cellular function in keratinocytes. These results suggest a role for Acrp30 as an anti-aging agent to improve impaired skin immune barriers. PMID:27349869

  15. A high-precision micropipette sensor for cellular-level real-time thermal characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Ramesh; Choi, Tae-Youl; Chang, Wonseok; Kim, Donsik

    2011-01-01

    We report herein development of a novel glass micropipette thermal sensor fabricated in a cost-effective manner, which is capable of measuring steady thermal fluctuation at spatial resolution of ∼2 μm with an accuracy of ±0.01 °C. We produced and tested various micrometer-sized sensors, ranging from 2 μm to 30 μm. The sensor comprises unleaded low-melting-point solder alloy (Sn-based) as a core metal inside a pulled borosilicate glass pipette and a thin film of nickel coating outside, creating a thermocouple junction at the tip. The sensor was calibrated using a thermally insulated calibration chamber, the temperature of which can be controlled with an accuracy of ±0.01 °C, and the thermoelectric power (Seebeck coefficient) of the sensor was recorded from 8.46 to 8.86 μV/°C. We have demonstrated the capability of measuring temperatures at a cellular level by inserting our temperature sensor into the membrane of a live retinal pigment epithelium cell subjected to a laser beam with a focal spot of 6 μm. We measured transient temperature profiles and the maximum temperatures were in the range of 38-55 ± 0.5 °C. PMID:22164108

  16. Oxidized phosphatidylcholines in membrane-level cellular signaling: from biophysics to physiology and molecular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volinsky, Roman; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2013-06-01

    The oxidation of lipids has been shown to impact virtually all cellular processes. The paradigm has been that this involvement is due to interference with the functions of membrane-associated proteins. It is only recently that methodological advances in molecular-level detection and identification have begun to provide insights into oxidative lipid modification and its involvement in cell signaling as well as in major diseases and inflammation. Extensive evidence suggests a correlation between lipid peroxidation and degenerative neurological diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, as well as type 2 diabetes and cancer. Despite the obvious relevance of understanding the molecular basis of the above ailments, the exact modes of action of oxidized lipids have remained elusive. In this minireview, we summarize recent findings on the biophysical characteristics of biomembranes following oxidative derivatization of their lipids, and how these altered properties are involved in both physiological processes and major pathological conditions. Lipid-bearing, oxidatively truncated and functionalized acyl chains are known to modify membrane bulk physical properties, such as thermal phase behavior, bilayer thickness, hydration and polarity profiles, as manifest in the altered structural dynamics of lipid bilayers, leading to augmented membrane permeability, fast lipid transbilayer diffusion (flip-flop), loss of lipid asymmetry (scrambling) and phase segregation (the formation of 'rafts'). These changes, together with the generated reactive lipid derivatives, can be further expected to interfere with lipid-protein interactions, influencing metabolic pathways, causing inflammation, the execution phase in apoptosis and initiating pathological processes. PMID:23506295

  17. Tracking and quantifying polymer therapeutic distribution on a cellular level using 3D dSTORM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Jonathan M; Zhang, Rui; Gudheti, Manasa; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2016-06-10

    We used a single-molecule localization technique called direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to quantify both colocalization and spatial distribution on a cellular level for two conceptually different N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer conjugates. Microscopy images were acquired of entire cells with resolutions as high as 25nm revealing the nanoscale distribution of the fluorescently labeled therapeutic components. Drug-free macromolecular therapeutics consisting of two self-assembling nanoconjugates showed slight increase in nanoclusters on the cell surface with time. Additionally, dSTORM provided high resolution images of the nanoscale organization of the self-assembling conjugates at the interface between two cells. A conjugate designed for treating ovarian cancer showed that the model drug (Cy3) and polymer bound to Cy5 were colocalized at an early time point before the model drug was enzymatically cleaved from the polymer. Using spatial descriptive statistics it was found that the drug was randomly distributed after 24h while the polymer bound dye remained in clusters. Four different fluorescent dyes were used and two different therapeutic systems were tested to demonstrate the versatility and possible general applicability of dSTORM for use in studying drug delivery systems. PMID:26855050

  18. Mechanism of Laser/light beam interaction at cellular and tissue level and study of the influential factors for the application of low level laser therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khalid, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of laser therapy it was realized it has useful application of wound healing and reduce pain, but due to the poor understanding of the mechanism and dose response this technique remained to be controversial for therapeutic applications. In order to understand the working and effectiveness different experiments were performed to determine the laser beam effect at the cellular and tissue level. This article discusses the mechanism of beam interaction at tissues and cellular level with different light sources and dosimetry principles for clinical application of low level laser therapy. Different application techniques and methods currently in use for clinical treatment has also been reviewed.

  19. Euclidean Reconstruction and Affine Camera Calibration Using Controlled Robot Motions

    OpenAIRE

    Horaud, Radu; Christy, Stéphane; Mohr, Roger

    1997-01-01

    We are addressing the problem of Euclidean reconstruction with an uncalibrated affine camera and the calibration of this camera. We investigate constraints under which the Euclidean shape and motion problem becomes linear. The theoretical study described in this paper leads us to impose some practical constraints that the camera is mounted onto a robot arm and that the robot is executing controlled motions whose parameters are known. The affine camera model considered here is just an approxim...

  20. On Clustering Time Series Using Euclidean Distance and Pearson Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    MICHAEL R BERTHOLD; Höppner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    For time series comparisons, it has often been observed that z-score normalized Euclidean distances far outperform the unnormalized variant. In this paper we show that a z-score normalized, squared Euclidean Distance is, in fact, equal to a distance based on Pearson Correlation. This has profound impact on many distance-based classification or clustering methods. In addition to this theoretically sound result we also show that the often used k-Means algorithm formally needs a mod ification to...

  1. Embedding spacetime via a geodesically equivalent metric of Euclidean signature

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Rickard

    2007-01-01

    Starting from the equations of motion in a 1 + 1 static, diagonal, Lorentzian spacetime, such as the Schwarzschild radial line element, I find another metric, but with Euclidean signature, which produces the same geodesics x(t). This geodesically equivalent, or dual, metric can be embedded in ordinary Euclidean space. On the embedded surface freely falling particles move on the shortest path. Thus one can visualize how acceleration in a gravitational field is explained by particles moving fre...

  2. The relation between Euclidean and Lorentzian 2D quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Ambjørn, J.; Correia, J; Kristjansen, C.; Loll, R.

    2006-01-01

    Starting from 2D Euclidean quantum gravity, we show that one recovers 2D Lorentzian quantum gravity by removing all baby universes. Using a peeling procedure to decompose the discrete, triangulated geometries along a one-dimensional path, we explicitly associate with each Euclidean space-time a (generalized) Lorentzian spacetime. This motivates a map between the parameter spaces of the two theories, under which their propagators get identified. In two dimensions, Lorentzian quantum gravity ca...

  3. Euclidean supersymmetrization of instantons and self-dual monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that N=1 D=4 Euclidean supersymmetry leads to the complexification of gauge potentials, and that to have a supersymmetric Euclidean D=4 theory which allows for the selfduality of real gauge potentials, the supersymmetry has to be extended to even N, i.e. at least N=2. We also discuss the supersymmetrization of Manton's procedure of using the dimensional reduction D=4 → D=3 to derive self-dual monopoles from instantons. (author)

  4. CBFA1 and topoisomerase I mRNA levels decline during cellular aging of human trabecular osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, M; Kveiborg, Marie; Kassem, M;

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the reasons for age-related impairment of the function of bone forming osteoblasts, we have examined the steady-state mRNA levels of the transcription factor CBFA1 and topoisomerase I during cellular aging of normal human trabecular osteoblasts, by the use of semiquantitative...... reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). There is a progressive and significant reduction of the CBFA1 steady-state mRNA level down to 50% during cellular aging of human osteoblasts. In comparison to the normal cells, human osteosarcoma cell lines SaOS-2 and KHOS/NP, and the SV40...

  5. Combined phase and X-Ray fluorescence imaging at the sub-cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents some recent developments in the field of hard X-ray imaging applied to biomedical research. As the discipline is evolving quickly, new questions appear and the list of needs becomes bigger. Some of them are dealt with in this manuscript. It has been shown that the ID22NI beamline of the ESRF can serve as a proper experimental setup to investigate diverse aspects of cellular research. Together with its high spatial resolution, high flux and high energy range the experimental setup provides bigger field of view, is less sensitive to radiation damages (while taking phase contrast images) and suits well chemical analysis with emphasis on endogenous metals (Zn, Fe, Mn) but also with a possibility for exogenous one's like these found in nanoparticles (Au, Pt, Ag) study. Two synchrotron-based imaging techniques, fluorescence and phase contrast imaging were used in this research project. They were correlated with each other on a number of biological cases, from bacteria E.coli to various cells (HEK 293, PC12, MRC5VA, red blood cells). The explorations made in the chapter 5 allowed preparation of more established and detailed analysis, described in the next chapter where both techniques, X-ray fluorescence and phase contrast imaging, were exploited in order to access absolute metal projected mass fraction in a whole cell. The final image presents for the first time true quantitative information at the sub-cellular level, not biased by the cell thickness. Thus for the first time a fluorescence map serves as a complete quantitative image of a cell without any risk of misinterpretation. Once both maps are divided by each other pixel by pixel (fluorescence map divided by the phase map) they present a complete and final result of the metal (Zn in this work) projected mass fraction in ppm of dry weight. For the purpose of this calculation the analysis was extended to calibration (non-biological) samples. Polystyrene spheres of a known diameter and known

  6. Euclidean Geometric Objects in the Clifford Geometric Algebra of {Origin, 3-Space, Infinity}

    OpenAIRE

    Hitzer, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the homogeneous (conformal) model of Euclidean space (Horosphere) with subspaces that intuitively correspond to Euclidean geometric objects in three dimensions. Mathematical details of the construction and (useful) parametrizations of the 3D Euclidean object models are explicitly demonstrated in order to show how 3D Euclidean information on positions, orientations and radii can be extracted.

  7. Regulation of biofilm formation and cellular buoyancy through modulating intracellular cyclic di-GMP levels in engineered cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Marco; Waters, Christopher M; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic dimeric (3'→5') GMP (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in the transition between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation, cellular aggregation or flocculation, and cellular buoyancy are under the control of c-di-GMP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) and Fremyella diplosiphon. Synechocystis is a unicellular cyanobacterium and displays lower levels of c-di-GMP; F. diplosiphon is filamentous and displays higher intracellular c-di-GMP levels. We transformed Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon with a plasmid for constitutive expression of genes encoding diguanylate cylase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) proteins from Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli, respectively. These engineered strains allowed us to modulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Biofilm formation and cellular deposition were induced in the DGC-expressing Synechocystis strain which exhibited high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP; whereas strains expressing PDE in Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon to drive low intracellular levels of c-di-GMP exhibited enhanced cellular buoyancy. In addition, the PDE-expressing F. diplosiphon strain showed elevated chlorophyll levels. These results imply roles for coordinating c-di-GMP homeostasis in regulating native cyanobacterial phenotypes. Engineering exogenous DGC or PDE proteins to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels represents an effective tool for uncovering cryptic phenotypes or modulating phenotypes in cyanobacteria for practical applications in biotechnology applicable in photobioreactors and in green biotechnologies, such as energy-efficient harvesting of cellular biomass or the treatment of metal-containing wastewaters. PMID:26192200

  8. SINGLE-CELL LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF CYTOSKELETAL/CELLULAR RESPONSE TO EXTERNAL STIMULI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiddessen, A L

    2007-02-26

    A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which chemical signals control cell behavior is needed if the complex biological processes of embryogenesis, development, health and disease are to be completely understood. Yet, if we are to fully understand the molecular mechanisms controlling cell behavior, measurements at the single cell level are needed to supplement information gained from population level studies. One of the major challenges to accomplishing studies at the single cell level has been a lack of physical tools to complement the powerful molecular biological assays which have provided much of what we currently know about cell behavior. The goal of this exploratory project is the development of an experimental platform that facilitates integrated observation, tracking and analysis of the responses of many individual cells to controlled environmental factors (e.g. extracellular signals). Toward this goal, we developed chemically-patterned microarrays of both adherent and suspension mammalian cell types. A novel chemical patterning methodology, based on photocatalytic lithography, was developed to construct biomolecule and cell arrays that facilitate analysis of biological function. Our patterning techniques rely on inexpensive stamp materials and visible light, and do not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates. Patterned silicon and glass substrates are modified such that there is a non-biofouling polymer matrix surrounding the adhesive regions that target biomolecules and cells. Fluorescence and reflectance microscopy reveal successful patterning of proteins and single to small clusters of mammalian cells. In vitro assays conducted upon cells on the patterned arrays demonstrate the viability of cells interfacing with this synthetic system. Hence, we have successfully established a versatile cell measurement platform which can be used to characterize the molecular regulators of cellular behavior in a variety of important

  9. Cellular Levels of Signaling Factors Are Sensed by β-actin Alleles to Modulate Transcriptional Pulse Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Kalo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional response of β-actin to extra-cellular stimuli is a paradigm for transcription factor complex assembly and regulation. Serum induction leads to a precisely timed pulse of β-actin transcription in the cell population. Actin protein is proposed to be involved in this response, but it is not known whether cellular actin levels affect nuclear β-actin transcription. We perturbed the levels of key signaling factors and examined the effect on the induced transcriptional pulse by following endogenous β-actin alleles in single living cells. Lowering serum response factor (SRF protein levels leads to loss of pulse integrity, whereas reducing actin protein levels reveals positive feedback regulation, resulting in elevated gene activation and a prolonged transcriptional response. Thus, transcriptional pulse fidelity requires regulated amounts of signaling proteins, and perturbations in factor levels eliminate the physiological response, resulting in either tuning down or exaggeration of the transcriptional pulse.

  10. A mathematical model of cortical bone remodeling at cellular level under mechanical stimulus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Hua Qin; Ya-Nan Wang

    2012-01-01

    A bone cell population dynamics model for cortical bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus is developed in this paper.The external experiments extracted from the literature which have not been used in the creation of the model are used to test the validity of the model.Not only can the model compare reasonably well with these experimental results such as the increase percentage of final values of bone mineral content (BMC) and bone fracture energy (BFE) among different loading schemes (which proves the validity of the model),but also predict the realtime development pattern of BMC and BFE,as well as the dynamics of osteoblasts (OBA),osteoclasts (OCA),nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) for each loading scheme,which can hardly be monitored through experiment.In conclusion,the model is the first of its kind that is able to provide an insight into the quantitative mechanism of bone remodeling at cellular level by which bone cells are activated by mechanical stimulus in order to start resorption/formation of bone mass.More importantly,this model has laid a solid foundation based on which future work such as systemic control theory analysis of bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus can be investigated.The to-be identified control mechanism will help to develop effective drugs and combined nonpharmacological therapies to combat bone loss pathologies.Also this deeper understanding of how mechanical forces quantitatively interact with skeletal tissue is essential for the generation of bone tissue for tissue replacement purposes in tissue engineering.

  11. Morphine Produces Immunosuppressive Effects in Non-human Primates at the Proteomic and Cellular Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Joseph N.; Ortiz, Gabriel M.; Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Chan, Eric Y.; Purdy, David E.; Murnane, Robert D.; Larsen, Kay; Palermo, Robert E.; Shukla, Anil K.; Clauss, Therese RW; Katze, Michael G.; McCune, Joseph M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-11

    Morphine has long been known to have immunosuppressive properties in vivo, but the molecular and immunologic changes induced by it are incompletely understood. As a prelude to understanding how these changes might interact with lentiviral infection in vivo, animals from two non-human primate (NHP) species [African green monkey (AGMs) and pigtailed macaque (PTs)] were provided morphine and studied using a systems biology approach. Biological specimens were obtained from multiple sources (e.g., lymph node, colon, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and peripheral blood) before and after the administration of morphine (titrated up to a maximum dose of 5 mg/kg over a period of 20 days). Cellular immune, plasma cytokine, and proteome changes were measured and morphine-induced changes in these parameters were assessed on an inter-organ, inter-individual, and inter-species basis. In both species, morphine was associated with decreased levels of (Ki-67+) T cell activation but with only minimal changes in overall T cell counts, neutrophil counts, and NK cells counts. While changes in T cell maturation were observed, these varied across the various tissue/fluid compartments studied. Proteomic analysis revealed a morphine-induced suppressive effect in the lymph node, with decreased abundance of protein mediators involved in the functional categories of energy metabolism, signaling, and maintenance of cell structure. These findings have relevance for understanding the impact of heroin addiction and the opioids used to treat addiction as well as on the interplay between opioid abuse and the response to infection with agents such as the human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV).

  12. Physical interpretation and geometrical representation of constant curvature surfaces in Euclidean and pseudo-Euclidean spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Riemann and Lorentz constant curvature surfaces are investigated from an Euclidean point of view. The four surfaces (constant positive and constant negative curvatures with definite and non-definite fine elements) are represented as surfaces in a Riemannian or in a particular semi-Riemannian flat space and it is shown that the complex and the hyperbolic numbers allow to obtain the same equations for the corresponding Riemann and Lorentz surfaces, respectively. Moreover it is shown that the geodesics on the Lorentz surfaces states, from a physical point of view, a link between curvature and fields. This result is obtained just as a consequence of the space-time geometrical symmetry, without invoking the famous Einstein general relativity postulate

  13. Euclidean distance harmonic method for establishing theoretical MAPK/Erk signaling pathway in treated breast cancer line MCF-7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-xin; LU Ying-hua; ZHANG Jin-ling

    2007-01-01

    Hierarchical clustering algorithms, such as Pearson's correlation, Euclidean distance, Euclidean distance harmonic,Spearman rank correlation, Kendall's tau, and City-block distance, were used to find the best way to establish theoretical MAPK/Erk signaling pathway on the basis of breast cancer line MCF-7 gene expressions. The algorithm consttucts a hierarchy from top to bottom on the basis of a self-organizing tree. It dynamically finds the number of clusters at each level. It was found that only Euclidean distance harmonic is fit for the analysis of the cascade composed from a RAF1 (c-Raf), a MKNK1, a MAPKK (MEK1/2) to MAPK (Erk) in breast cancer line MCF-7. The result is consistent with the biological experimental MAP/Erk signaling pathway, and the theoretical MAPK/Erk signaling pathway on breast cancer line MCF-7 is set up.

  14. The non-Euclidean revolution with an introduction by H.S.M. Coxeter

    CERN Document Server

    Trudeau, Richard J

    2001-01-01

    How unique and definitive is Euclidean geometry in describing the "real" space in which we live? Richard Trudeau confronts the fundamental question of truth and its representation through mathematical models in The Non-Euclidean Revolution. First, the author analyzes geometry in its historical and philosophical setting; second, he examines a revolution every bit as significant as the Copernican revolution in astronomy and the Darwinian revolution in biology; third, on the most speculative level, he questions the possibility of absolute knowledge of the world. Trudeau writes in a lively, entertaining, and highly accessible style. His book provides one of the most stimulating and personal presentations of a struggle with the nature of truth in mathematics and the physical world. A portion of the book won the Pólya Prize, a distinguished award from the Mathematical Association of America.

  15. Flexible intuitions of Euclidean geometry in an Amazonian indigene group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Véronique; Pica, Pierre; Spelke, Elizabeth S; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2011-06-14

    Kant argued that Euclidean geometry is synthesized on the basis of an a priori intuition of space. This proposal inspired much behavioral research probing whether spatial navigation in humans and animals conforms to the predictions of Euclidean geometry. However, Euclidean geometry also includes concepts that transcend the perceptible, such as objects that are infinitely small or infinitely large, or statements of necessity and impossibility. We tested the hypothesis that certain aspects of nonperceptible Euclidian geometry map onto intuitions of space that are present in all humans, even in the absence of formal mathematical education. Our tests probed intuitions of points, lines, and surfaces in participants from an indigene group in the Amazon, the Mundurucu, as well as adults and age-matched children controls from the United States and France and younger US children without education in geometry. The responses of Mundurucu adults and children converged with that of mathematically educated adults and children and revealed an intuitive understanding of essential properties of Euclidean geometry. For instance, on a surface described to them as perfectly planar, the Mundurucu's estimations of the internal angles of triangles added up to ~180 degrees, and when asked explicitly, they stated that there exists one single parallel line to any given line through a given point. These intuitions were also partially in place in the group of younger US participants. We conclude that, during childhood, humans develop geometrical intuitions that spontaneously accord with the principles of Euclidean geometry, even in the absence of training in mathematics. PMID:21606377

  16. Transmural heterogeneity of cellular level power output is reduced in human heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Premi; Nava, Kristofer E.; Lawson, Benjamin A.; Chung, Charles S.; Mitov, Mihail I.; Campbell, Stuart G.; Stromberg, Arnold J.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Bonnell, Mark R.; Hoopes, Charles W.; Campbell, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is associated with pump dysfunction and remodeling but it is not yet known if the condition affects different transmural regions of the heart in the same way. We tested the hypotheses that the left ventricles of non-failing human hearts exhibit transmural heterogeneity of cellular level contractile properties, and that heart failure produces transmural region-specific changes in contractile function. Permeabilized samples were prepared from the sub-epicardial, mid-myocardial, and sub-endocardial regions of the left ventricular free wall of non-failing (n=6) and failing (n=10) human hearts. Power, an in vitro index of systolic function, was higher in non-failing mid-myocardial samples (0.59±0.06 μW mg−1) than in samples from the sub-epicardium (p=0.021) and the sub-endocardium (p=0.015). Non-failing mid-myocardial samples also produced more isometric force (14.3±1.33 kN m−2) than samples from the sub-epicardium (p=0.008) and the sub-endocardium (p=0.026). Heart failure reduced power (p=0.009) and force (p=0.042) but affected the mid-myocardium more than the other transmural regions. Fibrosis increased with heart failure (p=0.021) and mid-myocardial tissue from failing hearts contained more collagen than matched sub-epicardial (p<0.001) and sub-endocardial (p=0.043) samples. Power output was correlated with the relative content of actin and troponin I, and was also statistically linked to the relative content and phosphorylation of desmin and myosin light chain- 1. Non-failing human hearts exhibit transmural heterogeneity of contractile properties. In failing organs, region-specific fibrosis produces the greatest contractile deficits in the mid-myocardium. Targeting fibrosis and sarcomeric proteins in the mid-myocardium may be particularly effective therapies for heart failure. PMID:24560668

  17. Complex I Disorders: Causes, Mechanisms, and Development of Treatment Strategies at the Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Federica; Koopman, Werner J. H.; Manjeri, Ganesh R.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; Willems, Peter H. G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) represents the final step in the conversion of nutrients into cellular energy. Genetic defects in the OXPHOS system have an incidence between 1:5,000 and 1:10,000 live births. Inherited isolated deficiency of the first complex (CI) of this system, a multisubunit assembly of 45 different proteins,…

  18. A study of the biological effects of rare earth elements at cellular level using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the biological effects and the effecting mechanisms of rare earth elements La, Gd and Ce on cultured rat cells. Methods: The biological effects of La3+ on cultured rat cells and the subcellular distribution of La and Gd and Ce, and the inflow of 45Ca2+ into the cells and total cellular calcium were measured by isotopic tracing, Proton Induced X Ray Emission Analysis (PIXE) and the techniques of biochemistry and cellular biology. Results: La3+ at the concentration of 10-10(or 10-9) - 10-6 mol/L significantly increased quantity of incorporation of 3H-TdR into DNA, total cellular protein and the activity of succinic dehydrogenase of mitochondria. The cell cycle analysis showed that the proportions of cells in S phase were accordingly increased acted by La3+ at above range of concentration. But these values were significantly decreased when concentration of La3+ raised to 10-4 - 10-3 mol/L. It was further discovered that La, Gd and Ce distributed mostly in the nuclei, and then in membranes. Gd and Ce also promoted the inflow of 45Ca2+ into the cells and increased the total calcium content in cells. Conclusions: 1) La3+ at a wide concentration range of 10-10( or 10-9) - 10-6 mol/L promotes proliferation of cultured rat cells, but at even higher concentration (10-4 - 10-3 mol/L) shows cellular toxicity, and there is a striking dose-effect relationship. 2) La, Gd and Ce can enter the cells and mainly distribute in the nuclei. 3) Gd and Ce can promote the inflow of extracellular Ca2+ into the cells and increase total cellular calcium

  19. Quaternion analyticity and conformally Kaehlerian structure in Euclidean gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guersey, F.; Chia-Hsiung Tze (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Gibbs Lab.)

    1984-09-01

    Starting from the fact that the d = 4 Euclidean flat spacetime is conformally related to the Kaehler manifold H/sup 2/xS/sup 2/, we show the Euclidean Schwarzschild metric to be conformally related to another Kaehler manifold M/sup 2/xS/sup 2/ with M/sup 2/ being conformal to H/sup 2/ in two dimensions. Both metrics which are conformally Kaehlerian, are form-invariant under the infinite parameter Fueter group, the Euclidean counterpart of Milne's group of clock regraduation. The associated Einstein's equations translate into Fueter's quaternionic analyticity. The latter leads to an infinite number of local continuity equations.

  20. Charged particle-induced modification of cellular genomic DNA and gene expression level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of this study is to understand cellular and molecular nature of cancer cells survived for long term after charged particle therapy. During the period of 1st year, clonogenic sensitivity of various cancer cell lines against charged particles was investigated by two experimental strategies. Firstly, human glioblastoma cell line, Becker, was investigated for the phenotypic changes after long term survival period (3 weeks). Especially, the cells were revealed to be sensitized toward secondary exposure of charged particles in a way of primary dose-dependence. However, this tendency was clearly eliminated when cells were treated by 5-azacytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor, before the primary exposure. Thus, epigenetic regulations of cellular genomic DNA were supposed to play important roles in the radiation sensitivity changes of the long-term survived cells. In the second approach, mouse cancer cell line analysis in the presence of 5-azacytidine revealed epigenetic heterogeneity of charged particle sensitivity within the cell population. (author)

  1. Inside s-inner product sets and Euclidean designs

    OpenAIRE

    Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    A finite set X in the Euclidean space is called an s-inner product set if the set of the usual inner products of any two distinct points in X has size s. First, we give a special upper bound for the cardinality of an s-inner product set on concentric spheres. The upper bound coincides with the known lower bound for the size of a Euclidean 2s-design. Secondly, we prove the non-existence of 2- or 3-inner product sets on two concentric spheres attaining the upper bound for any d>1. The efficient...

  2. Classification of flat slant surfaces in complex Euclidean plane

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bang-yen

    2002-01-01

    It is well-known that the classification of flat surfaces in Euclidean 3space is one of the most basic results in differential geometry. For surfaces in the complex Euclidean plane $C^{2}$ endowed with almost complex structure $J$ , flat surfaces are the simplest ones from intrinsic point of views. On the other hand, from $J$ -action point of views, the most natural surfaces in $C^{2}$ are slant surfaces, i.e., surfaces with constant Wintinger angle. In this paper the author completely classi...

  3. Cellular Levels of Oxidative Stress Affect the Response of Cervical Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Filippova; Valery Filippov; Williams, Vonetta M; Kangling Zhang; Anatolii Kokoza; Svetlana Bashkirova; Penelope Duerksen-Hughes

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of advanced and relapsed cervical cancer is frequently ineffective, due in large part to chemoresistance. To examine the pathways responsible, we employed the cervical carcinoma-derived SiHa and CaSki cells as cellular models of resistance and sensitivity, respectively, to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents, doxorubicin, and cisplatin. We compared the proteomic profiles of SiHa and CaSki cells and identified pathways with the potential to contribute to the differential response....

  4. Combination of Polymer Technology and Carbon Nanotube Array for the Development of an Effective Drug Delivery System at Cellular Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggio Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, a carbon nanotube (CNT array-based system combined with a polymer thin film is proposed as an effective drug release device directly at cellular level. The polymeric film embedded in the CNT array is described and characterized in terms of release kinetics, while in vitro assays on PC12 cell line have been performed in order to assess the efficiency and functionality of the entrapped agent (neural growth factor, NGF. PC12 cell differentiation, following incubation on the CNT array embedding the alginate delivery film, demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed solution. The achieved results indicate that polymeric technology could be efficiently embedded in CNT array acting as drug delivery system at cellular level. The implication of this study opens several perspectives in particular in the field of neurointerfaces, combining several functions into a single platform.

  5. Ag Nanoparticles (Ag NM300K) in the Terrestrial Environment: Effects at Population and Cellular Level in Folsomia candida (Collembola)

    OpenAIRE

    Luís André Mendes; Maria, Vera L.; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J.; Amorim, Mónica J. B.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of nanomaterials have been primarily assessed based on standard ecotoxicity guidelines. However, by adapting alternative measures the information gained could be enhanced considerably, e.g., studies should focus on more mechanistic approaches. Here, the environmental risk posed by the presence of silver nanoparticles (Ag NM300K) in soil was investigated, anchoring population and cellular level effects, i.e., survival, reproduction (28 days) and oxidative stress markers (0, 2, 4, 6...

  6. High-throughput dual-colour precision imaging for brain-wide connectome with cytoarchitectonic landmarks at the cellular level

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Hui; Xu, Dongli; Yuan, Jing; Li, Xiangning; Guo, Congdi; Peng, Jie; Li, Yuxin; Schwarz, Lindsay A.; Li, Anan; Hu, Bihe; Xiong, Benyi; Sun, Qingtao; Zhang, Yalun; Liu, Jiepeng; Zhong, Qiuyuan

    2016-01-01

    The precise annotation and accurate identification of neural structures are prerequisites for studying mammalian brain function. The orientation of neurons and neural circuits is usually determined by mapping brain images to coarse axial-sampling planar reference atlases. However, individual differences at the cellular level likely lead to position errors and an inability to orient neural projections at single-cell resolution. Here, we present a high-throughput precision imaging method that c...

  7. Effects of arsenite on UROtsa cells: low-level arsenite causes accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins that is enhanced by reduction in cellular glutathione levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic arsenic exposure increases risk for the development of diabetes, vascular disease, and cancers of the skin, lung, kidney, and bladder. This study investigates the effects of arsenite [As(III)] on human urothelial cells (UROtsa). As(III) toxicity was determined by exposing confluent UROtsa cells to As(III) (0.5-200 μM). Depleting cellular glutathione levels with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) potentiated the toxicity of As(III). Cell viability was assessed with the (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. UROtsa cell ability to biotransform As(III) was determined by dosing cells with environmentally relevant concentrations of As(III) followed by HPLC/ICP-MS analysis of cell media and lysate. Both pentavalent and trivalent monomethylated products were detected. Although cytotoxicity was observed at high doses of As(III) (approximately 100 μM) in UROtsa cells, perturbations of a variety of molecular processes occurred at much lower doses. Exposure to low-level As(III) (0.5-25 μM) causes an accumulation of ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugated proteins. This effect is enhanced when cellular glutathione levels have been reduced with BSO treatment. Because As(III) has many effects on UROtsa cells, a greater understanding of how As(III) is affecting cellular proteins in a target tissue will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of toxicity and pathogenesis for low-level As(III)

  8. Might carnitine status in animals indicate environmental/toxicological harm at the cellular level?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garst, J.E.

    1995-12-01

    It is well known that R-(L)-carnitine (Cn) is essential for the energy-producing, mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long chain fatty acids. Cn can ameliorate the diverse effects of drugs, a chemicals and pollutants. Moreover, the toxicities of carbon monoxide, several heavy metals, and even the antibiotic cephaloridine seem mediated, in part, by actions affecting the Cn system. Data which could suggest that the Cn system is an integrator/regulator of the cellular response by the organism to it`s environment is described.

  9. Energy absorption at cellular levels from curium isotopes deposited in the lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curium isotopes are generated hitherto as a waste product in nuclear energy production. Exposure in humans has occured mainly via inhalation. After reprocessing of spent reactor fuel these nuclides represent the highest alpha activity during the first 60 years. Therefore it is necessary to study the resulting radiation exposure in man after a accidental contamination. Lung tissue sections were analysed for histological characteristics by means of adaptive pattern recognition methods, using an electronic image analyzer. Alpha particle tracks were superimposed and interaction with cellular structures was simulated. Cell frequency distribution, along with specific hit-probability is used to assess quantitatively the resulting energy deposition in the single cells

  10. Euclidean Distances, soft and spectral Clustering on Weighted Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Bavaud, François

    2010-01-01

    We define a class of Euclidean distances on weighted graphs, enabling to perform thermodynamic soft graph clustering. The class can be constructed form the "raw coordinates" encountered in spectral clustering, and can be extended by means of higher-dimensional embeddings (Schoenberg transformations). Geographical flow data, properly conditioned, illustrate the procedure as well as visualization aspects.

  11. Smoothed analysis of partitioning algorithms for Euclidean functionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bläser, Markus; Manthey, Bodo; Rao, B.V. Raghavendra

    2013-01-01

    Euclidean optimization problems such as TSP and minimum-length matching admit fast partitioning algorithms that compute near-optimal solutions on typical instances. In order to explain this performance, we develop a general framework for the application of smoothed analysis to partitioning algorithm

  12. From geometry to algebra: the Euclidean way with technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarello, Daniela; Flavia Mammana, Maria; Pennisi, Mario

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of an experimental classroom activity, history-based with a phylogenetic approach, to achieve algebra properties through geometry. In particular, we used Euclidean propositions, processed them by a dynamic geometry system and translate them into algebraic special products.

  13. The toroidal Hausdorff dimension of 2d Euclidean quantum gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjorn, Jan; Budd, Timothy George

    2013-01-01

    The lengths of shortest non-contractible loops are studied numerically in 2d Euclidean quantum gravity on a torus coupled to conformal field theories with central charge less than one. We find that the distribution of these geodesic lengths displays a scaling in agreement with a Hausdorff dimension...

  14. Gravitation in 4D Euclidean Space-Time Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Winkler, Franz-Guenter

    2007-01-01

    The Euclidean interpretation of special relativity provides an intuitive way to understand and derive the Lorentz transformations in the framework of a "natural" 4D Euclidean space-time geometry. In this article the conceptual basis for a purely metric generalization of the Euclidean view is laid. It consists of i) the assumption of spatial and directional variations of the speed of light (VSL), ii) a formulation of the principle of general covariance in 4D Euclidean geometry, and iii) a generally covariant motion law for point particles. For the gravitation model, which is developed on this basis, three out of four effects of the Schwarzschild solution are derived (shift of spectral lines, deflection of light, precession of perihelia of planetary orbits). The explanation of the Shapiro radar echo delay requires modifications of the space-time geometry of the sun's environment. The additional effects brought forth by the respective model entail a possible account of the coronal heating problem and thus make t...

  15. The Role of Structure in Learning Non-Euclidean Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmuth, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    How do people learn novel mathematical information that contradicts prior knowledge? The focus of this thesis is the role of structure in the acquisition of knowledge about hyperbolic geometry, a non-Euclidean geometry. In a series of three experiments, I contrast a more holistic structure--training based on closed figures--with a mathematically…

  16. Euclidean Primes Have the Minimum Number of Primitive Roots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal; Somer, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2008), s. 121-127. ISSN 0972-5555 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100190803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Euclidean prime s * Fermat prime s * Sophie Germain prime s Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  17. Interaction of alpha particles at the cellular level - Implications for the radiation weighting factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since low dose effects of alpha particles are produced by cellular hits in a relatively small fraction of exposed cells, the present study focuses on alpha particle interactions in bronchial epithelial cells following exposure to inhaled radon progeny. A computer code was developed for the calculation of microdosimetric spectra, dose and hit probabilities for alpha particles emitted from uniform and non-uniform source distributions in cylindrical and Y-shaped bronchial airway geometries. Activity accumulations at the dividing spur of bronchial airway bifurcations produce hot spots of cellular hits, indicating that a small fraction of cells located at such sites may receive substantially higher doses. While presently available data on in vitro transformation frequencies suggest that the relative biological effectiveness for alpha particles ranges from about 3 to 10, the effect of inhomogeneous activity distributions of radon progeny may slightly increase the radiation weighting factor relative to a uniform distribution. Thus a radiation weighting factor of about 10 may be more realistic than the current value of 20, at least for lung cancer risk following inhalation of short-lived radon progeny. (authors)

  18. A Vector Approach to Euclidean Geometry: Inner Product Spaces, Euclidean Geometry and Trigonometry, Volume 2. Teacher's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Herbert E.; Szabo, Steven

    This is the teacher's edition of a text for the second year of a two-year high school geometry course. The course bases plane and solid geometry and trigonometry on the fact that the translations of a Euclidean space constitute a vector space which has an inner product. Congruence is a geometric topic reserved for Volume 2. Volume 2 opens with an…

  19. Biharmonic Submanifolds with Parallel Mean Curvature Vector in Pseudo-Euclidean Spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yu, E-mail: yufudufe@gmail.com [Dongbei University of Finance and Economics, School of Mathematics and Quantitative Economics (China)

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate biharmonic submanifolds in pseudo-Euclidean spaces with arbitrary index and dimension. We give a complete classification of biharmonic spacelike submanifolds with parallel mean curvature vector in pseudo-Euclidean spaces. We also determine all biharmonic Lorentzian surfaces with parallel mean curvature vector field in pseudo-Euclidean spaces.

  20. Mechanistic model of radon-induced lung cancer risk at low exposure levels based on cellular alpha particle hits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Hofmann; Hatim, Fakir [Salzburg Univ., Div. of Physics and Biophysics, Dept. of Material Science (Austria); Lucia-Adina, Truta-Popa [Babes-Bolyai Univ., Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    To explore the role of the multiplicity of cellular hits by radon progeny alpha particles for lung cancer incidence, the number of single and multiple alpha particle hits were computed for basal and secretory cells in the bronchial epithelium of human airway bifurcations employing Monte Carlo methods. Hot spots of alpha particle hits were observed at the branching points of bronchial airway bifurcations, suggesting that multiple alpha particle hits may occur primarily at carinal ridges. Random alpha particle intersections of bronchial cells during a given exposure period, selected from a Poisson distribution, were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, based on experimentally observed cellular transformation and survival functions. To consider potential bystander effects, which have been observed in cellular in vitro studies, alpha particle interactions were also simulated for larger sensitive target volumes in bronchial epithelium, consisting of a collection of cells. Lung cancer risk simulations indicated that cancer induction for continuous exposures is related to the cycle time of an irradiated cell, thus exhibiting a distinct dose-rate effect. While the dominant role of single hits leads to a linear dose-response relationship at low radon exposure levels, predicted lung cancer risk for a collection of interacting cells exhibits a linear-quadratic response, suggesting that bystander effects, if operating at all under in vivo irradiations, may be restricted to a small number of adjacent cells. (author)

  1. Mechanistic model of radon-induced lung cancer risk at low exposure levels based on cellular alpha particle hits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the role of the multiplicity of cellular hits by radon progeny alpha particles for lung cancer incidence, the number of single and multiple alpha particle hits were computed for basal and secretory cells in the bronchial epithelium of human airway bifurcations employing Monte Carlo methods. Hot spots of alpha particle hits were observed at the branching points of bronchial airway bifurcations, suggesting that multiple alpha particle hits may occur primarily at carinal ridges. Random alpha particle intersections of bronchial cells during a given exposure period, selected from a Poisson distribution, were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, based on experimentally observed cellular transformation and survival functions. To consider potential bystander effects, which have been observed in cellular in vitro studies, alpha particle interactions were also simulated for larger sensitive target volumes in bronchial epithelium, consisting of a collection of cells. Lung cancer risk simulations indicated that cancer induction for continuous exposures is related to the cycle time of an irradiated cell, thus exhibiting a distinct dose-rate effect. While the dominant role of single hits leads to a linear dose-response relationship at low radon exposure levels, predicted lung cancer risk for a collection of interacting cells exhibits a linear-quadratic response, suggesting that bystander effects, if operating at all under in vivo irradiations, may be restricted to a small number of adjacent cells. (author)

  2. Cellular-level near-wall unsteadiness of high-hematocrit erythrocyte flow using confocal μPIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Michael J.; Chen, Chia-Yuan; Frakes, David H.; Dur, Onur; Pekkan, Kerem

    2011-04-01

    In hemodynamics, the inherent intermittency of two-phase cellular-level flow has received little attention. Unsteadiness is reported and quantified for the first time in the literature using a combination of fluorescent dye labeling, time-resolved scanning confocal microscopy, and micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV). The near-wall red blood cell (RBC) motion of physiologic high-hematocrit blood in a rectangular microchannel was investigated under pressure-driven flow. Intermittent flow was associated with (1) the stretching of RBCs as they passed through RBC clusters with twisting motions; (2) external flow through local obstacles; and (3) transitionary rouleaux formations. Velocity profiles are presented for these cases. Unsteady flow clustered in local regions. Extra-cellular fluid flow generated by individual RBCs was examined using submicron fluorescent microspheres. The capabilities of confocal μPIV post-processing were verified using synthetic raw PIV data for validation. Cellular interactions and oscillating velocity profiles are presented, and 3D data are made available for computational model validation.

  3. Cellular-level near-wall unsteadiness of high-hematocrit erythrocyte flow using confocal {mu}PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, Michael J. [Carnegie Mellon University, Molecular Biosensor and Imaging Center (MBIC), Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chen, Chia-Yuan; Dur, Onur; Pekkan, Kerem [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Frakes, David H. [Arizona State University, School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering and School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2011-04-15

    In hemodynamics, the inherent intermittency of two-phase cellular-level flow has received little attention. Unsteadiness is reported and quantified for the first time in the literature using a combination of fluorescent dye labeling, time-resolved scanning confocal microscopy, and micro-particle image velocimetry ({mu}PIV). The near-wall red blood cell (RBC) motion of physiologic high-hematocrit blood in a rectangular microchannel was investigated under pressure-driven flow. Intermittent flow was associated with (1) the stretching of RBCs as they passed through RBC clusters with twisting motions; (2) external flow through local obstacles; and (3) transitionary rouleaux formations. Velocity profiles are presented for these cases. Unsteady flow clustered in local regions. Extra-cellular fluid flow generated by individual RBCs was examined using submicron fluorescent microspheres. The capabilities of confocal {mu}PIV post-processing were verified using synthetic raw PIV data for validation. Cellular interactions and oscillating velocity profiles are presented, and 3D data are made available for computational model validation. (orig.)

  4. Ag Nanoparticles (Ag NM300K) in the Terrestrial Environment: Effects at Population and Cellular Level in Folsomia candida (Collembola).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luís André; Maria, Vera L; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2015-10-01

    The effects of nanomaterials have been primarily assessed based on standard ecotoxicity guidelines. However, by adapting alternative measures the information gained could be enhanced considerably, e.g., studies should focus on more mechanistic approaches. Here, the environmental risk posed by the presence of silver nanoparticles (Ag NM300K) in soil was investigated, anchoring population and cellular level effects, i.e., survival, reproduction (28 days) and oxidative stress markers (0, 2, 4, 6, 10 days). The standard species Folsomia candida was used. Measured markers included catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), total glutathione (TG), metallothionein (MT) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Results showed that AgNO₃ was more toxic than AgNPs at the population level: reproduction EC₂₀ and EC₅₀ was ca. 2 and 4 times lower, respectively. At the cellular level Correspondence Analysis showed a clear separation between AgNO₃ and AgNP throughout time. Results showed differences in the mechanisms, indicating a combined effect of released Ag⁺ (MT and GST) and of AgNPs (CAT, GR, TG, LPO). Hence, clear advantages from mechanistic approaches are shown, but also that time is of importance when measuring such responses. PMID:26473892

  5. Ag Nanoparticles (Ag NM300K in the Terrestrial Environment: Effects at Population and Cellular Level in Folsomia candida (Collembola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís André Mendes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nanomaterials have been primarily assessed based on standard ecotoxicity guidelines. However, by adapting alternative measures the information gained could be enhanced considerably, e.g., studies should focus on more mechanistic approaches. Here, the environmental risk posed by the presence of silver nanoparticles (Ag NM300K in soil was investigated, anchoring population and cellular level effects, i.e., survival, reproduction (28 days and oxidative stress markers (0, 2, 4, 6, 10 days. The standard species Folsomia candida was used. Measured markers included catalase (CAT, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione S-transferase (GST, total glutathione (TG, metallothionein (MT and lipid peroxidation (LPO. Results showed that AgNO3 was more toxic than AgNPs at the population level: reproduction EC20 and EC50 was ca. 2 and 4 times lower, respectively. At the cellular level Correspondence Analysis showed a clear separation between AgNO3 and AgNP throughout time. Results showed differences in the mechanisms, indicating a combined effect of released Ag+ (MT and GST and of AgNPs (CAT, GR, TG, LPO. Hence, clear advantages from mechanistic approaches are shown, but also that time is of importance when measuring such responses.

  6. Analysis of cellular phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate levels and distribution using confocal fluorescent microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Michelle; Nowell, Cameron J; Condron, Melanie; Gardiner, James; Holmes, Andrew B; Desai, Jayesh; Burgess, Antony W; Catimel, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an immunocytochemistry method for the semiquantitative detection of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3) at the cell plasma membrane. This protocol combines the use of a glutathione S-transferase-tagged pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of the general phosphoinositides-1 receptor (GST-GRP1PH) with fluorescence confocal microscopy and image segmentation using cell mask software analysis. This methodology allows the analysis of PI(3,4,5)P3 subcellular distribution in resting and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated HEK293T cells and in LIM1215 (wild-type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)) and LIM2550 (H1047R mutation in PI3K catalytic domain) colonic carcinoma cells. Formation of PI(3,4,5)P3 was observed 5min following EGF stimulation and resulted in an increase of the membrane/cytoplasm fluorescence ratio from 1.03 to 1.53 for HEK293T cells and from 2.2 to 3.3 for LIM1215 cells. Resting LIM2550 cells stained with GST-GRP1PH had an elevated membrane/cytoplasm fluorescence ratio of 9.8, suggesting constitutive PI3K activation. The increase in the membrane/cytoplasm fluorescent ratio was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. This cellular confocal imaging assay can be used to directly assess the effects of PI3K mutations in cancer cell lines and to determine the potential specificity and effectiveness of PI3K inhibitors in cancer cells. PMID:20599646

  7. Effect of electromagnetic fields at 2.45 GHz on the levels of cellular stress proteins HSP-90 and 70 in the rat thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we analyzed the cellular stress levels achieved by heat shock proteins (HSP) 90 and 70 in rat thyroid tissue after exposure to radio waves in TWG experimental system. Parallel measurements of body stress in animals by rectal temperature probes allow us to determine whether there is any interaction between temperature increases and cellular stress.

  8. Lorentz connection from a conformal gauge theory of Euclidean space

    CERN Document Server

    Hazboun, Jeffrey S

    2013-01-01

    The quotient of the conformal group of Euclidean 4-space by its Weyl subgroup results in a geometry possessing many of the properties of relativistic phase space, including both a natural symplectic form and non-degenerate Killing metric. When we complete the identification with phase space by requiring the existence of orthogonal, canonically conjugate, metric submanifolds, we find that the induced metric and the spin connection are Lorentzian on the submanifolds, despite the Euclidean starting pont. By examining the structure equations of the biconformal space in an orthonormal frame adapted to its phase space properties, we also find that two new tensor fields emerge from this geometry. The first is a combination of the scale factor on the metric with the Weyl vector. The second comes from the components of the spin connection, symmetric with respect to the new metric. Though this field comes from the spin connection it transforms homogeneously.

  9. Embedding spacetime via a geodesically equivalent metric of Euclidean signature

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, Rickard

    2001-01-01

    Starting from the equations of motion in a 1 + 1 static, diagonal, Lorentzian spacetime, such as the Schwarzschild radial line element, I find another metric, but with Euclidean signature, which produces the same geodesics x(t). This geodesically equivalent, or dual, metric can be embedded in ordinary Euclidean space. On the embedded surface freely falling particles move on the shortest path. Thus one can visualize how acceleration in a gravitational field is explained by particles moving freely in a curved spacetime. Freedom in the dual metric allows us to display, with substantial curvature, even the weak gravity of our Earth. This may provide a nice pedagogical tool for elementary lectures on general relativity. I also study extensions of the dual metric scheme to higher dimensions. In an addendum I extend the analysis concerning the shape of an embedding of the dual spacetime of a line through a planet of constant proper density.

  10. Branes in the euclidean AdS3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we propose an exact microscopic description of maximally symmetric branes in a euclidean AdS3 background. As shown by Bachas and Petropoulos, the most important such branes are localized along a euclidean AdS2 is contained in AdS3. We provide explicit formulas for the coupling of closed strings to such branes (boundary states) and for the spectral density of open strings. The latter is computed in two different ways first in terms of the open string reflection amplitude and then also from the boundary states by world-sheet duality. This gives rise to an important Cardy type consistency check. All the results are compared in detail with the geometrical picture. We also discuss a second class of branes with spherical symmetry and finally comment on some implications for D-branes in a 2D back hole geometry. (author)

  11. Classification of Handwritten Marathi Numbers Using Euclidean Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kaousadikar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a system for recognition of Marathi handwritten numbers. In this system we develop an algorithm in which we employed Euclidean distance technique for recognition. This algorithm tested on our own database in which we collected 0-9 handwritten Marathi numbers and this handwritten numbers converted in digitization using scanner of brand UMAX model Astra 5600. The handwritten font size of each numbers for each person is different and we made same size, by comparing query/test image of number with database image of numbers by removing rows and columns from bigger size of row and column. Also we compare two techniques of removing rows and columns from centre and removed rows and columns from outer sides (i.e. from top, bottom, left and right side of database images of numbers for calculation of Euclidean distance. The algorithm tested in Matlab tool and the result is shown in table.

  12. Learning to Detect Spam: Naive-Euclidean Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Y.T. Chan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed for learning to classify spam and nonspamemails. It combines the strategy of the Best Stepwise Feature Selection with a classifier of Euclidean nearest-neighbor. Each text email is first transformed into a vector of D-dimensional Euclidean space. Emails were divided into training and test sets in the manner of 10-fold crossvalidation. Three experiments were performed, and their elapsed CPU times and accuracies reported. The proposed spam detection learner was found to be extremely fast in recognition and with good error rates. It could be used as a baseline learning agent, in terms of CPU time and accuracy, against which other learning agents can be measured.

  13. Active biopolymer networks generate scale-free but euclidean clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sheinman, M; Alvarado, J; Koenderink, G H; MacKintosh, F C

    2014-01-01

    We report analytical and numerical modelling of active elastic networks, motivated by experiments on crosslinked actin networks contracted by myosin motors. Within a broad range of parameters, the motor-driven collapse of active elastic networks leads to a critical state. We show that this state is qualitatively different from that of the random percolation model. Intriguingly, it possesses both euclidean and scale-free structure with Fisher exponent smaller than $2$. Remarkably, an indistinguishable Fisher exponent and the same euclidean structure is obtained at the critical point of the random percolation model after absorbing all enclaves into their surrounding clusters. We propose that in the experiment the enclaves are absorbed due to steric interactions of network elements. We model the network collapse, taking into account the steric interactions. The model shows how the system robustly drives itself towards the critical point of the random percolation model with absorbed enclaves, in agreement with th...

  14. Primordial scalar power spectrum from the Euclidean big bounce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schander, Susanne; Barrau, Aurélien; Bolliet, Boris; Linsefors, Linda; Mielczarek, Jakub; Grain, Julien

    2016-01-01

    In effective models of loop quantum cosmology, the holonomy corrections are associated with deformations of space-time symmetries. The most evident manifestation of the deformations is the emergence of a Euclidean phase accompanying the nonsingular bouncing dynamics of the scale factor. In this article, we compute the power spectrum of scalar perturbations generated in this model, with a massive scalar field as the matter content. Instantaneous and adiabatic vacuum-type initial conditions for scalar perturbations are imposed in the contracting phase. The evolution through the Euclidean region is calculated based on the extrapolation of the time direction pointed by the vectors normal to the Cauchy hypersurface in the Lorentzian domains. The obtained power spectrum is characterized by a suppression in the IR regime and oscillations in the intermediate energy range. Furthermore, the speculative extension of the analysis in the UV reveals a specific rise of the power leading to results incompatible with the data.

  15. Short-distance analysis for algebraic euclidean field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schlingemann, D

    1999-01-01

    Recently D. Buchholz and R. Verch have proposed a method for implementing in algebraic quantum field theory ideas from renormalization group analysis of short-distance (high energy) behavior by passing to certain scaling limit theories. Buchholz and Verch distinguish between different types of theories where the limit is unique, degenerate, or classical, and the method allows in principle to extract the `ultraparticle' content of a given model, i.e. to identify particles (like quarks and gluons) that are not visible at finite distances due to `confinement'. It is therefore of great importance for the physical interpretation of the theory. The method has been illustrated in a simple model in with some rather surprising results. This paper will focus on the question how the short distance behavior of models defined by euclidean means is reflected in the corresponding behavior of their Minkowski counterparts. More specifically, we shall prove that if a euclidean theory has some short distance limit, then it is p...

  16. Euclidean dynamical symmetry in nuclear shape phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Euclidean dynamical symmetry hidden in the critical region of nuclear shape phase transitions is revealed by a novel algebraic F(5) description. With a nonlinear projection, it is shown that the dynamics in the critical region of the spherical–axial deformed and the spherical–γ-soft shape phase transitions can indeed be manifested by this description, which thus provides a unified symmetry-based interpretation of the critical phenomena in the region.

  17. Change of Measure between Light Travel Time and Euclidean Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heymann Y.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of cosmological distances is approached using a method based on the propagation of light in an expanding Universe. From the chan ge of measure between Light Travel Time and Euclidean Distances, a formula is deri ved to compute distances as a function of redshift. This formula is identical to Matti g’s formula (with q 0 = 1 / 2 which is based on Friedmann’s equations of general relativi ty.

  18. General Nth order integrals of motion in the Euclidean plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, S.; Winternitz, P.

    2015-10-01

    The general form of an integral of motion that is a polynomial of order N in the momenta is presented for a Hamiltonian system in two-dimensional Euclidean space. The classical and the quantum cases are treated separately, emphasizing both the similarities and the differences between the two. The main application will be to study Nth order superintegrable systems that allow separation of variables in the Hamilton-Jacobi and Schrödinger equations, respectively.

  19. General Nth order integrals of motion in the Euclidean plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general form of an integral of motion that is a polynomial of order N in the momenta is presented for a Hamiltonian system in two-dimensional Euclidean space. The classical and the quantum cases are treated separately, emphasizing both the similarities and the differences between the two. The main application will be to study Nth order superintegrable systems that allow separation of variables in the Hamilton–Jacobi and Schrödinger equations, respectively. (paper)

  20. Dynamics of Induced Surfaces in Four-Dimensional Euclidean Space

    OpenAIRE

    Bracken, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The Davey Stewartson hierarchy will be developed based on a set of three matrix differential operators. These equations will act as evolution equations for different types of surface deformation in Euclidean four space. The Weierstrass representation for surfaces will be developed and its uniqueness up to gauge transformations will be reviewed. Applications of the hierarchy will be given with regard to generating deformations of surfaces, and it will be shown that the Willmore functional is p...

  1. Friezes and a construction of the euclidean cluster variables

    OpenAIRE

    Assem, I.; Dupont, G.

    2010-01-01

    Let $Q$ be an euclidean quiver. Using friezes in the sense of Assem-Reutenauer-Smith, we provide an algorithm for computing the (canonical) cluster character associated to any object in the cluster category of $Q$. In particular, this algorithm allows to compute all the cluster variables in the cluster algebra associated to $Q$. It also allows to compute the sum of the Euler characteristics of the quiver grassmannians of any module $M$ over the path algebra of $Q$.

  2. Upper Bounds for the Euclidean Operator Radius and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present paper is to establish various sharp upper bounds for the Euclidean operator radius of an n-tuple of bounded linear operators on a Hilbert space. The tools used are provided by several generalizations of Bessel inequality due to Boas-Bellman, Bombieri, and the author. Natural applications for the norm and the numerical radius of bounded linear operators on Hilbert spaces are also given.

  3. Upper Bounds for the Euclidean Operator Radius and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragomir SS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The main aim of the present paper is to establish various sharp upper bounds for the Euclidean operator radius of an -tuple of bounded linear operators on a Hilbert space. The tools used are provided by several generalizations of Bessel inequality due to Boas-Bellman, Bombieri, and the author. Natural applications for the norm and the numerical radius of bounded linear operators on Hilbert spaces are also given.

  4. Quantum Brans-Dicke Gravity in Euclidean Path Integral Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hongsu

    1997-01-01

    The conformal structure of Brans-Dicke gravity action is carefully studied. It is discussed that Brans-Dicke gravity action has definitely no conformal invariance. It is shown, however, that this lack of conformal invariance enables us to demonstrate that Brans-Dicke theory appears to have a better short-distance behavior than Einstein gravity as far as Euclidean path integral formulation for quantum gravity is concerned.

  5. Defects and boundary layers in non-Euclidean plates

    CERN Document Server

    Gemmer, John

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the behaviour of non-Euclidean plates with constant negative Gaussian curvature using the F\\"oppl-von K\\'arm\\'an reduced theory of elasticity. Motivated by recent experimental results, we focus on annuli with a periodic profile. We prove rigorous upper and lower bounds for the elastic energy that scales like the thickness squared. We also investigate the scaling with thickness of boundary layers where the stretching energy is concentrated with decreasing thickness.

  6. Euclidean Configuration Space Renormalization, Residues and Dilation Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolov, Nikolay M; Todorov, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Configuration (x-)space renormalization of Euclidean Feynman amplitudes in a massless quantum field theory is reduced to the study of local extensions of associate homogeneous distributions. Primitively divergent graphs are renormalized, in particular, by subtracting the residue of an analytically regularized expression. Examples are given of computing residues that involve zeta values. The renormalized Green functions are again associate homogeneous distributions of the same degree that transform under indecomposable representations of the dilation group.

  7. Modified Euclidean Algorithms for Decoding Reed-Solomon Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwate, Dilip V.; Yan, Zhiyuan

    2009-01-01

    The extended Euclidean algorithm (EEA) for polynomial greatest common divisors is commonly used in solving the key equation in the decoding of Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and more generally in BCH decoding. For this particular application, the iterations in the EEA are stopped when the degree of the remainder polynomial falls below a threshold. While determining the degree of a polynomial is a simple task for human beings, hardware implementation of this stopping rule is more complicated. This p...

  8. Euclidean Upgrade from a Minimal Number of Segments

    OpenAIRE

    Schilling, Tanja; Pajdla, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an algebraic approach to upgrade a projective reconstruction to a Euclidean one, and aim at computing the rectifying homography from a minimal number of 9 segments of known length. Constraints are derived from these segments which yield a set of polynomial equations that we solve by means of Gr\\"obner bases. We explain how a solver for such a system of equations can be constructed from simplified template data. Moreover, we present experiments that demonstrate that t...

  9. Selected materials of the international workshop on radiation risk and its origin at molecular and cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop ''International Workshop on Radiation Risk and its Origin at Molecular and Cellular Level'' was held at The Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, on the 6th and 7th of February 2003. The Laboratory of Radiation Risk Analysis of JAERI organized it. This international workshop attracted scientists from several different scientific areas, including radiation physics, radiation biology, molecular biology, crystallography of biomolecules, modeling and bio-informatics. Several foreign and domestic keynote speakers addresses the very fundamental areas of radiation risk and tried to establish a link between the fundamental studies at the molecular and cellular level and radiation damages at the organism. The symposium consisted of 13 oral lectures, 10 poster presentations and panel discussion. The 108 participants attended the workshop. This publication comprises of proceedings of oral and poster presentations where available. For the rest of contributions the abstracts or/and selections of presentation materials are shown instead. The 5 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Folding of non-Euclidean curved shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bende, Nakul; Evans, Arthur; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis; Cohen, Itai; Santangelo, Christian; Hayward, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Origami-based folding of 2D sheets has been of recent interest for a variety of applications ranging from deployable structures to self-folding robots. Though folding of planar sheets follows well-established principles, folding of curved shells involves an added level of complexity due to the inherent influence of curvature on mechanics. In this study, we use principles from differential geometry and thin shell mechanics to establish fundamental rules that govern folding of prototypical creased shells. In particular, we show how the normal curvature of a crease line controls whether the deformation is smooth or discontinuous, and investigate the influence of shell thickness and boundary conditions. We show that snap-folding of shells provides a route to rapid actuation on time-scales dictated by the speed of sound. The simple geometric design principles developed can be applied at any length-scale, offering potential for bio-inspired soft actuators for tunable optics, microfluidics, and robotics. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation through EFRI ODISSEI-1240441 with additional support to S.I.-G. through the UMass MRSEC DMR-0820506 REU program.

  11. Thermal conductivity of biological cells at cellular level and correlation with disease state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Woo, Yunho; Jeong, Dayeong; Park, Jaesung; Choi, Tae-Youl; Simmons, Denise Perry; Ha, Jeonghong; Kim, Dongsik

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the thermal conductivity k of matched pair cell lines: two pairs of a normal and a cancer cell, one pair of a primary and metastatic cell. The 3ω method with a nanoscale thermal sensor was used to measure k at the single-cell level. To observe the difference in k between normal and cancer cells, the measurements were conducted for Hs 578Bst/Hs 578 T (human breast cells) and TE 353.Sk/TE 354.T (human skin cells). Then k of WM-115/WM-266-4, a primary and metastatic pair of human skin cell, was measured to find the effect of disease progression on k. The measured k data for normal and disease cell samples show statistically meaningful differences. In all cases, k decreased as the disease progressed. This work shows that thermal-analysis schemes, such as the 3ω method, have a potential to detect diseases at the cell level.

  12. Efficient Uplink Modeling for Dynamic System-Level Simulations of Cellular and Mobile Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobinger Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel theoretical framework for uplink simulations is proposed. It allows investigations which have to cover a very long (real- time and which at the same time require a certain level of accuracy in terms of radio resource management, quality of service, and mobility. This is of particular importance for simulations of self-organizing networks. For this purpose, conventional system level simulators are not suitable due to slow simulation speeds far beyond real-time. Simpler, snapshot-based tools are lacking the aforementioned accuracy. The runtime improvements are achieved by deriving abstract theoretical models for the MAC layer behavior. The focus in this work is long term evolution, and the most important uplink effects such as fluctuating interference, power control, power limitation, adaptive transmission bandwidth, and control channel limitations are considered. Limitations of the abstract models will be discussed as well. Exemplary results are given at the end to demonstrate the capability of the derived framework.

  13. Highly Dynamic Cellular-Level Response of Symbiotic Coral to a Sudden Increase in Environmental Nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, C.; M. Pernice; Domart-Coulon, I.; Djediat, C.; J. E. Spangenberg; Alexander, D. T. L.; Hignette, M.; Meziane, T.; Meibom, A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metabolic interactions with endosymbiotic photosynthetic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium spp. are fundamental to reef-building corals (Scleractinia) thriving in nutrient-poor tropical seas. Yet, detailed understanding at the single-cell level of nutrient assimilation, translocation, and utilization within this fundamental symbiosis is lacking. Using pulse-chase 15N labeling and quantitative ion microprobe isotopic imaging (NanoSIMS; nanoscale secondary-ion mass spectrometry), we visualiz...

  14. Low neural exosomal levels of cellular survival factors in Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Goetzl, Edward J.; Boxer, Adam; Schwartz, Janice B.; Abner, Erin L; Petersen, Ronald C.; Miller, Bruce L.; Carlson, Olga D.; Mustapic, Maja; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors that mediate neuronal defenses against diverse stresses were quantified in plasma neural-derived exosomes of Alzheimer’s disease or frontotemporal dementia patients and matched controls. Exosomal levels of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6, heat-shock factor-1, and repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor all were significantly lower in Alzheimer’s disease patients than controls (P 

  15. Cellular and plasma levels of human glutaredoxin 1 and 2 detected by sensitive ELISA systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glutaredoxins (Grx) catalyze glutathione-dependent thiol-disulfide oxidoreduction reactions. Mammalian cells contain at least two dithiol glutaredoxins, the well-characterized cytoplasmic (12 kDa) Grx1 and the recently identified (18 kDa) Grx2 with mitochondrial and nuclear isoforms. We have developed two sensitive and specific sandwich ELISAs to study the levels of human Grx1 and Grx2. Both Grx1 and Grx2 were present in placenta extracts and in cell lysates prepared from various tumor cell lines. However, the levels of Grx1 were at least 20 times higher than those of Grx2. Plasma from healthy blood donors contained 13.4 ± 7.9 ng/ml of Grx1, while Grx2 was not detected. Unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were shown to secrete Grx1, but upon 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate activation, the secretion of Grx1 was strongly suppressed. This effect was shown to occur at the transcriptional level. The secretion of Grx1 and its presence in plasma suggests extracellular functions as found for mammalian thioredoxin 1

  16. The expression level of the transcription factor Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) determines cellular survival after radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour hypoxia promotes radioresistance and is associated with poor prognosis. The transcription factor Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), also designated as Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1β, is part of the HIF pathway which mediates cellular adaptations to oxygen deprivation and facilitates tumour progression. The subunits HIF-1α and ARNT are key players within this pathway. HIF-1α is regulated in an oxygen-dependent manner whereas ARNT is considered to be constitutively expressed. However, there is mounting evidence that certain tumour cells are capable to elevate ARNT in hypoxia which suggests a survival benefit. Therefore the objective of this study was to elucidate effects of an altered ARNT expression level on the cellular response to radiation. Different human cell lines (Hep3B, MCF-7, 786-Owt, 786-Ovhl, RCC4wt and RCC4vhl) originating from various tumour entities (Hepatocellular carcinoma, breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma respectively) were X-irradiated using a conventional linear accelerator. Knockdown of ARNT expression was achieved by transient siRNA transfection. Complementary experiments were performed by forced ARNT overexpression using appropriate plasmids. Presence/absence of ARNT protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Clonogenic survival assays were performed in order to determine cellular survival post irradiation. Statistical comparison of two groups was achieved by the unpaired t-test. The results of this study indicate that ARNT depletion renders tumour cells susceptible to radiation whereas overexpression of this transcription factor confers radioresistance. These findings provide evidence to consider ARNT as a drug target and as a predictive marker in clinical applications concerning the response to radiation. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0539-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  17. Regulatory Nexus of Synthesis and Degradation Deciphers Cellular Nrf2 Expression Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Takaya, Kai; Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Tsuta, Koji; Furuta, Koh; Goto, Koichi; Hosoda, Fumie; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is essential for oxidative and electrophilic stress responses. While it has been well characterized that Nrf2 activity is tightly regulated at the protein level through proteasomal degradation via Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1)-mediated ubiquitination, not much attention has been paid to the supply side of Nrf2, especially regulation of Nrf2 gene transcription. Here we report that manipulation of Nrf2 transcription is effective i...

  18. Perturbation of cellular proteostasis networks identifies pathways that modulate precursor and intermediate but not mature levels of frataxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabhan, Joseph F.; Gooch, Renea L.; Piatnitski Chekler, Eugene L.; Pierce, Betsy; Bulawa, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich’s Ataxia is a genetic disease caused by expansion of an intronic trinucleotide repeat in the frataxin (FXN) gene yielding diminished FXN expression and consequently disease. Since increasing FXN protein levels is desirable to ameliorate pathology, we explored the role of major cellular proteostasis pathways and mitochondrial proteases in FXN processing and turnover. We targeted p97/VCP, the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP), and autophagy with chemical inhibitors in cell lines and patient-derived cells. p97 inhibition by DBeQ increased precursor FXN levels, while UPP and autophagic flux modulators had variable effects predominantly on intermediate FXN. Our data suggest that these pathways cannot be modulated to influence mature functional FXN levels. We also targeted known mitochondrial proteases by RNA interference and discovered a novel protease PITRM1 that regulates intermediate FXN levels. Treatment with the aforementioned chemical and genetic modulators did not have a differential effect in patient cells containing lower amounts of FXN. Interestingly, a number of treatments caused a change in total amount of FXN protein, without an effect on mature FXN. Our results imply that regulation of FXN protein levels is complex and that total amounts can be modulated chemically and genetically without altering the absolute amount of mature FXN protein. PMID:26671574

  19. SYSTEM LEVEL SIMULATION FOR TWO TIER MACRO-FEMTO CELLULAR NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqi Xing

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available LTE is an emerging wireless communication technology to provide high- speed data service for the mobile phones and data terminals. To improve indoor coverage and capacity Femtocells are included in 3GPP since Release 8. There is no common simulation platform is available for performance justification of LTEFemtocells. LTE-Sim is an object-oriented open source simulator which incorporates a complete protocol stack can be used for simulating two-tier macro-femto scenarios. To the best of our knowledge no paper provides the guideline to perform system level simulation of Femtocell networks. Here, in this paper Femtocells performance is evaluated in multi-Macrocells and multi-Femtocells environment with interference from Microcells and Macrocell users along with the scripting

  20. Monitoring Astronaut Health at the Nanoscale Cellular Level Through the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Singh, Bhim S.; Rovati, Luigi; Docchio, Franco; Sebag, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    A user friendly goggles-like head-mounted device equipped with a suite of instruments for several non-invasive and quantitative medical evaluation of the eye, skin, and brain is desired for monitoring the health of astronauts during space travel and exploration of neighboring and distant planets. Real-time non-invasive evaluation of the different structures within the above organs can provide indices of the health of not just these organs, but the entire body. The techniques such as dynamic light scattering (for the early detection of uveitis, cholesterol levels, cataract, changes in the vitreous and possibly Alzheimer's disease), corneal autofluorescence (to assess extracellular matrix biology e.g., in diabetes), optical activity measurements (of anterior ocular fluid to evaluate blood-glucose levels), laser Doppler velocimetry (to assess retinal, optic nerve, and choroidal blood flow), reflectometry/oximetry (for assessing ocular and central nervous system oxygen metabolism), optical coherence tomography (to determine retinal tissue microstructure) and possibly scanning laser technology (for intraocular tissue imaging and scanning) will he integrated into this compact device. Skin sensors will also be mounted on the portion of the device in contact with the periocular region. This will enable monitoring of body temperature, EEG, and electrolyte status. This device will monitor astronaut health during long-duration space travel by detecting aberrations from pre-established "nonns", enabling prompt diagnosis and possibly the initiation of early preventative/curative therapy. The non-invasive nature of the device technologies permits frequent repetition of tests, enabling real-time complete crew health monitoring. This device may ultimately be useful in tele-medicine to bring modern healthcare to under-served areas on Earth as well as in so-called "advanced" care settings (e.g. diabetes in the USA).

  1. c-Myc and AMPK Control Cellular Energy Levels by Cooperatively Regulating Mitochondrial Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia R Edmunds

    Full Text Available The c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK regulate glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (Oxphos although often for different purposes. Because Myc over-expression depletes ATP with the resultant activation of AMPK, we explored the potential co-dependency of and cross-talk between these proteins by comparing the consequences of acute Myc induction in ampk+/+ (WT and ampk-/- (KO murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs. KO MEFs showed a higher basal rate of glycolysis than WT MEFs and an appropriate increase in response to activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor (MycER fusion protein. However, KO MEFs had a diminished ability to increase Oxphos, mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species in response to MycER activation. Other differences between WT and KO MEFs, either in the basal state or following MycER induction, included abnormalities in electron transport chain function, levels of TCA cycle-related oxidoreductases and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox states. Transcriptional profiling of pathways pertinent to glycolysis, Oxphos and mitochondrial structure and function also uncovered significant differences between WT and KO MEFs and their response to MycER activation. Finally, an unbiased mass-spectrometry (MS-based survey capable of quantifying ~40% of all mitochondrial proteins, showed about 15% of them to be AMPK- and/or Myc-dependent in their steady state. Significant differences in the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, which dictate pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A abundance, were also differentially responsive to Myc and AMPK and could account for some of the differences in basal metabolite levels that were also detected by MS. Thus, Myc and AMPK are highly co-dependent and appear to engage in significant cross-talk across numerous pathways which support metabolic and ATP-generating functions.

  2. A novel family of fluorescent hypoxia sensors reveal strong heterogeneity in tumor hypoxia at the cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erapaneedi, Raghu; Belousov, Vsevolod V; Schäfers, Michael; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an intensively investigated condition with profound effects on cell metabolism, migration, and angiogenesis during development and disease. Physiologically, hypoxia is linked to tissue homeostasis and maintenance of pluripotency. Hypoxia also contributes to pathologies including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Despite its importance, microscopic visualization of hypoxia is largely restricted to the detection of reductively activated probes by immunostaining. Here, we describe a novel family of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors that detect the activation of HIF transcription factors reported by the oxygen-independent fluorescent protein UnaG. It comprises sensors with different switching and memory behavior and combination sensors that allow the distinction of hypoxic and reoxygenated cells. We tested these sensors on orthotopically transplanted glioma cell lines. Using a cranial window, we could visualize hypoxia intravitally at cellular resolution. In tissue samples, sensor activity was detected in regions, which were largely devoid of blood vessels, correlated with HIF-1α stabilization, and were highly heterogeneous at a cellular level. Frequently, we detected recently reoxygenated cells outside hypoxic areas in the proximity of blood vessels, suggestive of hypoxia-promoted cell migration. PMID:26598532

  3. In vivo method for the detection of somatic mutations at the cellular level in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searle, A.G.; Stephenson, D.A. (Medical Research Council, Harwell (UK). Radiobiology Unit)

    1982-01-01

    This new method is based on the fact that recessive mutations at the dilute and leaden loci change the shape of pigment-cells in the hair follicles from their normal highly dendritic appearance to a rounded-up almost non-dendritic form. Gene action is autonomous and individual mutant melanocytes can be recognised in whole mounts of dorsal skin made after the post-natal onset of melanogenesis. Foetal heterozygotes for d and In were treated with X-rays (0-200 rad) or procarbazine (0-300 mg/kg body mass by maternal i.p. injection) 17 after detection of a vaginal plug; whole mounts of dorsal skin (fixed 3 after birth) were microscopically scanned for mutant melanocytes in the hair follicles. Mutant cells were mainly in the form of small intrafollicular clones; the few mounts containing large interfollicular clones were excluded from the analysis. For both treatments, dose-response relationships showed good fits to both a quadratic and a power-law curve. However, neither of these differed significantly from a square-law relationship. The estimated mutation rate at the 100 rad X-ray level of 4.7x10/sup -7//rad/locus was in good agreement with the literature. Possible ways in which the present method might be improved and extended are discussed.

  4. An in vivo method for the detection of somatic mutations at the cellular level in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This new method is based on the fact that recessive mutations at the dilute and leaden loci change the shape of pigment-cells in the hair follicles from their normal highly dendritic appearance to a rounded-up almost non-dendritic form. Gene action is autonomous and individual mutant melanocytes can be recognised in whole mounts of dorsal skin made after the post-natal onset of melanogenesis. Foetal heterozygotes for d and In were treated with X-rays (0-200 rad) or procarbazine (0-300 mg/kg body mass by maternal i.p. injection) 17 after detection of a vaginal plug; whole mounts of dorsal skin (fixed 3 after birth) were microscopically scanned for mutant melanocytes in the hair follicles. Mutant cells were mainly in the form of small intrafollicular clones; the few mounts containing large interfollicular clones were excluded from the analysis. For both treatments, dose-response relationships showed good fits to both a quadratic and a power-law curve. However, neither of these differed significantly from a square-law relationship. The estimated mutation rate at the 100 rad X-ray level of 4.7x10-7/rad/locus was in good agreement with the literature. Possible ways in which the present method might be improved and extended are discussed. (orig./MG)

  5. Tinnitus: pathology of synaptic plasticity at the cellular and system levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitton, Matthieu J

    2012-01-01

    Despite being more and more common, and having a high impact on the quality of life of sufferers, tinnitus does not yet have a cure. This has been mostly the result of limited knowledge of the biological mechanisms underlying this adverse pathology. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous progress in our understanding on the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Animal models have demonstrated that tinnitus is a pathology of neural plasticity, and has two main components: a molecular, peripheral component related to the initiation phase of tinnitus; and a system-level, central component-related to the long-term maintenance of tinnitus. Using the most recent experimental data and the molecular/system dichotomy as a framework, we describe here the biological basis of tinnitus. We then discuss these mechanisms from an evolutionary perspective, highlighting similarities with memory. Finally, we consider how these discoveries can translate into therapies, and we suggest operative strategies to design new and effective combined therapeutic solutions using both pharmacological (local and systemic) and behavioral tools (e.g., using tele-medicine and virtual reality settings). PMID:22408611

  6. An advanced approach for the generation of complex cellular material representative volume elements using distance fields and level sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonon, B.; François, B.; Massart, T. J.

    2015-08-01

    A general and widely tunable method for the generation of representative volume elements for cellular materials based on distance and level set functions is presented. The approach is based on random tessellations constructed from random inclusion packings. A general methodology to obtain arbitrary-shaped tessellations to produce disordered foams is presented and illustrated. These tessellations can degenerate either in classical Voronoï tessellations potentially additively weighted depending on properties of the initial inclusion packing used, or in Laguerre tessellations through a simple modification of the formulation. A versatile approach to control the particular morphology of the obtained foam is introduced. Specific local features such as concave triangular Plateau borders and non-constant thickness heterogeneous coatings can be built from the tessellation in a straightforward way and are tuned by a small set of parameters with a clear morphological interpretation.

  7. Orientation Maps in V1 and Non-Euclidean Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afgoustidis, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    In the primary visual cortex, the processing of information uses the distribution of orientations in the visual input: neurons react to some orientations in the stimulus more than to others. In many species, orientation preference is mapped in a remarkable way on the cortical surface, and this organization of the neural population seems to be important for visual processing. Now, existing models for the geometry and development of orientation preference maps in higher mammals make a crucial use of symmetry considerations. In this paper, we consider probabilistic models for V1 maps from the point of view of group theory; we focus on Gaussian random fields with symmetry properties and review the probabilistic arguments that allow one to estimate pinwheel densities and predict the observed value of π. Then, in order to test the relevance of general symmetry arguments and to introduce methods which could be of use in modeling curved regions, we reconsider this model in the light of group representation theory, the canonical mathematics of symmetry. We show that through the Plancherel decomposition of the space of complex-valued maps on the Euclidean plane, each infinite-dimensional irreducible unitary representation of the special Euclidean group yields a unique V1-like map, and we use representation theory as a symmetry-based toolbox to build orientation maps adapted to the most famous non-Euclidean geometries, viz. spherical and hyperbolic geometry. We find that most of the dominant traits of V1 maps are preserved in these; we also study the link between symmetry and the statistics of singularities in orientation maps, and show what the striking quantitative characteristics observed in animals become in our curved models. PMID:26082007

  8. A nonperturbative foundation of the Euclidean-Minkowskian duality of Wilson-loop correlation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Letter we discuss the analyticity properties of the Wilson-loop correlation functions relevant to the problem of soft high-energy scattering, directly at the level of the functional integral, in a genuinely nonperturbative way. The strategy is to start from the Euclidean theory and to push the dependence on the relevant variables θ (the relative angle between the loops) and T (the half-length of the loops) into the action by means of a field and coordinate transformation, and then to allow them to take complex values. In particular, we determine the analyticity domain of the relevant Euclidean correlation function, and we show that the corresponding Minkowskian quantity is recovered with the usual double analytic continuation in θ and T inside this domain. The formal manipulations of the functional integral are justified making use of a lattice regularisation. The new rescaled action so derived could also be used directly to get new insights (from first principles) in the problem of soft high-energy scattering.

  9. Euclidean D-branes and higher-dimensional gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider euclidean D-branes wrapping around manifolds of exceptional holonomy in dimensions seven and eight. The resulting theory on the D-brane-that is, the dimensional reduction of 10-dimensional supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory-is a cohomological field theory which describes the topology of the moduli space of instantons. The 7-dimensional theory is an NT=2 (or balanced) cohomological theory given by an action potential of Chern-Simons type. As a by-product of this method, we construct a related cohomological field theory which describes the monopole moduli space on a 7-manifold of G2 holonomy. (author). 22 refs, 3 tabs

  10. Divisibility tests and recurring decimals in Euclidean domains

    OpenAIRE

    Khare, Apoorva

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we try to explain and unify standard divisibility tests found in various books. We then look at recurring decimals, and list a few of their properties. We show how to compute the number of digits in the recurring part of any fraction. Most of these results are accompanied by a proof (along with the assumptions needed), that works in a Euclidean domain. We then ask some obvious questions related to the results, and mention some similar questions that have been answered. In the...

  11. Convergent perturbation expansions for Euclidean quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer perturbation theory is designed to provide computable convergent expansions which permit calculation of Greens functions in Euclidean Quantum Field Theory to arbitrary accuracy, including 'nonperturbative' contributions from large field fluctuations. Here we describe the expansions at the example of 3-dimensional lambdaphi4-theory (in continuous space). They are not essentially more complicated than standard perturbation theory. The n-th order term is expressed in terms of 0(n)-dimensional integrals, and is of order lambda4 if 4k-3<=n<=4k. (orig.)

  12. Fast Approximation Algorithm for Restricted Euclidean Bottleneck Steiner Tree Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimao Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bottleneck Steiner tree problem asks to find a Steiner tree for n terminals with at most k Steiner points such that the length of the longest edge in the tree is minimized. The problem has applications in the design of wireless communication networks. In this paper we study a restricted version of the bottleneck Steiner tree problem in the Euclidean plane which requires that only degree-2 Steiner points are possibly adjacent in the optimal solution. We first show that the problem is NP-hard and cannot be approximated within unless P=NP, and provide a fast polynomial time deterministic approximation algorithm with performance ratio .

  13. Non-Euclidean classification of medically imaged objects via s-reps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Junpyo; Vicory, Jared; Schulz, Jörn; Styner, Martin; Marron, J S; Pizer, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    Classifying medically imaged objects, e.g., into diseased and normal classes, has been one of the important goals in medical imaging. We propose a novel classification scheme that uses a skeletal representation to provide rich non-Euclidean geometric object properties. Our statistical method combines distance weighted discrimination (DWD) with a carefully chosen Euclideanization which takes full advantage of the geometry of the manifold on which these non-Euclidean geometric object properties (GOPs) live. Our method is evaluated via the task of classifying 3D hippocampi between schizophrenics and healthy controls. We address three central questions. 1) Does adding shape features increase discriminative power over the more standard classification based only on global volume? 2) If so, does our skeletal representation provide greater discriminative power than a conventional boundary point distribution model (PDM)? 3) Especially, is Euclideanization of non-Euclidean shape properties important in achieving high discriminative power? Measuring the capability of a method in terms of area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve, we show that our proposed method achieves strongly better classification than both the classification method based on global volume alone and the s-rep-based classification method without proper Euclideanization of non-Euclidean GOPs. We show classification using Euclideanized s-reps is also superior to classification using PDMs, whether the PDMs are first Euclideanized or not. We also show improved performance with Euclideanized boundary PDMs over non-linear boundary PDMs. This demonstrates the benefit that proper Euclideanization of non-Euclidean GOPs brings not only to s-rep-based classification but also to PDM-based classification. PMID:26963609

  14. A medaka model of cancer allowing direct observation of transplanted tumor cells in vivo at a cellular-level resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Maruyama, Kouichi; Takenaka, Hikaru; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2009-08-18

    The recent success with small fish as an animal model of cancer with the aid of fluorescence technique has attracted cancer modelers' attention because it would be possible to directly visualize tumor cells in vivo in real time. Here, we report a medaka model capable of allowing the observation of various cell behaviors of transplanted tumor cells, such as cell proliferation and metastasis, which were visualized easily in vivo. We established medaka melanoma (MM) cells stably expressing GFP and transplanted them into nonirradiated and irradiated medaka. The tumor cells were grown at the injection sites in medaka, and the spatiotemporal changes were visualized under a fluorescence stereoscopic microscope at a cellular-level resolution, and even at a single-cell level. Tumor dormancy and metastasis were also observed. Interestingly, in irradiated medaka, accelerated tumor growth and metastasis of the transplanted tumor cells were directly visualized. Our medaka model provides an opportunity to visualize in vivo tumor cells "as seen in a culture dish" and would be useful for in vivo tumor cell biology. PMID:19666513

  15. Engineered mutations in fibrillin-1 leading to Marfan syndrome act at the protein, cellular and organismal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyer, Karina A; Reinhardt, Dieter P

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are the major components of microfibrils in the extracellular matrix of elastic and non-elastic tissues. They are multi-domain proteins, containing primarily calcium binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domains and 8-cysteine/transforming growth factor-beta binding protein-like (TB) domains. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene give rise to Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder with clinical complications in the cardiovascular, skeletal, ocular and other organ systems. Here, we review the consequences of engineered Marfan syndrome mutations in fibrillin-1 at the protein, cellular and organismal levels. Representative point mutations associated with Marfan syndrome in affected individuals have been introduced and analyzed in recombinant fibrillin-1 fragments. Those mutations affect fibrillin-1 on a structural and functional level. Mutations which impair folding of cbEGF domains can affect protein trafficking. Protein folding disrupted by some mutations can lead to defective secretion in mutant fibrillin-1 fragments, whereas fragments with other Marfan mutations are secreted normally. Many Marfan mutations render fibrillin-1 more susceptible to proteolysis. There is also evidence that some mutations affect heparin binding. Few mutations have been further analyzed in mouse models. An extensively studied mouse model of Marfan syndrome expresses mouse fibrillin-1 with a missense mutation (p.C1039G). The mice display similar characteristics to human patients with Marfan syndrome. Overall, the analyses of engineered mutations leading to Marfan syndrome provide important insights into the pathogenic molecular mechanisms exerted by mutated fibrillin-1. PMID:26281765

  16. Quantum mechanics on manifolds embedded in Euclidean space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum particles confined to surfaces in higher-dimensional spaces are acted upon by forces that exist only as a result of the surface geometry and the quantum mechanical nature of the system. The dynamics are particularly rich when confinement is implemented by forces that act normal to the surface. We review this confining potential formalism applied to the confinement of a particle to an arbitrary manifold embedded in a higher-dimensional Euclidean space. We devote special attention to the geometrically induced gauge potential that appears in the effective Hamiltonian for motion on the surface. We emphasize that the gauge potential is only present when the space of states describing the degrees of freedom normal to the surface is degenerate. We also distinguish between the effects of the intrinsic and extrinsic geometry on the effective Hamiltonian and provide simple expressions for the induced-scalar potential. We discuss examples including the case of a three-dimensional manifold embedded in a five-dimensional Euclidean space

  17. The Einstein Constraint Equations on Asymptotically Euclidean Manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Dilts, James

    2015-01-01

    In this dissertation, we prove a number of results regarding the conformal method of finding solutions to the Einstein constraint equations. These results include necessary and sufficient conditions for the Lichnerowicz equation to have solutions, global supersolutions which guarantee solutions to the conformal constraint equations for near-constant-mean-curvature (near-CMC) data as well as for far-from-CMC data, a proof of the limit equation criterion in the near-CMC case, as well as a model problem on the relationship between the asymptotic constants of solutions and the ADM mass. We also prove a characterization of the Yamabe classes on asymptotically Euclidean manifolds and resolve the (conformally) prescribed scalar curvature problem on asymptotically Euclidean manifolds for the case of nonpositive scalar curvatures. Many, though not all, of the results in this dissertation have been previously published in [Dilts13b], [DIMM14], [DL14], [DM15], and [DGI15]. This article is the author's Ph.D. dissertation...

  18. On the Decidability of Connectedness Constraints in 2D and 3D Euclidean Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kontchakov, Roman; Pratt-Hartmann, Ian; Zakharyaschev, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We investigate (quantifier-free) spatial constraint languages with equality, contact and connectedness predicates as well as Boolean operations on regions, interpreted over low-dimensional Euclidean spaces. We show that the complexity of reasoning varies dramatically depending on the dimension of the space and on the type of regions considered. For example, the logic with the interior-connectedness predicate (and without contact) is undecidable over polygons or regular closed sets in the Euclidean plane, NP-complete over regular closed sets in three-dimensional Euclidean space, and ExpTime-complete over polyhedra in three-dimensional Euclidean space.

  19. On the Complexity of the Minimum Latency Scheduling Problem on the Euclidean Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Henry

    2012-01-01

    We show NP-hardness of the minimum latency scheduling (MLS) problem under the physical model of wireless networking. In this model a transmission is received successfully if the Signal to Interference-plus-Noise Ratio (SINR), is above a given threshold. In the minimum latency scheduling problem, the goal is to assign a time slot and power level to each transmission, so that all the messages are received successfully, and the number of distinct times slots is minimized. Despite its seeming simplicity and several previous hardness results for various settings of the minimum latency scheduling problem, it has remained an open question whether or not the minimum latency scheduling problem is NP-hard, when the nodes are placed in the Euclidean plane and arbitrary power levels can be chosen for the transmissions. We resolve this open question for all path loss exponent values $\\alpha \\geq 3$.

  20. Analysis of Students' Aptitude to Provide Meaning to Images that Represent Cellular Components at the Molecular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmani, Hassen-Reda; Schneeberger, Patricia; Kramer, IJsbrand M.

    2009-01-01

    The number of experimentally derived structures of cellular components is rapidly expanding, and this phenomenon is accompanied by the development of a new semiotic system for teaching. The infographic approach is shifting from a schematic toward a more realistic representation of cellular components. By realistic we mean artist-prepared or…

  1. Elevated serum levels of T3 without metabolic effect in nutritionally deficient rats, attributable to reduced cellular uptake of T3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats receiving a nutritionally deficient diet displayed markedly elevated serum free T3 levels but showed no increase in oxygen consumption. This was associated with greatly reduced ratios of hepatic cellular and nuclear /sub 125/I-T3 to serum /sub 125/I-T3. Kinetic data supported the conclusion that cellular uptake of T3 was decreased in the nutritionally deficient rats. The lack of metabolic effect, despite the elevated serum T3 levels, is attributable to reduced availability of serum T3 to tissue nuclear receptor sites

  2. Platelet-Rich Plasma Increases the Levels of Catabolic Molecules and Cellular Dedifferentiation in the Meniscus of a Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Shon, Oog-Jin; Park, Se-Il; Kim, Han-Jun; Kim, Sukyoung; Ahn, Myun-Whan; Do, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Despite the susceptibility to frequent intrinsic and extrinsic injuries, especially in the inner zone, the meniscus does not heal spontaneously owing to its poor vascularity. In this study, the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), containing various growth factors, on meniscal mechanisms was examined under normal and post-traumatic inflammatory conditions. Isolated primary meniscal cells of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were incubated for 3, 10, 14 and 21 days with PRP(−), 10% PRP (PRP(+)), IL(+) or IL(+)PRP(+). The meniscal cells were collected and examined using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Culture media were examined by immunoblot analyses for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) catabolic molecules. PRP containing growth factors improved the cellular viability of meniscal cells in a concentration-dependent manner at Days 1, 4 and 7. However, based on RT-PCR, meniscal cells demonstrated dedifferentiation, along with an increase in type I collagen in the PRP(+) and in IL(+)PRP(+). In PRP(+), the aggrecan expression levels were lower than in the PRP(−) until Day 21. The protein levels of MMP-1 and MMP-3 were higher in each PRP group, i.e., PRP(+) and IL(+)PRP(+), at each culture time. A reproducible 2-mm circular defect on the meniscus of NZW rabbit was used to implant fibrin glue (control) or PRP in vivo. After eight weeks, the lesions in the control and PRP groups were occupied with fibrous tissue, but not with meniscal cells. This study shows that PRP treatment of the meniscus results in an increase of catabolic molecules, especially those related to IL-1α-induced inflammation, and that PRP treatment for an in vivo meniscus injury accelerates fibrosis, instead of meniscal cartilage. PMID:26784189

  3. BPS Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime and Euclidean space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Theoretical Physics Division, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Beijing (China)

    2015-12-15

    We give evidence that spacelike BPS Wilson loops do not exist in Minkowski spacetime. We show that spacelikeWilson loops in Minkowski spacetime cannot preserve any supersymmetries, in d = 4 N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory, d = 3 N = 2 super Chern-Simons-matter theory, and d = 3 N = 6 Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis- Maldacena theory. We not only show this using infinite straight lines and circles as examples, but also we give proofs for general curves. We attribute this to the conflicts of the reality conditions of the spinors. However, spacelike Wilson loops do exist in Euclidean space. There are both BPS Wilson loops along infinite straight lines and circular BPS Wilson loops. This is because the reality conditions of the spinors are lost after Wick rotation. The result is reasonable in view of the AdS/CFT correspondence. (orig.)

  4. BPS Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime and Euclidean space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2015-12-01

    We give evidence that spacelike BPS Wilson loops do not exist in Minkowski spacetime. We show that spacelike Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime cannot preserve any supersymmetries, in d = 4 N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory, d = 3 N = 2 super Chern-Simons-matter theory, and d = 3 N = 6 Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena theory. We not only show this using infinite straight lines and circles as examples, but also we give proofs for general curves. We attribute this to the conflicts of the reality conditions of the spinors. However, spacelike Wilson loops do exist in Euclidean space. There are both BPS Wilson loops along infinite straight lines and circular BPS Wilson loops. This is because the reality conditions of the spinors are lost after Wick rotation. The result is reasonable in view of the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  5. Susceptible-Infected-Recovered model on Euclidean network

    CERN Document Server

    Khaleque, Abdul

    2012-01-01

    We consider the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) epidemic model on a Euclidean network in one dimension in which nodes at a distance $l$ are connected with probability $P(l) \\propto l^{-\\delta}$ in addition to nearest neighbors. The topology of the network changes as $\\delta$ is varied and its effect on the SIR model is studied. $R(t)$, the recovered fraction of population up to time $t$, and $\\tau$, the total duration of the epidemic are calculated for different values of the infection probability $q$ and $\\delta$. A threshold behavior is observed for all $\\delta$ up to $\\delta \\approx 2.0$; above the threshold value $q = q_c$, the saturation value $R_{sat}$ attains a finite value. Both $R_{sat}$ and $\\tau $ show scaling behavior in a finite system of size $N$; $R_{sat} \\sim N^{-\\beta/{\\tilde{\

  6. On continuous expansions of configurations of points in Euclidean space

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Holun; Zheng, Yidan

    2011-01-01

    For any two configurations of ordered points $p=(p_{1},...,\\p_{N})$ and $q=(q_{1},...,q_{N})$ in Euclidean space $E^d$ such that $q$ is an expansion of $p$, there exists a continuous expansion from $p$ to $q$ in dimension 2d; Bezdek and Connelly used this to prove the Kneser-Poulsen conjecture for the planar case. In this paper, we show that this construction is optimal in the sense that for any $d \\ge 2$ there exists configurations of $(d+1)^2$ points $p$ and $q$ in $E^d$ such that $q$ is an expansion of $p$ but there is no continuous expansion from $p$ to $q$ in dimension less than 2d. The techniques used in our proof are completely elementary.

  7. Entangling gates in even Euclidean lattices such as Leech lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Planat, Michel

    2010-01-01

    We point out a organic relationship between real entangling n-qubit gates of quantum computation and the group of automorphisms of even Euclidean lattices of the corresponding dimension 2n. The type of entanglement that is found in the gates/generators of Aut() depends on the lattice. In particular, we investigate Zn lattices, Barnes-Wall lattices D4, E8, 16 (associated to n = 2, 3 and 4 qubits), and the Leech lattices h24 and 24 (associated to a 3-qubit/qutrit system). Balanced tripartite entanglement is found to be a basic feature of Aut(), a nding that bears out our recent work related to the Weyl group of E8 [1, 2].

  8. Modified Euclidean Algorithms for Decoding Reed-Solomon Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Sarwate, Dilip V

    2009-01-01

    The extended Euclidean algorithm (EEA) for polynomial greatest common divisors is commonly used in solving the key equation in the decoding of Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and more generally in BCH decoding. For this particular application, the iterations in the EEA are stopped when the degree of the remainder polynomial falls below a threshold. While determining the degree of a polynomial is a simple task for human beings, hardware implementation of this stopping rule is more complicated. This paper describes a modified version of the EEA that is specifically adapted to the RS decoding problem. This modified algorithm requires no degree computation or comparison to a threshold, and it uses a fixed number of iterations. Another advantage of this modified version is in its application to the errors-and-erasures decoding problem for RS codes where significant hardware savings can be achieved via seamless computation.

  9. Nearly Optimal Solution for Restricted Euclidean Bottleneck Steiner Tree Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimao Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A variation of the traditional Steiner tree problem, the bottleneck Steiner tree problem is considered in this paper, which asks to find a Steiner tree for n terminals with at most k Steiner points such that the length of the longest edge in the tree is minimized. The problem has applications in the design of WDM optical networks, design of wireless communication networks and reconstruction of phylogenetic tree in biology. We study a restricted version of the bottleneck Steiner tree problem in the Euclidean plane which requires that only degree-2 Steiner points are possibly adjacent in the optimal solution. The problem is known to be MAX-SNP hard and cannot be approximated within unless P=NP, we propose a nearly optimal randomized polynomial time approximation algorithm with performance ratio +e, where e is a positive number.

  10. BPS Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime and Euclidean space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Hao, E-mail: ouyangh@ihep.ac.cn; Wu, Jun-Bao, E-mail: wujb@ihep.ac.cn; Zhang, Jia-ju, E-mail: jjzhang@ihep.ac.cn [Theoretical Physics Division, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Rd, 100049, Beijing (China); Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Rd, 100049, Beijing (China)

    2015-12-21

    We give evidence that spacelike BPS Wilson loops do not exist in Minkowski spacetime. We show that spacelike Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime cannot preserve any supersymmetries, in d=4N=4 super Yang–Mills theory, d=3N=2 super Chern–Simons-matter theory, and d=3N=6 Aharony–Bergman–Jafferis–Maldacena theory. We not only show this using infinite straight lines and circles as examples, but also we give proofs for general curves. We attribute this to the conflicts of the reality conditions of the spinors. However, spacelike Wilson loops do exist in Euclidean space. There are both BPS Wilson loops along infinite straight lines and circular BPS Wilson loops. This is because the reality conditions of the spinors are lost after Wick rotation. The result is reasonable in view of the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  11. The Euclidean Algorithm for Generalized Minimum Distance Decoding of Reed-Solomon Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Kampf, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method to merge Generalized Minimum Distance decoding of Reed-Solomon codes with the extended Euclidean algorithm. By merge, we mean that the steps taken to perform the Generalized Minimum Distance decoding are similar to those performed by the extended Euclidean algorithm. The resulting algorithm has a complexity of O(n^2).

  12. Euclidean wormholes with Phantom field and Phantom field accompanied by perfect fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Darabi, F.

    2010-01-01

    We study the classical Euclidean wormhole solutions for the gravitational systems with minimally coupled pure Phantom field and minimally coupled Phantom field accompanied by perfect fluid. It is shown that such solutions do exist and then the general forms of the Phantom field potential are obtained for which there are classical Euclidean wormhole solutions.

  13. The Dirac Eigenvalues as Observables of N=2 D=4 Euclidean Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Vancea, I V

    2004-01-01

    We generalize previous works on the Dirac eigenvalues as dynamical variables of the Euclidean gravity in four dimensions to N=2 D=4 Euclidean supergravity. We define the Poisson brackets in the covariant phase space of the theory and compute them for the Dirac eigenvalues.

  14. 10D to 4D Euclidean Supergravity over a Calabi-Yau three-fold

    CERN Document Server

    Sabra, Wafic

    2015-01-01

    We dimensionally reduce the bosonic sector of 10D Euclidean type IIA supergravity over a Calabi-Yau three-fold. The resulting theory describes the bosonic sector of 4D, N = 2 Euclidean supergravity coupled to vector- and hyper-multiplets.

  15. Split quaternions and semi-Euclidean projective spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we give one-to-one correspondence between the elements of the unit split three-sphere S(3,2) with the complex hyperbolic special unitary matrices SU(2,1). Thus, we express spherical concepts such as meridians of longitude and parallels of latitude on SU(2,1) by using the method given in Toth [Toth G. Glimpses of algebra and geometry. Springer-Verlag; 1998] for S3. The relation among the special orthogonal group SO(R3), the quotient group of unit quaternions S3/{±1} and the projective space RP3 given as SO(R3)≅S3/{±1}=RP3 is known as the Euclidean projective spaces [Toth G. Glimpses of algebra and geometry. Springer-Verlag; 1998]. This relation was generalized to the semi-Euclidean projective space and then, the expression SO(3,1)≅S(3,2)/{±1}=RP23 was acquired. Thus, it was found that Hopf fibriation map of S(2,1) can be used for Twistors (in not-null state) in quantum mechanics applications. In addition, the octonions and the split-octonions can be obtained from the Cayley-Dickson construction by defining a multiplication on pairs of quaternions or split quaternions. The automorphism group of the octonions is an exceptional Lie group. The split-octonions are used in the description of physical law. For example, the Dirac equation in physics (the equation of motion of a free spin 1/2 particle, like e.g. an electron or a proton) can be represented by a native split-octonion arithmetic.

  16. A general Euclidean connection for so(n,m) lie algebra and the algebraic approach to scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtain a general Euclidean connection for so(n,m). This Euclidean connection allows an algebraic derivation of the S matrix and it reduces to the known one in suitable circumstances. (author). 8 refs

  17. Deletion of Pim kinases elevates the cellular levels of reactive oxygen species and sensitizes to K-Ras-induced cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J H; An, N; Chatterjee, S; Kistner-Griffin, E; Mahajan, S; Mehrotra, S; Kraft, A S

    2015-07-01

    The Pim protein kinases contribute to transformation by enhancing the activity of oncogenic Myc and Ras, which drives significant metabolic changes during tumorigenesis. In this report, we demonstrate that mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking all three isoforms of Pim protein kinases, triple knockout (TKO), cannot tolerate the expression of activated K-Ras (K-Ras(G12V)) and undergo cell death. Transduction of K-Ras(G12V) into these cells markedly increased the level of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The addition of N-acetyl cysteine attenuated ROS production and reversed the cytotoxic effects of K-Ras(G12V) in the TKO MEFs. The altered cellular redox state caused by the loss of Pim occurred as a result of lower levels of metabolic intermediates in the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways as well as abnormal mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. TKO MEFs exhibit reduced levels of superoxide dismutase (Sod), glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) and peroxiredoxin 3 (Prdx3) that render them susceptible to killing by K-Ras(G12V)-mediated ROS production. In contrast, the transduction of c-Myc into TKO cells can overcome the lack of Pim protein kinases by regulating cellular metabolism and Sod2. In the absence of the Pim kinases, c-Myc transduction permitted K-Ras(G12V)-induced cell growth by decreasing Ras-induced cellular ROS levels. These results demonstrate that the Pim protein kinases have an important role in regulating cellular redox, metabolism and K-Ras-stimulated cell growth. PMID:25241892

  18. Temporal dynamics of changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and cellular morphology are coordinated during complementary chromatic acclimation in Fremyella diplosiphon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailendra P; Miller, Haley L; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2013-10-14

    Fremyella diplosiphon alters the phycobiliprotein composition of its light-harvesting complexes, i.e., phycobilisomes, and its cellular morphology in response to changes in the prevalent wavelengths of light in the external environment in a phenomenon known as complementary chromatic acclimation (CCA). The organism primarily responds to red light (RL) and green light (GL) during CCA to maximize light absorption for supporting optimal photosynthetic efficiency. Recently, we found that RL-characteristic spherical cell morphology is associated with higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to growth under GL where lower ROS levels and rectangular cell shape are observed. The RL-dependent association of increased ROS levels with cellular morphology was demonstrated by treating cells with a ROS-scavenging antioxidant which resulted in the observation of GL-characteristic rectangular morphology under RL. To gain additional insights into the involvement of ROS in impacting cellular morphology changes during CCA, we conducted experiments to study the temporal dynamics of changes in ROS levels and cellular morphology during transition to growth under RL or GL. Alterations in ROS levels and cell morphology were found to be correlated with each other at early stages of acclimation of low white light-grown cells to growth under high RL or cells transitioned between growth in RL and GL. These results provide further general evidence that significant RL-dependent increases in ROS levels are temporally correlated with changes in morphology toward spherical. Future studies will explore the light-dependent mechanisms by which ROS levels may be regulated and the direct impacts of ROS on the observed morphology changes. PMID:24122367

  19. Cellular HIV type 1 DNA levels are equivalent among drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral naive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Hezka, Johana; Kousiappa, Ioanna; Mamais, Ioannis; Skoura, Lemonia; Pilalas, Dimitris; Metallidis, Simeon; Nicolaidis, Pavlos; Malisiovas, Nicolaos; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2014-03-01

    The emergence of resistance against current antiretroviral drugs to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is an increasingly important concern to the continuous success of antiretroviral therapy to HIV-1-infected patients. In the past decade, a number of studies reported that the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance among newly diagnosed patients has reached an overall 9% prevalence worldwide. Also, a number of studies using longitudinal HIV-1 patient study cohorts demonstrated that the cellular HIV-1 DNA level in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has a prognostic value for the progression of HIV-1 disease independently of plasma HIV-1 RNA load and CD4 count. Using a previously established molecular-beacon-based real-time PCR methodology, cellular HIV-1 DNA levels were quantified in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral-naive patients in Northern Greece recruited between 2009 and 2010 using a predefined enrolling strategy, in an effort to investigate whether there is any relationship between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels and HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance. As part of the same study, DNA sequences encoding the env (C2-C5 region of gp120) were also amplified from PBMC-extracted DNA in order to determine the genotypic coreceptor tropism and genetic subtype. Cellular HIV-1 DNA levels had a median of 3.309 log10 HIV-1 copies per 10(6) PBMCs and demonstrated no correlation between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels and HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance. An absence of association between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels with plasma viral HIV-1 RNA load and CD4 levels was also found reconfirming the previously published study. Genotypic analysis of coreceptor tropism indicated that 96% of samples, independently of the presence or not of genotypic drug resistance, were CCR5-tropic. Overall, the findings reconfirmed the previously proposed proposition that transmitted drug resistance does not have an impact on disease progression in HIV-1-infected individuals. Also, CCR5

  20. Intrinsic flat stability of the positive mass theorem for graphical hypersurfaces of Euclidean space

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Lan-Hsuan; Sormani, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The rigidity of the Positive Mass Theorem states that the only complete asymptotically flat manifold of nonnegative scalar curvature and zero mass is Euclidean space. We study the stability of this statement for spaces that can be realized as graphical hypersurfaces in Euclidean space. We prove (under certain technical hypotheses) that if a sequence of complete asymptotically flat graphs of nonnegative scalar curvature has mass approaching zero, then the sequence must converge to Euclidean space in the pointed intrinsic flat sense. The appendix includes a new Gromov-Hausdorff and intrinsic flat compactness theorem for sequences of metric spaces with uniform Lipschitz bounds on their metrics.

  1. On the complexity of some quadratic Euclidean 2-clustering problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kel'manov, A. V.; Pyatkin, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Some problems of partitioning a finite set of points of Euclidean space into two clusters are considered. In these problems, the following criteria are minimized: (1) the sum over both clusters of the sums of squared pairwise distances between the elements of the cluster and (2) the sum of the (multiplied by the cardinalities of the clusters) sums of squared distances from the elements of the cluster to its geometric center, where the geometric center (or centroid) of a cluster is defined as the mean value of the elements in that cluster. Additionally, another problem close to (2) is considered, where the desired center of one of the clusters is given as input, while the center of the other cluster is unknown (is the variable to be optimized) as in problem (2). Two variants of the problems are analyzed, in which the cardinalities of the clusters are (1) parts of the input or (2) optimization variables. It is proved that all the considered problems are strongly NP-hard and that, in general, there is no fully polynomial-time approximation scheme for them (unless P = NP).

  2. Balancing Degree, Diameter and Weight in Euclidean Spanners

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Shay

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we devise a novel \\emph{unified} construction of Euclidean spanners that trades between the maximum degree, diameter and weight gracefully. For a positive integer k, our construction provides a (1+eps)-spanner with maximum degree O(k), diameter O(log_k n + alpha(k)), weight O(k \\cdot log_k n \\cdot log n) \\cdot w(MST(S)), and O(n) edges. Note that for k= n^{1/alpha(n)} this gives rise to diameter O(alpha(n)), weight O(n^{1/alpha(n)} \\cdot log n \\cdot alpha(n)) \\cdot w(MST(S)) and maximum degree O(n^{1/alpha(n)}), which improves upon a classical result of Arya et al. \\cite{ADMSS95}; in the corresponding result from \\cite{ADMSS95} the spanner has the same number of edges and diameter, but its weight and degree may be arbitrarily large. Also, for k = O(1) this gives rise to maximum degree O(1), diameter O(log n) and weight O(log^2 n) \\cdot w(MST(S)), which reproves another classical result of Arya et al. \\cite{ADMSS95}. Our bound of O(log_k n + alpha(k)) on the diameter is optimal under the constrai...

  3. Phg1/TM9 proteins control intracellular killing of bacteria by determining cellular levels of the Kil1 sulfotransferase in Dictyostelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Le Coadic

    Full Text Available Dictyostelium discoideum has largely been used to study phagocytosis and intracellular killing of bacteria. Previous studies have shown that Phg1A, Kil1 and Kil2 proteins are necessary for efficient intracellular killing of Klebsiella bacteria. Here we show that in phg1a KO cells, cellular levels of lysosomal glycosidases and lysozyme are decreased, and lysosomal pH is increased. Surprisingly, overexpression of Kil1 restores efficient killing in phg1a KO cells without correcting these lysosomal anomalies. Conversely, kil1 KO cells are defective for killing, but their enzymatic content and lysosomal pH are indistinguishable from WT cells. The killing defect of phg1a KO cells can be accounted for by the observation that in these cells the stability and the cellular amount of Kil1 are markedly reduced. Since Kil1 is the only sulfotransferase characterized in Dictyostelium, an (unidentified sulfated factor, defective in both phg1a and kil1 KO cells, may play a key role in intracellular killing of Klebsiella bacteria. In addition, Phg1B plays a redundant role with Phg1A in controlling cellular amounts of Kil1 and intracellular killing. Finally, cellular levels of Kil1 are unaffected in kil2 KO cells, and Kil1 overexpression does not correct the killing defect of kil2 KO cells, suggesting that Kil2 plays a distinct role in intracellular killing.

  4. Development of liquid chromatography mass spectrometric methods for quantification of metabolites from cellular level to clinical biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Tohmola, Niina

    2015-01-01

    Metabolites are low molecular weight compounds participating in different functions of cellular systems. Metabolites can be used as diagnostic biomarkers for numerous diseases. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a powerful tool in quantification of metabolites from various sample matrices. Good sensitivity and specificity are the main benefits of the technique. Mass spectrometry is commonly used in industry, drug research and clinical diagnostics. Extensive validatio...

  5. Scattering solutions of Bethe-Salpeter equation in Minkowski and Euclidean spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carbonell, J

    2016-01-01

    We shortly review different methods to obtain the scattering solutions of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in Minkowski space. We emphasize the possibility to obtain the zero energy observables in terms of the Euclidean scattering amplitude.

  6. Singularities of lightlike hypersurface in semi-Euclidean 4-space with index 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Anti de Sitter space is a maximally symmetric, vacuum solution of Einstein’s field equation with an attractive cosmological constant, and is the hyperquadric of semi-Euclidean space with index 2. So it is meaningful to study the submanifold in semi-Euclidean 4-space with index 2. However, the research on the submanifold in semi-Euclidean 4-space with index 2 has not been found from theory of singularity until now. In this paper, as a generalization of the study on lightlike hypersurface in Minkowski space and a preparation for the further study on anti de Sitter space, the singularities of lightlike hypersurface and Lorentzian surface in semi- Euclidean 4-space with index 2 will be studied. To do this, we reveal the relationships between the singularity of distance-squared function and that of lightlike hypersurface. In addition some geometric properties of lightlike hypersurface and Lorentzian surface are studied from geometrical point of view.

  7. The Euclidean quantisation of Kerr-Newman-de Sitter black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Chrusciel, Piotr; Hörzinger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We study the family of Einstein-Maxwell instantons associated with the Kerr-Newman metrics with a positive cosmological constant. This leads to a quantisation condition on the masses, charges, and angular momentum parameters of the resulting Euclidean solutions.

  8. Asymptotic analysis of fundamental solutions of Dirac operators on even dimensional Euclidean spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the short distance asymptotic behavior of some quantities formed out of fundamental solutions of Dirac operators on even dimensional Euclidean spaces with finite dimensional matrix-valued potentials. (orig.)

  9. Relationship between the cellular uptake of 99Tcm-MIBI and 99Tcm-tetrofosmin with the Pgp expression levels in carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the relationship between the cellular uptake of 99Tcm-MIBI and 99Tcm-tetrofosmin and the Pgp expression levels in four carcinoma cell lines, and the effect of quinidine on the uptake. Methods: 99Tcm-MIBI and 99Tcm-tetrofosmin were used as radioactive tracers to study the uptake kinetics in the carcinoma cell lines Hela, MCF-7, Bca61 and Mcf-7/Adr, and the effect of quinidine on the uptake of 99Tcm-MIBI and 99Tcm-tetrofosmin. The Pgp expression levels in carcinoma cell lines were estimated by using immunocytochemical method. Results: The cellular uptake of both 99Tcm-MIBI and 99Tcm-tetrofosmin was remarkably lower in MCF-7/Adr which gave a strong positive reaction in the Pgp immunocytochemical assay than Hela, MCF-7 and Bca61 did, which gave negative reactions in the immunocytochemical assay. Furthermore, the cellular uptake of 99Tcm-MIBI was higher than that of 99Tcm-tetrofosmin in the three Pgp negative carcinoma cell lines. The uptake of 99Tcm-MIBI and 99Tcm-tetrofosmin exhibited a 3.5 fold and a 4.3 fold increase respectively in the presence of quinidine. Conclusions: The cellular uptake of these two univalent cationic fat-soluble medicines in carcinoma cell lines is negatively correlated with the Pgp expression levels in the cells. Similar to 99Tcm-MIBI, 99Tcm-tetrofosmin seems also to be a good candidate as a noninvasive marker for the diagnosis of multi-drug resistance (MDR) relating to the Pgp levels in tumors. Quinidine can inhibit the drug resistance of MCF-7/Adr in some degree

  10. Euclidean Geometry Codes, minimum weight words and decodable error-patterns using bit-flipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Justesen, Jørn; Jonsson, Bergtor

    2005-01-01

    We determine the number of minimum wigth words in a class of Euclidean Geometry codes and link the performance of the bit-flipping decoding algorithm to the geometry of the error patterns.......We determine the number of minimum wigth words in a class of Euclidean Geometry codes and link the performance of the bit-flipping decoding algorithm to the geometry of the error patterns....

  11. Power- and Bandwidth-Efficient Euclidean Code with Sparse Generator Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Li; Xichuan Lin; Zhisong Bie; Kim Hyok Hui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a coded modulation scheme which is defined by a sparse real-valued generator matrix. As forward error correction (FEC) codes directly constructed in the Euclidean space, this kind of Euclidean codes (EC) named G-LDGM (Generalized Low-Density Generator Matrix) codes can naturally match the continuous communication channels. A shaping method based on hypercube lattice is introduced to prevent the power of signals from being too large. A linear-time parametric belief pro...

  12. The Berlekamp-Massey Algorithm and the Euclidean Algorithm: a Closer Link

    OpenAIRE

    Bras-Amorós, Maria; O'Sullivan, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    The two primary decoding algorithms for Reed-Solomon codes are the Berlekamp-Massey algorithm and the Sugiyama et al. adaptation of the Euclidean algorithm, both designed to solve a key equation. In this article an alternative version of the key equation and a new way to use the Euclidean algorithm to solve it are presented, which yield the Berlekamp-Massey algorithm. This results in a new, simpler, and compacter presentation of the Berlekamp-Massey algorithm.

  13. On the relation between Euclidean and Lorentzian 2D quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Ambjorn, J.; Correia, J; Kristjansen, C.; Loll, R.

    1999-01-01

    Starting from 2D Euclidean quantum gravity, we show that one recovers 2D Lorentzian quantum gravity by removing all baby universes. Using a peeling procedure to decompose the discrete, triangulated geometries along a one-dimensional path, we explicitly associate with each Euclidean space-time a (generalized) Lorentzian space-time. This motivates a map between the parameter spaces of the two theories, under which their propagators get identified. In two dimensions, Lorentzian quantum gravity c...

  14. On a Variety of Algebraic Minimal Surfaces in Euclidean 4-Space

    OpenAIRE

    Moriya, Katsuhiro

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we show that the moduli space of the Weierstrass data for algebraic minimal surfaces in Euclidean 4-space with fixed topological type, orders of branched points and ends, and total curvature, has the structure of a real analytic variety. We provide the lower bounds of its dimension. We also show that the moduli space of the Weierstrass data for stable algebraic minimal surfaces in Euclidean 4-space has the structure of a complex analytic variety.

  15. No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and its cytotoxicity--a paradoxical issue in ROS-based cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunpeng; Hu, Wei; Wu, Hao; Hu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Targeting cancer via ROS-based mechanism has been proposed as a radical therapeutic approach. Cancer cells exhibit higher endogenous oxidative stress than normal cells and pharmacological ROS insults via either enhancing ROS production or inhibiting ROS-scavenging activity can selectively kill cancer cells. In this study, we randomly chose 4 cancer cell lines and primary colon or rectal cancer cells from 4 patients to test the hypothesis and obtained following paradoxical results: while piperlongumin (PL) and β-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), 2 well-defined ROS-based anticancer agents, induced an increase of cellular ROS and killed effectively the tested cells, lactic acidosis (LA), a common tumor environmental factor that plays multifaceted roles in promoting cancer progression, induced a much higher ROS level in the tested cancer cells than PL and PEITC, but spared them; L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO, 20 μM) depleted cellular GSH more effectively and increased higher ROS level than PL or PEITC but permitted progressive growth of the tested cancer cells. No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and cytotoxicity was observed. If ROS is the effecter, it should obey the fundamental therapeutic principle - the dose-response relationship. This is a major concern. PMID:24848642

  16. Cellular resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  17. Effects of high CO₂ levels on fermentation, peroxidation, and cellular water stress in Fragaria vesca stored at low temperature in conditions of unlimited O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Maria; Rosales, Raquel; Mateos, Raquel; Perez-Gago, María B; Sanchez-Ballesta, Maria T; Escribano, María I; Merodio, Carmen

    2015-01-28

    To better understand the tolerance of strawberries (Fragaria vesca L.) to high CO2 in storage atmospheres, fermentation and cellular damage were investigated. Fruits were stored for 3 and 6 days at 0 °C in the presence of different CO2 levels (0, 20, or 40%) with 20% O2. Changes in pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene expression and in fermentative metabolites, as well as in bound water and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations, were analyzed. In strawberries stored without added CO2, up-regulation of PDC and ADH was not associated with an increase in fermentative metabolites. By contrast, moderate ethanol fermentation in fruits exposed to 20% CO2 seems to be essential to maintain fruit metabolism, reducing both lipid peroxidation and cellular water stress. However, if the CO2 concentration increases (40%), the excess acetaldehyde and ethanol produced were closely correlated with a decrease in bound water and production of MDA. PMID:25568930

  18. Combined effects of gamma irradiation and cadmium on cellular and population-level endpoints of the micro-alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major challenge in evaluating the risks of radiation to organisms is that radioactive substances often co-occur with other contaminants in the environment. The combined effects of multiple contaminants is poorly understood, particularly where radiation is involved, but mixture toxicity can give rise to synergistic, antagonistic or additive effects. The challenge of understanding mixture toxicity in a radiation context is the focus of one of the work packages of the STAR EU Network of Excellence in Radioecology, of which this study is a part. This paper presents results from an experiment where the green micro-alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was exposed to both acute external gamma irradiation and the toxic metal cadmium (Cd) (over 72 hours); the experiment had a fully factorial design with 4 gamma doses and 4 Cd concentrations. The endpoints measured were chosen to reflect subcellular, cellular and population-level effects: antioxidant enzyme expression; membrane damage; protein, vitamin and pigment content of the cells; individual cell biomass and growth; population growth (biomass per ml and cells per ml). Preliminary results suggest effects of both Cd and gamma on some of the cellular and subcellular endpoints such as thiamine (vitamin B1) and chlorophyll concentrations in the cells, and individual cell biomass. In some cases interactive effects of the combined Cd and gamma treatments were seen, and these appeared to be dose level dependent. This lack of a consistent pattern of interactive mixture toxicity effects across the endpoints measured means that such effects would be very hard to predict in a risk assessment context. The lack of measurable effects at the population level was probably due to the short experimental duration (72 hours). Other experiments in our research group on the same micro-alga species that have looked at longer term effects (weeks) have shown that effects may not manifest themselves until at least a week after an acute gamma

  19. Combined effects of gamma irradiation and cadmium on cellular and population-level endpoints of the micro-alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, C. [Stockholm University (Sweden); Abdul Meseh, D.; Alasawi, H.; Qiang, M.; Nascimento, F. [Dept of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    A major challenge in evaluating the risks of radiation to organisms is that radioactive substances often co-occur with other contaminants in the environment. The combined effects of multiple contaminants is poorly understood, particularly where radiation is involved, but mixture toxicity can give rise to synergistic, antagonistic or additive effects. The challenge of understanding mixture toxicity in a radiation context is the focus of one of the work packages of the STAR EU Network of Excellence in Radioecology, of which this study is a part. This paper presents results from an experiment where the green micro-alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was exposed to both acute external gamma irradiation and the toxic metal cadmium (Cd) (over 72 hours); the experiment had a fully factorial design with 4 gamma doses and 4 Cd concentrations. The endpoints measured were chosen to reflect subcellular, cellular and population-level effects: antioxidant enzyme expression; membrane damage; protein, vitamin and pigment content of the cells; individual cell biomass and growth; population growth (biomass per ml and cells per ml). Preliminary results suggest effects of both Cd and gamma on some of the cellular and subcellular endpoints such as thiamine (vitamin B1) and chlorophyll concentrations in the cells, and individual cell biomass. In some cases interactive effects of the combined Cd and gamma treatments were seen, and these appeared to be dose level dependent. This lack of a consistent pattern of interactive mixture toxicity effects across the endpoints measured means that such effects would be very hard to predict in a risk assessment context. The lack of measurable effects at the population level was probably due to the short experimental duration (72 hours). Other experiments in our research group on the same micro-alga species that have looked at longer term effects (weeks) have shown that effects may not manifest themselves until at least a week after an acute gamma

  20. Dual variables and a connection picture for the Euclidean Barrett-Crane model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The partition function of the SO(4)- or Spin(4)-symmetric Euclidean Barrett-Crane model can be understood as the sum over all quantized geometries of a given triangulation of a four-manifold. In the original formulation, the variables of the model are balanced representations of SO(4) which describe the quantized areas of the triangles. We present an exact duality transformation for the full quantum theory and reformulate the model in terms of new variables which can be understood as variables conjugate to the quantized areas. The new variables are pairs of S3-values associated with the tetrahedra. These S3-variables parametrize the hyperplanes spanned by the tetrahedra (locally embedded in R4), and the fact that there is a pair of variables for each tetrahedron can be viewed as a consequence of an SO(4)-valued parallel transport along the edges dual to the tetrahedra. We reconstruct the parallel transport of which only the action of SO(4) on S3 is physically relevant and rewrite the Barrett-Crane model as an SO(4) lattice BF-theory living on the 2-complex dual to the triangulation subject to suitable constraints whose form we derive at the quantum level. Our reformulation of the Barrett-Crane model in terms of continuous variables is suitable for the application of various analytical and numerical techniques familiar from statistical mechanics

  1. Elevated level of spindle checkprotein MAD2 correlates with cellular mitotic arrest, but not with aneuploidy and clinicopathological characteristics in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chew-Wun Wu; Chin-Wen Chi; Tze-Sing Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the relevance of spindle assembly checkprotein MAD2 to cellular mitotic status, aneuploidy and other clinicopathological characteristics in gastric cancer.METHODS: Western blot analyses were performed to analyze the protein levels of MAD2 and cyclin B1 in the tumorous and adjacent nontumorous tissues of 34 gastric cancer patients. Cell cycle distribution and DNA ploidy of cancer tissues were also determined by flow cytometry.Conventional statistical methods were adopted to determine the relevance of abnormal MAD2 level to mitotic status,aneuploidy and clinicopathological parameters.RESULTS: Out of 34 gastric cancer patients 25 (74%)exhibited elevated MAD2 levels in their tumorous tissues compared with the corresponding nontumorous tissues.Elevation of MAD2 levels significantly correlated with the increased levels of cydin B1 expression and G2/M-phase distribution (P = 0.038 and P = 0.033, respectively), but was not relevant to aneuploidy. The gastric cancer patients with elevated MAD2 levels showed a tendency toward better disease-free and overall survival (P>0.05). However, no association was found between elevated MAD2 levels and patients' clinicopathological characteristics.CONCLUSION: Elevation of MAD2 level is present in 74%of gastric cancer patients, and correlates with increased mitotic checkpoint activity. However, elevation of MAD2level is not associated with patients' aneuploidy and any of the clinicopathological characteristics.

  2. Modelling Molecular Mechanisms: A Framework of Scientific Reasoning to Construct Molecular-Level Explanations for Cellular Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mil, Marc H. W.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular-level details are part of the upper-secondary biology curriculum in most countries, many studies report that students fail to connect molecular knowledge to phenomena at the level of cells, organs and organisms. Recent studies suggest that students lack a framework to reason about complex systems to make this connection. In this…

  3. Modelling molecular mechanisms: a framework of scientific reasoning to construct molecular-level explanations for cellular behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mil, M.H.W.; Boerwinkel, D.J.; Waarlo, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular-level details are part of the upper-secondary biology curriculum in most countries, many studies report that students fail to connect molecular knowledge to phenomena at the level of cells, organs and organisms. Recent studies suggest that students lack a framework to reason about

  4. Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs

  5. Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkind, M.M.; Bedford, J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Waldren, C.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Gotchy, R.L. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Application of Tomita-Takesaki theory in algebraic euclidean field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Schlingemann, D

    1999-01-01

    The construction of the known interacting quantum field theory models is mostly based on euclidean techniques. The expectation values of interesting quantities are usually given in terms of euclidean correlation functions from which one should be able to extract information about the behavior of the correlation functions of the Minkowskian counterpart. We think that the C*-algebraic approach to euclidean field theory gives an appropriate setup in order to study structural aspects model independently. A previous paper deals with a construction scheme which relates to each euclidean field theory a Poincaré covariant quantum field theory model in the sense of R. Haag and D. Kastler. Within the framework of R. Haag and D. Kastler, the physical concept of PCT symmetry and spin and statistics is related to the Tomita-Takesaki theory of von Neumann algebras and this important aspects has been studied by several authors. We express the PCT symmetry in terms of euclidean reflexions and we explicitly identify the corr...

  7. Epileptic Seizure Detection with Log-Euclidean Gaussian Kernel-Based Sparse Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shasha; Zhou, Weidong; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic seizure detection plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy and reducing the massive workload of reviewing electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. In this work, a novel algorithm is developed to detect seizures employing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based sparse representation (SR) in long-term EEG recordings. Unlike the traditional SR for vector data in Euclidean space, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR framework is proposed for seizure detection in the space of the symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices, which form a Riemannian manifold. Since the Riemannian manifold is nonlinear, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel function is applied to embed it into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) for performing SR. The EEG signals of all channels are divided into epochs and the SPD matrices representing EEG epochs are generated by covariance descriptors. Then, the testing samples are sparsely coded over the dictionary composed by training samples utilizing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR. The classification of testing samples is achieved by computing the minimal reconstructed residuals. The proposed method is evaluated on the Freiburg EEG dataset of 21 patients and shows its notable performance on both epoch-based and event-based assessments. Moreover, this method handles multiple channels of EEG recordings synchronously which is more speedy and efficient than traditional seizure detection methods. PMID:26906674

  8. Log-Euclidean metrics for fast and simple calculus on diffusion tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsigny, Vincent; Fillard, Pierre; Pennec, Xavier; Ayache, Nicholas

    2006-08-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DT-MRI or DTI) is an emerging imaging modality whose importance has been growing considerably. However, the processing of this type of data (i.e., symmetric positive-definite matrices), called "tensors" here, has proved difficult in recent years. Usual Euclidean operations on matrices suffer from many defects on tensors, which have led to the use of many ad hoc methods. Recently, affine-invariant Riemannian metrics have been proposed as a rigorous and general framework in which these defects are corrected. These metrics have excellent theoretical properties and provide powerful processing tools, but also lead in practice to complex and slow algorithms. To remedy this limitation, a new family of Riemannian metrics called Log-Euclidean is proposed in this article. They also have excellent theoretical properties and yield similar results in practice, but with much simpler and faster computations. This new approach is based on a novel vector space structure for tensors. In this framework, Riemannian computations can be converted into Euclidean ones once tensors have been transformed into their matrix logarithms. Theoretical aspects are presented and the Euclidean, affine-invariant, and Log-Euclidean frameworks are compared experimentally. The comparison is carried out on interpolation and regularization tasks on synthetic and clinical 3D DTI data. PMID:16788917

  9. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  10. Euclidean Complex Relativistic Mechanics: A New Special Relativity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossos, Spyridon; Vossos, Elias

    2015-09-01

    Relativity Theory (RT) was fundamental for the development of Quantum Mechanics (QMs). Special Relativity (SR), as is applied until now, cancels the transitive attribute in parallelism, when three observers are related, because Lorentz Boost (LB) is not closed transformation. In this presentation, considering Linear Spacetime Transformation (LSTT), we demand the maintenance of Minkowski Spacetime Interval (S2). In addition, we demand this LSTT to be closed, so there is no need for axes rotation. The solution is the Vossos Matrix (ΛB) containing real and imaginary numbers. As a result, space becomes complex, but time remains real. Thus, the transitive attribute in parallelism, which is equivalent to the Euclidean Request (ER), is also valid for moving observers. Choosing real spacetime for the unmoved observer (O), all the natural sizes are real, too. Using Vossos Transformation (VT) for moving observers, the four-vectors’ zeroth component (such as energy) is real, in contrast with spatial components that are complex, but their norm is real. It is proved that moving (relative to O) human O' meter length, according to Lorentz Boost (LB). In addition, we find Rotation Matrix Vossos-Lorentz (RBL) that turns natural sizes’ complex components to real. We also prove that Speed of Light in Vacuum (c) is invariant, when complex components are used and VT is closed for three sequential observers. After, we find out the connection between two moving (relative to O) observers: X"= ΛLO"(o) ΛLO(O') X', using Lorentz Matrix (ΛL). We applied this theory, finding relations between natural sizes, that are the same as these extracted by Classic Relativity (CR), when two observers are related (i.e. relativistic Doppler shift is the same). But, the results are different, when more than two observers are related. VT of Electromagnetic Tensor (Fμv), leads to Complex Electromagnetic Fields (CEMFs) for a moving observer. When the unmoved observer O and a moving observer O' are

  11. In vivo localization at the cellular level of stilbene fluorescence induced by Plasmopara viticola in grapevine leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellow, Sébastien; Latouche, Gwendal; Brown, Spencer C; Poutaraud, Anne; Cerovic, Zoran G

    2012-06-01

    Accurate localization of phytoalexins is a key for better understanding their role. This work aims to localize stilbenes, the main phytoalexins of grapevine. The cellular localization of stilbene fluorescence induced by Plasmopara viticola, the agent of downy mildew, was determined in grapevine leaves of very susceptible, susceptible, and partially resistant genotypes during infection. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and microspectrofluorimetry were used to acquire UV-excited autofluorescence three-dimensional images and spectra of grapevine leaves 5-6 days after inoculation. This noninvasive technique of investigation in vivo was completed with in vitro spectrofluorimetric studies on pure stilbenes as their fluorescence is largely affected by the physicochemical environment in various leaf compartments. Viscosity was the major physicochemical factor influencing stilbene fluorescence intensity, modifying fluorescence yield by more than two orders of magnitude. Striking differences in the localization of stilbene fluorescence induced by P. viticola were observed between the different genotypes. All inoculated genotypes displayed stilbene fluorescence in cell walls of guard cells and periclinal cell walls of epidermal cells. Higher fluorescence intensity was observed in guard-cell walls than in any other compartment due to increased local viscosity. In addition stilbene fluorescence was found in epidermal cell vacuoles of the susceptible genotype and in the infected spongy parenchyma of the partially resistant genotype. The very susceptible genotype was devoid of fluorescence both in the epidermal vacuoles and the mesophyll. This strongly suggests that the resistance of grapevine leaves to P. viticola is correlated with the pattern of localization of induced stilbenes in host tissues. PMID:22412183

  12. Toxicity of selenite in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Comparison between effects at the population and sub-cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicity of selenium in aquatic ecosystems is mainly linked to its uptake and biotransformation by micro-organisms, and its subsequent transfer upwards into the food chain. Thus, organisms at low trophic level, such as algae, play a crucial role. The aim of our study was to investigate the biological effects of selenite on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both at the sub-cellular level (effect on ultrastructure) and at the population level (effect on growth). The cells were grown under batch culture conditions in well-defined media and exposed to waterborne selenite at concentrations up to 500 μM; i.e. up to lethal conditions. Based on the relationship between Se concentration and cell density achieved after a 96 h exposure period, an EC50 of 80 μM with a 95% confidence interval ranging between 64 and 98 μM was derived. No adaptation mechanisms were observed: the same toxicity was quantified for algae pre-contaminated with Se. The inhibition of growth was linked to impairments observed at the sub-cellular level. The intensity of the ultrastructural damages caused by selenite exposure depended on the level and duration of exposure. Observations by TEM suggested chloroplasts as the first target of selenite cytotoxicity, with effects on the stroma, thylakoids and pyrenoids. At higher concentrations, we could observe an increase in the number and volume of starch grains. For cells collected at 96 h, electron-dense granules were observed. Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed that these granules contained selenium and were also rich in calcium and phosphorus. This study confirms that the direct toxicity of selenite on the phytoplankton biomass is not likely to take place at concentrations found in the environment. At higher concentrations, the link between effects at the sub-cellular and population levels, the over-accumulation of starch, and the formation of dense granules containing selenium are reported for the first time in the literature for a

  13. Linear time constant factor approximation algorithm for the Euclidean ``Freeze-Tag`` robot awakening problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Namazifar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Freeze-Tag Problem (FTP arises in the study of swarm robotics. The FTP is a combinatorial optimization problem that starts by locating a set of robots in a Euclidean plane. Here, we are given a swarm of n asleep (frozen or inactive robots and a single awake (active robot. In order to activate an inactive robot in FTP, the active robot should either be in the physical proximity to the inactive robot or ``touch`` it. The new activated robot starts moving and can wake up other inactive robots. The goal is to find an optimal activating schedule with the minimum time required for activating all robots. In general, FTP is an NP-Hard problem and in the Euclidean space is an open problem. In this paper, we present a recursive approximation algorithm with a constant approximation factor and a linear running time for the Euclidean Freeze-Tag Problem.

  14. Ethacrynic acid inhibition of histamine release from rat mast cells: effect on cellular ATP levels and thiol groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1983-01-01

    The experiments concerned the effect of ethacrynic acid (0.5 mM) on the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of rat mast cells and the effect on histamine release induced by the ionophore A23187 (10 microM). Ethacrynic acid decreased the ATP level of the cells in presence of antimycin A and glucose...

  15. On the local structure and the homology of CAT$(\\kappa)$ spaces and euclidean buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Linus

    2010-01-01

    We prove that every open subset of a euclidean building is a finite dimensional absolute neighborhood retract. This implies in particular that such a set has the homotopy type of a finite dimensional simplicial complex. We also include a proof for the rigidity of homeomorphisms of euclidean buildings. A key step in our approach to this result is the following: the space of directions $\\Sigma_oX$ of a CAT$(\\kappa)$ space $X$ is homotopy quivalent to a small punctured disk $B_\\eps(X,o)\\setminus...

  16. Correlation function for the Grid-Poisson Euclidean matching on a line and on a circle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the two-point correlation function for spin configurations which are obtained by solving the Euclidean matching problem, for one family of points on a grid and the second family chosen uniformly at random, when the cost depends on a power p of the Euclidean distance. We provide the analytic solution in the thermodynamic limit, in a number of cases (p > 1 open b.c. and p = 2 periodic b.c., both at criticality) and analyse numerically other parts of the phase diagram. (paper)

  17. Generalized Thomson problem in arbitrary dimensions and non-euclidean geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batle, J.; Bagdasaryan, Armen; Abdel-Aty, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-06-01

    Systems of identical particles with equal charge are studied under a special type of confinement. These classical particles are free to move inside some convex region S and on the boundary of it Ω (the S d - 1 -sphere, in our case). We shall show how particles arrange themselves under the sole action of the Coulomb repulsion in many dimensions in the usual Euclidean space, therefore generalizing the so called Thomson problem to many dimensions. Also, we explore how the problem varies when non-Euclidean geometries are considered. We shall see that optimal configurations in all cases possess a high degree of symmetry, regardless of the concomitant dimension or geometry.

  18. Nonstandard q-deformation of the euclidean algebras and their representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the base of nonstandard q-deformed orthogonal algebras Uq1(son+1) and their finite dimensional irreducible representations (irreps) given in a q analogue of Gel'fand-Tsetlin basis, the corresponding q-deformed analogues Uq1(ison) of the Euclidean algebras iso(n) are obtained in a uniform fashion for all n ≥ 2 along with their infinite dimensional irreps. Low dimensional q-Euclidean algebras Uq1(iso2), Uq1(iso3) and Uq1(iso4), as well as their irreps, are considered in detail

  19. Solutions manual to accompany Classical geometry Euclidean, transformational, inversive, and projective

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, I E; Liu, A C F; Tokarsky, G W

    2014-01-01

    Solutions Manual to accompany Classical Geometry: Euclidean, Transformational, Inversive, and Projective Written by well-known mathematical problem solvers, Classical Geometry: Euclidean, Transformational, Inversive, and Projective features up-to-date and applicable coverage of the wide spectrum of geometry and aids readers in learning the art of logical reasoning, modeling, and proof. With its reader-friendly approach, this undergraduate text features self-contained topical coverage and provides a large selection of solved exercises to aid in reader comprehension. Material in this text can be tailored for a one-, two-, or three-semester sequence.

  20. mRNA expression levels in failing human hearts predict cellular electrophysiological remodeling: a population-based simulation study.

    OpenAIRE

    Walmsley, J.; Rodriguez, JF; Mirams, GR; Burrage, K; Efimov, IR; Rodriguez, B.

    2013-01-01

    Differences in mRNA expression levels have been observed in failing versus non-failing human hearts for several membrane channel proteins and accessory subunits. These differences may play a causal role in electrophysiological changes observed in human heart failure and atrial fibrillation, such as action potential (AP) prolongation, increased AP triangulation, decreased intracellular calcium transient (CaT) magnitude and decreased CaT triangulation. Our goal is to investigate whether the inf...

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of inosine against radiation-induced damage at cellular, biochemical and chromosomal levels in swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inosine has been used for treatment of various diseases and disorders in medicine. Modulator effect of inosine against γ radiation-induced histological alterations in testis, reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO), acid and alkaline phosphatases activities (AP and ALP) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in mice was studied at various experimental intervals between 1 and 30 days. Mice exposed to 8 Gy γ-rays showed acute radiation sickness including marked testis histological changes and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in bone marrow cells with 100 % mortality within 22 days. When inosine was given orally at a dose of 80 mg/ kg body wt for 15 consecutive days after exposure to γ-rays, death in radiation + inosine group was reduced to 70 % at 30 days. The radiation - dose reduction factor (DRF) was 1.43. There was significantly lesser degree of damage to testis tissue architecture and various cell populations including spermatogonia, spermatids and leydig cells. Correspondingly, a significant decrease in the LPO and increase in the GSH levels were observed in testis of radiation + inosine group. Similarly, a significant decrease in level of AP and increase in level of ALP were observed. Inosine treatment significantly prevented γ-rays-induced CA frequency in bone marrow cells.

  2. Analyzing the Expression Level and Cellular Location of the Tip-1 Protein in Oral Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mansoursamaei

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is the sixth most common cancer in the world and accounts for approximately 4% of all cancers and 2% of all cancer death.The single most important factor in the prevention of the disease is early detection although, due to increased risk of secondary malignancy, survival remains poor with only a 25% 5 years survival. Both hereditary and environmental factors have been shown to have a productive role in this disease. For example, although chronic exposure of oral epithelium to tobacco smoke and alcohol are amongst the most important aetiological factors, it is now becoming realized that infection with high risk types of human papilloma virus (HPV are also involved as causative agent in a subset of this disease. All of these OSCC associated factors are known to promote genetic instability in the target oral epithelial cells. Work in our laboratories has indicated that the Tax interacting protein 1 (Tip-1 is also a target for the HPV 16 E6 protein may play an important role in controlling genetic instability during the oncogenic process (Hampson L., et al unpublished. So far 14 oral cancer cell lines have been grown in cell culture and RNA extracted from these. Tip-1 transcript levels were analyzed in this material by Northern blotting and competitive template quantitative PCR, which showed that Tip-1 levels were higher in some, cell lines than others (4 high, 6 moderate, 4 low level. Cell ploidy was determined by FACS analysis of propidium iodide stained cells, which showed that out of all the OSCC cell lines tested the cell line (BICR 68 had the greatest numbers of polyploid cells and also had the highest expression of Tip-1 RNA.

  3. Towards a Cellular Automata Based Network Intrusion Detection System with Power Level Metric in Wireless Adhoc Networks (IDFADNWCA)

    OpenAIRE

    Sree, Pokkuluri Kiran; Babu, Inampudi Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Adhoc wireless network with their changing topology and distributed nature are more prone to intruders. The efficiency of an Intrusion detection system in the case of an adhoc network is not only determined by its dynamicity in monitoring but also in its flexibility in utilizing the available power in each of its nodes. In this paper we propose a hybrid intrusion detection system, based on a power level metric for potential adhoc hosts, which is used to determine the duration for which a part...

  4. The glycolytic shift in fumarate-hydratase-deficient kidney cancer lowers AMPK levels, increases anabolic propensities and lowers cellular iron levels

    KAUST Repository

    Tong, Winghang

    2011-09-01

    Inactivation of the TCA cycle enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH), drives a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis in FH-deficient kidney tumors and cell lines from patients with hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell cancer (HLRCC), resulting in decreased levels of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) and p53 tumor suppressor, and activation of the anabolic factors, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and ribosomal protein S6. Reduced AMPK levels lead to diminished expression of the DMT1 iron transporter, and the resulting cytosolic iron deficiency activates the iron regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2, and increases expression of the hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α. Silencing of HIF-1α or activation of AMPK diminishes invasive activities, indicating that alterations of HIF-1α and AMPK contribute to the oncogenic growth of FH-deficient cells. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  5. Towards instantaneous cellular level bio diagnosis: laser extraction and imaging of biological entities with conserved integrity and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, L; Robertson, W D; Reimer, R; Heinze, C; Schneider, C; Eggert, D; Truschow, P; Hansen, N-O; Kroetz, P; Zou, J; Miller, R J D

    2015-07-17

    The prospect for spatial imaging with mass spectroscopy at the level of the cell requires new means of cell extraction to conserve molecular structure. To this aim, we demonstrate a new laser extraction process capable of extracting intact biological entities with conserved biological function. The method is based on the recently developed picosecond infrared laser (PIRL), designed specifically to provide matrix-free extraction by selectively exciting the water vibrational modes under the condition of ultrafast desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE). The basic concept is to extract the constituent protein structures on the fastest impulsive limit for ablation to avoid excessive thermal heating of the proteins and to use strongly resonant 1-photon conditions to avoid multiphoton ionization and degradation of the sample integrity. With various microscope imaging and biochemical analysis methods, nanoscale single protein molecules, viruses, and cells in the ablation plume are found to be morphologically and functionally identical with their corresponding controls. This method provides a new means to resolve chemical activity within cells and is amenable to subcellular imaging with near-field approaches. The most important finding is the conserved nature of the extracted biological material within the laser ablation plume, which is fully consistent with in vivo structures and characteristics. PMID:26111866

  6. Steiner tree heuristic in the Euclidean d-space using bottleneck distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Stephan Sloth; Winter, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Some of the most efficient heuristics for the Euclidean Steiner minimal tree problem in the d-dimensional space, d ≥2, use Delaunay tessellations and minimum spanning trees to determine small subsets of geometrically close terminals. Their low-cost Steiner trees are determined and concatenated in a...

  7. Space Curves of Constant Breadth according to Bishop Frame in Euclidean 3-Space

    OpenAIRE

    Kocayiğit, Hüseyin; Çetin, Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, space curves of constant breadth according to Bishop frame in Euclidean 3-space are studied. It is shown that in some special cases, space curves of constant breadth are slant helix. Moreover, the differential equations characterizing the space curves of constant breadth in E are given. 3 are given

  8. Short-scale Emergence of Classical Geometry, in Euclidean Loop Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bayle, Vincent; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    We study the euclidean covariant loop-quantum-gravity vertex numerically, using a cylindrically symmetric boundary state and a convenient value of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter. We show that a classical geometry emerges already at low spin. We also recognise the appearance of the degenerate configurations.

  9. The best constant of Sobolev inequality in an $n$ dimensional Euclidean space

    OpenAIRE

    Kametaka, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Kohtaro; NAGAI, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    The best constant of Sobolev inequality in an $n$ dimensional Euclidean space is found by means of the theory of reproducing kernel and Green function. The concrete form of the best constant is also found in the case of Sobolev space $W^2(\\mathbf{R}^n)$ ($n=2,3$).

  10. Mayer expansions for Euclidean lattice field theory: Convergence properties and relation with perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the Mayer expansion in Euclidean lattice field theory by comparing it with the statistical mechanics of polymer systems. In this connection he discusses the Borel summability and the analyticity of the activities on the lattice. Furthermore the relations between renormalization and the Mayer expansion are considered. (HSI)

  11. Ab-initio reconstruction of complex Euclidean networks in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujarathi, S. R.; Farrow, C. L.; Glosser, C.; Granlund, L.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2014-05-01

    Reconstruction of complex structures is an inverse problem arising in virtually all areas of science and technology, from protein structure determination to bulk heterostructure solar cells and the structure of nanoparticles. We cast this problem as a complex network problem where the edges in a network have weights equal to the Euclidean distance between their endpoints. We present a method for reconstruction of the locations of the nodes of the network given only the edge weights of the Euclidean network. The theoretical foundations of the method are based on rigidity theory, which enables derivation of a polynomial bound on its efficiency. An efficient implementation of the method is discussed and timing results indicate that the run time of the algorithm is polynomial in the number of nodes in the network. We have reconstructed Euclidean networks of about 1000 nodes in approximately 24 h on a desktop computer using this implementation. We also reconstruct Euclidean networks corresponding to polymer chains in two dimensions and planar graphene nanoparticles. We have also modified our base algorithm so that it can successfully solve random point sets when the input data are less precise.

  12. Two AdS2 branes in the euclidean AdS3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the density of open strings stretching between AdS2 branes in the euclidean AdS3. This is done by solving the factorization constraint of a degenerate boundary field, and the result is checked by a Cardy-type computation. We mention applications to branes in the minkowskian AdS3 and its cigar coset. (author)

  13. Two AdS2 branes in the Euclidean AdS3

    CERN Document Server

    Ribault, S

    2003-01-01

    We compute the density of open strings stretching between AdS2 branes in the Euclidean AdS3. This is done by solving the factorization constraint of a degenerate boundary field, and the result is checked by a Cardy-type computation. We mention applications to branes in the Minkowskian AdS3 and its cigar coset.

  14. Constraints on spacetime manifold in Euclidean supergravity in terms of Dirac eigenvalues

    CERN Document Server

    Ciuhu, C

    2000-01-01

    We generalize previous work on Dirac eigenvalues as dynamical variables of Euclidean supergravity. The most general set of constraints on the curvatures of the tangent bundle and on the spinor bundle of the spacetime manifold under which spacetime addmits Dirac eigenvalues as observables, are derived.

  15. Constraints on Space-Time Manifold in Euclidean Supergravity in Terms of Dirac Eigenvalues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuhu, C.; Vancea, Ion V.

    We generalize a previous work on Dirac eigenvalues as dynamical variables of Euclidean supergravity. The most general set of constraints on the curvatures of the tangent bundle and on the spinor bundle of the space-time manifold, under which space-time admits Dirac eigenvalues as observables, are derived.

  16. Constraints on spacetime manifold in Euclidean supergravity in terms of Dirac eigenvalues

    OpenAIRE

    Ciuhu, C.; Vancea, I. V.

    1998-01-01

    We generalize previous work on Dirac eigenvalues as dynamical variables of Euclidean supergravity. The most general set of constraints on the curvatures of the tangent bundle and on the spinor bundle of the spacetime manifold under which spacetime admits Dirac eigenvalues as observables, are derived.

  17. A Vector Approach to Euclidean Geometry: Vector Spaces and Affine Geometry, Volume 1. Teacher's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Herbert E.; Szabo, Steven

    This is the teacher's edition of a text for the first year of a two-year high school geometry course. The course bases plane and solid geometry and trigonometry on the fact that the translations of a Euclidean space constitute a vector space which has an inner product. Volume 1 deals largely with affine geometry, and the notion of dimension is…

  18. On the Euclidean approach to quantum field theory in anti-de Sitter space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantum field theory in AdS has moved rapidly in the past few years. A continuation of this progress clearly requires the introduction of new methods and points of view. In this paper, the author will discuss the possibility of developing a purely Euclidean approach to quantum field theory in Ads

  19. Special Geometry of Euclidean Supersymmetry IV: the local c-map

    CERN Document Server

    Cortés, Vicente; Mohaupt, Thomas; Vaughan, Owen

    2015-01-01

    We consider timelike and spacelike reductions of 4D, N = 2 Minkowskian and Euclidean vector multiplets coupled to supergravity and the maps induced on the scalar geometry. In particular, we investigate (i) the (standard) spatial c-map, (ii) the temporal c-map, which corresponds to the reduction of the Minkowskian theory over time, and (iii) the Euclidean c-map, which corresponds to the reduction of the Euclidean theory over space. In the last two cases we prove that the target manifold is para-quaternionic Kahler. In cases (i) and (ii) we construct two integrable complex structures on the target manifold, one of which belongs to the quaternionic and para-quaternionic structure, respectively. In case (iii) we construct two integrable para-complex structures, one of which belongs to the para-quaternionic structure. In addition we provide a new global construction of the spatial, temporal and Euclidean c-maps, and separately consider a description of the target manifold as a fibre bundle over a projective specia...

  20. On the sequences ri, si, ti ∈ ℤ related to extended Euclidean algorithm and continued fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Khairun Nisak; Kamarulhaili, Hailiza

    2016-06-01

    The extended Euclidean Algorithm is a practical technique used in many cryptographic applications, where it computes the sequences ri, si, ti ∈ ℤ that always satisfy ri = si a+ tib. The integer ri is the remainder in the ith sequences. The sequences si and ti arising from the extended Euclidean algorithm are equal, up to sign, to the convergents of the continued fraction expansion of a/b. The values of (ri, si, ti) satisfy various properties which are used to solve the shortest vector problem in representing point multiplications in elliptic curves cryptography, namely the GLV (Gallant, Lambert & Vanstone) integer decomposition method and the ISD (integer sub decomposition) method. This paper is to extend the proof for each of the existing properties on (ri, si, ti). We also generate new properties which are relevant to the sequences ri, si, ti ∈ ℤ. The concepts of Euclidean algorithm, extended Euclidean algorithm and continued fractions are intertwined and the properties related to these concepts are proved. These properties together with the existing properties of the sequence (ri, si, ti) are regarded as part and parcel of the building blocks of a new generation of an efficient cryptographic protocol.

  1. Thinking Outside the Euclidean Box: Riemannian Geometry and Inter-Temporal Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Himanshu; Mishra, Arul

    2016-01-01

    Inter-temporal decisions involves assigning values to various payoffs occurring at different temporal distances. Past research has used different approaches to study these decisions made by humans and animals. For instance, considering that people discount future payoffs at a constant rate (e.g., exponential discounting) or at variable rate (e.g., hyperbolic discounting). In this research, we question the widely assumed, but seldom questioned, notion across many of the existing approaches that the decision space, where the decision-maker perceives time and monetary payoffs, is a Euclidean space. By relaxing the rigid assumption of Euclidean space, we propose that the decision space is a more flexible Riemannian space of Constant Negative Curvature. We test our proposal by deriving a discount function, which uses the distance in the Negative Curvature space instead of Euclidean temporal distance. The distance function includes both perceived values of time as well as money, unlike past work which has considered just time. By doing so we are able to explain many of the empirical findings in inter-temporal decision-making literature. We provide converging evidence for our proposal by estimating the curvature of the decision space utilizing manifold learning algorithm and showing that the characteristics (i.e., metric properties) of the decision space resembles those of the Negative Curvature space rather than the Euclidean space. We conclude by presenting new theoretical predictions derived from our proposal and implications for how non-normative behavior is defined. PMID:27018787

  2. mRNA expression levels in failing human hearts predict cellular electrophysiological remodeling: a population-based simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Walmsley

    Full Text Available Differences in mRNA expression levels have been observed in failing versus non-failing human hearts for several membrane channel proteins and accessory subunits. These differences may play a causal role in electrophysiological changes observed in human heart failure and atrial fibrillation, such as action potential (AP prolongation, increased AP triangulation, decreased intracellular calcium transient (CaT magnitude and decreased CaT triangulation. Our goal is to investigate whether the information contained in mRNA measurements can be used to predict cardiac electrophysiological remodeling in heart failure using computational modeling. Using mRNA data recently obtained from failing and non-failing human hearts, we construct failing and non-failing cell populations incorporating natural variability and up/down regulation of channel conductivities. Six biomarkers are calculated for each cell in each population, at cycle lengths between 1500 ms and 300 ms. Regression analysis is performed to determine which ion channels drive biomarker variability in failing versus non-failing cardiomyocytes. Our models suggest that reported mRNA expression changes are consistent with AP prolongation, increased AP triangulation, increased CaT duration, decreased CaT triangulation and amplitude, and increased delay between AP and CaT upstrokes in the failing population. Regression analysis reveals that changes in AP biomarkers are driven primarily by reduction in I[Formula: see text], and changes in CaT biomarkers are driven predominantly by reduction in I(Kr and SERCA. In particular, the role of I(CaL is pacing rate dependent. Additionally, alternans developed at fast pacing rates for both failing and non-failing cardiomyocytes, but the underlying mechanisms are different in control and heart failure.

  3. Absolute zinc quantification at the sub-cellular level by combined use of hard X-ray fluorescence and phase contrast imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy and magnified phase contrast imaging are combined to obtain quantitative maps of the projected zinc mass fraction in whole cell of PC12 cell lines. The experiments were performed on freeze dried cells at the nano-imaging station ID22NI of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). X-ray fluorescence analysis gives the areal mass of most major, minor and trace elements while quantitative phase contrast imaging provides maps of the projected mass. The combined method was validated on calibration samples by comparison with other alternative techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM). Up to now, absolute quantification at the sub-cellular level was impossible using X-ray fluorescence microscopy but can be reached for the first time with the use of the proposed approach

  4. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  5. Permutation asymmetry of the relativistic velocity addition law and non-Euclidean geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The asymmetry of the relativistic addition law for noncollinear velocities under the velocity permutation leads to two modified triangles on a Euclidean plane depicting the addition of unpermuted and permuted velocities and the appearance of a nonzero angle ω between two resulting velocities. A particle spin rotates through the same angle ω under a Lorentz boost with a velocity noncollinear to the particle velocity. Three mutually connected three-parameter representations of the angle ω, obtained by the author earlier, express the three-parameter symmetry of the sides and angles of two Euclidean triangles identical to the sine and cosine theorems for the sides and angles of a single geodesic triangle on the surface of a pseudosphere. Namely, all three representations of the angle ω, after a transformation of one of them, coincide with the representations of the area of a pseudospherical triangle expressed in terms of any two of its sides and the angle between them. The angle ω is also symmetrically expressed in terms of three angles or three sides of a geodesic triangle, and therefore it is an invariant of the group of triangle motions over the pseudo-sphere surface, the group that includes the Lorentz group. Although the pseudospheres in Euclidean and pseudo-Euclidean spaces are locally isometric, only the latter is isometric to the entire Lobachevsky plane and forms a homogeneous isotropic curved 4-velocity space in the flat Minkowski space. In this connection, relativistic physical processes that may be related to the pseudosphere in Euclidean space are especially interesting. (methodological notes)

  6. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Permutation asymmetry of the relativistic velocity addition law and non-Euclidean geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritus, V. I.

    2008-07-01

    The asymmetry of the relativistic addition law for noncollinear velocities under the velocity permutation leads to two modified triangles on a Euclidean plane depicting the addition of unpermuted and permuted velocities and the appearance of a nonzero angle ω between two resulting velocities. A particle spin rotates through the same angle ω under a Lorentz boost with a velocity noncollinear to the particle velocity. Three mutually connected three-parameter representations of the angle ω, obtained by the author earlier, express the three-parameter symmetry of the sides and angles of two Euclidean triangles identical to the sine and cosine theorems for the sides and angles of a single geodesic triangle on the surface of a pseudosphere. Namely, all three representations of the angle ω, after a transformation of one of them, coincide with the representations of the area of a pseudospherical triangle expressed in terms of any two of its sides and the angle between them. The angle ω is also symmetrically expressed in terms of three angles or three sides of a geodesic triangle, and therefore it is an invariant of the group of triangle motions over the pseudo-sphere surface, the group that includes the Lorentz group. Although the pseudospheres in Euclidean and pseudo-Euclidean spaces are locally isometric, only the latter is isometric to the entire Lobachevsky plane and forms a homogeneous isotropic curved 4-velocity space in the flat Minkowski space. In this connection, relativistic physical processes that may be related to the pseudosphere in Euclidean space are especially interesting.

  7. Euclidean-Minkowskian duality of Wilson-loop correlation functions

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano, M; Meggiolaro, E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the analyticity properties of the Wilson--loop correlation functions relevant to the problem of soft high-energy scattering, directly at the level of the functional integral, in a genuinely nonperturbative way.

  8. Changes in rRNA levels during stress invalidates results from mRNA blotting: Fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization permits renormalization for estimation of cellular mRNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.C.; Nielsen, A.K.; Molin, Søren; Hammer, Karin; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    experiments, in which mRNA levels routinely are normalized to a fixed amount of extracted total RNA. The cellular levels of specific mRNA species were estimated using a renormalization with the total RNA content per cell. By a combination of fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization, which estimates the...... relative level of rRNA per cell, and slot blotting to rRNA probes, which estimates the level of rRNA per extracted total RNA, the amount of RNA per cell was calculated in a series of heat shock experiments with the gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis. It was found that the level of rRNA per cell......Regulation of gene expression can be analyzed by a number of different techniques. Some techniques monitor the level of specific mRNA directly, and others monitor indirectly by determining the level of enzymes encoded by the mRNA. Each method has its own inherent way of normalization. When results...

  9. 电磁辐射的细胞生物学效应研究进展%Progress in biological effects on the cellular level of electromagnetic radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁真; 李劲涛; 吴水才; 曾毅

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of communication industry, the man⁃made electromagnetic pollution which was mainly caused by convenient electronic appliances has been a worldwide concern� Studies indicated that electromagnetic radiation ( EMR) could be harmful to human health, by affecting the nervous system, immune system, genital system and cardiocerebral vascular system� However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms were still unclear� The EMR impacts on cell viability, apoptosis, cell membrane function, cell receptor, cell signal transduction and genetic expression were illustrated and discussed here� The biological effects on the cellular level caused by EMR were summarized to provide evidences for further study on biological mechanism of EMR.%随着工业、信息行业的飞速发展,各种电子产品在给人类日常生活带来巨大便利的同时,产生的电磁污染也引起了人们的广泛关注。已有大量研究表明电磁辐射能从神经系统、免疫系统、生殖系统以及心脑血管系统等各个方面对人体产生不良影响,但具体微观作用机制还不能确定。本文综述了电磁辐射对细胞增殖、凋亡、细胞膜、受体分子、跨膜信号转导以及基因表达等方面的影响,详细介绍了细胞水平上电磁辐射的生物学效应,以期进一步对电磁辐射生物效应机制进行详细深入的研究。

  10. Protein Secondary Structures (α-helix and β-sheet) at a Cellular Level and Protein Fractions in Relation to Rumen Degradation Behaviours of Protein: A New Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying the secondary structure of proteins leads to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein, and such an understanding of the structure of the whole protein is often vital to understanding its digestive behaviour and nutritive value in animals. The main protein secondary structures are the α-helix and β-sheet. The percentage of these two structures in protein secondary structures influences protein nutritive value, quality and digestive behaviour. A high percentage of β-sheet structure may partly cause a low access to gastrointestinal digestive enzymes, which results in a low protein value. The objectives of the present study were to use advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform IR (S-FTIR) microspectroscopy as a new approach to reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein secondary structures of feed tissues affected by heat-processing within intact tissue at a cellular level, and to quantify protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modelling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods, in relation to protein digestive behaviours and nutritive value in the rumen, which was determined using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System. The synchrotron-based molecular chemistry research experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy. The results showed that, with S-FTIR microspectroscopy, the molecular chemistry, ultrastructural chemical make-up and nutritive characteristics could be revealed at a high ultraspatial resolution (∼10 μm). S-FTIR microspectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of protein differed between raw and roasted golden flaxseeds in terms of the percentages and ratio of α-helixes and β-sheets in the mid-IR range at the cellular level. By using multicomponent peak modelling, the results show that the roasting reduced (P <0.05) the percentage of α-helixes (from 47.1% to 36.1%: S-FTIR absorption intensity), increased the

  11. Metal-induced stress in bivalves living along a gradient of Cd contamination: relating sub-cellular metal distribution to population-level responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of biomarkers to assess the impacts of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems has noticeably increased over the past few years. Few of these studies, however, have contributed to the prediction of ecologically significant effects (i.e., at the population or community levels). The present field study was designed to evaluate the potential of metallothionein (MT) and sub-cellular metal partitioning measurements for predicting toxic effects at higher levels of the biological organization in freshwater bivalves (Pyganodon grandis) chronically exposed to Cd. For that purpose, we quantitatively sampled P. grandis populations in the littoral zone of nine lakes on the Precambrian Canadian Shield during two consecutive summers (1998 and 1999); lakes were characterized by contrasting Cd levels but similar trophic status. We tested relationships between the population status of P. grandis (i.e., growth parameters, density, biomass, secondary production, turnover ratio and cumulative fecundity) and (i) ambient Cd concentrations, (ii) sub-organismal responses (MT concentrations in the gill cytosol of individuals and Cd concentrations in three metal-ligand pools identified as M-HMW, the high molecular weight pool, M-MT, the metallothionein-like pool and M-LMW, the low molecular weight pool) and (iii) ecological confounding factors (food resources, presence of host fishes for the obligatory parasitic larval stage of P. grandis). Our results show that littoral density, live weight, dry viscera biomass, production and cumulative fecundity decreased with increasing concentrations of the free-cadmium ion in the environment (Pearson's r ranging from -0.63 to -0.78). On the other hand, theoretical maximum shell lengths (L∞) in our populations were related to both the dissolved Ca concentration and food quality (sestonic C and N concentrations). Overall, Cd concentrations in the gill cytosolic HMW pool of the individual molluscs were the biomarker response that was most frequently

  12. Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnoli, Franco

    1998-01-01

    An introduction to cellular automata (both deterministic and probabilistic) with examples. Definition of deterministic automata, dynamical properties, damage spreading and Lyapunov exponents; probabilistic automata and Markov processes, nonequilibrium phase transitions, directed percolation, diffusion; simulation techniques, mean field. Investigation themes: life, epidemics, forest fires, percolation, modeling of ecosystems and speciation. They represent my notes for the school "Dynamical Mod...

  13. N,N-Dimethylsphingosine is a potent competitive inhibitor of sphingosine kinase but not of protein kinase C: modulation of cellular levels of sphingosine 1-phosphate and ceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, L C; Van Brocklyn, J R; Cuvillier, O; Kleuser, B; Spiegel, S

    1998-09-15

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (SPP), a lipid second messenger formed by the action of sphingosine kinase, has been implicated in regulating diverse biological processes, including growth, survival, and differentiation. N,N-Dimethylsphingosine (DMS) inhibits sphingosine kinase and has been used to investigate the biological roles of SPP; however, little is known of the mechanism of inhibition of sphingosine kinase by DMS. In addition, DMS has been shown to inhibit protein kinase C in vitro. Here we report that DMS is a competitive inhibitor of sphingosine kinase from U937 monoblastic leukemia cells, Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, and PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. DMS decreases basal levels of SPP and prevents increases in SPP in response to physiological stimuli known to activate sphingosine kinase. DMS also effectively increases cellular levels of ceramide in a variety of cell types, and resetting of the ceramide/SPP rheostat may account for the pro-apoptotic effects of DMS. Moreover, DMS, at concentrations which effectively inhibit sphingosine kinase, has no effect on protein kinase C activity or its membrane translocation. Thus, DMS acts as a specific competitive inhibitor of sphingosine kinase in diverse cell types and is a useful tool to elucidate the role of SPP as an intracellular second messenger. PMID:9737868

  14. Membrane paradigm and entropy of black holes in the Euclidean action approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The membrane paradigm approach to black holes fixes in the vicinity of the event horizon a fictitious surface, the stretched horizon, so that the spacetime outside remains unchanged and the spacetime inside is vacuum. Using this powerful method, several black hole properties have been found and settled, such as the horizon's viscosity, electrical conductivity, resistivity, as well as other properties. On the other hand, the Euclidean action approach to black hole spacetimes has been very fruitful in understanding black hole entropy. Combining both the Euclidean action and membrane paradigm approaches, a direct derivation of the black hole entropy is given. In the derivation, it is considered that the only fields present are the gravitational and matter fields, with no electric field.

  15. Membrane paradigm and entropy of black holes in the Euclidean action approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lemos, José P S

    2011-01-01

    The membrane paradigm approach to black holes fixes in the vicinity of the event horizon a fictitious surface, the stretched horizon, so that the spacetime outside remains unchanged and the spacetime inside is vacuum. Using this powerful method, several black hole properties have been found and settled, such as the horizon's viscosity, electrical conductivity, resistivity, as well as other properties. On the other hand the Euclidean action approach to black hole spacetimes has been very fruitful in understanding black hole entropy. Combining both the Euclidean action and membrane paradigm approaches a direct derivation of the black hole entropy is given. In the derivation it is considered that the only fields present are the gravitational and matter fields, with no electric field.

  16. A Tale of Two Spaces: BPS Wilson Loops in Minkowski Spacetime and Euclidean Space

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyang, Hao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2015-01-01

    We discuss BPS Wilson loops of $d=4$ $\\mathcal N=4$ super Yang-Mills theory, $d=3$ $\\mathcal N=2$ super Chern-Simons-matter theory, and $d=3$ $\\mathcal N=6$ Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena theory, in both Minkowski spacetime and Euclidean space. We find that there are timelike and null BPS Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime, but spacelike BPS Wilson loops do not exist. We attribute this to the conflicts of reality conditions of spinors. However, in Euclidean space spacelike Wilson loops do exist. There are both Wilson lines of infinite straight lines and Wilson loops of circles. This is because the reality conditions of spinors are lost after Wick rotation. The result is reasonable in view of AdS/CFT correspondence.

  17. Microcanonical optimization algorithm for the Euclidean Steiner problem in Rn with application to phylogenetic inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Flávio; Torreão, José R A; Maculan, Nelson

    2003-11-01

    The Euclidean Steiner tree problem in R(n) (ESTP) is that of finding the shortest interconnecting network spanning p given nodes in the Euclidean R(n), with the possible use of extra nodes. Combinatorial explosion precludes the use of exact methods for large high-dimensional ESTP instances, but very few heuristic approaches have so far been proposed for them. Here we introduce a microcanonical optimization algorithm that works over a topology-describing data structure associated to the ESTP solutions, and which is proven able to find close-to-minimum Steiner trees in reasonable computational time, even for configurations of up to p=50 points in n=50 dimensions. Moreover, its performance is shown to increase with n, which makes it especially suited for high-dimensional clustering problems such as those of phylogenetic inference, an instance of which is considered here. PMID:14682906

  18. Path Integral Discussion for Smorodinsky-Winternitz Potentials: I.\\ Two- and Three Dimensional Euclidean Space

    OpenAIRE

    Grosche, C.; Pogosyan, G. S.; Sissakian, A. N.

    1994-01-01

    Path integral formulations for the Smorodinsky-Winternitz potentials in two- and three-dimen\\-sional Euclidean space are presented. We mention all coordinate systems which separate the Smorodinsky-Winternitz potentials and state the corresponding path integral formulations. Whereas in many coordinate systems an explicit path integral formulation is not possible, we list in all soluble cases the path integral evaluations explicitly in terms of the propagators and the spectral expansions into t...

  19. Solutions of the generalized Weierstrass representation in four-dimensional Euclidean space

    OpenAIRE

    P. Bracken; Grundland, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Several classes of solutions of the generalized Weierstrass system, which induces constant mean curvature surfaces into four-dimensional Euclidean space are constructed. A gauge transformation allows us to simplify the system considered and derive factorized classes of solutions. A reduction of the generalized Weierstrass system to decoupled CP^1 sigma models is also considered. A new procedure for constructing certain classes of solutions, including elementary solutions (kinks and bumps) and...

  20. The generalized Weierstrass system inducing surfaces of constant and nonconstant mean curvature in Euclidean three space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The generalized Weierstrass (GW) system is introduced and its correspondence with the associated two-dimensional nonlinear sigma model is reviewed. The method of symmetry reduction is systematically applied to derive several classes of invariant solutions for the GW system. The solutions can be used to induce constant mean curvature surfaces in Euclidean three space. Some properties of the system for the case of nonconstant mean curvature are introduced as well.

  1. A generalized Hamiltonian Constraint Operator in Loop Quantum Gravity and its simplest Euclidean Matrix Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Gaul, Marcus; Rovelli, Carlo

    2000-01-01

    We study a generalized version of the Hamiltonian constraint operator in nonperturbative loop quantum gravity. The generalization is based on admitting arbitrary irreducible SU(2) representations in the regularization of the operator, in contrast to the original definition where only the fundamental representation is taken. This leads to a quantization ambiguity and to a family of operators with the same classical limit. We calculate the action of the Euclidean part of the generalized Hamilto...

  2. Space, points and mereology. On foundations of point-free Euclidean geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Gruszczyński, Rafał; Pietruszczak, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    This article is devoted to the problem of ontological foundations of three-dimensional Euclidean geometry. Starting from Bertrand Russell’s intuitions concerning the sensual world we try to show that it is possible to build a foundation for pure geometry by means of the so called regions of space. It is not our intention to present mathematically developed theory, but rather demonstrate basic assumptions, tools and techniques that are used in construction of systems of point-free geometry and...

  3. Development of New Heuristics for the Euclidean Traveling SalesmanProblem

    OpenAIRE

    Tunnell, Thurman W.; Lenwood S. Heath

    1989-01-01

    Many heuristics have been developed to approximate optimal tours for the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem (ETSP). While much progress has been made, there are few quick heuristics which consistently produce tours within 4 percent of the optimal solution. This project examines a few of the well known heuristics and introduces two improvements, Maxdiff and Checks. Most algorithms, during tour constrution, add a city to the subtour because the city best satisfies some criterion. Maxdiff,...

  4. Derivatives, forms and vector fields on the kappa-deformed Euclidean space

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrijevic, Marija; Moeller, Lutz; Tsouchnika, Efrossini

    2004-01-01

    The model of kappa-deformed space is an interesting example of a noncommutative space, since it allows a deformed symmetry. In this paper we present new results concerning different sets of derivatives on the coordinate algebra of kappa-deformed Euclidean space. We introduce a differential calculus with two interesting sets of one-forms and higher-order forms. The transformation law of vector fields is constructed in accordance with the transformation behaviour of derivatives. The crucial pro...

  5. Clifford algebra-valued orthogonal polynomials in the open unit ball of Euclidean space

    OpenAIRE

    Fred Brackx; Nele De Schepper; Frank Sommen

    2004-01-01

    A new method for constructing Clifford algebra-valued orthogonal polynomials in the open unit ball of Euclidean space is presented. In earlier research, we only dealt with scalar-valued weight functions. Now the class of weight functions involved is enlarged to encompass Clifford algebra-valued functions. The method consists in transforming the orthogonality relation on the open unit ball into an orthogonality relation on the real axis by means of the so-called Clifford-Heaviside functions. C...

  6. Divide and Sprawl, Decline and Fall: A Comparative Critique of Euclidean Zoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Hall

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available As many commentators have pointed out, the land use patterns prevalent in the United States since the advent of Euclidean-style zoning have played a direct role in the development of a surprisingly broad range of problems: “[b]y fostering or requiring low density development with a high separation of uses, Euclidean zoning is one of the great generators of suburban sprawl, with all of its environmental, economic, and social costs.” These costs include pollution, loss of wilderness and farmland, racial and socioeconomic segregation of the population, and legal obstacles to effective urban rehabilitation.6 Moreover, in combination with prevailing patterns of local funding, the socioeconomic segregation caused by Euclidean zoning perpetuates itself by channeling less well-off children into chronically underequipped public schools and stretching the resources of many urban municipalities too thin, leaving them to choose between raising property tax rates or allowing their infrastructure to decay. That devil’s bargain bolsters the tendency of middle- and higher-income people to live in suburbs rather than cities, deepening the downward spiral in which many American cities find themselves. And the damage goes even further: “many current zoning practices disregard or even work against crime prevention goals” in both cities and suburbs. This is particularly problematic in light of the fact that “Euclidean systems of separation—conventional zoning—have been implemented ubiquitously” in the United States: “[a]bout ninety-seven percent of incorporated communities zone.”

  7. Lagrangian surfaces in complex Euclidean plane via spherical and hyperbolic curves

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Ildefonso; Chen, Bang-yen

    2006-01-01

    We present a method to construct a large family of Lagrangian surfaces in complex Euclidean plane $\\boldsymbol{C}^2$ by using Legendre curves in the 3-sphere and in the anti de Sitter 3-space or, equivalently, by using spherical and hyperbolic curves, respectively. Among this family, we characterize minimal, constant mean curvature, Hamiltonian-minimal and Willmore surfaces in terms of simple properties of the curvature of the generating curves. As applications, we provide explicitly conforma...

  8. Euclidean Wilson loops and minimal area surfaces in lorentzian AdS 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgang, Andrew; Kruczenski, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence relates Wilson loops in N=4 SYM theory to minimal area surfaces in AdS 5 × S 5 space. If the Wilson loop is Euclidean and confined to a plane ( t, x) then the dual surface is Euclidean and lives in Lorentzian AdS 3 ⊂ AdS 5. In this paper we study such minimal area surfaces generalizing previous results obtained in the Euclidean case. Since the surfaces we consider have the topology of a disk, the holonomy of the flat current vanishes which is equivalent to the condition that a certain boundary Schrödinger equation has all its solutions anti-periodic. If the potential for that Schrödinger equation is found then reconstructing the surface and finding the area become simpler. In particular we write a formula for the Area in terms of the Schwarzian derivative of the contour. Finally an infinite parameter family of analytical solutions using Riemann Theta functions is described. In this case, both the area and the shape of the surface are given analytically and used to check the previous results.

  9. Euclidean Wilson loops and Minimal Area Surfaces in Minkowski AdS3

    CERN Document Server

    Irrgang, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence relates Wilson loops in N=4 SYM theory to minimal area surfaces in AdS5xS5 space. If the Wilson loop is Euclidean and confined to a plane (t,x) then the dual surface is Euclidean and lives in Minkowski AdS3. In this paper we study such minimal area surfaces generalizing previous results obtained in the Euclidean case. Since the surfaces we consider have the topology of a disk, the holonomy of the flat current vanishes which is equivalent to the condition that a certain boundary Schroedinger equation has all its solutions anti-periodic. If the potential for that Schroedinger equation is found then reconstructing the surface and finding the area become simpler. In particular we write a formula for the Area in terms of the Schwarzian derivative of the contour. Finally an infinite parameter family of analytical solutions using Riemann Theta functions is described. In this case, both the area and the shape of the surface are given analytically and used to check the previous results.

  10. Changes in cellular energy allocation in Enchytraeus crypticus exposed to copper and silver--linkage to effects at higher level (reproduction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Susana I L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2015-09-01

    Under stressful conditions, organisms often try to detoxify by mobilizing certain energy sources with costs to various functions, e.g. growth or reproduction. Cellular energy allocation (CEA) is a commonly used methodology to evaluate the energetic status of an organism. In the present study, the effects of copper (Cu) and silver (Ag) were evaluated on the total energy budget of Enchytraeus crypticus (Oligochaeta) over periods of exposure (0-2, 2-4 and 4-8 days). The parameters measured were the total energy reserves available (protein, carbohydrate and lipid budgets) and the energy consumption (based on electron transport system activity) being further integrated to obtain the CEA. Results showed that Enchytraeids responded differently to Ag and Cu, mobilizing lipids and proteins in response to Ag and carbohydrates and proteins in response to Cu. Overall, it was possible to distinguish between effect concentrations (reproduction effect concentrations-EC10 and EC50), with EC10 causing an increase in energy consumption (Ec); while for the EC50, the increase in Ec is followed by a steep decrease in Ec, with a corresponding decrease in CEA in the longer exposure periods. These results could be linked with effects at higher levels of biological organization (effects on reproduction) providing evidences that CEA can be used as faster and sensitive endpoints towards metal exposure in E. crypticus. PMID:25971807

  11. Changes in serum cellular adhesion molecule and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels in patients with cerebral infarction following hyperbaric oxygen therapy A case and intergroup control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renliang Zhao; Chunxia Wang; Yongjun Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal studies have confirmed that hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy can reduce matrix metalloproteinase activity and blood brain barrier permeability, thereby exhibiting neuroprotective effects. However, at present, consensus does not exist in terms of its clinical efficacy. OBJECTIVE: To validate the significance of changes in serum cellular adhesion molecule and MMP-9 levels in patients with cerebral infarction following HBO therapy. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized, controlled, neurobiochemical study was performed at the Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College between December 2002 and March 2006. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 112 patients with acute cerebral infarction of internal carotid artery, comprising 64 males and 48 females, averaging (67 ± 11) years, were recruited and randomized to a HBO group (n = 50) and a routine treatment group (n = 62). An additional 30 gender- and age-matched normal subjects, consisting of 17 males and 13 females, averaging (63 ± 9) years, were enrolled as control subjects. METHODS: The routine treatment group received routine drug treatment and rehabilitation exercise. HBO treatment was additionally performed in the HBO group, once a day, for a total of 10 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule, soluble E-selectin, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Upon admission, serum levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule, soluble E-selectin, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were significantly increased in patients with cerebral infarction, compared with control subjects (P < 0.01). Following HBO and routine treatments, serum levels of the above-mentioned indices were significantly reduced in the HBO and routine treatment groups (P < 0.01). Moreover, greater efficacy was observed in the HBO

  12. A Fast Generalized Minimum Distance Decoder for Reed-Solomon Codes Based on the Extended Euclidean Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Kampf, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method to determine a set of basis polynomials from the extended Euclidean algorithm that allows Generalized Minimum Distance decoding of Reed-Solomon codes with a complexity of O(nd).

  13. Hyperbolic cosines and sines theorems for the triangle formed by intersection of three semicircles on Euclidean plane

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaleev, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose the present paper is to construct the hyperbolic trigonometry on Euclidean plane without refereing to hyperbolic plane. In this paper we show that the concept of hyperbolic angle and its functions forming the hyperbolic trigonometry give arise on Euclidean plane in a natural way. The method is based on a key- formula establishing a relationship between exponential function and the ratio of two segments. This formula opens a straightforward pathway to hyperbolic trigonometry on the Euclidean plane. The hyperbolic law of cosines I and II and the hyperbolic law of sines are derived by using of the key-formula and the methods of Euclidean Geometry, only. It is shown that these laws are consequences of the interrelations between distances and radii of the intersecting semi-circles.

  14. Elastic line deformed on a pseudo-hypersurface by an external field in pseudo-Euclidean spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YCESAN; Ahmet; KEN; A.Ceylan

    2008-01-01

    We derive intrinsic formulation for elastic line deformed on a pseudo-hypersurface by an external field in the pseudo-Euclidean spaces E_v~n.This formulation determines elastic line deformed on a pseudo-hypersurface.

  15. On the Dirac eigenvalues as observables of the on-shell N = 2D = 4 Euclidean supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancea, Ion

    2008-12-01

    We generalize previous works on the Dirac eigenvalues as dynamical variables of Euclidean gravity and N =1 D = 4 supergravity to on-shell N = 2 D = 4 Euclidean supergravity. The covariant phase space of the theory is defined as the space of the solutions of the equations of motion modulo the on-shell gauge transformations. In this space we define the Poisson brackets and compute their value for the Dirac eigenvalues.

  16. On the Dirac Eigenvalues as Observables of the on-shell N=2 D=4 Euclidean Supergravity

    OpenAIRE

    Vancea, Ion V.

    2004-01-01

    We generalize previous works on the Dirac eigenvalues as dynamical variables of the Euclidean gravity and N=1 D=4 supergravity to on-shell N=2 D=4 Euclidean supergravity. The covariant phase space of the theory is defined as as the space of the solutions of the equations of motion modulo the on-shell gauge transformations. In this space we define the Poisson brackets and compute their value for the Dirac eigenvalues.

  17. Development and implementation of cellular-based real-time reporting and internet accessible coastal sea-level gauge - A vital tool for monitoring storm surge and tsunami

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Joseph, A; Agarvadekar, Y.; Dabholkar, N.; Mehra, P.; Gouveia, A; Tengali, S.; VijayKumar, K.; Parab, A

    We describe the development and implementation of real-time reporting and Internet-accessible coastal sealevel gauge, wherein data communication between the gauge and an Internet server has been established through a cellular modem utilizing General...

  18. Pseudo Euclidean-Signature Harmonic Oscillator, Quantum Field Theory and Vanishing Cosmological Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Pavsic, Matej

    1998-01-01

    The harmonic oscillator in pseudo euclidean space is studied. A straightforward procedure reveals that although such a system may have negative energy, it is stable. In the quantized theory the vacuum state has to be suitably defined and then the zero-point energy corresponding to a positive-signature component is canceled by the one corresponding to a negative-signature component. This principle is then applied to a system of scalar fields. The metric in the space of fields is assumed to hav...

  19. On Local Constraints of D=4 Euclidean Supergravity in Terms of Dirac Eigenvalues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauna, N.; Vancea, Ion V.

    It has recently been shown that in order to have Dirac eigenvalues as observables of Euclidean supergravity, certain constraints should be imposed on the covariant phase space as well as on Dirac eigenspinors. We investigate the relationships among the constraints in the first set and argue that these relationships are not linear. We also derive a set of equations that should be satisfied by some arbitrary functions that enter as coefficients in the equation expressing the linear dependency of the constraints in order that the second set of constraints be linearly independent.

  20. The Fischer decomposition for Hodge-de Rham systems in Euclidean spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Souček, Vladimir; Delanghe, Richard; Lávička, Roman

    2012-01-01

    The classical Fischer decomposition of spinor-valued polynomials is a key result on solutions of the Dirac equation in the Euclidean space R^m. As is well-known, it can be understood as an irreducible decomposition with respect to the so-called L-action of the Pin group Pin(m). But, on Clifford algebra valued polynomials, we can consider also the H-action of Pin(m). In this paper, the corresponding Fischer decomposition for the H-action is obtained. It turns out that, in this case, basic buil...

  1. Decoding Reed-Solomon codes up to the Sudan radius with the Euclidean algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zeh, Alexander; Li, Wenhui

    2010-01-01

    We modify the Euclidean algorithm of Feng and Tzeng to decode Reed-Solomon (RS) codes up to the Sudan radius. The basic steps are the virtual extension to an Interleaved RS code and the reformulation of the multi-sequence shift-register problem of varying length to a multi-sequence problem of equal length. We prove the reformulation and analyze the complexity of our new decoding approach. Furthermore, the extended key equation, that describes the multi-sequence problem, is derived in an alter...

  2. Emergence of Euclidean dynamical symmetry as a consequence of shape phase mixing

    OpenAIRE

    Budaca, R.; Budaca, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid model which combines γ-stable and γ-rigid collective conditions through a rigidity parameter, is used to study the critical point of the phase transition between spherical and axially symmetric shapes. The model in the equally mixed case, called X(4), exhibits properties of the Euclidean symmetry in four dimensions. The spectral properties of the new model are investigated in connection to the exact symmetry. Experimental realisation of the X(4) model is found in two N=90 nuclei and ...

  3. Laplace approximations for large deviations of diffusion processes on Euclidean spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Song

    2005-01-01

    Consider a class of uniformly elliptic diffusion processes $ \\{ X_t \\}_{t \\ge 0} $ on Euclidean spaces $ \\bm{R}^{d} $ . We give an estimate of $ E^{P_x} \\left[ \\exp (T \\Phi ({1}/{T} \\int_0^T \\delta_{X_t} dt)) | X_T = y \\right] $ as $ T \\to \\infty $ up to the order $ 1 + o(1) $ , where $ \\delta_{\\cdot} $ means the delta measure, and $ \\Phi $ is a function on the set of measures on $\\bm{R}^{d} $ . This is a generalization of the works by Bolthausen-Deuschel-Tamura [3] and Kusuoka-Liang [10], wh...

  4. Construction and Borel summability of planar 4-dimensional Euclidean field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use methods to show that the planar part of the renormalized perturbation theory for phi44-euclidean field theory is Borel-summable on the asymptotically free side of the theory. The Borel sum can therefore be taken as a rigorous definition of the N->infinite limit of a massive NxN matrix model with a+trgphi4 interaction, hence with ''wrong sign'' of g. Our construction is essentially equivalent to a solution of the ultra-violet problem for planar QCD. We also propose a program for studying the structure of the ''renormalons'' singularities within the planar world. (orig.)

  5. Non-perturbative BRST quantization of Euclidean Yang-Mills theories in Curci-Ferrari gauges

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, A D; Sorella, S P

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we address the issue of the non-perturbative quantization of Euclidean Yang-Mills theories in the Curci-Ferrari gauge. In particular, we construct a Refined Gribov-Zwanziger action for this gauge which takes into account the presence of gauge copies as well as the dynamical formation of dimension two condensates. This action enjoys a non-perturbative BRST symmetry recently proposed in \\cite{Capri:2015ixa}. Finally, we give attention to the gluon propagator in different space-time dimensions.

  6. Calculus of spatial distribution of absorbed dose to cellular level by Monte Carlo simulation for a radio-labelled peptide with 188Re and with nuclear internalization : preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 188Re is a radionuclide of radiation gamma emitter, useful in obtaining of gamma-graphic images, but it is also emitter of beta radiations and Auger electrons. A bio-molecule directed to a specific receptor of a cancer cell labeled with a emitter radionuclide of beta particles and Auger electrons, as the 188Re-Tat-Bombesin, it has the potential to be used in radiotherapy of molecular targets for its capacity to penetrate to cellular nucleus. In this system, the radiation dose is distributed in way located at microscopic levels in sub cellular specific places, where Auger emissions contributes of significant way in absorbed dose. The cellular dosimetry is realized in most of cases, using analytic or semi analytical methods, for example the cellular MIRD methodology. However, it is required to complement these calculations simulating the electrons transport and considering experimental bio kinetics data. Therefore, in this work preliminary results are presented of dosimetric calculation to sub cellular level for 188Re-Tat-Bombesin by Monte Carlo simulation, using the 2008 version of PENELOPE: PENEASY code. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose in membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, was calculated with geometry of a cell of 10 μm of diameter, a nucleus of 2 μm of ratio and membrane of 0.2 μm of thickness, considering elementary constitution for each cellular compartment proposal in literature. The total number of disintegrations at sub cellular level was evaluated integrating the activity in function of time starting from experimental bio kinetics data in mamma cancer cells MDA-MB231. The preliminary results show that 46.4% of total disintegrations for unit of captured activity by cell occurs in nucleus, 38.4% in membrane and 15.2% in cytoplasm. The due absorbed dose to Auger electrons for 1 Bq of 188Re located in cellular membrane were respectively of 1.32E-1 and 1.43E-1 Gy in cytoplasm and nucleus. (Author)

  7. Extending breath analysis to the cellular level: current thoughts on the human microbiome and the expression of organic compounds in the human exposome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human biomarkers are comprised of compounds from cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, and the microbiome of bacteria in the gut, genitourinary, and pulmonary tracts. When we examine patterns in human biomarkers to discern human health state or diagnose specific diseases, it is...

  8. Implementations of a Parallel Algorithm for Computing Euclidean Distance Map in Multicore Processors and GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Ito

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Given a 2-D binary image of size n×n, Euclidean Distance Map (EDM is a 2-D array of the same size such that each element is storing the Euclidean distance to the nearest black pixel. It is known that a sequential algorithm can compute the EDM in O(n2 and thus this algorithm is optimal. Also, work-time optimal parallel algorithms for shared memory model have been presented. However, the presented parallel algorithms are too complicated to implement in existing shared memory parallel machines. The main contribution of this paper is to develop a simple parallel algorithm for the EDM and implement it in two different parallel platforms: multicore processors and Graphics Processing Units (GPUs. We have implemented our parallel algorithm in a Linux server with four Intel hexad-core processors (Intel Xeon X7460 2.66GHz. We have also implemented it in the following two modern GPU systems, Tesla C1060 and GTX 480, respectively. The experimental results have shown that, for an input binary image with size of 9216×9216, our implementation in the multicore system achieves a speedup factor of 18 over the performance of a sequential algorithm using a single processor in the same system. Meanwhile, for the same input binary image, our implementation on the GPU achieves a speedup factor of 26 over the sequential algorithm implementation.

  9. Simple Motion Pursuit and Evasion Differential Games with Many Pursuers on Manifolds with Euclidean Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atamurat Kuchkarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider pursuit and evasion differential games of a group of m pursuers and one evader on manifolds with Euclidean metric. The motions of all players are simple, and maximal speeds of all players are equal. If the state of a pursuer coincides with that of the evader at some time, we say that pursuit is completed. We establish that each of the differential games (pursuit or evasion is equivalent to a differential game of m groups of countably many pursuers and one group of countably many evaders in Euclidean space. All the players in any of these groups are controlled by one controlled parameter. We find a condition under which pursuit can be completed, and if this condition is not satisfied, then evasion is possible. We construct strategies for the pursuers in pursuit game which ensure completion the game for a finite time and give a formula for this time. In the case of evasion game, we construct a strategy for the evader.

  10. Bi-Lipshitz Embedding of Ultrametric Cantor Sets into Euclidean Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bellissard, Jean V

    2012-01-01

    Let $(C,d)$ be an ultrametric Cantor set. Then it admits an isometric embedding into an infinite dimensional Euclidean space \\cite{PB08}. Associated with it is a weighted rooted tree, the reduced Michon graph $\\mathscr T$ \\cite{Mi85}. It will be called $f$-embeddable if there is a bi-Lipshitz map from $(C,d)$ into a finite dimensional Euclidean space. The main result establishes that $(C,d)$ is $f$-embeddable if and only if it can be represented by a weighted Michon tree such that (i) the number of children per vertex is uniformly bounded, (ii) if $\\kappa$ denotes the weight, there are constants $c>0$ and $0<\\delta<1$ such that $\\kappa(v)/\\kappa(u)\\leq c\\,\\delta^{d(u,v)}$ where $v$ is a descendant of $u$ and where $d(u,v)$ denotes the graph distance between the vertices $u,v$. Several examples are provided: (a) the tiling space of a linear repetitive sequence is $f$-embeddable, (b) the tiling space of a Sturmian sequence is $f$-embeddable if and only if the irrational number characterizing it has bounde...

  11. Power- and Bandwidth-Efficient Euclidean Code with Sparse Generator Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a coded modulation scheme which is defined by a sparse real-valued generator matrix. As forward error correction (FEC codes directly constructed in the Euclidean space, this kind of Euclidean codes (EC named G-LDGM (Generalized Low-Density Generator Matrix codes can naturally match the continuous communication channels. A shaping method based on hypercube lattice is introduced to prevent the power of signals from being too large. A linear-time parametric belief propagation (BP decoding algorithm is formulated. To reduce the complexity of the decoding algorithm, passing messages are approximated as Gaussian distributions. A simplified analysis is given to show that under certain condition exponential convergence of decoding can be realized. A Monte Carlo density evolution method is provided to optimize the generator matrix. Simulation results suggest that the proposed 10,000 dimension G-LDGM code with no redundancy introduced into information data has a superior performance over non-binary LDPC (NB-LDPC codes with both linear-time encoding and decoding.

  12. Facial expression recognition based on image Euclidean distance-supervised neighborhood preserving embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Li, Yingjie; Li, Haibin

    2014-11-01

    High-dimensional data often lie on relatively low-dimensional manifold, while the nonlinear geometry of that manifold is often embedded in the similarities between the data points. These similar structures are captured by Neighborhood Preserving Embedding (NPE) effectively. But NPE as an unsupervised method can't utilize class information to guide the procedure of nonlinear dimensionality reduction. They ignore the geometrical structure information of local data points and the spatial information of pixels, which leads to the failure of classification. For this problem, a feature extraction method based on Image Euclidean Distance-Supervised NPE (IED-SNPE) is proposed, and is applied to facial expression recognition. Firstly, it employs Image Euclidean Distance (IED) to characterize the dissimilarity of data points. And then the neighborhood graph of the input data is constructed according to a certain kind of dissimilarity between data points. Finally, it fuses prior nonlinear facial expression manifold of facial expression images and class-label information to extract discriminative features for expression recognition. In the classification experiments on JAFFE facial expression database, IED-SNPE is used for feature extraction and compared with NPE, SNPE, and IED-NPE. The results reveal that IED-SNPE not only the local structure of expression manifold preserves well but also explicitly considers the spatial relationships among pixels in the images. So it excels NPE in feature extraction and is highly competitive with those well-known feature extraction methods.

  13. Predictive Modelling of Cellular Load

    OpenAIRE

    Carolan, Emmett; McLoone, Seamus; Farrell, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the temporal dynamics of cellular load in four Irish regions. Large scale underutilisation of network resources is identified both at the regional level and at the level of individual cells. Cellular load is modeled and prediction intervals are generated. These prediction intervals are used to put an upper bound on usage in a particular cell at a particular time. Opportunities for improvements in network utilization by incorporating these upper bounds on usage are identifie...

  14. Ethanol regulation of adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels in a clonal neural cell line: an in vitro model of cellular tolerance to ethanol.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, A S; Collier, K; Diamond, I.

    1986-01-01

    The acute and chronic neurologic effects of ethanol appear to be due to its interaction with neural cell membranes. Chronic exposure to ethanol induces changes in the membrane that lead to tolerance to the effects of ethanol. However, the actual membrane changes that account for tolerance to ethanol are not understood. We have developed a model cell culture system, using NG108-15 neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells, to study cellular tolerance to ethanol. We have found that adenosine receptor-s...

  15. Changes of anabolic processes at the cellular and molecular level in chronic wounds under topical negative pressure can be revealed by transcriptome analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Leffler, Mareike; Derrick, Kathleen L.; McNulty, Amy; Malsiner, Caye; Dragu, Adrian; Horch, Raymund E.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Chronic wounds – as defined by the World Union of Wound Healing Societies (WUWHS) – are a considerable worldwide health care expense and impair quality of life. In order for chronic wounds to heal, these wounds must be transformed to a more acute state to begin the healing process. Topical negative pressure (TNP) with reticulated open cell foam (ROCF) is known to promote healing in certain types of chronic wounds. However, little is known about changes at the cellular or molecular le...

  16. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  17. Superintegrability in two-dimensional Euclidean space and associated polynomial solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we examine the basis functions for those classical and quantum mechanical systems in two dimensions which admit separation of variables in at least two coordinate systems. We do this for the corresponding systems defined in Euclidean space and on the two dimensional sphere. We present all of these cases from a unified point of view. In particular, all of the spectral functions that arise via variable separation have their essential features expressed in terms of their zeros. The principal new results are the details of the polynomial base for each of the nonsubgroup base, not just the subgroup cartesian and polar coordinate case, and the details of the structure of the quadratic algebras. We also study the polynomial eigenfunctions in elliptic coordinates of the N-dimensional isotropic quantum oscillator. 28 refs., 1 tab

  18. Artificial immune system via Euclidean Distance Minimization for anomaly detection in bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montechiesi, L.; Cocconcelli, M.; Rubini, R.

    2016-08-01

    In recent years new diagnostics methodologies have emerged, with particular interest into machinery operating in non-stationary conditions. In fact continuous speed changes and variable loads make non-trivial the spectrum analysis. A variable speed means a variable characteristic fault frequency related to the damage that is no more recognizable in the spectrum. To overcome this problem the scientific community proposed different approaches listed in two main categories: model-based approaches and expert systems. In this context the paper aims to present a simple expert system derived from the mechanisms of the immune system called Euclidean Distance Minimization, and its application in a real case of bearing faults recognition. The proposed method is a simplification of the original process, adapted by the class of Artificial Immune Systems, which proved to be useful and promising in different application fields. Comparative results are provided, with a complete explanation of the algorithm and its functioning aspects.

  19. Faster exact algorithms for computing Steiner trees in higher dimensional Euclidean spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Brazil, Marcus; Winter, Pawel;

    2016-01-01

    The Euclidean Steiner tree problem asks for a network of minimum total length interconnecting a finite set of points in d-dimensional space. For d ≥ 3, only one practical algorithmic approach exists for this problem --- proposed by Smith in 1992. A number of refinements of Smith's algorithm have...... increased the range of solvable problems a little, but it is still infeasible to solve problem instances with more than around 17 terminals. In this paper we firstly propose some additional improvements to Smith's algorithm. Secondly, we propose a new algorithmic paradigm called branch enumeration. Our...... experiments show that branch enumeration has similar performance as an optimized version of Smith's algorithm; furthermore, we argue that branch enumeration has the potential to push the boundary of solvable problems further....

  20. Clear evidence of a continuum theory of 4D Euclidean simplicial quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, H. S.; Horata, S.; Yukawa, T.

    2002-03-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) simplicial quantum gravity coupled to both scalar fields ( NX) and gauge fields ( NA) has been studied using Monte-Carlo simulations. The matter dependence of the string susceptibility exponent γ (4) is estimated. Furthermore, we compare our numerical results with Background-Metric-Indepenent (BMI) formulation conjectured to describe the quantum field theory of gravity in 4D. The numerical results suggest that the 4D simplicial quantum gravity is related to the conformal gravity in 4D. Therefore, we propose a phase structure in detail with adding both scalar and gauge fields and discuss the possibility and the property of a continuum theory of 4D Euclidean simplicial quantum gravity.

  1. Clear Evidence of a Continuum Theory of 4D Euclidean Simplicial Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Egawa, H S; Yukawa, T

    2002-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) simplicial quantum gravity coupled to both scalar fields (N_X) and gauge fields (N_A) has been studied using Monte-Carlo simulations. The matter dependence of the string susceptibility exponent gamma^{(4)} is estimated. Furthermore, we compare our numerical results with Background-Metric-Independent (BMI) formulation conjectured to describe the quantum field theory of gravity in 4D. The numerical results suggest that the 4D simplicial quantum gravity is related to the conformal gravity in 4D. Therefore, we propose a phase structure in detail with adding both scalar and gauge fields and discuss the possibility and the property of a continuum theory of 4D Euclidean simplicial quantum gravity.

  2. Linear embeddings of finite-dimensional subsets of Banach spaces into Euclidean spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper treats the embedding of finite-dimensional subsets of a Banach space B into finite-dimensional Euclidean spaces. When the Hausdorff dimension of X − X is finite, dH(X − X) k are injective on X. The proof motivates the definition of the 'dual thickness exponent', which is the key to proving that a prevalent set of such linear maps have Hölder continuous inverse when the box-counting dimension of X is finite and k > 2dB(X). A related argument shows that if the Assouad dimension of X − X is finite and k > dA(X − X), a prevalent set of such maps are bi-Lipschitz with logarithmic corrections. This provides a new result for compact homogeneous metric spaces via the Kuratowksi embedding of (X, d) into L∞(X)

  3. A study of the Gribov copies in linear covariant gauges in euclidean Yang-Mills theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gribov copies and their consequences on the infrared behavior of the gluon propagator are investigated in euclidean Yang-Mills theories quantized in linear covariant gauges. Considering small values of the gauge parameter, it turns out that the transverse component of the gluon propagator is suppressed, while its longitudinal part is left unchanged. A Green function, Gtr(k), which displays infrared enhancement and which reduces to the ghost propagator in the Landau gauge is identified. The inclusion of the dimension two gluon condensate (Aμ2) is also considered. In this case, the transverse component of the gluon propagator and the Green function Gtr(k) remain suppressed and enhanced, respectively. Moreover, the longitudinal part of the gluon propagator becomes suppressed. A comparison with the results obtained from the studies of the Schwinger-Dyson equations and from lattice simulations is provided

  4. Existence and Blowup Results for Asymptotically Euclidean Initial Data Sets Generated by the Conformal Method

    CERN Document Server

    Dilts, James

    2016-01-01

    For each set of (freely chosen) seed data, the conformal method reduces the Einstein constraint equations to a system of elliptic equations, the conformal constraint equations. We prove an admissibility criterion, based on a (conformal) prescribed scalar curvature problem, which provides a necessary condition on the seed data for the conformal constraint equations to (possibly) admit a solution. We then consider sets of asymptotically Euclidean (AE) seed data for which solutions of the conformal constraint equations exist, and examine the blowup properties of these solutions as the seed data sets approach sets for which no solutions exist. We also prove that there are AE seed data sets which include a Yamabe nonpositive metric and lead to solutions of the conformal constraints. These data sets allow the mean curvature function to have zeroes.

  5. Exploring Euclidean Dynamical Triangulations with a Non-trivial Measure Term

    CERN Document Server

    Coumbe, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a nonperturbative formulation of quantum gravity defined via Euclidean dynamical triangulations (EDT) with a non-trivial measure term in the path integral. We are motivated to revisit this older formulation of dynamical triangulations by hints from renormalization group approaches that gravity may be asymptotically safe and by the emergence of a semiclassical phase in causal dynamical triangulations (CDT). We study the phase diagram of this model and identify the two phases that are well known from previous work: the branched polymer phase and the collapsed phase. We verify that the order of the phase transition dividing the branched polymer phase from the collapsed phase is almost certainly first-order. The nontrivial measure term enlarges the phase diagram, allowing us to explore a region of the phase diagram that has been dubbed the crinkled region. Although the collapsed and branched polymer phases have been studied extensively in the literature, the crinkled region has not received the sam...

  6. The multivariate Charlier polynomials as matrix elements of the Euclidean group representation on oscillator states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A family of multivariate orthogonal polynomials generalizing the standard (univariate) Charlier polynomials is shown to arise in the matrix elements of the unitary representation of the Euclidean group E(d) on oscillator states. These polynomials in d discrete variables are orthogonal on the product of d Poisson distributions. The accent is put on the d = 2 case and the group theoretical setting is used to obtain the main properties of the polynomials: orthogonality and recurrence relations, difference equation, raising/lowering relations, generating function, hypergeometric and integral representations and explicit expression in terms of standard Charlier and Krawtchouk polynomials. The approach is seen to extend straightforwardly to an arbitrary number of variables. The contraction of SO(3) to E(2) is used to show that the bivariate Charlier polynomials correspond to a limit of the bivariate Krawtchouk polynomials. (paper)

  7. Derivatives, forms and vector fields on the κ-deformed Euclidean space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The model of κ-deformed space is an interesting example of a noncommutative space, since it allows a deformed symmetry. In this paper, we present new results concerning different sets of derivatives on the coordinate algebra of κ-deformed Euclidean space. We introduce a differential calculus with two interesting sets of one-forms and higher-order forms. The transformation law of vector fields is constructed in accordance with the transformation behaviour of derivatives. The crucial property of the different derivatives, forms and vector fields is that in an n-dimensional spacetime there are always n of them. This is the key difference with respect to conventional approaches, in which the differential calculus is (n + 1)-dimensional. This work shows that derivative-valued quantities such as derivative-valued vector fields appear in a generic way on noncommutative spaces

  8. Patching up the No-Boundary Proposal with virtual Euclidean wormholes

    CERN Document Server

    Bousso, R; Bousso, Raphael; Chamblin, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    In quantum cosmology, one often considers tunneling phenomena which may have occurred in the early universe. Processes requiring quantum penetration of a potential barrier include black hole pair creation and the decay of vacuum domain walls. Ideally, one calculates the rates for such processes by finding an instanton, or Euclidean solution of the field equations, which interpolates between the initial and final states. In practice, however, it has become customary to calculate such amplitudes using the No-Boundary Proposal of Hartle and Hawking. A criticism of this method is that it does not use a single path which interpolates between the initial and final states, but two disjoint instantons: One divides the probability to create the final state from nothing by the probability to create the initial state from nothing and decrees the answer to be the rate of tunneling from the initial to the final state. Here, we demonstrate the validity of this approach by constructing continuous paths connecting the ingoin...

  9. New results on embeddings of polyhedra and manifolds in Euclidean spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this survey is to present several classical results on embeddings and isotopies of polyhedra and manifolds in Rm. We also describe the revival of interest in this beautiful branch of topology and give an account of new results, including an improvement of the Haefliger-Weber theorem on the completeness of the deleted product obstruction to embeddability and isotopy of highly connected manifolds in Rm (Skopenkov) as well as the unimprovability of this theorem for polyhedra (Freedman, Krushkal, Teichner, Segal, Skopenkov, and Spiez) and for manifolds without the necessary connectedness assumption (Skopenkov). We show how algebraic obstructions (in terms of cohomology, characteristic classes, and equivariant maps) arise from geometric problems of embeddability in Euclidean spaces. Several classical and modern results on completeness or incompleteness of these obstructions are stated and proved. By these proofs we illustrate classical and modern tools of geometric topology (engulfing, the Whitney trick, van Kampen and Casson finger moves, and their generalizations)

  10. Unstable spiral waves and local Euclidean symmetry in a model of cardiac tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcotte, Christopher D.; Grigoriev, Roman O. [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This paper investigates the properties of unstable single-spiral wave solutions arising in the Karma model of two-dimensional cardiac tissue. In particular, we discuss how such solutions can be computed numerically on domains of arbitrary shape and study how their stability, rotational frequency, and spatial drift depend on the size of the domain as well as the position of the spiral core with respect to the boundaries. We also discuss how the breaking of local Euclidean symmetry due to finite size effects as well as the spatial discretization of the model is reflected in the structure and dynamics of spiral waves. This analysis allows identification of a self-sustaining process responsible for maintaining the state of spiral chaos featuring multiple interacting spirals.

  11. The Euclidean gravitational action as black hole entropy, singularities, and spacetime voids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We argue why the static spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of Einstein's equations described by the textbook Hilbert metric gμν(r) is not diffeomorphic to the metric gμν(|r|) corresponding to the gravitational field of a point mass delta function source at r=0. By choosing a judicious radial function R(r)=r+2G|M|Θ(r) involving the Heaviside step function, one has the correct boundary condition R(r=0)=0, while displacing the horizon from r=2G|M| to a location arbitrarily close to r=0 as one desires, rh→0, where stringy geometry and quantum gravitational effects begin to take place. We solve the field equations due to a delta function point mass source at r=0, and show that the Euclidean gravitational action (in (ℎ/2π) units) is precisely equal to the black hole entropy (in Planck area units). This result holds in any dimensions D≥3. In the Reissner-Nordstrom (massive charged) and Kerr-Newman black hole case (massive rotating charged) we show that the Euclidean action in a bulk domain bounded by the inner and outer horizons is the same as the black hole entropy. When one smears out the point-mass and point-charge delta function distributions by a Gaussian distribution, the area-entropy relation is modified. We postulate why these modifications should furnish the logarithmic corrections (and higher inverse powers of the area) to the entropy of these smeared black holes. To finalize, we analyze the Bars-Witten stringy black hole in 1+1 dimension and its relation to the maximal acceleration principle in phase spaces and Finsler geometries

  12. Reducing residual stresses and deformations in selective laser melting through multi-level multi-scale optimization of cellular scanning strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses and deformations continue to remain one of the primary challenges towards expanding the scope of selective laser melting as an industrial scale manufacturing process. While process monitoring and feedback-based process control of the process has shown significant potential, there is still dearth of techniques to tackle the issue. Numerical modelling of selective laser melting process has thus been an active area of research in the last few years. However, large computational resource requirements have slowed the usage of these models for optimizing the process. In this paper, a calibrated, fast, multiscale thermal model coupled with a 3D finite element mechanical model is used to simulate residual stress formation and deformations during selective laser melting. The resulting reduction in thermal model computation time allows evolutionary algorithm-based optimization of the process. A multilevel optimization strategy is adopted using a customized genetic algorithm developed for optimizing cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting, with an objective of reducing residual stresses and deformations. The resulting thermo-mechanically optimized cellular scanning strategies are compared with standard scanning strategies and have been used to manufacture standard samples.

  13. Nonlinear σ model in the case of N x αN rectangular matrices in two-dimensional euclidean space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matrix nonlinear σ models are discussed and the matrix nonlinear σ model in the case of N x αN rectangular matrices is considered. The authors show that in two-dimensional Euclidean space, the model is renormalizable with respect to α and 1/N. The fulfillment of the chirality identity is demonstrated in the operator expansion for the renormalized theory

  14. Nonlinear sigma-model in the case of rectangular NxαN matrices in two-dimensional euclidean space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matrix nonlinear σ-model is considered in the case of rectangular matrices of the dimension NxαN. Renormalizability of the model with respect to α and 1/N is demonstrated for the case of two-dimensional Euclidean space. Validity of the chiral identity is proved in the operator expansion for the renormalized theory

  15. Cellular Barcoding Links B-1a B Cell Potential to a Fetal Hematopoietic Stem Cell State at the Single-Cell Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Trine A; Jaensson Gyllenbäck, Elin; Zriwil, Alya;

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo a functional switch in neonatal mice hallmarked by a decrease in self-renewing divisions and entry into quiescence. Here, we investigated whether the developmental attenuation of B-1a cell output is a consequence of a shift in stem cell state during ontogeny....... Using cellular barcoding for in vivo single-cell fate analyses, we found that fetal liver definitive HSCs gave rise to both B-1a and B-2 cells. Whereas B-1a potential diminished in all HSCs with time, B-2 output was maintained. B-1a and B-2 plasticity could be reinitiated in a subset of adult HSCs...... by ectopic expression of the RNA binding protein LIN28B, a key regulator of fetal hematopoiesis, and this coincided with the clonal reversal to fetal-like elevated self-renewal and repopulation potential. These results anchor the attenuation of B-1a cell output to fetal HSC behavior and demonstrate...

  16. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  17. Cellular-scale hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Faivre, Magalie; Horton, Renita; Smistrup, Kristian; Best-Popescu, Catherine A; Stone, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    Microfluidic tools are providing many new insights into the chemical, physical and physicochemical responses of cells. Both suspension-level and single-cell measurements have been studied. We review our studies of these kinds of problems for red blood cells with particular focus on the shapes of ...... mechanical effects on suspended cells can be studied systematically in small devices, and how these features can be exploited to develop methods for characterizing physicochemical responses and possibly for the diagnosis of cellular-scale changes to environmental factors....

  18. A multi-scale approach to colorectal cancer: from a biochemical- interaction signaling-network level, to multi-cellular dynamics of malignant transformation. Interplay with mutations and onco-protein inhibitor drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortolina, L; Castagnino, N; De Ambrosi, C; Moran, E; Patrone, F; Ballestrero, A; Parodi, S

    2012-05-01

    This review article is part of a special Current Cancer Drug Targets issue devoted to colorectal cancer and molecularly targeted treatments. In our paper we made an attempt to connect more basic aspects with preclinical, pharmacological / therapeutic and clinical aspects. Reconstruction of a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM) comprising an important part of the G0 - G1 - S cell cycle transition, was a major component of our review. Such a MIM serves also as a convenient / organized database of a large set of important molecular events. The frequency of mutated / altered signaling-proteins indicates the importance of this signaling-network region. We have considered problems at different scale levels. Our MIM works at a biochemical-interaction level. We have also touched the multi-cellular dynamics of normal and aberrant colon crypts. Until recently, dynamic simulations at a biochemical or multi-cellular scale level were considered as a sort of esoteric approach. We tried to convince the reader, also on the basis of a rapidly growing literature, mostly published in high quality journals, that suspicion towards simulations should dissipate, as the limitations and advantages of their application are better appreciated, opening the door to their permanent adoption in everyday research. What is really required is a more interdisciplinary mentality and an interdisciplinary approach. The prize is a level of understanding going beyond mere intuition. PMID:22385511

  19. Molecular chemistry of plant protein structure at a cellular level by synchrotron-based FTIR spectroscopy: Comparison of yellow ( Brassica rapa) and Brown ( Brassica napus) canola seed tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to use synchrotron light sourced FTIR microspectroscopy as a novel approach to characterize protein molecular structure of plant tissue: compared yellow and brown Brassica canola seed within cellular dimensions. Differences in the molecular chemistry and the structural-chemical characteristics were identified between two type of plant tissues. The yellow canola seeds contained a relatively lower (P < 0.05) percentage of model-fitted α-helices (33 vs. 37), a higher (P < 0.05) relative percentage of model-fitted β-sheets (27 vs. 21) and a lower (P < 0.05) ratio of α-helices to β-sheets (1.3 vs. 1.9) than the brown seeds. These results may indicate that the protein value of the yellow canola seeds as food or feed was different from that of the brown canola seeds. The cluster analysis and principal component analysis did not show clear differences between the yellow and brown canola seed tissues in terms of protein amide I structures, indicating they are related to each other. Both yellow and brown canola seeds contain the same proteins but in different ratios.

  20. Elucidation of lead-induced oxidative stress in Talinum triangulare roots by analysis of antioxidant responses and DNA damage at cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhay; Prasad, M N V; Mohan Murali Achary, V; Panda, Brahma B

    2013-07-01

    Hydroponic experiments were performed with Talinum triangulare (Jacq.) Willd. focusing the root cellular biochemistry with special emphasis on DNA damage, structural, and elemental analyses in Pb(NO3)2 exposed with 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, and 1.25 mM for 7 days. Lead (Pb) increased reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, cell death, and DNA damage and decreased the protein content in a dose-dependent manner. Likewise, a dose-dependent induction of antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase by Pb was evident. Ascorbate peroxidase on the other hand responded biphasically to Pb treatments by showing induction at low (0.25 and 0.50) and repression at high (0.75-1.25 mM) concentrations. The estimation of proline content also indicated a similar biphasic trend. Scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed that 1.25 mM Pb treatment resulted in ultrastructural modifications in roots and stem tissue that was marked by the change in the elemental profile. The findings pointed to the role of oxidative stress in the underlying Pb phytotoxicity and genotoxicity in T. triangulare. PMID:23263755

  1. A radiation measurement study on cellular phone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will explain the radiation level produced by various selected cellular phone from various models and brands available in the market. The result obtained from this study will also recommend whether a cellular phone is safe for public usage or it might cause any effect on public health. Finally, a database of radiation measurement level produced by selected various cellular phone will also be developed and exhibited in this paper. (Author)

  2. In vitro expression levels of cell-cycle checkpoint proteins are associated with cellular DNA repair capacity in peripheral blood lymphocytes: a multivariate analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, You-Hong; Hu, Zhibin; Li, Chunying; Wang, Li-E; Guo, Zhaozheng; Qiao, Yawei; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Wei; Mao, Li; Wei, Qingyi

    2007-01-01

    DNA repair should occur after cells sense DNA damage signals and undergo cell-cycle arrest to provide sufficient time for DNA repair, and suboptimal DNA repair capacity (DRC) in peripheral lymphocytes has been suggested as a cancer susceptibility marker. Numerous studies showed a functional link between DNA damage sensing, cell-cycle checkpoint and DNA repair. We hypothesized that in vitro cell-cycle checkpoint-related protein expression levels in stimulated lymphocytes predict DRC levels. To...

  3. Effect of electromagnetic fields at 2.45 GHz on the levels of cellular stress proteins HSP-90 and 70 in the rat thyroid; Efecto de los campos electromagneticos a 2,45 GHz sobre los niveles de proteinas de estres celular HSP-90 y 70 en el toroides de rata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misa Agustino, M. J.; Alvarez-Folgueras, M.; Jorge-Mora, M. T.; Jorge Barreiro, F. J.; Ares Pena, F. J.; Lleiro, J.; Lopez Martin, M. E.

    2011-07-01

    In this study we analyzed the cellular stress levels achieved by heat shock proteins (HSP) 90 and 70 in rat thyroid tissue after exposure to radio waves in TWG experimental system. Parallel measurements of body stress in animals by rectal temperature probes allow us to determine whether there is any interaction between temperature increases and cellular stress.

  4. Particle population diagnosis and euclidean minimum spanning tree in Monte Carlo calculation of power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mesh-input-free method is not yet established for particle population diagnosis in the power distribution calculation by the Monte Carlo source iteration method. To approach this issue, the Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST) in the graph theory was applied to the source particles. A characteristic volume that one particle covers was defined to be the cubic power of the average edge length of EMST. Thirty and one hundred times of the characteristic volume were proposed as weak and strong requirements, respectively, for a minimum tally cell volume since ten particle characteristic volumes can be accommodated within the tally cells producing one-third and 10% of average power density. These requirements were examined against a three-dimensional full-core model of a 1,100 MWe pressurized water reactor. The comparison with the population diagnosis with a mesh in Nucl. Sci. Eng., 158, 15 (2008) shows a lot of promise of the EMST-based approach. Further developmental issues are identified concerning computational time and output fitting. In addition, a practically useful result was obtained as follows. If the three-dimensional uniform tally cells have volume larger than the quarter fuel bundle unit, the EMST-based approach yields a less conservative diagnosis than fissile volume per source particle. (author)

  5. Pattern selection and multiscale behaviour in metrically discontinuous non-Euclidean plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study equilibrium configurations of non-Euclidean plates, in which the reference metric is uniaxially periodic. This work is motivated by recent experiments on thin sheets of composite thermally responsive gels (Wu et al 2013 Nature Commun. 4). Such sheets bend perpendicularly to the periodic axis in order to alleviate the metric discrepancy. For abruptly varying metrics, we identify multiple scaling regimes with different power law dependences of the elastic energy E and the axial curvature κ on the sheet's thickness h. In the h → 0 limit the equilibrium configuration tends to an isometric embedding of the reference metric, and E∼h2. Two intermediate asymptotic regimes emerge in between the buckling threshold and the h → 0 limit, in which the energy scales either like h4/5 or like h2/3. We believe that this system exemplifies a much more general phenomenon, in which the thickness of the sheet induces a cutoff length scale below which finer structures of the metric cannot be observed. When the reference metric consists of several separated length scales, a decrease of the sheet's thickness results in a sequence of conformational changes, as finer properties of the reference metric are revealed. (paper)

  6. Correlations and clustering in a scale-free network in Euclidean space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Nandi; G Mukherjee; S S Manna

    2008-08-01

    Empirical study shows that many real networks in nature and society share two generic properties: they are scale-free and they display a high degree of clustering. Quite often they are modular in nature also, implying occurrences of several small tightly linked groups which are connected in a hierarchical manner among themselves. Recently, we have introduced a model of spatial scale-free network where nodes pop-up at randomly located positions in the Euclidean space and are connected to one end of the nearest link of the existing network. It has been already argued that the large scale behaviour of this network is like the Barabási–Albert model. In the present paper we briefly review these results as well as present additional results on the study of non-trivial correlations present in this model which are found to have similar behaviours as in the real-world networks. Moreover, this model naturally possesses the hierarchical characteristics lacked by most of the models of the scale-free networks.

  7. New formulae for the Hubble Constant in a Euclidean Static Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzo, Zaninetti

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that the Hubble constant can be derived from the standard luminosity function of galaxies as well as from a new luminosity function as deduced from the mass-luminosity relationship for galaxies. An analytical expression for the Hubble constant can be found from the maximum number of galaxies (in a given solid angle and flux) as a function of the redshift. A second analytical definition of the Hubble constant can be found from the redshift averaged over a given solid angle and flux. The analysis of two luminosity functions for galaxies brings to four the new definitions of the Hubble constant. The equation that regulates the Malmquist bias for galaxies is derived and as a consequence it is possible to extract a complete sample. The application of these new formulae to the data of the two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey provides a Hubble constant of $( 65.26 \\pm 8.22 ) \\mathrm{\\ km\\ s}^{-1}\\mathrm{\\ Mpc}^{-1}$ for a redshift lower than 0.042. All the results are deduced in a Euclidean universe b...

  8. Bayesian approach to spectral function reconstruction for Euclidean quantum field theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnier, Yannis; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel approach to the inference of spectral functions from Euclidean time correlator data that makes close contact with modern Bayesian concepts. Our method differs significantly from the maximum entropy method (MEM). A new set of axioms is postulated for the prior probability, leading to an improved expression, which is devoid of the asymptotically flat directions present in the Shanon-Jaynes entropy. Hyperparameters are integrated out explicitly, liberating us from the Gaussian approximations underlying the evidence approach of the maximum entropy method. We present a realistic test of our method in the context of the nonperturbative extraction of the heavy quark potential. Based on hard-thermal-loop correlator mock data, we establish firm requirements in the number of data points and their accuracy for a successful extraction of the potential from lattice QCD. Finally we reinvestigate quenched lattice QCD correlators from a previous study and provide an improved potential estimation at T=2.33T(C). PMID:24237510

  9. $O(N)$ model in Euclidean de Sitter space: beyond the leading infrared approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Nacir, Diana López; Trombetta, Leonardo G

    2016-01-01

    We consider an $O(N)$ scalar field model with quartic interaction in $d$-dimensional Euclidean de Sitter space. In order to avoid the problems of the standard perturbative calculations for light and massless fields, we generalize to the $O(N)$ theory a systematic method introduced previously for a single field, which treats the zero modes exactly and the nonzero modes perturbatively. We compute the two-point functions taking into account not only the leading infrared contribution, coming from the self-interaction of the zero modes, but also corrections due to the interaction of the ultraviolet modes. For the model defined in the corresponding Lorentzian de Sitter spacetime, we obtain the two-point functions by analytical continuation. We point out that a partial resummation of the leading secular terms (which necessarily involves nonzero modes) is required to obtain a decay at large distances for massless fields. We implement this resummation along with a systematic double expansion in an effective coupling c...

  10. Color Image Quantization Based on Euclidean Distance Using Bacteria Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heena

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The RGB color model is an additive color model that yields a broad array of colors in which three primary colors red, green and blue are added together in various ways.RGB is device dependent color model used in input devices like color TV and video cameras, image scanners etc. and output devices like mobile phone displays, LCD etc. Bacteria Foraging Optimization is a nature-inspired optimization has drawn the attention of researchers because of its efficiency in solving real-world optimization problems arising in several application domains. Color image quantization is an important process of representing true color image using a small number of colors. The objective of this research work are to; 1 implement and compare its performance with other quantization techniques. To test the performance of proposed algorithm different quantative parameters like Quantized Distance, LMSE, Euclidean distance are used. 2 The results indicate that the proposed algorithm yields a significant improvement in image quality as compared to other approaches.

  11. New results on embeddings of polyhedra and manifolds in Euclidean spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repovs, D [University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Skopenkov, A B [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-12-31

    The aim of this survey is to present several classical results on embeddings and isotopies of polyhedra and manifolds in R{sup m}. We also describe the revival of interest in this beautiful branch of topology and give an account of new results, including an improvement of the Haefliger-Weber theorem on the completeness of the deleted product obstruction to embeddability and isotopy of highly connected manifolds in R{sup m} (Skopenkov) as well as the unimprovability of this theorem for polyhedra (Freedman, Krushkal, Teichner, Segal, Skopenkov, and Spiez) and for manifolds without the necessary connectedness assumption (Skopenkov). We show how algebraic obstructions (in terms of cohomology, characteristic classes, and equivariant maps) arise from geometric problems of embeddability in Euclidean spaces. Several classical and modern results on completeness or incompleteness of these obstructions are stated and proved. By these proofs we illustrate classical and modern tools of geometric topology (engulfing, the Whitney trick, van Kampen and Casson finger moves, and their generalizations)

  12. Shallow, Low, and Light Trees, and Tight Lower Bounds for Euclidean Spanners

    CERN Document Server

    Dinitz, Yefim; Solomon, Shay

    2008-01-01

    We show that for every $n$-point metric space $M$ there exists a spanning tree $T$ with unweighted diameter $O(\\log n)$ and weight $\\omega(T) = O(\\log n) \\cdot \\omega(MST(M))$. Moreover, there is a designated point $rt$ such that for every point $v$, $dist_T(rt,v) \\le (1+\\epsilon) \\cdot dist_M(rt,v)$, for an arbitrarily small constant $\\epsilon > 0$. We extend this result, and provide a tradeoff between unweighted diameter and weight, and prove that this tradeoff is \\emph{tight up to constant factors} in the entire range of parameters. These results enable us to settle a long-standing open question in Computational Geometry. In STOC'95 Arya et al. devised a construction of Euclidean Spanners with unweighted diameter $O(\\log n)$ and weight $O(\\log n) \\cdot \\omega(MST(M))$. Ten years later in SODA'05 Agarwal et al. showed that this result is tight up to a factor of $O(\\log \\log n)$. We close this gap and show that the result of Arya et al. is tight up to constant factors.

  13. Face Detection and Recognition Using Viola-Jones with PCA-LDA and Square Euclidean Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf Hazim Barnouti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an automatic face recognition system is proposed based on appearance-based features that focus on the entire face image rather than local facial features. The first step in face recognition system is face detection. Viola-Jones face detection method that capable of processing images extremely while achieving high detection rates is used. This method has the most impact in the 2000’s and known as the first object detection framework to provide relevant object detection that can run in real time. Feature extraction and dimension reduction method will be applied after face detection. Principal Component Analysis (PCA method is widely used in pattern recognition. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA method that used to overcome drawback the PCA has been successfully applied to face recognition. It is achieved by projecting the image onto the Eigenface space by PCA after that implementing pure LDA over it. Square Euclidean Distance (SED is used. The distance between two images is a major concern in pattern recognition. The distance between the vectors of two images leads to image similarity. The proposed method is tested on three databases (MUCT, Face94, and Grimace. Different number of training and testing images are used to evaluate the system performance and it show that increasing the number of training images will increase the recognition rate.

  14. Programs for kriging and sequential Gaussian simulation with locally varying anisotropy using non-Euclidean distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Jeff B.; Deutsch, Clayton V.

    2011-04-01

    Geological deposits display nonlinear features such as veins, channels or folds that result in complex spatial anisotropies that are difficult to model with currently available geostatistical techniques. The methodology presented in this paper for incorporating locally varying anisotropy in kriging or sequential Gaussian simulation is based on modifying how locations in space are related. Normally, the straight line path is used; however, when nonlinear features exist the appropriate path between locations follows along the features. The Dijkstra algorithm is used to determine the shortest path/distance between locations and a conventional covariance or variogram function is used. This nonlinear path is a non-Euclidean distance metric and positive definiteness of the resulting kriging system of equations is not guaranteed. Multidimensional scaling (landmark isometric mapping) is used to ensure positive definiteness. In addition to the variogram, the only parameters required for the implementation of kriging or sequential Gaussian simulation with locally varying anisotropy are (1) the local orientation and magnitude of anisotropy and (2) the number of dimensions required for multidimensional scaling. This paper presents a suite of programs that can be used to krige or simulate practically sized geostatistical models with locally varying anisotropy. The programs kt3d_LVA, SGS_LVA and gamv_LVA are provided.

  15. a Euclidean Formulation of Interior Orientation Costraints Imposed by the Fundamental Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisperakis, I.; Karras, G.; Petsa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Epipolar geometry of a stereopair can be expressed either in 3D, as the relative orientation (i.e. translation and rotation) of two bundles of optical rays in case of calibrated cameras or, in case of unclalibrated cameras, in 2D as the position of the epipoles on the image planes and a projective transformation that maps points in one image to corresponding epipolar lines on the other. The typical coplanarity equation describes the first case; the Fundamental matrix describes the second. It has also been proven in the Computer Vision literature that 2D epipolar geometry imposes two independent constraints on the parameters of camera interior orientation. In this contribution these constraints are expressed directly in 3D Euclidean space by imposing the equality of the dihedral angle of epipolar planes defined by the optical axes of the two cameras or by suitably chosen corresponding epipolar lines. By means of these constraints, new closed form algorithms are proposed for the estimation of a variable or common camera constant value given the fundamental matrix and the principal point position of a stereopair.

  16. The role of dose rate in radiation cancer risk: evaluating the effect of dose rate at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels using key events in critical pathways following exposure to low LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Preston, R. Julian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: This review evaluates the role of dose rate on cell and molecular responses. It focuses on the influence of dose rate on key events in critical pathways in the development of cancer. This approach is similar to that used by the U.S. EPA and others to evaluate risk from chemicals. It provides a mechanistic method to account for the influence of the dose rate from low-LET radiation, especially in the low-dose region on cancer risk assessment. Molecular, cellular, and tissues changes are observed in many key events and change as a function of dose rate. The magnitude and direction of change can be used to help establish an appropriate dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). Conclusions: Extensive data on key events suggest that exposure to low dose-rates are less effective in producing changes than high dose rates. Most of these data at the molecular and cellular level support a large (2–30) DREF. In addition, some evidence suggests that doses delivered at a low dose rate decrease damage to levels below that observed in the controls. However, there are some data human and mechanistic data that support a dose-rate effectiveness factor of 1. In summary, a review of the available molecular, cellular and tissue data indicates that not only is dose rate an important variable in understanding radiation risk but it also supports the selection of a DREF greater than one as currently recommended by ICRP (2007) and BEIR VII (NRC/NAS 2006). PMID:27266588

  17. A High-Speed Pipelined Degree-Computationless Modified Euclidean Algorithm Architecture for Reed-Solomon Decoders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungbeom; Lee, Hanho

    This paper presents a novel high-speed low-complexity pipelined degree-computationless modified Euclidean (pDCME) algorithm architecture for high-speed RS decoders. The pDCME algorithm allows elimination of the degree-computation so as to reduce hardware complexity and obtain high-speed processing. A high-speed RS decoder based on the pDCME algorithm has been designed and implemented with 0.13-μm CMOS standard cell technology in a supply voltage of 1.1V. The proposed RS decoder operates at a clock frequency of 660MHz and has a throughput of 5.3Gb/s. The proposed architecture requires approximately 15% fewer gate counts and a simpler control logic than architectures based on the popular modified Euclidean algorithm.

  18. Euclidean distance and Kolmogorov-Smirnov analyses of multi-day auditory event-related potentials: a longitudinal stability study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durato, M. V.; Albano, A. M.; Rapp, P. E.; Nawang, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    The validity of ERPs as indices of stable neurophysiological traits is partially dependent on their stability over time. Previous studies on ERP stability, however, have reported diverse stability estimates despite using the same component scoring methods. This present study explores a novel approach in investigating the longitudinal stability of average ERPs—that is, by treating the ERP waveform as a time series and then applying Euclidean Distance and Kolmogorov-Smirnov analyses to evaluate the similarity or dissimilarity between the ERP time series of different sessions or run pairs. Nonlinear dynamical analysis show that in the absence of a change in medical condition, the average ERPs of healthy human adults are highly longitudinally stable—as evaluated by both the Euclidean distance and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test.

  19. Non-CMC Solutions to the Einstein Constraint Equations on Asymptotically Euclidean Manifolds with Apparent Horizon Boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Holst, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this article we further develop the solution theory for the Einstein constraint equations on an n-dimensional, asymptotically Euclidean manifold M with interior boundary S. Building on recent results for both the asymptotically Euclidean and compact with boundary settings, we show existence of far-from-CMC and near-CMC solutions to the conformal formulation of the Einstein constraints when nonlinear Robin boundary conditions are imposed on S, similar to those analyzed previously by Dain (2004), by Maxwell (2004, 2005), and by Holst and Tsogtgerel (2013) as a model of black holes in various CMC settings, and by Holst, Meier, and Tsogtgerel (2013) in the setting of far-from-CMC solutions on compact manifolds with boundary. These "marginally trapped surface" Robin conditions ensure that the expansion scalars along null geodesics perpendicular to the boundary region S are non-positive, which is considered the correct mathematical model for black holes in the context of the Einstein constraint equations. Assumi...

  20. Scaling laws for non-Euclidean plates and the $W^{2,2}$ isometric immersions of Riemannian metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Lewicka, Marta

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns the elastic structures which exhibit non-zero strain at free equilibria. Many growing tissues (leaves, flowers or marine invertebrates) attain complicated configurations during their free growth. Our study departs from the 3d incompatible elasticity theory, conjectured to explain the mechanism for the spontaneous formation of non-Euclidean metrics. Recall that a smooth Riemannian metric on a simply connected domain can be realized as the pull-back metric of an orientation preserving deformation if and only if the associated Riemann curvature tensor vanishes identically. When this condition fails, one seeks a deformation yielding the closest metric realization. We set up a variational formulation of this problem by introducing the non-Euclidean version of the nonlinear elasticity functional, and establish its $\\Gamma$-convergence under the proper scaling. As a corollary, we obtain new necessary and sufficient conditions for existence of a $W^{2,2}$ isometric immersion of a given 2d metric i...

  1. Cordyceps militaris (L. Link Fruiting Body Reduces the Growth of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line by Increasing Cellular Levels of p53 and p21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Bizarro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cordyceps militaris (L. Link, an edible entomopathogenic fungus widely used in traditional Chinese medicine, has numerous potential medicinal properties including antitumor activity. The methanolic extract of C. militaris fruiting body was recently shown to have tumor cell growth inhibitory activity in several human tumor cell lines. Nonetheless, the mechanism of action involved is still not known. This work aimed at further studying the effect of the methanolic extract of C. militaris regarding its antitumor mechanism of action, using the non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460 as a model. Results showed that treatment with the extract decreased cellular proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 and increased apoptosis. In addition, the extract increased the levels of p53 and p21. Moreover, an increase in p-H2A.X and 53BP1 levels, together with an increase in the number of 53BP1 foci/cell (all indicative of DNA damage, were also observed after treatment with the extract. This work suggests that this extract affected NCI-H460 cellular viability through a mechanism involving DNA damage and p53 activation. This further supports the potential of this extract as a source of bioactive compounds, which may be used in anticancer strategies.

  2. Euclidean M-theory background dual to three-dimensional scale invariant field theory without conformal invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, Yu

    2016-01-01

    We show that eleven dimensional supergravity in Euclidean signature admits an exact classical solution with isometry corresponding to a three dimensional scale invariant field theory without conformal invariance. We also construct the holographic renormalization group flow that connects the known UV conformal fixed point and the new scale invariant but not conformal fixed point. In view of holography, the existence of such classical solutions suggests that the topologically twisted M2-brane gauge theory possesses a scale invariant but not conformal phase.

  3. On CP1 and CP2 maps and Weierstrass representations for surfaces immersed into multi-dimensional Euclidean spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Grundland, A. M.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    An extension of the classic Enneper-Weierstrass representation for conformally parametrised surfaces in multi-dimensional spaces is presented. This is based on low dimensional CP^1 and CP^2 sigma models which allow the study of the constant mean curvature (CMC) surfaces immersed into Euclidean 3- and 8-dimensional spaces, respectively. Relations of Weierstrass type systems to the equations of these sigma models are established. In particular, it is demonstrated that the generalised Weierstras...

  4. Pose Estimation using 1D Fourier Transform and Euclidean Distance Matching of CAD Model and Inspected Model Part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkoffli, Zuliani; Abu Bakar, Elmi

    2016-02-01

    This paper present pose estimation relation of CAD model object and Projection Real Object (PRI). Image sequence of PRI and CAD model rotate on z axis at 10 degree interval in simulation and real scene used in this experiment. All this image is go through preprocessing stage to rescale object size and image size and transform all the image into silhouette. Correlation of CAD and PRI image is going through in this stage. Magnitude spectrum shows a reliable value in range 0.99 to 1.00 and Phase spectrum correlation shows a fluctuate graph in range 0.56 - 0.97. Euclidean distance correlation graph for CAD and PRI shows 2 zone of similar value due to almost symmetrical object shape. Processing stage of retrieval inspected PRI image in CAD database was carried out using range phase spectrum and maximum magnitude spectrum value within ±10% tolerance. Additional processing stage of retrieval inspected PRI image using Euclidean distance within ±5% tolerance also carried out. Euclidean matching shows a reliable result compared to range phase spectrum and maximum magnitude spectrum value by sacrificing more than 5 times processing time.

  5. Analysis of Human Peripheral Blood Samples from Fatal and Nonfatal Cases of Ebola (Sudan) Hemorrhagic Fever: Cellular Responses, Virus Load, and Nitric Oxide Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Anthony; Lukwiya, Matthew; Bausch, Daniel; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Sanchez, Angela J.; Wagoner, Kent D.; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2004-01-01

    Peripheral blood samples obtained from patients during an outbreak of Ebola virus (Sudan species) disease in Uganda in 2000 were used to phenotype peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), quantitate gene expression, measure antigenemia, and determine nitric oxide levels. It was determined that as the severity of disease increased in infected patients, there was a corresponding increase in antigenemia and leukopenia. Blood smears revealed thrombocytopenia, a left shift in neutrophils (in som...

  6. Experimental study of Americium-241 biokinetics in Homarus Gammarus lobster. Analysis of the accumulation and detoxication mechanisms at the sub-cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Americium 241 radioelement accumulation and elimination rate and mechanisms in the lobster organism have been experimentally studied; incorporation and detoxification capacities of each organ are evaluated. The existence of various biological compartments is shown; the major role of the digestive gland in accumulation of the radioelement, its distribution towards the various organs, and its resorption is comprehensively described, with an analysis at the subcellular and molecular levels. 401 p., 65 fig., 43 tab., 428 ref

  7. Cellular signalling properties in microcircuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Wallén, Peter; Svirskis, Gytis; Hounsgaard, Jørn

    2005-01-01

    Molecules and cells are the signalling elements in microcircuits. Recent studies have uncovered bewildering diversity in postsynaptic signalling properties in all areas of the vertebrate nervous system. Major effort is now being invested in establishing the specialized signalling properties at th...... cellular and molecular levels in microcircuits in specific brain regions. This review is part of the TINS Microcircuits Special Feature....

  8. Natural products in Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) rhizome imaged at the cellular level by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Janfelt, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    .02 Da. With a mass resolving power of 140 000 and a bin width of 5 ppm in the image processing, the two compounds were well resolved in full-scan mode, and appeared with different distributions in the tissue sections. The identities of the compounds and their distributions were validated in a subsequent...... saponins in legume species, combing the spatially resolved chemical information with morphological details at the microscopic level. Furthermore, the technique offers a scheme capable of high-throughput profiling of metabolites in plant tissues....

  9. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds......, and pharmaceuticals. However, making cells into efficient factories is challenging because cells have evolved robust metabolic networks with hard-wired, tightly regulated lines of communication between molecular pathways that resist efforts to divert resources. Here, we will review the current status and challenges...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  10. Multipartite entanglement arising from dense Euclidean lattices in dimensions 4-24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group of automorphisms of Euclidean (embedded in Rn) dense lattices such as the root lattices D4 and E8, the Barnes-Wall lattice BW16, the unimodular lattice D12+ and the Leech lattice Λ24 may be generated by entangled quantum gates of the corresponding dimension. These (real) gates/lattices are useful for quantum error correction: for instance, the two- and four-qubit real Clifford groups are the automorphism groups of the lattices D4 and BW16, respectively, and the three-qubit real Clifford group is maximal in the Weyl group W(E8). Technically, the automorphism group Aut(Λ) of the lattice Λ is the set of orthogonal matrices B such that, following the conjugation action by the generating matrix of the lattice, the output matrix is unimodular (of determinant ±1, with integer entries). When the degree n is equal to the number of basis elements of Λ, Aut(Λ) also acts on basis vectors and is generated with matrices B such that the sum of squared entries in a row is 1, i.e. B may be seen as a quantum gate. For the dense lattices listed above, maximal multipartite entanglement arises. In particular, one finds a balanced tripartite entanglement in E8 (the two- and three-tangles have the same magnitude 1/4) and a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type entanglement in BW16. In this paper, we also investigate the entangled gates from D12+ and Λ24, by seeing them as systems coupling a qutrit to two- and three-qubits, respectively. In addition to quantum computing, the work may be related to particle physics in the spirit of Planat et al (2011 Rep. Math. Phys. 66 39-51).

  11. Predicting Cellular Growth from Gene Expression Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Dunham, Maitreya J.; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Airoldi, Edoardo; Broach, James R.; Caudy, Amy A.; Gresham, David; Botstein, David; Huttenhower, Curtis; Lu, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining balanced growth in a changing environment is a fundamental systems-level challenge for cellular physiology, particularly in microorganisms. While the complete set of regulatory and functional pathways supporting growth and cellular proliferation are not yet known, portions of them are well understood. In particular, cellular proliferation is governed by mechanisms that are highly conserved from unicellular to multicellular organisms, and the disruption of these processes in metazo...

  12. Effects of 5 Thio-D-Glucose on cellular adenosine triphosphate levels and deoxyribonucleic acid rejoining in hypoxic and aerobic Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were measured in both hypoxic and aerobic cultures of V79 Chinese hamster cells treated with 5-thio-D-glucose (5-SH-D-Glc). This glucose analog, a known inhibitor of D-glucose transport and metabolism, reduced ATP in cell cultures allowed to become hypoxic by cell metabolism, but not in aerobic cultures treated similarly. Cells depleted of ATP were unable to rejoin x-ray induced deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks as measured by the alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation technique. The inference for radiation therapy is that inhibition of glucose metabolism selectively depletes energy reserves in hypoxic cells, rendering these cells more radiosensitive and leading to a more effective tumor treatment

  13. Early Response Roles for Prolactin Cortisol and Circulating and Cellular Levels of Heat Shock Proteins 72 and 90α in Severe Sepsis and SIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vardas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the early heat shock protein (HSP and hormonal stress response of intensive care unit (ICU patients with severe sepsis/septic shock (SS or systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS compared to healthy subjects (H. Methods. Patients with early (first 48 hrs SS (n=29 or SIRS (n=29 admitted to a university ICU and 16 H were enrolled in the study. Serum prolactin, cortisol, and plasma ACTH were determined using immunoassay analyzers. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSPs (eHSP90α, eHSP72 and interleukins. Mean fluorescence intensity (MFI values for intracellular HSPs (iHSP72, iHSP90α were measured using 4-colour flow-cytometry. Results. Prolactin, cortisol, and eHSP90α levels were significantly increased in SS patients compared to SIRS and H (P<0.003. ACTH and eHSP72 were significantly higher in SS and SIRS compared to H (P<0.005. SS monocytes expressed lower iHSP72 MFI levels compared to H (P=0.03. Prolactin was related with SAPS III and APACHE II scores and cortisol with eHSP90α, IL-6, and lactate (P<0.05. In SS and SIRS eHSP90α was related with eHSP72, IL-6, and IL-10. Conclusion. Prolactin, apart from cortisol, may have a role in the acute stress response in severe sepsis. In this early-onset inflammatory process, cortisol relates to eHSP90α, monocytes suppress iHSP72, and plasma eHSP72 increases.

  14. Biokinetics of a transuranic (238PU) and a rare earth element (152Eu) in the lobster (Homarus gammarus): transfer mechanisms (accumulation and detoxification) in organs and at the cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented here is an experimental investigation of the biokinetics of transfer of a transuranic and a rare earth element (238Pu and 152Eu) in the lobster Homarus gammarus. The study of 238Pu biokinetics forms part of a wider framework of research concerning the transfer of transuranic elements in marine species, while the study of 152Eu is carried out with a view to supporting the analogy between the behaviour of transuranics and rare earths in living organisms. Exactly the same experimental protocol, based on techniques from various disciplines (biology, biochemistry and metrology), was used to Investigate the biokinetics of transfer of these two radionuclides. The Individual lobsters were radiolabelled by means of one-shot or chronic ingestion of spiked meals. As the first approach, the kinetics and transfer mechanisms were studied In whole animal samples and in different organs distinct series of pathways through the different organs were identified in the case of both radionuclides, being mainly linked to digestive processes induced by the meal as well as the transport function of hemo-lymph in this way, the Important role of the digestive gland was picked out, with two of four cellular types displaying a successive involvement In the fixation and then the retention of the studied radionuclides. As a corroborative approach, the digestive gland was subjected to a more detailed investigation with the aim of describing the mechanisms of Incorporation and elucidating transfer processes at the cellular and molecular levels. 238Pu is preferentially partitioned into the cytosol, where it is associated with various constituents such as ferritin (iron-storing protein). 152Eu is more diffusely distributed in the hepato-pancreatic cells, while the lysosomes appear to play a more important role during transfer. The results obtained in this study, both on the macroscopic scale (i.e. the whole animal and different organs) as well as the cellular and molecular levels

  15. Integrated cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C.

    integrate cells and direct their behaviors. This process permits, for the first time, the selection and in situ isolation of a single target cell from a population of cells with mixed phenotypes, and the subsequent monitoring of its behavior, and that of its progeny, under well defined conditions. These techniques promise a new means to integrate biomolecules with nanostructures and macroscale systems, and to manipulate cellular behavior at the individual cell level, having significant implications towards development of practical and robust integrated cellular systems.

  16. Modulation of NADH Levels by Arabidopsis Nudix Hydrolases, AtNUDX6 and 7, and the Respective Proteins Themselves Play Distinct Roles in the Regulation of Various Cellular Responses Involved in Biotic/Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takahisa; Muramoto, Kohei; Takada, Risa; Nakagawa, Shouya; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Yoshimura, Kazuya

    2016-06-01

    Arabidopsis Nudix hydrolases, AtNUDX6 and 7, exhibit pyrophosphohydrolase activities toward NADH and contribute to the modulation of various defense responses, such as the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PAR) reaction and salicylic acid (SA)-induced Nonexpresser of Pathogenesis-Related genes 1 (NPR1)-dependent defense pathway, against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the mechanisms by which these enzymes regulate such cellular responses remain unclear. To clarify the functional role(s) of AtNUDX6 and 7 and NADH metabolism, we examined the effects of the transient expression of the active and inactive forms of AtNUDX6 and 7 under the control of an estrogen (ES)-inducible system on various stress responses. The transient expression of active AtNUDX6 and 7 proteins suppressed NADH levels and induced PAR activity, whereas that of their inactive forms did not, indicating the involvement of NADH metabolism in the regulation of the PAR reaction. A transcriptome analysis using KO-nudx6, KO-nudx7 and double KO-nudx6/7 plants, in which intracellular NADH levels increased, identified genes (NADH-responsive genes, NRGs) whose expression levels positively and negatively correlated with NADH levels. Many NRGs did not overlap with the genes whose expression was reported to be responsive to various types of oxidants and reductants, suggesting a novel role for intracellular NADH levels as a redox signaling cue. The active and inactive AtNUDX6 proteins induced the expression of thioredoxin-h5, the activator of NPR1 and SA-induced NPR1-dependent defense genes, while the active and inactive AtNUDX7 proteins suppressed the accumulation of SA and subsequent gene expression, indicating that AtNUDX6 and 7 proteins themselves play distinct roles in stress responses. PMID:27095738

  17. Polynomial degree reduction in the discrete L2-norm equals best Euclidean approximation of h-Bézier coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Ait-Haddou, Rachid

    2015-06-04

    We show that the best degree reduction of a given polynomial P from degree n to m with respect to the discrete (Formula presented.)-norm is equivalent to the best Euclidean distance of the vector of h-Bézier coefficients of P from the vector of degree raised h-Bézier coefficients of polynomials of degree m. Moreover, we demonstrate the adequacy of h-Bézier curves for approaching the problem of weighted discrete least squares approximation. Applications to discrete orthogonal polynomials are also presented. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

  18. The induced representation of the isometry group of the euclidean Taub-NUT space and new spherical harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Euclidean Taub-Newman-Unti-Tamburino (Taub-NUT) metric is involved in many modern studies in physics. One of the first examples given of a gravitational instanton was the self-dual Taub-NUT solution. Much attention has been paid to the Euclidean Taub-NUT metric since in the long-distance limit the relative motion of two monopoles is described approximately by its geodesics. On the other hand this metric is just the space part of the metric of the celebrated Kaluza-Klein monopole of Gross and Perry and of Sorkin. The Taub-NUT space is also of interest since beside isometries there are hidden symmetries giving rise to conserved quantities associated to Staeckel-Killing tensors. There is a conserved vector, analogous to the Runge-Lenz vector of the Kepler type problem, whose existence is rather surprising in view of the complexity of the equations of motion. These hidden symmetries are related to the existence of special objects arising in this geometry, i.e. four Killing-Yano tensors generating the Staeckel-Killing ones. The quantum theory in the Euclidean Taub-NUT background has also interesting specific features in the case of the scalar fields as well as for Dirac fields of spin 1/2 fermions. In both cases there exist large algebras of conserved observables including the components of the angular momentum and three components of the Runge-Lenz operator that complete a six-dimensional dynamical algebra. Remarkably, the orbital angular momentum has a special unusual form that generates new harmonics called SO(3) X U(1)-harmonics. What is the explanation of this fact? In our opinion the form of the angular momentum operator is determined by the specific type of isometries of the Euclidean Taub-NUT space which combine linear representations with induced ones. The purpose of this article is to prove this showing that the fourth Cartesian (or spherical) coordinate transforms under rotations according to a representation of the SO(3) isometry group induced

  19. Deformed oscillator algebra for quantum superintegrable systems in two-dimensional Euclidean space and on a complex two-sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we study superintegrable quantum systems in two-dimensional Euclidean space and on a complex two-sphere with second-order constants of motion. We show that these constants of motion satisfy the deformed oscillator algebra. Then, we easily calculate the energy eigenvalues in an algebraic way by solving of a system of two equations satisfied by its structure function. The results are in agreement to the ones obtained from the solution of the relevant Schrödinger equation

  20. Changes in rRNA levels during stress invalidates results from mRNA blotting: Fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization permits renormalization for estimation of cellular mRNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.C.; Nielsen, A.K.; Molin, Søren;

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression can be analyzed by a number of different techniques. Some techniques monitor the level of specific mRNA directly, and others monitor indirectly by determining the level of enzymes encoded by the mRNA. Each method has its own inherent way of normalization. When results...... obtained by these techniques are compared between experiments in which differences in growth rates, strains, or stress treatments occur, the normalization procedure may have a significant impact on the results. In this report we present a solution to the normalization problem in RNA slot blotting...

  1. Discovering New Drugs on the Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    With the Vision for Space Exploration calling for a sustained human presence in space, astronauts will need to grow plants, while in orbit, for nourishment that they will not receive from only consuming dehydrated foods. As a potential source of food for long-duration missions, space-grown plants could also give astronauts an important psychological boost, as fresh vegetables could serve as a welcomed change from monotonous meals consisting of reconstituted foods in plastic bags. Even more, these plants could likely aid in the recycling of air and wastewater on spacecraft. With a helping hand from a company by the name of Biolog, Inc., NASA is studying the impacts of decreased gravity and spaceborne bacteria on the plants being grown for food in space. With a helping hand from NASA, this very same company is creating powerful new cell- and bacteria-analysis tools for use in discovering and developing new drugs on Earth.

  2. The role of sirtuins in cellular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupis, Wioleta; Pałyga, Jan; Tomal, Ewa; Niewiadomska, Ewa

    2016-09-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent lysine deacylases or ADP-ribosyltransferases. These cellular enzymes are metabolic sensors sensitive to NAD(+) levels that maintain physiological homeostasis in the animal and plant cells. PMID:27154583

  3. Modelling cellular behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  4. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  5. Alteration of cellular and subcellular electrophysiological parameters in mammalian cells by high- and low-LET irradiation at low dose-levels. Part of a coordinated programme on cell membrane probes as biological indicators in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transmembrane resting potential (MRP) was chosen as a highly sensitive indicator for cellular reactions. The MRP was studied for its suitability as biological indicator of the level of accidental radiation exposure. The development of methodology and installation of a low-cost test chamber, and dose-response studies of MRP-changes of human cells after irradiation with low- and high-LET radiation were considered. Cultured human embryonic lung fibroblasts and human lung biopsy samples were used, with a Co-60 source for low-LET irradiation at dose rates of 2 rad and 20 rad/min, respectively. For high-LET irradiation an Am-241 source was used. The onset of radiation induced effects on cell membranes was prompt but of short duration. In general, full recovery followed within hours of irradiation, at least under the particular experimental conditions. MRP changes in irradiated cells proved a highly sensitive parameter for assessing radiation effects on cell membranes. It appears premature to draw conclusions on the suitability of the method as a biological indicator of radiation damage from accidental exposure, in view of the short duration and prompt reversibility of the effects, and an incomplete understanding of the radiation-induced reactions involved at different LET's and at different doses and dose-rates

  6. Exact computation of the CDF of the Euclidean distance between a point and a random variable uniformly distributed in disks, balls, or polyhedrons and application to PSHA

    OpenAIRE

    Guigues, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    We consider a random variable expressed as the Euclidean distance between an arbitrary point and a random variable uniformly distributed in a closed and bounded set of a three-dimensional Euclidean space. Four cases are considered for this set: a union of disjoint disks, a union of disjoint balls, a union of disjoint line segments, and the boundary of a polyhedron. In the first three cases, we provide closed-form expressions of the cumulative distribution function and the density. In the last...

  7. Cellular oncogenes in neoplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, V T; McGee, J O

    1987-01-01

    In recent years cellular homologues of many viral oncogenes have been identified. As these genes are partially homologous to viral oncogenes and are activated in some tumour cell lines they are termed "proto-oncogenes". In tumour cell lines proto-oncogenes are activated by either quantitative or qualitative changes in gene structure: activation of these genes was originally thought to be a necessary primary event in carcinogenesis, but activated cellular oncogenes, unlike viral oncogenes, do ...

  8. Cellular Cardiomyoplasty: Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Chachques, J. (J.); Acar, C; J. Herreros; Trainini, J. (Jorge); Prosper, F.; D’Attellis, N. (N.); Fabiani, J. N.; Carpentier, A

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration can be induced with the implantation of a variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types. More than 150 patients have been treated with cellular cardiomyoplasty worldwide, 18 patients have been treated by our group. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit postischemic remodelling, and restore regional myocardial contractility. Techniques for skeletal myoblasts culture and ex vivo expansion using auto...

  9. A walk through energy, discrepancy, numerical integration and group invariant measures on measurable subsets of euclidean space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelin, S.

    2008-07-01

    (A) The celebrated Gaussian quadrature formula on finite intervals tells us that the Gauss nodes are the zeros of the unique solution of an extremal problem. We announce recent results of Damelin, Grabner, Levesley, Ragozin and Sun which derive quadrature estimates on compact, homogenous manifolds embedded in Euclidean spaces, via energy functionals associated with a class of group-invariant kernels which are generalizations of zonal kernels on the spheres or radial kernels in euclidean spaces. Our results apply, in particular, to weighted Riesz kernels defined on spheres and certain projective spaces. Our energy functionals describe both uniform and perturbed uniform distribution of quadrature point sets. (B) Given , some measurable subset of Euclidean space, one sometimes wants to construct, a design, a finite set of points, , with a small energy or discrepancy. We announce recent results of Damelin, Hickernell, Ragozin and Zeng which show that these two measures of quality are equivalent when they are defined via positive definite kernels . The error of approximating the integral by the sample average of f over has a tight upper bound in terms the energy or discrepancy of . The tightness of this error bound follows by requiring f to lie in the Hilbert space with reproducing kernel K. The theory presented here provides an interpretation of the best design for numerical integration as one with minimum energy, provided that the μ defining the integration problem is the equilibrium measure or charge distribution corresponding to the energy kernel, K. (C) Let be the orbit of a compact, possibly non Abelian group, , acting as measurable transformations of and the kernel K is invariant under the group action. We announce recent results of Damelin, Hickernell, Ragozin and Zeng which show that the equilibrium measure is the normalized measure on induced by Haar measure on . This allows us to calculate explicit representations of equilibrium measures. There is an

  10. Study on very high speed Reed-Solomon decoders using modified euclidean algorithm for volume holographic storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Xie, Changsheng; Liu, ZhaoBin

    2003-04-01

    Volume holography is currently the subject of widespread interest as a fast-readout-rate, high-capacity digital data-storage technology. However, due to the effect of cross-talk noise, scattering noise, noise gratings formed during a multiple exposure schedule, it brings a lot of burst errors and random errors in the system. Reed-Solomon error-correction codes have been widely used to protect digital data against errors. This paper presents VLSI implementations of an 16 errors correcting (255,223) Reed-Solomon decoder architecture for volume holographic storage. We describe the Reed-Solomon decoders using modified Euclidean algorithms which are regular and simple, and naturally suitable for VLSI implementations. We design the speedily multiplication for GF(28) and pipeline structure to solve hardware complexity and high data processing rate for the Reed-Solomon decoders. We adopt high speed FPGA and have a data processing rate of 200 Mbit/s.

  11. Renormalized G-convolution of n-point functions in quantum field theory. I. The Euclidean case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notion of Feynman amplitude associated with a graph G in perturbative quantum field theory admits a generalized version in which each vertex v of G is associated with a general (non-perturbative) nsub(v)-point function Hsup(nsub(v)), nsub(v) denoting the number of lines which are incident to v in G. In the case where no ultraviolet divergence occurs, this has been performed directly in complex momentum space through Bros-Lassalle's G-convolution procedure. The authors propose a generalization of G-convolution which includes the case when the functions Hsup(nsub(v)) are not integrable at infinity but belong to a suitable class of slowly increasing functions. A finite part of the G-convolution integral is then defined through an algorithm which closely follows Zimmermann's renormalization scheme. The case of Euclidean four-momentum configurations is only treated

  12. Fully polynomial-time approximation scheme for a special case of a quadratic Euclidean 2-clustering problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kel'manov, A. V.; Khandeev, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    The strongly NP-hard problem of partitioning a finite set of points of Euclidean space into two clusters of given sizes (cardinalities) minimizing the sum (over both clusters) of the intracluster sums of squared distances from the elements of the clusters to their centers is considered. It is assumed that the center of one of the sought clusters is specified at the desired (arbitrary) point of space (without loss of generality, at the origin), while the center of the other one is unknown and determined as the mean value over all elements of this cluster. It is shown that unless P = NP, there is no fully polynomial-time approximation scheme for this problem, and such a scheme is substantiated in the case of a fixed space dimension.

  13. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found. PMID:25291810

  14. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  15. Cellular Homeostasis and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Aging and longevity are controlled by a multiplicity of molecular and cellular signaling events that interface with environmental factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Modulation of these pathways to extend life span, including insulin-like signaling and the response to dietary restriction, identified the cellular machineries and networks of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and stress resistance pathways as critical players in the aging process. A decline of proteostasis capacity during aging leads to dysfunction of specific cell types and tissues, rendering the organism susceptible to a range of chronic diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of two reviews addressing our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying aging in model organisms and humans. PMID:27050288

  16. Asymptotic behaviour of the first moment of the number of steps in the by-excess and by-deficiency Euclidean algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first moments for the number of steps in different Euclidean algorithms are considered. For these moments asymptotic formulae with new remainder terms are obtained using refined estimates for sums of fractional parts and some ideas in Selberg's elementary proof of the prime number theorem. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  17. Asymptotic behaviour of the first moment of the number of steps in the by-excess and by-deficiency Euclidean algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolenkov, Dmitrii A.

    2012-02-01

    The first moments for the number of steps in different Euclidean algorithms are considered. For these moments asymptotic formulae with new remainder terms are obtained using refined estimates for sums of fractional parts and some ideas in Selberg's elementary proof of the prime number theorem. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  18. Cellular Dynamics of RNA Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chengqi; Pan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Decades of research have identified over 100 types of ribonucleosides that are post-transcriptionally modified. Many modified nucleosides are conserved in bacteria, archeae and eukaryotes, while some modified nucleosides are unique to each branch of life. However, the cellular and functional dynamics of RNA modifications remains largely unexplored, mostly due to the lack of functional hypotheses and experimental methods for quantification and large scale analysis. Just as many well characterized protein and DNA modifications, many RNA modifications are not essential for life. Instead, increasingly more evidence indicates that RNA modifications can play regulatory roles in cells, especially in response to stress conditions. In this Account, we review some known examples of RNA modifications that are dynamically controlled in cells and introduce some contemporary technologies and methods that enhance the studies of cellular dynamics of RNA modifications. Examples of RNA modifications discussed in this Account include (Figure 1): (1) 4-thio uridine (s4U) which can act as a cellular sensor of near UV-light; (2) queuosine (Q) which is a potential biomarker for malignancy; (3) N6-methyl adenine (m6A) which is the prevalent modification in eukaryotic mRNAs; and (4) pseudouridine (ψ) which are inducible by nutrient deprivation. Two recent technical advances that stimulated the studies of cellular dynamics of modified ribonucleosides are also described. First, a genome-wide method combines primer extension and microarray to study N1-methyl adenine (m1A) hypomodification in human tRNA. Second, a quantitative mass spectrometric method investigates dynamic changes of a wide range of tRNA modifications under stress conditions in yeast. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms that control dynamic regulation of RNA modifications, and hypotheses for discovering potential RNA de-modification enzymes. We conclude the Account by highlighting the need to develop new

  19. Wireless Cellular Mobile Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zalud

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article is briefly reviewed the history of wireless cellularmobile communications, examined the progress in current secondgeneration (2G cellular standards and discussed their migration to thethird generation (3G. The European 2G cellular standard GSM and itsevolution phases GPRS and EDGE are described somewhat in detail. Thethird generation standard UMTS taking up on GSM/GPRS core network andequipped with a new advanced access network on the basis of codedivision multiple access (CDMA is investigated too. A sketch of theperspective of mobile communication beyond 3G concludes this article.

  20. Translating partitioned cellular automata into classical type cellular automata

    OpenAIRE

    Poupet, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Partitioned cellular automata are a variant of cellular automata that was defined in order to make it very simple to create complex automata having strong properties such as number conservation and reversibility (which are often difficult to obtain on cellular automata). In this article we show how a partitioned cellular automaton can be translated into a regular cellular automaton in such a way that these properties are conserved.

  1. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  2. Radioactivity of cellular concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural radioactivity of cellular concrete is discussed. Some data on the concentrations of 40K, 226Ra and 232Th in building materials in Poland are given. The results of dose rates measurements in living quarters as well as outside are presented. (A.S.)

  3. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  4. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  5. Electromagnetic cellular interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, J. S.; Farhadi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2011), 223-246. ISSN 0079-6107. [36th International Congress of Physiological Sciences (IUPS2009). Kyoto, 27.07.2009-01.08.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP102/10/P454 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : bioelectric phenomena * cellular biophysics Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.203, year: 2011

  6. Magnetic Cellular Switches

    OpenAIRE

    Overby, Darryl R.; Alenghat, Francis J.; Montoya-Zavala, Martín; Bei, HuCheng; Oh, Philmo; Karavitis, John; Ingber, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of magnetic cellular switches to enable magnetic control of intracellular functions in living mammalian cells, including receptor signal transduction and gene transcription. Our approach takes advantage of the mechanosensitivity of adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) induction and downstream transcription controlled by the cAMP regulatory element (CRE) to engineer gene constructs that optically report gene expression in living cells. We activate transcri...

  7. Cellular therapy in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreemanta K. Parida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB. We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs, as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy.

  8. Cellular therapy in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Shreemanta K; Madansein, Rajhmun; Singh, Nalini; Padayatchi, Nesri; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs), as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy. PMID:25809753

  9. Quantum cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porod, Wolfgang; Lent, Craig S.; Bernstein, Gary H.

    1994-06-01

    The Notre Dame group has developed a new paradigm for ultra-dense and ultra-fast information processing in nanoelectronic systems. These Quantum Cellular Automata (QCA's) are the first concrete proposal for a technology based on arrays of coupled quantum dots. The basic building block of these cellular arrays is the Notre Dame Logic Cell, as it has been called in the literature. The phenomenon of Coulomb exclusion, which is a synergistic interplay of quantum confinement and Coulomb interaction, leads to a bistable behavior of each cell which makes possible their use in large-scale cellular arrays. The physical interaction between neighboring cells has been exploited to implement logic functions. New functionality may be achieved in this fashion, and the Notre Dame group invented a versatile majority logic gate. In a series of papers, the feasibility of QCA wires, wire crossing, inverters, and Boolean logic gates was demonstrated. A major finding is that all logic functions may be integrated in a hierarchial fashion which allows the design of complicated QCA structures. The most complicated system which was simulated to date is a one-bit full adder consisting of some 200 cells. In addition to exploring these new concepts, efforts are under way to physically realize such structures both in semiconductor and metal systems. Extensive modeling work of semiconductor quantum dot structures has helped identify optimum design parameters for QCA experimental implementations.

  10. A possible cosmological application of some thermodynamic properties of the black body radiation in $n-$dimensional Euclidean spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Cordero, Rubén; Angulo-Brown, F

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the generalization of some thermodynamic properties of the black body radiation (BBR) towards an $n-$dimensional Euclidean space. For this case the Planck function and the Stefan-Boltzmann law have already been given by Landsberg and de Vos and some adjustments by Menon and Agrawal. However, since then no much more has been done on this subject and we believe there are some relevant aspects yet to explore. In addition to the results previously found we calculate the thermodynamic potentials, the efficiency of the Carnot engine, the law for adiabatic processes and the heat capacity at constant volume. There is a region at which an interesting behavior of the thermodynamic potentials arise, maxima and minima appear for the $n-d$ BBR system at very high temperatures and low dimensionality, suggesting a possible application to cosmology. Finally we propose that an optimality criterion in a thermodynamic framework could have to do with the $3-d$ nature of the universe.

  11. Quantum deformations of $D=4$ Euclidean, Lorentz, Kleinian and quaternionic $\\mathfrak{o}^{\\star}(4)$ symmetries in unified $\\mathfrak{o}(4;\\mathbb{C})$ setting

    CERN Document Server

    Borowiec, A; Tolstoy, V N

    2015-01-01

    We employ new calculational technique and present complete list of classical $r$-matrices for $D=4$ complex homogeneous orthogonal Lie algebra $\\mathfrak{o}(4;\\mathbb{C})$, the rotational symmetry of four-dimensional complex space-time. Further applying reality conditions we obtain the classical $r$-matrices for all possible real forms of $\\mathfrak{o}(4;\\mathbb{C})$: Euclidean $\\mathfrak{o}(4)$, Lorentz $\\mathfrak{o}(3,1)$, Kleinian $\\mathfrak{o}(2,2)$ and quaternionic $\\mathfrak{o}^{\\star}(4)$ Lie algebras. For $\\mathfrak{o}(3,1)$ we get known four classical $D=4$ Lorentz $r$-matrices, but for other real Lie algebras (Euclidean, Kleinian, quaternionic) we provide new results.

  12. The system-dynamic and evolutionary non-Euclidean approach and the 'Lobachevsky-Poincare programme' idea for its successive realization in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The necessity of creating mesophysics is motivated on the basis of a general likeness of the description of many phenomena and processes in micro- and macroworld. For a general and detailed investigation of the former in modern high energy physics (HEP), the Absolute (arising from Minkovsky and irrespective of any reference system) universal approach is used. Its two conceptually new branches are non-linear system-dynamic and non-Euclidean evolutionary ones. They are complementary ones and completely adequate to an extreme complexity of directly unobservable HEP objects. Some primary problems of them are briefly made clear on the basis of synergetics principles and HEP's internal Lobachevsky-Euclidean geometry. They are noted as the primary content of the Lobachevsky-Poincare Programme (LPP) the idea of which has been proposed recently for their successive solution

  13. 欧氏空间中n维Pedoe不等式的推广及应用%Generlization of n-Dimsensional Pedoe Inequalities in Euclidean Space and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨世国; 王文

    2011-01-01

    The theory and method of distance geometry were used to study the problems of geometric inequalities for the edge-length and volume of two n-dimensional simplexes in the Euclidean space En. Two forms of the improved n-dimensional Peng-Chang inequalities were established. From these we obtained the generalization of n-dimensional Pedoe inequalities in the Euclidean space En.%利用距离几何的理论与方法,研究欧氏空间En中两个n维单形的棱长与体积的几何不等式,建立了n维单形两种加强形式的彭-常不等式,从而推广了En中n维Pedoe不等式.

  14. Failover in cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2010-01-01

    A cellular automata (CA) configuration is constructed that exhibits emergent failover. The configuration is based on standard Game of Life rules. Gliders and glider-guns form the core messaging structure in the configuration. The blinker is represented as the basic computational unit, and it is shown how it can be recreated in case of a failure. Stateless failover using primary-backup mechanism is demonstrated. The details of the CA components used in the configuration and its working are described, and a simulation of the complete configuration is also presented.

  15. Cellular mechanics and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  16. Radiolabelled Cellular Blood Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the abstracts of the 5th International Symposion on Radiolabelling of Cellular Blood Elements to be held in Vienna, Austria, September 10-14, 1989. The Meeting is the fifth in a series of meetings designed to discuss the basics and clinical application of radiolabelling techniques. In these days, beside the search for new labelling agents and extending the knowledge in clinical use, the use of monoclonal antibodies is a big new challenge. All reviewed contributions that have been accepted for presentation are contained in this volume. (authors) 58 of them are of INIS scope

  17. 在细胞水平上对高温珊瑚白化的初步研究%Preliminary study of coral bleaching at cellular level under thermal stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑; 余克服; 陈天然; 施祺

    2011-01-01

    Global warming and abnormal high temperature cause coral-zooxanthellae symbiosis collapse and significant loss of zooxanthellae (coral bleaching), and further lead to degradation of coral reef ecosystems. In this study, the authors collected six species of corals from the Luhuitou fringing reef in Sanya, and designed a mesocosm experiment that those corals were cultured under a high temperature stress, for investigating the diversity of tolerance among different coral symbiosis at cellular level. The results are as follows. The diversity of tolerance among different coral species under acute thermal stresses was related to their morphologies: branching corals showed the lowest tolerance in thermal stress, while the foliose and massive corals showed stronger tolerance, which was similar to the result in the field monitoring. Different coral species showed different ways of zooxanthellae loss under thermal stresses: zooxanthellae discharging continuously, like Pocillopora damicornis; zooxanthellae discharging partly and followed by coral tissues containing zooxanthellae separating from skeletons,like Acropora hyacinthus and Acropora brueggemanni; the residual zooxauthellae in coral tissues using mitotic proliferation to replenish their numbers quickly, like Pavona decussate; cell necrosis of zooxanthellae in coral tissues, like Porites lutea. This study confirmed that the role of coral host and zooxanthellae should be considered simultaneously in further studies of coral responses to global warming.%全球变暖背景下的异常高温能够导致珊瑚及其虫黄藻组成的共生体系崩溃,虫黄藻大量损失,出现珊瑚白化,并可能进一步导致珊瑚礁生态系统退化.文章通过对6种造礁石珊瑚的急性高温胁迫实验,分析不同种属的石珊瑚虫黄藻共生体系对高温的耐受性差异,为全球变暖背景下珊瑚群落演替趋势提供理论依据.结果显示:1)在急性高温胁迫下,石珊瑚耐受的差异性与其

  18. 欧氏空间En中Pedoe不等式推广%Generalizations of n-dimensional Pedoe inequality in euclidean space En

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文; 杨世国

    2012-01-01

    Using the theory and method of distance geometry, some geometric inequalities for n-dimensional simplexes were proved in Euclidean space En, from which the n-dimensional Pedoe inequality and Peng-Chang's inequality involving the edge-lengths of two simplexes were generalized. In addition, the k-n type Pedoe inequality and Peng-Chang's inequality in Euclidean space were generalized. Finally, a new inequality for an n-dimensional simplex in Euclidean space was obtained.%应用距离几何的理论与方法,先证明了欧氏空间中n维单形的几个几何不等式,然后建立了加强形式的涉及两个单形棱长的n维Pedoe不等式和彭-常不等式以及k-n型Pedoe不等式和彭-常不等式.另外还建立了一个重要不等式.

  19. Euclidean action of Fermi-system with “hidden order”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous break down of translational invariance of Fermi-system along Matsubara's time axis may lead to emergency of a new kind of “hidden order”. An exact solution is found that minimizes Landau–Ginzburg–Wilson (LGW) action of the fermionic system close to a usual spin density wave (SDW) instability. The solution has the form of SDW with amplitude that is analytic double-periodic function of the Matsubara and real time. This kind of order parameter behaves like a “hidden order”, since, e.g. in the limit of zero temperature, T=0 K, the state is characterized by a bound state of two antiferromagnetic SDW's propagating in the opposite directions in real space and forming “standing wave” with zero expectation value for the magnetization. There is finite energy gap between this state and lowest excited states corresponding to SDW's propagating in the opposite directions with slightly different amplitudes. Green's function of the hidden order field (HOF) is finite and periodic along Matsubara's axis, but Wick-rotated to the axis of real frequencies, it reveals periodic “chain” of second order poles. Hence, the scattering cross section of the HOF is zero in the lowest order approximation and, therefore, HOF is indeed “invisible”. Despite this, HOF induces a gap in the fermionic quasiparticle spectrum at Fermi-level, and also possesses several “visible” spin-modes with discrete frequencies above a finite gap. Relevance of the picture to high-Tc “hidden order” and pseudo-gap state is briefly discussed

  20. The ACADS gene variation spectrum in 114 patients with short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is dominated by missense variations leading to protein misfolding at the cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christina Bak; Kølvrå, Steen; Kølvraa, Agnete;

    2008-01-01

    , 26 missense, one start codon, and two stop codon variations. In vitro import studies of variant SCAD proteins in isolated mitochondria from SCAD deficient (SCAD-/-) mice demonstrated an increased tendency of the abnormal proteins to misfold and aggregate compared to the wild-type, a phenomenon that...... often leads to gain-of-function cellular phenotypes. However, no correlation was found between the clinical phenotype and the degree of SCAD dysfunction. We propose that SCAD deficiency should be considered as a disorder of protein folding that can lead to clinical disease in combination with other...

  1. Parametric study of double cellular detonation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasainov, B.; Virot, F.; Presles, H.-N.; Desbordes, D.

    2013-05-01

    A parametric numerical study is performed of a detonation cellular structure in a model gaseous explosive mixture whose decomposition occurs in two successive exothermic reaction steps with markedly different characteristic times. Kinetic and energetic parameters of both reactions are varied in a wide range in the case of one-dimensional steady and two-dimensional (2D) quasi-steady self-supported detonations. The range of governing parameters of both exothermic steps is defined where a "marked" double cellular structure exists. It is shown that the two-level cellular structure is completely governed by the kinetic parameters and the local overdrive ratio of the detonation front propagating inside large cells. Furthermore, since it is quite cumbersome to use detailed chemical kinetics in unsteady 2D case, the proposed work should help to identify the mixtures and the domain of their equivalence ratio where double detonation structure could be observed.

  2. Multiuser Cellular Network

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Modern radio communication is faced with a problem about how to distribute restricted frequency to users in a certain space. Since our task is to minimize the number of repeaters, a natural idea is enlarging coverage area. However, coverage has restrictions. First, service area has to be divided economically as repeater's coverage is limited. In this paper, our fundamental method is to adopt seamless cellular network division. Second, underlying physics content in frequency distribution problem is interference between two close frequencies. Consequently, we choose a proper frequency width of 0.1MHz and a relevantly reliable setting to apply one frequency several times. We make a few general assumptions to simplify real situation. For instance, immobile users yield to homogenous distribution; repeaters can receive and transmit information in any given frequency in duplex operation; coverage is mainly decided by antenna height. Two models are built up to solve 1000 users and 10000 users situations respectively....

  3. Modeling and cellular studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing the applicability of mathematical models with carefully designed experiments is a powerful tool in the investigations of the effects of ionizing radiation on cells. The modeling and cellular studies complement each other, for modeling provides guidance for designing critical experiments which must provide definitive results, while the experiments themselves provide new input to the model. Based on previous experimental results the model for the accumulation of damage in Chlamydomonas reinhardi has been extended to include various multiple two-event combinations. Split dose survival experiments have shown that models tested to date predict most but not all the observed behavior. Stationary-phase mammalian cells, required for tests of other aspects of the model, have been shown to be at different points in the cell cycle depending on how they were forced to stop proliferating. These cultures also demonstrate different capacities for repair of sublethal radiation damage

  4. Euclidean gravity attracts

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker MR; Smit, J.

    1993-01-01

    We look at gravitational attraction in simplicial gravity using the dynamical triangulation method. On the dynamical triangulation configurations we measure quenched propagators of a free massive scalar field. The masses measured from these propagators show that gravitational attraction is present.

  5. The State of Cellular Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Youngbin

    2003-01-01

    Cellular probe technology is one of several potentially promising technologies for obtaining accurate travel time information. In 1996, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) mandated E911 requirements that cellular location be provided when 911 emergency calls come in to emergency management authorities. The E911 requirements allow 50 -300 meters from the emergency call location, depending on the type of cellular phone technology used and whether handset-based or network-based solutions...

  6. Never-ageing cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ogrunc, Müge; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence was historically discovered as a form of cellular ageing of in vitro cultured cells. It has been under the spotlight following the evidence of oncogene-induced senescence in vivo and its role as a potent tumour suppressor mechanism. Presently, a PubMed search using keywords ‘cellular senescence and cancer’ reveals 8398 number of references (by April 2011) showing that while our knowledge of senescence keeps expanding, the complexity of the phenomenon keeps us – researchers...

  7. Cellular glutathione prevents cytolethality of monomethylarsonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenicals are clearly toxicants and carcinogens in humans. In mammals, including humans, inorganic arsenic often undergoes methylation, forming compounds such as monomethylarsonic acid (MMAsV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAsV). However, much less information is available on the in vitro toxic potential or mechanisms of these methylated arsenicals, especially MMAsV. We studied the molecular mechanisms of in vitro cytolethality of MMAsV using a rat liver epithelial cell line (TRL 1215). MMAsV was not cytotoxic in TRL 1215 cells even at concentrations exceeding 10 mM, but it became weakly cytotoxic and induced both necrotic and apoptotic cell death when cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) was depleted with the glutathione synthase inhibitor, L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO), or the glutathione reductase inhibitor, carmustine. Similar results were observed in the other mammalian cells, such as human skin TIG-112 cells, chimpanzee skin CRT-1609 cells, and mouse metallothionein (MT) positive and MT negative embryonic cells. Ethacrynic acid (EA), an inhibitor of glutathione S-transferase (GST) that catalyses GSH-substrate conjugation, also enhanced the cytolethality of MMAsV, but aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of β-lyase that catalyses the final breakdown of GSH-substrate conjugates, had no effect. Both the cellular GSH levels and the cellular GST activity were increased by the exposure to MMAsV in TRL 1215 cells. On the other hand, the addition of exogenous extracellular GSH enhanced the cytolethality of MMAsV, although cellular GSH levels actually prevented the cytolethality of combined MMAsV and exogenous GSH. These findings indicate that human arsenic metabolite MMAsV is not a highly toxic compound in mammalian cells, and the level of cellular GSH is critical to its eventual toxic effects

  8. Active Cellular Nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  9. Vanderbilt University Study Creates New Roadmap for Cellular Activity - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists studying cellular processes have long sought to measure redox modifications because they provide one of the normal layers of cell control. But redox disruption or oxidative stress at the cellular level can also create a pathway to diseases like

  10. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  11. Mapping of cellular iron using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eung Seok; Heo, Chaejeong; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Min

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive dopaminergic cell loss in the substantianigra (SN) and elevated iron levels demonstrated by autopsy and with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Direct visualization of iron with live imaging techniques has not yet been successful. The aim of this study is to visualize and quantify the distribution of cellular iron using an intrinsic iron hyperspectral fluorescence signal. The 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cellular model of PD was established in SHSY5Y cells. The cells were exposed to iron by treatment with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC, 100 μM) for up to 6 hours. The hyperspectral fluorescence imaging signal of iron was examined usinga high- resolution dark-field optical microscope system with signal absorption for the visible/ near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. The 6-hour group showed heavy cellular iron deposition compared with the small amount of iron accumulation in the 1-hour group. The cellular iron was dispersed in a small, particulate form, whereas extracellular iron was detected in an aggregated form. In addition, iron particles were found to be concentrated on the cell membrane/edge of shrunken cells. The cellular iron accumulation readily occurred in MPP+-induced cells, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating elevated iron levels in the SN in PD. This direct iron imaging methodology could be applied to analyze the physiological role of iron in PD, and its application might be expanded to various neurological disorders involving other metals, such as copper, manganese or zinc.

  12. Cellular Dynamic Simulator: An Event Driven Molecular Simulation Environment for Cellular Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michael J.; Waxham, M. Neal; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Cellular Dynamic Simulator (CDS) for simulating diffusion and chemical reactions within crowded molecular environments. CDS is based on a novel event driven algorithm specifically designed for precise calculation of the timing of collisions, reactions and other events for each individual molecule in the environment. Generic mesh based compartments allow the creation / importation of very simple or detailed cellular structures that exist in a 3D environment. Multiple levels of compartments and static obstacles can be used to create a dense environment to mimic cellular boundaries and the intracellular space. The CDS algorithm takes into account volume exclusion and molecular crowding that may impact signaling cascades in small sub-cellular compartments such as dendritic spines. With the CDS, we can simulate simple enzyme reactions; aggregation, channel transport, as well as highly complicated chemical reaction networks of both freely diffusing and membrane bound multi-protein complexes. Components of the CDS are generally defined such that the simulator can be applied to a wide range of environments in terms of scale and level of detail. Through an initialization GUI, a simple simulation environment can be created and populated within minutes yet is powerful enough to design complex 3D cellular architecture. The initialization tool allows visual confirmation of the environment construction prior to execution by the simulator. This paper describes the CDS algorithm, design implementation, and provides an overview of the types of features available and the utility of those features are highlighted in demonstrations. PMID:20361275

  13. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  14. Image processing with a cellular nonlinear network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cellular nonlinear network (CNN) based on uncoupled nonlinear oscillators is proposed for image processing purposes. It is shown theoretically and numerically that the contrast of an image loaded at the nodes of the CNN is strongly enhanced, even if this one is initially weak. An image inversion can be also obtained without reconfiguration of the network whereas a gray levels extraction can be performed with an additional threshold filtering. Lastly, an electronic implementation of this CNN is presented

  15. Actual problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kaupov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides review of cellular technologies used incardiology, describes types of cellular preparations depending onsources of cells and types of compounding cells. The generalmechanisms of therapies with stem cells applications are described.Use of cellular preparations for treatment of cardiovascular diseasesand is improvement of the forecast at patients with heartinsufficiency of various genesis is considered as alternative topractice with organ transplantations. Efforts of biotechnologicallaboratories are directed on search of optimum population of cellsfor application in cardiology and studying of mechanisms andfactors regulating function of cardiac stem cells.

  16. Validation of origins of tea samples using partial least squares analysis and Euclidean distance method with near-infrared spectroscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Zhou, Jian; Cheng, Hao; Wang, Liyuan; Wei, Kang; Wang, Weifeng; Li, Xinghui

    2012-02-01

    In today's global food markets, the ability to trace the origins of agricultural products is becoming increasingly important. We developed an efficient procedure for validating the authenticity and origin of tea samples where Partial Least Squares and Euclidean Distance methods, based on near-infrared spectroscopy data, were combined to classify tea samples from different tea producing areas. Four models for identification of authenticity of tea samples were constructed and utilized in our two-step procedure. High accuracy rates of 98.60%, 97.90%, 97.55%, and 99.83% for the calibration set, and 97.19%, 97.54%, 97.83%, 100% for test set, were achieved. After the first identification step, employing the four origin authenticity models, followed by the second step using the Euclidean Distance method, accuracy rates for specific origin identification were 98.43% in the calibration set and 96.84% in the test set. This method, employing two-step analysis of multi-origin model, accurately identified the origin of tea samples collected in four different areas. This study provided a potential reference method for the detection of "geographical indication" of agricultural products' and is available for use in traceability of origin studies.

  17. Very close to the identity, the diffeomorphisms of a Euclidean space with at least 2 dimensions have their periodic orbits on regular polygons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Let E denote a Euclidean space with dimension p ≥ 2; On= { x, f(x),…, fn-1(x) } a periodic orbit of length n ≥ 2 for a C1-diffeomorphism f:E → E; and ρ(f) the number ρ(f) = sup{|||Dzf - Id|||, z ∈ E} ∈ [0, +∞], defined by means of the classical triple norm associated with a Euclidean norm || · || in the set of linear endomorphisms of E. I have proved in (Dehove 2007 Nonlinearity 20 2191–203) that one has optimally ρ(f) ≥2 sin ((π)/n). The object of this paper is to show that if ρ(f) = 2 sin ((π/n)), then the orbit On is located on the vertices of a regular polygon, on the convex hull of which the diffeomorphism f coincides with a rotation of an angle (2π)/n. This involves several new results in geometry, formulated and proved in the paper

  18. 基于核的图像欧氏距离人脸识别%Image Euclidean distance based on kernel for face recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝建东; 张伟伟

    2011-01-01

    引进了两幅图像之间的一种新的距离度量方法——图像欧氏距离,该距离是利用核函数对传统的欧氏距离进行改进而得到的.在此基础上,设计了一种新的分类识别方法——基于核的图像欧氏距离人脸识别方法,并应用于人脸识别中.为验证该算法的可行性,对人脸图像进行DCT变换得到预处理样本,并在ORL和Yale人脸库上进行多角度的比较实验.分析实验结果表明,该方法优于其它距离分类器算法.%A new distance named Euclidean distance in the image is proposed, which consists of the idea of kernel function. On this basis, a novel recognition method called image Euclidean distance based on kernel for face recognition is designed. In order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method, firstly, it takes pretreatment to facial images to get pretreatment samples. The experiments show that this new algorithm outperforms other distance classifier algorithms.

  19. Cellular dosimetry in nuclear medicine imaging: training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclides used in nuclear medicine imaging emit not only diagnostically useful photons, but also energy electron emissions, responsible for dose heterogeneity at the cellular level. The mean dose delivered to the cell nucleus by electron emissions of 99mTc, 123I, 111In, 67Ga, and 201Tl, has been calculated, for the cell nucleus, a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distribution of radioactivity. This model takes into account both the self-dose which results from the radionuclide located in the target cell, and the cross-dose, which comes from the surrounding cells. The results obtained by cellular dosimetry (Dcel) have been compared with those obtained with conventional dosimetry (Dconv), by assuming the same amount of radioactivity per cell. Cellular dosimetry shows, for a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, that the main contribution to the dose to the cell nucleus, comes from the surrounding cells. On the other hand, for a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity, the self-dose is not negligible and may be the main contribution. The comparison between cellular and conventional dosimetry shows that Dcel/Dconv ratio ranges from 0.61 and O.89, in case of a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, depending on the radionuclide and cell dimensions. Thus, conventional dosimetry slightly overestimates the mean dose to the cell nucleus. On the other hand, Dcel/Dconv ranges from 1.1 to 75, in case of a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity. Conventional dosimetry may strongly underestimates the absorbed dose to the nucleus, when radioactivity is located in the nucleus. The study indicates that in nuclear medicine imaging, cellular dosimetry may lead to a better understanding of biological effects of radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  20. Cytokines as cellular communicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Debets

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines and their receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of many diseases. Here we present a detailed review on cytokines, receptors and signalling routes, and show that one important lesson from cytokine biology is the complex and diverse regulation of cytokine activity. The activity of cytokines is controlled at the level of transcription, translation, storage, processing, posttranslational modification, trapping, binding by soluble proteins, and receptor number and/or function. Translation of this diverse regulation in strategies aimed at the control of cytokine activity will result in the development of more specific and selective drugs to treat diseases.

  1. Cellular vs. organ approaches to dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular distribution of tissue-incorporated radionuclides has generally been neglected in the dosimetry of internal emitters. Traditional dosimetry assumes homogeneous distribution of radionuclides in organs of interest, while presuming that the ranges of particulate radiations are large relative to typical cell diameters. The macroscopic distribution of dose thus calculated has generally served as a sufficient approximation for the energy deposited within radiosensitive sites. However, with the increasing utilization of intracellular agents, such as thallium-201, it has become necessary to examine the microscopic distribution of energy at the cellular level. This is particularly important in the instance of radionuclides that decay by electron capture or by internal conversion with the release of Auger and Coster-Kronig electrons. In many instances, these electrons are released as a dense shower of low-energy particles with ranges of subcellular dimensions. The high electron density in the immediate vicinity of the decaying atom produces a focal deposition of energy that far exceeds the average dose taken over several cell diameters. These studies point out the increasing need to take into account the microscopic distribution of dose on the cellular level as radionuclides distributed in cells become more commonplace, especially if the decay involves electron capture or internal conversion. As radiotracers are developed for the measurement of intracellular functions these factors should be given greater consideration. 16 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  2. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis. (paper)

  3. Cellular mechanisms during vascular development

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system is an essential organ in vertebrate animals and provides the organism with enough oxygen and nutrients. It is composed of an interconnected network of blood vessels, which form using a number of different morphogenetic mechanisms. Angiogenesis describes the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting vessels. A number of molecular pathways have been shown to be essential during angiogenesis. However, cellular architecture of blood vessels as well as cellular mechanisms...

  4. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    OpenAIRE

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the...

  5. Quantifying the global cellular thiol-disulfide status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rosa E; Roth, Doris; Winther, Jakob R

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the redox status of protein thiols is of central importance to protein structure and folding and that glutathione is an important low-molecular-mass redox regulator. However, the total cellular pools of thiols and disulfides and their relative abundance have never been...... determined. In this study, we have assembled a global picture of the cellular thiol-disulfide status in cultured mammalian cells. We have quantified the absolute levels of protein thiols, protein disulfides, and glutathionylated protein (PSSG) in all cellular protein, including membrane proteins. These data...... cell types. However, when cells are exposed to a sublethal dose of the thiol-specific oxidant diamide, PSSG levels increase to >15% of all protein cysteine. Glutathione is typically characterized as the "cellular redox buffer"; nevertheless, our data show that protein thiols represent a larger active...

  6. Hierarchical Cellular Structures in High-Capacity Cellular Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, R K; Agrawal, N K

    2011-01-01

    In the prevailing cellular environment, it is important to provide the resources for the fluctuating traffic demand exactly in the place and at the time where and when they are needed. In this paper, we explored the ability of hierarchical cellular structures with inter layer reuse to increase the capacity of mobile communication network by applying total frequency hopping (T-FH) and adaptive frequency allocation (AFA) as a strategy to reuse the macro and micro cell resources without frequency planning in indoor pico cells [11]. The practical aspects for designing macro- micro cellular overlays in the existing big urban areas are also explained [4]. Femto cells are inducted in macro / micro / pico cells hierarchical structure to achieve the required QoS cost effectively.

  7. SoftCell: Taking Control of Cellular Core Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Xin; Li, Li Erran; Vanbever, Laurent; Rexford, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Existing cellular networks suffer from inflexible and expensive equipment, and complex control-plane protocols. To address these challenges, we present SoftCell, a scalable architecture for supporting fine-grained policies for mobile devices in cellular core networks. The SoftCell controller realizes high-level service polices by directing traffic over paths that traverse a sequence of middleboxes, optimized to the network conditions and user locations. To ensure scalability, the core switche...

  8. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  9. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetish Ranjan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequency reuse at a smaller distance. Maximizing the number of times each channel can be reused in a given geographical area is the key to an efficient cellular system design. During the past three decades, the world has seen significant changes in telecommunications industry. There have been some remarkable aspects to the rapid growth in wireless communications, as seen by the large expansion in mobile systems. This paper focuses on “Past, Present & Future of Cellular Telephony” and some light has been thrown upon the technologies of the cellular systems, namely 1G, 2G, 2.5G, 3G and future generations like 4G and 5G systems as well.

  10. Phenomenological study of irregular cellular automata based on Lyapunov exponents and Jacobians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baetens, Jan M; De Baets, Bernard

    2010-09-01

    Originally, cellular automata (CA) have been defined upon regular tessellations of the n-dimensional Euclidean space, while CA on irregular tessellations have received only little attention from the scientific community, notwithstanding serious shortcomings are associated with the former manner of subdividing Rn. In this paper we present a profound phenomenological study of two-state, two-dimensional irregular CA from a dynamical systems viewpoint. We opted to exploit properly defined quantitative measures instead of resorting to qualitative methods for discriminating between behavioral classes. As such, we employ Lyapunov exponents, measuring the divergence rate of close trajectories in phase space, and Jacobians, formulated using Boolean derivatives and expressing the sensitivity of a cellular automaton to its inputs. Both are stated for two-state CA on irregular tessellations, enabling us to characterize these discrete dynamical systems, and advancing us to propose a classification scheme for this CA family. In addition, a relationship between these quantitative measures is established in extension of the insights already developed for the classical CA paradigm. Finally, we discuss the repercussions on the CA dynamics that arise when the geometric variability of the spatial entities is taken into account during the CA simulation. PMID:20887052

  11. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  12. Novel Materials for Cellular Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi

    The monitoring of cellular behavior is useful for the advancement of biomedical diagnostics, drug development and the understanding of a cell as the main unit of the human body. Micro- and nanotechnology allow for the creation of functional devices that enhance the study of cellular dynamics by...... modifications for electrochemical nanosensors for the detection of analytes released from cells. Two type of materials were investigated, each pertaining to the two different aspects of such devices: peptide nanostructures were studied for the creation of cellular sensing substrates that mimic in vivo surfaces...... and that offer advantages of functionalization, and conducting polymers were used as electrochemical sensor surface modifications for increasing the sensitivity towards relevant analytes, with focus on the detection of dopamine released from cells via exocytosis. Vertical peptide nanowires were...

  13. Cellular-based preemption system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Aaron D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cellular-based preemption system that uses existing cellular infrastructure to transmit preemption related data to allow safe passage of emergency vehicles through one or more intersections. A cellular unit in an emergency vehicle is used to generate position reports that are transmitted to the one or more intersections during an emergency response. Based on this position data, the one or more intersections calculate an estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the emergency vehicle, and transmit preemption commands to traffic signals at the intersections based on the calculated ETA. Additional techniques may be used for refining the position reports, ETA calculations, and the like. Such techniques include, without limitation, statistical preemption, map-matching, dead-reckoning, augmented navigation, and/or preemption optimization techniques, all of which are described in further detail in the above-referenced patent applications.

  14. Empirical multiscale networks of cellular regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin de Bivort

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Grouping genes by similarity of expression across multiple cellular conditions enables the identification of cellular modules. The known functions of genes enable the characterization of the aggregate biological functions of these modules. In this paper, we use a high-throughput approach to identify the effective mutual regulatory interactions between modules composed of mouse genes from the Alliance for Cell Signaling (AfCS murine B-lymphocyte database which tracks the response of approximately 15,000 genes following chemokine perturbation. This analysis reveals principles of cellular organization that we discuss along four conceptual axes. (1 Regulatory implications: the derived collection of influences between any two modules quantifies intuitive as well as unexpected regulatory interactions. (2 Behavior across scales: trends across global networks of varying resolution (composed of various numbers of modules reveal principles of assembly of high-level behaviors from smaller components. (3 Temporal behavior: tracking the mutual module influences over different time intervals provides features of regulation dynamics such as duration, persistence, and periodicity. (4 Gene Ontology correspondence: the association of modules to known biological roles of individual genes describes the organization of functions within coexpressed modules of various sizes. We present key specific results in each of these four areas, as well as derive general principles of cellular organization. At the coarsest scale, the entire transcriptional network contains five divisions: two divisions devoted to ATP production/biosynthesis and DNA replication that activate all other divisions, an "extracellular interaction" division that represses all other divisions, and two divisions (proliferation/differentiation and membrane infrastructure that activate and repress other divisions in specific ways consistent with cell cycle control.

  15. Study of the properties of the Gribov region in SU(N) Euclidean Yang-Mills theories in the maximal Abelian gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we address the issue of the Gribov copies in SU(N), N > 2, Euclidean Yang-Mills theories quantized in the maximal Abelian gauge. A few properties of the Gribov region in this gauge are established. Similar to the case of SU(2), the Gribov region turns out to be convex, bounded along the off-diagonal directions in field space, and unbounded along the diagonal ones. The implementation of the restriction to the Gribov region in the functional integral is discussed through the introduction of the horizon function, whose construction will be outlined in detail. The influence of this restriction on the behavior of the gluon and ghost propagators of the theory is also investigated together with a set of dimension 2 condensates.

  16. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  17. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  18. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  19. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    OpenAIRE

    Preetish Ranjan; Prabhat Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequen...

  20. Effect of cellular mobility on immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. B.; Mannion, R.; Ruskin, H. J.

    2000-08-01

    Mobility of cell types in our HIV immune response model is subject to an intrinsic mobility and an explicit directed mobility, which is governed by Pmob. We investigate how restricting the explicit mobility, while maintaining the innate mobility of a viral-infected cell, affects the model's results. We find that increasing the explicit mobility of the immune system cells leads to viral dominance for certain levels of viral mutation. We conclude that increasing immune system cellular mobility indirectly increases the virus’ inherent mobility.