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Sample records for cellular interaction model

  1. A coarse-grained model for the simulations of biomolecular interactions in cellular environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao, E-mail: yinghao.wu@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Systems and Computational Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    The interactions of bio-molecules constitute the key steps of cellular functions. However, in vivo binding properties differ significantly from their in vitro measurements due to the heterogeneity of cellular environments. Here we introduce a coarse-grained model based on rigid-body representation to study how factors such as cellular crowding and membrane confinement affect molecular binding. The macroscopic parameters such as the equilibrium constant and the kinetic rate constant are calibrated by adjusting the microscopic coefficients used in the numerical simulations. By changing these model parameters that are experimentally approachable, we are able to study the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of molecular binding, as well as the effects caused by specific cellular environments. We investigate the volumetric effects of crowded intracellular space on bio-molecular diffusion and diffusion-limited reactions. Furthermore, the binding constants of membrane proteins are currently difficult to measure. We provide quantitative estimations about how the binding of membrane proteins deviates from soluble proteins under different degrees of membrane confinements. The simulation results provide biological insights to the functions of membrane receptors on cell surfaces. Overall, our studies establish a connection between the details of molecular interactions and the heterogeneity of cellular environments.

  2. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, O.; Sumanovski, L. T.; I. Checiu; Elisabeta Popescu; G. N. Misevic

    1999-01-01

    Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals) have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of...

  3. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases.

  4. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Popescu

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of isolated and purified glyconectins revealed the presence of specific carbohydrate structures, acidic glycans, different from classical glycosaminoglycans. Such acidic glycans of high molecular weight containing fucose, glucuronic or galacturonic acids, and sulfate groups, originally found in sponges and sea urchin embryos, may represent a new class of carbohydrate carcino-embryonal antigens in mice and humans. Such interactions between biological macromolecules are usually investigated by kinetic binding studies, calorimetric methods, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and other spectroscopic analyses. However, these methods do not supply a direct estimation of the intermolecular binding forces that are fundamental for the function of the ligand-receptor association. Recently, we have introduced atomic force microscopy to quantify the binding strength between cell adhesion proteoglycans. Measurement of binding forces intrinsic to cell adhesion proteoglycans is necessary to assess their contribution to the maintenance of the anatomical integrity of multicellular organisms. As a model, we selected the glyconectin 1, a cell adhesion proteoglycan isolated from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera. This glyconectin mediates in vivo cell recognition and aggregation via homophilic, species-specific, polyvalent, and calcium ion-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. Under physiological conditions, an adhesive force of up to 400 piconewtons

  5. Cellular systems biology profiling applied to cellular models of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Kenneth A; Premkumar, Daniel R; Strock, Christopher J; Johnston, Patricia; Taylor, Lansing

    2009-11-01

    Building cellular models of disease based on the approach of Cellular Systems Biology (CSB) has the potential to improve the process of creating drugs as part of the continuum from early drug discovery through drug development and clinical trials and diagnostics. This paper focuses on the application of CSB to early drug discovery. We discuss the integration of protein-protein interaction biosensors with other multiplexed, functional biomarkers as an example in using CSB to optimize the identification of quality lead series compounds.

  6. Investigation of cellular and protein interactions with model self-assembled monolayer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegoulia, Vassiliki Apostolou

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates on gold have been used to investigate the effect of substrate surface properties on bacterial and blood cell adhesion in the presence and absence of blood proteins. Protein adsorption and binding strength on SAMs as well as complement activation by these model surfaces were also studied. It is hoped that information gained, regarding factors that influence biological processes, will lead to strategies for designing materials and surfaces that specifically inhibit cell adhesion and protein adsorption. Single component SAMs of the general formula HS(CH2) 10X, where X = CH3, CH2OH. COOH and CH2(OCH 2CH2)3OH, and two component mixed SAMs created from binary solutions of HS(CH2), OCH3 and HS(CH 2)10CH2OH, were used. Adhesion was investigated under well-defined flow conditions. Adhesion was found to be higher for the hydrophobic methyl and minimal for the tri(ethyleneoxide) terminated SAM. Preincubation of the SAMs with fibrinogen led to an increase in cell adhesion for bacteria and a decrease for leukocyte adhesion. The effect of surface chemistry on protein adsorption was studied for three blood proteins, fibrinogen, fibronectin and albumin. Adsorption was found to be higher on the hydrophobic CH3 surface and lower but comparable for the other surfaces while proteins adsorbed strongly on all surfaces. SAMs were also used to evaluate complement activation by foreign surfaces. The hydroxyl rich SAMs were found to activate complement more significantly than the anionic carboxyl and the hydrophobic methyl terminated SAMs. A surface modification was introduced to incorporate a zwitterionic phosphorylcholine (PC) group on a hydroxyl monolayer in an effort to create a biomimetic surface that could minimize cell adhesion and protein adsorption. The good antifouling properties of the phosphorylcholine modified surface led to the synthesis of a novel phosphorylcholine functionalized thiol. Single component and two component

  7. Modelling cellular behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  8. Cellular encoding for interactive evolutionary robotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruau, F.C.; Quatramaran, K.

    1996-01-01

    This work reports experiments in interactive evolutionary robotics. The goal is to evolve an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to control the locomotion of an 8-legged robot. The ANNs are encoded using a cellular developmental process called cellular encoding. In a previous work similar experiments ha

  9. Towards a continuum theory of movement in interacting cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Timothy

    2003-10-01

    Interacting cellular systems form the basis of all higher organisms, and are fundamental to the understanding of embryogenesis, organ function, and neoplasms. I will describe a stochastic model of cell interactions which can be applied to these problems, and present some of our recent results on chemotactic response.

  10. A cellular automaton simulation model for pedestrian and vehicle interaction behaviors at unsignalized mid-block crosswalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lili; Ren, Gang; Wang, Wei; Chan, Ching-Yao; Wang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    At unsignalized crosswalks, interactions between pedestrians and vehicles often lead to traffic safety hazards due to absence of traffic control and unclear right-of-ways. To address this safety problem, there is a need to understand the interaction behaviors of pedestrians and vehicles that are complicated by a variety of traffic and roadway attributes. The prime objective of this study is to establish a reliable simulation model to represent the vehicle yielding and pedestrian crossing behaviors at unsignalized crosswalks in a realistic way. The model is calibrated with detailed behavioral data collected and extracted from field observations. The capability of the calibrated model in predicting the pedestrian-interaction events as well as estimating the driver yielding rate and pedestrian delay are also tested and demonstrated. Meanwhile, the traffic dynamics in the vicinity of the crosswalk can be meaningfully represented with simulation results based on the model. Moreover, with the definitions of the vehicle-pedestrian conflicts, the proposed model is capable to evaluate the pedestrian safety. Thereby, the simulation model has the potential to serve as a useful tool for assessing safety performance and traffic operations at existing facilities. Furthermore, the model can enable the evaluation of policy effectiveness and the selection of engineering treatments at unsignalized crosswalks to improve safety and efficiency of pedestrian crossing.

  11. Systematic Cellular Disease Models Reveal Synergistic Interaction of Trisomy 21 and GATA1 Mutations in Hematopoietic Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Kimihiko; Omori, Sayaka; Hirata, Katsuya; Nawa, Nobutoshi; Nakagawa, Natsuki; Nishimura, Ken; Ohtaka, Manami; Nakanishi, Mahito; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Toki, Tsutomu; Ito, Etsuro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Taniguchi, Hidetoshi; Arahori, Hitomi; Wada, Kazuko; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-05-10

    Chromosomal aneuploidy and specific gene mutations are recognized early hallmarks of many oncogenic processes. However, the net effect of these abnormalities has generally not been explored. We focused on transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD) in Down syndrome, which is characteristically associated with somatic mutations in GATA1. To better understand functional interplay between trisomy 21 and GATA1 mutations in hematopoiesis, we constructed cellular disease models using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and genome-editing technologies. Comparative analysis of these engineered iPSCs demonstrated that trisomy 21 perturbed hematopoietic development through the enhanced production of early hematopoietic progenitors and the upregulation of mutated GATA1, resulting in the accelerated production of aberrantly differentiated cells. These effects were mediated by dosage alterations of RUNX1, ETS2, and ERG, which are located in a critical 4-Mb region of chromosome 21. Our study provides insight into the genetic synergy that contributes to multi-step leukemogenesis. PMID:27134169

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  13. Dissecting stromal-epithelial interactions in a 3D in vitro cellularized intestinal model for permeability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla; Araújo, Francisca; Barrias, Cristina C; Granja, Pedro L; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    Absorption evaluation plays an increasingly important role at the early stage of drug discovery due to its potential to scan the ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) properties of new drug candidates. Therefore, a new three-dimensional (3D) in vitro model replicating the intestinal functioning is herein proposed aiming to dissect the stromal-epithelial interactions and evaluate the permeation of a model drug, insulin. Inspired on the intestinal mucosal architecture, the present model comprises intestinal myofibroblasts (CCD18-Co cells) embedded in Matrigel, onto which epithelial enterocytes (Caco-2 cells) and mucus-producing cells (HT29-MTX cells) were seeded. CCD18-Co myofibroblasts showed to have a central role in the remodeling of the surrounding matrix confirmed by the production of fibronectin. Subsequently, this matrix revealed to be essential to the maintenance of the model architecture by supporting the overlying epithelial cells. In terms of functionality, this model allowed the efficient prediction of insulin permeability in which the presence of mucus, the less tight character between Caco-2 and HT29-MTX epithelial cells and the 3D assembly were critical factors. Concluding, this model constitutes a robust tool in the drug development field with potential to bridge the traditional 2D cell culture models and in vivo animal models. PMID:25934277

  14. Cellular modelling using P systems and process algebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco J.Romero-Campero; Marian Gheorghe; Gabriel Ciobanu; John M. Auld; Mario J. Pérez-Jiménez

    2007-01-01

    In this paper various molecular chemical interactions are modelled under different computational paradigms. P systems and π-calculus are used to describe intra-cellular reactions like protein-protein interactions and gene regulation control.

  15. Cellular automata a parallel model

    CERN Document Server

    Mazoyer, J

    1999-01-01

    Cellular automata can be viewed both as computational models and modelling systems of real processes. This volume emphasises the first aspect. In articles written by leading researchers, sophisticated massive parallel algorithms (firing squad, life, Fischer's primes recognition) are treated. Their computational power and the specific complexity classes they determine are surveyed, while some recent results in relation to chaos from a new dynamic systems point of view are also presented. Audience: This book will be of interest to specialists of theoretical computer science and the parallelism challenge.

  16. Cellular automata modelling of SEIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Quan-Xing; Jin Zhen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the SEIRS epidemic spread is analysed, and a two-dimensional probability cellular automata model for SEIRS is presented. Each cellular automation cell represents a part of the population that may be found in one of five states of individuals: susceptible, exposed (or latency), infected, immunized (or recovered) and death. Here studied are the effects of two cases on the epidemic spread. i.e. the effects of non-segregation and segregation on the latency and the infected of population. The conclusion is reached that the epidemic will persist in the case of non-segregation but it will decrease in the case of segregation. The proposed model can serve as a basis for the development of algorithms to simulate real epidemics based on real data. Last we find the density series of the exposed and the infected will fluctuate near a positive equilibrium point, when the constant for the immunized is less than its corresponding constant τ0. Our theoretical results are verified by numerical simulations.

  17. Nematic order by elastic interactions and cellular rigidity sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, B. M.; Safran, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    We predict spontaneous nematic order in an ensemble of active force generators with elastic interactions as a minimal model for early nematic alignment of short stress fibers in non-motile, adhered cells. Mean-field theory is formally equivalent to Maier-Saupe theory for a nematic liquid. However, the elastic interactions are long-ranged (and thus depend on cell shape and matrix elasticity) and originate in cell activity. Depending on the density of force generators, we find two regimes of cellular rigidity sensing for which orientational, nematic order of stress fibers depends on matrix rigidity either in a step-like manner or with a maximum at an optimal rigidity.

  18. Cellular studies and interaction mechanisms of extremely low frequency fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburdy, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide interest in the biological effects of ELF (extremely low frequency, electromagnetic fields has grown significantly. Health professionals and government administrators and regulators, scientists and engineers, and, importantly, an increasing number of individuals in the general public are interested in this health issue. The goal of research at the cellular level is to identify cellular responses to ELF fields, to develop a dose threshold for such interactions, and with such information to formulate and test appropriate interaction mechanisms. This review is selective and will discuss the most recent cellular studies directed at these goals which relate to power line, sinusoidal ELF fields. In these studies an interaction site at the cell membrane is by consensus a likely candidate, since changes in ion transport, ligand-receptor events such as antibody binding, and G protein activation have been reported. These changes strongly indicate that signal transduction (ST) can be influenced. Also, ELF fields are reported to influence enzyme activation, gene expression, protein synthesis, and cell proliferation, which are triggered by earlier ST events at the cell membrane. The concept of ELF fields altering early cell membrane events and thereby influencing intracellular cell function via the ST cascade is perhaps the most plausible biological framework currently being investigated for understanding ELF effects on cells. For example, the consequence of an increase due to ELF fields in mitogenesis, the final endpoint of the ST cascade, is an overall increase in the probability of mutagenesis and consequently cancer, according to the Ames epigenetic model of carcinogenesis. Consistent with this epigenetic mechanism and the ST pathway to carcinogenesis is recent evidence that ELF fields can alter breast cancer cell proliferation and can act as a copromoter in vitro. The most important dosimetric question being addressed currently is whether the electric (E) or the

  19. Cellular Automata Models for Diffusion of Innovations

    CERN Document Server

    Fuks, H; Fuks, Henryk; Boccara, Nino

    1997-01-01

    We propose a probabilistic cellular automata model for the spread of innovations, rumors, news, etc. in a social system. The local rule used in the model is outertotalistic, and the range of interaction can vary. When the range R of the rule increases, the takeover time for innovation increases and converges toward its mean-field value, which is almost inversely proportional to R when R is large. Exact solutions for R=1 and $R=\\infty$ (mean-field) are presented, as well as simulation results for other values of R. The average local density is found to converge to a certain stationary value, which allows us to obtain a semi-phenomenological solution valid in the vicinity of the fixed point n=1 (for large t).

  20. Modeling In Vitro Cellular Responses to Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwaipayan Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanoparticles (NPs have been widely demonstrated to induce toxic effects to various cell types. In vitro cell exposure systems have high potential for reliable, high throughput screening of nanoparticle toxicity, allowing focusing on particular pathways while excluding unwanted effects due to other cells or tissue dosimetry. The work presented here involves a detailed biologically based computational model of cellular interactions with NPs; it utilizes measurements performed in human cell culture systems in vitro, to develop a mechanistic mathematical model that can support analysis and prediction of in vivo effects of NPs. The model considers basic cellular mechanisms including proliferation, apoptosis, and production of cytokines in response to NPs. This new model is implemented for macrophages and parameterized using in vitro measurements of changes in cellular viability and mRNA levels of cytokines: TNF, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. The model includes in vitro cellular dosimetry due to nanoparticle transport and transformation. Furthermore, the model developed here optimizes the essential cellular parameters based on in vitro measurements, and provides a “stepping stone” for the development of more advanced in vivo models that will incorporate additional cellular and NP interactions.

  1. Modeling cellular effects of coal pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this project is to develop and test models for the dose and dose-rate dependence of biological effects of coal pollutants on mammalian cells in tissue culture. Particular attention is given to the interaction of pollutants with the genetic material (deoxyribonucleic acid, or NDA) in the cell. Unlike radiation, which can interact directly with chromatin, chemical pollutants undergo numerous changes before the ultimate carcinogen becomes covalently bound to the DNA. Synthetic vesicles formed from a phospholipid bilayer are being used to investigate chemical transformations that may occur during the transport of pollutants across cellular membranes. The initial damage to DNA is rapidly modified by enzymatic repair systems in most living organisms. A model has been developed for predicting the effects of excision repair on the survival of human cells exposed to chemical carcinogens. In addition to the excision system, normal human cells also have tolerance mechanisms that permit continued growth and division of cells without removal of the damage. We are investigating the biological effect of damage passed to daughter cells by these tolerance mechanisms

  2. Minimal model for complex dynamics in cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suguna, C; Chowdhury, K K; Sinha, S

    1999-11-01

    Cellular functions are controlled and coordinated by the complex circuitry of biochemical pathways regulated by genetic and metabolic feedback processes. This paper aims to show, with the help of a minimal model of a regulated biochemical pathway, that the common nonlinearities and control structures present in biomolecular interactions are capable of eliciting a variety of functional dynamics, such as homeostasis, periodic, complex, and chaotic oscillations, including transients, that are observed in various cellular processes.

  3. Understanding cisplatin resistance using cellular models.

    OpenAIRE

    STORDAL, BRITTA KRISTINA

    2007-01-01

    PUBLISHED Many mechanisms of cisplatin resistance have been proposed from studies of cellular models of resistance including changes in cellular drug accumulation, detoxification of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis and repair of the DNA adducts. A series of resistant models were developed from CCRF-CEM leukaemia cells with increasing doses of cisplatin from 100 ng/ml. This produced increasing resistance up to 7-fold with a treatment dose of 1.6 ?g/ml. Cisplatin resistance i...

  4. Understanding cisplatin resistance using cellular models

    OpenAIRE

    Stordal, Britta; Davey, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Many mechanisms of cisplatin resistance have been proposed from studies of cellular models of resistance including changes in cellular drug accumulation, detoxification of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis and repair of the DNA adducts. A series of resistant models were developed from CCRF-CEM leukaemia cells with increasing doses of cisplatin from 100 ng/ml. This produced increasing resistance up to 7-fold with a treatment dose of 1.6 microg/ml. Cisplatin resistance in these cells correlated...

  5. Modeling diffusion of innovations with probabilistic cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Boccara, N; Boccara, Nino; Fuks, Henryk

    1997-01-01

    We present a family of one-dimensional cellular automata modeling the diffusion of an innovation in a population. Starting from simple deterministic rules, we construct models parameterized by the interaction range and exhibiting a second-order phase transition. We show that the number of individuals who eventually keep adopting the innovation strongly depends on connectivity between individuals.

  6. A cellular automata evacuation model considering friction and repulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Weiguo; YU Yanfei; FAN Weicheng; Zhang Heping

    2005-01-01

    There exist interactions among pedestrians and between pedestrian and environment in evacuation. These interactions include attraction, repulsion and friction that play key roles in human evacuation behaviors, speed and efficiency. Most former evacuation models focus on the attraction force, while repulsion and friction are not well modeled. As a kind of multi-particle self-driven model, the social force model introduced in recent years can represent those three forces but with low simulation efficiency because it is a continuous model with complex rules. Discrete models such as the cellular automata model and the lattice gas model have simple rules and high simulation efficiency, but are not quite suitable for interactions' simulation. In this paper, a new cellular automata model based on traditional models is introduced in which repulsion and friction are modeled quantitatively. It is indicated that the model can simulate some basic behaviors, e.g.arching and the "faster-is-slower" phenomenon, in evacuation as multi-particle self-driven models, but with high efficiency as the normal cellular automata model and the lattice gas model.

  7. A cellular automaton evacuation model based on mobile robot's behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG WenGuo; YUAN HongYong; FAN WeiCheng

    2007-01-01

    The research of evacuation in some emergencies, e.g. fire, is of great benefit to reducing the injuries of persons. In this paper, a cellular automaton evacuation model based on mobile robot's behaviors is presented. Each person is treated as an intelligent mobile robot, and motor schemas, including move-to-goal, avoid-obstacle, swirl-obstacle and nervous-motion, drive persons to interact with their environment. The motor schemas are combined with cellular automaton theory, and an evacuation model is built. Evacuation simulation of persons with different move velocities shows that the presented model can predict accurately the evacuation phenomena in some emergencies.

  8. Cellular Automaton Model for Immunology of Tumor Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Voitikova, M

    1998-01-01

    The stochastic discrete space-time model of an immune response on tumor spreading in a two-dimensional square lattice has been developed. The immunity-tumor interactions are described at the cellular level and then transferred into the setting of cellular automata (CA). The multistate CA model for system, in which all statesoflattice sites, composing of both immune and tumor cells populations, are the functions of the states of the 12 nearest neighbors. The CA model incorporates the essential featuresof the immunity-tumor system. Three regimes of neoplastic evolution including metastatic tumor growth and screen effect by inactive immune cells surrounding a tumor have been predicted.

  9. Animal and cellular models of human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Arends, Mark; White, Eric; Whitelaw, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this eighteenth (2016) Annual Review Issue of The Journal of Pathology, we present a collection of 19 invited review articles that cover different aspects of cellular and animal models of disease. These include genetically-engineered models, chemically-induced models, naturally-occurring models, and combinations thereof, with the focus on recent methodological and conceptual developments across a wide range of human diseases.

  10. A Modified Sensitive Driving Cellular Automaton Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Hong-Xia; DAI Shi-Qiang; DONG Li-Yun; LEI Li

    2005-01-01

    A modified cellular automaton model for traffic flow on highway is proposed with a novel concept about the variable security gap. The concept is first introduced into the original Nagel-Schreckenberg model, which is called the non-sensitive driving cellular automaton model. And then it is incorporated with a sensitive driving NaSch model,in which the randomization brake is arranged before the deterministic deceleration. A parameter related to the variable security gap is determined through simulation. Comparison of the simulation results indicates that the variable security gap has different influence on the two models. The fundamental diagram obtained by simulation with the modified sensitive driving NaSch model shows that the maximumflow are in good agreement with the observed data, indicating that the presented model is more reasonable and realistic.

  11. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  12. Identification of a novel Rev-interacting cellular protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cell types respond differently to infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Defining specific interactions between host cells and viral proteins is essential in understanding how viruses exploit cellular functions and the innate strategies underlying cellular control of HIV replication. The HIV Rev protein is a post-transcriptional inducer of HIV gene expression and an important target for interaction with cellular proteins. Identification of Rev-modulating cellular factors may eventually contribute to the design of novel antiviral therapies. Results Yeast-two hybrid screening of a T-cell cDNA library with Rev as bait led to isolation of a novel human cDNA product (16.4.1. 16.4.1-containing fusion proteins showed predominant cytoplasmic localization, which was dependent on CRM1-mediated export from the nucleus. Nuclear export activity of 16.4.1 was mapped to a 60 amino acid region and a novel transport signal identified. Interaction of 16.4.1 with Rev in human cells was shown in a mammalian two-hybrid assay and by colocalization of Rev and 16.4.1 in nucleoli, indicating that Rev can recruit 16.4.1 to the nucleus/nucleoli. Rev-dependent reporter expression was inhibited by overexpressing 16.4.1 and stimulated by siRNAs targeted to 16.4.1 sequences, demonstrating that 16.4.1 expression influences the transactivation function of Rev. Conclusion These results suggest that 16.4.1 may act as a modulator of Rev activity. The experimental strategies outlined in this study are applicable to the identification and biological characterization of further novel Rev-interacting cellular factors.

  13. Imaging protein interactions in vivo with sub-cellular resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Raicu, Valerica; Fung, Russell; Melnichuk, Mike; Jansma, David B; Pisterzi, Luca; Fox, Michael; Wells, James W; Saldin, Dilano K

    2008-01-01

    Resonant Energy Transfer (RET) from an optically excited donor molecule (D) to a non-excited acceptor molecule (A) residing nearby is widely used to detect molecular interactions in living cells. Stoichiometric information, such as the number of proteins forming a complex, has been obtained so far for a handful of proteins, but only after exposing the sample sequentially to at least two different excitation wavelengths. During this lengthy process of measurement, the molecular makeup of a cellular region may change, and this has so far limited the applicability of RET to determination of cellular averages. Here we demonstrate a method for imaging protein complex distribution in living cells with sub-cellular spatial resolution, which relies on a spectrally-resolved two-photon microscope, a simple but competent theory, and a keen selection of fluorescent tags. This technology may eventually lead to tracking dynamics of macromolecular complex formation and dissociation with spatial resolution inside living cell...

  14. Cellular automata modeling of pedestrian's crossing dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晋; 王慧; 李平

    2004-01-01

    Cellular automata modeling techniques and the characteristics of mixed traffic flow were used to derive the 2-dimensional model presented here for simulation of pedestrian's crossing dynamics.A conception of "stop point" is introduced to deal with traffic obstacles and resolve conflicts among pedestrians or between pedestrians and the other vehicles on the crosswalk.The model can be easily extended,is very efficient for simulation of pedestrian's crossing dynamics,can be integrated into traffic simulation software,and has been proved feasible by simulation experiments.

  15. A Mathematical Model for Cisplatin Cellular Pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardith W. El-Kareh

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple theoretical model for the cellular pharmacodynamics of cisplatin is presented. The model, which takes into account the kinetics of cisplatin uptake by cells and the intracellular binding of the drug, can be used to predict the dependence of survival (relative to controls on the time course of extracellular exposure. Cellular pharmacokinetic parameters are derived from uptake data for human ovarian and head and neck cancer cell lines. Survival relative to controls is assumed to depend on the peak concentration of DNA-bound intracellular platinum. Model predictions agree well with published data on cisplatin cytotoxicity for three different cancer cell lines, over a wide range of exposure times. In comparison with previously published mathematical models for anticancer drug pharmacodynamics, the present model provides a better fit to experimental data sets including long exposure times (∼100 hours. The model provides a possible explanation for the fact that cell kill correlates well with area under the extracellular concentration-time curve in some data sets, but not in others. The model may be useful for optimizing delivery schedules and for the dosing of cisplatin for cancer therapy.

  16. Cellular mechanisms underlying the interaction between cannabinoid and opioid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolaro, D; Rubino, T; Viganò, D; Massi, P; Guidali, C; Realini, N

    2010-04-01

    Recently, the presence of functional interaction between the opioid and cannabinoid system has been shown in various pharmacological responses. Although there is an increasing interest for the feasible therapeutic application of a co-administration of cannabinoids and opioids in some disorders (i.e. to manage pain, to modulate immune system and emotions) and the combined use of the two drugs by drug abusers is becoming largely diffuse, only few papers focused on cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this interaction. This review updates the biochemical and molecular underpinnings of opioid and cannabinoid interaction, both within the central nervous system and periphery. The most convincing theory for the explanation of this reciprocal interaction involves (i) the release of opioid peptides by cannabinoids or endocannabinoids by opioids, (ii) the existence of a direct receptor-receptor interaction when the receptors are co-expressed in the same cells, and (iii) the interaction of their intracellular pathways. Finally, the cannabinoid/opioid interaction might be different in the brain rewarding networks and in those accounting for other pharmacological effects (antinociception, modulation of emotionality and cognitive behavior), as well as between the central nervous system and periphery. Further insights about the cannabinoid/opioid interaction could pave the way for new and promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:20017730

  17. Cellular automata modelling of hantarvirus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Karim, Mohamad Faisal [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: faisal@usm.my; Md Ismail, Ahmad Izani [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: izani@cs.usm.my; Ching, Hoe Bee [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: Bee_Ching_Janice_Hoe@dell.com

    2009-09-15

    Hantaviruses are a group of viruses which have been identified as being responsible for the outbreak of diseases such as the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. In an effort to understand the characteristics and dynamics of hantavirus infection, mathematical models based on differential equations have been developed and widely studied. However, such models neglect the local characteristics of the spreading process and do not include variable susceptibility of individuals. In this paper, we develop an alternative approach based on cellular automata to analyze and study the spatiotemporal patterns of hantavirus infection.

  18. Cellular Automata Model for Elastic Solid Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yin-Feng; ZHANG Guang-Cai; XU Ai-Guo; GAN Yan-Biao

    2013-01-01

    The Cellular Automaton (CA) modeling and simulation of solid dynamics is a long-standing difficult problem.In this paper we present a new two-dimensional CA model for solid dynamics.In this model the solid body is represented by a set of white and black particles alternatively positioned in the x-and y-directions.The force acting on each particle is represented by the linear summation of relative displacements of the nearest-neighboring particles.The key technique in this new model is the construction of eight coefficient matrices.Theoretical and numerical analyses show that the present model can be mathematically described by a conservative system.So,it works for elastic material.In the continuum limit the CA model recovers the well-known Navier equation.The coefficient matrices are related to the shear module and Poisson ratio of the material body.Compared with previous CA model for solid body,this model realizes the natural coupling of deformations in the x-and y-directions.Consequently,the wave phenomena related to the Poisson ratio effects are successfully recovered.This work advances significantly the CA modeling and simulation in the field of computational solid dynamics.

  19. A cellular automata model for ant trails

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sibel Gokce; Ozhan Kayacan

    2013-05-01

    In this study, the unidirectional ant traffic flow with U-turn in an ant trail was investigated using one-dimensional cellular automata model. It is known that ants communicate with each other by dropping a chemical, called pheromone, on the substrate. Apart from the studies in the literature, it was considered in the model that (i) ant colony consists of two kinds of ants, goodand poor-smelling ants, (ii) ants might make U-turn for some special reasons. For some values of densities of good- and poor-smelling ants, the flux and mean velocity of the colony were studied as a function of density and evaporation rate of pheromone.

  20. Modeling the topological organization of cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavitto, Jean-Louis; Michel, Olivier

    2003-07-01

    The cell as a dynamical system presents the characteristics of having a dynamical structure. That is, the exact phase space of the system cannot be fixed before the evolution and integrative cell models must state the evolution of the structure jointly with the evolution of the cell state. This kind of dynamical systems is very challenging to model and simulate. New programming concepts must be developed to ease their modeling and simulation. In this context, the goal of the MGS project is to develop an experimental programming language dedicated to the simulation of this kind of systems. MGS proposes a unified view on several computational mechanisms (CHAM, Lindenmayer systems, Paun systems, cellular automata) enabling the specification of spatially localized computations on heterogeneous entities. The evolution of a dynamical structure is handled through the concept of transformation which relies on the topological organization of the system components. An example based on the modeling of spatially distributed biochemical networks is used to illustrate how these notions can be used to model the spatial and temporal organization of intracellular processes. PMID:12915272

  1. Cellular automata modelling of biomolecular networks dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonchev, D; Thomas, S; Apte, A; Kier, L B

    2010-01-01

    The modelling of biological systems dynamics is traditionally performed by ordinary differential equations (ODEs). When dealing with intracellular networks of genes, proteins and metabolites, however, this approach is hindered by network complexity and the lack of experimental kinetic parameters. This opened the field for other modelling techniques, such as cellular automata (CA) and agent-based modelling (ABM). This article reviews this emerging field of studies on network dynamics in molecular biology. The basics of the CA technique are discussed along with an extensive list of related software and websites. The application of CA to networks of biochemical reactions is exemplified in detail by the case studies of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, the FAS-ligand (FASL)-induced and Bcl-2-related apoptosis. The potential of the CA method to model basic pathways patterns, to identify ways to control pathway dynamics and to help in generating strategies to fight with cancer is demonstrated. The different line of CA applications presented includes the search for the best-performing network motifs, an analysis of importance for effective intracellular signalling and pathway cross-talk. PMID:20373215

  2. Cellular automata modeling of cooperative eutectic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Olejnik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The model and results of the 2D simulation of the cooperative growth of two phases in the lamellar eutectic are presented. The pro-posed model takes into account heat transfer, components diffusion and nonstationary concentration distribution in the liquid and solid phases, non-equlibrium nature of the phase transformation and kinetics of the growth, influence of the surface energy and interface curva-ture on the conditions of the thermodynamic equilibrium. For the determination of the phase interface shape the Cellular Automata tech-nique (CA was used. For the calculation of temperature and concentration distribution the numerical solution of the Fourier equation was used. The partial differential equations were solved by Finite Differences Method (FDM. The spatial position and cell sizes of CA lattice and FDM mesh are equal.Proposed model can predict the steady state growth with a constant interlamellar spacing in the regular plate eutectic, as well as some transient processes that bring to the changes of that parameters. Obtained simulation data show the solid-liquid interface changes result in the termination of lamella and enlargement of interlamellar spacing. Another simulation results illustrate a pocket formation in the center of one phase that forestalls nucleation (or intergrowth of the new lamellae of another phase. The data of the solidification study of the transparent material (CBr4 – 8,4% C2Cl6 obtained in the thin layer demonstrate the qualita-tive agreement of the simulation.

  3. A Quantum Cellular Automata architecture with nearest neighbor interactions using one quantum gate type

    CERN Document Server

    Ntalaperas, D

    2016-01-01

    We propose an architecture based on Quantum cellular Automata which allows the use of only one type of quantum gates per computational step in order to perform nearest neighbor interactions. The model is built in partial steps, each one of them analyzed using nearest neighbor interactions, starting with single qubit operations and continuing with two qubit ones. The effectiveness of the model is tested and valuated by developing a quantum circuit implementing the Quantum Fourier Transform. The important outcome of this validation was that the operations are performed in a local and controlled manner thus reducing the error rate of each computational step.

  4. Analytical Modeling of Uplink Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Novlan, Thomas D; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2012-01-01

    Cellular uplink analysis has typically been undertaken by either a simple approach that lumps all interference into a single deterministic or random parameter in a Wyner-type model, or via complex system level simulations that often do not provide insight into why various trends are observed. This paper proposes a novel middle way that is both accurate and also results in easy-to-evaluate integral expressions based on the Laplace transform of the interference. We assume mobiles and base stations are randomly placed in the network with each mobile pairing up to its closest base station. The model requires two important changes compared to related recent work on the downlink. First, dependence is introduced between the user and base station point processes to make sure each base station serves a single mobile in the given resource block. Second, per-mobile power control is included, which further couples the locations of the mobiles and their receiving base stations. Nevertheless, we succeed in deriving the cov...

  5. Motor Schema-Based Cellular Automaton Model for Pedestrian Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wenguo; Hasemi, Yuji; Fan, Weicheng

    A new cellular automaton model for pedestrian dynamics based on motor schema is presented. Each pedestrian is treated as an intelligent mobile robot, and motor schemas including move-to-goal, avoid-away and avoid-around drive pedestrians to interact with their environment. We investigate the phenomenon of many pedestrians with different move velocities escaping from a room. The results show that the pedestrian with high velocity have predominance in competitive evacuation, if we only consider repulsion from or avoiding around other pedestrians, and interaction with each other leads to disordered evacuation, i.e., decreased evacuation efficiency. Extensions of the model using learning algorithms for controlling pedestrians, i.e., reinforcement learning, neural network and genetic algorithms, etc. are noted.

  6. Integrated cellular network of transcription regulations and protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bor-Sen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the accumulation of increasing omics data, a key goal of systems biology is to construct networks at different cellular levels to investigate cellular machinery of the cell. However, there is currently no satisfactory method to construct an integrated cellular network that combines the gene regulatory network and the signaling regulatory pathway. Results In this study, we integrated different kinds of omics data and developed a systematic method to construct the integrated cellular network based on coupling dynamic models and statistical assessments. The proposed method was applied to S. cerevisiae stress responses, elucidating the stress response mechanism of the yeast. From the resulting integrated cellular network under hyperosmotic stress, the highly connected hubs which are functionally relevant to the stress response were identified. Beyond hyperosmotic stress, the integrated network under heat shock and oxidative stress were also constructed and the crosstalks of these networks were analyzed, specifying the significance of some transcription factors to serve as the decision-making devices at the center of the bow-tie structure and the crucial role for rapid adaptation scheme to respond to stress. In addition, the predictive power of the proposed method was also demonstrated. Conclusions We successfully construct the integrated cellular network which is validated by literature evidences. The integration of transcription regulations and protein-protein interactions gives more insight into the actual biological network and is more predictive than those without integration. The method is shown to be powerful and flexible and can be used under different conditions and for different species. The coupling dynamic models of the whole integrated cellular network are very useful for theoretical analyses and for further experiments in the fields of network biology and synthetic biology.

  7. Thymocyte migration: an affair of multiple cellular interactions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino W.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration is a crucial event in the general process of thymocyte differentiation. The cellular interactions involved in the control of this migration are beginning to be defined. At least chemokines and extracellular matrix proteins appear to be part of the game. Cells of the thymic microenvironment produce these two groups of molecules, whereas developing thymocytes express the corresponding receptors. Moreover, although chemokines and extracellular matrix can drive thymocyte migration per se, a combined role for these molecules appears to contribute to the resulting migration patterns of thymocytes in their various stages of differentiation. The dynamics of chemokine and extracellular matrix production and degradation is not yet well understood. However, matrix metalloproteinases are likely to play a role in the breakdown of intrathymic extracellular matrix contents. Thus, the physiological migration of thymocytes should be envisioned as a resulting vector of multiple, simultaneous and/or sequential stimuli involving chemokines, adhesive and de-adhesive extracellular matrix proteins, as well as matrix metalloproteinases. Accordingly, it is conceivable that any pathological change in any of these loops may result in the alteration of normal thymocyte migration. This seems to be the case in murine infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. A better knowledge of the physiological mechanisms governing thymocyte migration will provide new clues for designing therapeutic strategies targeting developing T cells.

  8. Nanoparticle-cell interactions: molecular structure of the protein corona and cellular outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Candace C; Payne, Christine K

    2014-08-19

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biology and medicine requires a molecular-level understanding of how NPs interact with cells in a physiological environment. A critical difference between well-controlled in vitro experiments and in vivo applications is the presence of a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. It has been established that extracellular serum proteins present in blood will adsorb onto the surface of NPs, forming a "protein corona". Our goal was to understand how this protein layer affected cellular-level events, including NP binding, internalization, and transport. A combination of microscopy, which provides spatial resolution, and spectroscopy, which provides molecular information, is necessary to probe protein-NP-cell interactions. Initial experiments used a model system composed of polystyrene NPs functionalized with either amine or carboxylate groups to provide a cationic or anionic surface, respectively. Serum proteins adsorb onto the surface of both cationic and anionic NPs, forming a net anionic protein-NP complex. Although these protein-NP complexes have similar diameters and effective surface charges, they show the exact opposite behavior in terms of cellular binding. In the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), the cellular binding of BSA-NP complexes formed from cationic NPs is enhanced, whereas the cellular binding of BSA-NP complexes formed from anionic NPs is inhibited. These trends are independent of NP diameter or cell type. Similar results were obtained for anionic quantum dots and colloidal gold nanospheres. Using competition assays, we determined that BSA-NP complexes formed from anionic NPs bind to albumin receptors on the cell surface. BSA-NP complexes formed from cationic NPs are redirected to scavenger receptors. The observation that similar NPs with identical protein corona compositions bind to different cellular receptors suggested that a difference in the structure of the adsorbed protein may be responsible for the

  9. Global Network Model based on Earth Grid and Cellular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqi Lu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We aim to understand the current health state of the Earth and find how human activities influence it. Based on the theory of Earth’s Grid and Cellular Automata, we define and test a global network model, analyze the mutual interactions and feedbacks of ecosystem, hydrologic circle and atmosphere. In addition, we consult a lot of data to find a benchmark for the “Earth Health Map”, with the ecosystem distribution on it, which can be helpful for making a strategic decision for policy makers and prediction. Our model can be extended to other similar fields. In the end, we discuss the sensitivity of parameters selection, and the superiorities and weaknesses of our model.

  10. Interaction of peptidomimetics with bilayer membranes: biophysical characterization and cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaona; Kasimova, Marina R; Simonsen, Anders H; Jorgensen, Lene; Malmsten, Martin; Franzyk, Henrik; Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2012-03-20

    Enzymatically stable cell-penetrating α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics constitute promising drug delivery vehicles for the transport of therapeutic biomacromolecules across membrane barriers. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism of peptidomimetic-lipid bilayer interactions. A series of peptidomimetics consisting of alternating cationic and hydrophobic residues displaying variation in length and N-terminal end group were applied to fluid-phase, anionic lipid bilayers, and their interaction was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and ellipsometry. Titration of lipid vesicles into solutions of peptidomimetics resulted in exothermic adsorption processes, and the interaction of all studied peptidomimetics with anionic lipid membranes was found to be enthalpy-driven. The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy (ΔG) proved more favorable with increasing chain length. However, not all charges contribute equally to the interaction, as evidenced by the charge-normalized ΔG being inversely correlated to the sequence length. Ellipsometry data suggested that the hydrophobic residues also played an important role in the interaction process. Furthermore, ΔG extracted from ellipsometry data showed good agreement with that obtained with ITC. To further elucidate their interaction with biological membranes, quantitative uptake and cellular distribution were studied in proliferating HeLa cells by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The cellular uptake of carboxyfluorescein-labeled peptidomimetics showed a similar ranking as that obtained from the adsorbed amount, and binding energy to model membranes demonstrated that the initial interaction with the membrane is of key importance for the cellular uptake.

  11. Fluctuation in option pricing using cellular automata based market models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuying; Beni, Gerardo

    2005-05-01

    A new agent-based Cellular Automaton (CA) computational algorithm for option pricing is proposed. CAs have been extensively used in modeling complex dynamical systems but not in modeling option prices. Compared with traditional tools, which rely on guessing volatilities to calculate option prices, the CA model is directly addressing market mechanisms and simulates price fluctuation from aggregation of actions made by interacting individual market makers in a large population. This paper explores whether CA models can provide reasonable good answers to pricing European options. The Black-Scholes model and the Binomial Tree model are used for comparison. Comparison reveals that CA models perform reasonably well in pricing options, reproducing overall characteristics of random walk based model, while at the same time providing plausible results for the 'fat-tail' phenomenon observed in many markets. We also show that the binomial tree model can be obtained from a CA rule. Thus, CA models are suitable tools to generalize the standard theories of option pricing.

  12. Critical Behavior in a Cellular Automata Animal Disease Transmission Model

    CERN Document Server

    Morley, P D; Chang, Julius

    2003-01-01

    Using a cellular automata model, we simulate the British Government Policy (BGP) in the 2001 foot and mouth epidemic in Great Britain. When clinical symptoms of the disease appeared on a farm, there is mandatory slaughter (culling) of all livestock on an infected premise (IP). Those farms that neighbor an IP (contiguous premise, CP), are also culled, aka nearest neighbor interaction. Farms where the disease may be prevalent from animal, human, vehicle or airborne transmission (dangerous contact, DC), are additionally culled, aka next-to-nearest neighbor iteractions and lightning factor. The resulting mathematical model possesses a phase transition, whereupon if the physical disease transmission kernel exceeds a critical value, catastrophic loss of animals ensues. The non-local disease transport probability can be as low as .01% per day and the disease can still be in the high mortality phase. We show that the fundamental equation for sustainable disease transport is the criticality equation for neutron fissio...

  13. Cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Pallab; Giri, Jyotsnendu; Banerjee, Rinti; Bellare, Jayesh; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2007-04-01

    In vitro cytocompatibility and cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles were evaluated with two different cell lines (mouse fibroblast and human cervical carcinoma). Lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles were less cytocompatible than dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles and cellular uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles was more than that of dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles. Lesser cytocompatibility and higher uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles as compared to dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles may be due to different cellular interactions by coating material. Thus, coating plays an important role in modulation of biocompatibility and cellular interaction of magnetic nanoparticles.

  14. Cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Pallab [School of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400076 (India); Giri, Jyotsnendu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400076 (India); Banerjee, Rinti [School of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bellare, Jayesh [School of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bahadur, Dhirendra [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400076 (India)]. E-mail: dhirenb@iitb.ac.in

    2007-04-15

    In vitro cytocompatibility and cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles were evaluated with two different cell lines (mouse fibroblast and human cervical carcinoma). Lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles were less cytocompatible than dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles and cellular uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles was more than that of dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles. Lesser cytocompatibility and higher uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles as compared to dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles may be due to different cellular interactions by coating material. Thus, coating plays an important role in modulation of biocompatibility and cellular interaction of magnetic nanoparticles.

  15. A cellular automata-based mathematical model for thymocyte development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallan Souza-e-Silva

    Full Text Available Intrathymic T cell development is an important process necessary for the normal formation of cell-mediated immune responses. Importantly, such a process depends on interactions of developing thymocytes with cellular and extracellular elements of the thymic microenvironment. Additionally, it includes a series of oriented and tunely regulated migration events, ultimately allowing mature cells to cross endothelial barriers and leave the organ. Herein we built a cellular automata-based mathematical model for thymocyte migration and development. The rules comprised in this model take into account the main stages of thymocyte development, two-dimensional sections of the normal thymic microenvironmental network, as well as the chemokines involved in intrathymic cell migration. Parameters of our computer simulations with further adjusted to results derived from previous experimental data using sub-lethally irradiated mice, in which thymus recovery can be evaluated. The model fitted with the increasing numbers of each CD4/CD8-defined thymocyte subset. It was further validated since it fitted with the times of permanence experimentally ascertained in each CD4/CD8-defined differentiation stage. Importantly, correlations using the whole mean volume of young normal adult mice revealed that the numbers of cells generated in silico with the mathematical model fall within the range of total thymocyte numbers seen in these animals. Furthermore, simulations made with a human thymic epithelial network using the same mathematical model generated similar profiles for temporal evolution of thymocyte developmental stages. Lastly, we provided in silico evidence that the thymus architecture is important in the thymocyte development, since changes in the epithelial network result in different theoretical profiles for T cell development/migration. This model likely can be used to predict thymocyte evolution following therapeutic strategies designed for recovery of the

  16. Interactions between mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cellular glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liemburg-Apers, D.C.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Grefte, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and detoxification are tightly balanced. Shifting this balance enables ROS to activate intracellular signaling and/or induce cellular damage and cell death. Increased mitochondrial ROS production is observed in a number of pathological condit

  17. Critical Behavior in Cellular Automata Animal Disease Transmission Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, P. D.; Chang, Julius

    Using cellular automata model, we simulate the British Government Policy (BGP) in the 2001 foot and mouth epidemic in Great Britain. When clinical symptoms of the disease appeared in a farm, there is mandatory slaughter (culling) of all livestock in an infected premise (IP). Those farms in the neighboring of an IP (contiguous premise, CP), are also culled, aka nearest neighbor interaction. Farms where the disease may be prevalent from animal, human, vehicle or airborne transmission (dangerous contact, DC), are additionally culled, aka next-to-nearest neighbor interactions and lightning factor. The resulting mathematical model possesses a phase transition, whereupon if the physical disease transmission kernel exceeds a critical value, catastrophic loss of animals ensues. The nonlocal disease transport probability can be as low as 0.01% per day and the disease can still be in the high mortality phase. We show that the fundamental equation for sustainable disease transport is the criticality equation for neutron fission cascade. Finally, we calculate that the percentage of culled animals that are actually healthy is ≈30%.

  18. TRAFFIC FLOW MODEL BASED ON CELLULAR AUTOMATION WITH ADAPTIVE DECELERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Shinkarev, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes continuation of the authors’ work in the field of traffic flow mathematical models based on the cellular automata theory. The refactored representation of the multifactorial traffic flow model based on the cellular automata theory is used for a representation of an adaptive deceleration step implementation. The adaptive deceleration step in the case of a leader deceleration allows slowing down smoothly but not instantly. Concepts of the number of time steps without confli...

  19. Modeling dynamics of HIV infected cells using stochastic cellular automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precharattana, Monamorn; Triampo, Wannapong

    2014-08-01

    Ever since HIV was first diagnosed in human, a great number of scientific works have been undertaken to explore the biological mechanisms involved in the infection and progression of the disease. Several cellular automata (CA) models have been introduced to gain insights into the dynamics of the disease progression but none of them has taken into account effects of certain immune cells such as the dendritic cells (DCs) and the CD8+ T lymphocytes (CD8+ T cells). In this work, we present a CA model, which incorporates effects of the HIV specific immune response focusing on the cell-mediated immunities, and investigate the interaction between the host immune response and the HIV infected cells in the lymph nodes. The aim of our work is to propose a model more realistic than the one in Precharattana et al. (2010) [10], by incorporating roles of the DCs, the CD4+ T cells, and the CD8+ T cells into the model so that it would reproduce the HIV infection dynamics during the primary phase of HIV infection.

  20. Mapping of cellular iron using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eung Seok; Heo, Chaejeong; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Min

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive dopaminergic cell loss in the substantianigra (SN) and elevated iron levels demonstrated by autopsy and with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Direct visualization of iron with live imaging techniques has not yet been successful. The aim of this study is to visualize and quantify the distribution of cellular iron using an intrinsic iron hyperspectral fluorescence signal. The 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cellular model of PD was established in SHSY5Y cells. The cells were exposed to iron by treatment with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC, 100 μM) for up to 6 hours. The hyperspectral fluorescence imaging signal of iron was examined usinga high- resolution dark-field optical microscope system with signal absorption for the visible/ near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. The 6-hour group showed heavy cellular iron deposition compared with the small amount of iron accumulation in the 1-hour group. The cellular iron was dispersed in a small, particulate form, whereas extracellular iron was detected in an aggregated form. In addition, iron particles were found to be concentrated on the cell membrane/edge of shrunken cells. The cellular iron accumulation readily occurred in MPP+-induced cells, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating elevated iron levels in the SN in PD. This direct iron imaging methodology could be applied to analyze the physiological role of iron in PD, and its application might be expanded to various neurological disorders involving other metals, such as copper, manganese or zinc.

  1. Cellular mechanisms regulating sperm-zona pellucida interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew T Reid; Kate Redgrove; R John Aitken; Brett Nixon

    2011-01-01

    For mammalian spermatozoa to exhibit the ability to bind the zona pellucida(ZP)they must undergo three distinct phases of maturation,namely,spermatogenesis(testis),epididymal maturation(epididymis)and capacitation(female reproductive tract).An impressive array of spermatozoa surface remodeling events accompany these phases of maturation and appear critical for recognition and adhesion of the outer vestments of the oocyte,a structure known as the ZP.It is becoming increasingly apparent that species-specific zona adhesion is not mediated by a single receptor.Instead,compelling evidence now points toward models implicating a multiplicity of receptor-ligand interactions.This notion is in keeping with emerging research that has shown that there is a dynamic aggregation of proteins believed to be important in sperm-ZP recognition to the regions of sperm that mediate this binding event.Such remodeling may in turn facilitate the assembly of a multimeric zona recognition complex(MZRC).Though formation of MZRCs raises questions regarding the nature of the block to polyspermy,formation and assembly of such a structure would no doubt explain the strenuous maturation process that sperm endure on their sojourn to functional maturity.

  2. Body composition analysis: Cellular level modeling of body component ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Wang; Heymsfield, S. B.; PI-SUNYER, F.X.; Gallagher, D.; PIERSON, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    During the past two decades, a major outgrowth of efforts by our research group at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital is the development of body composition models that include cellular level models, models based on body component ratios, total body potassium models, multi-component models, and resting energy expenditure-body composition models. This review summarizes these models with emphasis on component ratios that we believe are fundamental to understanding human body composition during growt...

  3. From cellular to tissue scales by asymptotic limits of thermostatted kinetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianca, Carlo; Dogbe, Christian; Lemarchand, Annie

    2016-02-01

    Tumor growth strictly depends on the interactions occurring at the cellular scale. In order to obtain the linking between the dynamics described at tissue and cellular scales, asymptotic methods have been employed, consisting in deriving tissue equations by suitable limits of mesoscopic models. In this paper, the evolution at the cellular scale is described by thermostatted kinetic theory that include conservative, nonconservative (proliferation, destruction and mutations), stochastic terms, and the role of external agents. The dynamics at the tissue scale (cell-density evolution) is obtained by performing a low-field scaling and considering the related convergence of the rescaled framework when the scaling parameter goes to zero.

  4. Use of specific glycosidases to probe cellular interactions in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idoni, Brian; Ghazarian, Haike; Metzenberg, Stan; Hutchins-Carroll, Virginia; Oppenheimer, Steven B; Carroll, Edward J

    2010-08-01

    We present an unusual and novel model for initial investigations of a putative role for specifically conformed glycans in cellular interactions. We have used alpha- and ss-amylase and alpha- and ss-glucosidase in dose-response experiments evaluating their effects on archenteron organization using the NIH designated sea urchin embryo model. In quantitative dose-response experiments, we show that defined activity levels of alpha-glucosidase and ss-amylase inhibited archenteron organization in living Lytechinus pictus gastrula embryos, whereas all concentrations of ss-glucosidase and alpha-amylase were without substantial effects on development. Product inhibition studies suggested that the enzymes were acting by their specific glycosidase activities and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggested that there was no detectable protease contamination in the active enzyme samples. The results provide evidence for a role of glycans in sea urchin embryo cellular interactions with special reference to the possible structural conformation of these glycans based on the differential activities of the alpha- and ss-glycosidases. PMID:20435035

  5. Particle acceleration in a complex solar active region modelled by a Cellular automata model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2004-12-01

    The models of cellular automat allowed to reproduce successfully several statistical properties of the solar flares. We use a cellular automat model based on the concept of self-organised critical system to model the evolution of the magnetic energy released in an eruptive active area. Each burst of magnetic energy released is assimilated to a process of magnetic reconnection. We will thus generate several current layers (RCS) where the particles are accelerated by a direct electric field. We calculate the energy gain of the particles (ions and electrons) for various types of magnetic configuration. We calculate the distribution function of the kinetic energy of the particles after their interactions with a given number of RCS for each type of configurations. We show that the relative efficiency of the acceleration of the electrons and the ions depends on the selected configuration.

  6. Computational model of cellular metabolic dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yanjun; Solomon, Thomas; Haus, Jacob M;

    2010-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms by which insulin regulates glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle is critical to understanding the etiology of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Our knowledge of these mechanisms is limited by the difficulty of obtaining in vivo intracellular data. To quantitatively...... cytosol and mitochondria. The model simulated skeletal muscle metabolic responses to insulin corresponding to human hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies. Insulin-mediated rate of glucose disposal was the primary model input. For model validation, simulations were compared with experimental data...... type 2 diabetes....

  7. Interaction English Teaching Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    穆宇娜

    2013-01-01

      Malash—Thomas pointed out“Interaction is a process in which people and things act upon each other through their ac⁃tions.”According to different subjects, interaction can be divided into human-computer interaction, people-people interaction and learner-content interaction. According to different forms, interactions can be divided into one-one interaction, one-more interac⁃tion and more-more interaction.“Interaction Education”means that teachers are leading parts and students are the center of class. During teaching process, teachers must lead students to discover. Demands from students can encourage teachers to inspire con⁃versely.Thus it can form a close communication between teachers and students. Teaching and learning are realized in a happy and harmonious atmosphere. Successful English teaching must take new bilateral teaching as the first part, which should let the func⁃tion of the two most important elements develop fully. Teachers should grasp opportunities to guide. Teaching methods need to be flexible, and contents of teaching need to be vivid;students should be keen to think, to participate actively, and can break the tradi⁃tion to produce fresh ideas, and in that situation the capability of students can develop fully. The educational model refers to the simplified description of detailed teaching activities. Possessing dual functions of theory and practice, the educational model is the manifestation of theoretical teaching method. The combination of interaction and educational model which are mentioned above form the“interactive teaching”model. With the coming of economic globalization and integration of science and technology, now communications are increasing with each passing day. If you want to take part in or to get in touch with others, you must use lan⁃guage. English has been learnt for 10 years in Middle school and in college, but it can’t be spoken very fluently. That is a realistic picture as the result of an

  8. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of Cell Biology Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan eFarhadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  9. Cellular automata modeling of cooperative eutectic growth

    OpenAIRE

    E. Olejnik; E. Fraś; D. Gurgul; A. Burbelko

    2010-01-01

    The model and results of the 2D simulation of the cooperative growth of two phases in the lamellar eutectic are presented. The pro-posed model takes into account heat transfer, components diffusion and nonstationary concentration distribution in the liquid and solid phases, non-equlibrium nature of the phase transformation and kinetics of the growth, influence of the surface energy and interface curva-ture on the conditions of the thermodynamic equilibrium. For the determination of the phase ...

  10. Modeling cellular deformations using the level set formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many cellular processes involve substantial shape changes. Traditional simulations of these cell shape changes require that grids and boundaries be moved as the cell's shape evolves. Here we demonstrate that accurate cell shape changes can be recreated using level set methods (LSM, in which the cellular shape is defined implicitly, thereby eschewing the need for updating boundaries. Results We obtain a viscoelastic model of Dictyostelium cells using micropipette aspiration and show how this viscoelastic model can be incorporated into LSM simulations to recreate the observed protrusion of cells into the micropipette faithfully. We also demonstrate the use of our techniques by simulating the cell shape changes elicited by the chemotactic response to an external chemoattractant gradient. Conclusion Our results provide a simple but effective means of incorporating cellular deformations into mathematical simulations of cell signaling. Such methods will be useful for simulating important cellular events such as chemotaxis and cytokinesis.

  11. Model Checking Feature Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guilly, Thibaut; Olsen, Petur; Pedersen, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an offline approach to analyzing feature interactions in embedded systems. The approach consists of a systematic process to gather the necessary information about system components and their models. The model is first specified in terms of predicates, before being refined to t...

  12. Modeling cellular deformations using the level set formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Liu; Effler Janet C; Kutscher Brett L; Sullivan Sarah E; Robinson Douglas N; Iglesias Pablo A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Many cellular processes involve substantial shape changes. Traditional simulations of these cell shape changes require that grids and boundaries be moved as the cell's shape evolves. Here we demonstrate that accurate cell shape changes can be recreated using level set methods (LSM), in which the cellular shape is defined implicitly, thereby eschewing the need for updating boundaries. Results We obtain a viscoelastic model of Dictyostelium cells using micropipette aspiratio...

  13. Excellent approach to modeling urban expansion by fuzzy cellular automata: agent base model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajavigodellou, Yousef; Alesheikh, Ali A.; Mohammed, Abdulrazak A. S.; Chapi, Kamran

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the interaction between humans and their environment is the one of important challenges in the world. Landuse/ cover change (LUCC) is a complex process that includes actors and factors at different social and spatial levels. The complexity and dynamics of urban systems make the applicable practice of urban modeling very difficult. With the increased computational power and the greater availability of spatial data, micro-simulation such as the agent based and cellular automata simulation methods, has been developed by geographers, planners, and scholars, and it has shown great potential for representing and simulating the complexity of the dynamic processes involved in urban growth and land use change. This paper presents Fuzzy Cellular Automata in Geospatial Information System and remote Sensing to simulated and predicted urban expansion pattern. These FCA-based dynamic spatial urban models provide an improved ability to forecast and assess future urban growth and to create planning scenarios, allowing us to explore the potential impacts of simulations that correspond to urban planning and management policies. A fuzzy inference guided cellular automata approach. Semantic or linguistic knowledge on Land use change is expressed as fuzzy rules, based on which fuzzy inference is applied to determine the urban development potential for each pixel. The model integrates an ABM (agent-based model) and FCA (Fuzzy Cellular Automata) to investigate a complex decision-making process and future urban dynamic processes. Based on this model rapid development and green land protection under the influences of the behaviors and decision modes of regional authority agents, real estate developer agents, resident agents and non- resident agents and their interactions have been applied to predict the future development patterns of the Erbil metropolitan region.

  14. A Versatile Dependent Model for Heterogeneous Cellular Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Haenggi, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new model for heterogeneous cellular networks that incorporates dependencies between the layers. In particular, it places lower-tier base stations at locations that are poorly covered by the macrocells, and it includes a small-cell model for the case where the goal is to enhance network capacity.

  15. Modeling integrated cellular machinery using hybrid Petri-Boolean networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Berestovsky

    Full Text Available The behavior and phenotypic changes of cells are governed by a cellular circuitry that represents a set of biochemical reactions. Based on biological functions, this circuitry is divided into three types of networks, each encoding for a major biological process: signal transduction, transcription regulation, and metabolism. This division has generally enabled taming computational complexity dealing with the entire system, allowed for using modeling techniques that are specific to each of the components, and achieved separation of the different time scales at which reactions in each of the three networks occur. Nonetheless, with this division comes loss of information and power needed to elucidate certain cellular phenomena. Within the cell, these three types of networks work in tandem, and each produces signals and/or substances that are used by the others to process information and operate normally. Therefore, computational techniques for modeling integrated cellular machinery are needed. In this work, we propose an integrated hybrid model (IHM that combines Petri nets and Boolean networks to model integrated cellular networks. Coupled with a stochastic simulation mechanism, the model simulates the dynamics of the integrated network, and can be perturbed to generate testable hypotheses. Our model is qualitative and is mostly built upon knowledge from the literature and requires fine-tuning of very few parameters. We validated our model on two systems: the transcriptional regulation of glucose metabolism in human cells, and cellular osmoregulation in S. cerevisiae. The model produced results that are in very good agreement with experimental data, and produces valid hypotheses. The abstract nature of our model and the ease of its construction makes it a very good candidate for modeling integrated networks from qualitative data. The results it produces can guide the practitioner to zoom into components and interconnections and investigate them

  16. Biomechanics and thermodynamics of nanoparticle interactions with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids in cellular uptake and endosomal escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Jin, Shihua; Weimer, Jonathan; Elegbede, Adekunle; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2014-07-01

    To be effective for cytoplasmic delivery of therapeutics, nanoparticles (NPs) taken up via endocytic pathways must efficiently transport across the cell membrane and subsequently escape from the secondary endosomes. We hypothesized that the biomechanical and thermodynamic interactions of NPs with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids are involved in these processes. Using model plasma and endosomal lipid membranes, we compared the interactions of cationic NPs composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) modified with the dichain surfactant didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) or the single-chain surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) vs anionic unmodified NPs of similar size. We validated our hypothesis in doxorubicin-sensitive (MCF-7, with relatively fluid membranes) and resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR, with rigid membranes). Despite their cationic surface charges, DMAB- and CTAB-modified NPs showed different patterns of biophysical interaction: DMAB-modified NPs induced bending of the model plasma membrane, whereas CTAB-modified NPs condensed the membrane, thereby resisted bending. Unmodified NPs showed no effects on bending. DMAB-modified NPs also induced thermodynamic instability of the model endosomal membrane, whereas CTAB-modified and unmodified NPs had no effect. Since bending of the plasma membrane and destabilization of the endosomal membrane are critical biophysical processes in NP cellular uptake and endosomal escape, respectively, we tested these NPs for cellular uptake and drug efficacy. Confocal imaging showed that in both sensitive and resistant cells DMAB-modified NPs exhibited greater cellular uptake and escape from endosomes than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs. Further, paclitaxel-loaded DMAB-modified NPs induced greater cytotoxicity even in resistant cells than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs or drug in solution, demonstrating the potential of DMAB-modified NPs to overcome the transport barrier in resistant cells. In

  17. Lattice gas cellular automata and lattice Boltzmann models an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A

    2000-01-01

    Lattice-gas cellular automata (LGCA) and lattice Boltzmann models (LBM) are relatively new and promising methods for the numerical solution of nonlinear partial differential equations. The book provides an introduction for graduate students and researchers. Working knowledge of calculus is required and experience in PDEs and fluid dynamics is recommended. Some peculiarities of cellular automata are outlined in Chapter 2. The properties of various LGCA and special coding techniques are discussed in Chapter 3. Concepts from statistical mechanics (Chapter 4) provide the necessary theoretical background for LGCA and LBM. The properties of lattice Boltzmann models and a method for their construction are presented in Chapter 5.

  18. WWW Business Applications Based on the Cellular Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshio Kodama; Tosiyasu L. Kunii; Yoichi Seki

    2008-01-01

    A cellular model based on the Incrementally Modular Abstraction Hierarchy (IMAH) is a novel model that can represent the architecture of and changes in cyberworlds, preserving invariants from a general level to a specific one. We have developed a data processing system called the Cellular Data System (CDS). In the development of business applications, you can prevent combinatorial explosion in the process of business design and testing by using CDS. In this paper, we have first designed and implemented wide-use algebra on the presentation level. Next, we have developed and verified the effectiveness of two general business applications using CDS: 1) a customer information management system, and 2) an estimate system.

  19. Modeling evolution and immune system by cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezzi, M. [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Florence (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    In this review the behavior of two different biological systems is investigated using cellular automata. Starting from this spatially extended approach it is also tried, in some cases, to reduce the complexity of the system introducing mean-field approximation, and solving (or trying to solve) these simplified systems. It is discussed the biological meaning of the results, the comparison with experimental data (if available) and the different features between spatially extended and mean-field versions. The biological systems considered in this review are the following: Darwinian evolution in simple ecosystems and immune system response. In the first section the main features of molecular evolution are introduced, giving a short survey of genetics for physicists and discussing some models for prebiotic systems and simple ecosystems. It is also introduced a cellular automaton model for studying a set of evolving individuals in a general fitness landscape, considering also the effects of co-evolution. In particular the process of species formation (speciation) is described in sect. 5. The second part deals with immune system modeling. The biological features of immune response are discussed, as well as it is introduced the concept of shape space and of idiotypic network. More detailed reviews which deal with immune system models (mainly focused on idiotypic network models) can be found. Other themes here discussed: the applications of CA to immune system modeling, two complex cellular automata for humoral and cellular immune response. Finally, it is discussed the biological data and the general conclusions are drawn in the last section.

  20. Modeling evolution and immune system by cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review the behavior of two different biological systems is investigated using cellular automata. Starting from this spatially extended approach it is also tried, in some cases, to reduce the complexity of the system introducing mean-field approximation, and solving (or trying to solve) these simplified systems. It is discussed the biological meaning of the results, the comparison with experimental data (if available) and the different features between spatially extended and mean-field versions. The biological systems considered in this review are the following: Darwinian evolution in simple ecosystems and immune system response. In the first section the main features of molecular evolution are introduced, giving a short survey of genetics for physicists and discussing some models for prebiotic systems and simple ecosystems. It is also introduced a cellular automaton model for studying a set of evolving individuals in a general fitness landscape, considering also the effects of co-evolution. In particular the process of species formation (speciation) is described in sect. 5. The second part deals with immune system modeling. The biological features of immune response are discussed, as well as it is introduced the concept of shape space and of idiotypic network. More detailed reviews which deal with immune system models (mainly focused on idiotypic network models) can be found. Other themes here discussed: the applications of CA to immune system modeling, two complex cellular automata for humoral and cellular immune response. Finally, it is discussed the biological data and the general conclusions are drawn in the last section

  1. Cellular microbiology and molecular ecology of Legionella-amoeba interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Ashley M; Von Dwingelo, Juanita E; Price, Christopher T; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    2013-05-15

    Legionella pneumophila is an aquatic organism that interacts with amoebae and ciliated protozoa as the natural hosts, and this interaction plays a central role in bacterial ecology and infectivity. Upon transmission to humans, L. pneumophila infect and replicate within alveolar macrophages causing pneumonia. Intracellular proliferation of L. pneumophila within the two evolutionarily distant hosts is facilitated by bacterial exploitation of evolutionarily conserved host processes that are targeted by bacterial protein effectors injected into the host cell by the Dot/Icm type VIB translocation system. Although cysteine is semi-essential for humans and essential for amoeba, it is a metabolically favorable source of carbon and energy generation by L. pneumophila. To counteract host limitation of cysteine, L. pneumophila utilizes the AnkB Dot/Icm-translocated F-box effector to promote host proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins within amoebae and human cells. Evidence indicates ankB and other Dot/Icm-translocated effector genes have been acquired through inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer.

  2. Empirical study on entropy models of cellular manufacturing systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifeng Zhang; Renbin Xiao

    2009-01-01

    From the theoretical point of view,the states of manufacturing resources can be monitored and assessed through the amount of information needed to describe their technological structure and operational state.The amount of information needed to describe cellular manufacturing systems is investigated by two measures:the structural entropy and the operational entropy.Based on the Shannon entropy,the models of the structural entropy and the operational entropy of cellular manufacturing systems are developed,and the cognizance of the states of manufacturing resources is also illustrated.Scheduling is introduced to measure the entropy models of cellular manufacturing systems,and the feasible concepts of maximum schedule horizon and schedule adherence are advanced to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of schedules.Finally,an example is used to demonstrate the validity of the proposed methodology.

  3. Station Model for Rail Transit System Using Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUN Jing; NING Bin; LI Ke-Ping

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new cellular automata model to simulate the railway traffic at station.Based on NaSch model, the proposed station model is composed of the main track and the siding track.Two different schemes for trains passing through station are considered.One is the scheme of "pass by the main track, start and stop by the siding track".The other is the scheme of "two tracks play the same role".We simulate the train movement using the proposed model and analyze the traffic flow at station.The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed cellular automata model can be successfully used for the simulations of railway traffic.Some characteristic behaviors of railway traffic flow can be reproduced.Moreover, the simulation values of the minimum headway are close to the theoretical values.This result demonstrates the dependability and availability of the proposed model.

  4. Interactions between X-rays and antimitotic drugs: cellular effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions between three drugs and X-rays were examined in rat hepatoma cells in vitro. Incubation with Daunomycine or 9-hydroxy ellipticine decreases the survival of both exponential and plateau phase cells, whereas cis-Pt (II) decreases the survival of plateau cells, especially irradiated in anoxia. The decrease in the Do was greater when the cells were incubated with the drugs prior to X-irradiation, and was greater in the case of plateau cells than in the case of exponential cells. The repair of potentially lethal damages was inhibited by these three compounds. However, the repair of sublethal damages was inhibited by cis-Pt II, but was modified neither by Daunomycine nor 9-hydroxy ellipticine

  5. Cellular worlds: a framework for modeling micro - macro dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    H Couclelis

    1985-01-01

    Cellular spaces have recently received a lot of attention in computer science and elsewhere as models capable of bridging the gap between disaggregate and aggregate description. Despite their obvious spatial interpretation, standard cell-space models are too constrained by their background conventions to be useful in realistic geographic applications. In this paper, a generalization of the cell-space principle is presented, based on discrete model theory, and then applied to a hypothetical bu...

  6. A Modified Cellular Automaton Model for Traffic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛红霞; 董力耘; 雷丽; 戴世强

    2004-01-01

    A modified cellular automaton model for traffic flow was proposed. A novel concept about the changeable security gap was introduced and a parameter related to the variable security gap was determined. The fundamental diagram obtained by simulation shows that the maximum flow more approaches to the observed data than that of the NaSch model, indicating that the presented model is more reasonable and realistic.

  7. Interactions of the HSV-1 UL25 Capsid Protein with Cellular Microtubule-associated Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei GUO; Ying ZHANG; Yan-chun CHE; Wen-juan WU; Wei-zhong LI; Li-chun WANG; Yun LIAO; Long-ding LIU; Qi-han LI

    2008-01-01

    An interaction between the HSV-1 UL25 capsid protein and cellular microtubule-associated protein was found using a yeast two-hybrid screen and β-D-galactosidase activity assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy of the UL25 protein demonstrated its co-localization with cellular microtubule-associated protein in the plasma membrane. Further investigations with deletion mutants suggest that UL25 is likely to have a function in the nucleus.

  8. Designing an experiment to measure cellular interaction forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlinden, Niall; Glass, David G.; Millington, Owain R.; Wright, Amanda J.

    2013-09-01

    Optical trapping is a powerful tool in Life Science research and is becoming common place in many microscopy laboratories and facilities. The force applied by the laser beam on the trapped object can be accurately determined allowing any external forces acting on the trapped object to be deduced. We aim to design a series of experiments that use an optical trap to measure and quantify the interaction force between immune cells. In order to cause minimum perturbation to the sample we plan to directly trap T cells and remove the need to introduce exogenous beads to the sample. This poses a series of challenges and raises questions that need to be answered in order to design a set of effect end-point experiments. A typical cell is large compared to the beads normally trapped and highly non-uniform - can we reliably trap such objects and prevent them from rolling and re-orientating? In this paper we show how a spatial light modulator can produce a triple-spot trap, as opposed to a single-spot trap, giving complete control over the object's orientation and preventing it from rolling due, for example, to Brownian motion. To use an optical trap as a force transducer to measure an external force you must first have a reliably calibrated system. The optical trapping force is typically measured using either the theory of equipartition and observing the Brownian motion of the trapped object or using an escape force method, e.g. the viscous drag force method. In this paper we examine the relationship between force and displacement, as well as measuring the maximum displacement from equilibrium position before an object falls out of the trap, hence determining the conditions under which the different calibration methods should be applied.

  9. The brittleness model of complex system based on cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN De-ming; JIN Hong-zhang; LI Qi; WU Hong-mei

    2004-01-01

    Now the research on the complex system is a hot spot. Brittleness is one of the basic characteristics of a complex system. In a complex system, after one of subsystems is struck to be collapsed, the whole system will collapse. Meanwhile, cellular automata is a discrete dynamic system. When the rule is given, the cellular automata could be defined. Then it can imitate the complex action. Cellular automata is used to simulate the brittleness action in this study. Entropy was used to analyze the action and get the rule. Then,three normal brittleness models were given. The result shows that the brittleness of complex system is existent and in addition some important behavior mode of complex system brittleness has been achieved.

  10. Cellular automata model of magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Kozelov

    Full Text Available We propose a cellular automata model (CAM to describe the substorm activity of the magnetospheric-ionospheric system. The state of each cell in the model is described by two numbers that correspond to the energy content in a region of the current sheet in the magnetospheric tail and to the conductivity of the ionospheric domain that is magnetically connected with this region. The driving force of the system is supposed to be provided by the solar wind that is convected along the two boundaries of the system. The energy flux inside is ensured by the penetration of the energy from the solar wind into the array of cells (magnetospheric tail with a finite velocity. The third boundary (near to the Earth is closed and the fourth boundary is opened, thereby modeling the flux far away from the tail. The energy dissipation in the system is quite similar to other CAM models, when the energy in a particular cell exceeds some pre-defined threshold, and the part of the energy excess is redistributed between the neighbouring cells. The second number attributed to each cell mimics ionospheric conductivity that can allow for a part of the energy to be shed on field-aligned currents. The feedback between "ionosphere" and "magnetospheric tail" is provided by the change in a part of the energy, which is redistributed in the tail when the threshold is surpassed. The control parameter of the model is the z-component of the interplanetary magnetic field (Bz IMF, "frozen" into the solar wind. To study the internal dynamics of the system at the beginning, this control parameter is taken to be constant. The dynamics of the system undergoes several bifurcations, when the constant varies from - 0.6 to - 6.0. The Bz IMF input results in the periodic transients (activation regions and the inter-transient period decreases with the decrease of Bz. At the same time the onset of activations in the array shifts towards the "Earth". When the modulus of the Bz IMF exceeds some

  11. Multiple cellular proteins interact with LEDGF/p75 through a conserved unstructured consensus motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesina, Petr; Čermáková, Kateřina; Hořejší, Magdalena; Procházková, Kateřina; Fábry, Milan; Sharma, Subhalakshmi; Christ, Frauke; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; De Rijck, Jan; Veverka, Václav; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2015-01-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is an epigenetic reader and attractive therapeutic target involved in HIV integration and the development of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL1) fusion-driven leukaemia. Besides HIV integrase and the MLL1-menin complex, LEDGF/p75 interacts with various cellular proteins via its integrase binding domain (IBD). Here we present structural characterization of IBD interactions with transcriptional repressor JPO2 and domesticated transposase PogZ, and show that the PogZ interaction is nearly identical to the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with MLL1. The interaction with the IBD is maintained by an intrinsically disordered IBD-binding motif (IBM) common to all known cellular partners of LEDGF/p75. In addition, based on IBM conservation, we identify and validate IWS1 as a novel LEDGF/p75 interaction partner. Our results also reveal how HIV integrase efficiently displaces cellular binding partners from LEDGF/p75. Finally, the similar binding modes of LEDGF/p75 interaction partners represent a new challenge for the development of selective interaction inhibitors.

  12. Cellular Automata Models Applied to the Study of Landslide Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liucci, Luisa; Melelli, Laura; Suteanu, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Landslides are caused by complex processes controlled by the interaction of numerous factors. Increasing efforts are being made to understand the spatial and temporal evolution of this phenomenon, and the use of remote sensing data is making significant contributions in improving forecast. This paper studies landslides seen as complex dynamic systems, in order to investigate their potential Self Organized Critical (SOC) behavior, and in particular, scale-invariant aspects of processes governing the spatial development of landslides and their temporal evolution, as well as the mechanisms involved in driving the system and keeping it in a critical state. For this purpose, we build Cellular Automata Models, which have been shown to be capable of reproducing the complexity of real world features using a small number of variables and simple rules, thus allowing for the reduction of the number of input parameters commonly used in the study of processes governing landslide evolution, such as those linked to the geomechanical properties of soils. This type of models has already been successfully applied in studying the dynamics of other natural hazards, such as earthquakes and forest fires. The basic structure of the model is composed of three modules: (i) An initialization module, which defines the topographic surface at time zero as a grid of square cells, each described by an altitude value; the surface is acquired from real Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). (ii) A transition function, which defines the rules used by the model to update the state of the system at each iteration. The rules use a stability criterion based on the slope angle and introduce a variable describing the weakening of the material over time, caused for example by rainfall. The weakening brings some sites of the system out of equilibrium thus causing the triggering of landslides, which propagate within the system through local interactions between neighboring cells. By using different rates of

  13. An efficient Cellular Potts Model algorithm that forbids cell fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Marc; Guesnet, Etienne

    2016-11-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) is a lattice based modeling technique which is widely used for simulating cellular patterns such as foams or biological tissues. Despite its realism and generality, the standard Monte Carlo algorithm used in the scientific literature to evolve this model preserves connectivity of cells on a limited range of simulation temperature only. We present a new algorithm in which cell fragmentation is forbidden for all simulation temperatures. This allows to significantly enhance realism of the simulated patterns. It also increases the computational efficiency compared with the standard CPM algorithm even at same simulation temperature, thanks to the time spared in not doing unrealistic moves. Moreover, our algorithm restores the detailed balance equation, ensuring that the long-term stage is independent of the chosen acceptance rate and chosen path in the temperature space.

  14. Modelling Nonlinear Sequence Generators in terms of Linear Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Fúster-Sabater, Amparo; 10.1016/j.apm.2005.08.013

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a wide family of LFSR-based sequence generators, the so-called Clock-Controlled Shrinking Generators (CCSGs), has been analyzed and identified with a subset of linear Cellular Automata (CA). In fact, a pair of linear models describing the behavior of the CCSGs can be derived. The algorithm that converts a given CCSG into a CA-based linear model is very simple and can be applied to CCSGs in a range of practical interest. The linearity of these cellular models can be advantageously used in two different ways: (a) for the analysis and/or cryptanalysis of the CCSGs and (b) for the reconstruction of the output sequence obtained from this kind of generators.

  15. Fire Spread Model for Old Towns Based on Cellular Automaton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Nan; WENG Wenguo; MA Wei; NI Shunjiang; HUANG Quanyi; YUAN Hongyong

    2008-01-01

    Old towns like Lijiang have enormous historic,artistic,and architectural value.The buildings in such old towns are usually made of highly combustible materials,such as wood and grass.If a fire breaks out,it will spread to multiple buildings,so fire spreading and controlling in old towns need to be studied.This paper presents a fire spread model for old towns based on cellular automaton.The cellular automaton rules were set according to historical fire data in empirical formulas.The model also considered the effects of climate.The simulation results were visualized in a geography information system.An example of a fire spread in Lijiang was investigated with the results showing that this model provides a realistic tool for predicting fire spread in old towns.Fire brigades can use this tool to predict when and how a fire spreads to minimize the losses.

  16. Parallelizing the Cellular Potts Model on graphics processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, José Juan; D'Souza, Roshan M.

    2011-04-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) is a lattice based modeling technique used for simulating cellular structures in computational biology. The computational complexity of the model means that current serial implementations restrict the size of simulation to a level well below biological relevance. Parallelization on computing clusters enables scaling the size of the simulation but marginally addresses computational speed due to the limited memory bandwidth between nodes. In this paper we present new data-parallel algorithms and data structures for simulating the Cellular Potts Model on graphics processing units. Our implementations handle most terms in the Hamiltonian, including cell-cell adhesion constraint, cell volume constraint, cell surface area constraint, and cell haptotaxis. We use fine level checkerboards with lock mechanisms using atomic operations to enable consistent updates while maintaining a high level of parallelism. A new data-parallel memory allocation algorithm has been developed to handle cell division. Tests show that our implementation enables simulations of >10 cells with lattice sizes of up to 256 3 on a single graphics card. Benchmarks show that our implementation runs ˜80× faster than serial implementations, and ˜5× faster than previous parallel implementations on computing clusters consisting of 25 nodes. The wide availability and economy of graphics cards mean that our techniques will enable simulation of realistically sized models at a fraction of the time and cost of previous implementations and are expected to greatly broaden the scope of CPM applications.

  17. A cellular automata model of Ebola virus dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhead, Emily; Hawkins, Jane

    2015-11-01

    We construct a stochastic cellular automaton (SCA) model for the spread of the Ebola virus (EBOV). We make substantial modifications to an existing SCA model used for HIV, introduced by others and studied by the authors. We give a rigorous analysis of the similarities between models due to the spread of virus and the typical immune response to it, and the differences which reflect the drastically different timing of the course of EBOV. We demonstrate output from the model and compare it with clinical data.

  18. A New Cellular Automaton Model for Traffic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongtaoHU

    1999-01-01

    Establishment of effective traffic models to reveal fundamental traffic characteristics is an essential requirement in the design,planning and operation of transportation systems .In 1992 Nagel and Schreckenberg presented a cellular automaton model describing traffic flow of N cars on a single lane and applied it in the famous project TRANSIMS on transportation simulation.In this paper,the author proposes a new model for the same problem and gives a comparison of simulation results with the former ones.The comparison shows that the new model works better under the condition of high traffic density.

  19. Public Evacuation Process Modeling and Simulatiaon Based on Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhikun Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Considering attraction of the nearest exit, repulsive force of the fire, barrier and its display style, effect of fire exit location on escape time in fire hazard, a mathematical model of evacuation process model was build based on cellular automatic theory. The program was developed by JavaScript. The influencing factors of evacuation were obtained through the simulation model by inputting crew size, creating initial positions of crew and fire seat stochastically. The experimental results show that the evacuation simulation model with authenticity and validity, which has guiding significance for people evacuation and public escape system design.  

  20. Car Deceleration Considering Its Own Velocity in Cellular Automata Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Ping

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new cellular automaton model, which is based on NaSch traffic model. In our method, when a car has a larger velocity, if the gap between the car and its leading car is not enough large, it will decrease. The aim is that the following car has a buffer space to decrease its velocity at the next time, and then avoid to decelerate too high. The simulation results show that using our model, the car deceleration is realistic, and is closer to thefield measure than that of NaSch model.

  1. A pipeline for determining protein-protein interactions and proximities in the cellular milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotin, Roman I; Chait, Brian T

    2014-11-01

    It remains extraordinarily challenging to elucidate endogenous protein-protein interactions and proximities within the cellular milieu. The dynamic nature and the large range of affinities of these interactions augment the difficulty of this undertaking. Among the most useful tools for extracting such information are those based on affinity capture of target bait proteins in combination with mass spectrometric readout of the co-isolated species. Although highly enabling, the utility of affinity-based methods is generally limited by difficulties in distinguishing specific from nonspecific interactors, preserving and isolating all unique interactions including those that are weak, transient, or rapidly exchanging, and differentiating proximal interactions from those that are more distal. Here, we have devised and optimized a set of methods to address these challenges. The resulting pipeline involves flash-freezing cells in liquid nitrogen to preserve the cellular environment at the moment of freezing; cryomilling to fracture the frozen cells into intact micron chunks to allow for rapid access of a chemical reagent and to stabilize the intact endogenous subcellular assemblies and interactors upon thawing; and utilizing the high reactivity of glutaraldehyde to achieve sufficiently rapid stabilization at low temperatures to preserve native cellular interactions. In the course of this work, we determined that relatively low molar ratios of glutaraldehyde to reactive amines within the cellular milieu were sufficient to preserve even labile and transient interactions. This mild treatment enables efficient and rapid affinity capture of the protein assemblies of interest under nondenaturing conditions, followed by bottom-up MS to identify and quantify the protein constituents. For convenience, we have termed this approach Stabilized Affinity Capture Mass Spectrometry. Here, we demonstrate that Stabilized Affinity Capture Mass Spectrometry allows us to stabilize and elucidate

  2. JSPAM: Interacting galaxies modeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, John F.; Holincheck, Anthony; Harvey, Allen

    2015-11-01

    JSPAM models galaxy collisions using a restricted n-body approach to speed up computation. Instead of using a softened point-mass potential, the software supports a modified version of the three component potential created by Hernquist (1994, ApJS 86, 389). Although spherically symmetric gravitationally potentials and a Gaussian model for the bulge are used to increase computational efficiency, the potential mimics that of a fully consistent n-body model of a galaxy. Dynamical friction has been implemented in the code to improve the accuracy of close approaches between galaxies. Simulations using this code using thousands of particles over the typical interaction times of a galaxy interaction take a few seconds on modern desktop workstations, making it ideal for rapidly prototyping the dynamics of colliding galaxies. Extensive testing of the code has shown that it produces nearly identical tidal features to those from hierarchical tree codes such as Gadget but using a fraction of the computational resources. This code was used in the Galaxy Zoo: Mergers project and is very well suited for automated fitting of galaxy mergers with automated pattern fitting approaches such as genetic algorithms. Java and Fortran versions of the code are available.

  3. Mathematical model for flood routing based on cellular automaton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin CAI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing frequency and severity of flooding have caused tremendous damage in China, requiring more essential countermeasures to alleviate the damage. In this study, the dynamic simulation property of a cellular automaton was used to make further progress in flood routing. In consideration of terrain’s influence on flood routing, we regarded the terrain elevation as an auxiliary attribute of a two-dimensional cellular automaton in path selection for flood routing and developed a mathematical model based on a cellular automaton. A numerical case of propagation of an outburst flood in an area of the lower Yangtze River was analyzed with both the fixed-step and variable-step models. The results show that the flood does not spread simultaneously in all directions, but flows into the lower place first, and that the submerged area grows quickly at the beginning, but slowly later on. The final submerged areas obtained from the two different models are consistent, and the flood volume balance test shows that the flood volume meets the requirement of the total volume balance. The analysis of the case shows that the proposed model can be a valuable tool for flood routing.

  4. A cellular automata model with probability infection and spatial dispersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Zhen; Liu Quan-Xing; Mainul Haque

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we have proposed an epidemic model based on the probability cellular automata theory. The essential mathematical features are analysed with the help of stability theory. We have given an alternative modelling approach for the spatiotemporal system which is more realistic from the practical point of view. A discrete and spatiotemporal approach is shown by using cellular automata theory. It is interesting to note that both the size of the endemic equilibrium and the density of the individuals increase with the increase of the neighbourhood size and infection rate, but the infections decrease with the increase of the recovery rate. The stability of the system around the positive interior equilibrium has been shown by using a suitable Lyapunov function. Finally, experimental data simulation for SARS disease in China in 2003 and a brief discussion are given.

  5. A Cellular Model for Screening Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Jianguo; Silverman, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors are potential drug candidates because it has been well demonstrated that excessive production of NO critically contributes to a range of diseases. Most inhibitors have been screened in vitro using recombinant enzymes, leading to the discovery of a variety of potent compounds. To make inhibition studies more physiologically relevant and bridge the gap between the in vitro assay and in vivo studies, we report here a cellular model for screening NOS inhibit...

  6. Cellular-Based Statistical Model for Mobile Dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulla, Mouhamed; Shayan, Yousef R.

    2013-01-01

    While analyzing mobile systems we often approximate the actual coverage surface and assume an ideal cell shape. In a multi-cellular network, because of its tessellating nature, a hexagon is more preferred than a circular geometry. Despite this reality, perhaps due to the inherent simplicity, only a model for circular based random spreading is available. However, if used, this results an unfair terminal distribution for non-circular contours. Therefore, in this paper we specifically derived an...

  7. A `Clicked' Tetrameric Hydroxamic Acid Glycopeptidomimetic Antagonizes Sugar-Lectin Interactions On The Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Lin; Zang, Yi; Xie, Juan; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; He, Xiao-Peng; Tian, He

    2014-07-01

    A tetrameric N-acetyl galactosaminyl (GalNAc) peptidomimetic was constructed by N-acetylation of repeating proline-based hydroxamic acid units, followed by a convergent `click chemistry' coupling. This novel glycopeptidomimetic was determined to effectively antagonize the interaction between a transmembrane hepatic lectin and GalNAc on the cellular level.

  8. Unified Stochastic Geometry Model for MIMO Cellular Networks with Retransmissions

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, Laila H.

    2016-10-11

    This paper presents a unified mathematical paradigm, based on stochastic geometry, for downlink cellular networks with multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) base stations (BSs). The developed paradigm accounts for signal retransmission upon decoding errors, in which the temporal correlation among the signal-to-interference-plus-noise-ratio (SINR) of the original and retransmitted signals is captured. In addition to modeling the effect of retransmission on the network performance, the developed mathematical model presents twofold analysis unification for MIMO cellular networks literature. First, it integrates the tangible decoding error probability and the abstracted (i.e., modulation scheme and receiver type agnostic) outage probability analysis, which are largely disjoint in the literature. Second, it unifies the analysis for different MIMO configurations. The unified MIMO analysis is achieved by abstracting unnecessary information conveyed within the interfering signals by Gaussian signaling approximation along with an equivalent SISO representation for the per-data stream SINR in MIMO cellular networks. We show that the proposed unification simplifies the analysis without sacrificing the model accuracy. To this end, we discuss the diversity-multiplexing tradeoff imposed by different MIMO schemes and shed light on the diversity loss due to the temporal correlation among the SINRs of the original and retransmitted signals. Finally, several design insights are highlighted.

  9. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wallach

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc. contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner.

  10. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Thomas; Schellenberg, Katja; Maier, Bert; Kalathur, Ravi Kiran Reddy; Porras, Pablo; Wanker, Erich E; Futschik, Matthias E; Kramer, Achim

    2013-03-01

    Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour) clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression) suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc.) contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner. PMID:23555304

  11. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are favorable to…

  12. Occupant evacuation model based on cellular automata in fire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By applying the rules set in traffic flow and pedestrian flow models, a basic cellular automata model is presented to simulate occupant evacuation in fire. Some extended models are introduced to study the special phenomena of evacuation from the fire room. The key of the models is the introduction of the danger grade which makes the route choice convenient and reasonable. Fire not only influences the emotional and behavioral characteristics of an individual but also affects his physical constitution, which reduces his maximal possible velocity. The models consider these influence factors by applying a set of simple but effective rules. It is needed to emphasize that all rules are established according to the essential phenomenon in fire evacuation, that is, all the occupants would try to move to the safest place as fast as possible. Some simulation examples are also presented to validate the applicability of the models.

  13. Infinity computations in cellular automaton forest-fire model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudin, D. I.; Sergeyev, Ya. D.; Hayakawa, M.

    2015-03-01

    Recently a number of traditional models related to the percolation theory has been considered by means of a new computational methodology that does not use Cantor's ideas and describes infinite and infinitesimal numbers in accordance with the principle 'The whole is greater than the part' (Euclid's Common Notion 5). Here we apply the new arithmetic to a cellular automaton forest-fire model which is connected with the percolation methodology and in some sense combines the dynamic and the static percolation problems and under certain conditions exhibits critical fluctuations. It is well known that there exist two versions of the model: real forest-fire model where fire catches adjacent trees in the forest in the step by step manner and simplified version with instantaneous combustion. Using new approach we observe that in both situations we deal with the same model but with different time resolution. We show that depending on the "microscope" we use the same cellular automaton forest-fire model reveals either instantaneous forest combustion or step by step firing. By means of the new approach it was also observed that as far as we choose an infinitesimal tree growing rate and infinitesimal ratio between the ignition probability and the growth probability we determine the measure or extent of the system size infinity that provides the criticality of the system dynamics. Correspondent inequalities for grosspowers are derived.

  14. Modelling of detonation cellular structure in aluminium suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, A.; Veyssiere, B.; Khasainov, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Heterogeneous detonations involving aluminium suspensions have been studied for many years for industrial safety policies, and for military and propulsion applications. Owing to their weak detonability and to the lack of available experimental results on the detonation cellular structure, numerical simulations provide a convenient way to improve the knowledge of such detonations. One major difficulty arising in numerical study of heterogeneous detonations involving suspensions of aluminium particles in oxidizing atmospheres is the modelling of aluminium combustion. Our previous two-step model provided results on the effect on the detonation cellular structure of particle diameter and characteristic chemical lengths. In this study, a hybrid model is incorporated in the numerical code EFAE, combining both kinetic and diffusion regimes in parallel. This more realistic model provides good agreement with the previous two-step model and confirms the correlations found between the detonation cell width, and particle diameter and characteristic lengths. Moreover, the linear dependence found between the detonation cell width and the induction length remains valid with the hybrid model.

  15. Cellular automata model of magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Kozelov, B. V.; Kozelova, T. V.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a cellular automata model (CAM) to describe the substorm activity of the magnetospheric-ionospheric system. The state of each cell in the model is described by two numbers that correspond to the energy content in a region of the current sheet in the magnetospheric tail and to the conductivity of the ionospheric domain that is magnetically connected with this region. The driving force of the system is supposed to be provided by the solar wind that is convected along the two b...

  16. Cellular automata modelling of phase-change memories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanhua Yu; David Wright

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to modelling phase-transition processes in phase change materials used for optical and electrical data storage applications is presented. The model is based on a cellular automaton (CA) approach to predict crystallization behaviour that is linked to thermal and electrical simulations to enable the study of the data writing and erasing processes. The CA approach is shown to be able to predict the evolution of the microstructure during the rapid heating and cooling cycles pertinent to data storage technology, and maps crystallization behaviour on the nanoscale. A simple example based on possible future nonvolatile phase-change random access solid-state memory is presented.

  17. A Realistic Cellular Automaton Model for Synchronized Traffic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bo-Han; HU Mao-Bin; JIANG Rui; WU Qing-Song

    2009-01-01

    A cellular automaton model is proposed to consider the anticipation effect in drivers' behavior. It is shown that the anticipation effect can be one of the origins of synchronized traffic flow. With anticipation effect, the congested traffic flow simulated by the model exhibits the features of synchronized flow. The spatiotemporal patterns induced by an on-ramp are also consistent with the three-phaee traffic theory. Since the origin of synchronized flow is still controversial, our work can shed some light on the mechanism of synchronized flow.

  18. A cellular automaton model for a bridge traffic bottleneck

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shifa Xiao; Lingjiang Kong; Muren Liu

    2005-01-01

    A cellular automaton (CA) model is proposed in this paper to analyze a bridge traffic bottleneck. The simulation results with this model show that there are several phase transitions in the traffic average density, velocity and flow for each lane under a periodic boundary condition. An unstable phase in the traffic average density and velocity for the upstream and downstream lanes of the bridge is shown in a range of initial traffic densities. The critical points of the phase transitions and the phenomenon of the unstable phase found in the simulation are also explained with the mean-field theory.

  19. Modeling and simulation for train control system using cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; KePing; GAO; ZiYou; YANG; LiXing

    2007-01-01

    Train control system plays a key role in railway traffic. Its function is to manage and control the train movement on railway networks. In our previous works, based on the cellular automata (CA) model, we proposed several models and algorithms for simulating the train movement under different control system conditions. However, these models are only suitable for some simple traffic conditions. Some basic factors, which are important for train movement, are not considered. In this paper, we extend these models and algorithms and give a unified formula. Using the proposed method, we analyze and discuss the space-time diagram of railway traffic flow and the trajectories of the train movement. The numerical simulation and analytical results demonstrate that the unified CA model is an effective tool for simulating the train control system.

  20. Cancer models, genomic instability and somatic cellular Darwinian evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little Mark P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biology of cancer is critically reviewed and evidence adduced that its development can be modelled as a somatic cellular Darwinian evolutionary process. The evidence for involvement of genomic instability (GI is also reviewed. A variety of quasi-mechanistic models of carcinogenesis are reviewed, all based on this somatic Darwinian evolutionary hypothesis; in particular, the multi-stage model of Armitage and Doll (Br. J. Cancer 1954:8;1-12, the two-mutation model of Moolgavkar, Venzon, and Knudson (MVK (Math. Biosci. 1979:47;55-77, the generalized MVK model of Little (Biometrics 1995:51;1278-1291 and various generalizations of these incorporating effects of GI (Little and Wright Math. Biosci. 2003:183;111-134; Little et al. J. Theoret. Biol. 2008:254;229-238. Reviewers This article was reviewed by RA Gatenby and M Kimmel.

  1. Cellular automaton model considering headway-distance effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Shou-Xin; Gao Kun; Wang Bing-Hong; Lu Yu-Feng

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a cellular automaton model for single-lane traffic flow.On the basis of the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) model,it further considers the effect of headway-distance between two successive cars on the randomization of the latter one.In numerical simulations,this model shows the following characteristics.(1) With a simple structure,this model succeeds in reproducing the hysteresis effect,which is absent in the NS model.(2) Compared with the slow-tostart models,this model exhibits a local fundamental diagram which is more consistent to empirical observations.(3)This model has much higher efficiency in dissolving congestions compared with the so-called NS model with velocitydependent randomization (VDR model).(4) This model is more robust when facing traffic obstructions.It can resist much longer shock times and has much shorter relaxation times on the other hand.To summarize,compared with the existing models,this model is quite simple in structure,but has good characteristics.

  2. Structural modeling of sandwich structures with lightweight cellular cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Deng, Z. C.; Lu, T. J.

    2007-10-01

    An effective single layered finite element (FE) computational model is proposed to predict the structural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels having two dimensional (2D) prismatic or three dimensional (3D) truss cores. Three different types of cellular core topology are considered: pyramidal truss core (3D), Kagome truss core (3D) and corrugated core (2D), representing three kinds of material anisotropy: orthotropic, monoclinic and general anisotropic. A homogenization technique is developed to obtain the homogenized macroscopic stiffness properties of the cellular core. In comparison with the results obtained by using detailed FE model, the single layered computational model can give acceptable predictions for both the static and dynamic behaviors of orthotropic truss core sandwich panels. However, for non-orthotropic 3D truss cores, the predictions are not so well. For both static and dynamic behaviors of a 2D corrugated core sandwich panel, the predictions derived by the single layered computational model is generally acceptable when the size of the unit cell varies within a certain range, with the predictions for moderately strong or strong corrugated cores more accurate than those for weak cores.

  3. Integrating cellular metabolism into a multiscale whole-body model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Krauss

    Full Text Available Cellular metabolism continuously processes an enormous range of external compounds into endogenous metabolites and is as such a key element in human physiology. The multifaceted physiological role of the metabolic network fulfilling the catalytic conversions can only be fully understood from a whole-body perspective where the causal interplay of the metabolic states of individual cells, the surrounding tissue and the whole organism are simultaneously considered. We here present an approach relying on dynamic flux balance analysis that allows the integration of metabolic networks at the cellular scale into standardized physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models at the whole-body level. To evaluate our approach we integrated a genome-scale network reconstruction of a human hepatocyte into the liver tissue of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of a human adult. The resulting multiscale model was used to investigate hyperuricemia therapy, ammonia detoxification and paracetamol-induced toxication at a systems level. The specific models simultaneously integrate multiple layers of biological organization and offer mechanistic insights into pathology and medication. The approach presented may in future support a mechanistic understanding in diagnostics and drug development.

  4. Structural modeling of sandwich structures with lightweight cellular cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Liu; Z. C. Deng; T. J. Lu

    2007-01-01

    An effective single layered finite element (FE) computational model is proposed to predict the structural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels having two dimensional (2D) prismatic or three dimensional (3D) truss cores.Three different types of cellular core topology are considered: pyramidal truss core (3D), Kagome truss core (3D) and corrugated core (2D), representing three kinds of material anisotropy: orthotropic, monoclinic and general anisotropic. A homogenization technique is developed to obtain the homogenized macroscopic stiffness properties of the cellular core. In comparison with the results obtained by using detailed FE model, the single layered computational model cangive acceptable predictions for both the static and dynamic behaviors of orthotropic truss core sandwich panels. However, for non-orthotropic 3D truss cores, the predictions are not so well. For both static and dynamic behaviors of a 2D corrugated core sandwich panel, the predictions derived by the single layered computational model is generally acceptable when the size of the unit cell varies within a certain range, with the predictions for moderately strong or strong corrugated cores more accurate than those for weak cores.

  5. A Fluid Model for Performance Analysis in Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coupechoux Marceau

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new framework to study the performance of cellular networks using a fluid model and we derive from this model analytical formulas for interference, outage probability, and spatial outage probability. The key idea of the fluid model is to consider the discrete base station (BS entities as a continuum of transmitters that are spatially distributed in the network. This model allows us to obtain simple analytical expressions to reveal main characteristics of the network. In this paper, we focus on the downlink other-cell interference factor (OCIF, which is defined for a given user as the ratio of its outer cell received power to its inner cell received power. A closed-form formula of the OCIF is provided in this paper. From this formula, we are able to obtain the global outage probability as well as the spatial outage probability, which depends on the location of a mobile station (MS initiating a new call. Our analytical results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations performed in a traditional hexagonal network. Furthermore, we demonstrate an application of the outage probability related to cell breathing and densification of cellular networks.

  6. Guided Inquiry and Consensus-Building Used to Construct Cellular Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel I. Cohen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Using models helps students learn from a “whole systems” perspective when studying the cell. This paper describes a model that employs guided inquiry and requires consensus building among students for its completion. The model is interactive, meaning that it expands upon a static model which, once completed, cannot be altered and additionally relates various levels of biological organization (molecular, organelle, and cellular to define cell and organelle function and interaction. Learning goals are assessed using data summed from final grades and from images of the student’s final cell model (plant, bacteria, and yeast taken from diverse seventh grade classes. Instructional figures showing consensus-building pathways and seating arrangements are discussed. Results suggest that the model leads to a high rate of participation, facilitates guided inquiry, and fosters group and individual exploration by challenging student understanding of the living cell.

  7. Robustness of a Cellular Automata Model for the HIV Infection

    CERN Document Server

    Figueirêdo, P H; Santos, R M Zorzenon dos

    2008-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the robustness of the results obtained from the cellular automata model which describes the spread of the HIV infection within lymphoid tissues [R. M. Zorzenon dos Santos and S. Coutinho, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 168102 (2001)]. The analysis focussed on the dynamic behavior of the model when defined in lattices with different symmetries and dimensionalities. The results illustrated that the three-phase dynamics of the planar models suffered minor changes in relation to lattice symmetry variations and, while differences were observed regarding dimensionality changes, qualitative behavior was preserved. A further investigation was conducted into primary infection and sensitiveness of the latency period to variations of the model's stochastic parameters over wide ranging values. The variables characterizing primary infection and the latency period exhibited power-law behavior when the stochastic parameters varied over a few orders of magnitude. The power-law exponents were app...

  8. A Cellular Automaton Model for Tumor Dormancy: Emergence of a Proliferative Switch

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Duyu; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Malignant cancers that lead to fatal outcomes for patients may remain dormant for very long periods of time. Although individual mechanisms such as cellular dormancy, angiogenic dormancy and immunosurveillance have been proposed, a comprehensive understanding of cancer dormancy and the "switch" from a dormant to a proliferative state still needs to be strengthened from both a basic and clinical point of view. Computational modeling enables one to explore a variety of scenarios for possible but realistic microscopic dormancy mechanisms and their predicted outcomes. The aim of this paper is to devise such a predictive computational model of dormancy with an emergent "switch" behavior. Specifically, we generalize a previous cellular automaton (CA) model for proliferative growth of solid tumor that now incorporates a variety of cell-level tumor-host interactions and different mechanisms for tumor dormancy, for example the effects of the immune system. Our new CA rules induce a natural "competition" between the tu...

  9. Simulation of root forms using cellular automata model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winarno, Nanang, E-mail: nanang-winarno@upi.edu; Prima, Eka Cahya [International Program on Science Education, Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia, Jl. Dr. Setiabudi no 229, Bandung40154 (Indonesia); Afifah, Ratih Mega Ayu [Department of Physics Education, Post Graduate School, Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia, Jl. Dr. Setiabudi no 229, Bandung40154 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    This research aims to produce a simulation program for root forms using cellular automata model. Stephen Wolfram in his book entitled “A New Kind of Science” discusses the formation rules based on the statistical analysis. In accordance with Stephen Wolfram’s investigation, the research will develop a basic idea of computer program using Delphi 7 programming language. To best of our knowledge, there is no previous research developing a simulation describing root forms using the cellular automata model compared to the natural root form with the presence of stone addition as the disturbance. The result shows that (1) the simulation used four rules comparing results of the program towards the natural photographs and each rule had shown different root forms; (2) the stone disturbances prevent the root growth and the multiplication of root forms had been successfully modeled. Therefore, this research had added some stones, which have size of 120 cells placed randomly in the soil. Like in nature, stones cannot be penetrated by plant roots. The result showed that it is very likely to further develop the program of simulating root forms by 50 variations.

  10. A hybrid parallel framework for the cellular Potts model simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; He, Kejing [SOUTH CHINA UNIV; Dong, Shoubin [SOUTH CHINA UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) has been widely used for biological simulations. However, most current implementations are either sequential or approximated, which can't be used for large scale complex 3D simulation. In this paper we present a hybrid parallel framework for CPM simulations. The time-consuming POE solving, cell division, and cell reaction operation are distributed to clusters using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The Monte Carlo lattice update is parallelized on shared-memory SMP system using OpenMP. Because the Monte Carlo lattice update is much faster than the POE solving and SMP systems are more and more common, this hybrid approach achieves good performance and high accuracy at the same time. Based on the parallel Cellular Potts Model, we studied the avascular tumor growth using a multiscale model. The application and performance analysis show that the hybrid parallel framework is quite efficient. The hybrid parallel CPM can be used for the large scale simulation ({approx}10{sup 8} sites) of complex collective behavior of numerous cells ({approx}10{sup 6}).

  11. Simulation of root forms using cellular automata model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research aims to produce a simulation program for root forms using cellular automata model. Stephen Wolfram in his book entitled “A New Kind of Science” discusses the formation rules based on the statistical analysis. In accordance with Stephen Wolfram’s investigation, the research will develop a basic idea of computer program using Delphi 7 programming language. To best of our knowledge, there is no previous research developing a simulation describing root forms using the cellular automata model compared to the natural root form with the presence of stone addition as the disturbance. The result shows that (1) the simulation used four rules comparing results of the program towards the natural photographs and each rule had shown different root forms; (2) the stone disturbances prevent the root growth and the multiplication of root forms had been successfully modeled. Therefore, this research had added some stones, which have size of 120 cells placed randomly in the soil. Like in nature, stones cannot be penetrated by plant roots. The result showed that it is very likely to further develop the program of simulating root forms by 50 variations

  12. Network modeling of membrane-based artificial cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Eric C.; Philen, Michael K.; Leo, Donald J.

    2013-04-01

    Computational models are derived for predicting the behavior of artificial cellular networks for engineering applications. The systems simulated involve the use of a biomolecular unit cell, a multiphase material that incorporates a lipid bilayer between two hydrophilic compartments. These unit cells may be considered building blocks that enable the fabrication of complex electrochemical networks. These networks can incorporate a variety of stimuli-responsive biomolecules to enable a diverse range of multifunctional behavior. Through the collective properties of these biomolecules, the system demonstrates abilities that recreate natural cellular phenomena such as mechanotransduction, optoelectronic response, and response to chemical gradients. A crucial step to increase the utility of these biomolecular networks is to develop mathematical models of their stimuli-responsive behavior. While models have been constructed deriving from the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model focusing on describing the system as a combination of traditional electrical components (capacitors and resistors), these electrical elements do not sufficiently describe the phenomena seen in experiment as they are not linked to the molecular scale processes. From this realization an advanced model is proposed that links the traditional unit cell parameters such as conductance and capacitance to the molecular structure of the system. Rather than approaching the membrane as an isolated parallel plate capacitor, the model seeks to link the electrical properties to the underlying chemical characteristics. This model is then applied towards experimental cases in order that a more complete picture of the underlying phenomena responsible for the desired sensing mechanisms may be constructed. In this way the stimuli-responsive characteristics may be understood and optimized.

  13. Agonistic encounters and cellular angst: social interactions induce heat shock proteins in juvenile salmonid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Currie, Suzanne; LeBlanc, Sacha; Watters, M. Alexandrea; Gilmour, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile salmonid fish readily form dominance hierarchies when faced with limited resources. While these social interactions may result in profound behavioural and physiological stress, it is unknown if this social stress is evident at the level of the cellular stress response—specifically, the induction of stress or heat shock proteins (Hsps). Thus, the goal of our study was to determine if Hsps are induced during hierarchy formation in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To this e...

  14. The evolution of early cellular systems viewed through the lens of biological interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M Poole

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The minimal cell concept represents a pragmatic approach to the question of how few genes are required to run a cell. This is a helpful way to build a parts-list, and has been more successful than attempts to deduce a minimal gene set for life by inferring the gene repertoire of the Last Universal Common Ancestor, as few genes trace back to this hypothetical ancestral state. However, the study of minimal cellular systems is the study of biological outliers where, by practical necessity, coevolutionary interactions are minimised or ignored. In this paper, we consider the biological context from which minimal genomes have been removed. For instance, some of the most reduced genomes are from endosymbionts and are the result of coevolutionary interactions with a host; few such organisms are ‘free-living’. As few, if any, biological systems exist in complete isolation, we expect that, as with modern life, early biological systems were part of an ecosystem, replete with organismal interactions. We favour refocusing discussions of the evolution of cellular systems on processes rather than gene counts. We therefore draw a distinction between a pragmatic minimal cell (an interesting engineering problem, a distributed genome (a system resulting from an evolutionary transition involving more than one cell and the looser coevolutionary interactions that are ubiquitous in ecosystems. Finally, we consider the distributed genome and coevolutionary interactions between genomic entities in the context of early evolution.

  15. Interactions between small viral RNAs of vesicular stomatitis virus and components of cellular gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, J D

    1985-05-01

    Recent interest in the details of virus-host interactions has come to focus on molecular contacts between cell factors and components of viruses. These generally concern protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, protein-nucleic acid interactions involving viral transcription products and cell proteins are considered. Also examined here will be the hypothesis that such interactions have evolved because viruses have adopted cellular processes to favour their own replication and that the consequences of this co-evolution can be the disruption of the macromolecular functions of the cell, and eventual cytopathology. For its own survival in the long term, the host may evolve more refined mechanisms to evade the damage levied by the intruding virus. PMID:2856377

  16. A generalized cellular automata approach to modeling first order enzyme kinetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhishek Dutta; Saurajyoti Kar; Advait Apte; Ingmar Nopens; Denis Constales

    2015-04-01

    Biochemical processes occur through intermediate steps which are associated with the formation of reaction complexes. These enzyme-catalyzed biochemical reactions are inhibited in a number of ways such as inhibitors competing for the binding site directly, inhibitors deforming the allosteric site or inhibitors changing the structure of active substrate. Using an in silico approach, the concentration of various reaction agents can be monitored at every single time step, which are otherwise difficult to analyze experimentally. Cell-based models with discrete state variables, such as Cellular Automata (CA) provide an understanding of the organizational principles of interacting cellular systems to link the individual cell (microscopic) dynamics wit a particular collective (macroscopic) phenomenon. In this study, a CA model representing a first order enzyme kinetics with inhibitor activity is formulated. The framework of enzyme reaction rules described in this study is probabilistic. An extended von Neumann neighborhood with periodic boundary condition is implemented on a two-dimensional (2D) lattice framework. The effect of lattice-size variation is studied followed by a sensitivity analysis of the model output to the probabilistic parameters which represent various kinetic reaction constants in the enzyme kinetic model. This provides a deeper insight into the sensitivity of the CA model to these parameters. It is observed that cellular automata can capture the essential features of a discrete real system, consisting of space, time and state, structured with simple local rules without making complex implementations but resulting in complex but explainable patterns.

  17. Two-dimensional cellular automaton model for simulating structural evolution of binary alloys during solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lin; ZHANG Cai-bei

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional cellular automaton(CA) simulations of phase transformations of binary alloys during solidification were reported. The modelling incorporates local concentration and heat changes into a nucleation or growth function, which is utilized by the automaton in a probabilistic fashion. These simulations may provide an efficient method of discovering how the physical processes involved in solidification processes dynamically progress and how they interact with each other during solidification. The simulated results show that the final morphology during solidification is related with the cooling conditions. The established model can be used to evaluate the phase transformation of binary alloys during solidification.

  18. Computer Modeling of the Earliest Cellular Structures and Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-03-01

    In the absence of extinct or extant record of protocells (the earliest ancestors of contemporary cells), the most direct way to test ourunderstanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models of protocells. Such efforts are currently underway in the NASA Astrobiology Program. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures and developing designs for molecules that perform protocellular functions. Many of these functions, such as import of nutrients, capture and storage of energy, and response to changes in the environment are carried out by proteins bound to membranes. We will discuss a series of large-scale, molecular-level computer simulations which demonstrate (a) how small proteins (peptides)organize themselves into ordered structures at water-membrane interfaces and insert into membranes, (b) how these peptides aggregate to form membrane-spanning structures (e.g. channels), and (c) by what mechanisms such aggregates perform essential protocellular functions, such as proton transport of protons across cell walls, a key step in cellular bioenergetics. The simulations were performed using the molecular dynamics method, in which Newton's equations of motion for each atom in the system are solved iteratively. The problems of interest required simulations on multi-nanosecond time scales, which corresponded to 10^6-10^8 time steps.

  19. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  20. The importance of volume exclusion in modelling cellular migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Louise; Baker, Ruth E

    2015-09-01

    The modelling of collective migration has traditionally been undertaken in a continuous framework, with little reference to the individual-level mechanisms that give rise to such a concerted movement. One factor whose importance is now coming to light is that the individuals themselves occupy space in the domain, thus obstructing others from moving past them (volume exclusion). In this work, we systematically derive continuous descriptions of cellular migration with volume exclusion for a wide range of individual-based mechanisms and in one, two and three dimensions. We also consider subpopulations of migrating individuals, which may have different characteristics, such as differing sizes and speeds of migration. We demonstrate that volume exclusion is of particular importance when biased movement is included, and thus conclude that volume exclusion may have its greatest effect when considering directed migratory mechanisms such as chemotaxis.

  1. Plant-Herbivore Interaction: Dissection of the Cellular Pattern of Tetranychus urticae Feeding on the Host Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensoussan, Nicolas; Santamaria, M. Estrella; Zhurov, Vladimir; Diaz, Isabel; Grbić, Miodrag; Grbić, Vojislava

    2016-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), is one of the most polyphagous herbivores feeding on cell contents of over 1100 plant species including more than 150 crops. It is being established as a model for chelicerate herbivores with tools that enable tracking of reciprocal responses in plant-spider mite interactions. However, despite their important pest status and a growing understanding of the molecular basis of interactions with plant hosts, knowledge of the way mites interface with the plant while feeding and the plant damage directly inflicted by mites is lacking. Here, utilizing histology and microscopy methods, we uncovered several key features of T. urticae feeding. By following the stylet path within the plant tissue, we determined that the stylet penetrates the leaf either in between epidermal pavement cells or through a stomatal opening, without damaging the epidermal cellular layer. Our recordings of mite feeding established that duration of the feeding event ranges from several minutes to more than half an hour, during which time mites consume a single mesophyll cell in a pattern that is common to both bean and Arabidopsis plant hosts. In addition, this study determined that leaf chlorotic spots, a common symptom of mite herbivory, do not form as an immediate consequence of mite feeding. Our results establish a cellular context for the plant-spider mite interaction that will support our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and cell signaling associated with spider mite feeding. PMID:27512397

  2. Plant-herbivore interaction: dissection of the cellular pattern of Tetranychus urticae feeding on the host plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bensoussan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae, is one of the most polyphagous herbivores feeding on cell contents of over 1,100 plant species including more than 150 crops. It is being established as a model for chelicerate herbivores with tools that enable tracking of reciprocal responses in plant-spider mite interactions. However, despite their important pest status and a growing understanding of the molecular basis of interactions with plant hosts, knowledge of the way mites interface with the plant while feeding and the plant damage directly inflicted by mites is lacking. Here, utilizing histology and microscopy methods, we uncovered several key features of T. urticae feeding. By following the stylet path within the plant tissue, we determined that the stylet penetrates the leaf either in between epidermal pavement cells or through a stomatal opening, without damaging the epidermal cellular layer. Our recordings of mite feeding established that duration of the feeding event ranges from several minutes to more than half an hour, during which time mites consume a single mesophyll cell in a pattern that is common to both bean and Arabidopsis plant hosts. In addition, this study determined that leaf chlorotic spots, a common symptom of mite herbivory, do not form as an immediate consequence of mite feeding. Our results establish a cellular context for the plant-spider mite interaction that will support our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and cell signaling associated with spider mite feeding.

  3. An Integrated Framework to Model Cellular Phenotype as a Component of Biochemical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gormley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of regulatory molecules in signaling pathways is critical for understanding cellular behavior. Given the complexity of the transcriptional gene network, the relationship between molecular expression and phenotype is difficult to determine using reductionist experimental methods. Computational models provide the means to characterize regulatory mechanisms and predict phenotype in the context of gene networks. Integrating gene expression data with phenotypic data in transcriptional network models enables systematic identification of critical molecules in a biological network. We developed an approach based on fuzzy logic to model cell budding in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using time series expression microarray data of the cell cycle. Cell budding is a phenotype of viable cells undergoing division. Predicted interactions between gene expression and phenotype reflected known biological relationships. Dynamic simulation analysis reproduced the behavior of the yeast cell cycle and accurately identified genes and interactions which are essential for cell viability.

  4. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF CONGESTION CONTROL MODELS FOR CELLULAR WIRELESS NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falade A. J

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cellular wireless systems like GSM suffer from congestion resulting in overall system degradation and poor service delivery. When the traffic demand in a geographical area is high, the input traffic rate will exceed thecapacity of the output lines. This work focused on homogenous wireless network (the network traffic and resource dimensioning that are statistically identical such that the network performance evaluation can be reduced to a system with single cell and a single traffic type. Such system can employa queuing model to evaluate the performance metric of a cell in terms of blocking probability. Five congestion control models were compared in the work to ascertain their peculiarities, they are Erlang B, Erlang C, Engset (cleared, Engset (buffered, and Bernoulli. To analyze the system, an aggregate onedimensional Markov chain wasderived, such that it describes a call arrival process under the assumption that it is Poisson distributed. The models were simulated and their results show varying performances, however the Bernoulli model (Pb5 tends to show a situation that allows more users access to the system and the congestion level remain unaffected despite increase in the number of users and the offered traffic into the system.

  5. Cellular automaton model of mass transport with chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport and chemical reactions of solutes are modelled as a cellular automaton in which molecules of different species perform a random walk on a regular lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. The model describes advection and diffusion in a simple way, and as no restriction is placed on the number of particles at a lattice site, it is also able to describe a wide variety of chemical reactions. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. Simulations on one-and two-dimensional lattices show that the discrete model can be used to approximate the solutions of the continuum equations. We discuss discrepancies which arise from correlations between molecules and how these discrepancies disappear as the continuum limit is approached. Of particular interest are simulations displaying long-time behaviour which depends on long-wavelength statistical fluctuations not accounted for by the standard equations. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔ c and a + b → c with homogeneous and inhomogeneous initial conditions as well as to systems subject to autocatalytic reactions and displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. (author) 9 figs., 34 refs

  6. A node-based version of the cellular Potts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scianna, Marco; Preziosi, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    The cellular Potts model (CPM) is a lattice-based Monte Carlo method that uses an energetic formalism to describe the phenomenological mechanisms underlying the biophysical problem of interest. We here propose a CPM-derived framework that relies on a node-based representation of cell-scale elements. This feature has relevant consequences on the overall simulation environment. First, our model can be implemented on any given domain, provided a proper discretization (which can be regular or irregular, fixed or time evolving). Then, it allowed an explicit representation of cell membranes, whose displacements realistically result in cell movement. Finally, our node-based approach can be easily interfaced with continuous mechanics or fluid dynamics models. The proposed computational environment is here applied to some simple biological phenomena, such as cell sorting and chemotactic migration, also in order to achieve an analysis of the performance of the underlying algorithm. This work is finally equipped with a critical comparison between the advantages and disadvantages of our model with respect to the traditional CPM and to some similar vertex-based approaches. PMID:27416549

  7. Cellular automaton model of crowd evacuation inspired by slime mould

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeiton, V. S.; Papadopoulos, D. P.; Georgilas, I. P.; Sirakoulis, G. Ch.; Adamatzky, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    In all the living organisms, the self-preservation behaviour is almost universal. Even the most simple of living organisms, like slime mould, is typically under intense selective pressure to evolve a response to ensure their evolution and safety in the best possible way. On the other hand, evacuation of a place can be easily characterized as one of the most stressful situations for the individuals taking part on it. Taking inspiration from the slime mould behaviour, we are introducing a computational bio-inspired model crowd evacuation model. Cellular Automata (CA) were selected as a fully parallel advanced computation tool able to mimic the Physarum's behaviour. In particular, the proposed CA model takes into account while mimicking the Physarum foraging process, the food diffusion, the organism's growth, the creation of tubes for each organism, the selection of optimum tube for each human in correspondence to the crowd evacuation under study and finally, the movement of all humans at each time step towards near exit. To test the model's efficiency and robustness, several simulation scenarios were proposed both in virtual and real-life indoor environments (namely, the first floor of office building B of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Democritus University of Thrace). The proposed model is further evaluated in a purely quantitative way by comparing the simulation results with the corresponding ones from the bibliography taken by real data. The examined fundamental diagrams of velocity-density and flow-density are found in full agreement with many of the already published corresponding results proving the adequacy, the fitness and the resulting dynamics of the model. Finally, several real Physarum experiments were conducted in an archetype of the aforementioned real-life environment proving at last that the proposed model succeeded in reproducing sufficiently the Physarum's recorded behaviour derived from observation of the aforementioned

  8. Model of dynamic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Klimchik, Alexandr; Pashkevich, Anatol; Caro, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    In robotic-based machining, an interaction between the workpiece and technological tool causes essential deflections that significantly decrease the manufacturing accuracy. Relevant compliance errors highly depend on the manipulator configuration and essentially differ throughout the workspace. Their influence is especially important for heavy serial robots. To overcome this difficulty this report presents a new technique for compensation of the compliance errors caused by technological proce...

  9. A cellular automata model of epidemics of a heterogeneous susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Zhen; Liu Quan-Xing

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present a model with spatial heterogeneity based on cellular automata (CA). In the model we consider the relevant heterogeneity of host (susceptible) mixing and the natural birth rate. We divide the susceptible population into three groups according to the immunity of each individual based on the classical susceptible-infectedremoved (SIR) epidemic models, and consider the spread of an infectious disease transmitted by direct contact among humans and vectors that have not an incubation period to become infectious. We test the local stability and instability of the disease-free equilibrium by the spectrum radii of Jacobian. The simulation shows that the structure of the nearest neighbour size of the cell (or the degree of the scale-free networks) plays a very important role in the spread properties of infectious disease. The positive equilibrium of the infections versus the neighbour size follows the third power law if an endemic equilibrium point exists. Finally, we analyse the feature of the infection waves for the homogeneity and heterogeneous cases respectively.

  10. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  11. A Computational model for compressed sensing RNAi cellular screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Hua

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi becomes an increasingly important and effective genetic tool to study the function of target genes by suppressing specific genes of interest. This system approach helps identify signaling pathways and cellular phase types by tracking intensity and/or morphological changes of cells. The traditional RNAi screening scheme, in which one siRNA is designed to knockdown one specific mRNA target, needs a large library of siRNAs and turns out to be time-consuming and expensive. Results In this paper, we propose a conceptual model, called compressed sensing RNAi (csRNAi, which employs a unique combination of group of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs to knockdown a much larger size of genes. This strategy is based on the fact that one gene can be partially bound with several small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and conversely, one siRNA can bind to a few genes with distinct binding affinity. This model constructs a multi-to-multi correspondence between siRNAs and their targets, with siRNAs much fewer than mRNA targets, compared with the conventional scheme. Mathematically this problem involves an underdetermined system of equations (linear or nonlinear, which is ill-posed in general. However, the recently developed compressed sensing (CS theory can solve this problem. We present a mathematical model to describe the csRNAi system based on both CS theory and biological concerns. To build this model, we first search nucleotide motifs in a target gene set. Then we propose a machine learning based method to find the effective siRNAs with novel features, such as image features and speech features to describe an siRNA sequence. Numerical simulations show that we can reduce the siRNA library to one third of that in the conventional scheme. In addition, the features to describe siRNAs outperform the existing ones substantially. Conclusions This csRNAi system is very promising in saving both time and cost for large-scale RNAi

  12. A Computational model for compressed sensing RNAi cellular screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) becomes an increasingly important and effective genetic tool to study the function of target genes by suppressing specific genes of interest. This system approach helps identify signaling pathways and cellular phase types by tracking intensity and/or morphological changes of cells. The traditional RNAi screening scheme, in which one siRNA is designed to knockdown one specific mRNA target, needs a large library of siRNAs and turns out to be time-consuming and expensive. Results In this paper, we propose a conceptual model, called compressed sensing RNAi (csRNAi), which employs a unique combination of group of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to knockdown a much larger size of genes. This strategy is based on the fact that one gene can be partially bound with several small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and conversely, one siRNA can bind to a few genes with distinct binding affinity. This model constructs a multi-to-multi correspondence between siRNAs and their targets, with siRNAs much fewer than mRNA targets, compared with the conventional scheme. Mathematically this problem involves an underdetermined system of equations (linear or nonlinear), which is ill-posed in general. However, the recently developed compressed sensing (CS) theory can solve this problem. We present a mathematical model to describe the csRNAi system based on both CS theory and biological concerns. To build this model, we first search nucleotide motifs in a target gene set. Then we propose a machine learning based method to find the effective siRNAs with novel features, such as image features and speech features to describe an siRNA sequence. Numerical simulations show that we can reduce the siRNA library to one third of that in the conventional scheme. In addition, the features to describe siRNAs outperform the existing ones substantially. Conclusions This csRNAi system is very promising in saving both time and cost for large-scale RNAi screening experiments which

  13. Emergent Behavior from A Cellular Automaton Model for Invasive Tumor Growth in Heterogeneous Microenvironments

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Understanding tumor invasion and metastasis is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical practice. In vitro experiments have established that the invasive growth of malignant tumors is characterized by the dendritic invasive branches composed of chains of tumor cells emanating from the primary tumor mass. The preponderance of previous tumor simulations focused on non-invasive (or proliferative) growth. The formation of the invasive cell chains and their interactions with the primary tumor mass and host microenvironment are not well understood. Here, we present a novel cellular automaton (CA) model that enables one to efficiently simulate invasive tumor growth in a heterogeneous host microenvironment. By taking into account a variety of microscopic-scale tumor-host interactions, including the short-range mechanical interactions between tumor cells and tumor stroma, degradation of extracellular matrix by the invasive cells and oxygen/nutrient gradient driven cell motions, our CA mo...

  14. Patterns of HIV-1 protein interaction identify perturbed host-cellular subsystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie I MacPherson

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 exploits a diverse array of host cell functions in order to replicate. This is mediated through a network of virus-host interactions. A variety of recent studies have catalogued this information. In particular the HIV-1, Human Protein Interaction Database (HHPID has provided a unique depth of protein interaction detail. However, as a map of HIV-1 infection, the HHPID is problematic, as it contains curation error and redundancy; in addition, it is based on a heterogeneous set of experimental methods. Based on identifying shared patterns of HIV-host interaction, we have developed a novel methodology to delimit the core set of host-cellular functions and their associated perturbation from the HHPID. Initially, using biclustering, we identify 279 significant sets of host proteins that undergo the same types of interaction. The functional cohesiveness of these protein sets was validated using a human protein-protein interaction network, gene ontology annotation and sequence similarity. Next, using a distance measure, we group host protein sets and identify 37 distinct higher-level subsystems. We further demonstrate the biological significance of these subsystems by cross-referencing with global siRNA screens that have been used to detect host factors necessary for HIV-1 replication, and investigate the seemingly small intersect between these data sets. Our results highlight significant host-cell subsystems that are perturbed during the course of HIV-1 infection. Moreover, we characterise the patterns of interaction that contribute to these perturbations. Thus, our work disentangles the complex set of HIV-1-host protein interactions in the HHPID, reconciles these with siRNA screens and provides an accessible and interpretable map of infection.

  15. Calcitriol-copper interaction leads to non enzymatic, reactive oxygen species mediated DNA breakage and modulation of cellular redox scavengers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Asim; Farhan, Mohd; Naseem, Imrana; Hadi, S M

    2016-09-01

    Calcitriol is the metabolically active form of Vitamin D and is known to kill cancer cells. Using the rat model of DEN induced hepatocellular carcinoma we show that there is a marked increase in cellular levels of copper in hepatocellular carcinoma and that calcitriol-copper interaction leads to reactive oxygen species mediated DNA breakage selectively in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In vivo studies show that calcitriol selectively induces severe fluctuations in cellular enzymatic and non enzymatic scavengers of reactive oxygen species in the malignant tissue. Lipid peroxidation, a well established marker of oxidative stress, was found to increase, and substantial cellular DNA breakage was observed. We propose that calcitriol is a proxidant in the cellular milieu of hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and this copper mediated prooxidant action of calcitriol causes selective DNA breakage in malignant cells, while sparing normal (non malignant) cells. PMID:27343126

  16. Modeling chemical systems using cellular automata a textbook and laboratory manual

    CERN Document Server

    Kier, Lemont B; Cheng, Chao-Kun

    2006-01-01

    Provides a practical introduction to an exciting modeling paradigm for complex systems. This book discusses the nature of scientific inquiry using models and simulations, and describes the nature of cellular automata models. It gives descriptions of how cellular automata models can be used in the study of a variety of phenomena.

  17. Developing land use scenario dynamics model by the integration of system dynamics model and cellular automata model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Chunyang; SHI; Peijun; CHEN; Jin; Li; Xiaobing; PAN; Ya

    2005-01-01

    Modeling land use scenario changes and its potential impacts on the structure and function of the ecosystem in the typical regions are helpful to understanding the interactive mechanism between land use system and ecological system. A Land Use Scenario Dynamics (LUSD) model by the integration of System Dynamics (SD) model and Cellular Automata (CA) model is developed with land use scenario changes in northern China in the next 20 years simulated in this paper. The basic idea of LUSD model is to simulate the land use scenario demands by using SD model at first, then allocate the land use scenario patterns at the local scale with the considerations of land use suitability, inheritance ability and neighborhood effect by using CA model to satisfy the balance between land use scenario demands and supply. The application of LUSD model in northern China suggests that the model has the ability to reflect the complex behavior of land use system at different scales to some extent and is a useful tool for assessing the potential impacts of land use system on ecological system. In addition, the simulated results also indicate that obvious land use changes will take place in the farming-pastoral zone of northern China in the next 20 years with cultivated land and urban land being the most active land use types.

  18. Silver Nanoparticle-Mediated Cellular Responses in Various Cell Lines: An in Vitro Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have attracted increased interest and are currently used in various industries including medicine, cosmetics, textiles, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, owing to their unique physical and chemical properties, particularly as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Recently, several studies have reported both beneficial and toxic effects of AgNPs on various prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. To develop nanoparticles for mediated therapy, several laboratories have used a variety of cell lines under in vitro conditions to evaluate the properties, mode of action, differential responses, and mechanisms of action of AgNPs. In vitro models are simple, cost-effective, rapid, and can be used to easily assess efficacy and performance. The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and biocompatibility of AgNPs depend on many factors such as size, shape, surface charge, surface coating, solubility, concentration, surface functionalization, distribution of particles, mode of entry, mode of action, growth media, exposure time, and cell type. Cellular responses to AgNPs are different in each cell type and depend on the physical and chemical nature of AgNPs. This review evaluates significant contributions to the literature on biological applications of AgNPs. It begins with an introduction to AgNPs, with particular attention to their overall impact on cellular effects. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the reasons for different cell types exhibiting differential responses to nanoparticles even when they possess similar size, shape, and other parameters. Firstly, we discuss the cellular effects of AgNPs on a variety of cell lines; Secondly, we discuss the mechanisms of action of AgNPs in various cellular systems, and try to elucidate how AgNPs interact with different mammalian cell lines and produce significant effects; Finally, we discuss the cellular activation of various signaling molecules in response to AgNPs, and conclude with

  19. Silver Nanoparticle-Mediated Cellular Responses in Various Cell Lines: An in Vitro Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted increased interest and are currently used in various industries including medicine, cosmetics, textiles, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, owing to their unique physical and chemical properties, particularly as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Recently, several studies have reported both beneficial and toxic effects of AgNPs on various prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. To develop nanoparticles for mediated therapy, several laboratories have used a variety of cell lines under in vitro conditions to evaluate the properties, mode of action, differential responses, and mechanisms of action of AgNPs. In vitro models are simple, cost-effective, rapid, and can be used to easily assess efficacy and performance. The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and biocompatibility of AgNPs depend on many factors such as size, shape, surface charge, surface coating, solubility, concentration, surface functionalization, distribution of particles, mode of entry, mode of action, growth media, exposure time, and cell type. Cellular responses to AgNPs are different in each cell type and depend on the physical and chemical nature of AgNPs. This review evaluates significant contributions to the literature on biological applications of AgNPs. It begins with an introduction to AgNPs, with particular attention to their overall impact on cellular effects. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the reasons for different cell types exhibiting differential responses to nanoparticles even when they possess similar size, shape, and other parameters. Firstly, we discuss the cellular effects of AgNPs on a variety of cell lines; Secondly, we discuss the mechanisms of action of AgNPs in various cellular systems, and try to elucidate how AgNPs interact with different mammalian cell lines and produce significant effects; Finally, we discuss the cellular activation of various signaling molecules in response to AgNPs, and conclude with future perspectives

  20. Silver Nanoparticle-Mediated Cellular Responses in Various Cell Lines: An in Vitro Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted increased interest and are currently used in various industries including medicine, cosmetics, textiles, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, owing to their unique physical and chemical properties, particularly as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Recently, several studies have reported both beneficial and toxic effects of AgNPs on various prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. To develop nanoparticles for mediated therapy, several laboratories have used a variety of cell lines under in vitro conditions to evaluate the properties, mode of action, differential responses, and mechanisms of action of AgNPs. In vitro models are simple, cost-effective, rapid, and can be used to easily assess efficacy and performance. The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and biocompatibility of AgNPs depend on many factors such as size, shape, surface charge, surface coating, solubility, concentration, surface functionalization, distribution of particles, mode of entry, mode of action, growth media, exposure time, and cell type. Cellular responses to AgNPs are different in each cell type and depend on the physical and chemical nature of AgNPs. This review evaluates significant contributions to the literature on biological applications of AgNPs. It begins with an introduction to AgNPs, with particular attention to their overall impact on cellular effects. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the reasons for different cell types exhibiting differential responses to nanoparticles even when they possess similar size, shape, and other parameters. Firstly, we discuss the cellular effects of AgNPs on a variety of cell lines; Secondly, we discuss the mechanisms of action of AgNPs in various cellular systems, and try to elucidate how AgNPs interact with different mammalian cell lines and produce significant effects; Finally, we discuss the cellular activation of various signaling molecules in response to AgNPs, and conclude with future perspectives

  1. Relationship between cellular response models and biochemical mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most cellular response experiments, survival reflects the kinetics of a variety of damage and repair processes. Unfortunately, biochemical studies of molecular repair deal with mechanisms which cannot be readily correlated with these kinetic observations. The difference in these approaches sometimes leads to confusion over terms such as potentially-lethal and sublethal damage. These terms were introduced with operation definitions, derived from kinetic studies of cell survival, but some researchers have since attempted to associate them with specific biochemical mechanisms. Consequently, the terms are often used in totally different ways be different investigators. The use of carefully constructed models originating either out of assumptions based on mechanisms, or on kinetics, can be used to design experiments to eliminate some alternative kinetic schemes. In turn, some mechanisms may also be eliminated, resulting in a reduction in the number of mechanisms which must be investigated biochemically. One must take advantage of a wide range of specialized radiation procedures in order to accomplish this. Examples of the use of such specialized experimental designs, which have led to a more detailed understanding of the kinetics of both algal and mammalian cell responses, are discussed

  2. Cellular cardiac electrophysiology modelling with Chaste and CellML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eCooper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaste is an open-source C++ library for computational biology that has well-developed cardiac electrophysiology tissue simulation support. In this paper, we introduce the features available for performing cardiac electrophysiology action potential simulations using a wide range of models from the Physiome repository.The mathematics of the models are described in CellML, with units for all quantities. The primary idea is that the model is defined in one place (the CellML file, and all model code is auto-generated at compile or run time; it never has to be manually edited.We use ontological annotation to identify model variables describing certain biological quantities (membrane voltage, capacitance, etc. to allow us to import any relevant CellML models into the Chaste framework in consistent units, and to interact with them via consistent interfaces. This approach provides a great deal of flexibility for analysing different models of the same system. Chaste provides a wide choice of numerical methods for solving the ordinary differential equations that describe the models. Fixed-timestep explicit and implicit solvers are provided, as discussed in previous work. Here we introduce the Rush--Larsen and Generalised Rush--Larsen integration techniques, made available via symbolic manipulation of the model equations, which are automatically rearranged into the forms required by these approaches. We have also integrated the CVODE solvers, a `gold standard' for stiff systems, and we have developed support for symbolic computation of the Jacobian matrix, yielding further increases in the performance and accuracy of CVODE. We discuss some of the technical details of this work and compare the performance of the available numerical methods.Finally, we discuss how this is generalised in our functional curation framework, which uses a domain-specific language for defining complex experiments as a basis for comparison of model behaviour.

  3. Four Dimensional (4-D BioChemInfoPhysics Models of Cardiac Cellular and Sub-Cellular Vibrations (Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hua Zou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD continued to be the leading cause of death. Failure or abnormal cardiac cellular or sub-cellular vibrations (oscillations could lead failure or abnormal heart beats that could cause CVD. Understanding the mechanisms of the vibrations (oscillations could help to prevent or to treat the diseases. Scientists have studied the mechanisms for more than 100 years. To our knowledge, the mechanisms are still unclear today. In this investigation, based on published data or results, conservation laws of the momentum as well as the energy, in views of biology, biochemistry, informatics and physics (BioChemInfoPhysics, we proposed our models of cardiac cellular and sub-cellular vibrations (oscillations of biological components, such as free ions in Biological Fluids (BF, Biological Membranes (BM, Ca++H+ (Ca++ and Na+K+ ATPases, Na+Ca++ exchangers (NCX, Ca++ carriers and myosin heads. Approach: Our models were described with 4-D (x, y, z, t or r, ?, z, t momentum transfer equations in mathematical physics. Results: The momentum transfer equations were solved with free and forced, damped, un-damped and over-damped, vibrations (oscillations. The biological components could be modeled as resonators or vibrators (oscillators, such as liquid plasmas, membranes, active springs, passive springs and active swings. Conclusion: We systematically provided new insights of automation (ignition and maintain, transportation, propagation and orientation of the cardiac cellular and sub-cellular vibrations (oscillations and resonances, with our BioChemInfoPhysics models of 4-D momentum transfer equations. Our modeling results implied: Auto-rhythmic cells (Sinoatrial Node Cells (SANC, Atrioventricular Node Cells (AVNC, Purkinje fibers, non-Auto-rhythmic ventricular myocytes and their Sarcoplasmic Reticulums (SR work as Biological Liquid Plasma Resonators (BLPR. The resonators were

  4. The mechanics of cellular compartmentalization as a model for tumor spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Pawlizak, Steve; Zink, Mareike; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Based on a recently developed surgical method of Michael H"ockel, which makes use of cellular confinement to compartments in the human body, we study the mechanics of the process of cell segregation. Compartmentalization is a fundamental process of cellular organization and occurs during embryonic development. A simple model system can demonstrate the process of compartmentalization: When two populations of suspended cells are mixed, this mixture will eventually segregate into two phases, whereas mixtures of the same cell type will not. In the 1960s, Malcolm S. Steinberg formulated the so-called differential adhesion hypothesis which explains the segregation in the model system and the process of compartmentalization by differences in surface tension and adhesiveness of the interacting cells. We are interested in to which extend the same physical principles affect tumor growth and spreading between compartments. For our studies, we use healthy and cancerous breast cell lines of different malignancy as well as primary cells from human cervix carcinoma. We apply a set of techniques to study their mechanical properties and interactions. The Optical Stretcher is used for whole cell rheology, while Cell-cell-adhesion forces are directly measured with a modified AFM. In combination with 3D segregation experiments in droplet cultures we try to clarify the role of surface tension in tumor spreading.

  5. Modelling land surface - atmosphere interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Højmark

    The study is investigates modelling of land surface – atmosphere interactions in context of fully coupled climatehydrological model. With a special focus of under what condition a fully coupled model system is needed. Regional climate model inter-comparison projects as ENSEMBLES have shown bias...... representation of groundwater in the hydrological model is found to important and this imply resolving the small river valleys. Because, the important shallow groundwater is found in the river valleys. If the model does not represent the shallow groundwater then the area mean surface flux calculation...

  6. A Cellular Automata Model for the Study of Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liucci, Luisa; Suteanu, Cristian; Melelli, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Power-law scaling has been observed in the frequency distribution of landslide sizes in many regions of the world, for landslides triggered by different factors, and in both multi-temporal and post-event datasets, thus indicating the universal character of this property of landslides and suggesting that the same mechanisms drive the dynamics of mass wasting processes. The reasons for the scaling behavior of landslide sizes are widely debated, since their understanding would improve our knowledge of the spatial and temporal evolution of this phenomenon. Self-Organized Critical (SOC) dynamics and the key role of topography have been suggested as possible explanations. The scaling exponent of the landslide size-frequency distribution defines the probability of landslide magnitudes and it thus represents an important parameter for hazard assessment. Therefore, another - still unanswered - important question concerns the factors on which its value depends. This paper investigates these issues using a Cellular Automata (CA) model. The CA uses a real topographic surface acquired from a Digital Elevation Model to represent the initial state of the system, where the states of cells are defined in terms of altitude. The stability criterion is based on the slope gradient. The system is driven to instability through a temporal decrease of the stability condition of cells, which may be thought of as representing the temporal weakening of soil caused by factors like rainfall. A transition rule defines the way in which instabilities lead to discharge from unstable cells to the neighboring cells, deciding upon the landslide direction and the quantity of mass involved. Both the direction and the transferred mass depend on the local topographic features. The scaling properties of the area-frequency distributions of the resulting landslide series are investigated for several rates of weakening and for different time windows, in order to explore the response of the system to model

  7. Plin2 inhibits cellular glucose uptake through interactions with SNAP23, a SNARE complex protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Senthivinayagam

    Full Text Available Although a link between excess lipid storage and aberrant glucose metabolism has been recognized for many years, little is known what role lipid storage droplets and associated proteins such as Plin2 play in managing cellular glucose levels. To address this issue, the influence of Plin2 on glucose uptake was examined using 2-NBD-Glucose and [(3H]-2-deoxyglucose to show that insulin-mediated glucose uptake was decreased 1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively in L cell fibroblasts overexpressing Plin2. Conversely, suppression of Plin2 levels by RNAi-mediated knockdown increased 2-NBD-Glucose uptake several fold in transfected L cells and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. The effect of Plin2 expression on proteins involved in glucose uptake and transport was also examined. Expression of the SNARE protein SNAP23 was increased 1.6-fold while levels of syntaxin-5 were decreased 1.7-fold in Plin2 overexpression cells with no significant changes observed in lipid droplet associated proteins Plin1 or FSP27 or with the insulin receptor, GLUT1, or VAMP4. FRET experiments revealed a close proximity of Plin2 to SNAP23 on lipid droplets to within an intramolecular distance of 51 Å. The extent of targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets was determined by co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments to show increased partitioning of SNAP23 to lipid droplets when Plin2 was overexpressed. Taken together, these results suggest that Plin2 inhibits glucose uptake by interacting with, and regulating cellular targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets. In summary, the current study for the first time provides direct evidence for the role of Plin2 in mediating cellular glucose uptake.

  8. Dynamical critical behavior in a cellular model of superconducting vortex avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkan, Tegy John

    Bak, Tang, and Wiesenfeld showed that certain driven dissipative systems with many degrees of freedom organize into a critical state characterized by avalanche dynamics and power law distribution of avalanche sizes and durations. They called this phenomenon self-organized criticality and sandpile became the prototype of such dynamical systems. Universality in these systems is not yet well established. Forty years ago, de Gennes noted that the Bean state in a type-II superconductor is similar to a sandpile. Motivated by strong experimental evidences, Bassler and Paczuski (BP) proposed a 2D sandpile model to study self-organization in the dynamics of vortices in superconductors. In this dissertation, the effect of anisotropy in the vortex-vortex interaction, stochasticity in the vortex toppling rule, and the configuration of the pinning centers on the scaling properties of the avalanches in the BP model is studied. Also, universality in the cellular model of vortex dynamics is investigated.

  9. An event-driven model simulating fundamental seismic characteristics with the use of cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlou, L.; Georgoudas, I. G.; Sirakoulis, G. Ch.; Scordilis, E. M.; Andreadis, I.

    This paper presents an extensive simulation tool based on a Cellular Automata (CA) system that models fundamental seismic characteristics of a region. The CA-based dynamic model consists of cells-charges and it is used for the simulation of the earthquake process. The simulation tool has remarkably accelerated the response of the model by incorporating principles of the High Performance Computing (HPC). Extensive programming features of parallel computing have been applied, thus improving its processing effectiveness. The tool implements an enhanced (or hyper-) 2-dimensional version of the proposed CA model. Regional characteristics that depend on the seismic background of the area under study are assigned to the model with the application of a user-friendly software environment. The model is evaluated with real data that correspond to a circular region around Skyros Island, Greece, for different time periods, as for example one of 45 years (1901-1945). The enhanced 2-dimensional version of the model incorporates all principal characteristics of the 2-dimensional one, also including groups of CA cells that interact with others, located to a considerable distance in an attempt to simulate long-range interaction. The advanced simulation tool has been thoroughly evaluated. Several measurements have been made for different critical states, as well as for various cascade (earthquake) sizes, cell activities and different neighbourhood sizes. Simulation results qualitatively approach the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) scaling law and reveal fundamental characteristics of the system.

  10. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhaohua, E-mail: ztang@jsd.claremont.edu [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Lin, Ren-Jang [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony [Genome Damage and Stability Center, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  11. Interactions of the p53 protein family in cellular stress response in gastrointestinal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilgelm, Anna E; Washington, Mary K; Wei, Jinxiong; Chen, Heidi; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Zaika, Alexander I

    2010-03-01

    p53, p63, and p73 are members of the p53 protein family involved in regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation, and other critical cellular processes. Here, we investigated the contribution of the entire p53 family in chemotherapeutic drug response in gastrointestinal tumors. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed complexity and variability of expression profiles of the p53 protein family. Using colon and esophageal cancer cells, we found that the integral transcription activity of the entire p53 family, as measured by the reporter analysis, associated with response to drug treatment in studied cells. We also found that p53 and p73, as well as p63 and p73, bind simultaneously to the promoters of p53 target genes. Taken together, our results support the view that the p53 protein family functions as an interacting network of proteins and show that cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drug treatment are determined by the total activity of the entire p53 family rather than p53 alone.

  12. Models of Interacting Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Zimdahl, W

    2012-01-01

    Any non-gravitational coupling between dark matter and dark energy modifies the cosmological dynamics. Interactions in the dark sector are considered to be relevant to address the coincidence problem. Moreover, in various models the observed accelerated expansion of the Universe is a pure interaction phenomenon. Here we review recent approaches in which a coupling between both dark components is crucial for the evolution of the Universe.

  13. The joy of interactive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchyts, Gennadii; Baart, Fedor; van Dam, Arthur; Jagers, Bert

    2013-04-01

    The conventional way of working with hydrodynamical models usually consists of the following steps: 1) define a schematization (e.g., in a graphical user interface, or by editing input files) 2) run model from start to end 3) visualize results 4) repeat any of the previous steps. This cycle commonly takes up from hours to several days. What if we can make this happen instantly? As most of the research done using numerical models is in fact qualitative and exploratory (Oreskes et al., 1994), why not use these models as such? How can we adapt models so that we can edit model input, run and visualize results at the same time? More and more, interactive models become available as online apps, mainly for demonstration and educational purposes. These models often simplify the physics behind flows and run on simplified model geometries, particularly when compared with state-of-the-art scientific simulation packages. Here we show how the aforementioned conventional standalone models ("static, run once") can be transformed into interactive models. The basic concepts behind turning existing (conventional) model engines into interactive engines are the following. The engine does not run the model from start to end, but is always available in memory, and can be fed by new boundary conditions, or state changes at any time. The model can be run continuously, per step, or up to a specified time. The Hollywood principle dictates how the model engine is instructed from 'outside', instead of the model engine taking all necessary actions on its own initiative. The underlying techniques that facilitate these concepts are introspection of the computation engine, which exposes its state variables, and control functions, e.g. for time stepping, via a standardized interface, such as BMI (Peckam et. al., 2012). In this work we have used a shallow water flow model engine D-Flow Flexible Mesh. The model was converted from executable to a library, and coupled to the graphical modelling

  14. The cellular membrane as a mediator for small molecule interaction with membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Christopher G; Arcario, Mark J; Mahinthichaichan, Paween; Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Navidpour, Latifeh; Wen, Po-Chao; Thangapandian, Sundarapandian; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-10-01

    The cellular membrane constitutes the first element that encounters a wide variety of molecular species to which a cell might be exposed. Hosting a large number of structurally and functionally diverse proteins associated with this key metabolic compartment, the membrane not only directly controls the traffic of various molecules in and out of the cell, it also participates in such diverse and important processes as signal transduction and chemical processing of incoming molecular species. In this article, we present a number of cases where details of interaction of small molecular species such as drugs with the membrane, which are often experimentally inaccessible, have been studied using advanced molecular simulation techniques. We have selected systems in which partitioning of the small molecule with the membrane constitutes a key step for its final biological function, often binding to and interacting with a protein associated with the membrane. These examples demonstrate that membrane partitioning is not only important for the overall distribution of drugs and other small molecules into different compartments of the body, it may also play a key role in determining the efficiency and the mode of interaction of the drug with its target protein. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:27163493

  15. Interactive Dimensioning of Parametric Models

    KAUST Repository

    Kelly, T.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a solution for the dimensioning of parametric and procedural models. Dimensioning has long been a staple of technical drawings, and we present the first solution for interactive dimensioning: A dimension line positioning system that adapts to the view direction, given behavioral properties. After proposing a set of design principles for interactive dimensioning, we describe our solution consisting of the following major components. First, we describe how an author can specify the desired interactive behavior of a dimension line. Second, we propose a novel algorithm to place dimension lines at interactive speeds. Third, we introduce multiple extensions, including chained dimension lines, controls for different parameter types (e.g. discrete choices, angles), and the use of dimension lines for interactive editing. Our results show the use of dimension lines in an interactive parametric modeling environment for architectural, botanical, and mechanical models. © 2015 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-02-01

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments.

  17. Cellular and molecular pathways of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field interactions with living systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    There is growing evidence that environmental electric and magnetic fields in the extremely-low-frequency (ELF) band below 300 Hz can influence biological functions by mechanisms that are only poorly understood at the present time. The primary objectives of this paper are to review the physical properties of ELF fields, their interactions with living systems at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels, and the key role of cell membranes ;in the transduction of signals from imposed ELF fields. Topics of discussion include signal-to-noise ratios for single cells and cell aggregates, resonance phenomena involving a combination of static and ELF magnetic fields, and the possible influence of ELF fields on molecular signaling pathways that involve membrane receptors and cytoplasmic second messengers.

  18. Targeting the molecular and cellular interactions of the bone marrow niche in immunologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozowski, Jaime M; Billard, Matthew J; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2014-02-01

    Recent investigations have expanded our knowledge of the regulatory bone marrow (BM) niche, which is critical in maintaining and directing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation. Osteoblasts, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells are niche components in close association with HSCs and have been more clearly defined in immune cell function and homeostasis. Importantly, cellular inhabitants of the BM niche signal through G protein-coupled surface receptors (GPCRs) for various appropriate immune functions. In this article, recent literature on BM niche inhabitants (HSCs, osteoblasts, MSCs, CAR cells) and their GPCR mechanistic interactions are reviewed for better understanding of the BM cells involved in immune development, immunologic disease, and current immune reconstitution therapies. PMID:24408534

  19. iGPCR-drug: a web server for predicting interaction between GPCRs and drugs in cellular networking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Xiao

    Full Text Available Involved in many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are among the most frequent targets of therapeutic drugs. It is time-consuming and expensive to determine whether a drug and a GPCR are to interact with each other in a cellular network purely by means of experimental techniques. Although some computational methods were developed in this regard based on the knowledge of the 3D (dimensional structure of protein, unfortunately their usage is quite limited because the 3D structures for most GPCRs are still unknown. To overcome the situation, a sequence-based classifier, called "iGPCR-drug", was developed to predict the interactions between GPCRs and drugs in cellular networking. In the predictor, the drug compound is formulated by a 2D (dimensional fingerprint via a 256D vector, GPCR by the PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, and the prediction engine is operated by the fuzzy K-nearest neighbour algorithm. Moreover, a user-friendly web-server for iGPCR-drug was established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated math equations presented in this paper just for its integrity. The overall success rate achieved by iGPCR-drug via the jackknife test was 85.5%, which is remarkably higher than the rate by the existing peer method developed in 2010 although no web server was ever established for it. It is anticipated that iGPCR-Drug may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the approach presented here can also be extended to study other drug - target interaction networks.

  20. Biomaterial design for specific cellular interactions: Role of surface functionalization and geometric features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhar, Poornima

    The areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering have experienced extraordinary growth in recent years with the application of engineering principles and their potential to support and improve the field of medicine. The tremendous progress in nanotechnology and biotechnology has lead to this explosion of research and development in biomedical applications. Biomaterials can now be engineered at a nanoscale and their specific interactions with the biological tissues can be modulated. Various design parameters are being established and researched for design of drug-delivery carriers and scaffolds to be implanted into humans. Nanoparticles made from versatile biomaterial can deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of bio-macromolecules, such as proteins and oligonucleotides. Similarly in the field of tissue engineering, current approaches emphasize nanoscale control of cell behavior by mimicking the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) unlike, traditional scaffolds. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely connected fields and both of these applications require materials with exceptional physical, chemical, biological, and biomechanical properties to provide superior therapy. In the current study the surface functionalization and the geometric features of the biomaterials has been explored. In particular, a synthetic surface for culture of human embryonic stem cells has been developed, demonstrating the importance of surface functionalization in maintaining the pluripotency of hESCs. In the second study, the geometric features of the drug delivery carriers are investigated and the polymeric nanoneedles mediated cellular permeabilization and direct cytoplasmic delivery is reported. In the third study, the combined effect of surface functionalization and geometric modification of carriers for vascular targeting is enunciated. These studies illustrate how the biomaterials can be designed to achieve various cellular behaviors and control the

  1. Genetic Algorithm Calibration of Probabilistic Cellular Automata for Modeling Mining Permit Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, S.J.; Raines, G.L.

    2003-01-01

    We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate a spatially and temporally resolved cellular automata to model mining activity on public land in Idaho and western Montana. The genetic algorithm searches through a space of transition rule parameters of a two dimensional cellular automata model to find rule parameters that fit observed mining activity data. Previous work by one of the authors in calibrating the cellular automaton took weeks - the genetic algorithm takes a day and produces rules leading to about the same (or better) fit to observed data. These preliminary results indicate that genetic algorithms are a viable tool in calibrating cellular automata for this application. Experience gained during the calibration of this cellular automata suggests that mineral resource information is a critical factor in the quality of the results. With automated calibration, further refinements of how the mineral-resource information is provided to the cellular automaton will probably improve our model.

  2. Analyses of Dynein Heavy Chain Mutations Reveal Complex Interactions Between Dynein Motor Domains and Cellular Dynein Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Razafsky, David S.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies. PMID:22649085

  3. Interactive graphics for geometry modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozny, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive vector capability to create geometry and a raster color shaded rendering capability to sample and verify interim geometric design steps through color snapshots is described. The development is outlined of the underlying methodology which facilitates computer aided engineering and design. At present, raster systems cannot match the interactivity and line-drawing capability of refresh vector systems. Consequently, an intermediate step in mechanical design is used to create objects interactively on the vector display and then scan convert the wireframe model to render it as a color shaded object on a raster display. Several algorithms are presented for rendering such objects. Superquadric solid primitive extend the class of primitives normally used in solid modelers.

  4. Cellular Interactions and Biocompatibility of Self-Assembling Diblock Polypeptide Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakstis, Lisa; Ozbas, Bulent; Pochan, Darrin; Robinson, Clifford; Nowak, Andrew; Deming, Timothy

    2002-03-01

    Self-assembling peptide based hydrogels having a unique nano- and microscopic morphology are being studied for potential use as tissue engineering scaffolds. Low molecular weight ( ~20 kg/mol), amphiphilic, diblock polypeptides of hydrophilic lysine (K) or glutamic acid (E) and hydrophobic leucine (L) or valine (V) form hydrogels in aqueous solution at neutral pH and at very low volume fraction of polymer (vol. fraction polypeptide >=0.5 wt%). The morphology of these hydrogels has been characterized using laser confocal microscopy (LCM), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM) imaging. Studies of the interactions of the hydrogels with bacterial and mammalian cells reveal that these materials are non-cytotoxic and biocompatible. Hence, the chemistry of the assembled diblock polypeptides allows for cellular proliferation whereas the same chemistry in the homopolyeric form is cytotoxic. Current research is directed at the design and incorporation of binding sites within the polypeptide to specifically target interactions of the hydrogel with desired cells types.

  5. Simple Cellular Automata-Based Linear Models for the Shrinking Generator

    CERN Document Server

    Fúster-Sabater, Amparo

    2010-01-01

    Structural properties of two well-known families of keystream generators, Shrinking Generators and Cellular Automata, have been analyzed. Emphasis is on the equivalence of the binary sequences obtained from both kinds of generators. In fact, Shrinking Generators (SG) can be identified with a subset of linear Cellular Automata (mainly rule 90, rule 150 or a hybrid combination of both rules). The linearity of these cellular models can be advantageously used in the cryptanalysis of those keystream generators.

  6. Stochastic Models of Vesicular Sorting in Cellular Organelles

    CERN Document Server

    Vagne, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    The proper sorting of membrane components by regulated exchange between cellular organelles is crucial to intra-cellular organization. This process relies on the budding and fusion of transport vesicles, and should be strongly influenced by stochastic fluctuations considering the relatively small size of many organelles. We identify the perfect sorting of two membrane components initially mixed in a single compartment as a first passage process, and we show that the mean sorting time exhibits two distinct regimes as a function of the ratio of vesicle fusion to budding rates. Low ratio values leads to fast sorting, but results in a broad size distribution of sorted compartments dominated by small entities. High ratio values result in two well defined sorted compartments but is exponentially slow. Our results suggests an optimal balance between vesicle budding and fusion for the rapid and efficient sorting of membrane components, and highlight the importance of stochastic effects for the steady-state organizati...

  7. Cellular-automata model of the dwarf shrubs populations and communities dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Komarov; E. V. Zubkova; P. V. Frolov

    2015-01-01

    The probabilistic cellular-automata model of development and long-time dynamics of dwarf shrub populations and communities is developed. It is based on the concept of discrete description of the plant ontogenesis and joint model approaches in terms of probabilistic cellular automata and L-systems by Lindenmayer. Short representation of the basic model allows evaluation of the approach and software implementation. The main variables of the model are a number of partial bushes in clones or area...

  8. A Large Deformation Model for the Elastic Moduli of Two-dimensional Cellular Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guoming; WAN Hui; ZHANG Youlin; BAO Wujun

    2006-01-01

    We developed a large deformation model for predicting the elastic moduli of two-dimensional cellular materials. This large deformation model was based on the large deflection of the inclined members of the cells of cellular materials. The deflection of the inclined member, the strain of the representative structure and the elastic moduli of two-dimensional cellular materials were expressed using incomplete elliptic integrals. The experimental results show that these elastic moduli are no longer constant at large deformation, but vary significantly with the strain. A comparison was made between this large deformation model and the small deformation model proposed by Gibson and Ashby.

  9. Special Issue: Redox Active Natural Products and Their Interaction with Cellular Signalling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, “natural” cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature’s treasure chest of “green gold”. Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic “sensor/effector” anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for “intracellular diagnostics”. In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur

  10. The natural alternative: protozoa as cellular models for Legionella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease occurs following infection by the Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Normally resident in fresh-water sources, Legionella are subject to predation by eukaryotic phagocytes such as amoeba and ciliates. To counter this, L. pneumophila has evolved a complex system of effector proteins which allow the bacteria to hijack the phagocytic vacuole, hiding and replicating within their erstwhile killers. These same mechanisms allow L. pneumophila to hijack another phagocyte, lung-based macrophages, which thus avoids a vital part of the immune system and leads to infection. The course of infection can be divided into five main categories: pathogen uptake, formation of the replication-permissive vacuole, intracellular replication, host cell response, and bacterial exit. L. pneumophila effector proteins target every stage of this process, interacting with secretory, endosomal, lysosomal, retrograde and autophagy pathways, as well as with mitochondria. Each of these steps can be studied in protozoa or mammalian cells, and the knowledge gained can be readily applied to human pathogenicity. Here we describe the manner whereby L. pneumophila infects host protozoa, the various techniques which are available to analyse these processes and the implications of this model for Legionella virulence and the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease.

  11. Tools and Models for Integrating Multiple Cellular Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstein, Mark [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Gerstein Lab.

    2015-11-06

    In this grant, we have systematically investigated the integrated networks, which are responsible for the coordination of activity between metabolic pathways in prokaryotes. We have developed several computational tools to analyze the topology of the integrated networks consisting of metabolic, regulatory, and physical interaction networks. The tools are all open-source, and they are available to download from Github, and can be incorporated in the Knowledgebase. Here, we summarize our work as follow. Understanding the topology of the integrated networks is the first step toward understanding its dynamics and evolution. For Aim 1 of this grant, we have developed a novel algorithm to determine and measure the hierarchical structure of transcriptional regulatory networks [1]. The hierarchy captures the direction of information flow in the network. The algorithm is generally applicable to regulatory networks in prokaryotes, yeast and higher organisms. Integrated datasets are extremely beneficial in understanding the biology of a system in a compact manner due to the conflation of multiple layers of information. Therefore for Aim 2 of this grant, we have developed several tools and carried out analysis for integrating system-wide genomic information. To make use of the structural data, we have developed DynaSIN for protein-protein interactions networks with various dynamical interfaces [2]. We then examined the association between network topology with phenotypic effects such as gene essentiality. In particular, we have organized E. coli and S. cerevisiae transcriptional regulatory networks into hierarchies. We then correlated gene phenotypic effects by tinkering with different layers to elucidate which layers were more tolerant to perturbations [3]. In the context of evolution, we also developed a workflow to guide the comparison between different types of biological networks across various species using the concept of rewiring [4], and Furthermore, we have developed

  12. A cellular automaton model adapted to sandboxes to simulate the transport of solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Boris; Donado, Leonardo; Castro, Eduardo; Bayuelo, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    The increasingly use of groundwater sources for human consumption and the growth of the levels of these hydric sources contamination make imperative to reach a deeper understanding how the contaminants are transported by the water, in particular through a heterogeneous porous medium. Accordingly, the present research aims to design a model, which simulates the transport of solutes through a heterogeneous porous medium, using cellular automata. Cellular automata (CA) are a class of spatially (pixels) and temporally discrete mathematical systems characterized by local interaction (neighborhoods). The pixel size and the CA neighborhood were determined in order to reproduce accurately the solute behavior (Ilachinski, 2001). For the design and corresponding validation of the CA model were developed different conservative tracer tests using a sandbox packed heterogeneously with a coarse sand (size # 20 grain diameter 0,85 to 0,6 mm) and clay. We use Uranine and a saline solution with NaCl as a tracer which were measured taking snapshots each 20 seconds. A calibration curve (pixel intensity Vs Concentration) was used to obtain concentration maps. The sandbox was constructed of acrylic (caliber 0,8 cms) with 70 x 45 x 4 cms of dimensions. The "sandbox" had a grid of 35 transversal holes with a diameter of 4 mm each and an uniform separation from one to another of 10 cms. To validate the CA-model it was used a metric consisting in rating the number of correctly predicted pixels over the total per image throughout the entire test run. The CA-model shows that calibrations of pixels and neighborhoods allow reaching results over the 60 % of correctly predictions usually. This makes possible to think that the application of the CA- model could be useful in further researches regarding the transport of contaminants in hydrogeology.

  13. Predictive model to describe water migration in cellular solid foods during storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.A.; Hirte, A.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Water migration in cellular solid foods during storage causes loss of crispness. To improve crispness retention, physical understanding of this process is needed. Mathematical models are suitable tools to gain this physical knowledge. Results: Water migration in cellular solid foods invo

  14. A mathematical model of amphibian skin epithelium with two types of transporting cellular units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Rasmussen, B E

    1985-01-01

    A computer model of ion transport across amphibian skin epithelium containing two types of cellular units, their relative number and sizes, and a paracellular pathway has been developed. The two cellular units are, a large Na+ transporting compartment representing the major epithelium from stratum...

  15. Effect of morphology on water sorption in cellular solid foods. Part I: Pore scale network model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esveld, D.C.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Dalen, van G.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    A pore scale network model is developed to predict the dynamics of moisture diffusion into complex cellular solid foods like bread, crackers, and cereals. The morphological characteristics of the sample, including the characteristics of each cellular void and the open pore connections between them a

  16. Predictive model to describe water migration in cellular solid foods during storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.A.; Hirte, A.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Water migration in cellular solid foods during storage causes loss of crispness. To improve crispness retention, physical understanding of this process is needed. Mathematical models are suitable tools to gain this physical knowledge. RESULTS: Water migration in cellular solid foods invo

  17. Preparation of oligodeoxynucleotide encapsulated cationic liposomes and release study with models of cellular membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaddon AM.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Cationic liposomes are used for cellular delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AsODN, where release of encapsulated AsODN is mainly controlled by endocytosis and fusion mechanisms. In this investigation, it was tried to model such a release process that is difficult to evaluate in cell culture. For this purpose, an AsODN model (against protein kinase C-α was encapsulated in a DODAP-containing cationic liposome and evaluated for size, zeta-potential, encapsulation and ODN stability. Vesicular models of outer layer and total plasma membranes and early and late endosomal membranes were developed, based on lipid content and pH, using ether injection method. ODN release was determined by the fluorescence dequenching of encapsulated FITC-ODN. Zeta potential, size and ODN encapsulation efficiency of the prepared liposomes were -2.49 ± 7.15 mV, 108.4 nm and 73% respectively. ODN protection was 3-4 times more than that of conventional liposome/ODN complexation method. There was a correlation between model concentration and percent of ODN release. At 7.5 µM, the percent of released ODN was 76% for the cholesterol-free model of the late endosome and 16% for the early endosomal membrane; while the release was less than 11% for the models of plasma membrane. ODN release increased with temperature in the range of 4-37◦C for the late endosomal model, but not for others, possibly due to their high cholesterol contents or acidic pH. The interaction was fast and completed within 5 minutes and didn’t change in the range of 5-60 minutes. Our data are in agreement with published cell culture studies and reveal that cell-liposomes interaction can be modeled by lamellar membranes.

  18. Intracellular Localization and Cellular Factors Interaction of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax Proteins: Similarities and Functional Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzoni, Umberto; Turci, Marco; Avesani, Francesca; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Bidoia, Carlo; Romanelli, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic viruses type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) present very similar genomic structures but HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2. Is this difference due to their transactivating Tax proteins, Tax-1 and Tax-2, which are responsible for viral and cellular gene activation? Do Tax-1 and Tax-2 differ in their cellular localization and in their interaction pattern with cellular factors? In this review, we summarize Tax-1 and Tax-2 structural and phenotypic properties, their interaction with factors involved in signal transduction and their localization-related behavior within the cell. Special attention will be given to the distinctions between Tax-1 and Tax-2 that likely play an important role in their transactivation activity. PMID:21994745

  19. Intracellular Localization and Cellular Factors Interaction of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax Proteins: Similarities and Functional Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Romanelli

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic viruses type 1 (HTLV-1 and type 2 (HTLV-2 present very similar genomic structures but HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2. Is this difference due to their transactivating Tax proteins, Tax-1 and Tax-2, which are responsible for viral and cellular gene activation? Do Tax-1 and Tax-2 differ in their cellular localization and in their interaction pattern with cellular factors? In this review, we summarize Tax-1 and Tax-2 structural and phenotypic properties, their interaction with factors involved in signal transduction and their localization-related behavior within the cell. Special attention will be given to the distinctions between Tax-1 and Tax-2 that likely play an important role in their transactivation activity.

  20. Identification of small peptides inhibiting the integrase-LEDGF/p75 interaction through targeting the cellular co-factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalluzzo, Claudia; Christ, Frauke; Voet, Arnout; Sharma, Ajendra; Singh, Brajendra Kumar; Zhang, Kam Y J; Lescrinier, Eveline; De Maeyer, Marc; Debyser, Zeger; Van der Eycken, Erik

    2013-10-01

    The integration of the viral DNA into the host genome is one of the essential steps in the HIV replication cycle. This process is mediated by the viral enzyme integrase (IN) and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a crucial cellular co-factor of integration that acts by tethering IN to the cellular chromatin. Recently, circular peptides were identified that bind to the C-terminal domain of IN and disrupt the interaction with LEDGF/p75. Starting from the circular peptides, we identified a short peptidic sequence able to inhibit the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction at low μM concentration through its binding to the IN binding site of LEDGF/p75. This discovery can lead to the synthesis of peptidomimetics with high anti-HIV activity targeting the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75 and not the viral protein IN.

  1. Dynamic modeling of cellular response to DNA damage based on p53 stress response networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinpeng Qi; Yongsheng Ding; Shihuang Shao

    2009-01-01

    Under acute perturbations from the outside, cells can trigger self-defensive mechanisms to fight against genome stress. To investigate the cellular response to continuous ion radiation (IR), a dynamic model for p53 stress response networks at the cellular level is proposed. The model can successfully be used to simulate the dynamic processes of double-strand breaks (DSBs) generation and their repair, switch-like ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation, oscillations occurring in the p53-MDM2 feedback loop, as well as toxins elimination triggered by p53 stress response networks. Especially, the model can predict the plausible outcomes of cellular response under different IR dose regimes.

  2. Interaction between core protein of classical swine fever virus with cellular IQGAP1 proetin appears essential for virulence in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we show that IQGAP1, a cellular protein that plays a pivotal role as a regulator of the cytoskeleton affecting cell adhesion, polarization and migration, interacts with Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein. Sequence analyses identified a defined set of residues within CSFV Core prote...

  3. Modeling and Analysis of Cellular Networks using Stochastic Geometry: A Tutorial

    KAUST Repository

    ElSawy, Hesham

    2016-03-22

    This paper presents a tutorial on stochastic geometry (SG) based analysis for cellular networks. This tutorial is distinguished by its depth with respect to wireless communication details and its focus on cellular networks. The paper starts by modeling and analyzing the baseband interference in a basic cellular network model. Then, it characterizes signal-tointerference- plus-noise-ratio (SINR) and its related performance metrics. In particular, a unified approach to conduct error probability, outage probability, and rate analysis is presented. Although the main focus of the paper is on cellular networks, the presented unified approach applies for other types of wireless networks that impose interference protection around receivers. The paper then extends the baseline unified approach to capture cellular network characteristics (e.g., frequency reuse, multiple antenna, power control, etc.). It also presents numerical examples associated with demonstrations and discussions. Finally, we point out future research directions.

  4. Modeling collective & intelligent decision making of multi-cellular populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Mahrou, Bahareh

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of unpredictable disturbances and uncertainties, cells intelligently achieve their goals by sharing information via cell-cell communication and making collective decisions, which are more reliable compared to individual decisions. Inspired by adaptive sensor network algorithms studied in communication engineering, we propose that a multi-cellular adaptive network can convert unreliable decisions by individual cells into a more reliable cell-population decision. It is demonstrated using the effector T helper (a type of immune cell) population, which plays a critical role in initiating immune reactions in response to invading foreign agents (e.g., viruses, bacteria, etc.). While each individual cell follows a simple adaptation rule, it is the combined coordination among multiple cells that leads to the manifestation of "self-organizing" decision making via cell-cell communication.

  5. Cellular Automation Model of Traffic Flow Based on the Car-Following Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Ping; GAO Zi-You

    2004-01-01

    @@ We propose a new cellular automation (CA) traffic model that is based on the car-following model. A class of driving strategies is used in the car-following model instead of the acceleration in the NaSch traffic model. In our model, some realistic driver behaviour and detailed vehicle characteristics have been taken into account, such as distance-headway and safe distance, etc. The simulation results show that our model can exhibit some traffic flow states that have been observed in the real traffic, and both of the maximum flux and the critical density are very close to the real measurement. Moreover, it is easy to extend our method to multi-lane traffic.

  6. Cellular polarization: Interaction between extrinsic bounded noises and the wave-pinning mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Cell polarization (cued or uncued) is a fundamental mechanism in cell biology. As an alternative to the classical Turing bifurcation, it has been proposed that the onset of cell polarity might arise by means of the well-known phenomenon of wave-pinning [Gamba , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USAPNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.0503974102 102, 16927 (2005)]. A particularly simple and elegant deterministic model of cell polarization based on the wave-pinning mechanism has been proposed by Edelstein-Keshet and coworkers [Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-349510.1529/biophysj.107.120824 94, 3684 (2008)]. This model consists of a small biomolecular network where an active membrane-bound factor interconverts into its inactive form that freely diffuses in the cell cytosol. However, biomolecular networks do communicate with other networks as well as with the external world. Thus, their dynamics must be considered as perturbed by extrinsic noises. These noises may have both a spatial and a temporal correlation, and in any case they must be bounded to preserve the biological meaningfulness of the perturbed parameters. Here we numerically show that the inclusion of external spatiotemporal bounded parametric perturbations in the above wave-pinning-based model of cellular polarization may sometimes destroy the polarized state. The polarization loss depends on both the extent of temporal and spatial correlations and on the kind of noise employed. For example, an increase of the spatial correlation of the noise induces an increase of the probability of cell polarization. However, if the noise is spatially homogeneous then the polarization is lost in the majority of cases. These phenomena are independent of the type of noise. Conversely, an increase of the temporal autocorrelation of the noise induces an effect that depends on the model of noise.

  7. Particle acceleration and radiation in flaring complex solar active regions modeled by cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2007-06-01

    Context: We study the acceleration and radiation of electrons and ions interacting with multiple small-scale dissipation regions resulting from the magnetic energy release process. Aims: We aim to calculate the distribution functions of the kinetic energy of the particles and the X-ray spectra and γ-ray fluxes produced by the accelerated particles. Methods: The evolution of the magnetic energy released in an active region is mimicked by a cellular automaton model based on the concept of self-organized criticality. Each burst of magnetic energy release is associated with a reconnecting current sheet (RCS) in which the particles are accelerated by a direct electric field. Results: We calculate the energy gain of the particles (ions and electrons) for three different magnetic configurations of the RCS after their interactions with a given number of RCS. We finally compare our results with existing observations. Conclusions: The results of our simulation can reproduce several properties of the observations such as variable electron and ion energy contents and γ-ray line ratio. Even if very flat X-ray spectra have been reported in a few events, the X-ray spectra produced in this model are too flat when compared to most X-ray observations.

  8. Effects of Mechanical Properties on Tumor Invasion: Insights from a Cellular Model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, YZ

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the regulating mechanism of tumor invasion is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical applications. Previous in vivo experiments have shown that invasive cancer cells dissociate from the primary tumor and invade into the stroma, forming an irregular invasive morphology. Although cell movements involved in tumor invasion are ultimately driven by mechanical forces of cell-cell interactions and tumor-host interactions, how these mechanical properties affect tumor invasion is still poorly understood. In this study, we use a recently developed two-dimensional cellular model to study the effects of mechanical properties on tumor invasion. We study the effects of cell-cell adhesions as well as the degree of degradation and stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM). Our simulation results show that cell-cell adhesion relationship must be satisfied for tumor invasion. Increased adhesion to ECM and decreased adhesion among tumor cells result in invasive tumor behaviors. When this invasive behavior occurs, ECM plays an important role for both tumor morphology and the shape of invasive cancer cells. Increased stiffness and stronger degree of degradation of ECM promote tumor invasion, generating more aggressive tumor invasive morphologies. It can also generate irregular shape of invasive cancer cells, protruding towards ECM. The capability of our model suggests it a useful tool to study tumor invasion and might be used to propose optimal treatment in clinical applications.

  9. Graphene nanoplatelets spontaneously translocate into the cytosol and physically interact with cellular organelles in the fish cell line PLHC-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammel, Tobias; Navas, José M., E-mail: jmnavas@inia.es

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • We assessed the cytotoxicity and uptake of graphene nanomaterials in PLHC-1 cells. • GO and CXYG nanoplatelets caused physical injury of the plasma membrane. • GO and CXYG accumulated in the cytosol and interacted with cellular organelles. • PLHC-1 cells exposed to GO/CXYG demonstrated high ROS levels but low cytotoxicity. • ROS formation was related with GO/CXYG-induced structural damage of mitochondria. - Abstract: Graphene and graphene derivatives constitute a novel class of carbon-based nanomaterials being increasingly produced and used in technical and consumer applications. Release of graphene nanoplatelets during the life cycle of these applications may result in human and environmental exposure calling for assessment of their potential to cause harm to humans and wildlife. This study aimed to assess the toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and carboxyl graphene (CXYG) nanoplatelets to non-mammalian species using the fish cell line PLHC-1 as in vitro model. The cytotoxicity of GO and CXYG was assessed using different assays measuring alterations in plasma membrane integrity, metabolic activity, and lysosomal and mitochondrial function. The induction of oxidative stress was assessed by measuring intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Interaction with the plasma membrane and internalization of nanoplatelets were investigated by electron microscopy. Graphene nanoplatelets spontaneously penetrated through the plasma membrane and accumulated in the cytosol, where they further interacted with mitochondrial and nuclear membranes. PLHC-1 cells demonstrated significantly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and increased ROS levels at 16 μg/ml GO and CXYG (72 h), but barely any decrease in cell viability. The observation of intracellular graphene accumulations not enclosed by membranes suggests that GO and CXYG internalization in fish hepatoma cells occurs through an endocytosis-independent mechanism.

  10. Intra-cellular transport by single-headed kinesin KIF1A: effects of single-motor mechano-chemistry and steric interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Greulich, P; Garai, A; Nishinari, K; Schadschneider, A; Chowdhury, Debashish; Garai, Ashok; Greulich, Philip; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, many motor proteins can move simultaneously on a single microtubule track. This leads to interesting collective phenomena like jamming. Recently we reported ({\\it Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 95}, 118101 (2005)}) a lattice-gas model which describes traffic of unconventional (single-headed) kinesins KIF1A. Here we generalize this model, introducing a novel interaction parameter $c$, to account for an interesting mechano-chemical process which has not been considered in any earlier model. We have been able to extract all the parameters of the model, except $c$, from experimentally measured quantities. In contrast to earlier models of intra-cellular molecular motor traffic, our model assigns distinct ``chemical'' (or, conformational) states to each kinesin to account for the hydrolysis of ATP, the chemical fuel of the motor. Our model makes experimentally testable theoretical predictions. We determine the phase diagram of the model in planes spanned by experimentally controllable parameters, namely...

  11. Simulation Modeling by Classification of Problems: A Case of Cellular Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afiqah, K. N.; Mahayuddin, Z. R.

    2016-02-01

    Cellular manufacturing provides good solution approach to manufacturing area by applying Group Technology concept. The evolution of cellular manufacturing can enhance performance of the cell and to increase the quality of the product manufactured but it triggers other problem. Generally, this paper highlights factors and problems which emerge commonly in cellular manufacturing. The aim of the research is to develop a thorough understanding of common problems in cellular manufacturing. A part from that, in order to find a solution to the problems exist using simulation technique, this classification framework is very useful to be adapted during model building. Biology evolution tool was used in the research in order to classify the problems emerge. The result reveals 22 problems and 25 factors using cladistic technique. In this research, the expected result is the cladogram established based on the problems in cellular manufacturing gathered.

  12. Toward a biaxial model of "bipolar" affective disorders: further exploration of genetic, molecular and cellular substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askland, Kathleen

    2006-08-01

    Current epidemiologic and genetic evidence strongly supports the heritability of bipolar disease. Inconsistencies across linkage and association analyses have been primarily interpreted as suggesting polygenic, nonMendelian and variably-penetrant inheritance (i.e., in terms of interacting disease models). An equally-likely explanation for this genetic complexity is that trait, locus and allelic heterogeneities (i.e., a heterogeneous disease model) are primarily responsible for observed variability at the population level. The two models of genetic complexity are not mutually-exclusive, and are in fact likely to co-exist both in trait determination and disease expression. However, the current model proposes that, while both types of complex genetics are likely central to observable affective trait spectra, inheritance patterns, gross phenotypic categories and treatment-responsiveness in affective disease (as well as the widespread inconsistencies across such studies) may be primarily explained in terms of a heterogeneous disease model. Gene-gene, gene-protein and protein-protein interactions, then, are most likely to serve as trait determinants and 'phenotypic modifiers' rather than as primary pathogenic determinants. Moreover, while locus heterogeneity indicates the presence of multiple susceptibility genes at the population level, it does not necessitate polygenic inheritance at the individual or pedigree level. Rather, it is compatible with the possibility of mono- or bigenic determination of disease susceptibility within individuals/pedigrees. More specifically, the biaxial model proposes that integration of specific findings from genetic linkage and association studies, ion channels research as well as pharmacologic mechanism, phenotypic specificity and effectiveness studies suggests that each gene of potential etiologic significance in primary affective illness might be categorized into one of two classes, according to their primary role in neuronal

  13. Logical Modeling and Dynamical Analysis of Cellular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Jaoudé, Wassim; Traynard, Pauline; Monteiro, Pedro T; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Helikar, Tomáš; Thieffry, Denis; Chaouiya, Claudine

    2016-01-01

    The logical (or logic) formalism is increasingly used to model regulatory and signaling networks. Complementing these applications, several groups contributed various methods and tools to support the definition and analysis of logical models. After an introduction to the logical modeling framework and to several of its variants, we review here a number of recent methodological advances to ease the analysis of large and intricate networks. In particular, we survey approaches to determine model attractors and their reachability properties, to assess the dynamical impact of variations of external signals, and to consistently reduce large models. To illustrate these developments, we further consider several published logical models for two important biological processes, namely the differentiation of T helper cells and the control of mammalian cell cycle.

  14. Jeans type instability for a chemotactic model of cellular aggregation

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2008-01-01

    We consider an inertial model of chemotactic aggregation generalizing the Keller-Segel model and we study the linear dynamical stability of an infinite and homogeneous distribution of cells (bacteria, amoebae, endothelial cells,...) when inertial effects are accounted for. These inertial terms model cells directional persistance. We determine the condition of instability and the growth rate of the perturbation as a function of the cell density and the wavelength of the perturbation. We discuss the differences between overdamped (Keller-Segel) and inertial models. Finally, we show the analogy between the instability criterion for biological populations and the Jeans instability criterion in astrophysics.

  15. Modified cellular automaton model for modeling of microstructure and microsegregation in solidification of ternary alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ming-fang; CAO Wei-sheng; CHEN Shuang-lin; XIE Fan-you; HONG Chunpyo; CHANG Y. Austin

    2006-01-01

    A modified cellular automaton (MCA) model has been extended to the ternary alloy system by coupling thermodynamic and phase equilibrium calculation engine PanEngine. In the present model the dendrite growth is driven by the difference between the local equilibrium liquidus temperature and local actual temperature, incorporating the effect of curvature. The local equilibrium liquidus temperature is calculated with PanEngine according to the local liquid concentrations of two solutes, which are determined by numerically solving the species transport equation in the domain. Model validation was carried out through the comparison of the simulated values to the prediction of the Scheil model for solute profiles in the primary dendrites. The simulated data with zero solid diffusivity and limited liquid diffusivity were increasingly close to the Scheil profiles as the solidification rate decreased. The simulated microstructure and microsegregation in an Al-Cu-Mg ternary alloy were compared with those obtained experimentally.

  16. Simulating debris flows through a hexagonal cellular automata model: SCIDDICA S3–hex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D’Ambrosio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular Automata (CA represent a formal frame for dynamical systems, which evolve on the base of local interactions. Some types of landslide, such as debris flows, match well this requirement. The latest hexagonal release (S3–hex of the deterministic model SCIDDICA, specifically developed for simulating debris flows, is described. For CA simulation purposes, landslides can be viewed as a dynamical system, subdivided into elementary parts, whose state evolves exclusively as a consequence of local interactions within a spatial and temporal discretum. Space is the world of the CA, here constituted by hexagonal cells. The attributes of each cell ("substates" describe physical characteristics. For computational reasons, the natural phenomenon is "decomposed" into a number of elementary processes, whose proper composition makes up the "transition function" of the CA. By simultaneously applying this function to all the cells, the evolution of the phenomenon can be simulated in terms of modifications of the substates. SCIDDICA S3–hex exhibits a great flexibility in modelling debris flows. With respect to the previous releases of the model, the mechanism of progressive erosion of the soil cover has been added to the transition function. Considered substates are: altitude; thickness and energy of landslide debris; depth of erodable soil cover; debris outflows. Considered elementary processes are: mobilisation triggering and effect (T1, debris outflows (I1, update of landslide debris thickness and energy (I2, and energy loss (T2.  Simulations of real debris flows, occurred in Campania (Southern Italy in May 1998 (Sarno and December 1999 (San Martino V.C. and Cervinara, have been performed for model calibration purposes; some examples of analysis are briefly described. Possible applications of the method are: risk mapping, also based on a statistical approach; evaluating the effects of mitigation actions (e.g. stream deviations, topographic

  17. A mathematical model of cortical bone remodeling at cellular level under mechanical stimulus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Hua Qin; Ya-Nan Wang

    2012-01-01

    A bone cell population dynamics model for cortical bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus is developed in this paper.The external experiments extracted from the literature which have not been used in the creation of the model are used to test the validity of the model.Not only can the model compare reasonably well with these experimental results such as the increase percentage of final values of bone mineral content (BMC) and bone fracture energy (BFE) among different loading schemes (which proves the validity of the model),but also predict the realtime development pattern of BMC and BFE,as well as the dynamics of osteoblasts (OBA),osteoclasts (OCA),nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) for each loading scheme,which can hardly be monitored through experiment.In conclusion,the model is the first of its kind that is able to provide an insight into the quantitative mechanism of bone remodeling at cellular level by which bone cells are activated by mechanical stimulus in order to start resorption/formation of bone mass.More importantly,this model has laid a solid foundation based on which future work such as systemic control theory analysis of bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus can be investigated.The to-be identified control mechanism will help to develop effective drugs and combined nonpharmacological therapies to combat bone loss pathologies.Also this deeper understanding of how mechanical forces quantitatively interact with skeletal tissue is essential for the generation of bone tissue for tissue replacement purposes in tissue engineering.

  18. Integration of logistic regression, Markov chain and cellular automata models to simulate urban expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokar Arsanjani, J.; Helbich, M.; Kainz, W.; Boloorani, A.

    2013-01-01

    This research analyses the suburban expansion in the metropolitan area of Tehran, Iran. A hybrid model consisting of logistic regression model, Markov chain (MC), and cellular automata (CA) was designed to improve the performance of the standard logistic regression model. Environmental and socio-eco

  19. A study of a main-road cellular automata traffic flow model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄乒花; 孔令江; 刘慕仁

    2002-01-01

    A main-road cellular automata traffic flow model on two dimensions is presented based on the Biham-Middleton-Levine traffic model. Its evolution equations are given and the self-organization and organization cooperation phenomenain this model are also studied by using computer simulation.

  20. Propagation Path Loss Models for 5G Urban Micro- and Macro-Cellular Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Shu; Rappaport, Theodore S.; Rangan, Sundeep;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents and compares two candidate large-scale propagation path loss models, the alpha-beta-gamma (ABG) model and the close-in (CI) free space reference distance model, for the design of fifth generation (5G) wireless communication systems in urban micro- and macro-cellular scenarios...

  1. Detection of regulatory circuits by integrating the cellular networks of protein–protein interactions and transcription regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Margalit, Hanah

    2003-01-01

    The post-genomic era is marked by huge amounts of data generated by large-scale functional genomic and proteomic experiments. A major challenge is to integrate the various types of genome-scale information in order to reveal the intra- and inter- relationships between genes and proteins that constitute a living cell. Here we present a novel application of classical graph algorithms to integrate the cellular networks of protein–protein interactions and transcription regulation. We demonstrate ...

  2. Macromolecular Chain at a Cellular Surface: a Computer Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Pandey, Ras

    2001-06-01

    Computer simulations are performed to study conformation and dynamics of relatively large chain macromolecule at the surface of a model cell membrane - a preliminary attempt to ultimately realistic model for protein on a cell membrane. We use a discrete lattice of size Lx × L × L. The chain molecule of length Lc is modelled by consecutive nodes connected by bonds on the trail of a random walk with appropriate constraints such as excluded volume, energy dependent configurational bias, etc. Monte Carlo method is used to move chains via segmental dynamics, i.e., end-move, kink-jump, crank-shaft, reptation, etc. Membrane substrate is designed by an ensemble of short chains on a flat surface. Large chain molecule is then driven toward the membrane by a field. We plan to examine the dynamics of chain macromolecule, spread of its density, and its conformation.

  3. Markov Model Based CAC algorithms for Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATLEVIČ Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate using ofthe Hidden Markov Model philosophy for solvingconnection admission control (CAC problem incellular networks. For more effective bandwidthutilization and Quality of Service (QoS support itis necessary to solve the connection admissioncontrol with respect to minimizing blockingprobability of handoff and newly arrivedconnections. This paper looks into an thresholdoriented CAC scheme for operation with twoclasses of connections with a Markov model usedfor computation of the threshold value based oncurrent conditions in the network and so makesthe operation of the mobile network cell moreeffectively. In article we extrapolate Markov chainmodel based CAC for three classes of connectionsand sketch how to generalize problem for n classesof connections.

  4. Cellular automata cell structure for modeling heterogeneous traffic

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Dibyendu; C.Mallikarjuna

    2010-01-01

    Gap maintaining behavior significantly affects the traffic flow modeling under heterogeneous traffic conditions. The clearance between two adjacent moving vehicles varies depending on several traffic conditions. From the data collected on the gap maintaining behavior it has been observed that vehicles maintain different gaps when travelling under different traffic conditions and this is also influenced by lateral position of the vehicle. Mallikarjuna (2007) has found that this variable gap ma...

  5. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Forest

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD. A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease.

  6. A cellular automata model for simulating fed-batch penicillin fermentation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Naigong; Ruan Xiaogang

    2006-01-01

    A cellular automata model to simulate penicillin fed-batch fermentation process(CAPFM)was established in this study,based on a morphologically structured dynamic penicillin production model,that is in turn based on the growth mechanism of penicillin producing microorganisms and the characteristics of penicillin fed-batch fermentation.CAPFM uses the three-dimensional cellular automata as a growth space,and a Moore-type neighborhood as the cellular neighborhood.The transition roles of CAPFM are designed based on mechanical and structural kinetic models of penicillin batch-fed fermentation processes.Every cell of CAPFM represents a single or specific number of penicillin producing microorganisms,and has various state.The simulation experimental results show that CAPFM replicates the evolutionary behavior of penicillin batch-fed fermentation processes described by the structured penicillin production kinetic model accordingly.

  7. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  8. Stochastic Model of Maturation and Vesicular Exchange in Cellular Organelles

    CERN Document Server

    Vagne, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical organization of membrane-bound organelles along intracellular transport pathways relies on vesicular exchange between organelles and on biochemical maturation of the organelle content by specific enzymes. The relative importance of each mechanism in controlling organelle dynamics remains controversial, in particular for transport through the Golgi apparatus. Using a stochastic model, we show that full maturation of membrane-bound compartments can be seen as the stochastic escape from a steady-state in which export is dominated by vesicular exchange. We show that full maturation can contribute a significant fraction of the total out-flux for small organelles such as endosomes and Golgi cisternae.

  9. Equal Distribution Model of Epidemic Drugs Based on a Cellular Automata Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xinyi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemic spreading of infectious disease is a process of evolution over time. Based on the cellular automata model[1], this paper analyzes the epidemic spreading rules, and establishes an efficient equal distribution model of drugs in a broad sense. For multiple regions, in case of demand of drugs exceeding supply, the drugs shall be distributed according to the proportion of a total number of people in each region, the number of patients, the number of the isolated, and the number of deaths. It is necessary to simulate based on these four schemes to obtain simulation results. The results show that, when the drugs are distributed by the proportion of the number of deaths, it is optimal for controlling over epidemic situations.

  10. Mystery of the Toxic Flea Dip: An Interactive Approach to Teaching Aerobic Cellular Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, A. T.; McVey, M.; Rybarczyk, B.; Thompson, J. T.; Wilkins, H. R.

    2004-01-01

    We designed an interrupted case study to teach aerobic cellular respiration to major and nonmajor biology students. The case is based loosely on a real-life incident of rotenone poisoning. It places students in the role of a coroner who must determine the cause of death of the victim. The case is presented to the students in four parts. Each part…

  11. A cellular automata intraurban model with prices and income-differentiated actors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furtado, B.A.; Ettema, D.F.; Ruiz, R.M.; Hurkens, J.; Delden, H. van

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an intraurban cellular automata model that is an extension to White and Engelen’s pioneering model. The paper’s main contribution is to distinguish between agglomerative eff ects, determined by the attraction of the neighbourhood, and disagglomerative eff ects, driven by land pri

  12. Mechanistic model of radon-induced lung cancer risk at low exposure levels based on cellular alpha particle hits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Hofmann; Hatim, Fakir [Salzburg Univ., Div. of Physics and Biophysics, Dept. of Material Science (Austria); Lucia-Adina, Truta-Popa [Babes-Bolyai Univ., Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    To explore the role of the multiplicity of cellular hits by radon progeny alpha particles for lung cancer incidence, the number of single and multiple alpha particle hits were computed for basal and secretory cells in the bronchial epithelium of human airway bifurcations employing Monte Carlo methods. Hot spots of alpha particle hits were observed at the branching points of bronchial airway bifurcations, suggesting that multiple alpha particle hits may occur primarily at carinal ridges. Random alpha particle intersections of bronchial cells during a given exposure period, selected from a Poisson distribution, were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, based on experimentally observed cellular transformation and survival functions. To consider potential bystander effects, which have been observed in cellular in vitro studies, alpha particle interactions were also simulated for larger sensitive target volumes in bronchial epithelium, consisting of a collection of cells. Lung cancer risk simulations indicated that cancer induction for continuous exposures is related to the cycle time of an irradiated cell, thus exhibiting a distinct dose-rate effect. While the dominant role of single hits leads to a linear dose-response relationship at low radon exposure levels, predicted lung cancer risk for a collection of interacting cells exhibits a linear-quadratic response, suggesting that bystander effects, if operating at all under in vivo irradiations, may be restricted to a small number of adjacent cells. (author)

  13. Evaluation of BACE1 Silencing in Cellular Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Sierant

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-secretase (BACE1 is the major enzyme participating in generation of toxic amyloid-beta (Aβ peptides, identified in amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD brains. Its downregulation results in decreasing secretion of Aβ. Thus, BACE1 silencing by RNAi represents possible strategy for antiamyloid therapy in the treatment of AD. In this study, a series of newly designed sequences of synthetic and vector-encoded siRNAs (pSilencer, pcPURhU6, and lentivirus were tested against overexpressed and endogenous BACE1 in several cell lines and in adult neural progenitor cells, derived from rat hippocampus. SiRNAs active in human, mouse, and rat cell models were shown to diminish the level of BACE1. In HCN A94 cells, two BACE1-specific siRNAs did not alter the expression of genes of BACE2 and several selected genes involved in neurogenesis (Synapsin I, βIII-Tubulin, Calbidin, NeuroD1, GluR2, CREB, MeCP2, PKR, however, remarkable lowering of SCG10 mRNA, coding protein of stathmin family, important in the development of nervous system, was observed.

  14. The cellular prion protein interacts with the tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase in membrane microdomains of bioaminergic neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Ermonval

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, is GPI anchored and abundant in lipid rafts. The absolute requirement of PrP(C in neurodegeneration associated to prion diseases is well established. However, the function of this ubiquitous protein is still puzzling. Our previous work using the 1C11 neuronal model, provided evidence that PrP(C acts as a cell surface receptor. Besides a ubiquitous signaling function of PrP(C, we have described a neuronal specificity pointing to a role of PrP(C in neuronal homeostasis. 1C11 cells, upon appropriate induction, engage into neuronal differentiation programs, giving rise either to serotonergic (1C11(5-HT or noradrenergic (1C11(NE derivatives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The neuronal specificity of PrP(C signaling prompted us to search for PrP(C partners in 1C11-derived bioaminergic neuronal cells. We show here by immunoprecipitation an association of PrP(C with an 80 kDa protein identified by mass spectrometry as the tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP. This interaction occurs in lipid rafts and is restricted to 1C11-derived neuronal progenies. Our data indicate that TNAP is implemented during the differentiation programs of 1C11(5-HT and 1C11(NE cells and is active at their cell surface. Noteworthy, TNAP may contribute to the regulation of serotonin or catecholamine synthesis in 1C11(5-HT and 1C11(NE bioaminergic cells by controlling pyridoxal phosphate levels. Finally, TNAP activity is shown to modulate the phosphorylation status of laminin and thereby its interaction with PrP. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of a novel PrP(C partner in lipid rafts of neuronal cells favors the idea of a role of PrP in multiple functions. Because PrP(C and laminin functionally interact to support neuronal differentiation and memory consolidation, our findings introduce TNAP as a functional protagonist in the PrP(C-laminin interplay. The partnership between TNAP and PrP(C in neuronal cells may

  15. An analytical model for interactive failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In some systems, failures of certain components can interact with each other, and accelerate the failure rates of these components. These failures are defined as interactive failure. Interactive failure is a prevalent cause of failure associated with complex systems, particularly in mechanical systems. The failure risk of an asset will be underestimated if the interactive effect is ignored. When failure risk is assessed, interactive failures of an asset need to be considered. However, the literature is silent on previous research work in this field. This paper introduces the concepts of interactive failure, develops an analytical model to analyse this type of failure quantitatively, and verifies the model using case studies and experiments

  16. Discovering the cellular-localized functional modules and modular interactions in response to liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Jing; Guo Zheng; Yang Da; Zhang Min; Wang Jing; Wang Chenguang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly identify the functional modules enriched with differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and characterized by biological processes in specific cellular locations, based on gene ontology (GO) and microarray data. Then, we further define and filter disease relevant signature modules according to the ranking of the disease discriminating abilities of the pre-selected functional modules. At last, we analyze the potential way by which they cooperate towards human disease. Application of the proposed method to the analysis of a liver cancer dataset shows that, using the same false discovery rate (FDR) threshold, we can find more biologically meaningful and detailed processes by using the cellular localization information. Some biological evidences support the relevancy of our biological modules to the disease mechanism.

  17. Interaction of cellular-localized signature modules in response to prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Rapid progress in high-throughput biotechnologies (e. g. microarrays) and exponential accumulation of gene functional knowledge makes it promising for systematic understanding of complex human diseases at the functional modules level. Current modular categorizations can be defined and selected more specifically and precisely in terms of both biological processes and cellular locations, aiming at uncovering the modular molecular networks highly relevant to cancers. Based on Gene Ontology, we identifed the functional modules enriched with differentially expressed genes and characterized by biological processes and specific cellular locations. Then, according to the ranking of the disease discriminating abilities of the pre-selected functional modules, we further defined and filtered signature modules which have higher relevance to the cancer under study. Applications of the proposed method to the analysis of a prostate cancer dataset revealed insightful biological modules.

  18. Current concepts in chronic inflammatory diseases: Interactions between microbes, cellular metabolism, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T; Binder, Elisabeth B; Bisgaard, Hans; Chatila, Talal A; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Culmsee, Carsten; Dannlowski, Udo; Gay, Steffen; Gern, James; Haahtela, Tari; Kircher, Tilo; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neurath, Markus F; Preissner, Klaus T; Reinhardt, Christoph; Rook, Graham; Russell, Shannon; Schmeck, Bernd; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Steinhoff, Ulrich; van Os, Jim; Weiss, Scott; Zemlin, Michael; Renz, Harald

    2016-07-01

    Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Röntgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany) to discuss recent developments in this field. These include a concept of biodiversity; the contribution of urbanization, lifestyle factors, and nutrition (eg, vitamin D); and new mechanisms of metabolic and immune dysregulation, such as extracellular and intracellular RNAs and cellular and mitochondrial stress. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute further to altered gene expression and therefore to the development of chronic inflammation. These novel findings provide the foundation for further development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27373325

  19. Modeling mechanical behaviors of composites with various ratios of matrixeinclusion properties using movable cellular automaton method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Yu. SMOLIN; E.V. SHILKO; S.V. ASTAFUROV; I.S. KONOVALENKO; S.P. BUYAKOVA; S.G. PSAKHIE

    2015-01-01

    Two classes of composite materials are considered: classical metaleceramic composites with reinforcing hard inclusions as well as hard ceramics matrix with soft gel inclusions. Movable cellular automaton method is used for modeling the mechanical behaviors of such different heterogeneous materials. The method is based on particle approach and may be considered as a kind of discrete element method. The main feature of the method is the use of many-body forces of inter-element interaction within the formalism of simply deformable element approximation. It was shown that the strength of reinforcing particles and the width of particle-binder interphase boundaries had determining influence on the service characteristics of metaleceramic composite. In particular, the increasing of strength of carbide inclusions may lead to significant increase in the strength and ultimate strain of composite material. On the example of porous zirconia ceramics it was shown that the change in the mechanical properties of pore surface leads to the corresponding change in effective elastic modulus and strength limit of the ceramic sample. The less is the pore size, the more is this effect. The increase in the elastic properties of pore surface of ceramics may reduce its fracture energy.

  20. Characterization of the Interaction of Lassa Fever Virus with Its Cellular Receptor α-Dystroglycan

    OpenAIRE

    Kunz, Stefan; Rojek, Jillian M.; Perez, Mar; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2005-01-01

    The cellular receptor for the Old World arenaviruses Lassa fever virus (LFV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has recently been identified as α-dystroglycan (α-DG), a cell surface receptor that provides a molecular link between the extracellular matrix and the actin-based cytoskeleton. In the present study, we show that LFV binds to α-DG with high affinity in the low-nanomolar range. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with LFV glycoprotein (GP) adopted the recepto...

  1. Phenomenological analysis of the interacting boson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, R. L.; Levit, S.

    1982-01-01

    The classical Hamiltonian of the interacting boson model is defined and expressed in terms of the conventional quadrupole variables. This is used in the analyses of the dynamics in the various limits of the model. The purpose is to determine the range and the features of the collective phenomena which the interacting boson model is capable of describing. In the commonly used version of the interacting boson model with one type of the s and d bosons and quartic interactions, this capability has certain limitations and the model should be used with care. A more sophisticated version of the interacting boson model with neutron and proton bosons is not discussed. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE Interacting bosons, classical IBM Hamiltonian in quadrupole variables, phenomenological content of the IBM and its limitations.

  2. Physiopathology of blood platelets: a model system for studies of cell-to-cell interaction. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    This report covers the studies on basic mechanisms of cellular interactions, utilizing platelets as a model system and, when possible, concentrating on the influence that environmental factors (nutritional, metabolic, cellular, immunologic and others) have on them. The four major sections include: platelet interaction with tumor cells; a model for the study of cell-to-cell interaction; interaction of platelets with vessel walls; and platelet interactions with immune proteins.

  3. Recent advances in interactions of designed nanoparticles and cells with respect to cellular uptake, intracellular fate, degradation and cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jun; Gao, Changyou

    2016-10-01

    The unique features of nanomaterials have led to their rapid development in the biomedical field. In particular, functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) are extensively used in the delivery of drugs and genes, bio-imaging and diagnosis. Hence, the interaction between NPs and cells is one of the most important issues towards understanding the true nature of the NP-mediated biological effects. Moreover, the intracellular safety concern of the NPs as a result of intracellular NP degradation remains to be clarified in detail. This review presents recent advances in the interactions of designed NPs and cells. The focus includes the governing factors on cellular uptake and the intracellular fate of NPs, and the degradation of NPs and its influence on nanotoxicity. Some basic consideration is proposed for optimizing the NP-cell interaction and designing NPs of better biocompatiblity for biomedical application.

  4. Facilitating arrhythmia simulation: the method of quantitative cellular automata modeling and parallel running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondry Adrian

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many arrhythmias are triggered by abnormal electrical activity at the ionic channel and cell level, and then evolve spatio-temporally within the heart. To understand arrhythmias better and to diagnose them more precisely by their ECG waveforms, a whole-heart model is required to explore the association between the massively parallel activities at the channel/cell level and the integrative electrophysiological phenomena at organ level. Methods We have developed a method to build large-scale electrophysiological models by using extended cellular automata, and to run such models on a cluster of shared memory machines. We describe here the method, including the extension of a language-based cellular automaton to implement quantitative computing, the building of a whole-heart model with Visible Human Project data, the parallelization of the model on a cluster of shared memory computers with OpenMP and MPI hybrid programming, and a simulation algorithm that links cellular activity with the ECG. Results We demonstrate that electrical activities at channel, cell, and organ levels can be traced and captured conveniently in our extended cellular automaton system. Examples of some ECG waveforms simulated with a 2-D slice are given to support the ECG simulation algorithm. A performance evaluation of the 3-D model on a four-node cluster is also given. Conclusions Quantitative multicellular modeling with extended cellular automata is a highly efficient and widely applicable method to weave experimental data at different levels into computational models. This process can be used to investigate complex and collective biological activities that can be described neither by their governing differentiation equations nor by discrete parallel computation. Transparent cluster computing is a convenient and effective method to make time-consuming simulation feasible. Arrhythmias, as a typical case, can be effectively simulated with the methods

  5. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Garcia, Cristiana B.; Matos-Silva, Flavia A. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Curti, Carlos [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leopoldino, Andréia M., E-mail: andreiaml@usp.br [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • hnRNPK is a new target of SET. • SET regulates hnRNPK. • SET and hnRNPK accumulation promotes tumorigenesis. • SET accumulation is a potential model to study genes regulated by SET-hnRNPK. - Abstract: SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET–hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  6. Solving the Advection-Diffusion Equations in Biological Contexts using the Cellular Potts Model

    CERN Document Server

    Dan, D; Chen, K; Glazier, J A; Dan, Debasis; Mueller, Chris; Chen, Kun; Glazier, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) is a robust, cell-level methodology for simulation of biological tissues and morphogenesis. Both tissue physiology and morphogenesis depend on diffusion of chemical morphogens in the extra-cellular fluid or matrix (ECM). Standard diffusion solvers applied to the cellular potts model use finite difference methods on the underlying CPM lattice. However, these methods produce a diffusing field tied to the underlying lattice, which is inaccurate in many biological situations in which cell or ECM movement causes advection rapid compared to diffusion. Finite difference schemes suffer numerical instabilities solving the resulting advection-diffusion equations. To circumvent these problems we simulate advection-diffusion within the framework of the CPM using off-lattice finite-difference methods. We define a set of generalized fluid particles which detach advection and diffusion from the lattice. Diffusion occurs between neighboring fluid particles by local averaging rules which approxi...

  7. Platinum nanozymes recover cellular ROS homeostasis in an oxidative stress-mediated disease model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglianetti, Mauro; de Luca, Elisa; Pedone, Deborah; Marotta, Roberto; Catelani, Tiziano; Sartori, Barbara; Amenitsch, Heinz; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the use of nanomaterials as biomimetic enzymes has attracted great interest. In this work, we show the potential of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as antioxidant nanozymes, which combine abundant cellular internalization and efficient scavenging activity of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus simultaneously integrating the functions of nanocarriers and antioxidant drugs. Careful toxicity assessment and intracellular tracking of Pt NPs proved their cytocompatibility and high cellular uptake, with compartmentalization within the endo/lysosomal vesicles. We have demonstrated that Pt NPs possess strong and broad antioxidant properties, acting as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase enzymes, with similar or even superior performance than natural enzymes, along with higher adaptability to the changes in environmental conditions. We then exploited their potent activity as radical scavenging materials in a cellular model of an oxidative stress-related disorder, namely human Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) disease, which is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Noteworthily, we found that Pt nanozymes can efficiently reduce ROS levels, completely restoring the cellular physiological homeostasis.In recent years, the use of nanomaterials as biomimetic enzymes has attracted great interest. In this work, we show the potential of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as antioxidant nanozymes, which combine abundant cellular internalization and efficient scavenging activity of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus simultaneously integrating the functions of nanocarriers and antioxidant drugs. Careful toxicity assessment and intracellular tracking of Pt NPs proved their cytocompatibility and high cellular uptake, with compartmentalization within the endo/lysosomal vesicles. We have demonstrated that Pt NPs possess strong and broad antioxidant properties, acting as superoxide

  8. Modelling Iron-Bentonite Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C.; Savage, D.; Benbow, S.; Wilson, J.

    2009-04-01

    The presence of both iron canisters and bentonitic clay in some engineered barrier system (EBS) designs for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes creates the potential for chemical interactions which may impact upon the long-term performance of the clay as a barrier to radionuclide migration. Flooding of potential radionuclide sorption sites on the clay by ferrous ions and conversion of clay to non-swelling sheet silicates (e.g. berthierine) are two possible outcomes deleterious to long-term performance. Laboratory experimental studies of the corrosion of iron in clay show that corrosion product layers are generally thin ( 250 °C) are dominated by chlorite, whereas lower temperatures produce berthierine, odinite, cronstedtite, or Fe-rich smectite. Unfortunately, the inevitable short-term nature of laboratory experimental studies introduces issues of metastability and kinetics. The sequential formation in time of minerals in natural systems often produces the formation of phases not predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics. Evidence from analogous natural systems suggests that the sequence of alteration of clay by Fe-rich fluids will proceed via an Ostwald step sequence. The computer code, QPAC, has been modified to incorporate processes of nucleation, growth, precursor cannibalisation, and Ostwald ripening to address the issues of the slow growth of bentonite alteration products. This, together with inclusion of processes of iron corrosion and diffusion, has enabled investigation of a representative model of the alteration of bentonite in a typical EBS environment. Simulations with fixed mineral surface areas show that berthierine dominates the solid product assemblage, with siderite replacing it at simulation times greater than 10 000 years. Simulations with time-dependent mineral surface areas show a sequence of solid alteration products, described by: magnetite -> cronstedtite -> berthierine -> chlorite. Using plausible estimates of mineral

  9. A Modified Cellular Automaton Approach for Mixed Bicycle Traffic Flow Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaonian Shan; Zhibin Li; Xiaohong Chen; Jianhong Ye

    2015-01-01

    Several previous studies have used the Cellular Automaton (CA) for the modeling of bicycle traffic flow. However, previous CA models have several limitations, resulting in differences between the simulated and the observed traffic flow features. The primary objective of this study is to propose a modified CA model for simulating the characteristics of mixed bicycle traffic flow. Field data were collected on physically separated bicycle path in Shanghai, China, and were used to calibrate the C...

  10. An agent-based model of cellular dynamics and circadian variability in human endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung T Nguyen

    Full Text Available As cellular variability and circadian rhythmicity play critical roles in immune and inflammatory responses, we present in this study an agent-based model of human endotoxemia to examine the interplay between circadian controls, cellular variability and stochastic dynamics of inflammatory cytokines. The model is qualitatively validated by its ability to reproduce circadian dynamics of inflammatory mediators and critical inflammatory responses after endotoxin administration in vivo. Novel computational concepts are proposed to characterize the cellular variability and synchronization of inflammatory cytokines in a population of heterogeneous leukocytes. Our results suggest that there is a decrease in cell-to-cell variability of inflammatory cytokines while their synchronization is increased after endotoxin challenge. Model parameters that are responsible for IκB production stimulated by NFκB activation and for the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines have large impacts on system behaviors. Additionally, examining time-dependent systemic responses revealed that the system is least vulnerable to endotoxin in the early morning and most vulnerable around midnight. Although much remains to be explored, proposed computational concepts and the model we have pioneered will provide important insights for future investigations and extensions, especially for single-cell studies to discover how cellular variability contributes to clinical implications.

  11. Embryonic stem cells as an ectodermal cellular model of human p63-related dysplasia syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rostagno, P.; Wolchinsky, Z.; Vigano, A.M.; Shivtiel, S.; Zhou, H.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Ferone, G.; Missero, C.; Mantovani, R.; Aberdam, D.; Virolle, T.

    2010-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the TP63 transcription factor underlie the molecular basis of several similar autosomal dominant ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndromes. Here we provide a novel cellular model derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells that recapitulates in vitro the main steps of embryonic skin d

  12. Performance Evaluation of Road Traffic Control Using a Fuzzy Cellular Model

    CERN Document Server

    Płaczek, Bartłomiej

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a method is proposed for performance evaluation of road traffic control systems. The method is designed to be implemented in an on-line simulation environment, which enables optimisation of adaptive traffic control strategies. Performance measures are computed using a fuzzy cellular traffic model, formulated as a hybrid system combining cellular automata and fuzzy calculus. Experimental results show that the introduced method allows the performance to be evaluated using imprecise traffic measurements. Moreover, the fuzzy definitions of performance measures are convenient for uncertainty determination in traffic control decisions.

  13. NN Interaction in Chiral Constituent Quark Models

    CERN Document Server

    Valcarce, A; González, P

    2003-01-01

    We review the actual state in the description of the NN interaction by means of chiral constituent quark models. We present a series of relevant features that are nicely explained within the quark model framework.

  14. Independent pair parton interactions-model of hadron interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Dremin, I. M.; Nechitailo, V. A.

    2004-01-01

    A model of independent pair parton interactions is proposed, according to which, hadron interactions are represented by a set of independent binary parton collisions. The final multiplicity distribution is described by a convolution of the negative binomial distributions in each of the partonic collisions. As a result, it is given by a weighted sum of negative binomial distributions with parameters multiplied by the number of active pairs. Its shape and moments are considered. Experimental da...

  15. Semantic models for adaptive interactive systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, Tim; Lukosch, Stephan; Ziegler, Jürgen; Calvary, Gaëlle

    2013-01-01

    Providing insights into methodologies for designing adaptive systems based on semantic data, and introducing semantic models that can be used for building interactive systems, this book showcases many of the applications made possible by the use of semantic models.Ontologies may enhance the functional coverage of an interactive system as well as its visualization and interaction capabilities in various ways. Semantic models can also contribute to bridging gaps; for example, between user models, context-aware interfaces, and model-driven UI generation. There is considerable potential for using

  16. Using Interaction Scenarios to Model Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars; Bøgh Andersen, Peter

    The purpose of this paper is to define and discuss a set of interaction primitives that can be used to model the dynamics of socio-technical activity systems, including information systems, in a way that emphasizes structural aspects of the interaction that occurs in such systems. The primitives...... are based on a unifying, conceptual definition of the disparate interaction types - a robust model of the types. The primitives can be combined and may thus represent mediated interaction. We present a set of visualizations that can be used to define multiple related interactions and we present and discuss...... a number of case studies that indicate that interaction primitives can be useful modeling tools for supplementing conventional flow-oriented modeling of business processes....

  17. Genome-wide Mapping of Cellular Protein-RNA Interactions Enabled by Chemical Crosslinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyu Li; Jinghui Song; Chengqi Yi

    2014-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions influence many biological processes. Identifying the binding sites of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) remains one of the most fundamental and important chal-lenges to the studies of such interactions. Capturing RNA and RBPs via chemical crosslinking allows stringent purification procedures that significantly remove the non-specific RNA and protein interactions. Two major types of chemical crosslinking strategies have been developed to date, i.e., UV-enabled crosslinking and enzymatic mechanism-based covalent capture. In this review, we com-pare such strategies and their current applications, with an emphasis on the technologies themselves rather than the biology that has been revealed. We hope such methods could benefit broader audi-ence and also urge for the development of new methods to study RNA RBP interactions.

  18. Cellular and molecular modifier pathways in tauopathies: the big picture from screening invertebrate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Shabab B; Dräger, Nina M; Rasse, Tobias M; Voigt, Aaron; Jahn, Thomas R

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal tau accumulations were observed and documented in post-mortem brains of patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) long before the identification of mutations in the Microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene, encoding the tau protein, in a different neurodegenerative disease called Frontotemporal dementia and Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). The discovery of mutations in the MAPT gene associated with FTDP-17 highlighted that dysfunctions in tau alone are sufficient to cause neurodegeneration. Invertebrate models have been diligently utilized in investigating tauopathies, contributing to the understanding of cellular and molecular pathways involved in disease etiology. An important discovery came with the demonstration that over-expression of human tau in Drosophila leads to premature mortality and neuronal dysfunction including neurodegeneration, recapitulating some key neuropathological features of the human disease. The simplicity of handling invertebrate models combined with the availability of a diverse range of experimental resources make these models, in particular Drosophila a powerful invertebrate screening tool. Consequently, several large-scale screens have been performed using Drosophila, to identify modifiers of tau toxicity. The screens have revealed not only common cellular and molecular pathways, but in some instances the same modifier has been independently identified in two or more screens suggesting a possible role for these modifiers in regulating tau toxicity. The purpose of this review is to discuss the genetic modifier screens on tauopathies performed in Drosophila and C. elegans models, and to highlight the common cellular and molecular pathways that have emerged from these studies. Here, we summarize results of tau toxicity screens providing mechanistic insights into pathological alterations in tauopathies. Key pathways or modifiers that have been identified are associated with a broad range of processes

  19. Computational Modelling of the Structural Integrity following Mass-Loss in Polymeric Charred Cellular Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. M. Whitty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel computational technique is presented for embedding mass-loss due to burning into the ANSYS finite element modelling code. The approaches employ a range of computational modelling methods in order to provide more complete theoretical treatment of thermoelasticity absent from the literature for over six decades. Techniques are employed to evaluate structural integrity (namely, elastic moduli, Poisson’s ratios, and compressive brittle strength of honeycomb systems known to approximate three-dimensional cellular chars. That is, reducing the mass of diagonal ribs and both diagonal-plus-vertical ribs simultaneously show rapid decreases in the structural integrity of both conventional and reentrant (auxetic, i.e., possessing a negative Poisson’s ratio honeycombs. On the other hand, reducing only the vertical ribs shows initially modest reductions in such properties, followed by catastrophic failure of the material system. Calculations of thermal stress distributions indicate that in all cases the total stress is reduced in reentrant (auxetic cellular solids. This indicates that conventional cellular solids are expected to fail before their auxetic counterparts. Furthermore, both analytical and FE modelling predictions of the brittle crush strength of both auxteic and conventional cellular solids show a relationship with structural stiffness.

  20. Modeling of solidification grain structure for Ti-45%Al alloy ingot by cellular automaton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shi-ping; LIU Dong-rong; GUO Jing-jie; FU Heng-zhi

    2005-01-01

    A cellular automaton model for simulating grain structure formation during solidification processes of Ti45%Al(mole fraction) alloy ingot was developed, based on finite differential method for macroscopic modeling of heat transfer and a cellular automaton technique for microscopic modeling of nucleation, growth, solute redistribution and solute diffusion. The relation between the growth velocity of a dendrite tip and the local undercooling,which consists of constitutional, thermal, curvature and attachment kinetics undercooling is calculated according to the Kurz-Giovanola-Trivedi model. The effect of solidification contraction is taken into consideration. The influence of process variables upon the resultant grain structures was investigated. Special moving allocation technique was designed to minimize the computation time and memory size associated with a large number of cells. The predicted grain structures are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Modeling of aluminum-silicon irregular eutectic growth by cellular automaton model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the extensive application of Al-Si alloys in the automotive and aerospace industries as structural components, an understanding of their microstructural formation, such as dendrite and (Al+Si eutectic, is of great importance to control the desirable microstructure, so as to modify the performance of castings. Since previous major themes of microstructural simulation are dendrite and regular eutectic growth, few efforts have been paid to simulate the irregular eutectic growth. Therefore, a multiphase cellular automaton (CA model is developed and applied to simulate the time-dependent Al-Si irregular eutectic growth. Prior to model establishment, related experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of cooling rate and Sr modification on the growth of eutectic Si. This CA model incorporates several aspects, including growth algorithms and nucleation criterion, to achieve the competitive and cooperative growth mechanism for nonfaceted-faceted Al-Si irregular eutectic. The growth kinetics considers thermal undercooling, constitutional undercooling, and curvature undercooling, as well as the anisotropic characteristic of eutectic Si growth. The capturing rule takes into account the effects of modification on the silicon growth behaviors. The simulated results indicate that for unmodified alloy, the higher eutectic undercooling results in the higher eutectic growth velocity, and a more refined eutectic microstructure as well as narrower eutectic lamellar spacing. For modified alloy, the eutectic silicon tends to be obvious fibrous morphology and the morphology of eutectic Si is determined by both chemical modifier and cooling rate. The predicted microstructure of Al-7Si alloy under different solidification conditions shows that this proposed model can successfully reproduce both dendrite and eutectic microstructures.

  2. Direct protein-protein interactions and substrate channeling between cellular retinoic acid binding proteins and CYP26B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cara H; Peng, Chi-Chi; Lutz, Justin D; Yeung, Catherine K; Zelter, Alex; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-08-01

    Cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABPs) bind all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) tightly. This study aimed to determine whether atRA is channeled directly to cytochrome P450 (CYP) CYP26B1 by CRABPs, and whether CRABPs interact directly with CYP26B1. atRA bound to CRABPs (holo-CRABP) was efficiently metabolized by CYP26B1. Isotope dilution experiments showed that delivery of atRA to CYP26B1 in solution was similar with or without CRABP. Holo-CRABPs had higher affinity for CYP26B1 than free atRA, but both apo-CRABPs inhibited the formation of 4-OH-RA by CYP26B1. Similar protein-protein interactions between soluble binding proteins and CYPs may be important for other lipophilic CYP substrates.

  3. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  4. Cellular immunity and pathogen strategies in combative interactions involving Drosophila hosts and their endoparasitic wasps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Nappi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Various cellular innate immune responses protect invertebrates from attack by eukaryotic pathogens. In insects, assessments of the factor(s causing, or contributing to, pathogen mortality have long considered as toxic components certain molecules associated with enzyme-mediated melanogenesis. In Drosophila hosts, observations that have prompted additional or alternative considerations are those that document either the survival of certain endoparasitic wasps despite melanotic encapsulation, or the destruction of the parasite with no evidence of this type of host response. Investigations of the production of some reactive intermediates of oxygen and nitrogen during infection provide a basis for proposing that these molecules constitute important elements of the immune arsenal of Drosophila. Studies of the target specificity of virulence factors injected by female wasps during infection that suppress the host immune response will likely facilitate identification of the toxic host molecules, and contribute to a more detailed understanding of the cell-signaling pathways that regulate their synthesis.

  5. Fragmentary model of exchange interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kotov, V M

    2000-01-01

    This article makes attempt to refusal from using neutrino for explanation continuous distribution of beta particle energy by conversion to characteristic exchange interaction particles in nucleolus. It is taking formulation for nuclear position with many different fragments. It is computing half-value period of spontaneous fission of heavy nucleolus. (author)

  6. Modeling graphene-substrate interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amlaki, Taher

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I focussed on the interactions between graphene-like materials (grapheme and germanene) and various substrates. The attractive properties of graphene like a high carrier mobility, its single-atomic thickness and its theoretical magic have made graphene a very popular and promising can

  7. Preparation of oligodeoxynucleotide encapsulated cationic liposomes and release study with models of cellular membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Tamaddon AM.; Hosseini-Shirazi F.; Moghimi HR

    2007-01-01

    Cationic liposomes are used for cellular delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AsODN), where release of encapsulated AsODN is mainly controlled by endocytosis and fusion mechanisms. In this investigation, it was tried to model such a release process that is difficult to evaluate in cell culture. For this purpose, an AsODN model (against protein kinase C-α) was encapsulated in a DODAP-containing cationic liposome and evaluated for size, zeta-potential, encapsulation and ODN stab...

  8. Modeling Recrystallization of Austenite for C-Mn Steels during Hot Deformation by Cellular Automaton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using a cellular automaton method, microstructure evolution of recrystallization in austenite during hot deformation was simulated for C-Mn steels. A model takes into account the influence of deformation temperature, strain, and strain rate on the dynamic recrystallization fraction, and the effect of the keeping time on the static recrystallization fraction based on a hot deformation test on a Gleeble-1500 simulator. In addition, the size changing of γ grains during continuous hot deformation was simulated by applying the model.

  9. Cellular interactions via conditioned media induce in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells or mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We have attempted in vivo nephron generation using conditioned media. •Vascular and tubular cells do cross-talks on cell proliferation and tubular changes. •Tubular cells suppress these changes in mesenchymal stem cells. •Tubular cells differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into tubular cells. •Nephrons can be created from implanted tubular cells or mesenchymal stem cells. -- Abstract: There are some successful reports of kidney generation by utilizing the natural course of kidney development, namely, the use of an artificially treated metanephros, blastocyst or ureteric bud. Under a novel concept of cellular interactions via conditioned media (CMs), we have attempted in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells (TECs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here we used 10× CMs of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and TECs, which is the first to introduce a CM into the field of organ regeneration. We first present stimulative cross-talks induced by these CMs between VECs and TECs on cell proliferation and morphological changes. In MSCs, TEC-CM suppressed these changes, however, induced cytokeratin expression, indicating the differentiation of MSCs into TECs. As a result, glomerular and tubular structures were created following the implantation of TECs or MSCs with both CMs. Our findings suggest that the cellular interactions via CMs might induce in vivo nephron generation from TECs or MSCs. As a promoting factor, CMs could also be applied to the regeneration of other organs and tissues

  10. Cellular interactions via conditioned media induce in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells or mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machiguchi, Toshihiko, E-mail: machiguchi.toshihiko.23u@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Nakamura, Tatsuo, E-mail: nakamura@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •We have attempted in vivo nephron generation using conditioned media. •Vascular and tubular cells do cross-talks on cell proliferation and tubular changes. •Tubular cells suppress these changes in mesenchymal stem cells. •Tubular cells differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into tubular cells. •Nephrons can be created from implanted tubular cells or mesenchymal stem cells. -- Abstract: There are some successful reports of kidney generation by utilizing the natural course of kidney development, namely, the use of an artificially treated metanephros, blastocyst or ureteric bud. Under a novel concept of cellular interactions via conditioned media (CMs), we have attempted in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells (TECs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here we used 10× CMs of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and TECs, which is the first to introduce a CM into the field of organ regeneration. We first present stimulative cross-talks induced by these CMs between VECs and TECs on cell proliferation and morphological changes. In MSCs, TEC-CM suppressed these changes, however, induced cytokeratin expression, indicating the differentiation of MSCs into TECs. As a result, glomerular and tubular structures were created following the implantation of TECs or MSCs with both CMs. Our findings suggest that the cellular interactions via CMs might induce in vivo nephron generation from TECs or MSCs. As a promoting factor, CMs could also be applied to the regeneration of other organs and tissues.

  11. GIM3E: Condition-specific Models of Cellular Metabolism Developed from Metabolomics and Expression Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Brian; Ebrahim, Ali; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernard O.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

    2013-11-15

    Motivation: Genome-scale metabolic models have been used extensively to investigate alterations in cellular metabolism. The accuracy of these models to represent cellular metabolism in specific conditions has been improved by constraining the model with omics data sources. However, few practical methods for integrating metabolomics data with other omics data sources into genome-scale models of metabolism have been reported. Results: GIMMME (Gene Inactivation Moderated by Metabolism, Metabolomics, and Expression) is an algorithm that enables the development of condition-specific models based on an objective function, transcriptomics, and intracellular metabolomics data. GIMMME establishes metabolite utilization requirements with metabolomics data, uses model-paired transcriptomics data to find experimentally supported solutions, and also provides calculations of the turnover (production / consumption) flux of metabolites. GIMMME was employed to investigate the effects of integrating additional omics datasets to create increasingly constrained solution spaces of Salmonella Typhimurium metabolism during growth in both rich and virulence media. This integration proved to be informative and resulted in a requirement of additional active reactions (12 in each case) or metabolites (26 or 29, respectively). The addition of constraints from transcriptomics also impacted the allowed solution space, and the cellular metabolites with turnover fluxes that were necessarily altered by the change in conditions increased from 118 to 271 of 1397. Availability: GIMMME has been implemented in Python and requires a COBRApy 0.2.x. The algorithm and sample data described here are freely available at: http://opencobra.sourceforge.net/

  12. ModelWizard: Toward Interactive Model Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchison, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Data scientists engage in model construction to discover machine learning models that well explain a dataset, in terms of predictiveness, understandability and generalization across domains. Questions such as "what if we model common cause Z" and "what if Y's dependence on X reverses" inspire many candidate models to consider and compare, yet current tools emphasize constructing a final model all at once. To more naturally reflect exploration when debating numerous models, we propose an inter...

  13. Modeling of time-dose-LET effects in the cellular response to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, Lisa Antje

    2015-07-20

    This work is dedicated to the elucidation of time-dose- and if applicable linear energy transfer (LET) effects in the cellular response to ion or photon radiation. In particular, the common concept of the Local Effect Model (LEM) and the Giant Loop Binary Lesion (GLOBLE) model, which explains cell survival probabilities on the hand of clustering of double-strand breaks (DSB) in micrometer-sized sub-structural units of the DNA, was investigated with regard to temporal aspects. In previous studies with the LEM and GLOBLE model, it has been demonstrated that the definition of two lesion classes, characterized by single or multiple DSB in a DNA giant loop, with two repair fidelities is adequate to comprehensively describe the dose dependence of the cellular response to instantaneous photon irradiation or ion irradiation with varying LET. Furthermore, with the GLOBLE model for photon radiation, it has been shown that the assignment of two repair time scales to the two lesion classes allows to adequately reproduce time-dose effects after photon irradiation with an arbitrary constant dose-rate. In this work, the results of four projects that strengthen the mechanistic consistency and the practical applicability of the LEM and GLOBLE model will be presented. First, it was found that the GLOBLE model is applicable to describe time-dose effects in the cellular response to two split photon doses and in the occurrence of deterministic radiation effects. Second, in a comparison of ten models for the temporal course of DSB rejoining, it was revealed that a bi-exponential approach, as suggested by the LEM and GLOBLE model, finds a relatively large support by 61 experimental data sets. Third, in a comparison of four kinetic photon cell survival models that was based on fits to 13 dose-rate experiments, it was shown that the GLOBLE model performs well with respect to e.g. accuracy, parsimony, reliability and other factors that characterize a good approach. Last but not least, the

  14. Magneto-optical cellular chip model for intracellular orientational-dynamic-activity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a magneto-optical cellular chip model (MoCCM) was developed to detect intracellular dynamics in macromolecules by using magneto-optical effects. For the purpose of cell-measurement under strong static magnetic fields of up to 10 T, we constructed a cellular chip model, which was a thin glass plate with a well for a cell culture. A cell line of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 was incubated in the glass well, and the well, 0.3 mm in depth, was sealed by a cover glass when the MoCCM was set in a fiber optic system. An initial intensity change of the polarized light transmission, which dispersed perpendicular to the cell's attaching surface, was collected for 10 to 60 min, and then magnetic fields were applied parallel and perpendicular to the surface and light direction, respectively. The magnetic birefringence signals that originated from the magnetic orientation of intracellular molecules such as cytoskeletons apparently appeared when the magnetic fields were constant at 10 T. A statistical analysis with 15 experiments confirmed that the cellular components under 10 T magnetic fields caused a stronger alignment, which was transferred into polarizing light intensity that increased more than the case before exposure. Cellular conditions such as generation and cell density affected the magnetic birefringence signals.

  15. A cellular automata traffic flow model considering the heterogeneity of acceleration and delay probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi-Lang; Wong, S. C.; Min, Jie; Tian, Shuo; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the cellular automata traffic flow model, which considers the heterogeneity of vehicle acceleration and the delay probability of vehicles. Computer simulations are used to identify three typical phases in the model: free-flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving traffic jam. In the synchronized flow region of the fundamental diagram, the low and high velocity vehicles compete with each other and play an important role in the evolution of the system. The analysis shows that there are two types of bistable phases. However, in the original Nagel and Schreckenberg cellular automata traffic model, there are only two kinds of traffic conditions, namely, free-flow and traffic jams. The synchronized flow phase and bistable phase have not been found.

  16. A conceptual mathematical model of the dynamic self-organisation of distinct cellular organelles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Binder

    Full Text Available Formation, degradation and renewal of cellular organelles is a dynamic process based on permanent budding, fusion and inter-organelle traffic of vesicles. These processes include many regulatory proteins such as SNAREs, Rabs and coats. Given this complex machinery, a controversially debated issue is the definition of a minimal set of generic mechanisms necessary to enable the self-organization of organelles differing in number, size and chemical composition. We present a conceptual mathematical model of dynamic organelle formation based on interacting vesicles which carry different types of fusogenic proteins (FP playing the role of characteristic marker proteins. Our simulations (ODEs show that a de novo formation of non-identical organelles, each accumulating a different type of FP, requires a certain degree of disproportionation of FPs during budding. More importantly however, the fusion kinetics must indispensably exhibit positive cooperativity among these FPs, particularly for the formation of larger organelles. We compared different types of cooperativity: sequential alignment of corresponding FPs on opposite vesicle/organelles during fusion and pre-formation of FP-aggregates (equivalent, e.g., to SNARE clusters prior to fusion described by Hill kinetics. This showed that the average organelle size in the system is much more sensitive to the disproportionation strength of FPs during budding if the vesicular transport system gets along with a fusion mechanism based on sequential alignments of FPs. Therefore, pre-formation of FP aggregates within the membranes prior to fusion introduce robustness with respect to organelle size. Our findings provide a plausible explanation for the evolution of a relatively large number of molecules to confer specificity on the fusion machinery compared to the relatively small number involved in the budding process. Moreover, we could speculate that a specific cooperativity which may be described by Hill

  17. Interaction between the human cytomegalovirus‑encoded UL142 and cellular Snapin proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Qi, Ying; Ma, Yanping; He, Rong; Sun, Zhengrong; Huang, Yujing; Ji, Yaohua; Ruan, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can cause severe illness in immunocompromised and immunodeficient individuals. As a novel HCMV‑encoded major histocompatibility complex class I‑related molecule, the UL142‑encoded protein (pUL142) is capable of suppressing natural killer (NK) cell recognition in the course of infection. However, no host factors that directly interact with HCMV pUL142 have been reported so far. In order to understand the interactions between HCMV pUL142 and host proteins, the current study used yeast two‑hybrid screening, a GST pull‑down assay and an immunofluorescence assay. A host protein, the SNARE‑associated protein Snapin, was identified to directly interact and colocalize with HCMV pUL142 in transfected human embryonic kidney‑293 cells. Snapin is abundantly expressed in the majority of cells and mediates the release of neurotransmitters through vesicular transport in the nervous system and vesicle fusion in non‑neuronal cells. It is hypothesized that HCMV pUL142 may have an impact on the neurotransmitter release process and viral dissemination via interaction with Snapin. PMID:25369979

  18. CALCIFICATION OF SUBCUTANEOUSLY IMPLANTED COLLAGENS IN RELATION TO CYTOTOXICITY, CELLULAR INTERACTIONS AND CROSS-LINKING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLUYN, MJA; VANWACHEM, PB; DIJKSTRA, PJ; DAMINK, LHHO; FEIJEN, J

    1995-01-01

    In general, calcification of biomaterials occurs through an interaction of host and implanted material factors, but up to now the real origin of pathologic calcification is unknown. In this study we aimed to investigate incidence of calcification of (crosslinked) dermal sheep collagens (DSCs) with r

  19. An Extended Cellular Automaton Model for Train Traffic Flow on the Dedicated Passenger Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the key components for the railway transportation system, the Train Operation Diagram can be greatly influenced by many extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Therefore, the railway train flow has shown the strong nonlinear characteristics, which makes it quite difficult to take further relative studies. Fortunately, the cellular automaton model has its own advantages in solving nonlinear problems and traffic flow simulation. Considering the mixed features of multispeed running trains on the passenger dedicated lines, this paper presents a new train model under the moving block system with different types of trains running with the cellular automaton idea. By analyzing such key factors as the maintenance skylight, the proportion of the multispeed running trains, and the distance between adjacent stations and departure intervals, the corresponding running rules for the cellular automaton model are reestablished herewith. By means of this CA model, the program of train running system is designed to analyze the potential impact on railway carrying capacity by various factors; the model can also be implemented to simulate the actual train running process and to draw the train operation diagram by computers. Basically the theory can be applied to organize the train operation on the dedicated passenger lines.

  20. Spatial interactions in agent-based modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Ausloos, Marcel; Merlone, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Agent Based Modeling (ABM) has become a widespread approach to model complex interactions. In this chapter after briefly summarizing some features of ABM the different approaches in modeling spatial interactions are discussed. It is stressed that agents can interact either indirectly through a shared environment and/or directly with each other. In such an approach, higher-order variables such as commodity prices, population dynamics or even institutions, are not exogenously specified but instead are seen as the results of interactions. It is highlighted in the chapter that the understanding of patterns emerging from such spatial interaction between agents is a key problem as much as their description through analytical or simulation means. The chapter reviews different approaches for modeling agents' behavior, taking into account either explicit spatial (lattice based) structures or networks. Some emphasis is placed on recent ABM as applied to the description of the dynamics of the geographical distribution o...

  1. In Silico Modeling of the Immune System: Cellular and Molecular Scale Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagrazia Belfiore

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The revolutions in biotechnology and information technology have produced clinical data, which complement biological data. These data enable detailed descriptions of various healthy and diseased states and responses to therapies. For the investigation of the physiology and pathology of the immune responses, computer and mathematical models have been used in the last decades, enabling the representation of biological processes. In this modeling effort, a major issue is represented by the communication between models that work at cellular and molecular level, that is, multiscale representation. Here we sketch some attempts to model immune system dynamics at both levels.

  2. Computational modeling of laser-tissue interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.A.; Amendt, P.; Bailey, D.S.; Eder, D.C.; Maitland, D.J.; Glinsky, M.E.; Strauss, M.; Zimmerman, G.B.

    1996-05-01

    Computational modeling can play an important role both in designing laser-tissue interaction experiments and in understanding the underlying mechanisms. This can lead to more rapid and less expensive development if new procedures and instruments, and a better understanding of their operation. We have recently directed computer programs and associated expertise developed over many years to model high intensity laser-matter interactions for fusion research towards laser-tissue interaction problem. A program called LATIS is being developed to specifically treat laser-tissue interaction phenomena, such as highly scattering light transport, thermal coagulation, and hydrodynamic motion.

  3. A Cascading Failure Model by Quantifying Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Junjian; Mei, Shengwei

    2013-01-01

    Cascading failures triggered by trivial initial events are encountered in many complex systems. It is the interaction and coupling between components of the system that causes cascading failures. We propose a simple model to simulate cascading failure by using the matrix that determines how components interact with each other. A careful comparison is made between the original cascades and the simulated cascades by the proposed model. It is seen that the model can capture general features of t...

  4. Quark models of hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soliton model represents an extension of the MIT bag model to allow for the dynamical degrees of freedom associated with the confinement mechanism. The soliton model has 5 parameters, MIT has 3, but the soliton model has the flexibility, by choice of the parameters, to reproduce either the MIT or the SLAC bags. With appropriate choice of parameters and inclusion of one gluon exchange, the resulting hadronic spectra is similar to the MIT model. Because the model can be cast in Hamiltonian form, dynamical processes can be calculated using techniques developed for nuclear collective motion. This permits calculation of N-N collisions, recoil corrections and the construction of bag states of good momentum. The last is essential for the proper calculation of electromagnetic form factors. In this paper, the pion has been alluded to frequently. It is currently being studied actively in the context of the soliton model. The pion appears here as an anomalously light particle, split off and pushed down from the meson multiplet by OGE. The nucleon bag should be soft to qq, virtual excitation with pion quantum numbers. In the soliton model, these virtual excitations are to be identified with the pion cloud. One can also calculate pi-nucleon coupling and the weak decay of the pion, π → μ + anti nu/sub μ/. Indeed, bags can be created and destroyed in the model. This description of pion physics begins with a Lagrangian which does not respect chiral invariance and seeks to achieve PCAC from dynamics. The more fashionable approach is to begin with a chirally invariant Lagrangian from which the pion emerges as a massless Goldstone boson; somewhere, the pion must be given a mass and CAC broken. In all models, effective fields (sigma or π or both) are introduced to describe degrees of freedom which are too difficult to handle explicitly. 20 references

  5. Characterization of the Interaction of Lassa Fever Virus with Its Cellular Receptor α-Dystroglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Stefan; Rojek, Jillian M.; Perez, Mar; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2005-01-01

    The cellular receptor for the Old World arenaviruses Lassa fever virus (LFV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has recently been identified as α-dystroglycan (α-DG), a cell surface receptor that provides a molecular link between the extracellular matrix and the actin-based cytoskeleton. In the present study, we show that LFV binds to α-DG with high affinity in the low-nanomolar range. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with LFV glycoprotein (GP) adopted the receptor binding characteristics of LFV and depended on α-DG for infection of cells. Mapping of the binding site of LFV on α-DG revealed that LFV binding required the same domains of α-DG that are involved in the binding of LCMV. Further, LFV was found to efficiently compete with laminin α1 and α2 chains for α-DG binding. Together with our previous studies on receptor binding of the prototypic immunosuppressive LCMV isolate LCMV clone 13, these findings indicate a high degree of conservation in the receptor binding characteristics between the highly human-pathogenic LFV and murine-immunosuppressive LCMV isolates. PMID:15857984

  6. Characterization of the interaction of lassa fever virus with its cellular receptor alpha-dystroglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Stefan; Rojek, Jillian M; Perez, Mar; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2005-05-01

    The cellular receptor for the Old World arenaviruses Lassa fever virus (LFV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has recently been identified as alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG), a cell surface receptor that provides a molecular link between the extracellular matrix and the actin-based cytoskeleton. In the present study, we show that LFV binds to alpha-DG with high affinity in the low-nanomolar range. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with LFV glycoprotein (GP) adopted the receptor binding characteristics of LFV and depended on alpha-DG for infection of cells. Mapping of the binding site of LFV on alpha-DG revealed that LFV binding required the same domains of alpha-DG that are involved in the binding of LCMV. Further, LFV was found to efficiently compete with laminin alpha1 and alpha2 chains for alpha-DG binding. Together with our previous studies on receptor binding of the prototypic immunosuppressive LCMV isolate LCMV clone 13, these findings indicate a high degree of conservation in the receptor binding characteristics between the highly human-pathogenic LFV and murine-immunosuppressive LCMV isolates. PMID:15857984

  7. Nutrient-Gene Interaction in Colon Cancer, from the Membrane to Cellular Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tim Y; Davidson, Laurie A; Kim, Eunjoo; Fan, Yang-Yi; Fuentes, Natividad R; Triff, Karen; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-07-17

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer recently released an assessment classifying red and processed meat as "carcinogenic to humans" on the basis of the positive association between increased consumption and risk for colorectal cancer. Diet, however, can also decrease the risk for colorectal cancer and be used as a chemopreventive strategy. Bioactive dietary molecules, such as n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, curcumin, and fermentable fiber, have been proposed to exert chemoprotective effects, and their molecular mechanisms have been the focus of research in the dietary/chemoprevention field. Using these bioactives as examples, this review surveys the proposed mechanisms by which they exert their effects, from the nucleus to the cellular membrane. In addition, we discuss emerging technologies involving the culturing of colonic organoids to study the physiological effects of dietary bioactives. Finally, we address future challenges to the field regarding the identification of additional molecular mechanisms and other bioactive dietary molecules that can be utilized in our fight to reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer. PMID:27431370

  8. Revealing the sequence and resulting cellular morphology of receptor-ligand interactions during Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta E Weiss

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During blood stage Plasmodium falciparum infection, merozoites invade uninfected erythrocytes via a complex, multistep process involving a series of distinct receptor-ligand binding events. Understanding each element in this process increases the potential to block the parasite's life cycle via drugs or vaccines. To investigate specific receptor-ligand interactions, they were systematically blocked using a combination of genetic deletion, enzymatic receptor cleavage and inhibition of binding via antibodies, peptides and small molecules, and the resulting temporal changes in invasion and morphological effects on erythrocytes were filmed using live cell imaging. Analysis of the videos have shown receptor-ligand interactions occur in the following sequence with the following cellular morphologies; 1 an early heparin-blockable interaction which weakly deforms the erythrocyte, 2 EBA and PfRh ligands which strongly deform the erythrocyte, a process dependant on the merozoite's actin-myosin motor, 3 a PfRh5-basigin binding step which results in a pore or opening between parasite and host through which it appears small molecules and possibly invasion components can flow and 4 an AMA1-RON2 interaction that mediates tight junction formation, which acts as an anchor point for internalization. In addition to enhancing general knowledge of apicomplexan biology, this work provides a rational basis to combine sequentially acting merozoite vaccine candidates in a single multi-receptor-blocking vaccine.

  9. Efficient Analysis of Systems Biology Markup Language Models of Cellular Populations Using Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Leandro; Myers, Chris J

    2016-08-19

    The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) has been widely used for modeling biological systems. Although SBML has been successful in representing a wide variety of biochemical models, the core standard lacks the structure for representing large complex regular systems in a standard way, such as whole-cell and cellular population models. These models require a large number of variables to represent certain aspects of these types of models, such as the chromosome in the whole-cell model and the many identical cell models in a cellular population. While SBML core is not designed to handle these types of models efficiently, the proposed SBML arrays package can represent such regular structures more easily. However, in order to take full advantage of the package, analysis needs to be aware of the arrays structure. When expanding the array constructs within a model, some of the advantages of using arrays are lost. This paper describes a more efficient way to simulate arrayed models. To illustrate the proposed method, this paper uses a population of repressilator and genetic toggle switch circuits as examples. Results show that there are memory benefits using this approach with a modest cost in runtime. PMID:26912276

  10. Interactions of HIV-1 proteins with their cellular partners : insights from computational methods

    OpenAIRE

    Quy, Vo Cam

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 attacks vital cells in the human immune system. HIV-1 differs from many viruses since it is characterized by a very high genetic variability. This means that many variants of HIV-1 virus can be generated in a single infected patient in the course of one day. HIV-1 hypervariability causes drug resistance and, consequently, medical treatment failure. Targeting the interactions between proteins from HIV-1 and from Homo sapiens may represent an excellent solution for drug design because it ...

  11. A Geometrical-Based Model for Cochannel Interference Analysis and Capacity Estimation of CDMA Cellular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltzis KonstantinosB

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A common assumption in cellular communications is the circular-cell approximation. In this paper, an alternative analysis based on the hexagonal shape of the cells is presented. A geometrical-based stochastic model is proposed to describe the angle of arrival of the interfering signals in the reverse link of a cellular system. Explicit closed form expressions are derived, and simulations performed exhibit the characteristics and validate the accuracy of the proposed model. Applications in the capacity estimation of WCDMA cellular networks are presented. Dependence of system capacity of the sectorization of the cells and the base station antenna radiation pattern is explored. Comparisons with data in literature validate the accuracy of the proposed model. The degree of error of the hexagonal and the circular-cell approaches has been investigated indicating the validity of the proposed model. Results have also shown that, in many cases, the two approaches give similar results when the radius of the circle equals to the hexagon inradius. A brief discussion on how the proposed technique may be applied to broadband access networks is finally made.

  12. A Geometrical-Based Model for Cochannel Interference Analysis and Capacity Estimation of CDMA Cellular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos B. Baltzis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A common assumption in cellular communications is the circular-cell approximation. In this paper, an alternative analysis based on the hexagonal shape of the cells is presented. A geometrical-based stochastic model is proposed to describe the angle of arrival of the interfering signals in the reverse link of a cellular system. Explicit closed form expressions are derived, and simulations performed exhibit the characteristics and validate the accuracy of the proposed model. Applications in the capacity estimation of WCDMA cellular networks are presented. Dependence of system capacity of the sectorization of the cells and the base station antenna radiation pattern is explored. Comparisons with data in literature validate the accuracy of the proposed model. The degree of error of the hexagonal and the circular-cell approaches has been investigated indicating the validity of the proposed model. Results have also shown that, in many cases, the two approaches give similar results when the radius of the circle equals to the hexagon inradius. A brief discussion on how the proposed technique may be applied to broadband access networks is finally made.

  13. Realistic multi-cellular dosimetry for 177Lu-labelled antibodies: model and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcatili, S.; Pichard, A.; Courteau, A.; Ladjohounlou, R.; Navarro-Teulon, I.; Repetto-Llamazares, A.; Heyerdahl, H.; Dahle, J.; Pouget, J. P.; Bardiès, M.

    2016-10-01

    Current preclinical dosimetric models often fail to take account of the complex nature of absorbed dose distribution typical of in vitro clonogenic experiments in targeted radionuclide therapy. For this reason, clonogenic survival is often expressed as a function of added activity rather than the absorbed dose delivered to cells/cell nuclei. We designed a multi-cellular dosimetry model that takes into account the realistic distributions of cells in the Petri dish, for the establishment of survival curves as a function of the absorbed dose. General-purpose software tools were used for the generation of realistic, randomised 3D cell culture geometries based on experimentally determined parameters (cell size, cell density, cluster density, average cluster size, cell cumulated activity). A mixture of Monte Carlo and analytical approaches was implemented in order to achieve as accurate as possible results while reducing calculation time. The model was here applied to clonogenic survival experiments carried out to compare the efficacy of Betalutin®, a novel 177Lu-labelled antibody radionuclide conjugate for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, to that of 177Lu-labelled CD20-specific (rituximab) and non-specific antibodies (Erbitux) on lymphocyte B cells. The 3D cellular model developed allowed a better understanding of the radiative and non-radiative processes associated with cellular death. Our approach is generic and can also be applied to other radiopharmaceuticals and cell distributions.

  14. A Method for Model Checking Feature Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas; Le Guilly, Thibaut; Ravn, Anders Peter;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method to check for feature interactions in a system assembled from independently developed concurrent processes as found in many reactive systems. The method combines and refines existing definitions and adds a set of activities. The activities describe how to populate the ...... the definitions with models to ensure that all interactions are captured. The method is illustrated on a home automation example with model checking as analysis tool. In particular, the modelling formalism is timed automata and the analysis uses UPPAAL to find interactions....

  15. Antiproliferative Activity and Cellular Uptake of Evodiamine and Rutaecarpine Based on 3D Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Guo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Evodiamine (EVO and rutaecarpine (RUT are promising anti-tumor drug candidates. The evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids of cancer cells would better recapitulate the native situation and thus better reflect an in vivo response to the treatment. Herein, we employed the 3D culture of MCF-7 and SMMC-7721 cells based on hanging drop method and evaluated the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids, and compared the results with those obtained from 2D monolayers. The drugs’ IC50 values were significantly increased from the range of 6.4–44.1 μM in 2D monolayers to 21.8–138.0 μM in 3D multicellular spheroids, which may be due to enhanced mass barrier and reduced drug penetration in 3D models. The fluorescence of EVO and RUT was measured via fluorescence spectroscopy and the cellular uptake of both drugs was characterized in 2D tumor models. The results showed that the cellular uptake concentrations of RUT increased with increasing drug concentrations. However, the EVO concentrations uptaken by the cells showed only a small change with increasing drug concentrations, which may be due to the different solubility of EVO and Rut in solvents. Overall, this study provided a new vision of the anti-tumor activity of EVO and RUT via 3D multicellular spheroids and cellular uptake through the fluorescence of compounds.

  16. Toward creation of interaction models: simple objects-interaction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Teresa; García-Huerta, Juan-M.; Vázquez-Cervantes, Alberto; Jiménez-Hernández, Hugo; Herrera-Navarro, Ana-M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a proposal to manage simple-objects interaction in video surveillance system. The proposal consists on locating a set of features in each video frame. Maxima regions from the second Eigen- value of the tensor matrix are used as features. Afterwards, statics features are discarded (labeling as background) and dynamic features are used to represent objects in motion (foreground). Dynamics features are dynamically clustered with k-neighborhood and EM algorithm. The centroid of each cluster locally represents motion objects, and its displacement through time is denoted by displacement of cumulus over several frames. The behavior of cumulus in time help us to model simple object interactions. These primitives can be used in addition to a causal dependencies across time; i.e. cluster division, cluster fusion and cluster motion with respect to the others, offer information of local dynamics which is referred to local interactions. And based on causal dependencies theory, a graph dependence of local centroids behavior can be built. This graph can represent the local interaction model. In experimental section, the approach is tested in several scenarios, extracting simple interaction objects in controlled/not-controlled scenarios.

  17. The Monash University Interactive Simple Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommenget, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Monash university interactive simple climate model is a web-based interface that allows students and the general public to explore the physical simulation of the climate system with a real global climate model. It is based on the Globally Resolved Energy Balance (GREB) model, which is a climate model published by Dommenget and Floeter [2011] in the international peer review science journal Climate Dynamics. The model simulates most of the main physical processes in the climate system in a very simplistic way and therefore allows very fast and simple climate model simulations on a normal PC computer. Despite its simplicity the model simulates the climate response to external forcings, such as doubling of the CO2 concentrations very realistically (similar to state of the art climate models). The Monash simple climate model web-interface allows you to study the results of more than a 2000 different model experiments in an interactive way and it allows you to study a number of tutorials on the interactions of physical processes in the climate system and solve some puzzles. By switching OFF/ON physical processes you can deconstruct the climate and learn how all the different processes interact to generate the observed climate and how the processes interact to generate the IPCC predicted climate change for anthropogenic CO2 increase. The presentation will illustrate how this web-base tool works and what are the possibilities in teaching students with this tool are.

  18. Porous models for wave-seabed interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeng, Dong-Sheng [Shanghai Jiaotong Univ., SH (China)

    2013-02-01

    Detailed discussion about the phenomenon of wave-seabed interactions. Novel models for wave-induced seabed response. Intensive theoretical derivations for wave-seabed interactions. Practical examples for engineering applications. ''Porous Models for Wave-seabed Interactions'' discusses the Phenomenon of wave-seabed interactions, which is a vital issue for coastal and geotechnical engineers involved in the design of foundations for marine structures such as pipelines, breakwaters, platforms, etc. The most important sections of this book will be the fully detailed theoretical models of wave-seabed interaction problem, which are particularly useful for postgraduate students and junior researchers entering the discipline of marine geotechnics and offshore engineering. This book also converts the research outcomes of theoretical studies to engineering applications that will provide front-line engineers with practical and effective tools in the assessment of seabed instability in engineering design.

  19. Analysis on Traffic Conflicts of Two-lane Highway Based on Improved Cellular Automation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiru Tang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on microscopic traffic characteristics of two-lane highway and different driving characteristics for drivers, the characteristics of drivers and vehicle structure are introduced into Cellular Automation model for establishing new Cellular Automation model of two-lane highway. Through computer simulation, the paper analyzes the effect of the promotion of different vehicles, drivers and arrival rates on traffic conflicts of two-lane highway, which gets the relationship between the parameters such as road traffic and velocity variance and collision. The results indicate that the frequency of traffic conflicts has close relationship with the product of traffic flow and velocity variation. When the traffic flow and velocity variation are great, the frequency of the conflict is the greatest, and when the traffic flow and velocity variation are little, the frequency of the conflict is the least.

  20. From Cells to Islands: An unified Model of Cellular Parallel Genetic Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Simoncini, David; Verel, Sébastien; Clergue, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the Anisotropic selection scheme for cellular Genetic Algorithms (cGA). This new scheme allows to enhance diversity and to control the selective pressure which are two important issues in Genetic Algorithms, especially when trying to solve difficult optimization problems. Varying the anisotropic degree of selection allows swapping from a cellular to an island model of parallel genetic algorithm. Measures of performances and diversity have been performed on one well-known problem: the Quadratic Assignment Problem which is known to be difficult to optimize. Experiences show that, tuning the anisotropic degree, we can find the accurate trade-off between cGA and island models to optimize performances of parallel evolutionary algorithms. This trade-off can be interpreted as the suitable degree of migration among subpopulations in a parallel Genetic Algorithm.

  1. Matrix models with Penner interaction inspired by interacting ribonucleic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradeep Bhadola; N Deo

    2015-02-01

    The Penner interaction known in studies of moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces is introduced and studied in the context of random matrix model of homo RNA. An analytic derivation of the generating function is given and the corresponding partition function is derived numerically. An additional dependence of the structure combinatorics factor on (related to the size of the matrix and the interaction strength) is obtained. This factor has a strong effect on the structure combinatorics in the low regime. Databases are scanned for real ribonucleic acid (RNA) structures and pairing information for these RNA structures is computationally extracted. Then the genus is calculated for every structure and plotted as a function of length. The genus distribution function is compared with the prediction from the nonlinear (NL) model. The specific heat and distribution of structure with temperature calculated from the NL model shows that the NL inter-action is biased towards planar structures. The second derivative of specific heat changes phase from a double peaked function for small to a single peak for large . Detailed analysis reveals the presence of the double peak only for genus 0 structures, the higher genii behave normally with . Comparable behaviour is found in studies involving interactions of RNA with osmolytes and monovalent cations in unfolding experiments.

  2. Interacting Induced Dark Energy Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrehbakhsh, Amir F.

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the idea of the brane world scenarios, but based on the approach of the induced matter theory, for a non--vacuum five--dimensional version of general relativity, we propose a model in which the conventional matter sources considered as all kind of the matter (the baryonic and dark) and the induced terms emerging from the extra dimension supposed to be as dark energy. Then we investigate the FLRW type cosmological equations and illustrate that the model is capable to explain respect...

  3. Bit-Vectorized GPU Implementation of a Stochastic Cellular Automaton Model for Surface Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Kelling, Jeffrey; Gemming, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic surface growth models aid in studying properties of universality classes like the Kardar--Paris--Zhang class. High precision results obtained from large scale computational studies can be transferred to many physical systems. Many properties, such as roughening and some two-time functions can be studied using stochastic cellular automaton (SCA) variants of stochastic models. Here we present a highly efficient SCA implementation of a surface growth model capable of simulating billions of lattice sites on a single GPU. We also provide insight into cases requiring arbitrary random probabilities which are not accessible through bit-vectorization.

  4. A Model of Redox Kinetics Implicates the Thiol Proteome in Cellular Hydrogen Peroxide Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Adimora, Nnenna J.; Jones, Dean P; Melissa L Kemp

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is appreciated as a cellular signaling molecule with second-messenger properties, yet the mechanisms by which the cell protects against intracellular H2O2 accumulation are not fully understood. We introduce a network model of H2O2 clearance that includes the pseudo-enzymatic oxidative turnover of protein thiols, the enzymatic actions of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, peroxiredoxin, and glutaredoxin, and the redox reactions of thioredoxin and glutathione. Simulations repro...

  5. An Exact Path-Loss Density Model for Mobiles in a Cellular System

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulla, Mouhamed; Shayan, Yousef R.

    2013-01-01

    In trying to emulate the spatial position of wireless nodes for purpose of analysis, we rely on stochastic simulation. And, it is customary, for mobile systems, to consider a base-station radiation coverage by an ideal cell shape. For cellular analysis, a hexagon contour is always preferred mainly because of its tessellating nature. Despite this fact, largely due to its intrinsic simplicity, in literature only random dispersion model for a circular shape is known. However, if considered, this...

  6. Abstract polymer models with general pair interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Procacci, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    A convergence criterion of cluster expansion is presented in the case of an abstract polymer system with general pair interactions (i.e. not necessarily hard core or repulsive). As a concrete example, the low temperature disordered phase of the BEG model with infinite range interactions, decaying polynomially as $1/r^{d+\\lambda}$ with $\\lambda>0$, is studied.

  7. Cellular interactions and photoprotective effects of idebenone-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers stabilized using PEG-free surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyadarkunte, Abhay Y; Patole, Milind S; Pokharkar, Varsha B

    2015-02-01

    In past years, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) have emerged as novel topical antioxidant delivery systems because of combined positive features of liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles. Here, we seek to unlock the possibility of idebenone (IDB; an antioxidant)-loaded NLCs (IDB-NLCs) cellular interactions such as, viability and uptake, and its photoprotective effects against Ultraviolet-B (UVB)-mediated oxidative stress in immortal human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). The two-step preformulation strategy followed by three-level, three-variable, L9 (3(3)) Taguchi robust orthogonal design employed was important in improving IDB-NLCs key physicochemical aspects such as, entrapment efficiency, drug release (sustained), occlusion, skin deposition and physical stability. UV crosslinker, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry techniques were used to (1) mediate oxidative stress in HaCaT cells, (2) study a qualitative cellular uptake, (3) measure intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial membrane potential, respectively. NLCs markedly improved biocompatibility of IDB under normal as well as stress conditions. Quantitative and qualitative cell uptake studies demonstrated a significant uptake of IDB-NLCs (3-fold increase) and nile red-labeled IDB-NLCs (NR-IDB-NLCs) at 2 h, respectively, hence exerted improved photoprotective effects.

  8. A model of redox kinetics implicates the thiol proteome in cellular hydrogen peroxide responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimora, Nnenna J; Jones, Dean P; Kemp, Melissa L

    2010-09-15

    Hydrogen peroxide is appreciated as a cellular signaling molecule with second-messenger properties, yet the mechanisms by which the cell protects against intracellular H(2)O(2) accumulation are not fully understood. We introduce a network model of H(2)O(2) clearance that includes the pseudo-enzymatic oxidative turnover of protein thiols, the enzymatic actions of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, peroxiredoxin, and glutaredoxin, and the redox reactions of thioredoxin and glutathione. Simulations reproduced experimental observations of the rapid and transient oxidation of glutathione and the rapid, sustained oxidation of thioredoxin on exposure to extracellular H(2)O(2). The model correctly predicted early oxidation profiles for the glutathione and thioredoxin redox couples across a range of initial extracellular [H(2)O(2)] and highlights the importance of cytoplasmic membrane permeability to the cellular defense against exogenous sources of H(2)O(2). The protein oxidation profile predicted by the model suggests that approximately 10% of intracellular protein thiols react with hydrogen peroxide at substantial rates, with a majority of these proteins forming protein disulfides as opposed to protein S-glutathionylated adducts. A steady-state flux analysis predicted an unequal distribution of the intracellular anti-oxidative burden between thioredoxin-dependent and glutathione-dependent antioxidant pathways, with the former contributing the majority of the cellular antioxidant defense due to peroxiredoxins and protein disulfides.

  9. iNR-Drug: Predicting the Interaction of Drugs with Nuclear Receptors in Cellular Networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Nong Fan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NRs are closely associated with various major diseases such as cancer, diabetes, inflammatory disease, and osteoporosis. Therefore, NRs have become a frequent target for drug development. During the process of developing drugs against these diseases by targeting NRs, we are often facing a problem: Given a NR and chemical compound, can we identify whether they are really in interaction with each other in a cell? To address this problem, a predictor called “iNR-Drug” was developed. In the predictor, the drug compound concerned was formulated by a 256-D (dimensional vector derived from its molecular fingerprint, and the NR by a 500-D vector formed by incorporating its sequential evolution information and physicochemical features into the general form of pseudo amino acid composition, and the prediction engine was operated by the SVM (support vector machine algorithm. Compared with the existing prediction methods in this area, iNR-Drug not only can yield a higher success rate, but is also featured by a user-friendly web-server established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iNR-Drug/, which is particularly useful for most experimental scientists to obtain their desired data in a timely manner. It is anticipated that the iNR-Drug server may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the current approach may be easily extended to study the interactions of drug with other targets as well.

  10. Modeling of Trophospheric Ozone Concentrations Using Genetically Trained Multi-Level Cellular Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Kurtulus OZCAN; Erdem BILGILI; Ulku SAHIN; O. Nuri UCAN; Cuma BAYAT

    2007-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations, which are an important air pollutant, are modeled by the use of an artificial intelligence structure. Data obtained from air pollution measurement stations in the city of Istanbul are utilized in constituting the model. A supervised algorithm for the evaluation of ozone concentration using a genetically trained multi-level cellular neural network (ML-CNN) is introduced, developed, and applied to real data. A genetic algorithm is used in the optimization of CNN templates. The model results and the actual measurement results are compared and statistically evaluated. It is observed that seasonal changes in ozone concentrations are reflected effectively by the concentrations estimated by the multilevel-CNN model structure, with a correlation value of 0.57 ascertained between actual and model results. It is shown that the multilevel-CNN modeling technique is as satisfactory as other modeling techniques in associating the data in a complex medium in air pollution applications.

  11. Modeling of trophospheric ozone concentrations using genetically trained multi-level cellular neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, H. Kurtulus; Bilgili, Erdem; Sahin, Ulku; Ucan, O. Nuri; Bayat, Cuma

    2007-09-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations, which are an important air pollutant, are modeled by the use of an artificial intelligence structure. Data obtained from air pollution measurement stations in the city of Istanbul are utilized in constituting the model. A supervised algorithm for the evaluation of ozone concentration using a genetically trained multi-level cellular neural network (ML-CNN) is introduced, developed, and applied to real data. A genetic algorithm is used in the optimization of CNN templates. The model results and the actual measurement results are compared and statistically evaluated. It is observed that seasonal changes in ozone concentrations are reflected effectively by the concentrations estimated by the multilevel-CNN model structure, with a correlation value of 0.57 ascertained between actual and model results. It is shown that the multilevel-CNN modeling technique is as satisfactory as other modeling techniques in associating the data in a complex medium in air pollution applications.

  12. Modeling of soil-water-structure interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian

    to dynamic ocean waves. The goal of this research project is to develop numerical soil models for computing realistic seabed response in the interacting offshore environment, where ocean waves, seabed and offshore structure highly interact with each other. The seabed soil models developed are based...... and decoupled algebraic systems, which are solved using the fixed-point iteration method. Upon the convergence of the iterative method, fully nonlinear coupled solutions are obtained. The developed nonlinear coupled soil models are capable of predicting the transient and gradual pore pressure variations as well...... as the developed nonlinear soil displacements and stresses under monotonic and cyclic loading. With the FVM nonlinear coupled soil models as a basis, multiphysics modeling of wave-seabed-structure interaction is carried out. The computations are done in an open source code environment, OpenFOAM, where FVM models...

  13. Syndetic model of fundamental interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The standard model of quarks and leptons is extended to connect three outstanding issues in particle physics and astrophysics: (1 the absence of strong CP nonconservation, (2 the existence of dark matter, and (3 the mechanism of nonzero neutrino masses, and that of the first family of quarks and leptons, all in the context of having only one Higgs boson in a renormalizable theory. Some phenomenological implications are discussed.

  14. Interaction Spline Models and Their Convergence Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zehua

    1991-01-01

    We consider interaction splines which model a multivariate regression function $f$ as a constant plus the sum of functions of one variable (main effects), plus the sum of functions of two variables (two-factor interactions), and so on. The estimation of $f$ by the penalized least squares method and the asymptotic properties of the models are studied in this article. It is shown that, under some regularity conditions on the data points, the expected squared error averaged over the data points ...

  15. Functional Modeling of Neural-Glia Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Brazhe, N.A.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Functional modeling is an approach that focuses on the representation of the qualitative dynamics of the individual components (e.g. cells) of a system and on the structure of the interaction network.......Functional modeling is an approach that focuses on the representation of the qualitative dynamics of the individual components (e.g. cells) of a system and on the structure of the interaction network....

  16. A Heuristic Molecular Model of Hydrophobic Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hummer, G; Garde, S; Garcia, A. E.; Pohorille, A; Pratt, L. R.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrophobic interactions provide driving forces for protein folding, membrane formation, and oil-water separation. Motivated by information theory, the poorly understood nonpolar solute interactions in water are investigated. A simple heuristic model of hydrophobic effects in terms of density fluctuations is developed. This model accounts quantitatively for the central hydrophobic phenomena of cavity formation and association of inert gas solutes; it therefore clarifies the underlying physics...

  17. Advances in modeling of biomolecular interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong-zhongCAI; Ze-rongLI; Wan-luWANG; Yu-zongCHEN

    2004-01-01

    Modeling of molecular interactions is increasingly used in life science research and biotechnology development.Examples are computer aided drug design, prediction of protein interactions with other molecules, and simulation of networks of biomolecules in a particular process in human body. This article reviews recent progress in the related fields and provides a brief overview on the methods used in molecular modeling of biological systems.

  18. Chronobiology at the cellular and molecular levels: models and mechanisms for circadian timekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, L N

    1983-12-01

    This review considers cellular chronobiology and examines, at least in a superficial way, several classes of models and mechanisms that have been proposed for circadian rhythmicity and some of the experimental approaches that have appeared to be most productive. After a brief discussion of temporal organization and the metabolic, epigenetic, and circadian time domains, the general properties of circadian rhythms are enumerated. A survey of independent oscillations in isolated organs, tissues, and cells is followed by a review of selected circadian rhythms in eukaryotic microorganisms, with particular emphasis placed on the rhythm of cell division in the algal flagellate Euglena as a model system illustrating temporal differentiation. In the ensuing section, experimental approaches to circadian clock mechanisms are considered. The dissection of the clock by the use of chemical inhibitors is illustrated for the rhythm of bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Gonyaulax and for the rhythm of photosynthetic capacity in the unicellular green alga Acetabularia. Alternatively, genetic analysis of circadian oscillators is considered in the green alga Chlamydomonas and in the bread mold Neurospora, both of which have yielded clock mutants and mutants having biochemical lesions that exhibit altered clock properties. On the basis of the evidence generated by these experimental approaches, several classes of biochemical and molecular models for circadian clocks have been proposed. These include strictly molecular models, feedback loop (network) models, transcriptional (tape-reading) models, and membrane models; some of their key elements and predictions are discussed. Finally, a number of general unsolved problems at the cellular level are briefly mentioned: cell cycle interfaces, the evolution of circadian rhythmicity, the possibility of multiple cellular oscillators, chronopharmacology and chronotherapy, and cell-cycle clocks in development and aging. PMID:6229999

  19. An improved multi-value cellular automata model for heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This letter develops an improved multi-value cellular automata model for heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow taking the higher maximum speed of electric bicycles into consideration. The update rules of both regular and electric bicycles are improved, with maximum speeds of two and three cells per second respectively. Numerical simulation results for deterministic and stochastic cases are obtained. The fundamental diagrams and multiple states effects under different model parameters are analyzed and discussed. Field observations were made to calibrate the slowdown probabilities. The results imply that the improved extended Burgers cellular automata (IEBCA) model is more consistent with the field observations than previous models and greatly enhances the realism of the bicycle traffic model. - Highlights: • We proposed an improved multi-value CA model with higher maximum speed. • Update rules are introduced for heterogeneous bicycle traffic with maximum speed 2 and 3 cells/s. • Simulation results of the proposed model are consistent with field bicycle data. • Slowdown probabilities of both regular and electric bicycles are calibrated

  20. Unified tractable model for downlink MIMO cellular networks using stochastic geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, Laila H.

    2016-07-26

    Several research efforts are invested to develop stochastic geometry models for cellular networks with multiple antenna transmission and reception (MIMO). On one hand, there are models that target abstract outage probability and ergodic rate for simplicity. On the other hand, there are models that sacrifice simplicity to target more tangible performance metrics such as the error probability. Both types of models are completely disjoint in terms of the analytic steps to obtain the performance measures, which makes it challenging to conduct studies that account for different performance metrics. This paper unifies both techniques and proposes a unified stochastic-geometry based mathematical paradigm to account for error probability, outage probability, and ergodic rates in MIMO cellular networks. The proposed model is also unified in terms of the antenna configurations and leads to simpler error probability analysis compared to existing state-of-the-art models. The core part of the analysis is based on abstracting unnecessary information conveyed within the interfering signals by assuming Gaussian signaling. To this end, the accuracy of the proposed framework is verified against state-of-the-art models as well as system level simulations. We provide via this unified study insights on network design by reflecting system parameters effect on different performance metrics. © 2016 IEEE.

  1. An improved multi-value cellular automata model for heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Sheng [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 China (China); Qu, Xiaobo [Griffith School of Engineering, Griffith University, Gold Coast, 4222 Australia (Australia); Xu, Cheng [Department of Transportation Management Engineering, Zhejiang Police College, Hangzhou, 310053 China (China); College of Transportation, Jilin University, Changchun, 130022 China (China); Ma, Dongfang, E-mail: mdf2004@zju.edu.cn [Ocean College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 China (China); Wang, Dianhai [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 China (China)

    2015-10-16

    This letter develops an improved multi-value cellular automata model for heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow taking the higher maximum speed of electric bicycles into consideration. The update rules of both regular and electric bicycles are improved, with maximum speeds of two and three cells per second respectively. Numerical simulation results for deterministic and stochastic cases are obtained. The fundamental diagrams and multiple states effects under different model parameters are analyzed and discussed. Field observations were made to calibrate the slowdown probabilities. The results imply that the improved extended Burgers cellular automata (IEBCA) model is more consistent with the field observations than previous models and greatly enhances the realism of the bicycle traffic model. - Highlights: • We proposed an improved multi-value CA model with higher maximum speed. • Update rules are introduced for heterogeneous bicycle traffic with maximum speed 2 and 3 cells/s. • Simulation results of the proposed model are consistent with field bicycle data. • Slowdown probabilities of both regular and electric bicycles are calibrated.

  2. Mapping of immunogenic and protein-interacting regions at the surface of the seven-bladed β-propeller domain of the HIV-1 cellular interactor EED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouet Patrice

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human EED protein, a member of the superfamily of Polycomb group proteins, is involved in multiple cellular protein complexes. Its C-terminal domain, which is common to the four EED isoforms, contains seven repeats of a canonical WD-40 motif. EED is an interactor of three HIV-1 proteins, matrix (MA, integrase (IN and Nef. An antiviral activity has been found to be associated with isoforms EED3 and EED4 at the late stage of HIV-1 replication, due to a negative effect on virus assembly and genomic RNA packaging. The aim of the present study was to determine the regions of the EED C-terminal core domain which were accessible and available to protein interactions, using three-dimensional (3D protein homology modelling with a WD-40 protein of known structure, and epitope mapping of anti-EED antibodies. Results Our data suggested that the C-terminal domain of EED was folded as a seven-bladed β-propeller protein. During the completion of our work, crystallographic data of EED became available from co-crystals of the EED C-terminal core with the N-terminal domain of its cellular partner EZH2. Our 3D-model was in good congruence with the refined structural model determined from crystallographic data, except for a unique α-helix in the fourth β-blade. More importantly, the position of flexible loops and accessible β-strands on the β-propeller was consistent with our mapping of immunogenic epitopes and sites of interaction with HIV-1 MA and IN. Certain immunoreactive regions were found to overlap with the EZH2, MA and IN binding sites, confirming their accessibility and reactivity at the surface of EED. Crystal structure of EED showed that the two discrete regions of interaction with MA and IN did not overlap with each other, nor with the EZH2 binding pocket, but were contiguous, and formed a continuous binding groove running along the lateral face of the β-propeller. Conclusion Identification of antibody-, MA-, IN- and EZH2

  3. Suppression of cellular transformation by poly (A binding protein interacting protein 2 (Paip2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy B Rosenfeld

    Full Text Available Controlling translation is crucial for the homeostasis of a cell. Its deregulation can facilitate the development and progression of many diseases including cancer. Poly (A binding protein interacting protein 2 (Paip2 inhibits efficient initiation of translation by impairing formation of the necessary closed loop of mRNA. The over production of Paip2 in the presence of a constitutively active form of hRas(V12 can reduce colony formation in a semi-solid matrix and focus formation on a cell monolayer. The ability of Paip2 to bind to Pabp is required to suppress the transformed phenotype mediated by hRas(V12. These observations indicate that Paip2 is able to function as a tumor suppressor.

  4. Multiscale modeling of cellular epigenetic states: stochasticity in molecular networks, chromatin folding in cell nuclei, and tissue pattern formation of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gürsoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions. PMID:27480462

  5. CELLULAR AUTOMATA MODELLING OF GRAIN COARSENING DURING REIHEATING AND VALIDATION WITH THE EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.H. Yu; E.J. Palmiere; S.P. Banks; J.T. Han

    2005-01-01

    A novel 2D cellular automata (CA) model has been developed for description of normal grain coarsening and abnormal grain coarsening process. The program reflects the grain coarsening quite well even through the average grain size becomes very large. Follow results have been obtained: (a) The model reflect the normal grain growth kinetics gradually increase with probability and grain growth speed can be controlled. Based on this result, temperature can be coupled in the model. (b) Abnormal grain growth is modelled successfully. (c) Methodology has been put forward to find the relationship between the experiment results and modelling results. The experimental work on the grain coarsening has been carried out. Graphical output matched the realistic microstructure in every detail. Because many physical parameters can be taken into account in the CA programme, this CA model could not only qualitatively demonstrate the grain growth process, but also quantitatively predict and analyse the grain coarsening process.

  6. A Survey On Interactivity in Topic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Ehrencrona Kjellin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trying to make sense and gain deeper insight from large sets of data is becoming a task very central to computer science in general. Topic models, capable of uncovering the semantic themes pervading through large collections of documents, have seen a surge in popularity in recent years. However, topic models are high level statistical tools; their output is given in terms of probability distributions, suited neither for simple interpretation nor deep analysis. Interpreting the fitted topic models in an intuitive manner requires visual and interactive tools. Additionally, some measure of human interaction is typically required for refining the output offered by such models. In the research, this area remains relatively unexplored – only recently has this aspect been receiving more attention. In this paper, the literature is surveyed as it pertains to interactivity and visualisation within the context of topic models, with the goal of finding current research trends in this area.

  7. Drosophila as a genetic and cellular model for studies on axonal growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitington Paul

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the most fascinating processes during nervous system development is the establishment of stereotypic neuronal networks. An essential step in this process is the outgrowth and precise navigation (pathfinding of axons and dendrites towards their synaptic partner cells. This phenomenon was first described more than a century ago and, over the past decades, increasing insights have been gained into the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating neuronal growth and navigation. Progress in this area has been greatly assisted by the use of simple and genetically tractable invertebrate model systems, such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This review is dedicated to Drosophila as a genetic and cellular model to study axonal growth and demonstrates how it can and has been used for this research. We describe the various cellular systems of Drosophila used for such studies, insights into axonal growth cones and their cytoskeletal dynamics, and summarise identified molecular signalling pathways required for growth cone navigation, with particular focus on pathfinding decisions in the ventral nerve cord of Drosophila embryos. These Drosophila-specific aspects are viewed in the general context of our current knowledge about neuronal growth.

  8. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Stephen J; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R(2) > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity. PMID:27624453

  9. Reprint of Infinity computations in cellular automaton forest-fire model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudin, D. I.; Sergeyev, Ya. D.; Hayakawa, M.

    2015-04-01

    Recently a number of traditional models related to the percolation theory has been considered by means of a new computational methodology that does not use Cantor's ideas and describes infinite and infinitesimal numbers in accordance with the principle 'The whole is greater than the part' (Euclid's Common Notion 5). Here we apply the new arithmetic to a cellular automaton forest-fire model which is connected with the percolation methodology and in some sense combines the dynamic and the static percolation problems and under certain conditions exhibits critical fluctuations. It is well known that there exist two versions of the model: real forest-fire model where fire catches adjacent trees in the forest in the step by step manner and simplified version with instantaneous combustion. Using new approach we observe that in both situations we deal with the same model but with different time resolution. We show that depending on the "microscope" we use the same cellular automaton forest-fire model reveals either instantaneous forest combustion or step by step firing. By means of the new approach it was also observed that as far as we choose an infinitesimal tree growing rate and infinitesimal ratio between the ignition probability and the growth probability we determine the measure or extent of the system size infinity that provides the criticality of the system dynamics. Correspondent inequalities for grosspowers are derived.

  10. Mechanism of Laser/light beam interaction at cellular and tissue level and study of the influential factors for the application of low level laser therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of laser therapy it was realized it has useful application of wound healing and reduce pain, but due to the poor understanding of the mechanism and dose response this technique remained to be controversial for therapeutic applications. In order to understand the working and effectiveness different experiments were performed to determine the laser beam effect at the cellular and tissue level. This article discusses the mechanism of beam interaction at tissues and cellular l...

  11. Interaction of the Papillomavirus E8∧E2C Protein with the Cellular CHD6 Protein Contributes to Transcriptional Repression▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Fertey, Jasmin; Ammermann, Ingo; Winkler, Michael; Stöger, Reinhard; Iftner, Thomas; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) is controlled by cellular transcription factors and by viral E2 and E8∧E2C proteins, which are both derived from the HPV E2 gene. Both proteins bind to and repress the HPV E6/E7 promoter. Promoter inhibition has been suggested to be due to binding site competition with cellular transcription factors and to interactions of different cellular transcription modulators with the different amino termini of E2 and E8∧E2C...

  12. A Cellular Automaton Model for Heterogeneous and Incosistent Driver Behavior in Urban Traffic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUMing-Zhe; ZHAO Shi-Bo; WANG Rui-Li

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a cellular automaton model is proposed to describe driver behavior at a single-lane urban roundabout. Driver behavior has been considered as heterogeneous and inconsistent. Most traffic papers in the literature just discussed heterogeneous driver behavior, to our best knowledge. Two truncated Caussian distributions are used to model heterogeneous and inconsistent driver behavior, respectively. The physical meanings of two truncated distributions are indicated. This method may help enhance a better understanding of driver behavior at roundabout traffic, and even possibly provide references for roundabout design and management.

  13. Idealized Mesoscale Model Simulations of Open Cellular Convection Over the Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Claire Louise; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Kelly, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    The atmospheric conditions during an observed case of open cellular convection over the North Sea were simulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical model. Wind, temperature and water vapour mixing ratio profiles from the WRF simulation were used to initialize an idealized...... version of the model, which excluded the effects of topography, surface inhomogeneities and large-scale weather forcing. Cells with an average diameter of 17.4 km developed. Simulations both with and without a capping inversion were made, and the cell-scale kinetic energy budget was calculated for each...

  14. A Cellular Automaton Model for Heterogeneous and Incosistent Driver Behavior in Urban Traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Zhe; Zhao, Shi-Bo; Wang, Rui-Li

    2012-11-01

    In this paper a cellular automaton model is proposed to describe driver behavior at a single-lane urban roundabout. Driver behavior has been considered as heterogeneous and inconsistent. Most traffic papers in the literature just discussed heterogeneous driver behavior, to our best knowledge. Two truncated Gaussian distributions are used to model heterogeneous and inconsistent driver behavior, respectively. The physical meanings of two truncated distributions are indicated. This method may help enhance a better understanding of driver behavior at roundabout traffic, and even possibly provide references for roundabout design and management.

  15. Modeling Mixed Bicycle Traffic Flow: A Comparative Study on the Cellular Automata Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation, as a powerful tool for evaluating transportation systems, has been widely used in transportation planning, management, and operations. Most of the simulation models are focused on motorized vehicles, and the modeling of nonmotorized vehicles is ignored. The cellular automata (CA model is a very important simulation approach and is widely used for motorized vehicle traffic. The Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS CA model and the multivalue CA (M-CA model are two categories of CA model that have been used in previous studies on bicycle traffic flow. This paper improves on these two CA models and also compares their characteristics. It introduces a two-lane NS CA model and M-CA model for both regular bicycles (RBs and electric bicycles (EBs. In the research for this paper, many cases, featuring different values for the slowing down probability, lane-changing probability, and proportion of EBs, were simulated, while the fundamental diagrams and capacities of the proposed models were analyzed and compared between the two models. Field data were collected for the evaluation of the two models. The results show that the M-CA model exhibits more stable performance than the two-lane NS model and provides results that are closer to real bicycle traffic.

  16. High-Aspect Ratio Bio-Metallic Nanocomposites for Cellular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deodhar, Sneha; Huckaby, Justin; Delahoussaye, Miles; DeCoster, Mark A.

    2014-08-01

    We synthesized high aspect ratio composites with biological and metal components. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) revealed linear morphology and smooth surface texture. SEM, TEM and light microscopy showed that composites have scalable dimensions from nano- to micro-, with diameters as low as 60 nm, lengths exceeding 150 pm, and average aspect ratio of 100. The structures are stable, remaining intact for over one year in dried form and in liquid, and did not aggregate, in contrast to metal nanoparticles such as iron and copper. Many metal nanoparticles are toxic to cells, limiting their use for biological applications. The bio-metallic composites characterized here showed lower toxicity compared to their precursor metal nanoparticles in brain tumor cell cultures. Due to these more biocompatible properties, we tested the ability of the composites to interact with cells. Zeta potential analysis indicated that composites carry a net negative charge (-24.3 ± 2.2 mV), while the starting metal nanoparticles measured (43.3 ± 2.4 mV). We labeled the composites with poly-l-lysine fluorescein isothiocyanate (PLL-FITC), which shifted the potential to 3.5 ± 2.9 mV. It was observed by fluorescence microscopy that composites smaller than cells were internalized by some cells and larger composites remained outside. Cells became fluorescent over time due to leakage of PLL-FITC from the composites which lost fluorescence over time. Higher biocompatibility, low aggregation, and ability to control size distribution of the linear composites may make them ideal vehicles to deliver drugs or other materials to cells, and may be used as a scaffolding material for cells.

  17. Numerical study on photoresist etching processes based on a cellular automata model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU ZaiFa; HUANG QingAn; LI WeiHua; LU Wei

    2007-01-01

    For the three-dimensional (3-D) numerical study of photoresist etching processes, the 2-D dynamic cellular automata (CA) model has been successfully extended to a 3-D dynamic CA model. Only the boundary cells will be processed in the 3-D dynamic CA model and the structure of "if-else" description in the simulation program is avoided to speed up the simulation. The 3-D dynamic CA model has found to be stable, fast and accurate for the numerical study of photoresist etching processes. The exposure simulation, post-exposure bake (PEB) simulation and etching simulation are integrated together to further investigate the performances of the CA model. Simulation results have been compared with the available experimental results and the simulations show good agreement with the available experiments.

  18. A traffic flow cellular automaton model to considering drivers' learning and forgetting behaviour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Jian-Xun; Huang Hai-Jun; Tian Qiong

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the commonly used NaSch cellular automaton (CA) model and its modifications can help explain the internal causes of the macro phenomena of traffic flow. However, the randomization probability of vehicle velocity used in these models is assumed to be an exogenous constant or a conditional constant, which cannot reflect the learning and forgetting behaviour of drivers with historical experiences. This paper further modifies the NaSch model by enabling the randomization probability to be adjusted on the bases of drivers' memory. The Markov properties of this modified model are discussed. Analytical and simulation results show that the traffic fundamental diagrams can be indeed improved when considering drivers' intelligent behaviour. Some new features of traffic are revealed by differently combining the model parameters representing learning and forgetting behaviour.

  19. 2D cellular automaton model for the evolution of active region coronal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, Marcelo López

    2016-01-01

    We study a 2D cellular automaton (CA) model for the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model is based on the idea that coronal loops are made of elementary magnetic strands that are tangled and stressed by the displacement of their footpoints by photospheric motions. The magnetic stress accumulated between neighbor strands is released in sudden reconnection events or nanoflares that heat the plasma. We combine the CA model with the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) model to compute the response of the plasma to the heating events. Using the known response of the XRT telescope on board Hinode we also obtain synthetic data. The model obeys easy to understand scaling laws relating the output (nanoflare energy, temperature, density, intensity) to the input parameters (field strength, strand length, critical misalignment angle). The nanoflares have a power-law distribution with a universal slope of -2.5, independent of the input parameters. The repetition frequency of nanoflares, expressed in t...

  20. Comparative Analysis of Empirical Path Loss Model for Cellular Transmission in Rivers State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.O.H Akinwole, Biebuma J.J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative analysis of three empirical path loss models with measured data for urban, suburban, and rural areas in Rivers State. The three models investigated were COST 231 Hata, SUI,ECC-33models. A downlink data was collected at operating frequency of 2100MHz using drive test procedure consisting of test mobile phones to determine the received signal power (RSCP at specified receiver distanceson a Globacom Node Bs located in some locations in the State. This test was carried out for investigating the effectiveness of the commonly used existing models for Cellular transmission. The results analysed were based on Mean Square Error (MSE and Standard Deviation (SD and were simulated on MATLAB (7.5.0. The results show that COST 231 Hata model gives better predictions and therefore recommended for path loss predictions in River State.

  1. Numerical study on photoresist etching processes based on a cellular automata model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    For the three-dimensional (3-D) numerical study of photoresist etching processes, the 2-D dynamic cellular automata (CA) model has been successfully extended to a 3-D dynamic CA model. Only the boundary cells will be processed in the 3-D dy-namic CA model and the structure of “if-else” description in the simulation pro-gram is avoided to speed up the simulation. The 3-D dynamic CA model has found to be stable, fast and accurate for the numerical study of photoresist etching processes. The exposure simulation, post-exposure bake (PEB) simulation and etching simulation are integrated together to further investigate the performances of the CA model. Simulation results have been compared with the available ex-perimental results and the simulations show good agreement with the available experiments.

  2. Modeling of hydrogen interactions with beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, improved mathematical models are developed for hydrogen interactions with beryllium. This includes the saturation effect observed for high-flux implantation of ions from plasmas and retention of tritium produced from neutronic transmutations in beryllium. Use of the models developed is justified by showing how they can replicated experimental data using the TMAP4 tritium transport code. (author)

  3. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.;

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were t...

  4. Interacting Dark Energy Models -- Scalar Linear Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Perico, E L D

    2016-01-01

    We extend the dark sector interacting models assuming the dark energy as the sum of independent contributions $\\rho_{\\Lambda} =\\sum_i\\rho_{\\Lambda i}$, associated with (and interacting with) each of the $i$ material species. We derive the linear scalar perturbations for two interacting dark energy scenarios, modeling its cosmic evolution and identifying their different imprints in the CMB and matter power spectrum. Our treatment was carried out for two phenomenological motivated expressions of the dark energy density, $\\rho_\\Lambda(H^2)$ and $\\rho_\\Lambda(R)$. The $\\rho_\\Lambda(H^2)$ description turned out to be a full interacting model, i.e., the dark energy interacts with everyone material species in the universe, whereas the $\\rho_\\Lambda(R)$ description only leads to interactions between dark energy and the non-relativistic matter components; which produces different imprints of the two models on the matter power spectrum. A comparison with the Planck 2015 data was made in order to constrain the free para...

  5. Looking for a needle in a haystack: Cellular proteins that may interact with the tyrosine-based sorting signal of the TGEV S protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trincone, Anna; Schwegmann-Weßels, Christel

    2015-04-16

    The spike protein S of transmissible gastroenteritis virus, an Alphacoronavirus, contains a tyrosine-based sorting signal that is responsible for ERGIC retention and may be important for a correct viral assembly process. To find out whether the S protein interacts with cellular proteins via this sorting signal, a pulldown assay with GST fusion proteins was performed. Filamin A has been identified as a putative interaction candidate. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed a co-localization between the TGEV S protein and filamin A. Further experiments have to be performed to prove a significant impact of filamin A on TGEV infection. Different approaches of several researchers for the identification of cellular interaction candidates relevant for coronavirus replication are summarized. These results may help in the future to identify the role of cellular proteins during coronavirus assembly at the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment. PMID:25481285

  6. The Protein Corona of Plant Virus Nanoparticles Influences their Dispersion Properties, Cellular Interactions, and In Vivo Fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitek, Andrzej S; Wen, Amy M; Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-04-01

    Biomolecules in bodily fluids such as plasma can adsorb to the surface of nanoparticles and influence their biological properties. This phenomenon, known as the protein corona, is well established in the field of synthetic nanotechnology but has not been described in the context of plant virus nanoparticles (VNPs). The interaction between VNPs derived from Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and plasma proteins is investigated, and it is found that the VNP protein corona is significantly less abundant compared to the corona of synthetic particles. The formed corona is dominated by complement proteins and immunoglobulins, the binding of which can be reduced by PEGylating the VNP surface. The impact of the VNP protein corona on molecular recognition and cell targeting in the context of cancer and thrombosis is investigated. A library of functionalized TMV rods with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide ligands targeting integrins or fibrin(ogen) show different dispersion properties, cellular interactions, and in vivo fates depending on the properties of the protein corona, influencing target specificity, and non-specific scavenging by macrophages. Our results provide insight into the in vivo properties of VNPs and suggest that the protein corona effect should be considered during the development of efficacious, targeted VNP formulations.

  7. Interaction of Streptococcus agalactiae and cellular innate immunity in colonization and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sybille eLandwehr-Kenzel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS is highly adapted to humans, where it is a normal constituent of the intestinal and vaginal flora. Yet, GBS has highly invasive potential and causes excessive inflammation, sepsis and death at the beginning of life, in the elderly and in diabetic patients. Thus GBS is a model pathobiont that thrives in the healthy host, but has not lost its potential virulence during coevolution with mankind. It remains incompletely understood how the innate immune system contains GBS in the natural niches, the intestinal and genital tracts, and which molecular events underlie breakdown of mucocutaneous resistance. Newborn infants between days seven and 90 of life are at risk of a particularly striking sepsis manifestation (late onset disease, LOD, where the transition from colonization to invasion and dissemination, and thus from health to severe sepsis is typically fulminant and not predictable. The great majority of late-onset sepsis cases is caused by one clone, GBS ST-17, which expresses HvgA as a signature virulence factor and adhesin. In mice, HvgA promotes the crossing of both the mucosal and the blood brain barrier. Expression levels of HvgA and other GBS virulence factors, such as pili and toxins, are regulated by the upstream two-component control system CovR/S. This in turn is modulated by acidic epithelial pH, high glucose levels and during the passage through the mouse intestine. After invasion, GBS has the ability to subvert innate immunity by mechanisms like GAPDH-dependent induction of IL-10 and β-protein binding to the inhibitory phagocyte receptors sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 5 and 14. On the host side, sensing of GBS nucleic acids and lipopeptides by both Toll-like receptors (TLRs and the inflammasome appears to be critical for host resistance against GBS. Yet, comprehensive models on the interplay between GBS and human immune cells at the colonizing site are just

  8. Phenylpyrazole insecticides induce cytotoxicity by altering mechanisms involved in cellular energy supply in the human epithelial cell model Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidau, Cyril; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Badiou, Alexandra; Belzunces, Luc P

    2009-06-01

    Phenylpyrazoles are relatively new insecticides designed to manage problematic insect resistance and public health hazards encountered with older pesticide families. In vitro cytotoxicity induced by the phenylpyrazole insecticides, Ethiprol and Fipronil, and Fipronil metabolites, sulfone and sulfide, was studied in Caco-2 cells. This cellular model was chosen because it made possible to mimic the primary site of oral exposure to xenobiotics, the intestinal epithelium. Assessment of the barrier function of Caco-2 epithelium was assessed by TEER measurement and showed a major loss of barrier integrity after exposure to Fipronil and its metabolites, but not to Ethiprol. The disruption of the epithelial barrier was attributed to severe ATP depletion independent of cell viability, as revealed by LDH release. The origin of energetic metabolism failure was investigated and revealed a transient enhancement of tetrazolium salt reduction and an increase in lactate production by Caco-2 cells, suggesting an increase in glucose metabolism by pesticides. Cellular symptoms observed in these experiments lead us to hypothesize that phenylpyrazole insecticides interacted with mitochondria.

  9. Web-based Interactive Landform Simulation Model - Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W.; Pelletier, J. D.; Duffin, K.; Ormand, C. J.; Hung, W.; Iverson, E. A.; Shernoff, D.; Zhai, X.; Chowdary, A.

    2013-12-01

    Earth science educators need interactive tools to engage and enable students to better understand how Earth systems work over geologic time scales. The evolution of landforms is ripe for interactive, inquiry-based learning exercises because landforms exist all around us. The Web-based Interactive Landform Simulation Model - Grand Canyon (WILSIM-GC, http://serc.carleton.edu/landform/) is a continuation and upgrade of the simple cellular automata (CA) rule-based model (WILSIM-CA, http://www.niu.edu/landform/) that can be accessed from anywhere with an Internet connection. Major improvements in WILSIM-GC include adopting a physically based model and the latest Java technology. The physically based model is incorporated to illustrate the fluvial processes involved in land-sculpting pertaining to the development and evolution of one of the most famous landforms on Earth: the Grand Canyon. It is hoped that this focus on a famous and specific landscape will attract greater student interest and provide opportunities for students to learn not only how different processes interact to form the landform we observe today, but also how models and data are used together to enhance our understanding of the processes involved. The latest development in Java technology (such as Java OpenGL for access to ubiquitous fast graphics hardware, Trusted Applet for file input and output, and multithreaded ability to take advantage of modern multi-core CPUs) are incorporated into building WILSIM-GC and active, standards-aligned curricula materials guided by educational psychology theory on science learning will be developed to accompany the model. This project is funded NSF-TUES program.

  10. Live cell visualization of the interactions between HIV-1 Gag and the cellular RNA-binding protein Staufen1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouland Andrew J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 uses cellular proteins and machinery to ensure transmission to uninfected cells. Although the host proteins involved in the transport of viral components toward the plasma membrane have been investigated, the dynamics of this process remain incompletely described. Previously we showed that the double-stranded (dsRNA-binding protein, Staufen1 is found in the HIV-1 ribonucleoprotein (RNP that contains the HIV-1 genomic RNA (vRNA, Gag and other host RNA-binding proteins in HIV-1-producing cells. Staufen1 interacts with the nucleocapsid domain (NC domain of Gag and regulates Gag multimerization on membranes thereby modulating HIV-1 assembly. The formation of the HIV-1 RNP is dynamic and likely central to the fate of the vRNA during the late phase of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Results Detailed molecular imaging of both the intracellular trafficking of virus components and of virus-host protein complexes is critical to enhance our understanding of factors that contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis. In this work, we visualized the interactions between Gag and host proteins using bimolecular and trimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC and TriFC analyses. These methods allow for the direct visualization of the localization of protein-protein and protein-protein-RNA interactions in live cells. We identified where the virus-host interactions between Gag and Staufen1 and Gag and IMP1 (also known as VICKZ1, IGF2BP1 and ZBP1 occur in cells. These virus-host interactions were not only detected in the cytoplasm, but were also found at cholesterol-enriched GM1-containing lipid raft plasma membrane domains. Importantly, Gag specifically recruited Staufen1 to the detergent insoluble membranes supporting a key function for this host factor during virus assembly. Notably, the TriFC experiments showed that Gag and Staufen1 actively recruited protein partners when tethered to mRNA. Conclusions The

  11. Independent pair parton interactions model of hadron interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, I. M.; Nechitailo, V. A.

    2004-08-01

    A model of independent pair parton interactions is proposed, according to which hadron interactions are represented by a set of independent binary parton collisions. The final multiplicity distribution is described by a convolution of the negative binomial distributions in each of the partonic collisions. As a result, it is given by a weighted sum of negative binomial distributions with parameters multiplied by the number of active pairs. Its shape and moments are considered. Experimental data on multiplicity distributions in high energy pp¯ processes are well fitted by these distributions. Predictions for the CERN Large Hadron Collider and higher energies are presented. The difference between e+e- and pp¯ processes is discussed.

  12. Multisite Interactions in Lattice-Gas Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, T. L.; Sathiyanarayanan, R.

    For detailed applications of lattice-gas models to surface systems, multisite interactions often play at least as significant a role as interactions between pairs of adatoms that are separated by a few lattice spacings. We recall that trio (3-adatom, non-pairwise) interactions do not inevitably create phase boundary asymmetries about half coverage. We discuss a sophisticated application to an experimental system and describe refinements in extracting lattice-gas energies from calculations of total energies of several different ordered overlayers. We describe how lateral relaxations complicate matters when there is direct interaction between the adatoms, an issue that is important when examining the angular dependence of step line tensions. We discuss the connector model as an alternative viewpoint and close with a brief account of recent work on organic molecule overlayers.

  13. Simulation of emotional contagion using modified SIR model: A cellular automaton approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Libi; Song, Weiguo; Lv, Wei; Lo, Siuming

    2014-07-01

    Emotion plays an important role in the decision-making of individuals in some emergency situations. The contagion of emotion may induce either normal or abnormal consolidated crowd behavior. This paper aims to simulate the dynamics of emotional contagion among crowds by modifying the epidemiological SIR model to a cellular automaton approach. This new cellular automaton model, entitled the “CA-SIRS model”, captures the dynamic process ‘susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible', which is based on SIRS contagion in epidemiological theory. Moreover, in this new model, the process is integrated with individual movement. The simulation results of this model show that multiple waves and dynamical stability around a mean value will appear during emotion spreading. It was found that the proportion of initial infected individuals had little influence on the final stable proportion of infected population in a given system, and that infection frequency increased with an increase in the average crowd density. Our results further suggest that individual movement accelerates the spread speed of emotion and increases the stable proportion of infected population. Furthermore, decreasing the duration of an infection and the probability of reinfection can markedly reduce the number of infected individuals. It is hoped that this study will be helpful in crowd management and evacuation organization.

  14. A new cellular automata model of traffic flow with negative exponential weighted look-ahead potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Zheng, Wei-Fan; Jiang, Bao-Shan; Zhang, Ji-Ye

    2016-10-01

    With the development of traffic systems, some issues such as traffic jams become more and more serious. Efficient traffic flow theory is needed to guide the overall controlling, organizing and management of traffic systems. On the basis of the cellular automata model and the traffic flow model with look-ahead potential, a new cellular automata traffic flow model with negative exponential weighted look-ahead potential is presented in this paper. By introducing the negative exponential weighting coefficient into the look-ahead potential and endowing the potential of vehicles closer to the driver with a greater coefficient, the modeling process is more suitable for the driver’s random decision-making process which is based on the traffic environment that the driver is facing. The fundamental diagrams for different weighting parameters are obtained by using numerical simulations which show that the negative exponential weighting coefficient has an obvious effect on high density traffic flux. The complex high density non-linear traffic behavior is also reproduced by numerical simulations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11572264, 11172247, 11402214, and 61373009).

  15. Microscopic Models of Heavy Ion Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Capella, A.

    2003-01-01

    An introduction to dynamical microscopic models of hadronic and nuclear interactions is presented. Special emphasis is put in the relation between multiparticle production and total cross-section contributions. In heavy ion collisions, some observables, considered as signals of the production of a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), are studied. It is shown that they can only be described if final state interactions are introduced. It is argued that the cross-sections required are too small to drive th...

  16. An analysis of penalized interaction models

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Junlong; Leng, Chenlei

    2016-01-01

    An important consideration for variable selection in interaction models is to design an appropriate penalty that respects hierarchy of the importance of the variables. A common theme is to include an interaction term only after the corresponding main effects are present. In this paper, we study several recently proposed approaches and present a unified analysis on the convergence rate for a class of estimators, when the design satisfies the restricted eigenvalue condition. In particular, we s...

  17. Empirical results for pedestrian dynamics and their implications for cellular automata models

    CERN Document Server

    Schadschneider, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A large number of models for pedestrian dynamics have been developed over the years. However, so far not much attention has been paid to their quantitative validation. Usually the focus is on the reproduction of empirically observed collective phenomena, as lane formation in counterflow. This can give an indication for the realism of the model, but practical applications, e.g. in safety analysis, require quantitative predictions. We discuss the current experimental situation, especially for the fundamental diagram which is the most important quantity needed for calibration. In addition we consider the implications for the modelling based on cellular automata. As specific example the floor field model is introduced. Apart from the properties of its fundamental diagram we discuss the implications of an egress experiment for the relevance of conflicts and friction effects.

  18. Modelling of Eutectic Saturation Influence on Microstructure in Thin Wall Ductile Iron Casting Using Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model of the globular eutectic solidification in 2D was designed. Proposed model is based on the Cellular AutomatonFinite Differences (CA-FD calculation method. Model has been used for studies of the primary austenite and of globular eutectic grainsgrowth during the ductile iron solidification in the thin wall casting. Model takes into account, among other things, non-uniformtemperature distribution in the casting wall cross-section, kinetics of the austenite and graphite grains nucleation, and non-equilibriumnature of the interphase boundary migration. Calculation of eutectic saturation influence (Sc = 0.9 - 1.1 on microstructure (austenite and graphite fraction, density of austenite and graphite grains and temperature curves in 2 mm wall ductile iron casting has been done.

  19. A self-modifying cellular automaton model of historical urbanization in the San Francisco Bay area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, K.C.; Hoppen, S.; Gaydos, L.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe a cellular automaton (CA) simulation model developed to predict urban growth as part of a project for estimating the regional and broader impact of urbanization on the San Francisco Bay area's climate. The rules of the model are more complex than those of a typical CA and involve the use of multiple data sources, including topography, road networks, and existing settlement distributions, and their modification over time. In addition, the control parameters of the model are allowed to self-modify: that is, the CA adapts itself to the circumstances it generates, in particular, during periods of rapid growth or stagnation. In addition, the model was written to allow the accumulation of probabilistic estimates based on Monte Carlo methods. Calibration of the model has been accomplished by the use of historical maps to compare model predictions of urbanization, based solely upon the distribution in year 1900, with observed data for years 1940, 1954, 1962, 1974, and 1990. The complexity of this model has made calibration a particularly demanding step. Lessons learned about the methods, measures, and strategies developed to calibrate the model may be of use in other environmental modeling contexts. With the calibration complete, the model is being used to generate a set of future scenarios for the San Francisco Bay area along with their probabilities based on the Monte Carlo version of the model. Animated dynamic mapping of the simulations will be used to allow visualization of the impact of future urban growth.

  20. Micropatterned co-culture of hepatocyte spheroids layered on non-parenchymal cells to understand heterotypic cellular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfabrication and micropatterning techniques in tissue engineering offer great potential for creating and controlling cellular microenvironments including cell–matrix interactions, soluble stimuli and cell–cell interactions. Here, we present a novel approach to generate layered patterning of hepatocyte spheroids on micropatterned non-parenchymal feeder cells using microfabricated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. Micropatterned PEG-hydrogel-treated substrates with two-dimensional arrays of gelatin circular domains (ϕ = 100 μm) were prepared by photolithographic method. Only on the critical structure of PEG hydrogel with perfect protein rejection, hepatocytes were co-cultured with non-parenchymal cells to be led to enhanced hepatocyte functions. Then, we investigated the mechanism of the functional enhancement in co-culture with respect to the contributions of soluble factors and direct cell–cell interactions. In particular, to elucidate the influence of soluble factors on hepatocyte function, hepatocyte spheroids underlaid with fibroblasts (NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts) or endothelial cells (BAECs: bovine aortic endothelial cells) were compared with physically separated co-culture of hepatocyte monospheroids with NIH3T3 or BAEC using trans-well culture systems. Our results suggested that direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors, both of these between hepatocytes and fibroblasts, significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions. In contrast, direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact between hepatocytes and endothelial cells only contributed to enhance hepatocyte functions. This patterning technique can be a useful experimental tool for applications in basic science, drug screening and tissue engineering, as well as in the design of artificial liver devices. (paper)

  1. Cellular-automata model of the dwarf shrubs populations and communities dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Komarov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The probabilistic cellular-automata model of development and long-time dynamics of dwarf shrub populations and communities is developed. It is based on the concept of discrete description of the plant ontogenesis and joint model approaches in terms of probabilistic cellular automata and L-systems by Lindenmayer. Short representation of the basic model allows evaluation of the approach and software implementation. The main variables of the model are a number of partial bushes in clones or area projective cover. The model allows us to investigate the conditions of self-maintenance and sustainability population under different environmental conditions (inaccessibility of the territory for settlement, mosaic moisture conditions of soil and wealth. The model provides a forecast of the total biomass dynamics shrubs and their fractions (stems, leaves, roots, fine roots, fruits on the basis of the data obtained in the discrete description of ontogenesis and further information on the productivity of the plant fractions. The inclusion of the joint dynamics of biomass of shrubs and soil in EFIMOD models cycle of carbon and nitrogen to evaluate the role of shrubs in these circulations, especially at high impact, such as forest fires and clear cutting, allow forecasting of the dynamics of populations and ecosystem functions of shrubs (regulation of biogeochemical cycles maintaining biodiversity, participation in the creation of non-wood products with changing climatic conditions and strong damaging effects (logging, fires; and application of the models developed to investigate the stability and productivity of shrubs and their participation in the cycle of carbon and nitrogen in different climatic and edaphic conditions.

  2. Cellular automata model based on GIS and urban sprawl dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Fengyun; Zhang, Zengxiang

    2005-10-01

    The simulation of land use change process needs the support of Geographical Information System (GIS) and other relative technologies. While the present commercial GIS lack capabilities of distribution, prediction, and simulation of spatial-temporal data. Cellular automata (CA) provide dynamically modeling "from bottom-to-top" framework and posses the capability of modeling spatial-temporal evolvement process of a complicated geographical system, which is composed of a fourfold: cells, states, neighbors and rules. The simplicity and flexibility make CA have the ability to simulate a variety of behaviors of complex systems. One of the most potentially useful applications of cellular automata from the point of view of spatial planning is their use in simulations of urban sprawl at local and regional level. The paper firstly introduces the principles and characters of the cellular automata, and then discusses three methods of the integration of CA and GIS. The paper analyses from a practical point of view the factors that effect urban activities in the science of spatial decision-making. The status of using CA to dynamic simulates of urban expansion at home and abroad is analyzed. Finally, the problems and tendencies that exist in the application of CA model are detailed discussed, such as the quality of the data that the CA needs, the self-organization of the CA roots in the mutual function among the elements of the system, the partition of the space scale, the time calibration of the CA and the integration of the CA with other modular such as artificial nerve net modular and population modular etc.

  3. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle. PMID:27087101

  4. Quark Interchange Model of Baryon Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Joel Neal

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point -like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and we assume that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (qq) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of Yn scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  5. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers

  6. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  7. Modeling Mixed Traffic Flow at Crosswalks in Micro-Simulations Using Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Houli; ZHANG Yi

    2007-01-01

    The cellular automata (CA) micro-simulation model was used to describe the behavior of the mixed traffic flows at crosswalks where the pedestrians compete with the vehicles to cross the roadway. The focus of this paper is the behavior of pedestrians and the influence of pedestrians' behavior on the vehicle flow, pedestrian flows, and the vehicle waiting time. The proportion of pedestrians who do not obey traffic laws, the group effect, and expected waiting time of pedestrians, regarded as the most important pedestrian characteristics, are taken into consideration in the analysis. Simulation results show the ability of the microsimulation to capture the most important features of mixed traffic flow.

  8. Metabolically active portion of fat-free mass: a cellular body composition level modeling analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, ZiMian; Heshka, Stanley; Wang, Jack; Gallagher, Dympna; Deurenberg, Paul; Chen, Zhao; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2006-01-01

    The proportion of fat-free mass (FFM) as body cell mass (BCM) is highly related to whole body resting energy expenditure. However, the magnitude of BCM/FFM may have been underestimated in previous studies. This is because Moore’s equation [BCM (kg) =0.00833 × total body potassium (in mmol)], which was used to predict BCM, underestimates BCM by ~ %. The aims of the present study were to develop a theoretical BCM/FFM model at the cellular level and to explore the influences of sex, age, and adi...

  9. Driver’s Awareness and Lane Changing Maneuver in Traffic Flow based on Cellular Automaton Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kohei Arai; Steven Ray Sentinuwo

    2015-01-01

    Effect of driver’s awareness (e.g., to estimate the speed and arrival time of another vehicle) on the lane changing maneuver is discussed. “Scope awareness” is defined as the visibility which is required for the driver to make a visual perception about road condition and the speed of vehicle that appears in the target lane for lane changing in the road. Cellular automaton based simulation model is created and applied to simulation studies for driver awareness behavior. This study clarifies re...

  10. A material optimization model to approximate energy bounds for cellular materials under multiload conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guedes, J.M.; Rodrigues, H.C.; Bendsøe, Martin P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a computational model, based on inverse homogenization and topology design, for approximating energy bounds for two-phase composites under multiple load cases. The approach allows for the identification of possible single-scale cellular materials that give rise to the optimal...... bounds within this class of composites. A comparison of the computational results with the globally optimal bounds given via rank-N layered composites illustrates the behaviour for tension and shear load situations, as well as the importance of considering the shape of the basic unit cell as part...

  11. SOFTWARE RELIABILITY MODEL FOR COMPONENT INTERACTION MODE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qiang; Lu Yang; Xu Zijun; Han Jianghong

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid progress of component technology,the software development methodology of gathering a large number of components for designing complex software systems has matured.But,how to assess the application reliability accurately with the information of system architecture and the components reliabilities together has become a knotty problem.In this paper,the defects in formal description of software architecture and the limitations in existed model assumptions are both analyzed.Moreover,a new software reliability model called Component Interaction Mode (CIM) is proposed.With this model,the problem for existed component-based software reliability analysis models that cannot deal with the cases of component interaction with non-failure independent and non-random control transition is resolved.At last,the practice examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of this model

  12. An implementation of cellular automaton model for single-line train working diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Wei; Liu Jun

    2006-01-01

    According to the railway transportation system's characteristics,a new cellular automaton model for the singleline railway system is presented in this paper.Based on this model,several simulations were done to imitate the train operation under three working diagrams.From a different angle the results show how the organization of train operation impacts on the railway carrying capacity.By using the non-parallel train working diagram the influence of fast-train on slow-train is found to be the strongest.Many slow-trains have to wait in-between neighbouring stations to let the fast-train(s) pass through first.So the slow-train will advance like a wave propagating from the departure station to the arrival station.This also resembles the situation of a highway jammed traffic flow.Furthermore,the nonuniformity of travel times between the sections also greatly limits the railway carrying capacity.After converting the nonuniform sections into the sections with uniform travel times while the total travel time is kept unchanged,all three carrying capacities are improved greatly as shown by simulation.It also shows that the cellular automaton model is an effective and feasible way to investigate the railway transDortation system.

  13. Transfer matrix modeling and experimental validation of cellular porous material with resonant inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutres, Olivier; Atalla, Noureddine; Osman, Haisam

    2015-06-01

    Porous materials are widely used for improving sound absorption and sound transmission loss of vibrating structures. However, their efficiency is limited to medium and high frequencies of sound. A solution for improving their low frequency behavior while keeping an acceptable thickness is to embed resonant structures such as Helmholtz resonators (HRs). This work investigates the absorption and transmission acoustic performances of a cellular porous material with a two-dimensional periodic arrangement of HR inclusions. A low frequency model of a resonant periodic unit cell based on the parallel transfer matrix method is presented. The model is validated by comparison with impedance tube measurements and simulations based on both the finite element method and a homogenization based model. At the HR resonance frequency (i) the transmission loss is greatly improved and (ii) the sound absorption of the foam can be either decreased or improved depending on the HR tuning frequency and on the thickness and properties of the host foam. Finally, the diffuse field sound absorption and diffuse field sound transmission loss performance of a 2.6 m(2) resonant cellular material are measured. It is shown that the improvements observed at the Helmholtz resonant frequency on a single cell are confirmed at a larger scale.

  14. Transition between immune and disease states in a cellular automaton model of clonal immune response

    CERN Document Server

    Bezzi, M; Ruffo, S; Seiden, P E; Bezzi, Michele; Celada, Franco; Ruffo, Stefano; Seiden, Philip E.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we extend the Celada-Seiden (CS) model of the humoral immune response to include infectious virus and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (cellular response). The response of the system to virus involves a competition between the ability of the virus to kill the host cells and the host's ability to eliminate the virus. We find two basins of attraction in the dynamics of this system, one is identified with disease and the other with the immune state. There is also an oscillating state that exists on the border of these two stable states. Fluctuations in the population of virus or antibody can end the oscillation and drive the system into one of the stable states. The introduction of mechanisms of cross-regulation between the two responses can bias the system towards one of them. We also study a mean field model, based on coupled maps, to investigate virus-like infections. This simple model reproduces the attractors for average populations observed in the cellular automaton. All the dynamical behavior connect...

  15. Computational models of atrial cellular electrophysiology and calcium handling, and their role in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijman, Jordi; Erfanian Abdoust, Pegah; Voigt, Niels; Nattel, Stanley; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2016-02-01

    The complexity of the heart makes an intuitive understanding of the relative contribution of ion channels, transporters and signalling pathways to cardiac electrophysiology challenging. Computational modelling of cardiac cellular electrophysiology has proven useful to integrate experimental findings, extrapolate results obtained in expression systems or animal models to other systems, test quantitatively ideas based on experimental data and provide novel hypotheses that are experimentally testable. While the bulk of computational modelling has traditionally been directed towards ventricular bioelectricity, increasing recognition of the clinical importance of atrial arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation, has led to widespread efforts to apply computational approaches to understanding atrial electrical function. The increasing availability of detailed, atrial-specific experimental data has stimulated the development of novel computational models of atrial-cellular electrophysiology and Ca(2+) handling. To date, more than 300 studies have employed mathematical simulations to enhance our understanding of atrial electrophysiology, arrhythmogenesis and therapeutic responses. Future modelling studies are likely to move beyond current whole-cell models by incorporating new data on subcellular architecture, macromolecular protein complexes, and localized ion-channel regulation by signalling pathways. At the same time, more integrative multicellular models that take into account regional electrophysiological and Ca(2+) handling properties, mechano-electrical feedback and/or autonomic regulation will be needed to investigate the mechanisms governing atrial arrhythmias. A combined experimental and computational approach is expected to provide the more comprehensive understanding of atrial arrhythmogenesis that is required to develop improved diagnostic and therapeutic options. Here, we review this rapidly expanding area, with a particular focus on Ca(2+) handling, and

  16. A Heuristic Molecular Model of Hydrophobic Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Hummer, G; García, A E; Pohorille, A; Pratt, L R

    1995-01-01

    Hydrophobic interactions provide driving forces for protein folding, membrane formation, and oil-water separation. Motivated by information theory, the poorly understood nonpolar solute interactions in water are investigated. A simple heuristic model of hydrophobic effects in terms of density fluctuations is developed. This model accounts quantitatively for the central hydrophobic phenomena of cavity formation and association of inert gas solutes; it therefore clarifies the underlying physics of hydrophobic effects and permits important applications to conformational equilibria of nonpolar solutes and hydrophobic residues in biopolymers.

  17. Comparison of Cellular Automaton and Phase Field Models to Simulate Dendrite Growth in Hexagonal Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    A cellular automaton (CA)-finite element (FE) model and a phase field (PF)-FE model were used to simulate equiaxed dendritic growth during the solidification of hexagonal metals. In the CA-FE model, the conservation equations of mass and energy were solved in order to calculate the temperature field, solute concentration, and the dendritic growth morphology. CA-FE simulation results showed reasonable agreement with the previously reported experimental data on secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) vs cooling rate. In the PF model, a PF variable was used to distinguish solid and liquid phases similar to the conventional PF models for solidification of pure materials. Another PF variable was considered to determine the evolution of solute concentration. Validation of both models was performed by comparing the simulation results with the analytical model developed by Lipton-Glicksman-Kurz (LGK), showing quantitatively good agreement in the tip growth velocity at a given melt undercooling. Application to magnesium alloy AZ91 (approximated with the binary Mg-8.9 wt% AI) illustrates the difficulty of modeling dendrite growth in hexagonal systems using CA-FE regarding mesh-induced anisotropy and a better performance of PF-FE in modeling multiple arbitrarily-oriented dendrites growth.

  18. Steady state speed distribution analysis for a combined cellular automaton traffic model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun-Feng; Chen Gui-Sheng; Liu Jin

    2008-01-01

    Cellular Automaton (CA) baaed traffic flow models have been extensively studied due to their effectiveness and simplicity in recent years. This paper develops a discrete time Markov chain (DTMC) analytical framework for a Nagel-Schreckenberg and Fukui-Ishibashi combined CA model (W2H traffic flow model) from microscopic point of view to capture the macroscopic steady state speed distributions. The inter-vehicle spacing Markov chain and the steady state speed Markov chain are proved to be irreducible and ergodie. The theoretical speed probability distributions depending on the traffic density and stochastic delay probability are in good accordance with numerical simulations. The derived fundamental diagram of the average speed from theoretical speed distributions is equivalent to the results in the previous work.

  19. Modeling of the competition life cycle using the software complex of cellular automata PyCAlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, D. B.; Beklemishev, K. A.; Medvedev, A. N.; Medvedeva, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the work is to develop a numerical model of the life cycle of competition on the basis of software complex cellular automata PyCAlab. The model is based on the general patterns of growth of various systems in resource-limited settings. At examples it is shown that the period of transition from an unlimited growth of the market agents to the stage of competitive growth takes quite a long time and may be characterized as monotonic. During this period two main strategies of competitive selection coexist: 1) capture of maximum market space with any reasonable costs; 2) saving by reducing costs. The obtained results allow concluding that the competitive strategies of companies must combine two mentioned types of behavior, and this issue needs to be given adequate attention in the academic literature on management. The created numerical model may be used for market research when developing of the strategies for promotion of new goods and services.

  20. A mathematical model in cellular manufacturing system considering subcontracting approach under constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Forghani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new mathematical model in cellular manufacturing systems (CMSs has been presented. In order to increase the performance of manufacturing system, the production quantity of parts has been considered as a decision variable, i.e. each part can be produced and outsourced, simultaneously. This extension would be minimized the unused capacity of machines. The exceptional elements (EEs are taken into account and would be totally outsourced to the external supplier in order to remove intercellular material handling cost. The problem has been formulated as a mixed-integer programming to minimize the sum of manufacturing variable costs under budget, machines capacity and demand constraints. Also, to evaluate advantages of the model, several illustrative numerical examples have been provided to compare the performance of the proposed model with the available classical approaches in the literature.

  1. A Two-Lane Cellular Automata Model with Influence of Next-Nearest Neighbor Vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new two-lane cellular automata model in which the influence of the next-nearest neighbor vehicle is considered. The attributes of the traffic system composed of fast-lane and slow-lane are investigated by the new traffic model. The simulation results show that the proposed two-lane traffic model can reproduce some traffic phenomena observed in real traffic, and that maximum flux and critical density are close to the field measurements.Moreover, the initial density distribution of the fast-lane and slow-lane has much influence on the traffic flow states.With the ratio between the densities of slow lane and fast lane increasing the lane changing frequency increases, but maximum flux decreases. Finally, the influence of the sensitivity coefficients is discussed.

  2. Designing a mathematical model for integrating dynamic cellular manufacturing into supply chain system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaei, Amin; Davoudpour, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    This article presents designing a new mathematical model for integrating dynamic cellular manufacturing into supply chain system with an extensive coverage of important manufacturing features consideration of multiple plants location, multi-markets allocation, multi-period planning horizons with demand and part mix variation, machine capacity, and the main constraints are demand of markets satisfaction in each period, machine availability, machine time-capacity, worker assignment, available time of worker, production volume for each plant and the amounts allocated to each market. The aim of the proposed model is to minimize holding and outsourcing costs, inter-cell material handling cost, external transportation cost, procurement & maintenance and overhead cost of machines, setup cost, reconfiguration cost of machines installation and removal, hiring, firing and salary worker costs. Aimed to prove the potential benefits of such a design, presented an example is shown using a proposed model.

  3. Partitioning, diffusion, and ligand binding of raft lipid analogs in model and cellular plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Levental, Ilya; Grzybek, Michal; Schwarzmann, Günter; Mueller, Veronika; Honigmann, Alf; Belov, Vladimir N; Eggeling, Christian; Coskun, Unal; Simons, Kai; Schwille, Petra

    2012-07-01

    Several simplified membrane models featuring coexisting liquid disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) lipid phases have been developed to mimic the heterogeneous organization of cellular membranes, and thus, aid our understanding of the nature and functional role of ordered lipid-protein nanodomains, termed "rafts". In spite of their greatly reduced complexity, quantitative characterization of local lipid environments using model membranes is not trivial, and the parallels that can be drawn to cellular membranes are not always evident. Similarly, various fluorescently labeled lipid analogs have been used to study membrane organization and function in vitro, although the biological activity of these probes in relation to their native counterparts often remains uncharacterized. This is particularly true for raft-preferring lipids ("raft lipids", e.g. sphingolipids and sterols), whose domain preference is a strict function of their molecular architecture, and is thus susceptible to disruption by fluorescence labeling. Here, we analyze the phase partitioning of a multitude of fluorescent raft lipid analogs in synthetic Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) and cell-derived Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs). We observe complex partitioning behavior dependent on label size, polarity, charge and position, lipid headgroup, and membrane composition. Several of the raft lipid analogs partitioned into the ordered phase in GPMVs, in contrast to fully synthetic GUVs, in which most raft lipid analogs mis-partitioned to the disordered phase. This behavior correlates with the greatly enhanced order difference between coexisting phases in the synthetic system. In addition, not only partitioning, but also ligand binding of the lipids is perturbed upon labeling: while cholera toxin B binds unlabeled GM1 in the Lo phase, it binds fluorescently labeled GMI exclusively in the Ld phase. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) by stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy on intact

  4. Mathematical modeling of ultrasound in tissue engineering: From bioreactors to the cellular scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Tobias M.

    Tissue engineering seeks to provide a means to treat injuries that are beyond the body's natural ability to repair without the issues associated with allografts. Autologous cells are cultured in a bioreactor which controls the cellular environment (including mechanical stimulation) for optimal tissue growth. We investigate ultrasound as an effective means of mechanical stimulation by predicting the ultrasonic field in a bioreactor, as well as ultrasonic bioeffects at the cellular level. The Transfer Matrix Angular Spectrum Approach was found to be the most accurate and computationally efficient bioreactor model. Three critical factors influence experimental results: (1) the diameter of the tissue engineering scaffold greatly affects the ultrasonic field; (2) the position of the ultrasonic transducer and liquid level in the tissue culture well determines the maximum pressure amplitude in the bioreactor, but the pressure can be controlled by measuring the transducer input electrical impedance and manipulating the applied voltage; and (3) the position of pressure nodes are influenced by ultrasonic frequency and liquid level; this will affect the response of cells to applied ultrasound. On the cellular level, it was shown that chondrocytes respond to ultrasound with frequency dependence. A predicted resonance frequency near 5MHz matched experimental results showing maximum expression of load inducible genes at 5MHz. Mechanical stresses are concentrated near the nucleus at resonance, alluding to the possibility that the nucleus may directly sense ultrasonic stimulation. We postulate that ultrasound influences the transport of p-ERK to the nucleus or causes minor chromatin reorganization, leading to the observed frequency dependent gene expression. We linked in vitro ultrasonic stimulation to in vivo mechanical stimulation generated by natural movement. The chondrocyte's response to impact is under-damped, and the cell oscillates with a frequency close to the model

  5. Using a Cellular Automata-Markov Model to Reconstruct Spatial Land-Use Patterns in Zhenlai County, Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Decadal to centennial land use and land cover change has been consistently singled out as a key element and an important driver of global environmental change, playing an essential role in balancing energy use. Understanding long-term human-environment interactions requires historical reconstruction of past land use and land cover changes. Most of the existing historical reconstructions have insufficient spatial and thematic detail and do not consider various land change types. In this context, this paper explored the possibility of using a cellular automata-Markov model in 90 m × 90 m spatial resolution to reconstruct historical land use in the 1930s in Zhenlai County, China. Then the three-map comparison methodology was employed to assess the predictive accuracy of the transition modeling. The model could produce backward projections by analyzing land use changes in recent decades, assuming that the present land use pattern is dynamically dependent on the historical one. The reconstruction results indicated that in the 1930s most of the study area was occupied by grasslands, followed by wetlands and arable land, while other land categories occupied relatively small areas. Analysis of the three-map comparison illustrated that the major differences among the three maps have less to do with the simulation model and more to do with the inconsistencies among the land categories during the study period. Different information provided by topographic maps and remote sensing images must be recognized.

  6. Binary Particle Model of Weak Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ndili, F N

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the new concept of binary particle as the basic matter unit that participates in weak interactions and not any one fermion singly. We state the quantum numbers of this binary particle, and show the concept leads us to a natural explanation of the standard model puzzle of the origin of flavor mixing and the CKM matrix. Certain other puzzles of the standard model such as the absence of flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC), are also explained naturally by the binary particle model. These puzzles are currently thought to be esoteric properties of electro weak interactions that have origins in physics beyond the standard model at some ultra high energy scales. We show that this is not necessarily the case.

  7. A computable cellular stress network model for non-diseased pulmonary and cardiovascular tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drubin David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Humans and other organisms are equipped with a set of responses that can prevent damage from exposure to a multitude of endogenous and environmental stressors. If these stress responses are overwhelmed, this can result in pathogenesis of diseases, which is reflected by an increased development of, e.g., pulmonary and cardiac diseases in humans exposed to chronic levels of environmental stress, including inhaled cigarette smoke (CS. Systems biology data sets (e.g., transcriptomics, phosphoproteomics, metabolomics could enable comprehensive investigation of the biological impact of these stressors. However, detailed mechanistic networks are needed to determine which specific pathways are activated in response to different stressors and to drive the qualitative and eventually quantitative assessment of these data. A current limiting step in this process is the availability of detailed mechanistic networks that can be used as an analytical substrate. Results We have built a detailed network model that captures the biology underlying the physiological cellular response to endogenous and exogenous stressors in non-diseased mammalian pulmonary and cardiovascular cells. The contents of the network model reflect several diverse areas of signaling, including oxidative stress, hypoxia, shear stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and xenobiotic stress, that are elicited in response to common pulmonary and cardiovascular stressors. We then tested the ability of the network model to identify the mechanisms that are activated in response to CS, a broad inducer of cellular stress. Using transcriptomic data from the lungs of mice exposed to CS, the network model identified a robust increase in the oxidative stress response, largely mediated by the anti-oxidant NRF2 pathways, consistent with previous reports on the impact of CS exposure in the mammalian lung. Conclusions The results presented here describe the construction of a cellular stress

  8. A Vector-based Cellular Automata Model for Simulating Urban Land Use Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yi; CAO Min; ZHANG Lei

    2015-01-01

    Cellular Automata (CA) is widely used for the simulation of land use changes.This study applied a vector-based CA model to simulate land use change in order to minimize or eliminate the scale sensitivity in traditional raster-based CA model.The cells of vector-based CA model are presented according to the shapes and attributes of geographic entities,and the transition rules of vector-based CA model are improved by taking spatial variables of the study area into consideration.The vector-based CA model is applied to simulate land use changes in downtown of Qidong City,Jiangsu Province,China and its validation is confirmed by the methods of visual assessment and spatial accuracy.The simulation result of vector-based CA model reveals that nearly 75% of newly increased urban cells are located in the northwest and southwest parts of the study area from 2002 to 2007,which is in consistent with real land use map.In addition,the simulation results of the vector-based and raster-based CA models are compared to real land use data and their spatial accuracies are found to be 84.0% and 81.9%,respectively.In conclusion,results from this study indicate that the vector-based CA model is a practical and applicable method for the simulation of urbanization processes.

  9. Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses About the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuchao; Conolly, Rory B; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2006-11-21

    This report describes the development of a computational systems biology approach to evaluate the hypotheses of molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaptive response to low dose ionizing radiation. Our concept is that computational models of signaling pathways can be developed and linked to biologically based dose response models to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms which lead to adaptive response. For development of quantitatively accurate, predictive models, it will be necessary to describe tissues consisting of multiple cell types where the different types each contribute in their own way to the overall function of the tissue. Such a model will probably need to incorporate not only cell type-specific data but also spatial information on the architecture of the tissue and on intercellular signaling. The scope of the current model was more limited. Data obtained in a number of different biological systems were synthesized to describe a chimeric, “average” population cell. Biochemical signaling pathways involved in sensing of DNA damage and in the activation of cell cycle checkpoint controls and the apoptotic path were also included. As with any computational modeling effort, it was necessary to develop these simplified initial descriptions (models) that can be iteratively refined. This preliminary model is a starting point which, with time, can evolve to a level of refinement where large amounts of detailed biological information are synthesized and a capability for robust predictions of dose- and time-response behaviors is obtained.

  10. A cellular automaton model for microstructural simulation of friction stir welded AZ91 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mostafa; Asadi, Parviz; Besharati Givi, MohammadKazem; Zolghadr, Parisa

    2016-03-01

    To predict the grain size and microstructure evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of AZ91 magnesium alloy, a finite element model (FEM) is developed based on the combination of a cellular automaton model and the Kocks  -  Mecking and Laasraoui-Jonas models. First, according to the flow stress curves and using the Kocks  -  Mecking model, the hardening and recovery parameters and the strain rate sensitivity were calculated. Next, an FEM model was established in Deform-3D software to simulate the FSW of AZ91 magnesium alloy. The results of the FEM model are used in microstructure evolution models to predict the grain size and microstructure of the weld zone. There is a good agreement between the simulated and experimental microstructures, and the proposed model can simulate the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process during FSW of AZ91 alloy. Moreover, microstructural properties of different points in the SZ as well as the effect of the w/v parameter on the grain size and microstructure are considered.

  11. A Hsp40 chaperone protein interacts with and modulates the cellular distribution of the primase protein of human cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Pei

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA replication is a universal and essential process for all herpesvirus including human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. HCMV UL70 protein, which is believed to encode the primase activity of the viral DNA replication machinery and is highly conserved among herpesviruses, needs to be localized in the nucleus, the site of viral DNA synthesis. No host factors that facilitate the nuclear import of UL70 have been reported. In this study, we provided the first direct evidence that UL70 specifically interacts with a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed member of the heat shock protein Hsp40/DNAJ family, DNAJB6, which is expressed as two isoforms, a and b, as a result of alternative splicing. The interaction of UL70 with a common region of DNAJB6a and b was identified by both a two hybrid screen in yeast and coimmunoprecipitation in human cells. In transfected cells, UL70 was primarily co-localized with DNAJB6a in the nuclei and with DNAJB6b in the cytoplasm, respectively. The nuclear import of UL70 was increased in cells in which DNAJB6a was up-regulated or DNAJB6b was down-regulated, and was reduced in cells in which DNAJB6a was down-regulated or DNAJB6b was up-regulated. Furthermore, the level of viral DNA synthesis and progeny production was increased in cells in which DNAJB6a was up-regulated or DNAJB6b was down-regulated, and was reduced in cells in which DNAJB6a was down-regulated or DNAJB6b was up-regulated. Thus, DNAJB6a and b appear to enhance the nuclear import and cytoplasmic accumulation of UL70, respectively. Our results also suggest that the relative expression levels of DNAJB6 isoforms may play a key role in regulating the cellular localization of UL70, leading to modulation of HCMV DNA synthesis and lytic infection.

  12. Interaction of cadmium and zinc on accumulation and sub-cellular distribution in leaves of hyperaccumulator Potentilla griffithii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Rongliang, E-mail: eesqrl@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Thangavel, Palaniswamy; Hu Pengjie; Senthilkumar, Palaninaicker; Ying Rongrong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Tang Yetao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2011-02-28

    Potentilla griffithii Hook is a newly found hyperaccumulator plant capable of high tolerance and accumulation of Zn and Cd. We investigated the interactive effects between Cd and Zn on accumulation and vacuolar sequestration in P. griffithii. Stimulatory effect of growth was noted at 0.2 mM Cd and 1.25 and 2.5 mM Zn tested. Accumulation of Zn and Cd in roots, petioles and leaves were increased significantly with addition of these metals individually. However, the Zn supplement decreased root Cd accumulation but increased the concentration of Cd in petioles and leaves. The results from sub-cellular distribution showed that up to 94% and 70% of the total Zn and Cd in the leaves were present in the protoplasts, and more than 90% Cd and Zn in the protoplasts were localized in the vacuoles. Nearly, 88% and 85% of total Cd and Zn were extracted in the cell sap of the leaves suggesting that most of the Cd and Zn in the leaves were available in soluble form. The present results indicate that Zn supplement significantly enhanced the petiole accumulation of Cd and further vacuolar sequestration plays an important role in tolerance, detoxification and hyperaccumulation of these metals in P. griffithii.

  13. Interaction of cadmium and zinc on accumulation and sub-cellular distribution in leaves of hyperaccumulator Potentilla griffithii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Rong-Liang; Thangavel, Palaniswamy; Hu, Peng-Jie; Senthilkumar, Palaninaicker; Ying, Rong-Rong; Tang, Ye-Tao

    2011-02-28

    Potentilla griffithii Hook is a newly found hyperaccumulator plant capable of high tolerance and accumulation of Zn and Cd. We investigated the interactive effects between Cd and Zn on accumulation and vacuolar sequestration in P. griffithii. Stimulatory effect of growth was noted at 0.2 mM Cd and 1.25 and 2.5 mM Zn tested. Accumulation of Zn and Cd in roots, petioles and leaves were increased significantly with addition of these metals individually. However, the Zn supplement decreased root Cd accumulation but increased the concentration of Cd in petioles and leaves. The results from sub-cellular distribution showed that up to 94% and 70% of the total Zn and Cd in the leaves were present in the protoplasts, and more than 90% Cd and Zn in the protoplasts were localized in the vacuoles. Nearly, 88% and 85% of total Cd and Zn were extracted in the cell sap of the leaves suggesting that most of the Cd and Zn in the leaves were available in soluble form. The present results indicate that Zn supplement significantly enhanced the petiole accumulation of Cd and further vacuolar sequestration plays an important role in tolerance, detoxification and hyperaccumulation of these metals in P. griffithii. PMID:21211902

  14. Geographic Spatiotemporal Dynamic Model using Cellular Automata and Data Mining Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zuhdi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Geospatial data and information availability has been increasing rapidly and has provided users with knowledge on entities change and movement in a system. Cellular Geography model applies Cellular Automata on Geographic data by defining transition rules to the data grid. This paper presents the techniques for extracting transition rule(s from time series data grids, using multiple linear regression analysis. Clustering technique is applied to minimize the number of transition rules, which can be offered and chosen to change a new unknown grid. Each centroid of a cluster is associated with a transition rule and a grid of data. The chosen transition rule is associated with grid that has a minimum distance to the new data grid to be simulated. Validation of the model can be provided either quantitatively through an error measurement or qualitatively by visualizing the result of the simulation process. The visualization can also be more informative by adding the error information. Increasing number of cluster may give possibility to improve the simulation accuracy.

  15. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE's ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model. PMID:27517912

  16. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imène Achour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE, the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model.

  17. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model. PMID:27517912

  18. Parameter Symmetry of the Interacting Boson Model

    CERN Document Server

    Shirokov, A M; Smirnov, Yu F; Shirokov, Andrey M.; Smirnov, Yu. F.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the symmetry of the parameter space of the interacting boson model (IBM). It is shown that for any set of the IBM Hamiltonian parameters (with the only exception of the U(5) dynamical symmetry limit) one can always find another set that generates the equivalent spectrum. We discuss the origin of the symmetry and its relevance for physical applications.

  19. Intuitionistic preference modeling and interactive decision making

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zeshui

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an in-depth and comprehensive introduction to the priority methods of intuitionistic preference relations, the consistency and consensus improving procedures for intuitionistic preference relations, the approaches to group decision making based on intuitionistic preference relations, the approaches and models for interactive decision making with intuitionistic fuzzy information, and the extended results in interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy environments.

  20. A yarn interaction model for circular braiding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravenhorst, van J.H.; Akkerman, R.

    2016-01-01

    Machine control data for the automation of the circular braiding process has been generated using previously published mathematical models that neglect yarn interaction. This resulted in a significant deviation from the required braid angle at mandrel cross-sectional changes, likely caused by an inc

  1. Dynamic computational model suggests that cellular citizenship is fundamental for selective tumor apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Olsen

    Full Text Available Computational models in the field of cancer research have focused primarily on estimates of biological events based on laboratory generated data. We introduce a novel in-silico technology that takes us to the next level of prediction models and facilitates innovative solutions through the mathematical system. The model's building blocks are cells defined phenotypically as normal or tumor, with biological processes translated into equations describing the life protocols of the cells in a quantitative and stochastic manner. The essentials of communication in a society composed of normal and tumor cells are explored to reveal "protocols" for selective tumor eradication. Results consistently identify "citizenship properties" among cells that are essential for the induction of healing processes in a healthy system invaded by cancer. These properties act via inter-cellular communication protocols that can be optimized to induce tumor eradication along with system recovery. Within the computational systems, the protocols universally succeed in removing a wide variety of tumors defined by proliferation rates, initial volumes, and apoptosis resistant phenotypes; they show high adaptability for biological details and allow incorporation of population heterogeneity. These protocols work as long as at least 32% of cells obey extra-cellular commands and at least 28% of cancer cells report their deaths. This low percentage implies that the protocols are resilient to the suboptimal situations often seen in biological systems. We conclude that our in-silico model is a powerful tool to investigate, to propose, and to exercise logical anti-cancer solutions. Functional results should be confirmed in a biological system and molecular findings should be loaded into the computational model for the next level of directed experiments.

  2. An equilibrium approach to modelling social interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to put forward a statistical mechanics theory of social interaction, generalizing econometric discrete choice models. After showing the formal equivalence linking econometric multinomial logit models to equilibrium statical mechanics, a multi-population generalization of the Curie-Weiss model for ferromagnets is considered as a starting point in developing a model capable of describing sudden shifts in aggregate human behaviour. Existence of the thermodynamic limit for the model is shown by an asymptotic sub-additivity method and factorization of correlation functions is proved almost everywhere. The exact solution of the model is provided in the thermodynamical limit by finding converging upper and lower bounds for the system's pressure, and the solution is used to prove an analytic result regarding the number of possible equilibrium states of a two-population system. The work stresses the importance of linking regimes predicted by the model to real phenomena, and to this end it propo...

  3. Cellular Interactions and Biological Responses to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in HepG2 and BEAS-2B Cells: Role of Cell Culture Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that the composition of the biological medium used in vitro can affect the cellular interaction and biological response of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in human lung epithelial cells. However, it is unclear if these effects are co...

  4. Continuous macroscopic limit of a discrete stochastic model for interaction of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Alber, M; Lushnikov, P M; Newman, S A; Alber, Mark; Chen, Nan; Lushnikov, Pavel M.; Newman, Stuart A.

    2007-01-01

    In the development of multiscale biological models it is crucial to establish a connection between discrete microscopic or mesoscopic stochastic models and macroscopic continuous descriptions based on cellular density. In this paper a continuous limit of a two-dimensional Cellular Potts Model (CPM) with excluded volume is derived, describing cells moving in a medium and reacting to each other through both direct contact and long range chemotaxis. The continuous macroscopic model is obtained as a Fokker-Planck equation describing evolution of the cell probability density function. All coefficients of the general macroscopic model are derived from parameters of the CPM and a very good agreement is demonstrated between CPM Monte Carlo simulations and numerical solution of the macroscopic model. It is also shown that in the absence of contact cell-cell interactions, the obtained model reduces to the classical macroscopic Keller-Segel model. General multiscale approach is demonstrated by simulating spongy bone for...

  5. A Modified Cellular Automaton Approach for Mixed Bicycle Traffic Flow Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonian Shan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several previous studies have used the Cellular Automaton (CA for the modeling of bicycle traffic flow. However, previous CA models have several limitations, resulting in differences between the simulated and the observed traffic flow features. The primary objective of this study is to propose a modified CA model for simulating the characteristics of mixed bicycle traffic flow. Field data were collected on physically separated bicycle path in Shanghai, China, and were used to calibrate the CA model using the genetic algorithm. Traffic flow features between simulations of several CA models and field observations were compared. The results showed that our modified CA model produced more accurate simulation for the fundamental diagram and the passing events in mixed bicycle traffic flow. Based on our model, the bicycle traffic flow features, including the fundamental diagram, the number of passing events, and the number of lane changes, were analyzed. We also analyzed the traffic flow features with different traffic densities, traffic components on different travel lanes. Results of the study can provide important information for understanding and simulating the operations of mixed bicycle traffic flow.

  6. Knowledge-guided fuzzy logic modeling to infer cellular signaling networks from proteomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Mishra, Shital Kumar; Zhou, Shuigeng; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of signaling pathways is crucial for understanding and predicting cellular responses to drug treatments. However, canonical signaling pathways curated from literature are seldom context-specific and thus can hardly predict cell type-specific response to external perturbations; purely data-driven methods also have drawbacks such as limited biological interpretability. Therefore, hybrid methods that can integrate prior knowledge and real data for network inference are highly desirable. In this paper, we propose a knowledge-guided fuzzy logic network model to infer signaling pathways by exploiting both prior knowledge and time-series data. In particular, the dynamic time warping algorithm is employed to measure the goodness of fit between experimental and predicted data, so that our method can model temporally-ordered experimental observations. We evaluated the proposed method on a synthetic dataset and two real phosphoproteomic datasets. The experimental results demonstrate that our model can uncover drug-induced alterations in signaling pathways in cancer cells. Compared with existing hybrid models, our method can model feedback loops so that the dynamical mechanisms of signaling networks can be uncovered from time-series data. By calibrating generic models of signaling pathways against real data, our method supports precise predictions of context-specific anticancer drug effects, which is an important step towards precision medicine. PMID:27774993

  7. A cellular automation model for the change of public attitude regarding nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cellular automation model was constructed to investigate how public opinion on nuclear energy in Japan depends upon the information environment and personal communication between people. From simulation with this model, the following become clear; (i) society is a highly non-linear system with a self-organizing potential: (ii) in a society composed of one type of constituent member with homogeneous characteristics, the trend of public opinion is substantially changed only when the effort to ameliorate public acceptance over a long period of time, by means such as education, persuasion and advertisement, exceeds a certain threshold, and (iii) in the case when the amount of information on nuclear risk released from the newsmedia is reduced continuously from now on, the acceptability of nuclear energy is significantly improved so far as the extent of the reduction exceeds a certain threshold. (author)

  8. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Musunuru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  9. Micro-macroscopic coupling in the cellular automaton model of solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Bertolazzi Biscuola

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A cellular automaton (CA model to predict the formation of grain macrostructure during solidification has been implemented and the coupling between the microscopic and the macroscopic submodels has been investigated. The microscopic submodel simulates the nucleation and growth of grains, whereas the macroscopic solves the heat conduction equation. The directional solidification of an Al-7 wt. (% Si alloy was simulated, enabling the calculation of the temperature and solid fraction profiles. The calculated temperature was used to obtain the solid fraction profile by an application of Scheil equation. This solid fraction disagrees with that calculated in the micro-macro coupling of the model, although this coupling is completely based on Scheil equation. Careful examination of the discrepancies shows that it is a result of the undercoolings for nucleation and growth of grains and also of the interpolations of enthalpy change and temperature from the finite volume mesh to the CA cell mesh.

  10. Potential Field Cellular Automata Model for Pedestrian Evacuation in a Domain with a Ramp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xia Jian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a potential field cellular automata model with a pushing force field to simulate the pedestrian evacuation in a domain with a ramp. We construct a cost potential depending on the ramp angle and introduce a function to evaluate the pushing force, which is related to the cost and the desired direction of pedestrian. With increase of crowd density, there is no empty space for pedestrian moving forward; pedestrian will purposefully push another pedestrian on her or his desired location to arrive the destination quickly. We analyse the relationship between the slope of ramp and the pushing force and investigate the changing of injured situations with the changing of the slope of ramp. When the number of pedestrians and the ramp angle arrive at certain critical points, the Domino effect will be simulated by this proposed model.

  11. An improved cellular automaton model considering the effect of traffic lights and driving behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Di; Lu, Wei-Zhen; Dong, Li-Yun

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes an improved cellular automaton model to describe the urban traffic flow with the consideration of traffic light and driving behaviour effects. Based on the model, the characteristics of the urban traffic flow on a single-lane road are investigated under three different control strategies, i.e., the synchronized, the green wave and the random strategies. The fundamental diagrams and time-space patterns of the traffic flows are provided for these strategies respectively. It finds that the dynamical transition to the congested flow appears when the vehicle density is higher than a critical level. The saturated flow is less dependent on the cycle time and the strategies of the traffic light control, while the critical vehicle density varies with the cycle time and the strategies. Simulated results indicate that the green wave strategy is proven to be the most effective one among the above three control strategies.

  12. Modeling and Simulation for Urban Rail Traffic Problem Based on Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许琰; 曹成铉; 李明华; 罗金龙

    2012-01-01

    Based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg model, we propose a new cellular automata model to simulate the urban rail traffic flow under moving block system and present a new minimum instantaneous distance formula under pure moving block. We also analyze the characteristics of the urban rail traffic flow under the influence of train density, station dwell times, the length of train, and the train velocity. Train delays can be decreased effectively through flexible departure intervals according to the preceding train type before its departure. The results demonstrate that a suitable adjustment of the current train velocity based on the following train velocity can greatly shorten the minimum departure intervals and then increase the capacity of rail transit.

  13. Decellularized extracellular matrix microparticles as a vehicle for cellular delivery in a model of anastomosis healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoganson, David M; Owens, Gwen E; Meppelink, Amanda M; Bassett, Erik K; Bowley, Chris M; Hinkel, Cameron J; Finkelstein, Eric B; Goldman, Scott M; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2016-07-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) materials from animal and human sources have become important materials for soft tissue repair. Microparticles of ECM materials have increased surface area and exposed binding sites compared to sheet materials. Decellularized porcine peritoneum was mechanically dissociated into 200 µm microparticles, seeded with fibroblasts and cultured in a low gravity rotating bioreactor. The cells avidly attached and maintained excellent viability on the microparticles. When the seeded microparticles were placed in a collagen gel, the cells quickly migrated off the microparticles and through the gel. Cells from seeded microparticles migrated to and across an in vitro anastomosis model, increasing the tensile strength of the model. Cell seeded microparticles of ECM material have potential for paracrine and cellular delivery therapies when delivered in a gel carrier. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1728-1735, 2016. PMID:26946064

  14. Driver’s Awareness and Lane Changing Maneuver in Traffic Flow based on Cellular Automaton Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Effect of driver’s awareness (e.g., to estimate the speed and arrival time of another vehicle on the lane changing maneuver is discussed. “Scope awareness” is defined as the visibility which is required for the driver to make a visual perception about road condition and the speed of vehicle that appears in the target lane for lane changing in the road. Cellular automaton based simulation model is created and applied to simulation studies for driver awareness behavior. This study clarifies relations between the lane changing behavior and the scope awareness parameter that reflects driver behavior. Simulation results show that the proposed model is valid for investigation of the important features of lane changing maneuver.

  15. An improved cellular automaton model considering the effect of traffic lights and driving behaviour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Hong-Di; Lu Wei-Zhen; Dong Li-Yun

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an improved cellular automaton model to describe the urban traffic flow with the consideration of traffic light and driving behaviour effects. Based on the model, the characteristics of the urban traffic flow on a singlelane road are investigated under three different control strategies, i.e., the synchronized, the green wave and the random strategies. The fundamental diagrams and time-space patterns of the traffic flows are provided for these strategies respectively. It finds that the dynamical transition to the congested flow appears when the vehicle density is higher than a critical level. The saturated flow is less dependent on the cycle time and the strategies of the traffic light control,while the critical vehicle density varies with the cycle time and the strategies. Simulated results indicate that the green wave strategy is proven to be the most effective one among the above three control strategies.

  16. System-level insights into the cellular interactome of a non-model organism: inferring, modelling and analysing functional gene network of soybean (Glycine max.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yungang Xu

    Full Text Available Cellular interactome, in which genes and/or their products interact on several levels, forming transcriptional regulatory-, protein interaction-, metabolic-, signal transduction networks, etc., has attracted decades of research focuses. However, such a specific type of network alone can hardly explain the various interactive activities among genes. These networks characterize different interaction relationships, implying their unique intrinsic properties and defects, and covering different slices of biological information. Functional gene network (FGN, a consolidated interaction network that models fuzzy and more generalized notion of gene-gene relations, have been proposed to combine heterogeneous networks with the goal of identifying functional modules supported by multiple interaction types. There are yet no successful precedents of FGNs on sparsely studied non-model organisms, such as soybean (Glycine max, due to the absence of sufficient heterogeneous interaction data. We present an alternative solution for inferring the FGNs of soybean (SoyFGNs, in a pioneering study on the soybean interactome, which is also applicable to other organisms. SoyFGNs exhibit the typical characteristics of biological networks: scale-free, small-world architecture and modularization. Verified by co-expression and KEGG pathways, SoyFGNs are more extensive and accurate than an orthology network derived from Arabidopsis. As a case study, network-guided disease-resistance gene discovery indicates that SoyFGNs can provide system-level studies on gene functions and interactions. This work suggests that inferring and modelling the interactome of a non-model plant are feasible. It will speed up the discovery and definition of the functions and interactions of other genes that control important functions, such as nitrogen fixation and protein or lipid synthesis. The efforts of the study are the basis of our further comprehensive studies on the soybean functional

  17. Understanding and modelling man-machine interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an overview of the current state of the art in man-machine system interaction studies, focusing on the problems derived from highly automated working environments and the role of humans in the control loop. In particular, it is argued that there is a need for sound approaches to the design and analysis of man-machine interaction (MMI), which stem from the contribution of three expertises in interfacing domains, namely engineering, computer science and psychology: engineering for understanding and modelling plants and their material and energy conservation principles; psychology for understanding and modelling humans an their cognitive behaviours; computer science for converting models in sound simulations running in appropriate computer architectures. (orig.)

  18. Understanding and modelling Man-Machine Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an overview of the current state of the art in man machine systems interaction studies, focusing on the problems derived from highly automated working environments and the role of humans in the control loop. In particular, it is argued that there is a need for sound approaches to design and analysis of Man-Machine Interaction (MMI), which stem from the contribution of three expertises in interfacing domains, namely engineering, computer science and psychology: engineering for understanding and modelling plants and their material and energy conservation principles; psychology for understanding and modelling humans and their cognitive behaviours; computer science for converting models in sound simulations running in appropriate computer architectures. (author)

  19. Algebraic Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    The results of a series of Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) and Partially Stirred Reactor (PaSR) simulations are compared to each other over a wide range of operating conditions. It is found that the PaSR results can be simulated by a PSR solution with just an adjusted chemical reaction rate. A simple expression has been developed that gives the required change in reaction rate for a PSR solution to simulate the PaSR results. This expression is the basis of a simple turbulence-chemistry interaction model. The interaction model that has been developed is intended for use with simple one-step global reaction mechanisms and for steady-state flow simulations. Due to the simplicity of the model there is very little additional computational cost in adding it to existing CFD codes.

  20. Secret neutrino interactions: a pseudoscalar model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archidiacono, Maria; Hannestad, Steen; Sloth Hansen, Rasmus; Tram, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments point towards the existence of additional mostly sterile neutrino mass eigenstates in the eV mass range. At the same time, such sterile neutrinos are disfavoured by cosmology (Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure), unless they can be prevented from being thermalised in the early Universe. To this aim, we introduce a model of sterile neutrino secret interactions mediated by a new light pseudoscalar: The new interactions can accomodate sterile neutrinos in the early Universe, providing a good fit to all the up to date cosmological data.

  1. IPPI-model of hadron interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Dremin, I M

    2004-01-01

    A model of Independent Pair Parton Interactions (IPPI) is proposed. According to it, hadron interactions are represented by a set of independent binary parton collisions. The final multiplicity distribution is described by a convolution of the negative binomial distributions in each of the partonic collisions. As a result, it is given by a weighted sum of negative binomial distributions with parameters multiplied by the number of active pairs. Its shape and moments are considered. Experimental data on multiplicity distributions in high energy $p\\bar p$ processes are well fitted by these distributions. Predictions for LHC and higher energies are presented. Difference between $e^+e^-$ and $p\\bar p$ is discussed.

  2. CellLab-CTS 2015: continuous-time stochastic cellular automaton modeling using Landlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Gregory E.; Hobley, Daniel E. J.; Hutton, Eric; Gasparini, Nicole M.; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Adams, Jordan M.; Siddartha Nudurupati, Sai

    2016-02-01

    CellLab-CTS 2015 is a Python-language software library for creating two-dimensional, continuous-time stochastic (CTS) cellular automaton models. The model domain consists of a set of grid nodes, with each node assigned an integer state code that represents its condition or composition. Adjacent pairs of nodes may undergo transitions to different states, according to a user-defined average transition rate. A model is created by writing a Python code that defines the possible states, the transitions, and the rates of those transitions. The code instantiates, initializes, and runs one of four object classes that represent different types of CTS models. CellLab-CTS provides the option of using either square or hexagonal grid cells. The software provides the ability to treat particular grid-node states as moving particles, and to track their position over time. Grid nodes may also be assigned user-defined properties, which the user can update after each transition through the use of a callback function. As a component of the Landlab modeling framework, CellLab-CTS models take advantage of a suite of Landlab's tools and capabilities, such as support for standardized input and output.

  3. A nanoflare based cellular automaton model and the observed properties of the coronal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, Marcelo López

    2016-01-01

    We use the cellular automaton model described in L\\'opez Fuentes \\& Klimchuk (2015, ApJ, 799, 128) to study the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model, based on the idea of a critical misalignment angle in tangled magnetic fields, produces nanoflares of varying frequency with respect to the plasma cooling time. We compare the results of the model with active region (AR) observations obtained with the Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA instruments. The comparison is based on the statistical properties of synthetic and observed loop lightcurves. Our results show that the model reproduces the main observational characteristics of the evolution of the plasma in AR coronal loops. The typical intensity fluctuations have an amplitude of 10 to 15\\% both for the model and the observations. The sign of the skewness of the intensity distributions indicates the presence of cooling plasma in the loops. We also study the emission measure (EM) distribution predicted by the model and obtain slopes in log(EM) versus log(T) betw...

  4. A Multitarget Land Use Change Simulation Model Based on Cellular Automata and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of the existing land use change simulation model, combined with macroland use change driving factors and microlocal land use competition, and through the application of Python language integrated technical approaches such as CA, GIS, AHP, and Markov, a multitarget land use change simulation model based on cellular automata(CA is established. This model was applied to conduct scenario simulation of land use/cover change of the Jinzhou New District, based on 1:10000 map scale land use, planning, topography, statistics, and other data collected in the year of 1988, 2003, and 2012. The simulation results indicate the following: (1 this model can simulate the mutual transformation of multiple land use types in a relatively satisfactory way; it takes land use system as a whole and simultaneously takes the land use demand in the macrolevel and the land use suitability in the local scale into account; and (2 the simulation accuracy of the model reaches 72%, presenting higher creditability. The model is capable of providing auxiliary decision-making support for coastal regions with the analysis of the land use change driving mechanism, prediction of land use change tendencies, and establishment of land resource sustainable utilization policies.

  5. The influence of receptor-mediated interactions on reaction-diffusion mechanisms of cellular self-organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klika, Václav; Baker, Ruth E; Headon, Denis; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. PMID:22072186

  6. Distinctive behavioral and cellular responses to fluoxetine in the mouse model for Fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko eUutela

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine is used as a therapeutic agent for autism spectrum disorder (ASD, including Fragile X syndrome (FXS. The treatment often associates with disruptive behaviors such as agitation and disinhibited behaviors in FXS. To identify mechanisms that increase the risk to poor treatment outcome, we investigated the behavioral and cellular effects of fluoxetine on adult Fmr1 knockout (KO mice, a mouse model for FXS. We found that fluoxetine reduced anxiety-like behavior of both wild type and Fmr1 KO mice seen as shortened latency to enter the center area in the open field test. In Fmr1 KO mice, fluoxetine normalized locomotor hyperactivity but abnormally increased exploratory activity. Reduced Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and increased TrkB receptor expression levels in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice associated with inappropriate coping responses under stressful condition and abolished antidepressant activity of fluoxetine. Fluoxetine response in the cell proliferation was also missing in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice when compared with wild type controls. The postnatal expression of serotonin transporter was reduced in the thalamic nuclei of Fmr1 KO mice during the time of transient innervation of somatosensory neurons suggesting that developmental changes of serotonin transporter (SERT expression were involved in the differential cellular and behavioral responses to fluoxetine in wild type and Fmr1 mice. The results indicate that changes of BDNF/TrkB signaling contribute to differential behavioral responses to fluoxetine among individuals with ASD.

  7. Developing an Abaqus *HYPERFOAM Model for M9747 (4003047) Cellular Silicone Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siranosian, Antranik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, R. Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-26

    This report documents work done to develop an Abaqus *HYPERFOAM hyperelastic model for M9747 (4003047) cellular silicone foam for use in quasi-static analyses at ambient temperature. Experimental data, from acceptance tests for 'Pad A' conducted at the Kansas City Plant (KCP), was used to calibrate the model. The data includes gap (relative displacement) and load measurements from three locations on the pad. Thirteen sets of data, from pads with different serial numbers, were provided. The thirty-nine gap-load curves were extracted from the thirteen supplied Excel spreadsheets and analyzed, and from those thirty-nine one set of data, representing a qualitative mean, was chosen to calibrate the model. The data was converted from gap and load to nominal (engineering) strain and nominal stress in order to implement it in Abaqus. Strain computations required initial pad thickness estimates. An Abaqus model of a right-circular cylinder was used to evaluate and calibrate the *HYPERFOAM model.

  8. A multi-objective model for designing a group layout of a dynamic cellular manufacturing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Reza; Shirazi, Hossein; Javadian, Nikbakhsh; Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, Reza

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a multi-objective mixed-integer nonlinear programming model to design a group layout of a cellular manufacturing system in a dynamic environment, in which the number of cells to be formed is variable. Cell formation (CF) and group layout (GL) are concurrently made in a dynamic environment by the integrated model, which incorporates with an extensive coverage of important manufacturing features used in the design of CMSs. Additionally, there are some features that make the presented model different from the previous studies. These features include the following: (1) the variable number of cells, (2) the integrated CF and GL decisions in a dynamic environment by a multi-objective mathematical model, and (3) two conflicting objectives that minimize the total costs (i.e., costs of intra and inter-cell material handling, machine relocation, purchasing new machines, machine overhead, machine processing, and forming cells) and minimize the imbalance of workload among cells. Furthermore, the presented model considers some limitations, such as machine capability, machine capacity, part demands satisfaction, cell size, material flow conservation, and location assignment. Four numerical examples are solved by the GAMS software to illustrate the promising results obtained by the incorporated features.

  9. ONE-DIMENSIONAL CELLULAR AUTOMATON MODEL OF TRAFFIC FLOW BASED ON CAR-FOLLOWING IDEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董力耘; 薛郁; 戴世强

    2002-01-01

    An improved one-dimensional CA (Cellular Automaton) traffic model was proposed to describe the highway traffic under the periodic boundary conditions. This model was based on the idea of the car-following model, which claims that the motion of a vehicle at one time step depends on both its headway and the synchronous motion of the front vehicle,thus including indirectly the influence of its sub-neighboring vehicle. In addition, the socalled safety distance was introduced to consider the deceleration behavior of vehicles and the stochastic factor was taken into account by introducing the deceleration probability.Meanwhile, the conditional deceleration in the model gives a better description of the phenomena observed on highways. It is found that there exists the metastability and hysteresis effect of traffic flow in the neighborhood of critical density under different initial conditions.Since this model gives a reasonable depiction of the motion of a single vehicle, it is easy to be extended to the case of traffic flow under the control of traffic lights in cities.

  10. Integrating the system dynamic and cellular automata models to predict land use and land cover change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoming; Du, Ziqiang; Zhang, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Land use and land cover change (LULCC) is a widely researched topic in related studies. A number of models have been established to simulate LULCC patterns. However, the integration of the system dynamic (SD) and the cellular automata (CA) model have been rarely employed in LULCC simulations, although it allows for combining the advantages of each approach and therefore improving the simulation accuracy. In this study, we integrated an SD model and a CA model to predict LULCC under three future development scenarios in Northern Shanxi province of China, a typical agro-pastoral transitional zone. The results indicated that our integrated approach represented the impacts of natural and socioeconomic factors on LULCC well, and could accurately simulate the magnitude and spatial pattern of LULCC. The modeling scenarios illustrated that different development pathways would lead to various LULCC patterns. This study demonstrated the advantages of the integration approach for simulating LULCC and suggests that LULCC is affected to a large degree by natural and socioeconomic factors.

  11. Derivation of Solar Flare Cellular Automata Models from a Subset of the Magnetohydrodynamic Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Anastasiadis, A.; Georgoulis, M.; Vlahos, L.

    1998-12-01

    Cellular automata (CA) models account for the power-law distributions found for solar flare hard X-ray observations, but their physics has been unclear. We examine four of these models and show that their criteria and magnetic field distribution rules can be derived by discretizing the MHD diffusion equation as obtained from a simplified Ohm's law. Identifying the discrete MHD with the CA models leads to an expression for the resistivity as a function of the current on the flux tube boundary, as may be expected from current-driven instabilities. Anisotropic CA models correspond to a nonlinear resistivity η(J), while isotropic ones are associated with hyperresistivity η(▽2J). The discrete equations satisfy the necessary conditions for self-organized criticality (Lu): there is local conservation of a field (magnetic flux), while the nonlinear resistivity provides a rapid dissipation and relaxation mechanism. The approach justifies many features of the CA models that were originally based on intuition.

  12. An empirical Bayesian approach for model-based inference of cellular signaling networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klinke David J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common challenge in systems biology is to infer mechanistic descriptions of biological process given limited observations of a biological system. Mathematical models are frequently used to represent a belief about the causal relationships among proteins within a signaling network. Bayesian methods provide an attractive framework for inferring the validity of those beliefs in the context of the available data. However, efficient sampling of high-dimensional parameter space and appropriate convergence criteria provide barriers for implementing an empirical Bayesian approach. The objective of this study was to apply an Adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo technique to a typical study of cellular signaling pathways. Results As an illustrative example, a kinetic model for the early signaling events associated with the epidermal growth factor (EGF signaling network was calibrated against dynamic measurements observed in primary rat hepatocytes. A convergence criterion, based upon the Gelman-Rubin potential scale reduction factor, was applied to the model predictions. The posterior distributions of the parameters exhibited complicated structure, including significant covariance between specific parameters and a broad range of variance among the parameters. The model predictions, in contrast, were narrowly distributed and were used to identify areas of agreement among a collection of experimental studies. Conclusion In summary, an empirical Bayesian approach was developed for inferring the confidence that one can place in a particular model that describes signal transduction mechanisms and for inferring inconsistencies in experimental measurements.

  13. Direct interaction of cellular hnRNP-F and NS1 of influenza A virus accelerates viral replication by modulation of viral transcriptional activity and host gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate novel NS1-interacting proteins, we conducted a yeast two-hybrid analysis, followed by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP-F) as a cellular protein interacting with NS1 during influenza A virus infection. Co-precipitation assays suggest that interaction between hnRNP-F and NS1 is a common and direct event among human or avian influenza viruses. NS1 and hnRNP-F co-localize in the nucleus of host cells, and the RNA-binding domain of NS1 directly interacts with the GY-rich region of hnRNP-F determined by GST pull-down assays with truncated proteins. Importantly, hnRNP-F expression levels in host cells indicate regulatory role on virus replication. hnRNP-F depletion by small interfering RNA (siRNA) shows 10- to 100-fold increases in virus titers corresponding to enhanced viral RNA polymerase activity. Our results delineate novel mechanism of action by which NS1 accelerates influenza virus replication by modulating normal cellular mRNA processes through direct interaction with cellular hnRNP-F protein.

  14. Mechanism of Laser/light beam interaction at cellular and tissue level and study of the influential factors for the application of low level laser therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khalid, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of laser therapy it was realized it has useful application of wound healing and reduce pain, but due to the poor understanding of the mechanism and dose response this technique remained to be controversial for therapeutic applications. In order to understand the working and effectiveness different experiments were performed to determine the laser beam effect at the cellular and tissue level. This article discusses the mechanism of beam interaction at tissues and cellular level with different light sources and dosimetry principles for clinical application of low level laser therapy. Different application techniques and methods currently in use for clinical treatment has also been reviewed.

  15. Comments on interactions in the SUSY models

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, Sudhakar; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We consider the special supersymmetry (SUSY) transformations with $m$ generators $\\overleftarrow{s}_\\alpha,$ for some class of the models and study the physical consequences when making the Grassmann-odd transformations to form an Abelian supergroup with finite parameters and set of group-like elements with finite parameters being by a functionals of field variables. The SUSY-invariant path integral measure within conventional quantization scheme leads to appearance of the Jacobian under change of variables generated by such SUSY transformations, which is explicitly calculated. The Jacobian leads, first, to appearance of only trivial interactions in the transformed action, second, to the presence of modified Ward identity, which reduceds to the standard Ward identities for constant parameters. We examine the case of ${N}=1$, $N=2$ supersymmetric harmonic oscillator to illustrate the general concept on a free simple model with $(1,1)$ physical degrees of freedom. It is shown that the interaction terms, $U_{tr}...

  16. The interaction of the cellular export adaptor protein Aly/REF with ICP27 contributes to the efficiency of herpes simplex virus 1 mRNA export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaochen; Devi-Rao, Gayathri; Golovanov, Alexander P; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M

    2013-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) protein ICP27 enables viral mRNA export by accessing the cellular mRNA export receptor TAP/NXF, which guides mRNA through the nuclear pore complex. ICP27 binds viral mRNAs and interacts with TAP/NXF, providing a link to the cellular mRNA export pathway. ICP27 also interacts with the mRNA export adaptor protein Aly/REF, which binds cellular mRNAs and also interacts with TAP/NXF. Studies using small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown indicated that Aly/REF is not required for cellular mRNA export, and similar knockdown studies during HSV-1 infection led us to conclude that Aly/REF may be dispensable for viral RNA export. Recently, the structural basis of the interaction of ICP27 with Aly/REF was elucidated at atomic resolution, and it was shown that three ICP27 residues, W105, R107, and L108, interface with the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain of Aly/REF. Here, to determine the role the interaction of ICP27 and Aly/REF plays during infection, these residues were mutated to alanine, and a recombinant virus, WRL-A, was constructed. Virus production was reduced about 10-fold during WRL-A infection, and export of ICP27 protein and most viral mRNAs was less efficient. We conclude that interaction of ICP27 with Aly/REF contributes to efficient viral mRNA export.

  17. An Option Pricing Model Based on Cellular Automaton%基于元胞自动机的期权定价模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李捷

    2011-01-01

    Option pricing is one of the most difficult problems in financial research. The key to the problem is how to simulate the randomness of the underlying asset price. This paper designs and implements an option pricing model based on the cellular automaton, which treats market participants as the cells in the cellular automaton. The model uses cellular automaton rules to simulate the interactions between traders and the changes of underlying asset prices. The paper compares the output data of the model with the calculation results of the Black-Scholes model, tests the normality of the model's output data, and finds that the option pricing model based on the cellular automaton is not only feasible, but also more effective than the Black-Scholes model.%针对期权定价难于模拟基础资产价格波动随机性的问题,设计了基于元胞自动机的期权定价模型.该模型将市场参与者看作一个个的元胞,使用元胞规则来模拟金融市场中交易者之间的交互行为。从而在总体上模拟出基础资产价格的变化.比较了模型产出的数据和Black-Scholes模型的计算结果,检验了模型产出数据的正态性,发现基于元胞自动机的期权定价模型不仅具有可行性,而且比Black-Scholes模型更有效.

  18. Fatigue design of a cellular phone folder using regression model-based multi-objective optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Gyun; Lee, Jongsoo

    2016-08-01

    In a folding cellular phone, the folding device is repeatedly opened and closed by the user, which eventually results in fatigue damage, particularly to the front of the folder. Hence, it is important to improve the safety and endurance of the folder while also reducing its weight. This article presents an optimal design for the folder front that maximizes its fatigue endurance while minimizing its thickness. Design data for analysis and optimization were obtained experimentally using a test jig. Multi-objective optimization was carried out using a nonlinear regression model. Three regression methods were employed: back-propagation neural networks, logistic regression and support vector machines. The AdaBoost ensemble technique was also used to improve the approximation. Two-objective Pareto-optimal solutions were identified using the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II). Finally, a numerically optimized solution was validated against experimental product data, in terms of both fatigue endurance and thickness index.

  19. Cellular uptake of antisense oligonucleotides after complexing or conjugation with cell-penetrating model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlke, J; Birth, P; Klauschenz, E; Wiesner, B; Beyermann, M; Oksche, A; Bienert, M

    2002-08-01

    The uptake by mammalian cells of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides was compared with that of their respective complexes or conjugates with cationic, cell-penetrating model peptides of varying helix-forming propensity and amphipathicity. An HPLC-based protocol for the synthesis and purification of disulfide bridged conjugates in the 10-100 nmol range was developed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with gel-capillary electrophoresis and laser induced fluorescence detection (GCE-LIF) revealed cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulationin all cases. The uptake differences between naked oligonucleotides and their respective peptide complexes or conjugates were generally confined to one order of magnitude. No significant influence of the structural properties of the peptide components upon cellular uptake was found. Our results question the common belief that the increased biological activity of oligonucleotides after derivatization with membrane permeable peptides may be primarily due to improved membrane translocation.

  20. Phase transition in the economically modeled growth of a cellular nervous system

    CERN Document Server

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Schafer, William R; Latora, Vito; Bullmore, Edward T; 10.1073/pnas.1300753110

    2013-01-01

    Spatially-embedded complex networks, such as nervous systems, the Internet and transportation networks, generally have non-trivial topological patterns of connections combined with nearly minimal wiring costs. However the growth rules shaping these economical trade-offs between cost and topology are not well understood. Here we study the cellular nervous system of the nematode worm C. elegans, together with information on the birth times of neurons and on their spatial locations. We find that the growth of this network undergoes a transition from an accelerated to a constant increase in the number of links (synaptic connections) as a function of the number of nodes (neurons). The time of this phase transition coincides closely with the observed moment of hatching, when development switches metamorphically from oval to larval stages. We use graph analysis and generative modelling to show that the transition between different growth regimes, as well as its coincidence with the moment of hatching, can be explain...

  1. Molecular modeling of the conformational dynamics of the cellular prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Charles; Colling, Ian; Bartz, Jason; Soto, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    Prions are infectious agents responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a type of fatal neurodegenerative disease in mammals. Prions propagate biological information by conversion of the non-pathological version of the prion protein to the infectious conformation, PrPSc. A wealth of knowledge has shed light on the nature and mechanism of prion protein conversion. In spite of the significance of this problem, we are far from fully understanding the conformational dynamics of the cellular isoform. To remedy this situation we employ multiple biomolecular modeling techniques such as docking and molecular dynamics simulations to map the free energy landscape and determine what specific regions of the prion protein are most conductive to binding. The overall goal is to characterize the conformational dynamics of the cell form of the prion protein, PrPc, to gain insight into inhibition pathways against misfolding. NE EPSCoR FIRST Award to Patricia Soto.

  2. A Discrete/continuous Coupled Approach for Modeling Impacts on Cellular Geostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugnot, A.; Lambert, S.; Villard, P.; Gotteland, P.

    2016-05-01

    This article presents a numerical model coupling the finite difference method and discrete element methods (FDM, DEM) for simulating the response of cellular geostructures to impacts. DEM is used in the vicinity of the impacted area while FDM is used far away. The continuity between the DEM and FDM domains is insured using the edge-to-edge method. The numerical parameters are calibrated based on compression and impact experiments conducted on elementary cells. Numerical simulations at the structure scale are compared with real-scale experimental data. The response of the structure is addressed varying the impact conditions. The projectile shape and the position of the impact point appear to be the most influential parameters.

  3. Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valone, Steven M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beyerlein, Irene J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, T. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-31

    Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

  4. The Standard Model of Electroweak Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Pich, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gauge invariance is a powerful tool to determine the dynamical forces among the fundamental constituents of matter. The particle content, structure and symmetries of the Standard Model Lagrangian are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the many phenomenological tests which have established this theoretical framework as the Standard Theory of the electroweak interactions: electroweak precision tests, Higgs searches, quark mixing, neutrino oscillations. The present experimental status is summarized.

  5. An earthquake model with interacting asperities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lane R.

    2010-09-01

    A model is presented that treats an earthquake as the failure of asperities in a manner consistent with modern concepts of sliding friction. The mathematical description of the model includes results for elliptical and circular asperities, oblique tectonic slip, static and dynamic solutions for slip on the fault, stress intensity factors, strain energy and second-order moment tensor. The equations that control interaction of asperities are derived and solved both in a quasi-static tectonic mode when none of the asperities are in the process of failing and a dynamic failure mode when asperities are failing and sending out slip pulses that can trigger failure of additional asperities. The model produces moment rate functions for each asperity failure so that, given an appropriate Green function, the radiation of elastic waves is a straightforward calculation. The model explains an observed scaling relationship between repeat time and seismic moment for repeating seismic events and is consistent with the properties of pseudo-tachylites treated as fossil asperities. Properties of the model are explored with simulations of seismic activity that results when a section of the fault containing a spatial distribution of asperities is subjected to tectonic slip. The simulations show that the failure of a group of strongly interacting asperities satisfies the same scaling relationship as the failure of individual asperities, and that realistic distributions of asperities on a fault plane lead to seismic activity consistent with probability estimates for the interaction of asperities and predicted values of the Gutenberg-Richter a and b values. General features of the model are the exterior crack solution as a theoretical foundation, a heterogeneous state of stress and strength on the fault, dynamic effects controlled by propagating slip pulses and radiated elastic waves with a broad frequency band.

  6. Modeling Users' Experiences with Interactive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Karapanos, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade the field of Human-Computer Interaction has evolved from the study of the usability of interactive products towards a more holistic understanding of how they may mediate desired human experiences.  This book identifies the notion of diversity in usersʼ experiences with interactive products and proposes methods and tools for modeling this along two levels: (a) interpersonal diversity in usersʽ responses to early conceptual designs, and (b) the dynamics of usersʼ experiences over time. The Repertory Grid Technique is proposed as an alternative to standardized psychometric scales for modeling interpersonal diversity in usersʼ responses to early concepts in the design process, and new Multi-Dimensional Scaling procedures are introduced for modeling such complex quantitative data. iScale, a tool for the retrospective assessment of usersʼ experiences over time is proposed as an alternative to longitudinal field studies, and a semi-automated technique for the analysis of the elicited exper...

  7. Neuroprotective effects of protocatechuic aldehyde against neurotoxin-induced cellular and animal models of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    Full Text Available Protocatechuic aldehyde (PAL has been reported to bind to DJ-1, a key protein involved in Parkinson's disease (PD, and exerts potential neuroprotective effects via DJ-1 in SH-SY5Y cells. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective pharmacological effects of PAL against neurotoxin-induced cell and animal models of PD. In cellular models of PD, PAL markedly increased cell viability rates, mitochondrial oxidation-reduction activity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced intracellular ROS levels to prevent neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. In animal models of PD, PAL reduced the apomorphine injection, caused turning in 6-OHDA treated rats, and increased the motor coordination and stride decreases in MPTP treated mice. Meanwhile, in an MPTP mouse model, PAL prevented a decrease of the contents of dopamine (DA and its metabolites in the striatum and TH-positive dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra (SN. In addition, PAL increased the protein expression of DJ-1 and reduced the level of α-synuclein in the SN of MPTP lesioned mice. PAL also increased the spine density in hippocampal CA1 neurons. The current study demonstrates that PAL can efficiently protect dopaminergic neurons against neurotoxin injury in vitro and in vivo, and that the potential mechanisms may be related to its effects in increasing DJ-1, decreasing α-synuclein and its growth-promoting effect on spine density.

  8. An Integrated Model for Production Planning and Cell Formation in Cellular Manufacturing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Raminfar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular manufacturing (CM is a production approach directed towards reducing costs, as well as increasing system's flexibility in today's small-to-medium lot production environment. Many structural and operational issues should be considered for a successful CM design and implementation such as cell formation (CF, production planning, and facility layout. Most researchers have addressed these issues sequentially or independently, instead of jointly optimizing a combination of these issues. In order to attain better results to ensure that the system will be capable of remaining efficient in unknown future situations, these issues should be addressed simultaneously. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed using an integrated approach for production planning and cell formation problems in a CM. A set of numerical examples are provided from existing the literature in order to test and illustrate the proposed model. In order to evaluate and verify the performance of the proposed model, it is compared with a well-known cell formation methods (rank order clustering and direct clustering analysis, using group capability index (GCI measure. The results and comparisons indicate that the proposed model has a significantly higher and satisfactory performance and it is reliable for the design and the analysis of CM systems.

  9. Realistic numerical modelling of human head tissue exposure to electromagnetic waves from cellular phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarella, Gilles; Clatz, Olivier; Lanteri, Stéphane; Beaume, Grégory; Oudot, Steve; Pons, Jean-Philippe; Piperno, Sergo; Joly, Patrick; Wiart, Joe

    2006-06-01

    The ever-rising diffusion of cellular phones has brought about an increased concern for the possible consequences of electromagnetic radiation on human health. Possible thermal effects have been investigated, via experimentation or simulation, by several research projects in the last decade. Concerning numerical modeling, the power absorption in a user's head is generally computed using discretized models built from clinical MRI data. The vast majority of such numerical studies have been conducted using Finite Differences Time Domain methods, although strong limitations of their accuracy are due to heterogeneity, poor definition of the detailed structures of head tissues (staircasing effects), etc. In order to propose numerical modeling using Finite Element or Discontinuous Galerkin Time Domain methods, reliable automated tools for the unstructured discretization of human heads are also needed. Results presented in this article aim at filling the gap between human head MRI images and the accurate numerical modeling of wave propagation in biological tissues and its thermal effects. To cite this article: G. Scarella et al., C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  10. Cellular replication limits in the Luria-Delbrück mutation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Brenes, Ignacio A.; Wodarz, Dominik; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2016-08-01

    Originally developed to elucidate the mechanisms of natural selection in bacteria, the Luria-Delbrück model assumed that cells are intrinsically capable of dividing an unlimited number of times. This assumption however, is not true for human somatic cells which undergo replicative senescence. Replicative senescence is thought to act as a mechanism to protect against cancer and the escape from it is a rate-limiting step in cancer progression. Here we introduce a Luria-Delbrück model that explicitly takes into account cellular replication limits in the wild type cell population and models the emergence of mutants that escape replicative senescence. We present results on the mean, variance, distribution, and asymptotic behavior of the mutant population in terms of three classical formulations of the problem. More broadly the paper introduces the concept of incorporating replicative limits as part of the Luria-Delbrück mutational framework. Guidelines to extend the theory to include other types of mutations and possible applications to the modeling of telomere crisis and fluctuation analysis are also discussed.

  11. Oil transformation sector modelling: price interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global oil and oil product prices evolution model is proposed that covers the transformation sector incidence and the final user price establishment together with price interactions between gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons. High disparities among oil product prices in the various consumer zones (North America, Western Europe, Japan) are well described and compared with the low differences between oil supply prices in these zones. Final user price fluctuations are shown to be induced by transformation differences and competition; natural gas market is also modelled

  12. Strategic Interaction Model with Censored Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazgul Jenish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop a new model of a static game of incomplete information with a large number of players. The model has two key distinguishing features. First, the strategies are subject to threshold effects, and can be interpreted as dependent censored random variables. Second, in contrast to most of the existing literature, our inferential theory relies on a large number of players, rather than a large number of independent repetitions of the same game. We establish existence and uniqueness of the pure strategy equilibrium, and prove that the censored equilibrium strategies satisfy a near-epoch dependence property. We then show that the normal maximum likelihood and least squares estimators of this censored model are consistent and asymptotically normal. Our model can be useful in a wide variety of settings, including investment, R&D, labor supply, and social interaction applications.

  13. Large-scale parallel lattice Boltzmann-cellular automaton model of two-dimensional dendritic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Bohumir; Eshraghi, Mohsen; Felicelli, Sergio; Peters, John F.

    2014-03-01

    An extremely scalable lattice Boltzmann (LB)-cellular automaton (CA) model for simulations of two-dimensional (2D) dendritic solidification under forced convection is presented. The model incorporates effects of phase change, solute diffusion, melt convection, and heat transport. The LB model represents the diffusion, convection, and heat transfer phenomena. The dendrite growth is driven by a difference between actual and equilibrium liquid composition at the solid-liquid interface. The CA technique is deployed to track the new interface cells. The computer program was parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) technique. Parallel scaling of the algorithm was studied and major scalability bottlenecks were identified. Efficiency loss attributable to the high memory bandwidth requirement of the algorithm was observed when using multiple cores per processor. Parallel writing of the output variables of interest was implemented in the binary Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) to improve the output performance, and to simplify visualization. Calculations were carried out in single precision arithmetic without significant loss in accuracy, resulting in 50% reduction of memory and computational time requirements. The presented solidification model shows a very good scalability up to centimeter size domains, including more than ten million of dendrites. Catalogue identifier: AEQZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEQZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, UK Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 29,767 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3131,367 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90. Computer: Linux PC and clusters. Operating system: Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Program is parallelized using MPI

  14. Interlinked nonlinear subnetworks underlie the formation of robust cellular patterns in Arabidopsis epidermis: a dynamic spatial model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padilla-Longoria Pablo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamical models are instrumental for exploring the way information required to generate robust developmental patterns arises from complex interactions among genetic and non-genetic factors. We address this fundamental issue of developmental biology studying the leaf and root epidermis of Arabidopsis. We propose an experimentally-grounded model of gene regulatory networks (GRNs that are coupled by protein diffusion and comprise a meta-GRN implemented on cellularised domains. Results Steady states of the meta-GRN model correspond to gene expression profiles typical of hair and non-hair epidermal cells. The simulations also render spatial patterns that match the cellular arrangements observed in root and leaf epidermis. As in actual plants, such patterns are robust in the face of diverse perturbations. We validated the model by checking that it also reproduced the patterns of reported mutants. The meta-GRN model shows that interlinked sub-networks contribute redundantly to the formation of robust hair patterns and permits to advance novel and testable predictions regarding the effect of cell shape, signalling pathways and additional gene interactions affecting spatial cell-patterning. Conclusion The spatial meta-GRN model integrates available experimental data and contributes to further understanding of the Arabidopsis epidermal system. It also provides a systems biology framework to explore the interplay among sub-networks of a GRN, cell-to-cell communication, cell shape and domain traits, which could help understanding of general aspects of patterning processes. For instance, our model suggests that the information needed for cell fate determination emerges from dynamic processes that depend upon molecular components inside and outside differentiating cells, suggesting that the classical distinction of lineage versus positional cell differentiation may be instrumental but rather artificial. It also suggests that interlinkage

  15. Motion Model Employment using interacting Motion Model Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a simulation study to track a maneuvering target using a selective approach in choosing Interacting Multiple Models (IMM) algorithm to provide a wider coverage to track such targets.  Initially, there are two motion models in the system to track a target.  Probability of each...... model being correct is computed through a likelihood function for each model.  The study presented a simple technique to introduce additional models into the system using deterministic acceleration which basically defines the dynamics of the system.  Therefore, based on this value more motion models can...... be employed to increase the coverage.  Finally, the combined estimate is obtained using posteriori probabilities from different filter models.   The implemented approach provides an adaptive scheme for selecting various number of motion models.  Motion model description is important as it defines the kind...

  16. Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Glycoprotein Interaction with HVEM Influences Virus-Specific Recall Cellular Responses at the Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Kopp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of susceptible cells by herpes simplex virus (HSV requires the interaction of the HSV gD glycoprotein with one of two principal entry receptors, herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM or nectins. HVEM naturally functions in immune signaling, and the gD-HVEM interaction alters innate signaling early after mucosal infection. We investigated whether the gD-HVEM interaction during priming changes lymphocyte recall responses in the murine intravaginal model. Mice were primed with attenuated HSV-2 expressing wild-type gD or mutant gD unable to engage HVEM and challenged 32 days later with virulent HSV-2 expressing wild-type gD. HSV-specific CD8+ T cells were decreased at the genital mucosa during the recall response after priming with virus unable to engage HVEM but did not differ in draining lymph nodes. CD4+ T cells, which are critical for entry of HSV-specific CD8+ T cells into mucosa in acute infection, did not differ between the two groups in either tissue. An inverse association between Foxp3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells and CD8+ infiltration into the mucosa was not statistically significant. CXCR3 surface expression was not significantly different among different lymphocyte subsets. We conclude that engagement of HVEM during the acute phase of HSV infection influences the antiviral CD8+ recall response by an unexplained mechanism.

  17. Channel modeling for fifth generation cellular networks and wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Amir

    In view of exponential growth in data traffic demand, the wireless communications industry has aimed to increase the capacity of existing networks by 1000 times over the next 20 years. A combination of extreme cell densification, more bandwidth, and higher spectral efficiency is needed to support the data traffic requirements for fifth generation (5G) cellular communications. In this research, the potential improvements achieved by using three major 5G enabling technologies (i.e., small cells, millimeter-wave spectrum, and massive MIMO) in rural and urban environments are investigated. This work develops SPM and KA-based ray models to investigate the impact of geometrical parameters on terrain-based multiuser MIMO channel characteristic. Moreover, a new directional 3D channel model is developed for urban millimeter-wave (mmW) small cells. Path-loss, spatial correlation, coverage distance, and coherence length are studied in urban areas. Exploiting physical optics (PO) and geometric optics (GO) solutions, closed form expressions are derived for spatial correlation. Achievable spatial diversity is evaluated using horizontal and vertical linear arrays as well as planar 2D arrays. In another study, a versatile near-ground field prediction model is proposed to facilitate accurate wireless sensor network (WSN) simulations. Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the effects of antenna height, frequency of operation, polarization, and terrain dielectric and roughness properties on WSNs performance.

  18. Quasi-classical modeling of molecular quantum-dot cellular automata multidriver gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ehsan; Nejad, Shahram Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    Molecular quantum-dot cellular automata (mQCA) has received considerable attention in nanoscience. Unlike the current-based molecular switches, where the digital data is represented by the on/off states of the switches, in mQCA devices, binary information is encoded in charge configuration within molecular redox centers. The mQCA paradigm allows high device density and ultra-low power consumption. Digital mQCA gates are the building blocks of circuits in this paradigm. Design and analysis of these gates require quantum chemical calculations, which are demanding in computer time and memory. Therefore, developing simple models to probe mQCA gates is of paramount importance. We derive a semi-classical model to study the steady-state output polarization of mQCA multidriver gates, directly from the two-state approximation in electron transfer theory. The accuracy and validity of this model are analyzed using full quantum chemistry calculations. A complete set of logic gates, including inverters and minority voters, are implemented to provide an appropriate test bench in the two-dot mQCA regime. We also briefly discuss how the QCADesigner tool could find its application in simulation of mQCA devices.

  19. Effect of Driver Scope Awareness in the Lane Changing Maneuvers Using Cellular Automaton Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of drivers’ visibility and their perception (e.g., to estimate the speed and arrival time of another vehicle on the lane changing maneuver. The term of scope awareness was used to describe the visibility required by the driver to make a perception about road condition and the speed of vehicle that exist in that road. A computer simulation model was conducted to show this driver awareness behavior. This studying attempt to precisely catching the lane changing behavior and illustrate the scope awareness parameter that reflects driver behavior. This paper proposes a simple cellular automata model for studying driver visibility effects of lane changing maneuver and driver perception of estimated speed. Different values of scope awareness were examined to capture its effect on the traffic flow. Simulation results show the ability of this model to capture the important features of lane changing maneuver and revealed the appearance of the short-thin solid line jam and the wide solid line jam in the traffic flow as the consequences of lane changing maneuver.

  20. A trans-well-based cellular model for the rapid pre-evaluation of tympanic membrane repair materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shih-Han; Su, Chin-Hui; Tseng, How

    2016-08-01

    It is important to have a standardized tympanic membrane (TM) perforation platform to evaluate the various myringoplasty materials that have been studied and developed extensively during recent years. However, currently there are no cellular models specifically designed for this purpose, and animal models remain unsatisfactory. The purpose of this study is to propose an inexpensive, readily available, well-controlled, and easy-to-create cellular model as a substitute for use in the evaluation of TM repairing materials. A trans-well model was created using a cell culture insert with a round hole created at the center of the polycarbonate membrane. HaCaT cells were cultured on the fenestrated culture insert, and the desired myringoplasty graft was placed at the center of the window for one week and observed by fluorescent microscopy under vital staining. Under this cellular model, there was notable migration of HaCaT cells onto the positive control graft (rabbit fascia), while only a few cell clusters were observed on the negative control graft (paper). Model validation showed that the cell migration ratio for the PLLA + 1% hyaluronic acid (HA) graft is significantly higher than using myringoplasty paper, poly L-lactide (PLLA), or PLLA + 0.5% HA (p < 0.05). This trans-well-based cellular model might be a useful pre-evaluation platform for the evaluation of TM repairing materials. The model is inexpensive, readily available, easy to create, and standardized for use. PMID:26335291

  1. Expression of cellular components in granulomatous inflammatory response in Piaractus mesopotamicus model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Gómez Manrique

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to describe and characterize the cellular components during the evolution of chronic granulomatous inflammation in the teleost fish pacus (P. mesopotamicus induced by Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG, using S-100, iNOS and cytokeratin antibodies. 50 fish (120±5.0 g were anesthetized and 45 inoculated with 20 μL (40 mg/mL (2.0 x 10(6 CFU/mg and five inoculated with saline (0,65% into muscle tissue in the laterodorsal region. To evaluate the inflammatory process, nine fish inoculated with BCG and one control were sampled in five periods: 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st and 33rd days post-inoculation (DPI. Immunohistochemical examination showed that the marking with anti-S-100 protein and anti-iNOS antibodies was weak, with a diffuse pattern, between the third and seventh DPI. From the 14th to the 33rd day, the marking became stronger and marked the cytoplasm of the macrophages. Positivity for cytokeratin was initially observed in the 14th DPI, and the stronger immunostaining in the 33rd day, period in which the epithelioid cells were more evident and the granuloma was fully formed. Also after the 14th day, a certain degree of cellular organization was observed, due to the arrangement of the macrophages around the inoculated material, with little evidence of edema. The arrangement of the macrophages around the inoculum, the fibroblasts, the lymphocytes and, in most cases, the presence of melanomacrophages formed the granuloma and kept the inoculum isolated in the 33rd DPI. The present study suggested that the granulomatous experimental model using teleost fish P. mesopotamicus presented a similar response to those observed in mammals, confirming its importance for studies of chronic inflammatory reaction.

  2. Measuring dark matter by modeling interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Petsch, H P; Theis, Ch

    2009-01-01

    The dark matter content of galaxies is usually determined from galaxies in dynamical equilibrium, mainly from rotationally supported galactic components. Such determinations restrict measurements to special regions in galaxies, e.g. the galactic plane(s), whereas other regions are not probed at all. Interacting galaxies offer an alternative, because extended tidal tails often probe outer or off-plane regions of galaxies. However, these systems are neither in dynamical equilibrium nor simple, because they are composed of two or more galaxies, by this increasing the associated parameter space.We present our genetic algorithm based modeling tool which allows to investigate the extended parameter space of interacting galaxies. From these studies, we derive the dynamical history of (well observed) galaxies. Among other parameters we constrain the dark matter content of the involved galaxies. We demonstrate the applicability of this strategy with examples ranging from stellar streams around theMilkyWay to extended ...

  3. Calogero model with Yukawa like interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kessabi, M; Sebbata, H; Kessabi, Mohammed; Saidi, El Hassan; Sebbata, Hanane

    2006-01-01

    We study an extension of one dimensional Calogero model involving strongly coupled and electrically charged particles. Besides Calogero term $\\frac{g}{% 2x^{2}}$, there is an extra factor described by a Yukawa like coupling modeling short distance interactions. Mimicking Calogero analysis and using developments in formal series of the wave function $\\Psi (x) $ factorised as $x^{\\epsilon}\\Phi (x) $ with $\\epsilon (\\epsilon -1) =g$, we develop a technique to approach the spectrum of the generalized system and show that information on full spectrum is captured by $\\Phi (x) $ and $\\Phi ^{\\prime \\prime}(x) $ at the singular point $x=0$ of the potential. Convergence of $% \\int dx| \\Psi (x) | ^{2}$ requires $\\epsilon >-{1/2}$ and is shown to be sensitive to the zero mode of $\\Phi (x) $ at $x=0$. \\textbf{Key words}: \\textit{Hamitonian systems, quantum integrability, Calogero model, Yukawa like potential.}

  4. On dark degeneracy and interacting models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, S.; Borges, H.A., E-mail: saulo.carneiro@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: humberto@ufba.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus de Ondina, Salvador, BA, 40210-340 Brazil (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    Cosmological background observations cannot fix the dark energy equation of state, which is related to a degeneracy in the definition of the dark sector components. Here we show that this degeneracy can be broken at perturbation level by imposing two observational properties on dark matter. First, dark matter is defined as the clustering component we observe in large scale structures. This definition is meaningful only if dark energy is unperturbed, which is achieved if we additionally assume, as a second condition, that dark matter is cold, i.e. non-relativistic. As a consequence, dark energy models with equation-of-state parameter −1 ≤ ω < 0 are reduced to two observationally distinguishable classes with ω = −1, equally competitive when tested against observations. The first comprises the ΛCDM model with constant dark energy density. The second consists of interacting models with an energy flux from dark energy to dark matter.

  5. Treatment Analysis in a Cancer Stem Cell Context Using a Tumor Growth Model Based on Cellular Automata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Monteagudo

    Full Text Available Cancer can be viewed as an emergent behavior in terms of complex system theory and artificial life, Cellular Automata (CA being the tool most used for studying and characterizing the emergent behavior. Different approaches with CA models were used to model cancer growth. The use of the abstract model of acquired cancer hallmarks permits the direct modeling at cellular level, where a cellular automaton defines the mitotic and apoptotic behavior of cells, and allows for an analysis of different dynamics of the cellular system depending on the presence of the different hallmarks. A CA model based on the presence of hallmarks in the cells, which includes a simulation of the behavior of Cancer Stem Cells (CSC and their implications for the resultant growth behavior of the multicellular system, was employed. This modeling of cancer growth, in the avascular phase, was employed to analyze the effect of cancer treatments in a cancer stem cell context. The model clearly explains why, after treatment against non-stem cancer cells, the regrowth capability of CSCs generates a faster regrowth of tumor behavior, and also shows that a continuous low-intensity treatment does not favor CSC proliferation and differentiation, thereby allowing an unproblematic control of future tumor regrowth. The analysis performed indicates that, contrary to the current attempts at CSC control, trying to make CSC proliferation more difficult is an important point to consider, especially in the immediate period after a standard treatment for controlling non-stem cancer cell proliferation.

  6. Interacting damage models mapped onto ising and percolation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toussaint, Renaud; Pride, Steven R.

    2004-03-23

    The authors introduce a class of damage models on regular lattices with isotropic interactions between the broken cells of the lattice. Quasistatic fiber bundles are an example. The interactions are assumed to be weak, in the sense that the stress perturbation from a broken cell is much smaller than the mean stress in the system. The system starts intact with a surface-energy threshold required to break any cell sampled from an uncorrelated quenched-disorder distribution. The evolution of this heterogeneous system is ruled by Griffith's principle which states that a cell breaks when the release in potential (elastic) energy in the system exceeds the surface-energy barrier necessary to break the cell. By direct integration over all possible realizations of the quenched disorder, they obtain the probability distribution of each damage configuration at any level of the imposed external deformation. They demonstrate an isomorphism between the distributions so obtained and standard generalized Ising models, in which the coupling constants and effective temperature in the Ising model are functions of the nature of the quenched-disorder distribution and the extent of accumulated damage. In particular, they show that damage models with global load sharing are isomorphic to standard percolation theory, that damage models with local load sharing rule are isomorphic to the standard ising model, and draw consequences thereof for the universality class and behavior of the autocorrelation length of the breakdown transitions corresponding to these models. they also treat damage models having more general power-law interactions, and classify the breakdown process as a function of the power-law interaction exponent. Last, they also show that the probability distribution over configurations is a maximum of Shannon's entropy under some specific constraints related to the energetic balance of the fracture process, which firmly relates this type of quenched-disorder based

  7. Simulation of estrogen transport and behavior in laboratory soil columns using a cellular automata model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingcai; Shi, Jianghong; Liu, Xiaowei; Wu, Wei; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    A cellular automata model (CA model) was used to simulate the soil column leaching process of estrogens during the processes of migration and transformation. The results of the simulated leaching experiment showed that the first-order degradation rates of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), 17β-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1) were 0.131 h- 1 for E2, 0.099 h- 1 for E1 and 0.064 h- 1 for EE2 in the EE2 and E2 leaching process, and the first-order sorption rates were 5.94 h- 1 for E2, 5.63 h- 1 for EE2, 3.125 h- 1 for E1. Their sorption rates were positively correlated with the n-octanol/water partition coefficients. When the diffusion rate was low, its impact on the simulation results was insignificant. The increase in sorption and degradation rates caused the decrease in the total estrogens that leached. In addition, increasing the sorption rate could delay the emerging time of the maximum concentration of estrogen that leached, whereas increasing the degradation rate could shorten the emerging time of the maximum concentration of estrogen that leached. The comparison made between the experimental data and the simulation results of the CA model and the HYDRUS-1D software showed that the establishment of one-component and multi-component CA models could simulate EE2 and E2 soil column leaching processes, and the CA models achieve an intuitive, dynamic, and visual simulation.

  8. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    KAUST Repository

    Klika, Václav

    2011-11-10

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. © 2011 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  9. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae Assay System to Investigate Ligand/AdipoR1 Interactions That Lead to Cellular Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2013-06-07

    Adiponectin is a mammalian hormone that exerts anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and cardioprotective effects through interaction with its major ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane localized receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Here, we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae based method for investigating agonist-AdipoR interactions that is amenable for high-throughput scale-up and can be used to study both AdipoRs separately. Agonist-AdipoR1 interactions are detected using a split firefly luciferase assay based on reconstitution of firefly luciferase (Luc) activity due to juxtaposition of its N- and C-terminal fragments, NLuc and CLuc, by ligand induced interaction of the chimeric proteins CLuc-AdipoR1 and APPL1-NLuc (adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif 1-NLuc) in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking the yeast homolog of AdipoRs (Izh2p). The assay monitors the earliest known step in the adiponectin-AdipoR anti-diabetic signaling cascade. We demonstrate that reconstituted Luc activity can be detected in colonies or cells using a CCD camera and quantified in cell suspensions using a microplate reader. AdipoR1-APPL1 interaction occurs in absence of ligand but can be stimulated specifically by agonists such as adiponectin and the tobacco protein osmotin that was shown to have AdipoR-dependent adiponectin-like biological activity in mammalian cells. To further validate this assay, we have modeled the three dimensional structures of receptor-ligand complexes of membrane-embedded AdipoR1 with cyclic peptides derived from osmotin or osmotin-like plant proteins. We demonstrate that the calculated AdipoR1-peptide binding energies correlate with the peptides\\' ability to behave as AdipoR1 agonists in the split luciferase assay. Further, we demonstrate agonist-AdipoR dependent activation of protein kinase A (PKA) signaling and AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae, which are homologous to

  10. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae assay system to investigate ligand/AdipoR1 interactions that lead to cellular signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Aouida

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is a mammalian hormone that exerts anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and cardioprotective effects through interaction with its major ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane localized receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Here, we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae based method for investigating agonist-AdipoR interactions that is amenable for high-throughput scale-up and can be used to study both AdipoRs separately. Agonist-AdipoR1 interactions are detected using a split firefly luciferase assay based on reconstitution of firefly luciferase (Luc activity due to juxtaposition of its N- and C-terminal fragments, NLuc and CLuc, by ligand induced interaction of the chimeric proteins CLuc-AdipoR1 and APPL1-NLuc (adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif 1-NLuc in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking the yeast homolog of AdipoRs (Izh2p. The assay monitors the earliest known step in the adiponectin-AdipoR anti-diabetic signaling cascade. We demonstrate that reconstituted Luc activity can be detected in colonies or cells using a CCD camera and quantified in cell suspensions using a microplate reader. AdipoR1-APPL1 interaction occurs in absence of ligand but can be stimulated specifically by agonists such as adiponectin and the tobacco protein osmotin that was shown to have AdipoR-dependent adiponectin-like biological activity in mammalian cells. To further validate this assay, we have modeled the three dimensional structures of receptor-ligand complexes of membrane-embedded AdipoR1 with cyclic peptides derived from osmotin or osmotin-like plant proteins. We demonstrate that the calculated AdipoR1-peptide binding energies correlate with the peptides' ability to behave as AdipoR1 agonists in the split luciferase assay. Further, we demonstrate agonist-AdipoR dependent activation of protein kinase A (PKA signaling and AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae, which are

  11. Cell-centred model for the simulation of curved cellular monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaffa, Payman; Asadipour, Nina; Millán, Daniel; Rodríguez-Ferran, Antonio; J Muñoz, Jose

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a cell-centred model for the simulation of planar and curved multicellular soft tissues. We propose a computational model that includes stress relaxation due to cell reorganisation (intercellular connectivity changes) and cytoskeleton remodelling (intracellular changes). Cells are represented by their cell centres, and their mechanical interaction is modelled through active non-linear elastic laws with a dynamically changing resting length. Special attention is paid to the handling of connectivity changes between cells, and the relaxation that the tissues exhibit under these topological changes. Cell-cell connectivity is computed by resorting to a Delaunay triangulation, which is combined with a mapping technique in order to obtain triangulations on curved manifolds. Our numerical results show that even a linear elastic cell-cell interaction model may induce a global non-linear response due to the reorganisation of the cell connectivity. This plastic-like behaviour is combined with a non-linear rheological law where the resting length depends on the elastic strain, mimicking the global visco-elastic response of tissues. The model is applied to simulate the elongation of planar and curved monolayers.

  12. Load-aware modeling for uplink cellular networks in a multi-channel environment

    KAUST Repository

    Alammouri, Ahmad Mohammad Abdel-Karim

    2014-09-01

    We exploit tools from stochastic geometry to develop a tractable analytical approach for modeling uplink cellular networks. The developed model is load aware and accounts for per-user power control as well as the limited transmit power constraint for the users\\' equipment (UEs). The proposed analytical paradigm is based on a simple per-user power control scheme in which each user inverts his path-loss such that the signal is received at his serving base station (BS) with a certain power threshold ρ Due to the limited transmit power of the UEs, users that cannot invert their path-loss to their serving BSs are allowed to transmit with their maximum transmit power. We show that the proposed power control scheme not only provides a balanced cell center and cell edge user performance, it also facilitates the analysis when compared to the state-of-the-art approaches in the literature. To this end, we discuss how to manipulate the design variable ρ in response to the network parameters to optimize one or more of the performance metrics such as the outage probability, the network capacity, and the energy efficiency.

  13. Modeling on dynamic recrystallization of aluminium alloy 7050 during hot compression based on cellular automaton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-chao; XIE Zhi-yuan; LI Song-pu; ZANG Yan-yan

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process of hot compressed aluminium alloy 7050 was predicted using cellular automaton (CA) combined with topology deformation. The hot deformatation characteristics of aluminium alloy 7050 were investigated by hot uniaxial compression tests in order to obtain the material parameters used in the CA model. The influences of process parameters (strain, strain rate and temperature) on the fraction of DRX and the average recrystallization grain (R-grain) size were investigated and discussed. It is found that larger stain, higher temperature and lower strain rate (less than 0.1 s–1) are beneficial to the increasing fraction of DRX. And the deformation temperature affects the mean R-grain size much more greatly than other parameters. It is also noted that there is a critical strain for the occurrence of DRX which is related to strain rate and temperature. In addition, it is shown that the CA model with topology deformation is able to simulate the microstructural evolution and the flow behavior of aluminium alloy 7050 material under various deformation conditions.

  14. Cellular automaton models for traffic flow considering opposite driving of an emergency vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Han-Tao; Li, Jing-Ru; Nie, Cen

    2015-12-01

    Aiming at two-lane road, this paper establishes three models to analyze the opposite-overtaking rules of emergency vehicle based on cellular automaton (CCA) model. Based on the simulation of mixed traffic flow for multi-density conditions, the density-speed diagrams have been obtained consequently. According to the analysis, when the traffic density of the opposite lane is low, the opposite driving behavior of emergency vehicle can improve the average speed effectively. At the same time, if the cocurrent lane is in high-density traffic, the traffic in the opposite lane will be disturbed, but the vehicles in the cocurrent lane will not be affected. The paper has further discussed the influence of different emergency vehicle driving behaviors on traffic. The results reveal that as the traffic of the opposite lane is in a low-density range, if emergency vehicle operates overtaking behavior precisely, the greater the density of the cocurrent lane is, the more obviously the speed improve. Meanwhile large random fluctuation of overtaking times will occur. While the risky lane change behavior displays different traffic characteristics, that is when the same direction lane is in high density, the speed increases slightly and the lane change number is changed regularly.

  15. Cellular responses to disruption of the permeability barrier in a three-dimensional organotypic epidermal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repeated injury to the stratum corneum of mammalian skin (caused by friction, soaps, or organic solvents) elicits hyperkeratosis and epidermal thickening. Functionally, these changes serve to restore the cutaneous barrier and protect the organism. To better understand the molecular and cellular basis of this response, we have engineered an in vitro model of acetone-induced injury using organotypic epidermal cultures. Rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), grown on a collagen raft in the absence of any feeder fibroblasts, developed all the hallmarks of a true epidermis including a well-formed cornified layer. To induce barrier injury, REK cultures were treated with intermittent 30-s exposures to acetone then were fixed and paraffin-sectioned. After two exposures, increased proliferation (Ki67 and BrdU staining) was observed in basal and suprabasal layers. After three exposures, proliferation became confined to localized buds in the basal layer and increased terminal differentiation was observed (compact hyperkeratosis of the stratum corneum, elevated levels of K10 and filaggrin, and heightened transglutaminase activity). Thus, barrier disruption causes epidermal hyperplasia and/or enhances differentiation, depending upon the extent and duration of injury. Given that no fibroblasts are present in the model, the ability to mount a hyperplastic response to barrier injury is an inherent property of keratinocytes

  16. Cellular automata model for urban road traffic flow considering pedestrian crossing street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Han-Tao; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Xiao-Xu

    2016-11-01

    In order to analyze the effect of pedestrians' crossing street on vehicle flows, we investigated traffic characteristics of vehicles and pedestrians. Based on that, rules of lane changing, acceleration, deceleration, randomization and update are modified. Then we established two urban two-lane cellular automata models of traffic flow, one of which is about sections with non-signalized crosswalk and the other is on uncontrolled sections with pedestrians crossing street at random. MATLAB is used for numerical simulation of the different traffic conditions; meanwhile space-time diagram and relational graphs of traffic flow parameters are generated and then comparatively analyzed. Simulation results indicate that when vehicle density is lower than around 25 vehs/(km lane), pedestrians have modest impact on traffic flow, whereas when vehicle density is higher than about 60 vehs/(km lane), traffic speed and volume will decrease significantly especially on sections with non-signal-controlled crosswalk. The results illustrate that the proposed models reconstruct the traffic flow's characteristic with the situation where there are pedestrians crossing and can provide some practical reference for urban traffic management.

  17. A biofidelic 3D culture model to study the development of brain cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, M.; Du, C.; Herrero Acero, E.; Tang-Schomer, M. D.; Özkucur, N.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how cells assemble as systems during corticogenesis to generate collective functions. We built a neurobiology platform that consists of fetal rat cerebral cortical cells grown within 3D silk scaffolds (SF). Ivermectin (Ivm), a glycine receptor (GLR) agonist, was used to modulate cell resting membrane potential (Vmem) according to methods described in a previous work that implicated Ivm in the arrangement and connectivity of cortical cell assemblies. The cells developed into distinct populations of neuroglial stem/progenitor cells, mature neurons or epithelial-mesenchymal cells. Importantly, the synchronized electrical activity in the newly developed cortical assemblies could be recorded as local field potential (LFP) measurements. This study therefore describes the first example of the development of a biologically relevant cortical plate assembly outside of the body. This model provides i) a preclinical basis for engineering cerebral cortex tissue autografts and ii) a biofidelic 3D culture model for investigating biologically relevant processes during the functional development of cerebral cortical cellular systems. PMID:27112667

  18. Theoretical models and simulation codes to investigate bystander effects and cellular communication at low doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, F.; Alloni, D.; Facoetti, A.; Mairani, A.; Nano, R.; Ottolenghi, A.

    Astronauts in space are continuously exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays During the last ten years the effects of low radiation doses have been widely re-discussed following a large number of observations on the so-called non targeted effects in particular bystander effects The latter consist of induction of cytogenetic damage in cells not directly traversed by radiation most likely as a response to molecular messengers released by directly irradiated cells Bystander effects which are observed both for lethal endpoints e g clonogenic inactivation and apoptosis and for non-lethal ones e g mutations and neoplastic transformation tend to show non-linear dose responses This might have significant consequences in terms of low-dose risk which is generally calculated on the basis of the Linear No Threshold hypothesis Although the mechanisms underlying bystander effects are still largely unknown it is now clear that two types of cellular communication i e via gap junctions and or release of molecular messengers into the extracellular environment play a fundamental role Theoretical models and simulation codes can be of help in elucidating such mechanisms In the present paper we will review different available modelling approaches including one that is being developed at the University of Pavia The focus will be on the different assumptions adopted by the various authors and on the implications of such assumptions in terms of non-targeted radiobiological damage and more generally low-dose

  19. Fate of PLA and PCL-Based Polymeric Nanocarriers in Cellular and Animal Models of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitia, Leopoldo; Ferrari, Raffaele; Violatto, Martina B; Talamini, Laura; Dragoni, Luca; Colombo, Claudio; Colombo, Laura; Lupi, Monica; Ubezio, Paolo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Morbidelli, Massimo; Salmona, Mario; Moscatelli, Davide; Bigini, Paolo

    2016-03-14

    An integrated platform to assess the interaction between nanocarriers and biological matrices has been developed by our group using poly methyl-methacrylate nanoparticles. In this study, we exploited this platform to evaluate the behavior of two biodegradable formulations, poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL3) and poly lactic-acid (PLA8), respectively, in cellular and animal models of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Both NPs shared the main physicochemical parameters (size, shape, ζ-potential) and exclusively differentiated on the material on which they are composed. Our results showed that (1) PLA8 NPs, systemically injected in mice, underwent rapid degradation without penetration into tumors; (2) PLA8 NPs were not internalized in the human TNBC cell line (MDA-MB-231); (3) PCL3 NPs had a longer bioavailability, reached the tumor parenchyma, and efficiently penetrated in MDA-MB-231 cells. Our data highlight the relevance of the material selection to both improve bioavailability and target tropism, and make PCL3 NPs an interesting tool for the development of nanodrugs against TNBC. PMID:26791775

  20. Mud-Wave Interaction: A Viscoelastic Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This study is devoted to the interaction between water surface waves and a thin layer of viscoelastic mud on the bottom. On the assumption that the mud layer is comparable in thickness with the wave boundary layer and is much smaller than the wavelength, a two-layer Stokes boundary layer model is adopted to determine the mud motions under the waves. Analytical expressions are derived for the near-bottom water and mud velocity fields, surface wave-damping rate, and interface wave amplitude and phase lag. Examined in particular is how these kinematic quantities may depend on the viscous and elastic properties of the mud.

  1. Pairing and realistic shell-model interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Covello, A; Gargano, A.; Kuo, T. T. S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper starts with a brief historical overview of pairing in nuclei, which fulfills the purpose of properly framing the main subject. This concerns the pairing properties of a realistic shell-model effective interaction which has proved very successful in describing nuclei around doubly magic 132Sn. We focus attention on the two nuclei 134Te and 134Sn with two valence protons and neutrons, respectively. Our study brings out the key role of one particle-one hole excitations in producing a ...

  2. Evolving Transport Networks With Cellular Automata Models Inspired by Slime Mould.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsompanas, Michail-Antisthenis I; Sirakoulis, Georgios Ch; Adamatzky, Andrew I

    2015-09-01

    Man-made transport networks and their design are closely related to the shortest path problem and considered amongst the most debated problems of computational intelligence. Apart from using conventional or bio-inspired computer algorithms, many researchers tried to solve this kind of problem using biological computing substrates, gas-discharge solvers, prototypes of a mobile droplet, and hot ice computers. In this aspect, another example of biological computer is the plasmodium of acellular slime mould Physarum polycephalum (P. polycephalum), which is a large single cell visible by an unaided eye and has been proven as a reliable living substrate for implementing biological computing devices for computational geometry, graph-theoretical problems, and optimization and imitation of transport networks. Although P. polycephalum is easy to experiment with, computing devices built with the living slime mould are extremely slow; it takes slime mould days to execute a computation. Consequently, mapping key computing mechanisms of the slime mould onto silicon would allow us to produce efficient bio-inspired computing devices to tackle with hard to solve computational intelligence problems like the aforementioned. Toward this direction, a cellular automaton (CA)-based, Physarum-inspired, network designing model is proposed. This novel CA-based model is inspired by the propagating strategy, the formation of tubular networks, and the computing abilities of the plasmodium of P. polycephalum. The results delivered by the CA model demonstrate a good match with several previously published results of experimental laboratory studies on imitation of man-made transport networks with P. polycephalum. Consequently, the proposed CA model can be used as a virtual, easy-to-access, and biomimicking laboratory emulator that will economize large time periods needed for biological experiments while producing networks almost identical to the tubular networks of the real-slime mould. PMID

  3. Protective effect of probiotics on Salmonella infectivity assessed with combined in vitro gut fermentation-cellular models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihler Annina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate assessment of probiotics with targeted anti-Salmonella activity requires suitable models accounting for both, microbe-microbe and host-microbe interactions in gut environments. Here we report the combination of two original in vitro intestinal models closely mimicking the complex in vivo conditions of the large intestine. Effluents from continuous in vitro three-stage fermentation colonic models of Salmonella Typhimurium infection inoculated with immobilized child microbiota and Salmonella were directly applied to confluent mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cell layers. The effects of Salmonella, addition of two bacteriocinogenic strains, Bifidobacterium thermophilum RBL67 (thermophilicin B67 and Escherichia coli L1000 (microcin B17, and inulin were tested on Salmonella growth and interactions with epithelial cell layers. Salmonella adhesion and invasion were investigated and epithelial integrity assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER measurements and confocal microscopy observation. Data from complex effluents were compared with pure Salmonella cultures. Results Salmonella in effluents of all reactors of the colonic fermentation model stabilized at mean values of 5.3 ± 0.8 log10 cfu/ml effluent. Invasion of cell-associated Salmonella was up to 50-fold lower in complex reactor samples compared to pure Salmonella cultures. It further depended on environmental factors, with 0.2 ± 0.1% being measured with proximal, 0.6 ± 0.2% with transverse and 1.3 ± 0.7% with distal reactor effluents, accompanied by a similar high decrease of TER across cell monolayers (minus 45% and disruption of tight junctions. Subsequent addition of E. coli L1000 stimulated Salmonella growth (6.4 ± 0.6 log10 cfu/ml effluent of all 3 reactors and further decreased TER, but led to 10-fold decreased invasion efficiency when tested with distal reactor samples. In contrast, presence of B. thermophilum RBL67 revealed a protective effect on

  4. A cellular stress response (CSR) that interacts with NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) is a new regulator of hypoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Ami; Koyama, Chika; Xu, Jing; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-02-28

    NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) was previously found to contribute to the hypoxic response of cells, but the mechanism was not clarified. In this study, we identified a cellular stress response (CSR) as a new factor interacting with NPR by a yeast two-hybrid system. Overexpression of CSR enhanced the induction of erythropoietin and hypoxia response element (HRE) activity under hypoxia in human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (Hep3B), while knockdown of CSR suppressed them. This new finding regarding the interaction of NPR with CSR provides insight into the function of NPR in hypoxic response.

  5. A cellular stress response (CSR) that interacts with NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) is a new regulator of hypoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Ami; Koyama, Chika; Xu, Jing; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-02-28

    NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) was previously found to contribute to the hypoxic response of cells, but the mechanism was not clarified. In this study, we identified a cellular stress response (CSR) as a new factor interacting with NPR by a yeast two-hybrid system. Overexpression of CSR enhanced the induction of erythropoietin and hypoxia response element (HRE) activity under hypoxia in human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (Hep3B), while knockdown of CSR suppressed them. This new finding regarding the interaction of NPR with CSR provides insight into the function of NPR in hypoxic response. PMID:24491563

  6. Interactive Inconsistency Fixing in Feature Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王波; 熊英飞; 胡振江; 赵海燕; 张伟; 梅宏

    2014-01-01

    Feature models have been widely adopted to reuse the requirements of a set of similar products in a domain. In feature models’ construction, one basic task is to ensure the consistency of feature models, which often involves detecting and fixing of inconsistencies in feature models. While many approaches have been proposed, most of them focus on detecting inconsistencies rather than fixing inconsistencies. In this paper, we propose a novel dynamic-priority based approach to interactively fixing inconsistencies in feature models, and report an implementation of a system that not only automatically recommends a solution to fixing inconsistencies but also supports domain analysts to gradually reach the desirable solution by dynamically adjusting priorities of constraints. The key technical contribution is, as far as we are aware, the first application of the constraint hierarchy theory to feature modeling, where the degree of domain analysts’ confidence on constraints is expressed by using priority and inconsistencies are resolved by deleting one or more lower-priority constraints. Two case studies demonstrate the usability and scalability (effciency) of our new approach.

  7. Laser interaction with biological material mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the principles of laser interaction with biological cells and tissues of varying degrees of organization. The problems of biomedical diagnostics are considered. Scattering of laser irradiation of blood cells is modeled for biological structures (dermis, epidermis, vascular plexus). An analytic theory is provided which is based on solving the wave equation for the electromagnetic field. It allows the accurate analysis of interference effects arising from the partial superposition of scattered waves. Treated topics of mathematical modeling are: optical characterization of biological tissue with large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the layers, heating blood vessel under laser irradiation incident on the outer surface of the skin and thermo-chemical denaturation of biological structures at the example of human skin.

  8. Modeling the Enceladus plume--plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fleshman, B L; Bagenal, F

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the chemical interaction between Saturn's corotating plasma and Enceladus' volcanic plumes. We evolve plasma as it passes through a prescribed H2O plume using a physical chemistry model adapted for water-group reactions. The flow field is assumed to be that of a plasma around an electrically-conducting obstacle centered on Enceladus and aligned with Saturn's magnetic field, consistent with Cassini magnetometer data. We explore the effects on the physical chemistry due to: (1) a small population of hot electrons; (2) a plasma flow decelerated in response to the pickup of fresh ions; (3) the source rate of neutral H2O. The model confirms that charge exchange dominates the local chemistry and that H3O+ dominates the water-group composition downstream of the Enceladus plumes. We also find that the amount of fresh pickup ions depends heavily on both the neutral source strength and on the presence of a persistent population of hot electrons.

  9. Interaction of Defensins with Model Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Gordon, Vernita D.; Selsted, Michael E.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. For many AMPs, activity comes from their ability to selectively disrupt and lyse bacterial cell membranes. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of selective membrane permeation remains unclear. Theta defensins are circularized peptides with a high degree of selectivity. We investigate the interaction of model bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes with theta defensins RTD-1, BTD-7, and compare them to protegrin PG-1, a prototypical AMP, using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The relationship between membrane composition and peptide induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. By comparing the membrane phase behavior induced by these different peptides we will discuss the importance of amino acid composition and placement on membrane rearrangement.

  10. Boolean Modeling of Cellular and Molecular Pathways Involved in Influenza Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher S; DeDiego, Marta L; Topham, David J; Thakar, Juilee

    2016-01-01

    Systems virology integrates host-directed approaches with molecular profiling to understand viral pathogenesis. Self-contained statistical approaches that combine expression profiles of genes with the available databases defining the genes involved in the pathways (gene-sets) have allowed characterization of predictive gene-signatures associated with outcome of the influenza virus (IV) infection. However, such enrichment techniques do not take into account interactions among pathways that are responsible for the IV infection pathogenesis. We investigate dendritic cell response to seasonal H1N1 influenza A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NC) infection and infer the Boolean logic rules underlying the interaction network of ligand induced signaling pathways and transcription factors. The model reveals several novel regulatory modes and provides insights into mechanism of cross talk between NFκB and IRF mediated signaling. Additionally, the logic rule underlying the regulation of IL2 pathway that was predicted by the Boolean model was experimentally validated. Thus, the model developed in this paper integrates pathway analysis tools with the dynamic modeling approaches to reveal the regulation between signaling pathways and transcription factors using genome-wide transcriptional profiles measured upon influenza infection.

  11. Boolean Modeling of Cellular and Molecular Pathways Involved in Influenza Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher S.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Topham, David J.; Thakar, Juilee

    2016-01-01

    Systems virology integrates host-directed approaches with molecular profiling to understand viral pathogenesis. Self-contained statistical approaches that combine expression profiles of genes with the available databases defining the genes involved in the pathways (gene-sets) have allowed characterization of predictive gene-signatures associated with outcome of the influenza virus (IV) infection. However, such enrichment techniques do not take into account interactions among pathways that are responsible for the IV infection pathogenesis. We investigate dendritic cell response to seasonal H1N1 influenza A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NC) infection and infer the Boolean logic rules underlying the interaction network of ligand induced signaling pathways and transcription factors. The model reveals several novel regulatory modes and provides insights into mechanism of cross talk between NFκB and IRF mediated signaling. Additionally, the logic rule underlying the regulation of IL2 pathway that was predicted by the Boolean model was experimentally validated. Thus, the model developed in this paper integrates pathway analysis tools with the dynamic modeling approaches to reveal the regulation between signaling pathways and transcription factors using genome-wide transcriptional profiles measured upon influenza infection. PMID:26981147

  12. Boolean Modeling of Cellular and Molecular Pathways Involved in Influenza Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Anderson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systems virology integrates host-directed approaches with molecular profiling to understand viral pathogenesis. Self-contained statistical approaches that combine expression profiles of genes with the available databases defining the genes involved in the pathways (gene-sets have allowed characterization of predictive gene-signatures associated with outcome of the influenza virus (IV infection. However, such enrichment techniques do not take into account interactions among pathways that are responsible for the IV infection pathogenesis. We investigate dendritic cell response to seasonal H1N1 influenza A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NC infection and infer the Boolean logic rules underlying the interaction network of ligand induced signaling pathways and transcription factors. The model reveals several novel regulatory modes and provides insights into mechanism of cross talk between NFκB and IRF mediated signaling. Additionally, the logic rule underlying the regulation of IL2 pathway that was predicted by the Boolean model was experimentally validated. Thus, the model developed in this paper integrates pathway analysis tools with the dynamic modeling approaches to reveal the regulation between signaling pathways and transcription factors using genome-wide transcriptional profiles measured upon influenza infection.

  13. Repetition-based Interactive Facade Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    AlHalawani, Sawsan

    2012-07-01

    Modeling and reconstruction of urban environments has gained researchers attention throughout the past few years. It spreads in a variety of directions across multiple disciplines such as image processing, computer graphics and computer vision as well as in architecture, geoscience and remote sensing. Having a virtual world of our real cities is very attractive in various directions such as entertainment, engineering, governments among many others. In this thesis, we address the problem of processing a single fa cade image to acquire useful information that can be utilized to manipulate the fa cade and generate variations of fa cade images which can be later used for buildings\\' texturing. Typical fa cade structures exhibit a rectilinear distribution where in windows and other elements are organized in a grid of horizontal and vertical repetitions of similar patterns. In the firt part of this thesis, we propose an efficient algorithm that exploits information obtained from a single image to identify the distribution grid of the dominant elements i.e. windows. This detection method is initially assisted with the user marking the dominant window followed by an automatic process for identifying its repeated instances which are used to define the structure grid. Given the distribution grid, we allow the user to interactively manipulate the fa cade by adding, deleting, resizing or repositioning the windows in order to generate new fa cade structures. Having the utility for the interactive fa cade is very valuable to create fa cade variations and generate new textures for building models. Ultimately, there is a wide range of interesting possibilities of interactions to be explored.

  14. LSST Survey Data: Models for EPO Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, J. K.; Borne, K. D.

    2007-12-01

    The potential for education and public outreach with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is as far reaching as the telescope itself. LSST data will be available to the public, giving anyone with a web browser a movie-like window on the Universe. The LSST project is unique in designing its data management and data access systems with the public and community users in mind. The enormous volume of data to be generated by LSST is staggering: 30 Terabytes per night, 10 Petabytes per year. The final database of extracted science parameters from the images will also be enormous -- 50-100 Petabytes -- a rich gold mine for data mining and scientific discovery potential. LSST will also generate 100,000 astronomical alerts per night, for 10 years. The LSST EPO team is examining models for EPO interaction with the survey data, particularly in how the community (amateurs, teachers, students, and general public) can participate in the discovery process. We will outline some of our models of community interaction for inquiry-based science using the LSST survey data, and we invite discussion on these topics.

  15. Analyzing the Influence of Mobile Phone Use of Drivers on Traffic Flow Based on an Improved Cellular Automaton Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Xiao; Jing Shi

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to analyze the influence of drivers’ behavior of phone use while driving on traffic flow, including both traffic efficiency and traffic safety. An improved cellular automaton model was proposed to simulate traffic flow with distracted drivers based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg model. The driving characters of drivers using a phone were first discussed and a value representing the probability to use a phone while driving was put into the CA model. Simulation results showed that ...

  16. Cellular, molecular and functional characterisation of YAC transgenic mouse models of Friedreich ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Anjomani Virmouni

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of the FXN gene. We have previously established and performed preliminary characterisation of several human FXN yeast artificial chromosome (YAC transgenic FRDA mouse models containing GAA repeat expansions, Y47R (9 GAA repeats, YG8R (90 and 190 GAA repeats and YG22R (190 GAA repeats.We now report extended cellular, molecular and functional characterisation of these FXN YAC transgenic mouse models. FXN transgene copy number analysis of the FRDA mice demonstrated that the YG22R and Y47R lines each have a single copy of the FXN transgene while the YG8R line has two copies. Single integration sites of all transgenes were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH analysis of metaphase and interphase chromosomes. We identified significant functional deficits, together with a degree of glucose intolerance and insulin hypersensitivity, in YG8R and YG22R FRDA mice compared to Y47R and wild-type control mice. We also confirmed increased somatic GAA repeat instability in the cerebellum and brain of YG22R and YG8R mice, together with significantly reduced levels of FXN mRNA and protein in the brain and liver of YG8R and YG22R compared to Y47R.Together these studies provide a detailed characterisation of our GAA repeat expansion-based YAC transgenic FRDA mouse models that will help investigations of FRDA disease mechanisms and therapy.

  17. Phase transitions in cellular automata models of spatial susceptible-infected-resistant-susceptible epidemics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhi-Zhen; Wang Ai-Ling

    2009-01-01

    Spatially explicit models have become widely used in today's mathematical ecology and epidemiology to study the persistence of populations. For simplicity, population dynamics is often analysed by using ordinary differential equations (ODEs) or partial differential equations (PDEs) in the one-dimensional (1D) space. An important question is to predict species extinction or persistence rate by mean of computer simulation based on the spatial model. Recently, it has been reported that stable turbulent and regular waves are persistent based on the spatial susceptible-infected-resistant-susceptible (SIRS) model by using the cellular automata (CA) method in the two-dimensional (2D) space [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 18246 (2004)]. In this paper, we address other important issues relevant to phase transitions of epidemic persistence. We are interested in assessing the significance of the risk of extinction in 1D space. Our results show that the 2D space can considerably increase the possibility of persistence of spread of epidemics when the degree distribution of the individuals is uniform, I.e. The pattern of 2D spatial persistence corresponding to extinction in a 1D system with the same parameters. The trade-offs of extinction and persistence between the infection period and infection rate are observed in the 1D case. Moreover, near the trade-off (phase transition) line, an independent estimation of the dynamic exponent can be performed, and it is in excellent agreement with the result obtained by using the conjectured relationship of directed percolation. We find that the introduction of a short-range diffusion and a long-range diffusion among the neighbourhoods can enhance the persistence and global disease spread in the space.

  18. Entrainment of the mammalian cell cycle by the circadian clock: modeling two coupled cellular rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Gérard

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cell division cycle and the circadian clock represent two major cellular rhythms. These two periodic processes are coupled in multiple ways, given that several molecular components of the cell cycle network are controlled in a circadian manner. For example, in the network of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks that governs progression along the successive phases of the cell cycle, the synthesis of the kinase Wee1, which inhibits the G2/M transition, is enhanced by the complex CLOCK-BMAL1 that plays a central role in the circadian clock network. Another component of the latter network, REV-ERBα, inhibits the synthesis of the Cdk inhibitor p21. Moreover, the synthesis of the oncogene c-Myc, which promotes G1 cyclin synthesis, is repressed by CLOCK-BMAL1. Using detailed computational models for the two networks we investigate the conditions in which the mammalian cell cycle can be entrained by the circadian clock. We show that the cell cycle can be brought to oscillate at a period of 24 h or 48 h when its autonomous period prior to coupling is in an appropriate range. The model indicates that the combination of multiple modes of coupling does not necessarily facilitate entrainment of the cell cycle by the circadian clock. Entrainment can also occur as a result of circadian variations in the level of a growth factor controlling entry into G1. Outside the range of entrainment, the coupling to the circadian clock may lead to disconnected oscillations in the cell cycle and the circadian system, or to complex oscillatory dynamics of the cell cycle in the form of endoreplication, complex periodic oscillations or chaos. The model predicts that the transition from entrainment to 24 h or 48 h might occur when the strength of coupling to the circadian clock or the level of growth factor decrease below critical values.

  19. Modeling energy-economy interactions using integrated models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated models are defined as economic energy models that consist of several submodels, either coupled by an interface module, or embedded in one large model. These models can be used for energy policy analysis. Using integrated models yields the following benefits. They provide a framework in which energy-economy interactions can be better analyzed than in stand-alone models. Integrated models can represent both energy sector technological details, as well as the behaviour of the market and the role of prices. Furthermore, the combination of modeling methodologies in one model can compensate weaknesses of one approach with strengths of another. These advantages motivated this survey of the class of integrated models. The purpose of this literature survey therefore was to collect and to present information on integrated models. To carry out this task, several goals were identified. The first goal was to give an overview of what is reported on these models in general. The second one was to find and describe examples of such models. Other goals were to find out what kinds of models were used as component models, and to examine the linkage methodology. Solution methods and their convergence properties were also a subject of interest. The report has the following structure. In chapter 2, a 'conceptual framework' is given. In chapter 3 a number of integrated models is described. In a table, a complete overview is presented of all described models. Finally, in chapter 4, the report is summarized, and conclusions are drawn regarding the advantages and drawbacks of integrated models. 8 figs., 29 refs

  20. In silico analyses of dystrophin Dp40 cellular distribution, nuclear export signals and structure modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Martínez-Herrera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophin Dp40 is the shortest protein encoded by the DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene. This protein is unique since it lacks the C-terminal end of dystrophins. In this data article, we describe the subcellular localization, nuclear export signals and the three-dimensional structure modeling of putative Dp40 proteins using bioinformatics tools. The Dp40 wild type protein was predicted as a cytoplasmic protein while the Dp40n4 was predicted to be nuclear. Changes L93P and L170P are involved in the nuclear localization of Dp40n4 protein. A close analysis of Dp40 protein scored that amino acids 93LEQEHNNLV101 and 168LLLHDSIQI176 could function as NES sequences and the scores are lost in Dp40n4. In addition, the changes L93/170P modify the tertiary structure of putative Dp40 mutants. The analysis showed that changes of residues 93 and 170 from leucine to proline allow the nuclear localization of Dp40 proteins. The data described here are related to the research article entitled “EF-hand domains are involved in the differential cellular distribution of dystrophin Dp40” (J. Aragón et al. Neurosci. Lett. 600 (2015 115–120 [1].