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Sample records for cellular immune responses

  1. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  2. The insect cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael R. Strand

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system of insects is divided into humoral defenses that include the production of soluble effector molecules and cellular defenses like phagocytosis and encapsulation that are mediated by hemocytes. This review summarizes current understanding of the cellular immune response. Insects produce several terminally differentiated types of hemocytes that are distinguished by morphology, molecular and antigenic markers, and function. The differentiated hemocytes that circulate in larval or nymphal stage insects arise from two sources: progenitor cells produced during embryogenesis and mesodermally derived hematopoietic organs. Regulation of hematopoiesis and hemocyte differentiation also involves several different signaling pathways. Phagocytosis and encapsulation require that hemocytes first recognize a given target as foreign followed by activation of downstream signaling and effector responses. A number of humoral and cellular receptors have been identified that recognize different microbes and multicellular parasites. In turn, activation of these receptors stimulates a number of signaling pathways that regulate different hemocyte functions. Recent studies also identify hemocytes as important sources of a number of humoral effector molecules required for killing different foreign invaders.

  3. Cellular immune responses towards regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Stine Kiær

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the results from two published papers identifying spontaneous cellular immune responses against the transcription factors Foxp3 and Foxo3. The tumor microenvironment is infiltrated by cells that hinder effective tumor immunity from developing. Two of these cell types, which have been linked to a bad prognosis for patients, are regulatory T cells (Treg) and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC). Tregs inhibit effector T cells from attacking the tumor through various mechanisms, including secreted factors and cell-to-cell contact. Tregs express the transcription factor Foxp3, which is necessary for their development and suppressive activities. Tolerogenic DCs participate in creating an environment in the tumor where effector T cells become tolerant towards the tumor instead of attacking it. The transcription factor Foxo3 was recently described to be highly expressed by tolerogenic DCs and to programme their tolerogenic influence. This thesis describes for the first time the existence of spontaneous cellular immune responses against peptides derived from Foxp3 and Foxo3. We have detected the presence of cytotoxic T cells that recognise these peptides in an HLA-A2 restricted manner in cancer patients and for Foxp3 in healthy donors as well. In addition, we have demonstrated that the Foxp3- and Foxo3-specific CTLs recognize Foxp3- and Foxo3-expressing cancer cell lines and importantly, suppressive immune cells, namely Tregs and in vitro generated DCs. Cancer immunotherapy is recently emerging as an important treatment modality improving the survival of selected patients. The current progress is largely owing to targeting of the immune suppressive milieu that is dominating the tumor microenvironment. This is being done through immune checkpoint blockade with CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies and through lymphodepleting conditioning of patients and ex vivo activation of TILs in adoptive cell transfer. Several strategies are being explored for depletion of

  4. Cellular immune responses to respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    When a respiratory virus successfully infects the lungs, cascades of immune responses are initiated aimed to remove the pathogen. Immediate non-specific protection is provided by the innate immune system and this reduces the viral load during the first days of infection. The adaptive immune response

  5. Innate Cellular Immune Responses in Aedes caspius (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, D E; Farid, H A; Hammad, R E; Gad, A M; Bartholomay, L C

    2016-03-01

    Mosquitoes transmit a variety of pathogens that have devastating consequences for global public and veterinary health. Despite their capacity to serve as vectors, these insects have a robust capacity to respond to invading organisms with strong cellular and humoral immune responses. In Egypt, Aedes caspius (Pallas, 1771) has been suspected to act as a bridge vector of Rift Valley Fever virus between animals and humans. Microscopic analysis of Ae. caspius hemolymph revealed the presence of phagocytic cells called granulocytes. We further evaluated cellular immune responses produced by Ae. caspius as a result of exposure to a Gram-negative, and Gram-positive bacterium, and to latex beads. After challenge, a rapid and strong phagocytic response against either a natural or synthetic invader was evident. Hemocyte integrity in bacteria-inoculated mosquitoes was not morphologically affected. The number of circulating granulocytes decreased with age, reducing the overall phagocytic capacity of mosquitoes over time. The magnitude and speed of the phagocytic response suggested that granulocytes act as an important force in the battle against foreign invaders, as has been characterized in other important mosquito vector species.

  6. Humoral and Cellular Immune Response in Canine Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J; Popiel, J; Chełmońska-Soyta, A

    2015-07-01

    Hypothyroidism is one of the most common endocrine diseases in dogs and is generally considered to be autoimmune in nature. In human hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is destroyed by both cellular (i.e. autoreactive helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes) and humoral (i.e. autoantibodies specific for thyroglobulin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine) effector mechanisms. Other suggested factors include impaired peripheral immune suppression (i.e. the malfunction of regulatory T cells) or an additional pro-inflammatory effect of T helper 17 lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunological changes in canine hypothyroidism. Twenty-eight clinically healthy dogs, 25 hypothyroid dogs without thyroglobulin antibodies and eight hypothyroid dogs with these autoantibodies were enrolled into the study. There were alterations in serum proteins in hypothyroid dogs compared with healthy controls (i.e. raised concentrations of α-globulins, β2- and γ-globulins) as well as higher concentration of acute phase proteins and circulating immune complexes. Hypothyroid animals had a lower CD4:CD8 ratio in peripheral blood compared with control dogs and diseased dogs also had higher expression of interferon γ (gene and protein expression) and CD28 (gene expression). Similar findings were found in both groups of hypothyroid dogs. Canine hypothyroidism is therefore characterized by systemic inflammation with dominance of a cellular immune response.

  7. Transition between immune and disease states in a cellular automaton model of clonal immune response

    CERN Document Server

    Bezzi, M; Ruffo, S; Seiden, P E; Bezzi, Michele; Celada, Franco; Ruffo, Stefano; Seiden, Philip E.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we extend the Celada-Seiden (CS) model of the humoral immune response to include infectious virus and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (cellular response). The response of the system to virus involves a competition between the ability of the virus to kill the host cells and the host's ability to eliminate the virus. We find two basins of attraction in the dynamics of this system, one is identified with disease and the other with the immune state. There is also an oscillating state that exists on the border of these two stable states. Fluctuations in the population of virus or antibody can end the oscillation and drive the system into one of the stable states. The introduction of mechanisms of cross-regulation between the two responses can bias the system towards one of them. We also study a mean field model, based on coupled maps, to investigate virus-like infections. This simple model reproduces the attractors for average populations observed in the cellular automaton. All the dynamical behavior connect...

  8. Dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Saito, Akatsuki; Katakai, Yuko; Iwasaki, Yuki; Kurosawa, Terue; Hamano, Masataka; Higashino, Atsunori; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Kurane, Ichiro; Akari, Hirofumi

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we examined the dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus (DENV) infection in a marmoset model. Here, we found that DENV infection in marmosets greatly induced responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. Interestingly, the strength of the immune response was greater in animals infected with a dengue fever strain than in those infected with a dengue hemorrhagic fever strain of DENV. In contrast, when animals were re-challenged with the same DENV strain used for primary infection, the neutralizing antibody induced appeared to play a critical role in sterilizing inhibition against viral replication, resulting in strong but delayed responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. The results in this study may help to better understand the dynamics of cellular and humoral immune responses in the control of DENV infection.

  9. Various eicosanoids modulate the cellular and humoral immune responses of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sony; Kim, Yonggyun

    2009-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) can catalyze the oxidation of C20 fatty acids to produce certain eicosanoids, which play roles in mediating immune responses in insects. Despite their critical role in insect immunity, there have been few studies of the unique effects of different eicosanoids on immune responses. This study analyzed cellular and humoral immune responses of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, using seven eicosanoids selected from two major eicosanoid subgroups: prostaglandin (PG) and leukotriene (LT), derived from catalytic activities of COX and LOX respectively. Upon bacterial challenge, all seven eicosanoids (PGA(1), PGB(2), PGD(2), PGE(1), PGE(2), PGF(1alpha), and LTB(4)) significantly induced hemocyte nodulation and phagocytosis in the presence of dexamethasone, an eicosanoid biosynthesis inhibitor. However, only PGs induced cell lysis of oenocytoids to release prophenoloxidase, which resulted in an increase in phenoloxidase activity. These seven eicosanoids also induced expression of humoral immune-associated genes, including prophenoloxidase, serpin, dopa decarboxylase, cecropin, and lysozyme, in which PGB(2) and PGE(1) did not induce gene expression of prophenoloxidase. To understand the interactions between different eicosanoids, mixture effects of these eicosanoids were compared with their individual eicosanoid effects on mediating nodule formation in response to bacterial challenge. All six single PGs showed increases in nodule formation in a dose-dependent manner without significant difference among the different types. LTB(4) was more potent than the tested PGs in mediating the cellular immune response. At low doses, all combinations of two eicosanoids showed significant additive effects on nodule formation. These results indicate that immune target cells, such as hemocyte and fat body, of S. exigua can respond to different COX and LOX products to express cellular and humoral immune responses, and their overlapping, additive

  10. A mathematical model representing cellular immune development and response to Salmonella of chicken intestinal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, D.; Bannink, A.; Smits, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to create a dynamic mathematical model of the development of the cellular branch of the intestinal immune system of poultry during the first 42 days of life and of its response towards an oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. The system elements were

  11. Microbial Degradation of Cellular Kinases Impairs Innate Immune Signaling and Paracrine TNFα Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Kenneth; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2016-10-04

    The NFκB and MAPK signaling pathways are critical components of innate immunity that orchestrate appropriate immune responses to control and eradicate pathogens. Their activation results in the induction of proinflammatory mediators, such as TNFα a potent bioactive molecule commonly secreted by recruited inflammatory cells, allowing for paracrine signaling at the site of an infection. In this study we identified a novel mechanism by which the opportunistic pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis dampens innate immune responses by disruption of kinase signaling and degradation of inflammatory mediators. The intracellular immune kinases RIPK1, TAK1, and AKT were selectively degraded by the P. gingivalis lysine-specific gingipain (Kgp) in human endothelial cells, which correlated with dysregulated innate immune signaling. Kgp was also observed to attenuate endothelial responsiveness to TNFα, resulting in a reduction in signal flux through AKT, ERK and NFκB pathways, as well as a decrease in downstream proinflammatory mRNA induction of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. A deficiency in Kgp activity negated decreases to host cell kinase protein levels and responsiveness to TNFα. Given the essential role of kinase signaling in immune responses, these findings highlight a unique mechanism of pathogen-induced immune dysregulation through inhibition of cell activation, paracrine signaling, and dampened cellular proinflammatory responses.

  12. JAK/STAT signaling in Drosophila muscles controls the cellular immune response against parasitoid infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hairu; Kronhamn, Jesper; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Korkut, Gül Gizem; Hultmark, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The role of JAK/STAT signaling in the cellular immune response of Drosophila is not well understood. Here, we show that parasitoid wasp infection activates JAK/STAT signaling in somatic muscles of the Drosophila larva, triggered by secretion of the cytokines Upd2 and Upd3 from circulating hemocytes. Deletion of upd2 or upd3, but not the related os (upd1) gene, reduced the cellular immune response, and suppression of the JAK/STAT pathway in muscle cells reduced the encapsulation of wasp eggs and the number of circulating lamellocyte effector cells. These results suggest that JAK/STAT signaling in muscles participates in a systemic immune defense against wasp infection.

  13. Immune responses in human infections with Brugia malayi: specific cellular unresponsiveness to filarial antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piessens, W F; McGreevy, P B; Piessens, P W; McGreevy, M; Koiman, I; Saroso, J S; Dennis, D T

    1980-01-01

    We evaluated the cellular immune competence of 101 subjects living in an area of South Kalimantan (Borneo) where Malayan filariasis is endemic. All patients with elephantiasis but none with other clinical stages of filariasis reacted with adult worm antigens. The majority of subjects without clinical or parasitological evidence of filariasis and approximately one-half of those with amicrofilaremic filariasis reacted with microfilarial antigens. In contrast, most patients with patent microfilaremia did not respond to microfilarial antigens. The in vitro reactivity of all patient categories to nonparasite antigens was similar to that of the distant control group. These results indicate that patent microfilaremia is associated with a state of specific cellular immune unresponsiveness and are consistent with the current hypothesis that the various clinical manifestations of filariasis result from different types of immune responses to distinct antigens associated with different developmental stages of filarial worms. PMID:7350196

  14. Metal oxide nanoparticles interact with immune cells and activate different cellular responses

    OpenAIRE

    Simón-Vázquez R; Lozano-Fernández T; Dávila-Grana A; González-Fernández A

    2016-01-01

    Rosana Simón-Vázquez, Tamara Lozano-Fernández, Angela Dávila-Grana, Africa González-Fernández Immunology Laboratory, Biomedical Research Center (CINBIO) and Institute of Biomedical Research of Ourense-Pontevedra-Vigo (IBI), University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain Abstract: Besides cell death, nanoparticles (Nps) can induce other cellular responses such as inflammation. The potential immune respon...

  15. A nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpusik, Adam

    2017-02-01

    We present a nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection. The main advantage of this approach is that it preserves the essential qualitative features of the original continuous model (non-negativity and boundedness of the solution, equilibria and their stability conditions), while being easy to implement. All of the qualitative features are preserved independently of the chosen step-size. Numerical simulations of our approach and comparison with other conventional simulation methods are presented.

  16. Cellular and humoral local immune responses in sheep experimentally infected with Oestrus ovis (Diptera: Oestridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabouret, Guillaume; Lacroux, Caroline; Andreoletti, Olivier; Bergeaud, Jean Paul; Hailu-Tolosa, Yacob; Hoste, Hervé; Prevot, Françoise; Grisez, Christelle; Dorchies, Philippe; Jacquiet, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Cellular and humoral local responses were investigated following repetitive artificial Oestrus ovis infections in lambs. The presence of larvae induced a huge local recruitment of either leucocytes (T and B lymphocytes, macrophages) or granulocytes (eosinophils, mast cells and globule leucocytes). This cellular response was more pronounced in the ethmoid and sinus (development sites of second and third instar larvae) than in the septum or turbinates where first instar larvae migrate. Infected lambs produced Oestrus ovis specific IgG and IgA antibodies in their mucus. This local humoral response was mainly directed against larval salivary gland antigens and not against larval digestive tract antigens. Compared to the control animals, the sinusal mucosa of infected animals was extremely thickened and the epithelium exhibited hyperplasia, metaplasia and eosinophilic exocytosis. The possible roles of these local immune responses in the regulation of O. ovis larvae populations in sheep are discussed.

  17. Signaling pathways implicated in the cellular innate immune responses of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Nappi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetically conserved innate immune systems of insects and other invertebrates employblood cells (hemocytes that are functionally reminiscent of vertebrate macrophages, attesting to theimportance of phagocytosis and other cell-mediated responses in eliminating various pathogens. Receptorligandbinding activates signaling cascades that promote collaborative cellular interactions and theproduction of pathogen-specific cytotoxic responses. Numerous comparative genetic and molecularstudies have shown the cytotoxic effector responses made by cells of the innate immune system to beevolutionarily conserved. Comparative analyses of genomic sequences provide convincing evidence thatmany of the biochemical processes manifested by immune-activated hemocytes are similar to thosemade by activated vertebrate macrophages. Included in this genomic repertoire are enzymes associatedwith reactive intermediates of oxygen and nitrogen, cellular redox homeostasis, and apoptosis, thesynthesis of extracellular matrix, cell adhesion and pattern recognition molecules. Surprisingly, little isknown of the types of cytotoxic molecules produced by invertebrate hemocytes, and the signaling andtranscriptional events associated with their collaborative interactions when engaging pathogens andparasites. This review examines certain aspects of the blood cell-mediated defense responses ofDrosophila, and some of the signaling pathways that have been implicated in hemocyte activation,differentiation, and the regulation of hematopoiesis.

  18. The immune system strikes back: cellular immune responses against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Baek Sørensen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO exerts an well established immunosuppressive function in cancer. IDO is expressed within the tumor itself as well as in antigen-presenting cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes, where it promotes the establishment of peripheral immune tolerance to tumor antigens. In the present study, we tested the notion whether IDO itself may be subject to immune responses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The presence of naturally occurring IDO-specific CD8 T cells in cancer patients was determined by MHC/peptide stainings as well as ELISPOT. Antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL from the peripheral blood of cancer patients were cloned and expanded. The functional capacity of the established CTL clones was examined by chrome release assays. The study unveiled spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO in peripheral blood as well as in the tumor microenvironment of different cancer patients. We demonstrate that these IDO reactive T cells are indeed peptide specific, cytotoxic effector cells. Hence, IDO reactive T cells are able to recognize and kill tumor cells including directly isolated AML blasts as well as IDO-expressing dendritic cells, i.e. one of the major immune suppressive cell populations. CONCLUSION: IDO may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. Furthermore, as emerging evidence suggests that IDO constitutes a significant counter-regulatory mechanism induced by pro-inflammatory signals, IDO-based immunotherapy holds the promise to boost anti-cancer immunotherapy in general.

  19. A candidate DNA vaccine elicits HCV specific humoral and cellular immune responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Xin Zhu; Jing Liu; Ye Ye; You-Hua Xie; Yu-Ying Kong; Guang-Di Li; Yuan Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the immunogenicity of candidate DNA vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) delivered by two plasmids expressing HCV envelope protein 1 (E1) and envelope protein 2 (E2) antigens respectively and to study the effect of CpG adjuvant on this candidate vaccine.METHODS: Recombinant plasmids expressing HCV E1 and E2 antigens respectively were used to simultaneously inoculate mice with or without CpG adjuvant. Antisera were then collected and titers of anti-HCV antibodies were analyzed by ELISA. One month after the last injection, animals were sacrificed to prepare single-cell suspension of splenocytes.These cells were subjected to HCVantigen specific proliferation assays and cytokine secretion assays to evaluate the cellular immune responses of the vaccinated animals.RESULTS: Antibody responses to HCV E1 and E2 antigens were detected in vaccinated animals. Animals receiving CpG adjuvant had slightly lower titers of anti-HCV antibodies in the sera, while the splenocytes from these animals showed higher HCV-antigen specific proliferation. Analysis of cytokine secretion from the splenocytes was consistent with the above results. While no antigen-specific IL-4 secretion was detected for all vaccinated animals, HCV antigen-specific INF-γ secretion was detected for the splenocytes of vaccinated animals. CpG adjuvant enhanced the secretion of INF-γ but did not change the profile of IL-4 secretion.CONCLUSION: Vaccination of mice with plasmids encoding HCV E1 and E2 antigens induces humoral and cellular immune responses. CpG adjuvant significantly enhances the cellular immune response.

  20. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata eToth

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as C. parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response towards this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi’s virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses.In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host pathogen interactions.

  1. Human papillomavirus (HPV upregulates the cellular deubiquitinase UCHL1 to suppress the keratinocyte's innate immune response.

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    Rezaul Karim

    Full Text Available Persistent infection of basal keratinocytes with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV may cause cancer. Keratinocytes are equipped with different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs but hrHPV has developed ways to dampen their signals resulting in minimal inflammation and evasion of host immunity for sustained periods of time. To understand the mechanisms underlying hrHPV's capacity to evade immunity, we studied PRR signaling in non, newly, and persistently hrHPV-infected keratinocytes. We found that active infection with hrHPV hampered the relay of signals downstream of the PRRs to the nucleus, thereby affecting the production of type-I interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This suppression was shown to depend on hrHPV-induced expression of the cellular protein ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1 in keratinocytes. UCHL1 accomplished this by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3 K63 poly-ubiquitination which lead to lower levels of TRAF3 bound to TANK-binding kinase 1 and a reduced phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3. Furthermore, UCHL1 mediated the degradation of the NF-kappa-B essential modulator with as result the suppression of p65 phosphorylation and canonical NF-κB signaling. We conclude that hrHPV exploits the cellular protein UCHL1 to evade host innate immunity by suppressing PRR-induced keratinocyte-mediated production of interferons, cytokines and chemokines, which normally results in the attraction and activation of an adaptive immune response. This identifies UCHL1 as a negative regulator of PRR-induced immune responses and consequently its virus-increased expression as a strategy for hrHPV to persist.

  2. Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan P.; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Calderón de la Barca, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet. PMID:24152750

  3. Impaired cellular immune response to tetanus toxoid but not to cytomegalovirus in effectively HAART-treated HIV-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, Laia; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Fortuny, Clàudia

    2013-05-07

    Despite of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the response to vaccines in HIV-infected children is poor and short-lived, probably due to a defect in cellular immune responses. We compared the cellular immune response (assessed in terms of IFN-γ production) to tetanus toxoid and to cytomegalovirus in a series of 13 HIV-perinatally-infected children and adolescents with optimal immunovirological response to first line antiretroviral therapy, implemented during chronic infection. A stronger cellular response to cytomegalovirus (11 out of 13 patients) was observed, as compared to tetanus toxoid (1 out of 13; p=0.003). These results suggest that the repeated exposition to CMV, as opposed to the past exposition to TT, is able to maintain an effective antigen-specific immune response in stable HIV-infected pediatric patients and strengthen current recommendations on immunization practices in these children.

  4. DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate nanoparticles elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

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    Gajadhar Bhakta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of pEGFP (plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-encapsulated PEGylated (meaning polyethylene glycol coated magnesium phosphate nanoparticles (referred to as MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles for the induction of immune responses was investigated in a mouse model. MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles induced enhanced serum antibody and antigen-specific T-lymphocyte responses, as well as increased IFN-γ and IL-12 levels compared to naked pEGFP when administered via intravenous, intraperitoneal or intramuscular routes. A significant macrophage response, both in size and activity, was also observed when mice were immunized with the nanoparticle formulation. The response was highly specific for the antigen, as the increase in interaction between macrophages and lymphocytes as well as lymphocyte proliferation took place only when they were re-stimulated with recombinant green fluorescence protein (rGFP. Thus the nanoparticle formulation elicited both humoral as well as cellular responses. Cytokine profiling revealed the induction of Th-1 type responses. The results suggest DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate (MgPi nanoparticles may constitute a safer, more stable and cost-efficient DNA vaccine formulation.

  5. Cellular immune response of humans to the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax

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    Mauricio M. Rodrigues

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available The cellular immune response to the circumsporozoite (CS protein of plasmodium vivax of individuals from malaria-endemic areas of Brazil was studied. We examined the in vitro proliferative response of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of 22 individuals when stimulated with a CS recombinant protein (rPvCS-2 and two other synthetic peptides based on the sequenceof the P. vivax CS protein. Seven of the individuals from malaria-endemic area displayed an antigen specific in vitro proliferative responseto the recombinant protein PvCS-2 and one out of 6, proliferative response to the peptide 308-320. In contrast, none of the individuals displayed a proliferative reponse when stimulated with the D/A peptide which represent some of the repeated units present in this CS protein. Our study, therefore, provides evidence for the presence, withinthe major surface antigen of P. vivax sporozoites, of epitopes capble to induce proliferation of human PBMC.

  6. The immune system strikes back: cellular immune responses against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Baek; Berge-Hansen, Linda; Junker, Niels;

    2009-01-01

    of the major immune suppressive cell populations. CONCLUSION: IDO may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. Furthermore, as emerging evidence suggests that IDO constitutes a significant counter-regulatory mechanism induced by pro-inflammatory signals...

  7. Vaccination with dengue virus-like particles induces humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

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    Zhang Quanfu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of dengue, an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV, has dramatically increased around the world in recent decades and is becoming a severe public health threat. However, there is currently no specific treatment for dengue fever, and licensed vaccine against dengue is not available. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs has shown considerable promise for many viral diseases, but the effect of DENV VLPs to induce specific immune responses has not been adequately investigated. Results By optimizing the expression plasmids, recombinant VLPs of four antigenically different DENV serotypes DENV1-4 were successfully produced in 293T cells. The vaccination effect of dengue VLPs in mice showed that monovalent VLPs of each serotype stimulated specific IgG responses and potent neutralizing antibodies against homotypic virus. Tetravalent VLPs efficiently enhanced specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies against all four serotypes of DENV. Moreover, vaccination with monovalent or tetravalent VLPs resulted in the induction of specific cytotoxic T cell responses. Conclusions Mammalian cell expressed dengue VLPs are capable to induce VLP-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and being a promising subunit vaccine candidate for prevention of dengue virus infection.

  8. Cellular immune responses and occult infection in seronegative heterosexual partners of chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque-Cuéllar, M C; Sánchez, B; García-Lozano, J R; Praena-Fernández, J M; Núñez-Roldán, A; Aguilar-Reina, J

    2011-10-01

    It is unknown whether hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific cellular immune responses can develop in seronegative sexual partners of chronically HCV-infected patients and whether they have occult infection. Thirty-one heterosexual partners of patients with chronic HCV were studied, fifteen of them with HCV transmission risks. Ten healthy individuals and 17 anti-HCV seropositive patients, without viremia, were used as controls. Virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were measured by flow cytometry against six HCV peptides, situated within the nonstructural (NS) proteins NS3, NS4 and NS5, through intracellular detection of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) or interleukin 4 (IL-4) production and CD69 expression. Sexual partners had a higher production of IFN-γ and IL-4 by CD4+ cells against NS3-p124 (P = 0.003), NS5b-p257 (P = 0.005) and NS5b-p294 (P = 0.012), and CD8+ cells against NS3-p124 (P = 0.002), NS4b-p177 (P = 0.001) and NS3-p294 (P = 0.004) as compared with healthy controls. We observed elevated IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells against NS5b-p257 (P = 0.042) and NS5b-p294 (P = 0.009) in the sexual partners with HCV transmission risks (sexual, professional and familial altogether) than in those without risks. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and detection of HCV-RNA positive and replicative (negative) strands was performed by strand-specific real-time PCR. In four sexual partners, the presence of positive and negative HCV- RNA strands in PBMC was confirmed. Hence, we found an HCV-specific cellular immune response as well as occult HCV infection in seronegative and aviremic sexual partners of chronically HCV-infected patients.

  9. The adaptor protein FHL2 enhances the cellular innate immune response to influenza A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhoff, Carolin; Hillesheim, Andrea; Walter, Beate M; Haasbach, Emanuel; Planz, Oliver; Ehrhardt, Christina; Ludwig, Stephan; Wixler, Viktor

    2012-07-01

    The innate immune response of influenza A virus-infected cells is predominantly mediated by type I interferon-induced proteins. Expression of the interferon β (IFNβ) itself is initiated by accumulating viral RNA and is transmitted by different signalling cascades that feed into activation of the three transcriptional elements located in the IFNβ promoter, AP-1, IRF-3 and NF-κB. FHL2 (four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 2) is an adaptor molecule that shuttles between membrane and nucleus regulating signalling cascades and gene transcription. Here we describe FHL2 as a novel regulator of influenza A virus propagation. Using mouse FHL2 wild-type, knockout and rescued cells and human epithelial cells with different expression levels of FHL2 we showed that FHL2 decreases influenza A virus propagation by regulating the intrinsic cellular antiviral immune response. On virus infection FHL2 translocates into the nucleus, potentiating the IRF-3-dependent transcription of the IFNβ gene.

  10. Metal oxide nanoparticles interact with immune cells and activate different cellular responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simón-Vázquez R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rosana Simón-Vázquez, Tamara Lozano-Fernández, Angela Dávila-Grana, Africa González-Fernández Immunology Laboratory, Biomedical Research Center (CINBIO and Institute of Biomedical Research of Ourense-Pontevedra-Vigo (IBI, University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain Abstract: Besides cell death, nanoparticles (Nps can induce other cellular responses such as inflammation. The potential immune response mediated by the exposure of human lymphoid cells to metal oxide Nps (moNps was characterized using four different moNps (CeO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO to study the three most relevant mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamilies and the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of the activated B-cell inhibitor, IκBα, as well as the expression of several genes by immune cells incubated with these Nps. The moNps activated different signaling pathways and altered the gene expression in human lymphocyte cells. The ZnO Nps were the most active and the release of Zn2+ ions was the main mechanism of toxicity. CeO2 Nps induced the smallest changes in gene expression and in the IκBα protein. The effects of the particles were strongly dependent on the type and concentration of the Nps and on the cell activation status prior to Np exposure. Keywords: Jurkat, MAPK, NFκB, qPCR, inflammation, metabolism

  11. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with physiological responses during rat liver regeneration: Cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Xing Zhang; Li-Feng Zhao; An-Shi Zhang; Xiao-Guang Chen; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the cellular immune response during rat liver regeneration (LR) at a transcriptional level.METHODS: Genes associated with the cellular immune response were obtained by collecting the data from databases and retrieving articles. Gene expression changes during LR were detected by rat genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: A total of 127 genes were found to be associated with LR. The number of initially and totally expressing genes in the initial phase of LR [0.5-4 h after partial hepatectomy (PH)], transition from G0-G1(4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH),cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction (66-168 h after PH) was 54, 11, 34, 3 and 54, 49, 70, 49 respectively, illustrating that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the initiation of LR, and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity,these genes were classified into 41 up-regulated, 21 predominantly up-regulated, 41 down-regulated, 14 predominantly down-regulated, 10 similarly up-regulated and down-regulated genes, respectively. The total upand down-regulated expression times were 419 and 274,respectively, demonstrating that the expression of most genes was increased while the expression of a small number of genes was decreased. Their time relevance was classified into 14 groups, showing that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities were staggered during LR. According to the gene expression patterns,they were classified into 21 types, showing the activities were diverse and complicated during LR.CONCLUSION: Antigen processing and presentation are enhanced mainly in the forepart, prophase and anaphase of LR. T-cell activation and antigen elimination are enhanced mainly in the forepart and prophase of LR. A total of 127 genes associated with LR play an important role in cellular immunity.

  12. The cellular immune response plays an important role in protecting against dengue virus in the mouse encephalitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; López, Carlos; Blanco, Aracelys; Lazo, Laura; Martín, Jorge; Valdés, Iris; Romero, Yaremis; Figueroa, Yassel; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2009-02-01

    For several years, researchers have known that the generation of neutralizing antibodies is a prerequisite for attaining adequate protection against dengue virus. Nevertheless, the cellular immune response is the principal arm of the adaptive immune system against non-cytopathic viruses such as dengue, as once the virus enters into the cell it is necessary to destroy it to eliminate the virus. To define the role of the cellular immune response in the protection against dengue, we selected the mouse encephalitis model. Mice were immunized with a single dose of infective dengue 2 virus and different markers of both branches of the induced adaptive immunity were measured. Animals elicited a broad antibody response against the four dengue virus serotypes, but neutralizing activity was only detected against the homologous serotype. On the other hand, the splenocytes of the infected animals strongly proliferated after in vitro stimulation with the homologous virus, and specifically the CD8 T-cell subset was responsible for the secretion of the cytokine IFN-gamma. Finally, to define the role of T cells in in vivo protection, groups of animals were inoculated with the depleting monoclonal antibodies anti-CD4 or anti-CD8. Only depletion with anti-CD8 decreased to 50% the level of protection reached in the non-depleted mice. The present work constitutes the first report defining the role of the cellular immune response in protection against dengue virus in the mouse model.

  13. Cellular and humoral immune responses to Borrelia burgdorferi antigens in patients with culture-positive early Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, A; Glickstein, L; Field, J A; McHugh, G; Sikand, V K; Damle, N; Steere, A C

    2001-12-01

    We determined cellular and humoral immune responses to Borrelia burgdorferi lysate and to recombinant flagellin (FlaB), OspC, and OspA in acute- and convalescent-phase samples from 39 culture-positive patients with erythema migrans and in 20 healthy control subjects. During the acute illness, a median of 4 days after the onset of erythema migrans, 51% of the patients had proliferative cellular responses and 72% had antibody responses to at least one of the borrelial antigens tested. During convalescence, at the conclusion of antibiotic therapy, 64% of the patients had proliferative cellular reactivity and 95% had antibody reactivity with at least one of the spirochetal antigens tested. In both acute- and convalescent-phase samples, cellular immune responses were found as frequently to OspA as to OspC and FlaB. Although antibody responses were also frequently seen to OspC and FlaB, only a few patients had marginal antibody reactivity with OspA. The percentage of patients with proliferative responses was similar in those with clinical evidence of localized or disseminated infection, whereas humoral reactivity was found more often in those with disseminated disease. We conclude that cellular and humoral responses to B. burgdorferi antigens are often found among patients with early Lyme disease. In contrast with the other antigens tested, cellular but not humoral reactivity was often found with OspA.

  14. Cellular and humoral immune responses in a population from the Baringo District, Kenya to Leishmania promastigote lipophosphoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtzhals, J A; Hey, A S; Theander, T G

    1992-01-01

    In a cross-sectional house-to-house study in a leishmaniasis-endemic area in Kenya, the cellular and humoral immune response to Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) was determined. Clinical data, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and plasma were obtained from 50 individuals over the age of eight...

  15. Impaired cellular immune response to diphtheria and tetanus vaccines in children after thoracic transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urschel, Simon; Rieck, Birgit D; Birnbaum, Julia; Dalla Pozza, Robert; Rieber, Nikolaus; Januszewska, Katarzyna; Fuchs, Alexandra; West, Lori J; Netz, Heinrich; Belohradsky, Bernd H

    2011-05-01

    Safety and immunogenicity of diphtheria and tetanus booster vaccination were evaluated in 28 children after thoracic transplantation. Adverse events were documented in a patient diary. Blood was collected prior to and four wk after vaccination. Specific antibody concentrations were measured by ELISA. Lymphocytes were investigated for expression of activation markers (CD25, HLA-DR) by flow cytometry and proliferation assays with and without stimulation. Post-vaccination antibody titers were higher than prevaccination (p antibody levels against diphtheria (p antibodies was negatively correlated with tacrolimus dose, and impaired cellular immunity was associated with higher tacrolimus dose and steroid use. Adverse events were similar to the general population; serious adverse events and rejection did not occur. Vaccination with inactivated vaccines can be performed safely in immunosuppressed children after thoracic transplantation and induces protective antibody levels in the majority of patients. Impaired induction of specific cellular immunity is correlated with intensity of immunosuppression and may explain reduced sustainability of antibodies.

  16. Comparative analysis of SIV-specific cellular immune responses induced by different vaccine platforms in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Antonio; McKinnon, Katherine; Li, Jinyao; Rosati, Margherita; Kulkarni, Viraj; Pilkington, Guy R; Bear, Jenifer; Alicea, Candido; Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Jean Patterson, L; Pegu, Poonam; Liyanage, Namal P M; Gordon, Shari N; Vaccari, Monica; Wang, Yichuan; Hogg, Alison E; Frey, Blake; Sui, Yongjun; Reed, Steven G; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Berzofsky, Jay A; Franchini, Genoveffa; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N

    2014-11-01

    To identify the most promising vaccine candidates for combinatorial strategies, we compared five SIV vaccine platforms including recombinant canary pox virus ALVAC, replication-competent adenovirus type 5 host range mutant RepAd, DNA, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), peptides and protein in distinct combinations. Three regimens used viral vectors (prime or boost) and two regimens used plasmid DNA. Analysis at necropsy showed that the DNA-based vaccine regimens elicited significantly higher cellular responses against Gag and Env than any of the other vaccine platforms. The T cell responses induced by most vaccine regimens disseminated systemically into secondary lymphoid tissues (lymph nodes, spleen) and effector anatomical sites (including liver, vaginal tissue), indicative of their role in viral containment at the portal of entry. The cellular and reported humoral immune response data suggest that combination of DNA and viral vectors elicits a balanced immunity with strong and durable responses able to disseminate into relevant mucosal sites.

  17. Enhancing cellular immune response to HBV M DNA vaccine in mice by codelivery of interleukin-18 recombinant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建忠; 朱海红; 刘克洲; 陈智

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of interleukin-18 (IL-18) on immune response induced by plasmid encoding hepatitis B virus middle protein antigen and to explore new strategies for prophylactic and therapeutic HBV DNA vaccines.Methods:BALB/c mice were immunized with pCMV-M alone or co-immunized with pcDNA3-18 and pCMV-M and then their sera were collected for analysing anti-HBsAg antibody by ELISA;splenocytes were isolated for detecting specific CTL response and cytokine assay in vitro.Results:The anti-HBs antibody level of mice co-immunized with pcDNA3-18 and pCMV-M was slightly higher than that of mice immunized with pCMV-M alone,but there was not significantly different (P>0.05).Compared with mice injected with pCMV-M, the specific CTL cytotoxity activity of mice immunized with pcDNA3-18 and pCMV-M was significantly enhanced (P0.05).Conclusion:The plasmid encoding IL-18 together with HBV M gene DNA vaccines may enhance specific TH1 cells and CTL cellular immune response induced in mice, so that IL-18 is a promising immune adjuvant.

  18. Effects of levamisole hydrochloride on cellular immune response and flock performance of commercial broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OA Oladele

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Levamisole hydrochloride (Lev.HCl has been acclaimed to boost immune response particularly in immunocompromised state. Its routine use as an immunomodulator in poultry production is yet to be well embraced, thus its effects of on cellular immunity and flock performance of commercial broilers were evaluated. One hundred and fifty Anak broiler chicks were separated into two groups of 75 each. Broilers in group 1 were sensitized with 150µg of Staphylococcus aureus antigen each at 4 and 5 weeks, while those in group 2 were not sensitized. Each group was further divided into subgroups A, B, and C. Levamisole hydrochloride (40 mg/kg was administered orally to 1A and 2A at 45 and 46 days of age and to 1B and 2B at 47 and 48 days of age, while 1C and 2C were not treated. At 47 days of age, 12 broilers from all subgroups were challenged with 75µg of S. aureus antigen each at the right wattle. Wattle thickness was measured till 72 hours post challenge (pc and delayed wattle reaction (DWR was determined. Tissues were harvested at 72 hours pc for histopathology. Morbidity, mortality and live weights at 8 weeks of age were recorded. DWR peaked at 4 hours pc in 1A (2.22 ± 0.21 mm and 1B (2.96 ± 0.21 mm and 24 hours pc in 1C (3.39 ± 0.34 mm, the difference being significant (p<0.05. Inflammatory lesions were observed in wattles of sensitized subgroups and were more severe in 1C. Mortality rates were 4.17% and 29.17% in 1A and 1C respectively. Mean live weights in A and B i.e. 1.57± 0.06 kg and 1.56 ± 0.06 kg respectively, were significantly higher (p<0.0 than 1.43 ± 0.08 kg in C. Levamisole enhanced DTH via an early response, improved broiler liveability, and its anti-inflammatory property was confirmed.

  19. Effect of tylosin tartrate (Tylan Soluble) on cellular immune responses in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, T; Yamashita, N; Kodama, H; Mukamoto, M; Asada, M; Nakamoto, K; Nose, Y; McGruder, E D

    1998-09-01

    Although many antimicrobial agents have been reported to cause immunosuppression in animals, macrolide antibiotics enhance immune function. Tylosin is a macrolide antibiotic approved for the control of mycoplasmosis in poultry. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of tylosin on cellular immune functions in chickens. There was no significant difference in adherent splenocyte chemotaxis between tylosin-treated and untreated (control) chickens. Tylosin increased splenocyte proliferation and splenocyte conditioned medium (CM) proliferative activity above control levels. Removal of adherent splenocytes before preparation of CM caused a reduction in CM proliferative activity. Tylosin also increased antitumor activity of splenocytes. These data are the first to suggest that the macrolide antibiotic, tylosin tartrate, has a modulatory effect in chickens on the immune parameters studied.

  20. Specific cellular stimulation in the primary immune response: experimental test of a quantized model.

    OpenAIRE

    Dintzis, R Z; Vogelstein, B; Dintzis, H M

    1982-01-01

    Dose-response and dose-suppression curves have been measured for the primary immune response in mice, in vivo and in vitro, by using size-fractionated linear polymers of acrylamide substituted with hapten. The results are in general agreement with a simple theory based on the premise that the specific primary immunological response is quantized at some fundamental and limiting step, requiring a minimum number of linked antigen receptors for response.

  1. Plasmid DNA Vaccine Co-Immunisation Modulates Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Intranasal Inoculation in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah F L King

    Full Text Available An effective HIV vaccine will likely require induction of both mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses. We investigated whether intramuscular (IM delivery of electroporated plasmid DNA vaccine and simultaneous protein vaccinations by intranasal (IN and IM routes could be combined to induce mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses to a model HIV-1 CN54 gp140 antigen in mice.Co-immunisation of DNA with intranasal protein successfully elicited both serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses, whereas DNA and IM protein co-delivery did not induce systemic or mucosal IgA responses. Cellular IFNγ responses were preserved in co-immunisation protocols compared to protein-only vaccination groups. The addition of DNA to IN protein vaccination reduced the strong Th2 bias observed with IN protein vaccination alone. Luminex analysis also revealed that co-immunisation with DNA and IN protein induced expression of cytokines that promote B-cell function, generation of TFH cells and CCR5 ligands that can reduce HIV infectivity.These data suggest that while IN inoculation alone elicits both cellular and humoral responses, co-administration with homologous DNA vaccination can tailor these towards a more balanced Th1/Th2 phenotype modulating the cellular cytokine profile while eliciting high-levels of antigen-specific antibody. This work provides insights on how to generate differential immune responses within the same vaccination visit, and supports co-immunisation with DNA and protein by a mucosal route as a potential delivery strategy for HIV vaccines.

  2. Modulation of cellular and humoral immune responses to anHIV-1 DNA vaccine by interleukin-12 and interleukin-18 DNA immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙永涛; 王福祥; 孙永年; 徐哲; 王临旭; 刘娟; 白雪帆; 黄长形

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-18 (IL-18)DNA immunization on immune response induced by HIV-1 DNA vaccine and to explore new strategies for therapeutic HIV DNA vaccine.Methods: The recombinant expression vector pCI-neoGAG was constructed by inserting HIV Gag gene into the eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo. Balb/c mice were immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone or co-immunized with the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18. Anti-HIV antibody and IFN-γ were tested by ELISA, and splenocytes were isolated for detecting antigen-specific lymphoproliferative responses and specific CTL response by MTT assay and LDH assay respectively. Results: The antiHIV antibody titers of mice co-immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 were lower than that of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone( P < 0.01). In contrast, the IFN-γ level of mice co-immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 was higher than that of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone ( P <0.01). Furthermore, compared with mice injected with pCI-neoGAG alone, the specific CTL cytotoxity activity and antigenspecific lymphoproliferative responses of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 were significantly enhanced respectively ( P < 0.01). Conclusion: The DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 together with HIV DNA vaccine may enhance specific Th-1 responses and cellular immune response elicited in mice. Hence, the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 are promising immune adjuvants for HIV-1 DNA vaccine.

  3. Positive and Negative Regulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Physiologic Conditions and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Viganò

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system has evolved to allow robust responses against pathogens while avoiding autoimmunity. This is notably enabled by stimulatory and inhibitory signals which contribute to the regulation of immune responses. In the presence of a pathogen, a specific and effective immune response must be induced and this leads to antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, cytokines production, and induction of T-cell differentiation toward an effector phenotype. After clearance or control of the pathogen, the effector immune response must be terminated in order to avoid tissue damage and chronic inflammation and this process involves coinhibitory molecules. When the immune system fails to eliminate or control the pathogen, continuous stimulation of T cells prevents the full contraction and leads to the functional exhaustion of effector T cells. Several evidences both in vitro and in vivo suggest that this anergic state can be reverted by blocking the interactions between coinhibitory molecules and their ligands. The potential to revert exhausted or inactivated T-cell responses following selective blocking of their function made these markers interesting targets for therapeutic interventions in patients with persistent viral infections or cancer.

  4. Specific cellular stimulation in the primary immune response: a quantized model.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    A general theory for the initial phase of T cell independent immune response is derived from elementary physical-chemical considerations and from the premise that response entails a quantized linkage of cell surface receptors. The theory leads to the construction of explicit antigen dose--response and antigen dose--suppression curves, to the calculation of intrinsic affinities for receptors, and to the deduction that receptors are divalent in character. The theory may be applicable to other c...

  5. Cellular and molecular immune responses of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) experimentally infected with betanodavirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scapigliati, G.; Buonocore, F.; Randelli, E.;

    2010-01-01

    Naïve sea bass juveniles (38.4 ± 4.5 g) were intramuscularly infected with a sublethal dose of betanodavirus isolate 378/I03, followed after 43 days by a similar boosting. This infection resulted in an overall mortality of 7.6%. At various intervals, sampling of fish tissues was performed to inve...... was also observed, while the other tested genes did not show any significant variations with respect to mock-treated fish. Overall, our work represents a first comprehensive analysis of cellular and molecular immune parameters in a fish species exposed to a pathogenic virus....

  6. Aberrant cellular immune responses in humans infected persistently with parvovirus B19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Norbeck, Oscar; Hirbod, Taha;

    2006-01-01

    A subset of parvovirus B19 (B19) infected patients retains the infection for years, as defined by detection of B19 DNA in bone marrow. Thus far, analysis of B19-specific humoral immune responses and viral genome variations has not revealed a mechanism for the absent viral clearance. In this study...

  7. Modification to the capsid of the adenovirus vector that enhances dendritic cell infection and transgene-specific cellular immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worgall, Stefan; Busch, Annette; Rivara, Michael; Bonnyay, David; Leopold, Philip L; Merritt, Robert; Hackett, Neil R; Rovelink, Peter W; Bruder, Joseph T; Wickham, Thomas J; Kovesdi, Imi; Crystal, Ronald G

    2004-03-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors can be used to transfer and express antigens and function as strong adjuvants and thus are useful platforms for the development of genetic vaccines. Based on the hypothesis that Ad vectors with enhanced infectibility of dendritic cells (DC) may be able to evoke enhanced immune responses against antigens encoded by the vector in vivo, the present study analyzes the vaccine potential of an Ad vector expressing beta-galactosidase as a model antigen and genetically modified with RGD on the fiber knob [AdZ.F(RGD)] to more selectively infect DC and consequently enhance immunity against the beta-galactosidase antigen. Infection of murine DC in vitro with AdZ.F(RGD) showed an eightfold-increased transgene expression following infection compared to AdZ (also expressing beta-galactosidase, but with a wild-type capsid). Binding, cellular uptake, and trafficking in DC were also increased with AdZ.F(RGD) compared to AdZ. To determine whether AdZ.F(RGD) could evoke enhanced immune responses to beta-galactosidase in vivo, C57BL/6 mice were immunized with AdZ.F(RGD) or AdZ subcutaneously via the footpad. Humoral responses with both vectors were comparable, with similar anti-beta-galactosidase antibody levels following vector administration. However, cellular responses to beta-galactosidase were significantly enhanced, with the frequency of CD4(+) as well as the CD8(+) beta-galactosidase-specific gamma interferon response in cells isolated from the draining lymph nodes increased following immunization with AdZ.F(RGD) compared to Ad.Z (P AdZ.F(RGD) vector was sufficient to evoke enhanced inhibition of the growth of preexisting tumors expressing beta-galactosidase: BALB/c mice implanted with the CT26 syngeneic beta-galactosidase-expressing colon carcinoma cell line and subsequently immunized with AdZ.F(RGD) showed decreased tumor growth and improved survival compared to mice immunized with AdZ. These data demonstrate that addition of an RGD motif

  8. The cellular immune response of the pea aphid to foreign intrusion and symbiotic challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonin Schmitz

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum has low immune defenses. However, its immune components are largely undescribed, and notably, extensive characterization of circulating cells has been missing. Here, we report characterization of five cell categories in hemolymph of adults of the LL01 pea aphid clone, devoid of secondary symbionts (SS: prohemocytes, plasmatocytes, granulocytes, spherulocytes and wax cells. Circulating lipid-filed wax cells are rare; they otherwise localize at the basis of the cornicles. Spherulocytes, that are likely sub-cuticular sessile cells, are involved in the coagulation process. Prohemocytes have features of precursor cells. Plasmatocytes and granulocytes, the only adherent cells, can form a layer in vivo around inserted foreign objects and phagocytize latex beads or Escherichia coli bacteria injected into aphid hemolymph. Using digital image analysis, we estimated that the hemolymph from one LL01 aphid contains about 600 adherent cells, 35% being granulocytes. Among aphid YR2 lines differing only in their SS content, similar results to LL01 were observed for YR2-Amp (without SS and YR2-Ss (with Serratia symbiotica, while YR2-Hd (with Hamiltonella defensa and YR2(Ri (with Regiella insecticola had strikingly lower adherent hemocyte numbers and granulocyte proportions. The effect of the presence of SS on A. pisum cellular immunity is thus symbiont-dependent. Interestingly, Buchnera aphidicola (the aphid primary symbiont and all SS, whether naturally present, released during hemolymph collection, or artificially injected, were internalized by adherent hemocytes. Inside hemocytes, SS were observed in phagocytic vesicles, most often in phagolysosomes. Our results thus raise the question whether aphid symbionts in hemolymph are taken up and destroyed by hemocytes, or actively promote their own internalization, for instance as a way of being transmitted to the next generation. Altogether, we

  9. scFv from Antibody That Mimics gp43 Modulates the Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses during Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannuzzi, Grasielle Pereira; Tavares, Aldo Henrique F P; Kaihami, Gilberto Hideo; de Almeida, José Roberto Fogaça; de Almeida, Sandro Rogério; Ferreira, Karen Spadari

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by Paracoccidioides species is a prevalent systemic and progressive mycosis that occurs in Latin America. It is caused by Paracoccidioides species. Immunization with dendritic cells transfected with a plasmid encoding the scFv (pMAC/PS-scFv) that mimics the main antigen of P. brasiliensis (gp43) confers protection in experimental PCM. DCs link innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing invading pathogens and selecting the type of effector T cell to mediate the immune response. Here, we showed that DC-pMAC/PS-scFv induces the activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results demonstrated that BALB/c mice infected with P. brasiliensis and treated with DC-pMAC/PS-scFv showed the induction of specific IgG production against gp43 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-4 cytokines. Analysis of regional lymph nodes revealed increases in the expression of clec7a, myd88, tlr2, gata3 and tbx21, which are involved in the immune response. Taken together, our results indicate that the scFv modulates the humoral and cellular immune responses and presents epitopes to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

  10. scFv from Antibody That Mimics gp43 Modulates the Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses during Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasielle Pereira Jannuzzi

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, caused by Paracoccidioides species is a prevalent systemic and progressive mycosis that occurs in Latin America. It is caused by Paracoccidioides species. Immunization with dendritic cells transfected with a plasmid encoding the scFv (pMAC/PS-scFv that mimics the main antigen of P. brasiliensis (gp43 confers protection in experimental PCM. DCs link innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing invading pathogens and selecting the type of effector T cell to mediate the immune response. Here, we showed that DC-pMAC/PS-scFv induces the activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results demonstrated that BALB/c mice infected with P. brasiliensis and treated with DC-pMAC/PS-scFv showed the induction of specific IgG production against gp43 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-4 cytokines. Analysis of regional lymph nodes revealed increases in the expression of clec7a, myd88, tlr2, gata3 and tbx21, which are involved in the immune response. Taken together, our results indicate that the scFv modulates the humoral and cellular immune responses and presents epitopes to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

  11. Cellular immune findings in Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, L. H.; Moffat, C. M.; Steere, A. C.; Dwyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:6240164

  12. THE HUMORAL AND CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES INDUCED BY HPV18L1-E6/E7 DNA VACCINES IN MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jin; Li Xu; Li Ang; Wang Yili; Si Lüsheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective To construct eukaryotic expression vector of HPV18 L1- E6, E7 chimeric gene and examine the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by this DNA vaccines in mice. Methods The C-terminal of major capsid protein L1 gene and mutant zinc finger domains of early E6/7 oncogenes in HPV18 were integrated and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to generate vaccines pVAX1-L1E6Mxx, E7Mxx. CHO cells were transiently transfected with the individual construct. Target protein expressions in the lysate of the transfected cells were measured by ELISA and immunocytochemistry. After BALB/c mice were vaccinated with various recombinant plasmids(pVAX1-L1-E6M3 or pVAX1-L1-E7M3) and immunie adjuvants (pLXHDmB7-2 or LTB) through different administration routes (intramuscular or intranasal) , the great cellular immune responses were produced as revealed by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and lymphocyte proliferation, and the expression of IL-4 and IFN- γ cells in CD4+ and CD8+subpopulations. Results The highly efficient expression of pVAX1-L1E6Mxx, E7Mxx vector in host eukaryotic cells were demonstrated both by ELISA and immunocytochemistry. The level of specific serum IgG against HPV in experiment groups mice was much higher than that of control group, and intranuscular immunization group had the highest antibody level. Intramuscular immunization groups were superior to intranasal immunization groups in DTH response, splenocyte proliferation and CD8+ IFN-γ + cells number, but CD4+ IL4+ cell number was higher in intranasal immunization groups. The immunization groups using pLXHDmB7-2 as adjuvant were superior to other groups in immunoresponse. Conclusion These DNA vaccines produce remarkable cellular and humoral immuneresponses in the mouse and may provide as prophylatic and therapeutic candidates for HPV induced cancer treatment.

  13. Cellular immune responses to nine Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine candidates following intranasal vaccination.

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    Suraj B Sable

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccines that elicit a protective immune response in the lungs is important for the development of an effective vaccine against tuberculosis. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, a comparison of intranasal (i.n. and subcutaneous (s.c. vaccination with the BCG vaccine demonstrated that a single moderate dose delivered intranasally induced a stronger and sustained M. tuberculosis-specific T-cell response in lung parenchyma and cervical lymph nodes of BALB/c mice than vaccine delivered subcutaneously. Both BCG and a multicomponent subunit vaccine composed of nine M. tuberculosis recombinant proteins induced strong antigen-specific T-cell responses in various local and peripheral immune compartments. Among the nine recombinant proteins evaluated, the alanine proline rich antigen (Apa, Rv1860 was highly antigenic following i.n. BCG and immunogenic after vaccination with a combination of the nine recombinant antigens. The Apa-induced responses included induction of both type 1 and type 2 cytokines in the lungs as evaluated by ELISPOT and a multiplexed microsphere-based cytokine immunoassay. Of importance, i.n. subunit vaccination with Apa imparted significant protection in the lungs and spleen of mice against M. tuberculosis challenge. Despite observed differences in the frequencies and location of specific cytokine secreting T cells both BCG vaccination routes afforded comparable levels of protection in our study. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our findings support consideration and further evaluation of an intranasally targeted Apa-based vaccine to prevent tuberculosis.

  14. Cellular Immune Responses Associated with Occult Hepatitis C Virus Infection of the Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Quiroga, Juan A.; Llorente, Silvia; Castillo, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Pardo, Margarita; CARREÑO, VICENTE

    2006-01-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a type of recently identified chronic infection that is evidenced only by detection of HCV RNA in liver; patients consistently test negative for antibodies to HCV and HCV RNA in serum. Using ex vivo and in vitro measures of T-cell responses, we have identified functional virus-specific memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with occult HCV infection. The features of the virus-specific T cells were consistent with immune sur...

  15. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare differential domains from orthologous surface proteins induce distinct cellular immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Fernanda Munhoz Dos Anjos; Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2016-07-15

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare are two genetically close species found in the swine respiratory tract. Despite their similarities, while M. hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, M. flocculare is a commensal bacterium. Genomic and transcriptional comparative analyses so far failed to explain the difference in pathogenicity between these two species. We then hypothesized that such difference might be, at least in part, explained by amino acid sequence and immunological or functional differences between ortholog surface proteins. In line with that, it was verified that approximately 85% of the ortholog surface proteins from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and M. flocculare present one or more differential domains. To experimentally assess possible immunological implications of this kind of difference, the extracellular differential domains from one pair of orthologous surface proteins (MHP7448_0612, from M. hyopneumoniae, and MF_00357, from M. flocculare) were expressed in E. coli and used to immunize mice. The recombinant polypeptides (rMHP61267-169 and rMF35767-196, respectively) induced distinct cellular immune responses. While, rMHP61267-169 induced both Th1 and Th2 responses, rMF35767-196 induced just an early pro-inflammatory response. These results indicate that immunological properties determined by differential domains in orthologous surface protein might play a role in pathogenicity, contributing to elicit specific and differential immune responses against each species.

  16. Intranasal Immunization with Pressure Inactivated Avian Influenza Elicits Cellular and Humoral Responses in Mice.

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    Shana P C Barroso

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses pose a serious global health threat, particularly in light of newly emerging strains, such as the avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 viruses. Vaccination remains the primary method for preventing acquiring influenza or for avoiding developing serious complications related to the disease. Vaccinations based on inactivated split virus vaccines or on chemically inactivated whole virus have some important drawbacks, including changes in the immunogenic properties of the virus. To induce a greater mucosal immune response, intranasally administered vaccines are highly desired as they not only prevent disease but can also block the infection at its primary site. To avoid these drawbacks, hydrostatic pressure has been used as a potential method for viral inactivation and vaccine production. In this study, we show that hydrostatic pressure inactivates the avian influenza A H3N8 virus, while still maintaining hemagglutinin and neuraminidase functionalities. Challenged vaccinated animals showed no disease signs (ruffled fur, lethargy, weight loss, and huddling. Similarly, these animals showed less Evans Blue dye leakage and lower cell counts in their bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with the challenged non-vaccinated group. We found that the whole inactivated particles were capable of generating a neutralizing antibody response in serum, and IgA was also found in nasal mucosa and feces. After the vaccination and challenge we observed Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion with a prevalence of IFN-γ. Our data indicate that the animals present a satisfactory immune response after vaccination and are protected against infection. Our results may pave the way for the development of a novel pressure-based vaccine against influenza virus.

  17. Tetanus toxoid-loaded cationic non-aggregated nanostructured lipid particles triggered strong humoral and cellular immune responses.

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    Kaur, Amandeep; Jyoti, Kiran; Rai, Shweta; Sidhu, Rupinder; Pandey, Ravi Shankar; Jain, Upendra Kumar; Katyal, Anju; Madan, Jitender

    2016-05-01

    In the present investigation, non-aggregated cationic and unmodified nanoparticles (TT-C-NLPs4 and TT-NLPs1) were prepared of about 49.2 ± 6.8-nm and 40.8 ± 8.3-nm, respectively. In addition, spherical shape, crystalline architecture and cationic charge were also noticed. Furthermore, integrity and conformational stability of TT were maintained in both TT-C-NLPs4 and TT-NLPs1, as evidenced by symmetrical position of bands and superimposed spectra, respectively in SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism. Cellular uptake in RAW264.7 cells indicating the concentration-dependent internalisation of nanoparticles. Qualitatively, CLSM exhibited enhanced cellular uptake of non-aggregated TT-C-NLPs4 owing to interaction with negatively charged plasma membrane and clevaloe mediated/independent endocytosis. In last, in vivo immunisation with non-aggregated TT-C-NLPs4 elicited strong humoral (anti-TT IgG) and cellular (IFN-γ) immune responses at day 42, as compared to non-aggregated TT-NLPs1 and TT-Alum following booster immunisation at day 14 and 28. Thus, non-aggregated cationic lipid nanoparticles may be a potent immune-adjuvant for parenteral delivery of weak antigens.

  18. The specifically enhanced cellular immune responses in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) against secondary challenge with Vibrio splendidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Qiu, Limei; Sun, Zhibin; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Rui; Yue, Feng; Sun, Rui; Song, Linsheng

    2014-07-01

    The increasing experimental evidences suggest that there are some forms of specific acquired immunity in invertebrates, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) stimulated primarily by heat-killed Vibrio splendidus displayed stronger immune responses at cellular and molecular levels when they encountered the secondary challenge of live V. splendidus. The total hemocyte counts (THC) increased significantly after the primary stimulation of heat-killed V. splendidus, and it increased even higher (p oysters received the secondary stimulation with live V. splendidus, and the phagocytic rate was also enhanced significantly (p oysters after the secondary stimulation of V. splendidus were higher (p oyster with specifically enhanced phagocytosis and rapidly promoted regeneration of circulating hemocytes when the primed oysters encountered the secondary challenge with V. splendidus.

  19. Synergistic and additive effects of cimetidine and levamisole on cellular immune responses to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, X; Yang, Y; Wang, J

    2013-02-01

    We and others have previously shown that both cimetidine (CIM) and levamisole (LMS) enhance humoral and cellular responses to DNA vaccines via different mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the synergistic and additive effects of CIM and LMS on the potency of antigen-specific immunities generated by a DNA vaccine encoding the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, pVax-S2). Compared with CIM or LMS alone, the combination of CIM and LMS elicited a robust HBsAg-specific cellular response that was characterized by higher IgG2a, but did not further increase HBsAg-specific antibody IgG and IgG1 production. Consistent with these results, the combination of CIM and LMS produced the highest level of IL-2 and IFN-γ in antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, whereas the combination of CIM and LMS did not further increase IL-4 production. Significantly, a robust HBsAg-specific cytotoxic response was also observed in the animals immunized with pVax-S2 in the presence of the combination of CIM and LMS. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that the combination of CIM and LMS promoted dendritic cell (DC) activation and blocked anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β production in CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells. These findings suggest that CIM and LMS have the synergistic and additive ability to enhance cellular response to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine, which may be mediated by DC activation and inhibition of anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. Thus, the combination of cimetidine and levamisole may be useful as an effective adjuvant in DNA vaccinations for chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum synthetic LbL microparticle vaccine elicits protective neutralizing antibody and parasite-specific cellular immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas J; Tang, Jie; Derome, Mary E; Mitchell, Robert A; Jacobs, Andrea; Deng, Yanhong; Palath, Naveen; Cardenas, Edwin; Boyd, James G; Nardin, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    Epitopes of the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of Plasmodium falciparum, the most pathogenic species of the malaria parasite, have been shown to elicit protective immunity in experimental animals and human volunteers. The mechanisms of immunity include parasite-neutralizing antibodies that can inhibit parasite motility in the skin at the site of infection and in the bloodstream during transit to the hepatocyte host cell and also block interaction with host cell receptors on hepatocytes. In addition, specific CD4+ and CD8+ cellular mechanisms target the intracellular hepatic forms, thus preventing release of erythrocytic stage parasites from the infected hepatocyte and the ensuing blood stage cycle responsible for clinical disease. An innovative method for producing particle vaccines, layer-by-layer (LbL) fabrication of polypeptide films on solid CaCO3 cores, was used to produce synthetic malaria vaccines containing a tri-epitope CS peptide T1BT comprising the antibody epitope of the CS repeat region (B) and two T-cell epitopes, the highly conserved T1 epitope and the universal epitope T. Mice immunized with microparticles loaded with T1BT peptide developed parasite-neutralizing antibodies and malaria-specific T-cell responses including cytotoxic effector T-cells. Protection from liver stage infection following challenge with live sporozoites from infected mosquitoes correlated with neutralizing antibody levels. Although some immunized mice with low or undetectable neutralizing antibodies were also protected, depletion of T-cells prior to challenge resulted in the majority of mice remaining resistant to challenge. In addition, mice immunized with microparticles bearing only T-cell epitopes were not protected, demonstrating that cellular immunity alone was not sufficient for protective immunity. Although the microparticles without adjuvant were immunogenic and protective, a simple modification with the lipopeptide TLR2 agonist Pam3Cys increased the potency and

  1. Role of Natural Immunomodulator (Aloe Vera in Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses

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    Ening Wiedosari

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Aloe vera belongs to a group of Liliaceae family plant and cultivated worldwide. It possesses acemannan (acetylated mannan, which has a significant pharmacological property. The acemannan has an immunomodulatory activity when administered to animals. The major immunomodulating effect includes the activation of immune effector cells, such as lymphocytes and macrophages, resulting in the production of cytokines, interleukin (IL-1, IL-6, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα. In particular, this extract can modulate the differentiation capacity of CD4+T cells to mature into Th1 subsets and enhance the innate cytokine response. As a consequence, this extract will have a profound effect in controlling disease, caused by intracellular infectious agents (bacteria and viruses. However, further studies are needed to determine the immunomodulating effects of Aloe vera in multi-component extracts equivalent to what are being used commonly in traditional medicine.

  2. Autoimmunity in ulcerative colitis: humoral and cellular immune response bytropomyosin in ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Geng; Masato Taniguchi; Hui Hui Dai; JJ-C Lin; Jim Lin; Kiron Moy Das

    2000-01-01

    AIM Autoimmunity has been emphasized in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC). We reported thattropomyosin (TM) or TM related protein is a putative autoantigen in UC. In human fibroblast, at least 8isoforms of TM have been identified with molecular weight range from 30kD to 40kD, depending upon theisoforms, and human TM isoforms (hTM5) has been found the main isoform in human intestinal epithelialcells. In this study, hTM5 was used as a putative auto-antigen for the humoral and T cell immune responses inpatients with UC, Crohn's disease (CD) and healthy subjects (HS) as controls.METHODS Anti-bTM antibody was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human sera(UC 59, CD 28, HS 26) against hTM isoforms. The IFN-γ production by peripheral blood T cells followingstimulation by recombinant hTM5 was analyzed by ELISPOT assay.RESULTS Anti-hTM5 antibody (IgG1) was detected in 15/59 (25.4%) patients with UC, 3/28 (10.γ%)with CD, and 3/26 (11.5%) of HS. The OD value in UC was significantly higher than in CD and HS groups(P < 0.05; P < 0.01 respectively). Western blot analysis demonstrated immunoreactivity against hTM5 inseveral UC sera. ELISPOT assay demonstrated that IFN-γ production is significantly higher in UC (7/18),39.0%), compared with CD (0/8, 0%) and HS (0/7, 0%), (P<0.05).CONCLUSION A significantly higher immune response to hTM5 was present in UC compared to CD andHS. Further studies of the hTM5/peptides may provide immuno-biochemical mechanism of autoimmuneprocess in UC.

  3. Avian CD154 enhances humoral and cellular immune responses induced by an adenovirus vector-based vaccine in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Ramos, Oliberto; González Pose, Alain; Gómez-Puerta, Silvia; Noda Gomez, Julia; Vega Redondo, Armando; Águila Benites, Julio César; Suárez Amarán, Lester; Parra, Natalie C; Toledo Alonso, Jorge R

    2011-05-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors have emerged as an attractive system for veterinary vaccines development. However, for poultry vaccination a very important criterion for an ideal vaccine is its low cost. The objective of this study was to test the ability of chicken CD154 to enhance the immunogenicity of an adenoviral vector-based vaccine against avian influenza virus in order to reduce the amount of antigen required to induce an effective immune response in avian. Chickens were vaccinated with three different doses of adenoviral vectors encoding either HA (AdHA), or HA fused to extracellular domain chicken's CD154 (AdHACD). Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay and relative quantification of IFN-γ showed that the adenoviral vector encoding for the chimeric antigen is able to elicit an improved humoral and cellular immune response, which demonstrated that CD154 can be used as a molecular adjuvant allowing to reduce in about 50-fold the amount of adenoviral vector vaccine required to induce an effective immune response.

  4. DHA Supplementation during Pregnancy and Lactation Affects Infants' Cellular but Not Humoral Immune Response

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    Esther Granot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is currently recommended that diet of pregnant mothers contain 200–300 mg DHA/day. Aim. To determine whether DHA supplementation during pregnancy and lactation affects infants' immune response. Methods. 60 women in ≥3rd pregnancy studied; 30 randomly assigned to receive DHA 400 mg/day from 12th week gestation until 4 months postpartum. From breast-fed infants, blood obtained for anti-HBs antibodies, immunoglobulins, lymphocyte subset phenotyping, and intracellular cytokine production. Results. CD4+ lymphocytes did not differ between groups, but CD4CD45RA/CD4 (naïve cells significantly higher in infants in DHA+ group. Proportion of CD4 and CD8 cells producing IFNγ significantly lower in DHA+ group, with no differences in proportion of IL4-producing cells. Immunoglobulins and anti-HBs levels did not differ between groups. Conclusions. In infants of mothers receiving DHA supplementation, a higher percentage of CD4 naïve cells and decreased CD4 and CD8 IFNγ production is compatible with attenuation of a proinflammatory response.

  5. Cellular Immune Response to an Engineered Cell-Based Tumor Vaccine at the Vaccination Site

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou,Qiang; Johnson, Bryon D.; Rimas J Orentas

    2007-01-01

    The engineered expression of the immune co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD137L on the surface of a neuroblastoma cell line converts this tumor into a cell-based cancer vaccine. The mechanism by which this vaccine activates the immune system was investigated by capturing and analyzing immune cells responding to the vaccine cell line embedded in a collagen matrix and injected subcutaneously. The vaccine induced a significant increase in the number of activated CD62L− CCR7− CD49b+ CD8 effector...

  6. Plasma cytokines, chemokines and cellular immune responses in pre-school Nigerian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum

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    Noone Cariosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with over one million deaths annually, particularly in children under five years. This study was the first to examine plasma cytokines, chemokines and cellular immune responses in pre-school Nigerian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum from four semi-urban villages near Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria. Methods Blood was obtained from 231 children (aged 39–73 months who were classified according to mean P. falciparum density per μl of blood (uninfected (n = 89, low density (10,000, n = 22. IL-12p70, IL-10, Nitric oxide, IFN-γ, TNF, IL-17, IL-4 and TGF-β, C-C chemokine RANTES, MMP-8 and TIMP-1 were measured in plasma. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained and examined markers of innate immune cells (CD14, CD36, CD56, CD54, CD11c AND HLA-DR. T-cell sub-populations (CD4, CD3 and γδTCR were intracellularly stained for IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF following polyclonal stimulation or stimulated with malaria parasites. Ascaris lumbricoides was endemic in these villages and all data were analysed taking into account the potential impact of bystander helminth infection. All data were analysed using SPSS 15 for windows and in all tests, p Results The level of P. falciparum parasitaemia was positively associated with plasma IL-10 and negatively associated with IL-12p70. The percentage of monocytes was significantly decreased in malaria-infected individuals while malaria parasitaemia was positively associated with increasing percentages of CD54+, CD11c+ and CD56+ cell populations. No association was observed in cytokine expression in mitogen-activated T-cell populations between groups and no malaria specific immune responses were detected. Although A. lumbricoides is endemic in these villages, an analysis of the data showed no impact of this helminth infection on P. falciparum parasitaemia or on immune responses associated with P. falciparum infection

  7. Solid bioneedle-delivered influenza vaccines are highly thermostable and induce both humoral and cellular immune responses.

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    Peter C Soema

    Full Text Available The potential of bioneedles to deliver influenza vaccines was investigated. Four influenza vaccine formulations were screened to determine the optimal formulation for use with bioneedles. The stability of the formulations after freeze-drying was checked to predict the stability of the influenza vaccines in the bioneedles. Subunit, split, virosomal and whole inactivated influenza (WIV vaccine were formulated and lyophilized in bioneedles, and subsequently administered to C57BL/6 mice. Humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed after vaccination. The thermostability of lyophilized vaccines was determined after one-month storage at elevated temperatures. Bioneedle influenza vaccines induced HI titers that are comparable to those induced by intramuscular WIV vaccination. Delivery by bioneedles did not alter the type of immune response induced by the influenza vaccines. Stability studies showed that lyophilized influenza vaccines have superior thermostability compared to conventional liquid vaccines, and remained stable after one-month storage at 60°C. Influenza vaccines delivered by bioneedles are a viable alternative to conventional liquid influenza vaccines. WIV was determined to be the most potent vaccine formulation for administration by bioneedles. Lyophilized influenza vaccines in bioneedles are independent of a cold-chain, due to their increased thermostability, which makes distribution and stockpiling easier.

  8. Quantifying the dynamics of viruses and the cellular immune response of the host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Althaus, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Infections can be caused by viruses, which attack certain cells within an infected host. However, the immune system of the host has evolved remarkable defense mechanisms that counter against an infection. In particular, so-called cytotoxic T lymphocytes can recognize and eliminate infected cells. Th

  9. Human papillomavirus (HPV) upregulates the cellular deubiquitinase UCHL1 to suppress the keratinocyte's innate immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karim, R.; Tummers, B.; Meyers, C.; Biryukov, J.L.; Alam, S.; Backendorf, C.; Jha, V.; Offringa, R.; van Ommen, G.J.; Melief, C.J.; Guardavaccaro, D.; Boer, J.M.; van der Burg, S.H.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent infection of basal keratinocytes with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) may cause cancer. Keratinocytes are equipped with different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) but hrHPV has developed ways to dampen their signals resulting in minimal inflammation and evasion of host immunity

  10. The catalytic A1 domains of cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin are potent DNA adjuvants that evoke mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Kenneth; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael; Schwartz, Jennifer; Fouts, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    DNA encoded adjuvants are well known for increasing the magnitude of cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against vaccine antigens. DNA adjuvants can also tune immune responses directed against vaccine antigens to better protect against infection of the target organism. Two potent DNA adjuvants that have unique abilities to tune immune responses are the catalytic A1 domains of Cholera Toxin (CTA1) and Heat-Labile Enterotoxin (LTA1). Here, we have characterized the adjuvant activities of CTA1 and LTA1 using HIV and SIV genes as model antigens. Both of these adjuvants enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on par with those induced by the well-characterized cytokine adjuvants IL-12 and GM-CSF. CTA1 and LTA1 preferentially enhanced cellular responses to the intracellular antigen SIVmac239-gag over those for the secreted HIVBaL-gp120 antigen. IL-12, GM-CSF and electroporation did the opposite suggesting differences in the mechanisms of actions of these diverse adjuvants. Combinations of CTA1 or LTA1 with IL-12 or GM-CSF generated additive and better balanced cellular responses to both of these antigens. Consistent with observations made with the holotoxin and the CTA1-DD adjuvant, CTA1 and LTA1 evoked mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses. Together, these results show that CTA1 and LTA1 are potent DNA vaccine adjuvants that favor the intracellular antigen gag over the secreted antigen gp120 and evoke mixed Th1/Th17 responses against both of these antigens. The results also indicate that achieving a balanced immune response to multiple intracellular and extracellular antigens delivered via DNA vaccination may require combining adjuvants that have different and complementary mechanisms of action.

  11. Cellular immune responses in HIV-negative immunodeficiency with anti-interferon-γ antibodies and opportunistic intracellular microorganisms.

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    Jiraprapa Wipasa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-mediated immunity plays a crucial role in resistance to intracellular infection. We previously reported antibodies against interferon-gamma (IFN-γ in HIV- negative (HIV- patients with acquired immunodeficiency presenting with repeated episodes of disseminated infection caused by uncommon opportunistic intracellular fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens. This follow-up study aimed to investigate cellular immune responses in these unusual patients. METHODS: Twenty HIV- patients presenting with ≥2 episodes of culture- or histopathologic-proven opportunistic infections were enrolled along with age- and sex-matched controls comprised of 20 HIV+ patients plus 20 healthy adults. Monocyte phenotyping and intracellular cytokine production were determined by staining with specific antibodies followed by flow cytometry. Anti-interferon-γ antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and inducible nitric oxide synthase by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: There were no differences among cases, HIV+, and healthy controls in the percentage of monocytes, or CD68 and HLA-DR expression on their surfaces. FcR1 (CD119 expression on monocytes was significantly higher in cases than in HIV+ (p<0.05 and healthy controls (p<0.01, suggesting the presence of activated monocytes in the circulation. Interleukin (IL-2 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α production in CD4 cells were significantly lower in cases than in healthy controls (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively. CD8 production of TNF-α among cases was significantly lower than that of healthy controls (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Immunodeficiency in HIV- individuals with repeated infections with intracellular pathogens may be associated with one or more of the abnormal immune responses reflected by the reduced production of both IL-2 by CD4 T cells and TNF-α by CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells, as well as presence of anti-IFN-γ antibody, as previously reported.

  12. Interferon (IFN) and Cellular Immune Response Evoked in RNA-Pattern Sensing During Infection with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV).

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    Nakai, Masato; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Funami, Kenji; Okamoto, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects hepatocytes but not dendritic cells (DCs), but DCs effectively mature in response to HCV-infected hepatocytes. Using gene-disrupted mice and hydrodynamic injection strategy, we found the MAVS pathway to be crucial for induction of type III interferons (IFNs) in response to HCV in mouse. Human hepatocytes barely express TLR3 under non-infectious states, but frequently express it in HCV infection. Type I and III IFNs are induced upon stimulation with polyI:C, an analog of double-stranded (ds)RNA. Activation of TLR3 and the TICAM-1 pathway, followed by DC-mediated activation of cellular immunity, is augmented during exposure to viral RNA. Although type III IFNs are released from replication-competent human hepatocytes, DC-mediated CTL proliferation and NK cell activation hardly occur in response to the released type III IFNs. Yet, type I IFNs and HCV-infected hepatocytes can induce maturation of DCs in either human or mouse origin. In addition, mouse CD8+ DCs mature in response to HCV-infected hepatocytes unless the TLR3/TICAM-1 pathway is blocked. We found the exosomes containing HCV RNA in the supernatant of the HCV-infected hepatocytes act as a source of TLR3-mediated DC maturation. Here we summarize our view on the mechanism by which DCs mature to induce NK and CTL in a status of HCV infection.

  13. Cellular immune responses and phagocytic activity of fishes exposed to pollution of volcano mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risjani, Yenny; Yunianta; Couteau, Jerome; Minier, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Since May 29, 2006, a mud volcano in the Brantas Delta of the Sidoarjo district has emitted mud that has inundated nearby villages. Pollution in this area has been implicated in detrimental effects on fish health. In fishes, leukocyte and phagocytic cells play a vital role in body defenses. We report for the first time the effect of "LUSI" volcano mud on the immune systems of fish in the Brantas Delta. The aim of this study was to find biomarkers to allow the evaluation of the effects of volcanic mud and anthropogenic pollution on fish health in the Brantas Delta. The study took places at the Brantas Delta, which was polluted by volcano mud, and at reference sites in Karangkates and Pasuruan. Leukocyte numbers were determined using a Neubauer hemocytometer and a light microscope. Differential leukocyte counts were determined using blood smears stained with May Grunwald-Giemsa, providing neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. Macrophages were taken from fish kidney, and their phagocytic activity was measured. In vitro analyses revealed that leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts (DLC) were higher in Channa striata and Chanos chanos caught from the polluted area. Macrophage numbers were higher in Oreochromis mossambicus than in the other species, indicating that this species is more sensitive to pollution. In areas close to volcanic mud eruption, all specimens had lower phagocytic activity. Our results show that immune cells were changed and phagocytic activity was reduced in the polluted area indicating cytotoxicity and alteration of the innate immune system in fishes exposed to LUSI volcano mud and anthropogenic pollution.

  14.  Evaluation of the humoral and cellular immune responses after implantation of a PTFE vascular prosthesis

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    Jan Skóra

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  Introduction:The experiment was designed in order to determine the immunological processes that occur during the healing in synthetic vascular grafts, especially to establish the differences in the location of the complement system proteins between the proximal and distal anastomosis and the differences in the arrangement of inflammatory cells in those anastomoses. The understanding of those processes will provide a true basis for determining risk factors for complications after arterial repair procedures.Material/Methods:The experiment was carried out on 16 dogs that underwent implantation of unilateral aorto-femoral bypass with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE. After 6 months all animals were euthanized to dissect the vascular grafts. Immunohistochemical assays and electron microscopic examinations were performed.Results:Immunohistochemical findings in the structure of neointima between anastomoses of vascular prostheses demonstrated significant differences between humoral and cellular responses. The area of proximal anastomosis revealed the presence of fibroblasts, but no macrophages were detected. The histological structure of the proximal anastomosis indicates that inflammatory processes were ended during the prosthesis healing. The immunological response obtained in the distal anastomosis corresponded to the chronic inflammatory reaction with the presence of macrophages, myofibroblasts and deposits of complement C3.Discussion:The identification of differences in the presence of macrophages and myofibroblasts and the presence of the C3 component between the anastomoses is the original achievement of the present study. In the available literature, no such significant differences have been shown so far in the humoral and cellular immune response caused by the presence of an artificial vessel in the arterial system.

  15. Cellular immune responses of filaria (Litomosoides sigmodontis) infected BALB/c mice detected on the level of cytokine transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, A; Zahner, H

    2001-08-01

    Cellular immune responses of BALB/c mice infected with 80 or 160 L3 of Litomosoides sigmodontis were studied over a period of 200 days postinfection (p.i.) by stimulating spleen cells with specific microfilariae and adult antigens and Concanavalin A (Con A). Effects were determined as the level of transcription of cytokine genes [interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13] employing a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique. Con A stimulation resulted in generally enhanced transcription levels in infected animals. Exposure to filarial antigens stimulated T cells of infected animals dependent on time p.i. There was a general strong response in the early prepatency (24 days p.i.), a temporary almost complete downregulation of cytokine gene transcription except IL-10 towards the end of prepatency (45 days p.i.), and subsequently strong reactions particularly concerning IFN-gamma and IL-13 during patency and postpatency. The dose of infection as well as the mode of antigenic stimulation had generally only small effects on the cytokine gene transcription: following the same type of kinetics, infection with 160 L3 as well as the use of microfilarial antigen generally induced lower levels of cytokine gene transcription compared with infection with 80 L3 and stimulation with female antigen, respectively.

  16. Immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and tetanus antitoxin are examples of passive immunization. BLOOD COMPONENTS The immune system includes certain types of white ... lymphocytes develop, they normally learn to tell the difference between your own body tissues and substances that ...

  17. Cellular immunity in Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, S H; D'Silva, H; Gothoskar, B P; Dinshaw, K A; Nair, C N; Gopalkrishna, R; Talwalkar, G V; Desai, P B

    1979-02-01

    Defective cell-mediated immunity (CMI) occurs early in the course of Hodgkin's disease (HD) and may persist even two years after successful treatment. This has been confirmed by in vivo and in vitro tests performed on 51 untreated and 52 treated patients of HD. The grading of skin reponse in vivo to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) correlated very well with the in vitro leukocyte migration inhibition (LMI) response against phytohemagglutinin (PHA). An inhibitory influence of HD patients' sera was demonstrated by LMI tests in vitro. The response of peripheral leukocytes from HD patients in the LMI tests could be augmented in vitro by addition of levamisole (an immuno-potentiator) to the culture medium, thus pointing to an intrinsic defect in Lymphocytes. The data indicate that defect at multiple sites in the immune system is responsible for persistent anergy in HD.

  18. CONSECUTIVE IMMUNIZATION WITH RECOMBINANT FOWLPOX VIRUS AND PLASMID DNA FOR ENHANCING CELLULAR AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗坤; 金宁一; 郭志儒; 秦云龙; 郭炎; 方厚华; 安汝国; 殷震

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the influence of consecutive immunization on cellular and humoral immunity in mice. Methods: We evaluated a consecutive immunization strategy of priming with recombinant fowlpox virus vUTALG and boosting with plasmid DNA pcDNAG encoding HIV-1 capsid protein Gag. Results: In immunized mice, the number of CD4+ T cells from splenic lymphocytes increased significantly and the proliferation response of splenocytes to ConA and LPS elevated markedly and HIV-1-specific antibody response could be induced. Conclusion: Consecutive immunization could increase cellular and humoral immunity responses in mice.

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis NOD1 and NOD2 receptors and their functional role in in-vitro cellular immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Brahma

    Full Text Available Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD-like receptors (NLRs are innate immune receptors that recognize bacterial cell wall components and initiate host immune response. Structure and function of NLRs have been well studied in human and mice, but little information exists on genetic composition and role of these receptors in innate immune system of water buffalo--a species known for its exceptional disease resistance. Here, a comparative study on the functional domains of NOD1 and NOD2 was performed across different species. The NOD mediated in-vitro cellular responses were studied in buffalo peripheral blood mononuclear cells, resident macrophages, mammary epithelial, and fibroblast cells. Buffalo NOD1 (buNOD1 and buNOD2 showed conserved domain architectures as found in other mammals. The domains of buNOD1 and buNOD2 showed analogy in secondary and tertiary conformations. Constitutive expressions of NODs were ubiquitous in different tissues. Following treatment with NOD agonists, peripheral lymphocytes showed an IFN-γ response along-with production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Alveolar macrophages and mammary epithelial cells showed NOD mediated in-vitro immune response through NF-κB dependent pathway. Fibroblasts showed pro-inflammatory cytokine response following agonist treatment. Our study demonstrates that both immune and non-immune cells could generate NOD-mediated responses to pathogens though the type and magnitude of response depend on the cell types. The structural basis of ligand recognition by buffalo NODs and knowledge of immune response by different cell types could be useful for development of non-infective innate immune modulators and next generation anti-inflammatory compounds.

  20. PIKA as an Adjuvant Enhances Specific Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Following the Vaccination of Mice with HBsAg plus PIKA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erxia Shen; Li Li; Lietao Li; Lianqiang Feng; Lin Lu; Ziliang Yao; Haixiang Lin; Changyou Wu

    2007-01-01

    An adjuvant is usually used to enhance the immune response induced by vaccines. The choice of adjuvant or immune enhancer determines the effectiveness of the immune response. Currently, aluminium (Alum, a generic term for salts of aluminium) is the only FDA-approved adjuvant. Alum predominantly induces the differentiation of Th2 cells and thus mediates an antibody immune response. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new adjuvants that enhance not only humoral but also cellular immune responses. In the present study, we demonstrates that PIKA (a stabilized dsRNA) as an adjuvant directly induces the activation and the proliferation of both B and NK cells in vitro. Injection of PIKA into mice results in the production of cytokines in vivo. In addition, the study demonstrates that PIKA promotes the maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) including up-regulation of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80, CD86 and CD40, and the induction of cytokines such as IL-12p70, IL-12p40 and IL-6. Importantly, after immunization of mice with HBsAg plus PIKA, the presence of PIKA enhances the titers of HBsAg-specific IgG and HBsAg-specific IFN-γ production. These results demonstrate that PIKA as an adjuvant can promote both humoral and cellular immune responses. These might have an implication in applying PIKA as an adjuvant to be used in the design and development of both therapeutic and preventive vaccines, and used in the clinical study.

  1. Cellular immune responses of BALB/c mice induced by intramuscular injection of PRRSV-ORF5 DNA vaccine with different doses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Anchun; WANG Mingshu; CHEN Xiwen; XINI Nigen; DOU Wenbo; LI Xuemei; LIU Wumei; WANG Gang; ZHANG Pingying

    2007-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with 50 μg,100 μg,200 μg of pcDNA-PRRSV-ORF5 DNA vaccine respectively by intramuscular injection,with PBS and pcDNA3.1(+)as controls.Fluorescence activated cell Sorter (FACS)was used to detect the number of CD4+ and CD8+T-lymphocytes.T-lymphocyte proliferation test was used to detect proliferation of the T-lymphocyte cells in peripheral blood lymphocytes of mice vaccinated with pcDNA-PRRSV-ORF5 DNA vaccine.The results showed that the difference in ConA response to T-lymphocytes in blood was highly significant between all experimental groups and the control group(P<0.01).The number of CD4+T-lymphocytes in experimental groups was significantly higher than that of the control group 7d after vaccination.The number of CD8+ T-lymphocytes in the experimental groups was higher than that of the control group 28 d after vaccination.Mice immunized with a higher dose(200 μg)of DNA vaccine demonstrated higher cellular immune response than those immunized with a lower dose(100 μg,50 μg)of DNA vaccine.The results demonstrated that pcDNA-PRRSV-ORF5 DNA vaccine could induce a good cellular immune response which may be dose-dependent.

  2. A new adenovirus based vaccine vector expressing an Eimeria tenella derived TLR agonist improves cellular immune responses to an antigenic target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Appledorn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adenoviral based vectors remain promising vaccine platforms for use against numerous pathogens, including HIV. Recent vaccine trials utilizing Adenovirus based vaccines expressing HIV antigens confirmed induction of cellular immune responses, but these responses failed to prevent HIV infections in vaccinees. This illustrates the need to develop vaccine formulations capable of generating more potent T-cell responses to HIV antigens, such as HIV-Gag, since robust immune responses to this antigen correlate with improved outcomes in long-term non-progressor HIV infected individuals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we designed a novel vaccine strategy utilizing an Ad-based vector expressing a potent TLR agonist derived from Eimeria tenella as an adjuvant to improve immune responses from a [E1-]Ad-based HIV-Gag vaccine. Our results confirm that expression of rEA elicits significantly increased TLR mediated innate immune responses as measured by the influx of plasma cytokines and chemokines, and activation of innate immune responding cells. Furthermore, our data show that the quantity and quality of HIV-Gag specific CD8(+ and CD8(- T-cell responses were significantly improved when coupled with rEA expression. These responses also correlated with a significantly increased number of HIV-Gag derived epitopes being recognized by host T cells. Finally, functional assays confirmed that rEA expression significantly improved antigen specific CTL responses, in vivo. Moreover, we show that these improved responses were dependent upon improved TLR pathway interactions. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The data presented in this study illustrate the potential utility of Ad-based vectors expressing TLR agonists to improve clinical outcomes dependent upon induction of robust, antigen specific immune responses.

  3. Single and mixed-species trypanosome and microsporidia infections elicit distinct, ephemeral cellular and humoral immune responses in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ryan S; Evans, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Frequently encountered parasite species impart strong selective pressures on host immune system evolution and are more apt to concurrently infect the same host, yet molecular impacts in light of this are often overlooked. We have contrasted immune responses in honey bees to two common eukaryotic endoparasites by establishing single and mixed-species infections using the long-associated parasite Crithidia mellificae and the emergent parasite Nosema ceranae. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to screen host immune gene expression at 9 time points post inoculation. Systemic responses in abdomens during early stages of parasite establishment revealed conserved receptor (Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule, Dscam and nimrod C1, nimC1), signaling (MyD88 and Imd) and antimicrobial peptide (AMP) effector (Defensin 2) responses. Late, established infections were distinct with a refined 2 AMP response to C. mellificae that contrasted starkly with a 5 AMP response to N. ceranae. Mixed species infections induced a moderate 3 AMPs. Transcription in gut tissues highlighted important local roles for Dscam toward both parasites and Imd signaling toward N. ceranae. At both systemic and local levels Dscam, MyD88 and Imd transcription was consistently correlated based on clustering analysis. Significant gene suppression occurred in two cases from midgut to ileum tissue: Dscam was lowered during mixed infections compared to N. ceranae infections and both C. mellificae and mixed infections had reduced nimC1 transcription compared to uninfected controls. We show that honey bees rapidly mount complex immune responses to both Nosema and Crithidia that are dynamic over time and that mixed-species infections significantly alter local and systemic immune gene transcription.

  4. Epitope DNA vaccines against tuberculosis: spacers and ubiquitin modulates cellular immune responses elicited by epitope DNA vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang QM; Sun SH; Hu ZL; Zhou FJ; Yin M; Xiao CJ; Zhang JC

    2005-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses are crucial in the protection against tuberculosis. In this study, we constructed epitope DNA vaccines (p3-M-38) encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes of MPT64 and 38 kDa proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In order to observe the influence of spacer sequence (Ala-Ala-Tyr) or ubiquitin (UbGR) on the efficacy of the two CTL epitopes, we also constructed DNA vaccines, p3-M-S(spacer)-38, p3-Ub (UbGR)-M-S-38 and p3-Ub-M-38. The immune responses elicited by the four DNA vaccines were tested in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. The cytotoxicity of T cells was detected by LDH-release method and by enzyme-linked immunospot assay for epitope-specific cells secreting interferon-gamma. The results showed that DNA immunization with p3-M-38 vaccine could induce epitope-specific CD8+ CTL response and that the spacer sequence (AAY) only enhanced M epitope presentation. The protein-targeting sequence (UbGR) enhanced the immunogenicity of the two epitopes. The finding that defined spacer sequences at C-terminus and protein-targeting degradation modulated the immune response of epitope string DNA vaccines will be of importance for the further development of multi-epitope DNA vaccines against tuberculosis.

  5. Induction of potent and long-lived antibody and cellular immune responses in the genito-rectal mucosae could be the critical determinant of HIV vaccine efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia eChanzu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The field of HIV prevention has indeed progressed in leaps and bounds, but with major limitations of the current prevention and treatment options, the world remains desperate for an HIV vaccine. Sadly, this continues to be elusive as more than 30 years since its discovery there is no licensed HIV vaccine. Research aiming to define immunological biomarkers to accurately predict vaccine efficacy have focussed mainly on systemic immune responses, and as such, studies defining correlates of protection in the genito-rectal mucosae, the primary target site for HIV entry and seeding are sparse. Clearly, difficulties in sampling and analysis of mucosal specimens, as well as their limited size have been a major deterrent in characterizing the type (mucosal antibodies, cytokines, chemokines or CTL, threshold (magnitude, depth and breadth and viral inhibitory capacity of HIV-1 specific immune responses in the genito-rectal mucosae, where they are needed to immediately block HIV acquisition and arrest subsequent virus dissemination. Nevertheless, a few studies document the existence of HIV-specific immune responses in the genito-rectal mucosae of HIV-infected aviremic and viremic controllers, as well as in highly exposed persistently seronegative (HEPS individuals with natural resistance to HIV-1. Some of these responses strongly correlate with protection from HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, thus providing significant clues of the ideal components of an efficacious HIV vaccine. In this article, we provide an overview of the key features of protective immune responses found in HEPS, elite and viremic controllers and discuss how these can be achieved through mucosal immunization. Inevitably, HIV vaccine development research will have to consider strategies which elicit potent antibody and cellular immune responses within the genito-rectal mucosae or induction of systemic immune cells with an inherent potential to home and persist at mucosal sites

  6. Epitope-based vaccines with the Anaplasma marginale MSP1a functional motif induce a balanced humoral and cellular immune response in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula S Santos

    Full Text Available Bovine anaplasmosis is a hemoparasitic disease that causes considerable economic loss to the dairy and beef industries. Cattle immunized with the Anaplasma marginale MSP1 outer membrane protein complex presents a protective humoral immune response; however, its efficacy is variable. Immunodominant epitopes seem to be a key-limiting factor for the adaptive immunity. We have successfully demonstrated that critical motifs of the MSP1a functional epitope are essential for antibody recognition of infected animal sera, but its protective immunity is yet to be tested. We have evaluated two synthetic vaccine formulations against A. marginale, using epitope-based approach in mice. Mice infection with bovine anaplasmosis was demonstrated by qPCR analysis of erythrocytes after 15-day exposure. A proof-of-concept was obtained in this murine model, in which peptides conjugated to bovine serum albumin were used for immunization in three 15-day intervals by intraperitoneal injections before challenging with live bacteria. Blood samples were analyzed for the presence of specific IgG2a and IgG1 antibodies, as well as for the rickettsemia analysis. A panel containing the cytokines' transcriptional profile for innate and adaptive immune responses was carried out through qPCR. Immunized BALB/c mice challenged with A. marginale presented stable body weight, reduced number of infected erythrocytes, and no mortality; and among control groups mortality rates ranged from 15% to 29%. Additionally, vaccines have significantly induced higher IgG2a than IgG1 response, followed by increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This is a successful demonstration of epitope-based vaccines, and protection against anaplasmosis may be associated with elicitation of effector functions of humoral and cellular immune responses in murine model.

  7. Modification to the Capsid of the Adenovirus Vector That Enhances Dendritic Cell Infection and Transgene-Specific Cellular Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Worgall, Stefan; Busch, Annette; Rivara, Michael; Bonnyay, David; Leopold, Philip L.; Merritt, Robert; Hackett, Neil R.; Rovelink, Peter W.; Joseph T Bruder; Wickham, Thomas J.; Kovesdi, Imi; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2004-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors can be used to transfer and express antigens and function as strong adjuvants and thus are useful platforms for the development of genetic vaccines. Based on the hypothesis that Ad vectors with enhanced infectibility of dendritic cells (DC) may be able to evoke enhanced immune responses against antigens encoded by the vector in vivo, the present study analyzes the vaccine potential of an Ad vector expressing β-galactosidase as a model antigen and genetica...

  8. Cellular Response to Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bo; YAN Shi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    To explore the nonlinear activities of the cellular signaling system composed of one transcriptional arm and one protein-interaction arm, we use an irradiation-response module to study the dynamics of stochastic interactions.It is shown that the oscillatory behavior could be described in a unified way when the radiation-derived signal and noise are incorporated.

  9. Effect of Pleuran (β-glucan from Pleurotus ostreatus) supplementation on cellular immune response after intensive exercise in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobovčák, Marián; Kuniaková, Renata; Gabriž, Ján; Majtán, Juraj

    2010-12-01

    Excessive and exhausting physical loads depress the immune system. Carbohydrate consumption may minimize the postexercise suppression of the innate immune system. β-Glucan is a well-known immunomodulator, with positive effects on the functioning of immunocompetent cells. The goal of this study was to determine whether β-glucan dietary supplementation from the mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus decreases the suppressed immune system responses induced by short-term high-intensity exercise in humans. In this double-blind pilot study, 20 elite athletes were randomized to β-glucan (n = 9) or placebo (n = 11) groups; these groups consumed 100 mg of β-glucan (Imunoglukan) or placebo supplements, respectively, once a day for 2 months. Venous whole blood was collected before and after 2 months of supplementation (baseline), both immediately and 1 h after (recovery period) a 20-min intensive exercise bout at the end of the supplementation period. The blood samples were used to measure the cell counts of leukocytes, erythrocyte, and lymphocytes; subpopulations of lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes; and natural killer (NK) cell activity (NKCA). A 28% reduction in NKCA (p athletes.

  10. Development of cellular immune response of mice to infection with low doses of Trichinella spiralis, Trichinella britovi and Trichinella pseudospiralis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorožňáková, Emília; Hurníková, Zuzana; Kołodziej-Sobocińska, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The murine cellular immune response to the infection with ten larvae of encapsulating (Trichinella spiralis, Trichinella britovi) and non-encapsulating species (Trichinella pseudospiralis) was studied. Both T. spiralis and T. britovi stimulated the proliferation of splenic T and B lymphocytes during the intestinal phase of infection, but T. spiralis activated the proliferative response also at the muscle phase, particularly in B cells. Non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis stimulated the proliferation of T and B cells only on day 10 post-infection (p.i.) and later at the muscle phase. The numbers of splenic CD4 and CD8 T cells of T. spiralis infected mice were significantly increased till day 10 p.i., i.e., at the intestinal phase, and then at the late muscle phase, on day 60 p.i. T. britovi infection increased the CD4 and CD8 T cell numbers only on day 30 p.i. Decreased numbers of CD4 and CD8 T cells after T. pseudospiralis infection suggest a suppression of cellular immunity. Both encapsulating Trichinella species induced the Th2 response (cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and interleukin-10) at the intestinal phase and the Th2 dominant response at the advanced muscle phase. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production (Th1 type) started to increase with migrating newborn larvae from day 15 p.i. till the end of the experiment. IL-5 production was suppressed during the intestinal phase of T. pseudospiralis infection. The immune response to T. pseudospiralis was directed more to the Th1 response at the muscle phase, the high IFN-γ production was found on day 10 p.i. and it peaked on days 45 and 60 p.i.

  11. Cord blood Streptococcus pneumoniae-specific cellular immune responses predict early pneumococcal carriage in high-risk infants in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, J P; Richmond, P C; Strickland, D; Prescott, S L; Pomat, W S; Michael, A; Nadal-Sims, M A; Edwards-Devitt, C J; Holt, P G; Lehmann, D; van den Biggelaar, A H J

    2017-03-01

    In areas where Streptococcus pneumoniae is highly endemic, infants experience very early pneumococcal colonization of the upper respiratory tract, with carriage often persisting into adulthood. We aimed to explore whether newborns in high-risk areas have pre-existing pneumococcal-specific cellular immune responses that may affect early pneumococcal acquisition. Cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) of 84 Papua New Guinean (PNG; high endemic) and 33 Australian (AUS; low endemic) newborns were stimulated in vitro with detoxified pneumolysin (dPly) or pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA; families 1 and 2) and compared for cytokine responses. Within the PNG cohort, associations between CBMC dPly and PspA-induced responses and pneumococcal colonization within the first month of life were studied. Significantly higher PspA-specific interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 responses, and lower dPly-IL-6 responses were produced in CBMC cultures of PNG compared to AUS newborns. Higher CBMC PspA-IL-5 and PspA-IL-13 responses correlated with a higher proportion of cord CD4 T cells, and higher dPly-IL-6 responses with a higher frequency of cord antigen-presenting cells. In the PNG cohort, higher PspA-specific IL-5 and IL-6 CBMC responses were associated independently and significantly with increased risk of earlier pneumococcal colonization, while a significant protective effect was found for higher PspA-IL-10 CBMC responses. Pneumococcus-specific cellular immune responses differ between children born in pneumococcal high versus low endemic settings, which may contribute to the higher risk of infants in high endemic settings for early pneumococcal colonization, and hence disease.

  12. Immunopotentiation of Different Adjuvants on Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Induced by HA1-2 Subunit Vaccines of H7N9 Influenza in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Xiong, Dan; Hu, Maozhi; Kang, Xilong; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2013, human infections with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus were reported in China. The number of cases has increased with over 200 mortalities reported to date. However, there is currently no vaccine available for the H7 subtype of influenza A virus. Virus-specific cellular immune responses play a critical role in virus clearance during influenza infection. In this study, we undertook a side-by-side evaluation of two different adjuvants, Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (fliC) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), through intraperitoneal administration to assess their effects on the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine of H7N9 influenza. The fusion protein HA1-2-fliC and HA1-2 combined with PEI could induce significantly higher HA1-2-specific IgG and hemagglutination inhibition titers than HA1-2 alone at 12 days post-boost, with superior HA1-2 specific IgG titers in the HA1-2-fliC group compared with the PEI adjuvanted group. The PEI adjuvanted vaccine induced higher IgG1/IgG2a ratio and significantly increased numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells than HA1-2 alone, suggesting a mixed Th1/Th2-type cellular immune response with a Th2 bias. Meanwhile, the HA1-2-fliC induced higher IgG2a and IgG1 levels, which is indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2-type profile. Consistent with this, significant levels, and equal numbers, of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells were detected after HA1-2-fliC vaccination. Moreover, the marked increase in CD69 expression and the proliferative index with the HA1-2-fliC and PEI adjuvanted vaccines indicated that both adjuvanted vaccine candidates effectively induced antigen-specific cellular immune responses. Taken together, our findings indicate that the two adjuvanted vaccine candidates elicit effective and HA1-2-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, offering significant promise for the development of a successful recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine for H7N9 influenza.

  13. Immunopotentiation of Different Adjuvants on Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Induced by HA1-2 Subunit Vaccines of H7N9 Influenza in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Song

    Full Text Available In spring 2013, human infections with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9 virus were reported in China. The number of cases has increased with over 200 mortalities reported to date. However, there is currently no vaccine available for the H7 subtype of influenza A virus. Virus-specific cellular immune responses play a critical role in virus clearance during influenza infection. In this study, we undertook a side-by-side evaluation of two different adjuvants, Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (fliC and polyethyleneimine (PEI, through intraperitoneal administration to assess their effects on the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine of H7N9 influenza. The fusion protein HA1-2-fliC and HA1-2 combined with PEI could induce significantly higher HA1-2-specific IgG and hemagglutination inhibition titers than HA1-2 alone at 12 days post-boost, with superior HA1-2 specific IgG titers in the HA1-2-fliC group compared with the PEI adjuvanted group. The PEI adjuvanted vaccine induced higher IgG1/IgG2a ratio and significantly increased numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells than HA1-2 alone, suggesting a mixed Th1/Th2-type cellular immune response with a Th2 bias. Meanwhile, the HA1-2-fliC induced higher IgG2a and IgG1 levels, which is indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2-type profile. Consistent with this, significant levels, and equal numbers, of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells were detected after HA1-2-fliC vaccination. Moreover, the marked increase in CD69 expression and the proliferative index with the HA1-2-fliC and PEI adjuvanted vaccines indicated that both adjuvanted vaccine candidates effectively induced antigen-specific cellular immune responses. Taken together, our findings indicate that the two adjuvanted vaccine candidates elicit effective and HA1-2-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, offering significant promise for the development of a successful recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine for H7N9 influenza.

  14. Immunopotentiation of Different Adjuvants on Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Induced by HA1-2 Subunit Vaccines of H7N9 Influenza in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Xiong, Dan; Hu, Maozhi; Kang, Xilong; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2013, human infections with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus were reported in China. The number of cases has increased with over 200 mortalities reported to date. However, there is currently no vaccine available for the H7 subtype of influenza A virus. Virus-specific cellular immune responses play a critical role in virus clearance during influenza infection. In this study, we undertook a side-by-side evaluation of two different adjuvants, Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (fliC) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), through intraperitoneal administration to assess their effects on the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine of H7N9 influenza. The fusion protein HA1-2-fliC and HA1-2 combined with PEI could induce significantly higher HA1-2-specific IgG and hemagglutination inhibition titers than HA1-2 alone at 12 days post-boost, with superior HA1-2 specific IgG titers in the HA1-2-fliC group compared with the PEI adjuvanted group. The PEI adjuvanted vaccine induced higher IgG1/IgG2a ratio and significantly increased numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells than HA1-2 alone, suggesting a mixed Th1/Th2-type cellular immune response with a Th2 bias. Meanwhile, the HA1-2-fliC induced higher IgG2a and IgG1 levels, which is indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2-type profile. Consistent with this, significant levels, and equal numbers, of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells were detected after HA1-2-fliC vaccination. Moreover, the marked increase in CD69 expression and the proliferative index with the HA1-2-fliC and PEI adjuvanted vaccines indicated that both adjuvanted vaccine candidates effectively induced antigen-specific cellular immune responses. Taken together, our findings indicate that the two adjuvanted vaccine candidates elicit effective and HA1-2-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, offering significant promise for the development of a successful recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine for H7N9 influenza. PMID:26930068

  15. Cellular and humoral immune responses in sheep vaccinated with candidate antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna eGurung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Control of Johne’s disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP in ruminants using commercially available vaccine reduces production losses, mortality, faecal shedding and histopathological lesions but does not provide complete protection from infection and interferes with serological diagnosis of Johne’s disease and bovine tuberculosis. At this time no recombinant antigens have been found to provide superior protection compared to whole killed or live-attenuated MAP vaccines. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate more candidate MAP antigens. In this study recombinant MAP antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 were formulated with four different MONTANIDE (ISA 50V2, 61VG, 71VG and 201VG adjuvants and evaluated for their ability to produce specific immune responses in vaccinated sheep. The cellular immune response was measured with an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ release assay and the humoral immune response was measured by antibody detection enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Recombinant vaccine formulation with the antigen MAP2698c and MONTANIDE ISA 201VG adjuvant produced strong whole-MAP as well as MAP2698c-specific IFN-γ responses in a high proportion of the vaccinated sheep. The formulation caused less severe injection site lesions in comparison to other formulations. The findings from this study suggest that the MAP2698c + 201VG should be evaluated in a challenge trial to determine the efficacy of this vaccine candidate.

  16. Cellular and humoral immune responses in sheep vaccinated with candidate antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Ratna B.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.; Begg, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Control of Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in ruminants using commercially available vaccine reduces production losses, mortality, fecal shedding and histopathological lesions but does not provide complete protection from infection and interferes with serological diagnosis of Johne's disease and bovine tuberculosis. At this time no recombinant antigens have been found to provide superior protection compared to whole killed or live-attenuated MAP vaccines. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate more candidate MAP antigens. In this study recombinant MAP antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 were formulated with four different MONTANIDE™ (ISA 50V2, 61VG, 71VG, and 201VG) adjuvants and evaluated for their ability to produce specific immune responses in vaccinated sheep. The cellular immune response was measured with an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay and the humoral immune response was measured by antibody detection enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Recombinant vaccine formulation with the antigen MAP2698c and MONTANIDE™ ISA 201VG adjuvant produced strong whole-MAP as well as MAP2698c-specific IFN-γ responses in a high proportion of the vaccinated sheep. The formulation caused less severe injection site lesions in comparison to other formulations. The findings from this study suggest that the MAP2698c + 201VG should be evaluated in a challenge trial to determine the efficacy of this vaccine candidate. PMID:25077074

  17. Cellular and humoral immune responses in sheep vaccinated with candidate antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Ratna B; Purdie, Auriol C; Whittington, Richard J; Begg, Douglas J

    2014-01-01

    Control of Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in ruminants using commercially available vaccine reduces production losses, mortality, fecal shedding and histopathological lesions but does not provide complete protection from infection and interferes with serological diagnosis of Johne's disease and bovine tuberculosis. At this time no recombinant antigens have been found to provide superior protection compared to whole killed or live-attenuated MAP vaccines. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate more candidate MAP antigens. In this study recombinant MAP antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 were formulated with four different MONTANIDE™ (ISA 50V2, 61VG, 71VG, and 201VG) adjuvants and evaluated for their ability to produce specific immune responses in vaccinated sheep. The cellular immune response was measured with an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay and the humoral immune response was measured by antibody detection enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Recombinant vaccine formulation with the antigen MAP2698c and MONTANIDE™ ISA 201VG adjuvant produced strong whole-MAP as well as MAP2698c-specific IFN-γ responses in a high proportion of the vaccinated sheep. The formulation caused less severe injection site lesions in comparison to other formulations. The findings from this study suggest that the MAP2698c + 201VG should be evaluated in a challenge trial to determine the efficacy of this vaccine candidate.

  18. Persistence at one year of age of antigen-induced cellular immune responses in preterm infants vaccinated against whooping cough: comparison of three different vaccines and effect of a booster dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Françoise; Dirix, Violette; Verscheure, Virginie; Damis, Eliane; Vermeylen, Danièle; Locht, Camille; Mascart, Françoise

    2013-04-01

    Due to their high risk of developing severe Bordetella pertussis (Bp) infections, it is recommended to immunize preterm infants at their chronological age. However, little is known about the persistence of their specific immune responses, especially of the cellular responses recognized to play a role in protection. We compared here the cellular immune responses to two major antigens of Bp between three groups of one year-old children born prematurely, who received for their primary vaccination respectively the whole cell vaccine Tetracoq(®) (TC), the acellular vaccine Tetravac(®) (TV), or the acellular vaccine Infanrix-hexa(®) (IR). Whereas most children had still detectable IFN-γ responses at one year of age, they were lower in the IR-vaccinated children compared to the two other groups. In contrast, both the TV- and the IR-vaccinated children displayed higher Th2-type immune responses, resulting in higher antigen-specific IFN-γ/IL-5 ratios in TC- than in TV- or IR-vaccinated children. The IFN-γ/IL-5 ratio of mitogen-induced cytokines was also lower in IR- compared to TC- or TV-vaccinated children. No major differences in the immune responses were noted after the booster compared to the pre-booster responses for each vaccine. The IR-vaccinated children had a persistently low specific Th1-type immune response associated with high specific Th2-type immune responses, resulting in lower antigen-specific IFN-γ/IL-5 ratios compared to the two other groups. We conclude that antigen-specific cellular immune responses persisted in one year-old children born prematurely and vaccinated during infancy at their chronological age, that a booster dose did not significantly boost the cellular immune responses, and that the Th1/Th2 balance of the immune responses is modulated by the different vaccines.

  19. Cellular and Molecular Dynamics of Th17 Differentiation and its Developmental Plasticity in the Intestinal Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Suniti; Basu, Rajatava

    2017-01-01

    After emerging from the thymus, naive CD4 T cells circulate through secondary lymphoid tissues, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue of the intestine. The activation of naïve CD4 T cells by antigen-presenting cells offering cognate antigen initiate differentiation programs that lead to the development of highly specialized T helper (Th) cell lineages. Although initially believed that developmental programing of effector T cells such as T helper 1 (Th1) or T helper 2 (Th2) resulted in irreversible commitment to a fixed fate, subsequent studies have demonstrated greater flexibility, or plasticity, in effector T cell stability than originally conceived. This is particularly so for the Th17 subset, differentiation of which is a highly dynamic process with overlapping developmental axes with inducible regulatory T (iTreg), T helper 22 (Th22), and Th1 cells. Accordingly, intermediary stages of Th17 cells are found in various tissues, which co-express lineage-specific transcription factor(s) or cytokine(s) of developmentally related CD4 T cell subsets. A highly specialized tissue like that of the intestine, which harbors the largest immune compartment of the body, adds several layers of complexity to the intricate process of Th differentiation. Due to constant exposure to millions of commensal microbes and periodic exposure to pathogens, the intestinal mucosa maintains a delicate balance between regulatory and effector T cells. It is becoming increasingly clear that equilibrium between tolerogenic and inflammatory axes is maintained in the intestine by shuttling the flexible genetic programming of a developing CD4 T cell along the developmental axis of iTreg, Th17, Th22, and Th1 subsets. Currently, Th17 plasticity remains an unresolved concern in the field of clinical research as targeting Th17 cells to cure immune-mediated disease might also target its related subsets. In this review, we discuss the expanding sphere of Th17 plasticity through its shared

  20. Modulation of the cellular immune response by a carbohydrate rich fraction from Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces in infected or immunized Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dematteis, S; Pirotto, F; Marqués, J; Nieto, A; Orn, A; Baz, A

    2001-01-01

    Infection of Balb/c mice with Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces constitutes the model for secondary hydatid infection. The immune response of Balb/c mice infected with E. granulosus is characterized by secretion of antibodies specific for carbohydrate epitopes and production of type-2 cytokines. A role for glycoconjugates in the induction of type-2 responses has been suggested in other host--parasite systems. Although glycoconjugates are immunogenic in E. granulosus infection, the role of these molecules in the establishment of the type-2 response has never been analysed. In this study, a carbohydrate rich fraction (E4+) from E. granulosus protoscoleces was obtained using the monoclonal antibody E492/G1 specific for the moiety Galalpha(1,4)Gal which is widely represented in protoscoleces and other E. granulosus antigenic preparations. The results showed that E4+ was immunogenic in Balb/c mice evoking an antibody response mainly directed against carbohydrate epitopes. In addition, splenocytes from E4+-immunized mice showed suppressed proliferative responses to Con A and E4+ induced IL-10 secretion by E4+-primed and naive splenocytes. The fraction E4+ also was immunogenic in infected mice during early infection. In this case also, splenocytes from infected mice as well as peritoneal cells from infected or naive mice, when stimulated in vitro with E4+, secreted IL-10. Collectively, these results suggest that E4+ may be involved in immunosuppression phenomena and, by stimulating IL-10 secretion, may contribute to the induction and sustaining of the type-2 cytokine response established in early experimental infection.

  1. Rising Cellular Immune Response after Injection of pVax/iutA: A Genetic DNA Cassette as Candidate Vaccine against Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    BAKHTIARI, Ronak; AHMADIAN, Shahin; FALLAH MEHRABADI, Jalil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are major bacterial agent of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI). This infection is more prevalent among women because approximately half of all women will experience a UTI in their life-time and near a quarter of them will have a recurrent infection within 6–12 months. IutA protein has a major role during UPEC pathogenesis and consequently infection. Therefore, the aim of current study was assessment of IutA protein roles as a potential candidate antigen based for vaccine designing. Methods: This survey was conducted during 2014–2015 at the University of Tehran, Iran. Chromosomal DNA extracted from E. coli 35218 and iutA gene amplified by PCR. The amplicon cloned to pVax.1 eukaryotic expression vector and recombinant vector confirmed by sequencing. The iutA gene expression in genetic cassette of pVax/iutA was evaluated in COS7 cell line by RT-PCR. Then, injected to mouse model, which divided to three groups: injected with pVax vector, PBS and pVax/iutA cassette respectively in two stages (d 1 and 14). One week after the second injection, bleeding from immunized mouse was performed and IFN-gamma was measured. Results: The mice immunized with pVax/iutA showed increased interferon-γ responses significantly higher than two non-immunized groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: Cellular immune response has a main protective role against UTI. Raising this kind of immune response is important to preventing of recurrent infection. Moreover, the current DNA cassette will be valuable for more trying to prepare a new vaccine against UTI. PMID:27516995

  2. Rising Cellular Immune Response after Injection of pVax/iutA: A Genetic DNA Cassette as Candidate Vaccine against Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak BAKHTIARI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC are major bacterial agent of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI. This infection is more prevalent among women because approximately half of all women will experience a UTI in their life-time and near a quarter of them will have a recurrent infection within 6–12 months. IutA protein has a major role during UPEC pathogenesis and consequently infection. Therefore, the aim of current study was assessment of IutA protein roles as a potential candidate antigen based for vaccine designing.Methods: This survey was conducted during 2014-2015 at the University of Tehran, Iran. Chromosomal DNA extracted from E. coli 35218 and iutA gene amplified by PCR. The amplicon cloned to pVax.1 eukaryotic expression vector and recombinant vector confirmed by sequencing. The iutA gene expression in genetic cassette of pVax/iutA was evaluated in COS7 cell line by RT-PCR. Then, injected to mouse model, which divided to three groups: injected with pVax vector, PBS and pVax/iutA cassette respectively in two stages (d 1 and 14. One week after the second injection, bleeding from immunized mouse was performed and IFN-gamma was measured.Results: The mice immunized with pVax/iutA showed increased interferon-γ responses significantly higher than two non-immunized groups (P<0.05.Conclusion: Cellular immune response has a main protective role against UTI. Raising this kind of immune response is important to preventing of recurrent infection. Moreover, the current DNA cassette will be valuable for more trying to prepare a new vaccine against UTI. Keywords: Genetic vaccination, Uropathogenic escherichia coli, IutA

  3. In vivo monitoring of transfected DNA, gene expression kinetics, and cellular immune responses in mice immunized with a human NIS gene-expressing plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hye-Youn; Jeon, Yong-Hyun; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Chul-Woo

    2016-12-01

    In assessing the effectiveness of DNA vaccines, it is important to monitor: (1) the kinetics of target gene expression in vivo; and (2) the movement of cells that become transfected with the plasmid DNA used in the immunization of a subject. In this study, we used, as a visual imaging marker, expression of the transfected human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene, which enhances intracellular radio-pertechnetate (TcO4-) accumulation. After intradermal (i.d.) and systemic injection of mice with pcDNA-hNIS and radioactive Technetium-99m (Tc-99m), respectively, whole-body images were obtained by nuclear scintigraphy. The migration of mice cells transfected with the hNIS gene was monitored over a 2-week period by gamma-radioactivity counting of isolated cell populations and was demonstrated in peripheral lymphoid tissues, especially in the draining lymph nodes (dLNs). Beginning at 24 h after DNA inoculation and continuing for the 2-week monitoring period, hNIS-expressing cells were observed specifically in the T-cell-rich zones of the paracortical area of the dLNs. Over the same time period, high levels of INF-γ-secreting CD8 T-cells were found in the dLNs of the pcDNA-hNIS immunized mice. Tumor growth was also significantly retarded in the mice that received hNIS DNA immunization followed by inoculation with CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells that had been transfected with the rat NIS gene (rNIS), which is 93% homologous to the hNIS gene. In conclusion, mouse cells transfected with hNIS DNA after i.d. immunization were found to traffic to the dLNs, and hNIS gene expression in these cells continued for at least 2 weeks post immunization. Furthermore, sequential presentation of NIS DNA to T-cells by migratory antigen presenting cells could induce NIS DNA-specific Th1 immune responses and thus retard the growth of NIS-expressing tumors.

  4. Modeling evolution and immune system by cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezzi, M. [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Florence (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    In this review the behavior of two different biological systems is investigated using cellular automata. Starting from this spatially extended approach it is also tried, in some cases, to reduce the complexity of the system introducing mean-field approximation, and solving (or trying to solve) these simplified systems. It is discussed the biological meaning of the results, the comparison with experimental data (if available) and the different features between spatially extended and mean-field versions. The biological systems considered in this review are the following: Darwinian evolution in simple ecosystems and immune system response. In the first section the main features of molecular evolution are introduced, giving a short survey of genetics for physicists and discussing some models for prebiotic systems and simple ecosystems. It is also introduced a cellular automaton model for studying a set of evolving individuals in a general fitness landscape, considering also the effects of co-evolution. In particular the process of species formation (speciation) is described in sect. 5. The second part deals with immune system modeling. The biological features of immune response are discussed, as well as it is introduced the concept of shape space and of idiotypic network. More detailed reviews which deal with immune system models (mainly focused on idiotypic network models) can be found. Other themes here discussed: the applications of CA to immune system modeling, two complex cellular automata for humoral and cellular immune response. Finally, it is discussed the biological data and the general conclusions are drawn in the last section.

  5. In vitro induction of tumor-specific immunity. VI: analysis of specificity of immune response by cellular competitive inhibition: limitations and advantages of the technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chism, S E; Burton, R C; Grail, D L; Bell, P M; Warner, N L

    1977-01-01

    The cellular competitive inhibition 51Cr-release assay makes two distinct contributions to the in vitro study of cell-mediated immunity. It allows target cells which are not amenable to isotopic labelling to be investigated for their antigenic specificity, and it provides a means, complementary to the direct cytotoxicity assay, of estimating qualitative and quantitative differences in antigen expression on intact normal and neoplastic cells. Various parameters of a micro-51Cr-release inhibition assay have been studied, and it was found that the assay conditions markedly influenced both the sensitivity and specificity. It is concluded that optimal assay conditions for specificity include: 1) moderate levels of lysis on the linear part of the CL/T titration curve, 2) avoidance of prolonged assay times, and 3) low ratios of blocker to target cells. When tumor cells with large cell volumes are used as competitive inhibitor (blocker) cells, non-specific blocking will occur; limits have been defined for this particular micro-inhibition assay which, in general, exclude these effects.

  6. Synthetic consensus HIV-1 DNA induces potent cellular immune responses and synthesis of granzyme B, perforin in HIV infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection.

  7. MAP Kinases in Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongliangZhang; ChenDong

    2005-01-01

    MAP kinases are evolutionarily conserved signaling regulators from budding yeast to mammals and play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. There are three main families of MAPKs in mammals. Each of them has its own activators, inactivators, substrates and scaffolds, which altogether form a fine signaling network in response to different extracellular or intracellular stimulation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding of the regulation of MAP kinases and the roles of MAP kinases in innate and adaptive immune responses. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):20-27.

  8. Humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by purified iridoid mixture that inhibits penetration of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae upon topical treatment of mice tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahgat, Mahmoud; Shalaby, Nagwa M M; Ruppel, Andreas; Maghraby, Amany S

    2005-08-01

    When tested for possible blocking effect on the cercarial, serine proteinase, elastase (CE) activity, an iridoid mixture extracted from leaves of Citharexylum quadrangular abolished 31% of the enzyme activity at final concentration 15 microg. When formulated in jojoba oil and applied to mice tails followed by infection with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, the iridoid mixture blocked cercarial penetration and caused significant reducetion (94%; P < 0.05) in worm burden in treated mice in comparison to controls. Also, immunomodulatory effects of iridoid mixture, iridoid-treated S. mansoni worm homogenate on mice were studied by measuring IgG and IgM levels against E. coli lysates (ECL), solube S. mansoni worm antigenic preparation (SWAP) and cancer bladder homogenates (CBH) as antigens by ELISA. Cellular immune responses were studied by calculating mean percent of CD4+, CD8(+)-T, B-mesenteric lymph node cells (MLNC) and CD4+, CD8(+)-T thymocytes by direct immunofluorescence staining in treated mice as compared to untreated homogenate given mice or untreated mice. Injecting mice with serial dilutions of iridoid mixture resulted in fluctuation, peaks and troughs, in both IgG and IgM responses against the above mentioned antigens. 1st and 2nd immunizations with iridoid mixture treated homogenate resulted in significantly elevated (P < 0.05). IgM and IgG levels against the 3 used antigens in comparison with sera from control mice. Immunized mice with homogenate treated with iridoid mixture showed a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CD4+T thymocytes, a non significant increase in CD8+T thymocytes, a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CD4+T lymphocytes (MLNC) and a non significant increase in CD8+ T- and B-lymphocytes (MLNC) compared with mice immunized with untreated homogenate or non-injected normal mice.

  9. Potent SIV-specific Cellular Immune Responses in the Breast Milk of SIV-infected, Lactating Rhesus Monkeys1

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Breast milk transmission of HIV is a leading cause of infant HIV/AIDS in the developing world. Remarkably, only a small minority of breastfeeding infants born to HIV-infected mothers contract HIV via breast milk exposure, raising the possibility that immune factors in the breast milk confer protection to the infants who remain uninfected. To model HIV-specific immunity in breast milk, lactation was pharmacologically induced in Mamu-A*01+ female rhesus monkeys. The composition of lymphocyte su...

  10. Heavy metal mediated innate immune responses of the Indian green frog, Euphlyctis hexadactylus (Anura: Ranidae): Cellular profiles and associated Th1 skewed cytokine response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayawardena, Uthpala A.; Ratnasooriya, Wanigasekara D.; Wickramasinghe, Deepthi D.; Udagama, Preethi V., E-mail: dappvr@yahoo.com

    2016-10-01

    Immune cell and cytokine profiles in relation to metal exposure though much studied in mammals has not been adequately investigated in amphibians, due mainly to lack of suitable reagents for cytokine profiling in non-model species. However, interspecies cross reactivity of cytokines permitted us to assay levels of IFNγ, TNFα, IL6 and IL10in a common anuran, the Indian green frog (Euphlyctis hexadactylus), exposed to heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb, at ~ 5 ppm each) under field and laboratory settings in Sri Lanka. Enumeration of immune cells in blood and melanomacrophages in the liver, assay of serum and hepatic cytokines, and Th1/Th2 cytokine polarisation were investigated. Immune cell counts indicated overall immunosuppression with decreasing total WBC and splenocyte counts while neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio increased with metal exposure, indicating metal mediated stress. Serum IL6 levels of metal exposed frogs reported the highest (~ 9360 pg/mL) of all cytokines tested. Significantly elevated IFNγ production (P < 0.05) was evident in heavy metal exposed frogs. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio in both serum and liver tissue homogenates was Th1 skewed due to significantly higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFNγ in serum and TNFα in the liver (P < 0.01).Metal mediated aggregations of melanomacrophages in the liver were positively and significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with the hepatic expression of TNFα, IL6 and IL10 activity. Overall, Th1 skewed response may well be due to oxidative stress mediated nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) which enhances the transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Xenobiotic stress has recently imposed an unprecedented level of threat to wildlife, particularly to sensitive species such as amphibians. Therefore, understanding the interactions between physiological stress and related immune responses is fundamental to conserve these environmental sentinels in the face of emerging eco

  11. Genetic vaccination with Flt3-L and GM-CSF as adjuvants:Enhancement of cellular and humoral immune responses that results in protective immunity in a murine model of hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jens Encke; Jomo Bernardin; Jasmin Geib; Gocha Barbakadze; Raymond Bujdoso; Wolfgang Stremmel

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether transfection of plasmid DNA encoding these cytokines enhances both humoral and cellular immune responses to hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a murine model.METHODS: We established a tumor model of HCV infection using syngenic mouse myeloma cells stably transfected with NS5. Co-vaccination of DNA encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) and Fit-3 ligand together with a plasmid encoding for the HCV NS5 protein was carried out. Mice were sacrificed 14 d after the last immunization event with collection of spleen cells and serum to determine humoral and cellular immune responses.RESULTS: Co-vaccination of DNA encoding GM-CSF and Flt-3 ligand together with a plasmid encoding for the HCV NS5 protein induced increased antibody responses and CD4+ T cell proliferation to this protein. Vaccination with DNA encoding GM-CSF and Flt-3L promoted protection against tumor formation and/or reduction in mice coimmunized with cytokine-encoding DNA constructs. This suggests this strategy is capable of generating cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in vivo. Following inoculation with plasmid DNA encoding Flt-3L, no increase in spleen size or in dendritic cell (DC) and natural killer cell numbers was observed. This was in contrast to a dramatic increase of both cell types after administration of recombinant Flt3-L in vivo. This suggests that vaccination with plasmid DNA encoding cytokines that regulate DC generation and mobilization may not promote unwanted side effects, such as autoimmunity, splenic fibrosis or hematopoietic malignancies that may occur with administration of recombinant forms of these proteins.CONCLUSION: Our data support the view that plasmid DNA vaccination is a promising approach for HCV immunization, and may provide a general adjuvant vaccination strategy against malignancies and other pathogens.

  12. A synthetic lymph node containing inactivated Treponema pallidum cells elicits strong, antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Lola V; Drapp, Rebecca L

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a synthetic lymph node (SLN) for delivery of Treponema pallidum (Tp) antigens. Immune responses of C57BL/6 mice were analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after SLN implantation. Group 1 mice received SLN with no antigen; Group 2, SLN with formalin-inactivated Tp (f-Tp); and Group 3, SLN with f-Tp plus a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. When tested by ELISA, sera from Group 2 and Group 3 mice showed stronger IgG antibody reactivity than sera from Group 1 mice to sonicates of f-Tp or untreated Tp, but not to sonicate of normal rabbit testicular extract at all times. The IgG1 level was higher than IgG2c level for Group 2 mice at all times and for Group 3 mice at 4 and 8 weeks. IgG1 and IgG2c levels were nearly equivalent for Group 3 mice at 12 weeks. Immunoblotting showed that IgG from Group 2 and Group 3 mice recognized several Tp proteins at all times. Supernatants of splenocytes from Group 2 and Group 3 mice contained significantly more IFNγ than those from Group 1 mice after stimulation with f-Tp at all times. A significant level of IL-4 was not detected in any supernatants. These data show that strong humoral and cellular immune responses to Tp can be elicited via a SLN.

  13. Study of cellular immunity response of mB7-1 gene transfected mouse ovarian cancer cell line and its tumorigeneeities in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Jie; Liang Huamao; Yang Xingsheng; Cui Baoxia; Zhang Youzhong; Kong Beihua

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cellular immunity response in vitro and the tumorigenecities in vivo of mB7-1 gene transfected murine ovarian cancer cell line. Methods: mB7-1 gene was transfected into the NuTu-19 cell line by retrovirus vector, and the expression of mB7-1 gene was confirmed by flow cytometry(FCM).NuTu-19/neo and NuTu-19/mB7-1 cells were injected subcutaneously into syngeneic Fischer 344 rats respectively, and their tumorigenecities were recorded. Proliferation indices of lymphocyte were assayed after syngenieic mixed tumor-lymphocyte cultures(MTLCs). The lysis activity of CTL toward tumor cells was determined using methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium(MTT) assay. Results: Successful transfection of mB7-1 gene into NuTu-19 cell line was comfirmed with FCM. In vitro study showed that there was no obvious changes in cell growth of gene transfected cell line, compared with the cell line NuTu-19. NuTu-19/mB7-1 cells could induce more effective proliferation of effector lymphocytes( P < 0.05). The lysis activity of CTL activated by NuTu-19/mB7-1 was stronger than that of NuTu-19/neo ( P < 0.01). Tumor sizes were smaller in the NuTu-19/mB7-1 receptance syngeneic Fischer 344 rats compared with those in the control group. Conclusion: mB7-1 genetically modified ovarian cancer cells could induce the cellular immunity response in vitro and the tumorigenecitiy of NuTu-19 cells was decreased after inoculation with the experimental vaccine.

  14. Norovirus P particle efficiently elicits innate, humoral and cellular immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Fang

    Full Text Available Norovirus (NoV P domain complexes, the 24 mer P particles and the P dimers, induced effective humoral immunity, but their role in the cellular immune responses remained unclear. We reported here a study on cellular immune responses of the two P domain complexes in comparison with the virus-like particle (VLP of a GII.4 NoV (VA387 in mice. The P domain complexes induced significant central memory CD4(+ T cell phenotypes (CD4(+ CD44(+ CD62L(+ CCR7(+ and activated polyclonal CD4(+ T cells as shown by production of Interleukin (IL-2, Interferon (IFN-γ, and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-α. Most importantly, VA387-specific CD4(+ T cell epitope induced a production of IFN-γ, indicating an antigen-specific CD4(+ T cell response in P domain complex-immunized mice. Furthermore, P domain complexes efficiently induced bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (BMDC maturation, evidenced by up-regulation of co-stimulatory and MHC class II molecules, as well as production of IL-12 and IL-1β. Finally, P domain complex-induced mature dendritic cells (DCs elicited proliferation of specific CD4(+ T cells targeting VA387 P domain. Overall, we conclude that the NoV P domain complexes are efficiently presented by DCs to elicit not only humoral but also cellular immune responses against NoVs. Since the P particle is highly effective for both humoral and cellular immune responses and easily produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli, it is a good choice of vaccine against NoVs and a vaccine platform against other diseases.

  15. Evaluation of humoral and cellular immune responses to BP26 and OMP31 epitopes in the attenuated Brucella melitensis vaccinated sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjing; Wu, Jingbo; Qiao, Jun; Weng, Yunceng; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Qingyu; Qiu, Jinlang; Chen, Chuangfu; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2014-02-07

    In recent years, the number of cases of human brucellosis has been increasing by approximately 10% per year in China. Most cases were caused by Brucella melitensis through contacts with infected sheep, goats or their products. An attenuated B. melitensis vaccine M5-90 is currently used to vaccinate both animals in China. This vaccine has not been investigated for critical parameters such as immune response and its association with protective efficacy. In this study, humoral and cellular immune response to the periplasmic protein BP26 and the outer membrane protein OMP31 were evaluated in M5-90 vaccinated Chinese merino and Kazak sheep. Antibodies to BP26 or OMP31 were detected at low levels, and specific IFN-γ response was quantified. Strongly reactive peptides derived from BP26 and OMP31 identified five T-cell epitopes (BP26-6, -8, -11, -12 and OMP31-23) common to both sheep species, five species-specific epitopes (BP26-10, -18, -21 and -22 and OMP31-12) and four animal-specific epitopes (BP26-15, -23, OMP31-6 and -21), which stimulated specific IFN-γ response in vaccinated sheep. Among those T-cell epitopes, reactivity to BP26-18 and -21 epitopes was significantly associated with MHC-I B allele (P=0.024). However, a specific T-cell response induced by the M5-90 vaccine was relatively week and did not sustain long enough, which might be suppressed by rapid activation of T-regulatory (Treg) cells following vaccination. These findings provide an insight in designing a safer and more effective vaccine for use in animals and in humans.

  16. Dynamic Metabolism in Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Chakraborty, Paramita; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-01-01

    Cell, the basic unit of life depends for its survival on nutrients and thereby energy to perform its physiological function. Cells of lymphoid and myeloid origin are key in evoking an immune response against “self” or “non-self” antigens. The thymus derived lymphoid cells called T cells are a heterogenous group with distinct phenotypic and molecular signatures that have been shown to respond against an infection (bacterial, viral, protozoan) or cancer. Recent studies have unearthed the key differences in energy metabolism between the various T cell subsets, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid derived suppressor cells. While a number of groups are dwelling into the nuances of the metabolism and its role in immune response at various strata, this review focuses on dynamic state of metabolism that is operational within various cellular compartments that interact to mount an effective immune response to alleviate disease state.

  17. Heavy metal mediated innate immune responses of the Indian green frog, Euphlyctis hexadactylus (Anura: Ranidae): Cellular profiles and associated Th1 skewed cytokine response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Uthpala A; Ratnasooriya, Wanigasekara D; Wickramasinghe, Deepthi D; Udagama, Preethi V

    2016-10-01

    Immune cell and cytokine profiles in relation to metal exposure though much studied in mammals has not been adequately investigated in amphibians, due mainly to lack of suitable reagents for cytokine profiling in non-model species. However, interspecies cross reactivity of cytokines permitted us to assay levels of IFNγ, TNFα, IL6 and IL10in a common anuran, the Indian green frog (Euphlyctis hexadactylus), exposed to heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb, at ~5ppm each) under field and laboratory settings in Sri Lanka. Enumeration of immune cells in blood and melanomacrophages in the liver, assay of serum and hepatic cytokines, and Th1/Th2 cytokine polarisation were investigated. Immune cell counts indicated overall immunosuppression with decreasing total WBC and splenocyte counts while neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio increased with metal exposure, indicating metal mediated stress. Serum IL6 levels of metal exposed frogs reported the highest (~9360pg/mL) of all cytokines tested. Significantly elevated IFNγ production (Pfrogs. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio in both serum and liver tissue homogenates was Th1 skewed due to significantly higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFNγ in serum and TNFα in the liver (P<0.01).Metal mediated aggregations of melanomacrophages in the liver were positively and significantly (P<0.05) correlated with the hepatic expression of TNFα, IL6 and IL10 activity. Overall, Th1 skewed response may well be due to oxidative stress mediated nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) which enhances the transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Xenobiotic stress has recently imposed an unprecedented level of threat to wildlife, particularly to sensitive species such as amphibians. Therefore, understanding the interactions between physiological stress and related immune responses is fundamental to conserve these environmental sentinels in the face of emerging eco-challenges.

  18. Waning and aging of cellular immunity to Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Twillert, Inonge; Han, Wanda G H; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2015-11-01

    While it is clear that the maintenance of Bordetella pertussis-specific immunity evoked both after vaccination and infection is insufficient, it is unknown at which pace waning occurs and which threshold levels of sustained functional memory B and T cells are required to provide long-term protection. Longevity of human cellular immunity to B. pertussis has been studied less extensively than serology, but is suggested to be key for the observed differences between the duration of protection induced by acellular vaccination and whole cell vaccination or infection. The induction and maintenance of levels of protective memory B and T cells may alter with age, associated with changes of the immune system throughout life and with accumulating exposures to circulating B. pertussis or vaccine doses. This is relevant since pertussis affects all age groups. This review summarizes current knowledge on the waning patterns of human cellular immune responses to B. pertussis as addressed in diverse vaccination and infection settings and in various age groups. Knowledge on the effectiveness and flaws in human B. pertussis-specific cellular immunity ultimately will advance the improvement of pertussis vaccination strategies.

  19. Surface structure characterization of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia mutated in the melanin synthesis pathway and their human cellular immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Beaussart, Audrey; Dufrêne, Yves F; Sharma, Meenu; Bansal, Kushagra; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Brakhage, Axel A; Kaveri, Srini V; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Beauvais, Anne

    2014-08-01

    In Aspergillus fumigatus, the conidial surface contains dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin. Six-clustered gene products have been identified that mediate sequential catalysis of DHN-melanin biosynthesis. Melanin thus produced is known to be a virulence factor, protecting the fungus from the host defense mechanisms. In the present study, individual deletion of the genes involved in the initial three steps of melanin biosynthesis resulted in an altered conidial surface with masked surface rodlet layer, leaky cell wall allowing the deposition of proteins on the cell surface and exposing the otherwise-masked cell wall polysaccharides at the surface. Melanin as such was immunologically inert; however, deletion mutant conidia with modified surfaces could activate human dendritic cells and the subsequent cytokine production in contrast to the wild-type conidia. Cell surface defects were rectified in the conidia mutated in downstream melanin biosynthetic pathway, and maximum immune inertness was observed upon synthesis of vermelone onward. These observations suggest that although melanin as such is an immunologically inert material, it confers virulence by facilitating proper formation of the A. fumigatus conidial surface.

  20. Immune response to fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Jose L; Garcia, Marta E

    2008-09-15

    The immune mechanisms of defence against fungal infections are numerous, and range from protective mechanisms that were present early in evolution (innate immunity) to sophisticated adaptive mechanisms that are induced specifically during infection and disease (adaptive immunity). The first-line innate mechanism is the presence of physical barriers in the form of skin and mucous membranes, which is complemented by cell membranes, cellular receptors and humoral factors. There has been a debate about the relative contribution of humoral and cellular immunity to host defence against fungal infections. For a long time it was considered that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was important, but humoral immunity had little or no role. However, it is accepted now that CMI is the main mechanism of defence, but that certain types of antibody response are protective. In general, Th1-type CMI is required for clearance of a fungal infection, while Th2 immunity usually results in susceptibility to infection. Aspergillosis, which is a disease caused by the fungus Aspergillus, has been the subject of many studies, including details of the immune response. Attempts to relate aspergillosis to some form of immunosuppression in animals, as is the case with humans, have not been successful to date. The defence against Aspergillus is based on recognition of the pathogen, a rapidly deployed and highly effective innate effector phase, and a delayed but robust adaptive effector phase. Candida albicans, part of the normal microbial flora associated with mucous surfaces, can be present as congenital candidiasis or as acquired defects of cell-mediated immunity. Resistance to this yeast is associated with Th1 CMI, whereas Th2 immunity is associated with susceptibility to systemic infection. Dermatophytes produce skin alterations in humans and other animals, and the essential role of the CMI response is to destroy the fungi and produce an immunoprotective status against re-infection. The resolution

  1. Combinatorial Contextualization of Peptidic Epitopes for Enhanced Cellular Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masaki; Hayashi, Kazumi; Adachi, Eru; Minamisawa, Tamiko; Homma, Sadamu; Koido, Shigeo; Shiba, Kiyotaka

    2014-01-01

    Invocation of cellular immunity by epitopic peptides remains largely dependent on empirically developed protocols, such as interfusion of aluminum salts or emulsification using terpenoids and surfactants. To explore novel vaccine formulation, epitopic peptide motifs were co-programmed with structural motifs to produce artificial antigens using our “motif-programming” approach. As a proof of concept, we used an ovalbumin (OVA) system and prepared an artificial protein library by combinatorially polymerizing MHC class I and II sequences from OVA along with a sequence that tends to form secondary structures. The purified endotoxin-free proteins were then examined for their ability to activate OVA-specific T-cell hybridoma cells after being processed within dendritic cells. One clone, F37A (containing three MHC I and two MHC II OVA epitopes), possessed a greater ability to evoke cellular immunity than the native OVA or the other artificial antigens. The sensitivity profiles of drugs that interfered with the F37A uptake differed from those of the other artificial proteins and OVA, suggesting that alteration of the cross-presentation pathway is responsible for the enhanced immunogenicity. Moreover, F37A, but not an epitopic peptide, invoked cellular immunity when injected together with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), and retarded tumor growth in mice. Thus, an artificially synthesized protein antigen induced cellular immunity in vivo in the absence of incomplete Freund's adjuvant or aluminum salts. The method described here could be potentially used for developing vaccines for such intractable ailments as AIDS, malaria and cancer, ailments in which cellular immunity likely play a crucial role in prevention and treatment. PMID:25343355

  2. Cellular Immune Responses for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen Recognized by T Cells 3 in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Kiichiro; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Arai, Kuniaki; Sunagozaka, Hajime; Fushimi, Kazumi; Nakagawa, Hidetoshi; Yamada, Kazutoshi; Terashima, Takeshi; Kitahara, Masaaki; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims Squamous cell carcinoma antigen recognized by T cells 3 (SART3), a tumor-associated antigen expressed in many cancers, functions in tumor rejection. In this study, we investigated its usefulness as an immunotherapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods The expression of SART3 in hepatoma cell lines and HCC tissues was investigated by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses. Two peptides derived from SART3 (SART3109 and SART3315) were used for immunological analysis. T-cell responses were investigated by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 47 patients, and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in 8 of 47 patients with HCC. The safety of immunotherapy using a SART3-derived peptide was investigated by vaccinations of SART3109 in 12 patients with HCC (trial registration: UMIN000005677). Results The immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses showed that SART3 was expressed in six HCC cell lines, and in HCC tissues including of alpha-fetoprotein-negative individuals. SART3-specific CTLs were generated by stimulating PBMCs with the peptides, and they showed cytotoxicity against HCC cells expressing the protein. Of the 47 HCC patients, 25.5% and 10.6% showed significant responses to SART3109 and SART3315, respectively. The infiltration of SART3109-specific IFN-γ-producing CTLs into the tumor site was confirmed. In the vaccination study, no severe adverse events were observed, and the peptide-specific CTLs were newly induced in four of five patients tested. Conclusions SART3 is an immunotherapeutic candidate, and peptides from this antigen may be applied in HCC immunotherapy. Trial Registration UMIN000005677 PMID:28114424

  3. Development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to feline interferon (fIFN)-γ as tools to evaluate cellular immune responses to feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Ryoichi; Kaku, Ayumi; Satomura, Megumi; Kohori, Michiyo; Noura, Kanako; Furukawa, Tomoko; Kotake, Masako; Takano, Tomomi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) can cause a lethal disease in cats, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of FIPV infection has been recognised in experimentally infected cats, and cellular immunity is considered to play an important role in preventing the onset of FIP. To evaluate the importance of cellular immunity for FIPV infection, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against feline interferon (fIFN)-γ were first created to establish fIFN-γ detection systems using the MAbs. Six anti-fIFN-γ MAbs were created. Then, the difference in epitope which those MAbs recognise was demonstrated by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and IFN-γ neutralisation tests. Detection systems for fIFN-γ (sandwich ELISA, ELISpot assay, and two-colour flow cytometry) were established using anti-fIFN-γ MAbs that recognise different epitopes. In all tests, fIFN-γ production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from cats experimentally infected with an FIPV isolate that did not develop the disease was significantly increased by heat-inactivated FIPV stimulation in comparison with medium alone. Especially, CD8(+)fIFN-γ(+) cells, but not CD4(+)fIFN-γ(+) cells, were increased. In contrast, fIFN-γ production from PBMCs isolated from cats that had developed FIP and specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats was not increased by heat-inactivated FIPV stimulation. These results suggest that cellular immunity plays an important role in preventing the development of FIP. Measurement of fIFN-γ production with the anti-fIFN-γ MAbs created in this study appeared to be useful in evaluating cellular immunity in cats.

  4. Exercise boosts immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Ruth

    2012-06-29

    Ageing is associated with a decline in normal functioning of the immune system described as 'immunosenescence'. This contributes to poorer vaccine response and increased incidence of infection and malignancy seen in older people. Regular exercise can enhance vaccination response, increase T-cells and boost the function of the natural killer cells in the immune system. Exercise also lowers levels of the inflammatory cytokines that cause the 'inflamm-ageing' that is thought to play a role in conditions including cardiovascular disease; type 2 diabetes; Alzheimer's disease; osteoporosis and some cancers.

  5. Towards the conservation of endangered avian species: a recombinant West Nile Virus vaccine results in increased humoral and cellular immune responses in Japanese Quail (Coturnix japonica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay A Young

    Full Text Available West Nile Virus (WNV arrived in North America in 1999 and is now endemic. Many families of birds, especially corvids, are highly susceptible to WNV and infection often results in fatality. Avian species susceptible to WNV infection also include endangered species, such as the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus uropbasianuts and the Eastern Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus migrans. The virus has been shown to contribute towards the likelihood of their extinction. Although a clear and present threat, there exists no avian WNV vaccine available to combat this lethal menace. As a first step in establishing an avian model for testing candidate WNV vaccines, avian antibody based reagents were assessed for cross-reactivity with Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica T cell markers CD4 and CD8; the most reactive were found to be the anti-duck CD8 antibody, clone Du-CD8-1, and the anti-chicken/turkey CD4 antibody, clone CT4. These reagents were then used to assess vaccine performance as well as to establish T cell populations in quail, with a novel population of CD4/CD8 double positive T cells being identified in Japanese quail. Concurrently, non-replicating recombinant adenoviruses, expressing either the WNV envelope or NS3 'genes' were constructed and assessed for effectiveness as avian vaccines. Japanese Quail were selected for testing the vaccines, as they provide an avian model that parallels the population diversity of bird species in the wild. Both the level of WNV specific antibodies and the number of T cells in vaccinated birds were increased compared to unvaccinated controls. The results indicate the vaccines to be effective in increasing both humoral and cellular immune responses. These recombinant vaccines therefore may find utility as tools to protect and maintain domestic and wild avian populations. Their implementation may also arrest the progression towards extinction of endangered avian species and reduce the viral reservoir that

  6. A polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine applied by needle-free intradermal delivery induces cross-reactive humoral and cellular immune responses in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Karlsson, Ingrid;

    2016-01-01

    influenza in pigs, the development of more effective swine influenza vaccines inducing broader cross-protective immune responses is needed. Previously, we have shown that a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine using vectors containing antibiotic resistance genes induced a broadly protective immune response......BACKGROUND: Pigs are natural hosts for influenza A viruses, and the infection is widely prevalent in swine herds throughout the world. Current commercial influenza vaccines for pigs induce a narrow immune response and are not very effective against antigenically diverse viruses. To control...... in pigs and ferrets using intradermal injection followed by electroporation. However, this vaccination approach is not practical in large swine herds, and DNA vaccine vectors containing antibiotic resistance genes are undesirable. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the immunogenicity of an optimized version...

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis recombinant MOMP encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles triggers primarily T helper 1 cellular and antibody immune responses in mice: a desirable candidate nanovaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairley SJ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stacie J Fairley, Shree R Singh, Abebayehu N Yilma, Alain B Waffo, Praseetha Subbarayan, Saurabh Dixit, Murtada A Taha, Chino D Cambridge, Vida A Dennis Center for NanoBiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA Abstract: We recently demonstrated by in vitro experiments that PLGA (poly D, L-lactide-co-glycolide potentiates T helper 1 (Th1 immune responses induced by a peptide derived from the recombinant major outer membrane protein (rMOMP of Chlamydia trachomatis, and may be a promising vaccine delivery system. Herein we evaluated the immune-potentiating potential of PLGA by encapsulating the full-length rMOMP (PLGA-rMOMP, characterizing it in vitro, and investigating its immunogenicity in vivo. Our hypothesis was that PLGA-rMOMP triggers Th1 immune responses in mice, which are desirable prerequisites for a C. trachomatis candidate nanovaccine. Physical-structural characterizations of PLGA-rMOMP revealed its size (approximately 272 nm, zeta potential (−14.30 mV, apparent spherical smooth morphology, and continuous slow release pattern. PLGA potentiated the ability of encapsulated rMOMP to trigger production of cytokines and chemokines by mouse J774 macrophages. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with PLGA-rMOMP had elevated numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets, and secreted more rMOMP-specific interferon-gamma (Th1 and interleukin (IL-12p40 (Th1/Th17 than IL-4 and IL-10 (Th2 cytokines. PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice produced higher serum immunoglobulin (IgG and IgG2a (Th1 than IgG1 (Th2 rMOMP-specific antibodies. Notably, sera from PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice had a 64-fold higher Th1 than Th2 antibody titer, whereas mice immunized with rMOMP in Freund's adjuvant had only a four-fold higher Th1 than Th2 antibody titer, suggesting primarily induction of a Th1 antibody response in PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice. Our data underscore PLGA as an effective delivery system for a C

  8. Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0423 TITLE: Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Smita...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0423 Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...immune checkpoint blockade, local CTLA-4 modulation, prostate cancer immunotherapy , prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), RNA-based vaccines 16

  9. Co-administration of Interleukin-2 Enhances Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses to HIV Vaccine DNA Prime/MVA Boost Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chun-lai; YU Xiang-hui; WU Yong-ge; LI Wei; KONG Wei

    2005-01-01

    Interleukine-2(IL-2) is a growth factor for antigen-stimulated T lymphocytes and is responsible for T-cell clonal expansion after antigen recognition. It has been demonstrated that DNA vaccine-elicited immune responses in mice could be augmented substantially by using either an IL-2 protein or a plasmid expressing IL-2. Twenty mice, divided into four experimental groups, were immunized with: (1) sham plasmid; (2) HIV-1 DNA vaccine alone; (3) HIV-1 DNA vaccine and IL-2 protein; or (4) HIV-1 DNA vaccine and IL-2 plasmid, separately. All the groups were immunized 3 times at a 2-week interval. Fourteen days after the last DNA vaccine injection, recombinant MVA was injected into all the mice except those in group 1. ELISA and ELISPOT were employed to investigate the effect of IL-2 on DNA vaccine immune responses. The obtained results strongly indicate that the efficacy of HIV vaccine can be enhanced by co-administration of a plasmid encoding IL-2.

  10. Immune responses to bioengineered organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochando, Jordi; Charron, Dominique; Baptista, Pedro M.; Uygun, Basak E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Organ donation in the United States registered 9079 deceased organ donors in 2015. This high percentage of donations allowed organ transplantation in 29 851 recipients. Despite increasing numbers of transplants performed in comparison with previous years, the numbers of patients that are in need for a transplant increase every year at a higher rate. This reveals that the discrepancy between the demand and availability of organs remains fundamental problem in organ transplantation. Recent findings Development of bioengineered organs represents a promising approach to increase the pool of organs for transplantation. The technology involves obtaining complex three-dimensional scaffolds that support cellular activity and functional remodeling though tissue recellularization protocols using progenitor cells. This innovative approach integrates cross-thematic approaches from specific areas of transplant immunology, tissue engineering and stem cell biology, to potentially manufacture an unlimited source of donor organs for transplantation. Summary Although bioengineered organs are thought to escape immune recognition, the potential immune reactivity toward each of its components has not been studied in detail. Here, we summarize the host immune response toward different progenitor cells and discuss the potential implications of using nonself biological scaffolds to develop bioengineered organs. PMID:27926545

  11. Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi T. cruzi I strains with different degrees of virulence induce diverse humoral and cellular immune responses in a murine experimental infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, B; Rico, T; Sosa, S; Oaxaca, E; Vizcaino-Castillo, A; Caballero, M L; Martínez, I

    2010-01-01

    It is has been shown that the majority of T. cruzi strains isolated from Mexico belong to the T. cruzi I (TCI). The immune response produced in response to Mexican T. cruzi I strains has not been well characterized. In this study, two Mexican T. cruzi I strains were used to infect Balb/c mice. The Queretaro (TBAR/MX/0000/Queretaro)(Qro) strain resulted in 100% mortality. In contrast, no mortality was observed in mice infected with the Ninoa (MHOM/MX/1994/Ninoa) strain. Both strains produced extended lymphocyte infiltrates in cardiac tissue. Ninoa infection induced a diverse humoral response with a higher variety of immunoglobulin isotypes than were found in Qro-infected mice. Also, a stronger inflammatory TH1 response, represented by IL-12p40, IFNgamma, RANTES, MIG, MIP-1beta, and MCP-1 production was observed in Qro-infected mice when compared with Ninoa-infected mice. We propose that an exacerbated TH1 immune response is a likely cause of pathological damage observed in cardiac tissue and the primary cause of death in Qro-infected mice.

  12. Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi (TCI Strains with Different Degrees of Virulence Induce Diverse Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in a Murine Experimental Infection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Espinoza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is has been shown that the majority of T. cruzi strains isolated from Mexico belong to the T. cruzi I (TCI. The immune response produced in response to Mexican T. cruzi I strains has not been well characterized. In this study, two Mexican T. cruzi I strains were used to infect Balb/c mice. The Queretaro (TBAR/MX/0000/Queretaro(Qro strain resulted in 100% mortality. In contrast, no mortality was observed in mice infected with the Ninoa (MHOM/MX/1994/Ninoa strain. Both strains produced extended lymphocyte infiltrates in cardiac tissue. Ninoa infection induced a diverse humoral response with a higher variety of immunoglobulin isotypes than were found in Qro-infected mice. Also, a stronger inflammatory TH1 response, represented by IL-12p40, IFNγ, RANTES, MIG, MIP-1β, and MCP-1 production was observed in Qro-infected mice when compared with Ninoa-infected mice. We propose that an exacerbated TH1 immune response is a likely cause of pathological damage observed in cardiac tissue and the primary cause of death in Qro-infected mice.

  13. Structural, cellular and molecular aspects of immune privilege in the testis

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    Nan eLi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The testis presents a special immunological environment, considering its property of immune privilege that tolerates allo- and auto-antigens. Testicular immune privilege was once believed to be mainly based on the sequestration of antigens from the immune system by the blood-testis barrier in the seminiferous epithelium. Substantial evidence supports the view that the combination of physical structure, testicular cells, and cytokines controls immune responses in the testis to preserve the structural and functional integrity of testicular immune privilege. Both systemic immune tolerance and local immunosuppression help maintain the immune privilege status. Constitutive expression of anti-inflammatory factors in testicular cells is critical for local immunosuppression. However, the testis locally generates an efficient innate immune system against pathogens. Disruption of these mechanisms may lead to orchitis and impair fertility. This review article highlights the current understanding of structural, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the unique immune environment of the testis, particularly its immune privilege status.

  14. Cationic lipid/DNA complexes (JVRS-100) combined with influenza vaccine (Fluzone) increases antibody response, cellular immunity, and antigenically drifted protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Marla; Callejo, Bernadette; Chang, Stella; Hong, David K; Lewis, David B; Carroll, Timothy D; Matzinger, Shannon; Fritts, Linda; Miller, Christopher J; Warner, John F; Liang, Lily; Fairman, Jeffery

    2009-06-12

    Safe and effective adjuvants for influenza vaccines that could increase both the levels of neutralizing antibody, including against drifted viral subtypes, and T-cell immunity would be a major advance in vaccine design. The JVRS-100 adjuvant, consisting of DOTIM/cholesterol cationic liposome-DNA complexes, is particularly promising for vaccines that require induction of high levels of antibody and T-cell immunity, including CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Inclusion of protein antigens with JVRS-100 results in the induction of enhanced humoral and cell-mediated (i.e., CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells) immune responses. The JVRS-100 adjuvant combined with a split trivalent influenza vaccine (Fluzone-sanofi pasteur) elicited increased antibody and T-cell responses in mice and non-human primates compared to vaccination with Fluzone alone. Mice vaccinated with JVRS-100-Fluzone and challenged with antigenically drifted strains of H1N1 (PR/8/34) and influenza B (B/Lee/40) viruses had higher grade protection, as measured by attenuation of weight loss and increased survival, compared to recipients of unadjuvanted vaccine. The results indicate that the JVRS-100 adjuvant substantially increases immunogenicity and protection from drifted-strain challenge using an existing influenza vaccine.

  15. Interferon γ Stimulates Cellular Maturation of Dendritic Cell Line DC2.4 Leading to Induction of Efficient Cytotoxic T Cell Responses and Antitumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianpei He; Chaoke Tang; Shulin Xu; Terence Moyana; Jim Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for the initiation of antigen (Ag)-specific immune responses. In most studies, mature DCs are generated from bone marrow cells or peripheral monocytes; in either case, the harvested cells are then cultured in medium containing recombinant GM-CSF, IL-4 and TNF-α for 7-10 days and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, this approach is time-consuming and expensive. There is another less cost approach of using immobilized DC cell lines, which can easily grow in the medium. A disadvantage with the immobilized DC cell lines, however, is that they are immature DCs and lack expression of MHC class Ⅱ and costimulatory CD40 and CD80 molecules. This, therefore, limits their capacity for inducing efficient antitumor immunity. In the current study, we investigated the possible efficacy of various stimuli (IL-1β,IFN-γ, TNF-α, CpG and LPS) in converting the immature dendritic cell line DC2.4 to mature DCs. Our findings were quite interesting since we demonstrated for the first time that IFN-γ was able to stimulate the maturation of DC2.4 cells. The IFN-γ-activated ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed DC2.4 cells have capacity to upregulate MHC class Ⅱ,CD40, CD80 and CCR7, and to more efficiently stimulate in vitro and in vivo OVA-specific CD8+ T cell responses and antitumor immunity. Therefore, IFN-γ-activated immortal DC2.4 cells may prove to be useful in the study of DC biology and antitumor immunity.

  16. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG enhanced Th1 cellular immunity but did not affect antibody responses in a human gut microbiota transplanted neonatal gnotobiotic pig model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wen

    Full Text Available This study aims to establish a human gut microbiota (HGM transplanted gnotobiotic (Gn pig model of human rotavirus (HRV infection and diarrhea, and to verify the dose-effects of probiotics on HRV vaccine-induced immune responses. Our previous studies using the Gn pig model found that probiotics dose-dependently regulated both T cell and B cell immune responses induced by rotavirus vaccines. We generated the HGM transplanted neonatal Gn pigs through daily feeding of neonatal human fecal suspension to germ-free pigs for 3 days starting at 12 hours after birth. We found that attenuated HRV (AttHRV vaccination conferred similar overall protection against rotavirus diarrhea and virus shedding in Gn pigs and HGM transplanted Gn pigs. HGM promoted the development of the neonatal immune system, as evidenced by the significantly enhanced IFN-γ producing T cell responses and reduction of regulatory T cells and their cytokine production in the AttHRV-vaccinated pigs. The higher dose Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG feeding (14 doses, up to 109 colony-forming-unit [CFU]/dose effectively increased the LGG counts in the HGM Gn pig intestinal contents and significantly enhanced HRV-specific IFN-γ producing T cell responses to the AttHRV vaccine. Lower dose LGG (9 doses, up to 106 CFU/dose was ineffective. Neither doses of LGG significantly improved the protection rate, HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers in serum, or IgA antibody titers in intestinal contents compared to the AttHRV vaccine alone, suggesting that an even higher dose of LGG is needed to overcome the influence of the microbiota to achieve the immunostimulatory effect in the HGM pigs. This study demonstrated that HGM Gn pig is an applicable animal model for studying immune responses to rotavirus vaccines and can be used for studying interventions (i.e., probiotics and prebiotics that may enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines through improving the gut microbiota.

  17. Plant viral nanoparticles-based HER2 vaccine: Immune response influenced by differential transport, localization and cellular interactions of particulate carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sourabh; Myers, Jay T; Woods, Sarah E; Gong, Xingjian; Czapar, Anna E; Commandeur, Ulrich; Huang, Alex Y; Levine, Alan D; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2017-03-01

    Cancer vaccines are designed to elicit an endogenous adaptive immune response that can successfully recognize and eliminate residual or recurring tumors. Such approaches can potentially overcome shortcomings of passive immunotherapies by generating long-lived therapeutic effects and immune memory while limiting systemic toxicities. A critical determinant of vaccine efficacy is efficient transport and delivery of tumor-associated antigens to professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Plant viral nanoparticles (VNPs) with natural tropism for APCs and a high payload carrying capacity may be particularly effective vaccine carriers. The applicability of VNP platform technologies is governed by stringent structure-function relationships. We compare two distinct VNP platforms: icosahedral cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) and filamentous potato virus X (PVX). Specifically, we evaluate in vivo capabilities of engineered VNPs delivering human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) epitopes for therapy and prophylaxis of HER2(+) malignancies. Our results corroborate the structure-function relationship where icosahedral CPMV particles showed significantly enhanced lymph node transport and retention, and greater uptake by/activation of APCs compared to filamentous PVX particles. These enhanced immune cell interactions and transport properties resulted in elevated HER2-specific antibody titers raised by CPMV- vs. PVX-based peptide vaccine. The 'synthetic virology' field is rapidly expanding with numerous platforms undergoing development and preclinical testing; our studies highlight the need for systematic studies to define rules guiding the design and rational choice of platform, in the context of peptide-vaccine display technologies.

  18. Sex hormones and the immune response in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Annechien; Heineman, Maas Jan; Faas, Marijke M.

    2005-01-01

    In addition to their effects on sexual differentiation and reproduction, sex hormones appear to influence the immune system. This results in a sexual dimorphism in the immune response in humans: for instance, females produce more vigorous cellular and more vigorous humoral immune reactions, are more

  19. Dengue in Vietnamese infants--results of infection-enhancement assays correlate with age-related disease epidemiology, and cellular immune responses correlate with disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Tran Nguyen Bich; Quyen, Nguyen Than Ha; Thuy, Tran Thi; Tuan, Nguyen Minh; Hoang, Dang Minh; Dung, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Lien, Le Bich; Quy, Nguyen Thien; Hieu, Nguyen Trong; Hieu, Lu Thi Minh; Hien, Tran Tinh; Hung, Nguyen Thanh; Farrar, Jeremy; Simmons, Cameron P

    2008-08-15

    The pathogenesis of severe dengue is not well understood. Maternally derived subneutralizing levels of dengue virus-reactive IgG are postulated to be a critical risk factor for severe dengue during infancy. In this study, we found that, in healthy Vietnamese infants, there was a strong temporal association between the Fc-dependent, dengue virus infection-enhancing activity of neat plasma and the age-related epidemiology of severe dengue. We then postulated that disease severity in infants with primary infections would be associated with a robust immune response, possibly as a consequence of higher viral burdens in vivo. Accordingly, in infants hospitalized with acute dengue, the activation phenotype of peripheral-blood NK cells and CD8+ and CD4+ T cells correlated with overall disease severity, but HLA-A*1101-restricted NS3(133-142)-specific CD8+ T cells were not measurable until early convalescence. Plasma levels of cytokines/chemokines were generally higher in infants with dengue shock syndrome. Collectively, these data support a model of dengue pathogenesis in infants whereby antibody-dependent enhancement of infection explains the age-related case epidemiology and could account for antigen-driven immune activation and its association with disease severity. These results also highlight potential risks in the use of live attenuated dengue vaccines in infants in countries where dengue is endemic.

  20. Seasonal changes in human immune responses to malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Theander, T G

    1993-01-01

    Cellular as well as humorol immune responses to malaria antigens fluctuate in time in individuals living in molono-endemic areas, particularly where malaria transmission is seasonal. The most pronounced changes are seen in association with clinical attacks, but osymptomatic infection can also lead...... to apparent immune depression. However, recent data have shown that seasonal variation in cellular immune responses may occur even in the absence of detectable porositaemia. Here, Lars Hviid and Thor G. Theonder review the seasonal variation in human immune responses to malaria, and discuss its possible...

  1. Cellular Immune Responses to Live Attenuated Japanese Encephalitis (JE) Vaccine SA14-14-2 in Adults in a JE/Dengue Co-Endemic Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatullo, Filippo; Bali, Tanushka; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Soni, Mohammed; Chan, Sajesh; Chib, Savita; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Fadnis, Prachi; Yaïch, Mansour; Fernandez, Stefan; Klenerman, Paul; Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Solomon, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) causes severe epidemic encephalitis across Asia, for which the live attenuated vaccine SA14-14-2 is being used increasingly. JEV is a flavivirus, and is closely related to dengue virus (DENV), which is co-endemic in many parts of Asia, with clinically relevant interactions. There is no information on the human T cell response to SA14-14-2, or whether responses to SA14-14-2 cross-react with DENV. We used live attenuated JE vaccine SA14-14-2 as a model for studying T cell responses to JEV infection in adults, and to determine whether these T cell responses are cross-reactive with DENV, and other flaviviruses. Methods We conducted a single arm, open label clinical trial (registration: clinicaltrials.gov NCT01656200) to study T cell responses to SA14-14-2 in adults in South India, an area endemic for JE and dengue. Results Ten out of 16 (62.5%) participants seroconverted to JEV SA14-14-2, and geometric mean neutralising antibody (NAb) titre was 18.5. Proliferation responses were commonly present before vaccination in the absence of NAb, indicating a likely high degree of previous flavivirus exposure. Thirteen of 15 (87%) participants made T cell interferon-gamma (IFNγ) responses against JEV proteins. In four subjects tested, at least some T cell epitopes mapped cross-reacted with DENV and other flaviviruses. Conclusions JEV SA14-14-2 was more immunogenic for T cell IFNγ than for NAb in adults in this JE/DENV co-endemic area. The proliferation positive, NAb negative combination may represent a new marker of long term immunity/exposure to JE. T cell responses can cross-react between JE vaccine and DENV in a co-endemic area, illustrating a need for greater knowledge on such responses to inform the development of next-generation vaccines effective against both diseases. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01656200) PMID:28135273

  2. A trifunctional dextran-based nanovaccine targets and activates murine dendritic cells, and induces potent cellular and humoral immune responses in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Shen

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs constitute an attractive target for specific delivery of nanovaccines for immunotherapeutic applications. Here we tested nano-sized dextran (DEX particles to serve as a DC-addressing nanocarrier platform. Non-functionalized DEX particles had no immunomodulatory effect on bone marrow (BM-derived murine DCs in vitro. However, when adsorbed with ovalbumine (OVA, DEX particles were efficiently engulfed by BM-DCs in a mannose receptor-dependent manner. A DEX-based nanovaccine containing OVA and lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a DC stimulus induced strong OVA peptide-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell proliferation both in vitro and upon systemic application in mice, as well as a robust OVA-specific humoral immune response (IgG1>IgG2a in vivo. Accordingly, this nanovaccine also raised both a more pronounced delayed-type hypersensitivity response and a stronger induction of cytotoxic CD8(+ T cells than obtained upon administration of OVA and LPS in soluble form. Therefore, DEX-based nanoparticles constitute a potent, versatile and easy to prepare nanovaccine platform for immunotherapeutic approaches.

  3. Increased cellular immune responses and CD4+ T-cell proliferation correlate with reduced plasma viral load in SIV challenged recombinant simian varicella virus - simian immunodeficiency virus (rSVV-SIV vaccinated rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahar Bapi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An effective AIDS vaccine remains one of the highest priorities in HIV-research. Our recent study showed that vaccination of rhesus macaques with recombinant simian varicella virus (rSVV vector – simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV envelope and gag genes, induced neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV and also significantly reduced plasma viral loads following intravenous pathogenic challenge with SIVMAC251/CX1. Findings The purpose of this study was to define cellular immunological correlates of protection in rSVV-SIV vaccinated and SIV challenged animals. Immunofluorescent staining and multifunctional assessment of SIV-specific T-cell responses were evaluated in both Experimental and Control vaccinated animal groups. Significant increases in the proliferating CD4+ T-cell population and polyfunctional T-cell responses were observed in all Experimental-vaccinated animals compared with the Control-vaccinated animals. Conclusions Increased CD4+ T-cell proliferation was significantly and inversely correlated with plasma viral load. Increased SIV-specific polyfunctional cytokine responses and increased proliferation of CD4+ T-cell may be crucial to control plasma viral loads in vaccinated and SIVMAC251/CX1 challenged macaques.

  4. Polyomavirus specific cellular immunity: from BK-virus-specific cellular immunity to BK-virus-associated nephropathy ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    manon edekeyser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In renal transplantation, BK-virus-associated nephropathy has emerged as a major complication, with a prevalence of 5–10% and graft loss in >50% of cases. BK-virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family and rarely induces apparent clinical disease in the general population. However, replication of polyomaviruses, associated with significant organ disease, is observed in patients with acquired immunosuppression, which suggests a critical role for virus-specific cellular immunity to control virus replication and prevent chronic disease. Monitoring of specific immunity combined with viral load could be used to individually assess the risk of viral reactivation and virus control. We review the current knowledge on BK-virus specific cellular immunity and, more specifically, in immunocompromised patients. In the future, immune-based therapies could allow us to treat and prevent BK-virus-associated nephropathy.

  5. Treatment of Leishmania (Leishmania) Amazonensis-Infected Mice with a Combination of a Palladacycle Complex and Heat-Killed Propionibacterium acnes Triggers Protective Cellular Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladi, Carolina S.; da Silva, Danielle A. M.; Motta, Priscila D.; Garcia, Daniel M.; Teixeira, Daniela; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda M.; Katz, Simone; Barbiéri, Clara L.

    2017-01-01

    Palladacycle complex DPPE 1.2 was previously reported to inhibit the in vitro and in vivo infection by Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of DPPE 1.2, in association with heat-killed Propionibacterium acnes, on L. (L.) amazonensis infection in two mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, and to evaluate the immune responses of the treated animals. Foot lesions of L. (L.) amazonensis-infected mice were injected with DPPE 1.2 alone, or associated with P. acnes as an adjuvant. Analysis of T-cell populations in the treated mice and in untreated controls was performed by FACS. Detection of IFN-γ-secreting lymphocytes was carried out by an ELISPOT assay and active TGF-β was measured by means of a double-sandwich ELISA test. The treatment with DPPE 1.2 resulted in a significant reduction of foot lesion sizes and parasite burdens in both mouse strains, and the lowest parasite burden was found in mice treated with DPPE 1.2 plus P. acnes. Mice treated with DPPE 1.2 alone displayed a significant increase of TCD4+ and TCD8+ lymphocytes and IFN-γ secretion which were significantly higher in animals treated with DPPE 1.2 plus P. acnes. A significant reduction of active TGF-β was observed in mice treated with DPPE 1.2 alone or associated with P. acnes. Moreover, DPPE 1.2 associated to P. acnes was non-toxic to treated animals. The destruction of L. (L.) amazonensis by DPPE 1.2 was followed by host inflammatory responses which were exacerbated when the palladacycle complex was associated with P. acnes. PMID:28321209

  6. Purif ied Protein Fraction of Garlic Extract Modulates Cellular Immune Response against Breast Transplanted Tumors in BALB/c Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Zare Mehrjardi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Garlic (Allium sativum has anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenesis, and immunomodulatory properties that modulate anti-tumor immunity and inhibit tumor growth. In this study we have examined the effect of a protein fraction isolated from fresh garlic on anti-tumor response and intra-tumor lymphocyte infiltration.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study a protein fraction was purified from fresh garlic bulbs using ultra-filtration, followed by chromatofocusing, and SDS-PAGE analysis. Anti-tumor activity was assessed by intra-tumor injection of the protein fraction and garlic extract, itself, into groups of 5 mice each. The percentage of peripheral blood and intra-tumor CD4+ and CD8+ cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Unpaired student’s t test using the SPSS program was applied for all statistical analyses.Results: Garlic extract included different type of proteins with different molecular weight. One of protein’s fraction was immunomodeulator and was composed of three single polypeptides, with molecular masses of ~10-13 kDa and different isoelectric points (pI. These molecules augmented the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH response compared to the control group. Intra-tumor injection of the fraction provoked a significant increase in the CD8+ subpopulation of T-lymphocytes, as well as a decrease in tumor size. The fraction increased peripheral blood CD8+ T-lymphocytes in treated animals.Conclusion: The data confirms that protein fractions purified from fresh garlic bulbs augment CD8+ T-cell infiltration into the tumor site, inhibiting tumor growth more efficiently than garlic extract. These fi ndings provide a basis for further investigations on the purified polypeptide as a useful candidate for immunomodulation and tumor treatment.

  7. Adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jonathan P; Moyes, David L

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are becoming increasingly prevalent in the human population and contribute to morbidity and mortality in healthy and immunocompromised individuals respectively. Candida albicans is the most commonly encountered fungal pathogen of humans, and is frequently found on the mucosal surfaces of the body. Host defense against C. albicans is dependent upon a finely tuned implementation of innate and adaptive immune responses, enabling the host to neutralise the invading fungus. Central to this protection are the adaptive Th1 and Th17 cellular responses, which are considered paramount to successful immune defense against C. albicans infections, and enable tissue homeostasis to be maintained in the presence of colonising fungi. This review will highlight the recent advances in our understanding of adaptive immunity to Candida albicans infections.

  8. Leptin Regulation of Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Caitlin; Petri, William A

    2016-02-01

    Leptin is a regulatory hormone with multiple roles in the immune system. We favor the concept that leptin signaling 'licenses' various immune cells to engage in immune responses and/or to differentiate. Leptin is an inflammatory molecule that is capable of activating both adaptive and innate immunity. It can also 'enhance' immune functions, including inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages, granulocyte chemotaxis, and increased Th17 proliferation. Leptin can also 'inhibit' cells; CD4(+) T cells are inhibited from differentiating into regulatory T cells in the presence of elevated leptin, while NK cells can exhibit impaired cytotoxicity under the same circumstances. Consequently, understanding the effect of leptin signaling is important to appreciate various aspects of immune dysregulation observed in malnutrition, obesity, and autoimmunity.

  9. Immunohistochemical study of the cellular immune response in human Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia Estudo imuno-histoquímico da resposta imune celular na pneumonia humana por Pneumocystis carinii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Mantovani de Castro

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It has been experimentally demonstrated that host defense against Pneumocystis carinii depends on complex interactions within host immune response, mainly CD4 lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages. Since this is an important agent related to immunodeficiency, our purpose was to characterize the inflammatory immune response in lung from necropsy of AIDS patients. PROCEDURES: Twenty-five necropsies with diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were selected for immunohistochemical investigation of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, macrophages (CD68+, NK cells (CD57+ and cells expressing TNF-alpha. The immunostained cells were quantified and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: All specimens presented a great number of cysts of Pneumocystis carinii in alveoli, as well as septal enlargement with inflammatory infiltrate constituted predominantly by lymphocytes and macrophages. CD4+ T cells were decreased in number, and CD8+ T cells, NK cells and macrophages predominated. Cells expressing TNF-alpha were frequently observed in septal inflammatory infiltrate. CONCLUSIONS: The immunosupression related to AIDS induces a reduction in the number of CD4+ T cells and influences high-level parasitism. The cell components that characterize the inflammatory infiltrate contribute to the severe lung injury of those patients.OBJETIVO: Trabalhos experimentais demonstram que as defesas do hospedeiro frente ao Pneumocystis carinii incluem interações complexas entre as células imunes, principalmente linfócitos TCD4+ e macrófagos alveolares. Sendo esse um agente importante associado às imunodeficiências, nosso objetivo foi caracterizar a resposta inflamatória em pulmão de necrópsias de pacientes com AIDS. MÉTODOS: Foram selecionadas 25 necrópsias com diagnóstico de pneumonia por Pneumocystis carinii para pesquisa imuno-histoquímica de linfócitos TCD4+, TCD8+, macrófagos CD68+, células NK CD57+ e células com expressão de TNF-alfa. As c

  10. Development of a novel, guinea pig-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT assay and characterization of guinea pig cytomegalovirus GP83-specific cellular immune responses following immunization with a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-vectored GP83 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Peter A; Hernandez-Alvarado, Nelmary; Gnanandarajah, Josephine S; Wussow, Felix; Diamond, Don J; Schleiss, Mark R

    2014-06-30

    The guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) provides a useful animal model for studying the pathogenesis of many infectious diseases, and for preclinical evaluation of vaccines. However, guinea pig models are limited by the lack of immunological reagents required for characterization and quantification of antigen-specific T cell responses. To address this deficiency, an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay for guinea pig interferon (IFN)-γ was developed to measure antigen/epitope-specific T cell responses to guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) vaccines. Using splenocytes harvested from animals vaccinated with a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vector encoding the GPCMV GP83 (homolog of human CMV pp65 [gpUL83]) protein, we were able to enumerate and map antigen-specific responses, both in vaccinated as well as GPCMV-infected animals, using a panel of GP83-specific peptides. Several potential immunodominant GP83-specific peptides were identified, including one epitope, LGIVHFFDN, that was noted in all guinea pigs that had a detectable CD8+ response to GP83. Development of a guinea pig IFN-γ ELISPOT should be useful in characterization of additional T cell-specific responses to GPCMV, as well as other pathogens. This information in turn can help focus future experimental evaluation of immunization strategies, both for GPCMV as well as for other vaccine-preventable illnesses studied in the guinea pig model.

  11. SPECIFIC IMMUNOTHERAPY AND CELLULAR IMMUNITY IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Kenbaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular mechanisms are quite important immunological components of tumor surveillance, being, however, most vulnerable to influence of different adverse factors, including surgery-associated stress and ionizing radiation. Our study was aimed for assessing specific effects of immunotherapy upon indices of cellular immunity in patients with cervical cancer. Eighty-eight patients with cervical cancer (clinical stage I-IIA, Т1аN0M0-T2aN0M0, who underwent appropriate surgery (for IA stage, or a combined treatment, including surgery gamma-ray teletherapy (IB, IIA stages are under study. The patients were distributed in two groups, depending on the therapy applied. Group 1 included patients subjected to surgical treatment plus and radiation therapy, Group 2 included those patients who were treated according to this protocol, with addition of a specific immunotherapy. Contents of T cells and various CD subpopulations of T-lymphocytes were identified by immunofluorescence techniques. Among patients with cervical cancer at clinical stages IA, IB, IIA, a reliable decrease in cellular immunity indices was registered, both after surgery, and during combined treatment. Introduction of specific immunotherapy to the conventional treatment schedule was associated with increase of cellular immune indices, and, in first line, the antineoplastic mechanisms (e.g., NK’s and NKT cell contents. One should point to a relatively low efficiency of this immunotherapy in combined treatment of patients with cervical cancer at IIA stage.

  12. Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) challenge, ruminal condition and cellular immunity in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shigeru

    2015-02-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is characterized by repeated bouts of low ruminal pH. Cows with SARA often develop complications or other diseases, and associate physiologically with immunosuppression and inflammation. Ruminal free lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increases during SARA and translocates into the blood circulation activating an inflammatory response. Ruminal fermentation and cellular immunity are encouraged by supplementing hay with calf starter during weaning. SARA calves given a 5-day repeated administration of a bacteria-based probiotic had stable ruminal pH levels (6.6-6.8). The repeated administration of probiotics enhance cellular immune function and encourage recovery from diarrhea in pre-weaning calves. Furthermore, the ruminal fermentation could guard against acute and short-term feeding changes, and changes in the rumen microbial composition of SARA cattle might occur following changes in ruminal pH. The repeated bouts of low ruminal pH in SARA cattle might be associated with depression of cellular immunity.

  13. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  14. Slamf receptors : Modulators of Phagocyte Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Driel, Boaz Job

    2015-01-01

    Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule family (Slamf) receptors can operate in three distinct modes. Slamf receptors can dictate the extent of immune responses, thereby maneuvering immunity to the optimal zone between immunopathology or autoimmunity and weak, ineffective immune responses. A second

  15. Immune response to H pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Suarez; Victor E Reyes; Ellen J Beswick

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer,attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium.

  16. MAP Kinases in Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongliang Zhang; Chen Dong

    2005-01-01

    MAP kinases are evolutionarily conserved signaling regulators from budding yeast to mammals and play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. There are three main families of MAPKs in mammals. Each of them has its own activators, inactivators, substrates and scaffolds, which altogether form a fine signaling network in response to different extracellular or intracellular stimulation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding of the regulation of MAP kinases and the roles of MAP kinases in innate and adaptive immune responses.

  17. Immune Response After Measles Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj A.K

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles immunization of 192 under 5 years of age children was undertaken and the overall seroconversion was 76.0%. Seroconversion rate in the age group of 9-12 months was 70.9% and it was 100% after one year. Immune response in malnourished children was more as compared to normal children. There were negligible side reactions after measles vaccination, and this vaccine passed normal potency tests under field conditions.

  18. HIV-1 proteins in infected cells determine the presentation of viral peptides by HLA class I and class II molecules and the nature of the cellular and humoral antiviral immune responses--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Y

    1994-07-01

    The goals of molecular virology and immunology during the second half of the 20th century have been to provide the conceptual approaches and the tools for the development of safe and efficient virus vaccines for the human population. The success of the vaccination approach to prevent virus epidemics was attributed to the ability of inactivated and live virus vaccines to induce a humoral immune response and to produce antiviral neutralizing antibodies in the vaccinees. The successful development of antiviral vaccines and their application to most of the human population led to a marked decrease in virus epidemics around the globe. Despite this remarkable achievement, the developing epidemics of HIV-caused AIDS (accompanied by activation of latent herpesviruses in AIDS patients), epidemics of Dengue fever, and infections with respiratory syncytial virus may indicate that conventional approaches to the development of virus vaccines that induce antiviral humoral responses may not suffice. This may indicate that virus vaccines that induce a cellular immune response, leading to the destruction of virus-infected cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may be needed. Antiviral CD8+ CTLs are induced by viral peptides presented within the peptide binding grooves of HLA class I molecules present on the surface of infected cells. Studies in the last decade provided an insight into the presentation of viral peptides by HLA class I molecules to CD8+ T cells. These studies are here reviewed, together with a review of the molecular events of virus replication, to obtain an overview of how viral peptides associate with the HLA class I molecules. A similar review is provided on the molecular pathway by which viral proteins, used as subunit vaccines or inactivated virus particles, are taken up by endosomes in the endosome pathway and are processed by proteolytic enzymes into peptides that interact with HLA class II molecules during their transport to the plasma membrane of antigen

  19. Matrix-M adjuvant enhances antibody, cellular and protective immune responses of a Zaire Ebola/Makona virus glycoprotein (GP) nanoparticle vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Karin Lövgren; Song, Haifeng; Stertman, Linda; Liu, Ye; Flyer, David C; Massare, Michael J; Xu, Ren-Huan; Zhou, Bin; Lu, Hanxin; Kwilas, Steve A; Hahn, Timothy J; Kpamegan, Eloi; Hooper, Jay; Carrion, Ricardo; Glenn, Gregory; Smith, Gale

    2016-04-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes severe hemorrhagic fever for which there is no approved treatment or preventive vaccine. Immunological correlates of protective immunity against EBOV disease are not well understood. However, non-human primate studies have associated protection of experimental vaccines with binding and neutralizing antibodies to the EBOV glycoprotein (GP) as well as EBOV GP-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In this report a full length, unmodified Zaire EBOV GP gene from the 2014 EBOV Makona strain (EBOV/Mak) was cloned into a baculovirus vector. Recombinant EBOV/Mak GP was produced in Sf9 insect cells as glycosylated trimers and, when purified, formed spherical 30-40 nm particles. In mice, EBOV/Mak GP co-administered with the saponin adjuvant Matrix-M was significantly more immunogenic, as measured by virus neutralization titers and anti-EBOV/Mak GP IgG as compared to immunization with AlPO4 adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted EBOV/Mak GP. Similarly, antigen specific T cells secreting IFN-γ were induced most prominently by EBOV/Mak GP with Matrix-M. Matrix-M also enhanced the frequency of antigen-specific germinal center B cells and follicular helper T (TFH) cells in the spleen in a dose-dependent manner. Immunization with EBOV/Mak GP with Matrix-M was 100% protective in a lethal viral challenge murine model; whereas no protection was observed with the AlPO4 adjuvant and only 10% (1/10) mice were protected in the EBOV/Mak GP antigen alone group. Matrix-M adjuvanted vaccine induced a rapid onset of specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies, increased frequency of multifunctional CD4+ and CD8(+) T cells, specific TFH cells, germinal center B cells, and persistence of EBOV GP-specific plasma B cells in the bone marrow. Taken together, the addition of Matrix-M adjuvant to the EBOV/Mak GP nanoparticles enhanced both B and T-cell immune stimulation which may be critical for an Ebola subunit vaccine with broad and long lasting protective immunity.

  20. Induction of specific humoral and cellular immune responses in a mouse model following gene fusion of HSP70C and Hantaan virus Gn and S0.7 in an adenoviral vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Cheng

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs display adjuvant functions when given as fusion proteins to enhance vaccination efficiency. To evaluate enhanced potency of Hantaan virus (HTNV glycoprotein (GP and nucleocapsid protein (NP immunogenicity by heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, a recombinant adenovirus rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C expression vector was developed by genetically linking the HSP70 C-terminal gene (HSP70 359-610 aa, HSP70C to the Gn and 0.7 kb fragment of the NP (aa1-274-S0.7. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with these recombinant adenoviral vectors. A series of immunological assays determined the immunogenicity of the recombinant adenoviral vectors. The results showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C induced a stronger humoral and cellular immune response than other recombinant adenoviruses (rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG and rAd-GnS0.7 and the HFRS vaccine control. Animal protection experiments showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C was effective at protecting C57BL/6 mice from HTNV infection. The results of the immunological experiments showed that HSP70C lead to enhanced vaccine potency, and suggested significant potential in the development of genetically engineered vaccines against HTNV.

  1. T cell immunity as a tool for studying epigenetic regulation of cellular differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Edward Russ

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellular differentiation is regulated by the strict spatial and temporal control of gene expression. This is achieved, in part, by regulating changes in histone post-translational modifications (PTMs and DNA methylation that in-turn, impact transcriptional activity. Further, histone PTMs and DNA methylation are often propagated faithfully at cell division (termed epigenetic propagation, and thus contribute to maintaining cellular identity in the absence of signals driving differentiation. Cardinal features of adaptive T cell immunity include the ability to differentiate in response to infection, resulting in acquisition of immune functions required for pathogen clearance; and the ability to maintain this functional capacity in the long-term, allowing more rapid and effective pathogen elimination following re-infection. These characteristics underpin vaccination strategies by effectively establishing a long-lived T cell population that contributes to an immunologically protective state (termed immunological memory. As we discuss in this review, epigenetic mechanisms provide attractive and powerful explanations for key aspects of T cell-mediated immunity - most obviously and notably, immunological memory, because of the capacity of epigenetic circuits to perpetuate cellular identities in the absence of the initial signals that drive differentiation. Indeed, T cell responses to infection are an ideal model system for studying how epigenetic factors shape cellular differentiation and development generally. This review will examine how epigenetic mechanisms regulate T cell function and differentiation, and how these model systems are providing general insights into the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription during cellular differentiation.

  2. A preliminary study to evaluate the immune responses induced by immunization of dogs with inactivated Ehrlichia canis organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Mahan

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia canis is an intracellular pathogen that causes canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Although the role of antibody responses cannot be discounted, control of this intracellular pathogen is expected to be by cell mediated immune responses. The immune responses in dogs immunized with inactivated E. canis organisms in combination with Quil A were evaluated. Immunization provoked strong humoral and cellular immune responses, which were demonstrable by Western blotting and lymphocyte proliferation assays. By Western blotting antibodies to several immunodominant E. canis proteins were detected in serum from immunized dogs and antibody titres increased after each immunization. The complement of immunogenic proteins recognized by the antisera were similar to those recognized in serum from infected dogs. Upon challenge with live E. canis, rapid anamnestic humoral responses were detected in the serum of immunized dogs and primary antibody responses were detected in the serum from control dogs. Following immunization, a lymphocyte proliferative response (cellular immunity was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNs of immunized dogs upon stimulation with E. canis antigens. These responses were absent from non-immunized control dogs until after infection with live E. canis, when antigen specific-lymphocyte proliferation responses were also detected in the PBMNs of the control dogs. It can be thus concluded that immunization against canine monocytic ehrlichiosis may be feasible. However, the immunization regimen needs to be optimized and a detailed investigation needs to be done to determine if this regimen can prevent development of acute and chronic disease.

  3. Humoral Immune Response in Tuberculous Pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous pleuritis is a good human model to understand the local and protective immune response against tuberculosis, due to the self-limitedness of the disease. Although the cellular immune response has been well characterised in tuberculous pleurisy, much less is known about the humoral immune response operating at the site of infection. To understand the humoral immune response, B cells were enumerated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMC of tuberculous (TP and non-tuberculous pleuritis patients (NTP. The levels of IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies for PPD, culture filtrate (CF and sonicate antigens (Son Ag were assessed in plasma (BL and pleural fluid (PF and a western blot was carried out with the CF antigen. The percentage of CD19+B-cells was similar in PBMC and PFMC of TP patients but was significantly lower in PFMCs of NTP patients. The IgG levels for PPD and CF antigens were higher in PF of TP than NTP patients. The antigen recognition patterns did not differ in plasma and pleural fluid of the same patient in both groups pointing out the passive diffusion of the plasma to the pleura. The antigens 25, 31, 33, 70, 110, 124 and 132 kDa were recognized exclusively by the TP patients. Thus our study showed that the local humoral response in TP did not differ from the systemic response. However, the humoral response differed in TP patients when compared to NTP patients.

  4. Clonal priming of human lymphocytes: Specificity and cross-reactivity of cellular immune reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, W R; Datiner, A M

    1977-04-23

    Clonal priming in response to chemical and microbial antigens which defines the specificity of cellular immune reactions, was demonstrated by culture techniques. Human leucocyte cultures stimulated with specific antigens typically show peak levels of D.N.A. synthesis after 5 to 7 days in culture. Such primary leucocyte cultures were incubated for 10-20 days, then the cells were gently centrifuged and resuspended in fresh RPMI 1640 with 20% plasma. These secondary or primed cultures typically showed less than 1000 c.p.m. after 48 hours. However, if the original antigenic stimulant was added, specific accelerated responses were seen by 48 hours in the secondary cultures. Lymphocyte clones in these sceondary cultures primed with dinitrophenylated (D.N.P.) antigens (from subjects sensitised to dinitrochlorobenzene) showed enhanced D.N.A. sythesis in response to the same dinitrophenylated antigens and showed varible accelerated responses to related chemically modified antigens. However, D.N.P.-activated clones in these secondary cultures did not show enhanced responses to microbial antigens even though the lymphocytes had been highly responsive to tetanus toxoid and other microbial antigens in primary cultures. The specificity of this clonal activation was further demonstrated by the enhanced response of secondary cultures of tetanus-toxoid-activated clones to tetanus toxoid but not to dinitrophenylated antigens. The abiltty to detect specificity and cross-reactivity of cellular immune reaction has broad implications for investigations of cellular immunity as well as many potential applications in the diagnosis and understanding the patogenesis of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases in which cellular immune discrimination may be involved.

  5. Cellular immune responses to ESAT-6 discriminate between patients with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium avium complex and those with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lein, A D; von Reyn, C F; Ravn, P;

    1999-01-01

    ESAT-6 (for 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target) is a secreted antigen found almost exclusively in organisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We compared in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells to this antigen in patients with pulmonary...... disease due to either Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) or Mycobacterium tuberculosis with those in healthy, skin test-negative, control subjects. Significant IFN-gamma responses to ESAT-6 were detected in 16 (59%) of 27 M. tuberculosis pulmonary disease patients, 0 (0%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 0...... (0%) of 8 controls. Significant IFN-gamma responses to M. tuberculosis purified protein derivative were detected in 23 (85%) of 27 M. tuberculosis disease patients, 2 (25%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 5 (63%) of 8 healthy controls. M. avium sensitin was recognized in 24 (89%) of 27 M. tuberculosis...

  6. Cell-mediated immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Sonja Izquierdo; Fuglsang, Katrine; Blaakaer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This clinical review aims to assess the efficacy of human papillomavirus 16/18 (HPV16/18) vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response in women with existing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer induced by HPV16 or HPV18. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: A focused...... and thorough literature search conducted in five different databases found 996 publications. Six relevant articles were chosen for further review. In total, 154 patients (>18 years of age) were enrolled in prospective study trials with 3-15 months of follow up. The vaccine applications were administered two...... triggered a detectable cell-mediated immune response, some of which were statistically significant. Correlations between immunological response and clinical outcome (histopathology) were not significant, so neoplasms may not be susceptible to vaccine-generated cytotoxic T cells (CD8(+)). CONCLUSIONS...

  7. Trade-off between cellular immunity and life span in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Indrikis KRAMS; Jan(i)na DAUK(S)TE; Inese KIVLENIECE; Ants KAASIK; Tatjana KRAMA; Todd M.FREEBERG; Markus J.RANTALA

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulation is a nonspecific,cellular response through which insects defend themselves against multicellular pathogens.During this immune reaction,haemocytes recognize an object as foreign and cause other haemocytes to aggregate and form a capsule around the object,often consisting of melanized cells.The process of melanisation is accompanied by the formation of potentially toxic reactive oxygen species,which can kill not only pathogens but also host cells.In this study we tested whether the encapsulation response is costly in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor.We found a negative relationship between the duration of implantation via a nylon monofilament and remaining life span.We also found a negative relationship between the strength of immune response and remaining life span,suggesting that cellular immunity is costly in T.molitor,and that there is a trade-off between immune response and remaining life span.However,this relationship disappeared at 31-32 hours of implantation at 25 ± 2℃.As the disappearance of a relationship between duration of implantation and lifespan coincided with the highest values of encapsulation response,we concluded that the beetles stopped investment in the production of melanotic cells,as the implant,a synthetic parasite,was fully isolated from the host's tissues.

  8. Trade-off between cellular immunity and life span in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrikis KRAMS, Janīna DAUKŠTE, Inese KIVLENIECE, Ants KAASIK, Tatjana KRAMA, Todd M. REEBERG, Markus J. RANTALA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Encapsulation is a nonspecific, cellular response through which insects defend themselves against multicellular pathogens. During this immune reaction, haemocytes recognize an object as foreign and cause other haemocytes to aggregate and form a capsule around the object, often consisting of melanized cells. The process of melanisation is accompanied by the formation of potentially toxic reactive oxygen species, which can kill not only pathogens but also host cells. In this study we tested whether the encapsulation response is costly in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor. We found a negative relationship between the duration of implantation via a nylon monofilament and remaining life span. We also found a negative relationship between the strength of immune response and remaining life span, suggesting that cellular immunity is costly in T. molitor, and that there is a trade-off between immune response and remaining life span. However, this relationship disappeared at 31-32 hours of implantation at 25 ± 2℃. As the disappearance of a relationship between duration of implantation and lifespan coincided with the highest values of encapsulation response, we concluded that the beetles stopped investment in the production of melanotic cells, as the implant, a synthetic parasite, was fully isolated from the host’s tissues [Current Zoology 59 (3: 340–346, 2013].

  9. Cellular immune activation in children with acute dengue virus infections is modulated by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Khin S; Endy, Timothy P; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Manomuth, Choompun; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Vaughn, David W; Nisalak, Ananda; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Libraty, Daniel H

    2006-09-01

    Apoptosis is an important modulator of cellular immune responses during systemic viral infections. Peripheral-blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) apoptosis and plasma soluble levels of CD95, a mediator of apoptosis, were determined in sequential samples from children participating in a prospective study of dengue virus (DV) infections. During the period of defervescence, levels of PBMC apoptosis were higher in children developing dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), the most severe form of illness, than in those with dengue fever (DF) and other, nondengue, febrile illnesses. CD8(+) T lymphocytes made up approximately half of the peak circulating apoptotic PBMCs in DHF and DF. Maximum plasma levels of soluble CD95 were also higher in children with DHF than in those with DF. The level of PBMC apoptosis correlated with dengue disease severity. Apoptosis appears to be involved in modulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses to DV infection and is likely involved in the evolution of immune responses in other viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  10. Cellular immunity and pathogen strategies in combative interactions involving Drosophila hosts and their endoparasitic wasps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Nappi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Various cellular innate immune responses protect invertebrates from attack by eukaryotic pathogens. In insects, assessments of the factor(s causing, or contributing to, pathogen mortality have long considered as toxic components certain molecules associated with enzyme-mediated melanogenesis. In Drosophila hosts, observations that have prompted additional or alternative considerations are those that document either the survival of certain endoparasitic wasps despite melanotic encapsulation, or the destruction of the parasite with no evidence of this type of host response. Investigations of the production of some reactive intermediates of oxygen and nitrogen during infection provide a basis for proposing that these molecules constitute important elements of the immune arsenal of Drosophila. Studies of the target specificity of virulence factors injected by female wasps during infection that suppress the host immune response will likely facilitate identification of the toxic host molecules, and contribute to a more detailed understanding of the cell-signaling pathways that regulate their synthesis.

  11. Alterations of Cellular Immune Reactions in Crew Members Overwintering in the Antarctic Research Station Concordia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Feuerecker, Matthias; Moreels, Marjan; Crucian, Brian; Kaufmann, Ines; Salam, Alex Paddy; Rybka, Alex; Ulrike, Thieme; Quintens, Roel; Sams, Clarence F.; Schelling, Gustav; Thiel, Manfred; Baatout, Sarah; Chouker, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Background: Concordia Station is located inside Antarctica about 1000km from the coast at an altitude of 3200m (Dome C). Hence, individuals living in this harsh environment are exposed to two major conditions: 1.) hypobaric hypoxia and 2.) confinement and extreme isolation. Both hypoxia and confinement can affect human immunity and health, and are likely to be present during exploration class space missions. This study focused on immune alterations measured by a new global immunity test assay, similar to the phased out delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. Methods: After informed written consent 14 healthy male subjects were included to the CHOICE-study (Consequences-of-longterm-Confinement-and-Hypobaric-HypOxia-on-Immunity-in-the Antarctic-Concordia-Environment). Data collection occurred during two winter-over periods lasting each one year. During the first campaign 6 healthy male were enrolled followed by a second campaign with 8 healthy males. Blood was drawn monthly and incubated for 48h with various bacterial, viral and fungal antigens followed by an analysis of plasma cytokine levels (TNF-alpha, IL2, IFN-gamma, IL10). As a control, blood was incubated without stimulation ("resting condition"). Goals: The scope of this study was to assess the consequences of hypoxia and confinement on cellular immunity as assessed by a new in vitro DTH-like test. Results: Initial results indicate that under resting conditions the in vitro DTH-like test showed low cytokine levels which remained almost unchanged during the entire observation period. However, cytokine responses to viral, bacterial and fungal antigens were remarkably reduced at the first month after arrival at Concordia when compared to levels measured in Europe prior to departure for Antarctica. With incrementing months of confinement this depressed DTH-like response tended to reverse, and in fact to show an "overshooting" immune reaction after stimulation. Conclusion: The reduced in vitro DTH-like test

  12. [Immune response to influenza vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, I; Corral, J; Arranz, A; Foruria, A; Landa, V; Lejarza, J R; Marijuán, L; Martínez, J M

    1989-01-01

    The present study investigated the level of immunity of the population against three strains of the influenza virus (A Chile/1/83 -A Philippines/2/82 and B URSS/100/83) before and three months after vaccination, and the immune response to whole virus vaccine as compared with fragmented virus vaccine. A high percentage of the population had titers greater than or equal to 1/10 before vaccination for the Chile (54%) and Philippines (65.7%) strains, while titers against the URSS strain were lower (25.4%). There was a definitive increase in antibody titer in the vaccinated population, although it was lower than expected. The overall response to both vaccines, with protecting titers greater than or equal to 1/40 after vaccination was 65.2% for the Chile strain, 74.6% for the Philippines strain, and 15% for the URSS strain. No differences in the overall immune response were found between the groups vaccinated with whole and fragmented virus.

  13. [Adaptive immune response of people living near chemically hazardous object].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petlenko, S V; Ivanov, M B; Goverdovskiĭ, Iu B; Bogdanova, E G; Golubkov, A V

    2011-10-01

    The article presents data dynamics of adaptive immune responses of people for a long time living in adverse environmental conditions caused by pollution of the environment by industrial toxic waste. It is shown that in the process of adaptation to adverse environmental factors, changes in the immune system are in the phase fluctuations of immunological parameters that are accompanied by changes in the structure of immunodependent pathology. Most sensitive to prolonged exposure to toxic compounds are the cellular mechanisms of immune protection. Violations of the structural and quantitative and functional parameters of the link of the immune system are leading to the formation of immunopathological processes.

  14. Role of Cellular Immunity in Cow’s Milk Allergy: Pathogenesis, Tolerance Induction, and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juandy Jo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy is an aberrant immune-mediated reaction against harmless food substances, such as cow’s milk proteins. Due to its very early introduction, cow’s milk allergy is one of the earliest and most common food allergies. For this reason cow’s milk allergy can be recognized as one of the first indications of an aberrant inflammatory response in early life. Classically, cow’s milk allergy, as is true for most other allergies as well, is primarily associated with abnormal humoral immune responses, that is, elevation of specific immunoglobulin E levels. There is growing evidence indicating that cellular components of both innate and adaptive immunity play significant roles during the pathogenesis of cow’s milk allergy. This is true for the initiation of the allergic phenotype (stimulation and skewing towards sensitization, development and outgrowth of the allergic disease. This review discusses findings pertaining to roles of cellular immunity in allergic inflammation, and tolerance induction against cow’s milk proteins. In addition, a possible interaction between immune mechanisms underlying cow’s milk allergy and other types of inflammation (infections and noncommunicable diseases is discussed.

  15. Differential impact of ageing on cellular and humoral immunity to a persistent murine γ-herpesvirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkum Claire E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncogenic γ-herpesviruses establish life-long infections in their hosts and control of these latent infections is dependent on continual immune surveillance. Immune function declines with age, raising the possibility that immune control of γ-herpesvirus infection becomes compromised with increasing age, allowing viral reactivation and/or increased latent load, both of which are associated with the development of malignancies. Results In this study, we use the experimental mouse γ-herpesvirus model, γHV68, to investigate viral immunity in aged mice. We found no evidence of viral recrudescence or increased latent load in aged latently-infected mice, suggesting that effective immune control of γ-herpesvirus infection remains intact with ageing. As both cellular and humoral immunity have been implicated in host control of γHV68 latency, we independently examined the impact of ageing on γHV68-specific CD8 T cell function and antibody responses. Virus-specific CD8 T cell numbers and cytolytic function were not profoundly diminished with age. In contrast, whereas ELISA titers of virus-specific IgG were maintained over time, there was a progressive decline in neutralizing activity. In addition, although aged mice were able to control de novo acute infection with only slightly delayed viral clearance, serum titers of neutralizing antibody were reduced in aged mice as compared to young mice. Conclusion Although there is no obvious loss of immune control of latent virus, these data indicate that ageing has differential impacts on anti-viral cellular and humoral immune protection during persistent γHV68 infection. This observation has potential relevance for understanding γ-herpesvirus immune control during disease-associated or therapeutic immunosuppression.

  16. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  17. Characterizing heterogeneous cellular responses to perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Michael D; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2008-12-01

    Cellular populations have been widely observed to respond heterogeneously to perturbation. However, interpreting the observed heterogeneity is an extremely challenging problem because of the complexity of possible cellular phenotypes, the large dimension of potential perturbations, and the lack of methods for separating meaningful biological information from noise. Here, we develop an image-based approach to characterize cellular phenotypes based on patterns of signaling marker colocalization. Heterogeneous cellular populations are characterized as mixtures of phenotypically distinct subpopulations, and responses to perturbations are summarized succinctly as probabilistic redistributions of these mixtures. We apply our method to characterize the heterogeneous responses of cancer cells to a panel of drugs. We find that cells treated with drugs of (dis-)similar mechanism exhibit (dis-)similar patterns of heterogeneity. Despite the observed phenotypic diversity of cells observed within our data, low-complexity models of heterogeneity were sufficient to distinguish most classes of drug mechanism. Our approach offers a computational framework for assessing the complexity of cellular heterogeneity, investigating the degree to which perturbations induce redistributions of a limited, but nontrivial, repertoire of underlying states and revealing functional significance contained within distinct patterns of heterogeneous responses.

  18. Human Metapneumovirus Antagonism of Innate Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyong Bao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is a recently identified RNA virus belonging to the Paramyxoviridae family, which includes several major human and animal pathogens. Epidemiological studies indicate that hMPV is a significant human respiratory pathogen with worldwide distribution. It is associated with respiratory illnesses in children, adults, and immunocompromised patients, ranging from upper respiratory tract infections to severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Interferon (IFN represents a major line of defense against virus infection, and in response, viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN production as well as IFN signaling. Although the strategies of IFN evasion are similar, the specific mechanisms by which paramyxoviruses inhibit IFN responses are quite diverse. In this review, we will present an overview of the strategies that hMPV uses to subvert cellular signaling in airway epithelial cells, the major target of infection, as well as in primary immune cells.

  19. Mathematical Modelling of Immune Response in Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Su

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a spatial–temporal mathematical model (PDE to capture fundamental aspects of the immune response to antigen. We have considered terms that broadly describe intercellular communication, cell movement, and effector function (activation or inhibition. The PDE model is robust to variation in antigen load and it can account for (1 antigen recognition, (2 an innate immune response, (3 an adaptive immune response, (4 the elimination of antigen and subsequent resolution of the immune response or (5 equilibrium of the immune response to the presence of persistent antigen (chronic infection and the formation of a granuloma.

  20. Effects of antibacterial peptide on cellular immunity in weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Z H; Yuan, W; Deng, H D; Deng, J L; Dan, Q X; Jin, H T; Tian, C L; Peng, X; Liang, Z; Gao, S; Xu, S H; Li, G; Hu, Y

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of antibacterial peptide (ABP) sufficiency on cellular immune functions by determining the spleen cell cycle and apoptosis, peripheral blood T cell subsets, and T cell proliferation function in weaned piglets. A total of 90 piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire) of both sexes were randomly allotted to 5 dietary treatments. Each treatment consisted of 3 replicates with 6 piglets per replicate. The dietary treatments consisted of the negative control (NC; basal diet), positive control (PC; basal diet supplemented with 400 mg/kg Astragalus polysaccharide), and ABP (basal diet mixed with 250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg ABP). The experimental lasted for 28 d. Two piglets from each replicate were selected randomly for blood samples extraction from the jugular vein to obtain peripheral blood T cell subsets, and T cell proliferation function analysis was performed on d 32, 39, 46, and 53. Two piglets from each replicate were selected and euthanized to observe the spleen cell cycle and apoptosis on d 39 and 53. In ABP-sufficient piglets, the G0/G1 phase of the spleen cell cycle was much lower (P ABP sufficiency (P ABP-sufficient piglets. Percentages of CD3 (+) and CD3 (+)CD4 (+) ratios (d 39, 46, and 53) and CD4 (+)CD8 (+) ratios (d 32, 39, 46, and 53) increased remarkably (P ABP sufficiency compared with NC. These results suggest that ABP sufficiency could increase the T cell population and proliferation function of T cells and could induce decreased percentages of apoptotic cells. Overall, the cellular immune function was evidently improved in weaned piglets. We suggest optimal dosages of 500 mg/kg ABP for 4-wk addition and 1,000 mg/kg ABP for 2-wk addition.

  1. Immune response associated with nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, F M; Kripke, M L

    1997-10-01

    It is now clear that UV radiation causes nonmelanoma skin cancer in at least two ways: by causing permanent changes in the genetic code and by preventing immunologic recognition of mutant cells. These are interacting rather than separate mechanisms. Damage to DNA results in disregulation of cellular proliferation and initiates immune suppression by stimulating the production of suppressive cytokines. These cytokines contribute to the loss of immunosurveillance. Ultraviolet radiation has both local and systemic immunosuppressive effects. Locally, it depletes and alters antigen-presenting LC at the site of UV irradiation. Systemic suppression results when Ts cells are induced, by altered LC, by inflammatory macrophages that enter the skin following UV irradiation, or by the action of cytokines. Damage to DNA appears to be one of the triggering events in inducing systemic immunosuppression via the release of immunosuppressive cytokines and mediators. Immunologic approaches to treating skin cancers so far have concentrated on nonspecifically stimulating immune cells that infiltrate these tumors, but induction of specific immune responses against these tumors with antitumor vaccines has received little attention as yet. Preventive measures include sun avoidance and the use of sunscreens to prevent DNA damage by UV light. Future strategies may employ means to reverse UV-induced immunosuppression by using anti-inflammatory agents, biologicals that accelerate DNA repair or prevent the generation of immunosuppressive cytokines, and specific immunotherapy with tumor antigens. New approaches for studying the immunology of human skin cancers are needed to accelerate progress in this field.

  2. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defence: Links and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Schumacher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signalling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signalling. We highlight evidence gained into (i which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signalling, (ii how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans.

  3. Characterization of immune response to neurofilament light in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Puentes (Fabiola); B.J. van der Star (Baukje); M. Victor (Marion); M. Kipp (Markus); C. Beyer (Cordian); R.M.B. Peferoen-Baert (Regina); K. Ummenthum (Kimberley); K. Pryce (Karena); W. Gerritsen (Wouter); R. Huizinga (Ruth); A. Reijerkerk (Arie); P. van der Valk (Paul); D.A. Baker (David); S. Amor (Sandra)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Autoimmunity to neuronal proteins occurs in several neurological syndromes, where cellular and humoral responses are directed to surface as well as intracellular antigens. Similar to myelin autoimmunity, pathogenic immune response to neuroaxonal components such as neurofilame

  4. Improved humoral and cellular immune responses against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatitis B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A; Nielsen, H V; Bryder, K

    1998-01-01

    with the HIV MN gp160 envelope plasmid induced a slow and low titred anti-MN V3 antibody response at 12 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.) and a late appearing (7 weeks), weak and variable CTL response. In contrast, DNA vaccination with the HBsAg-encoding plasmid induced a rapid and high titred anti-HBsAg antibody...... response and a uniform strong anti-HBs CTL response already 1 week p.i. in all mice. DNA vaccination with the chimeric MN V3/HBsAg plasmid elicited humoral responses against both viruses within 3-6 weeks which peaked at 6-12 weeks and remained stable for at least 25 weeks. In addition, specific CTL......-2d-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope. In an attempt to improve the immunogenicity of V3 in DNA vaccines, a plasmid expressing MN V3 as a fusion protein with the highly immunogenic middle (pre-S2 + S) surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) was constructed. Epidermal inoculation...

  5. Improved humoral and cellular immune response against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatites B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A.; Nielsen, H.V.; Bryder, K.

    1998-01-01

    MN gp160 envelope plasmid induced a slow and low titred anti-MN V3 antibody response at 12 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.) and a late appearing (7 weeks), weak and variable CTL response. In contrast, DNA vaccination with the HBsAg-encoding plasmid induced a rapid and high titred anti-HBsAg antibody...... response and a uniform strong anti-HBs CTL response already 1 week p.i. in all mice. DNA vaccination with the chimeric MN V2/HBsAg plasmid elicited humoral responses against both viruses within 3-6 weeks which peaked at 6-12 weeks and remained stable for at least 25 weeks. In addition, specific CTL......-2d-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope. In an attempt to improve the immunogenicity of V3 in DNA vaccines, a plasmid expressing MN V3 as a fusion protein with the highly immunogenic middle (pre-S2+S) surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) was constructed. Epidermal inoculation...

  6. The Role of the Immune Response in Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triozzi, Pierre L., E-mail: triozzp@ccf.org [Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Fernandez, Anthony P. [Departments of Dermatology and Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2013-02-28

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is implicated in its pathogenesis. Immune mechanisms are also implicated. Patients who are immunosuppressed have an increased risk. There is evidence that high intratumoral T-cell counts and immune transcripts are associated with favorable survival. Spontaneous regressions implicate immune effector mechanisms. Immunogenicity is also supported by observation of autoimmune paraneoplastic syndromes. Case reports suggest that immune modulation, including reduction of immune suppression, can result in tumor regression. The relationships between MCPyV infection, the immune response, and clinical outcome, however, remain poorly understood. Circulating antibodies against MCPyV antigens are present in most individuals. MCPyV-reactive T cells have been detected in both MCC patients and control subjects. High intratumoral T-cell counts are also associated with favorable survival in MCPyV-negative MCC. That the immune system plays a central role in preventing and controlling MCC is supported by several observations. MCCs often develop, however, despite the presence of humoral and cellular immune responses. A better understanding on how MCPyV and MCC evade the immune response will be necessary to develop effective immunotherapies.

  7. Impaired innate, humoral, and cellular immunity despite a take in smallpox vaccine recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Oberg, Ann L; Asmann, Yan W; Grill, Diane E; Vierkant, Robert A; Jacobson, Robert M

    2016-06-14

    Smallpox vaccine is highly effective, inducing protective immunity to smallpox and diseases caused by related orthopoxviruses. Smallpox vaccine efficacy was historically defined by the appearance of a lesion or "take" at the vaccine site, which leaves behind a characteristic scar. Both the take and scar are readily recognizable and were used during the eradication effort to indicate successful vaccination and to categorize individuals as "protected." However, the development of a typical vaccine take may not equate to the successful development of a robust, protective immune response. In this report, we examined two large (>1000) cohorts of recipients of either Dryvax(®) or ACAM2000 using a testing and replication study design and identified subgroups of individuals who had documented vaccine takes, but who failed to develop robust neutralizing antibody titers. Examination of these individuals revealed that they had suboptimal cellular immune responses as well. Further testing indicated these low responders had a diminished innate antiviral gene expression pattern (IFNA1, CXCL10, CXCL11, OASL) upon in vitro stimulation with vaccinia virus, perhaps indicative of a dysregulated innate response. Our results suggest that poor activation of innate antiviral pathways may result in suboptimal immune responses to the smallpox vaccine. These genes and pathways may serve as suitable targets for adjuvants in new attenuated smallpox vaccines and/or effective antiviral therapy targets against poxvirus infections.

  8. Altered Allogeneic Immune Responses in Middle-Aged Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yimin Sun; Hanhan Li; Alan N. Langnas; Yong Zhao

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that leukocyte composition, T cell phenotypes and immune function change in aged mice and humans. However, limited and conflicting results on the age-related immune changes in middle-aged mice were reported. Identification of the characteristics of allogeneic immune responses in aging mice may offer important information for transplantation immunology. The major age-related changes in the immune cell phenotypes and function of 12 months old mice include: 1) the significantly decreased CD4+ cell population in the peripheral blood, the major peripheral CD4+ cells is CD45RBlowCD62Llow memory phenotype; 2) the in vitro responses to alloantigens and Con A of splenocytes markedly reduced; 3) the in vivo secondary humoral immune responses to alloantigens significantly declined; 4) the age-related alteration in the thymus mainly occurred in CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) stage; and 5) increased CD80+ and MHC class Ⅱ+ cell population in spleens. Thus, the major age-related immune changes in 12 months old mice occurred in CD4+ T cells in the periphery and DP stage in the thymus, which may subsequently lead to the decreased allogeneic immune responses and the different sensitivity to immunosuppressive drugs and treatments. Further studies on the characteristics of allogeneic immunity in aging individuals may help to determine the appropriated treatment for transplant aging individuals. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(6) :440-446.

  9. Altered Allogeneic Immune Responses in Middle-Aged Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YiminSun; HanhanLi; AlanN.Langnas

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that leukocyte composition, T cell phenotypes and immune function change in aged mice and humans. However, limited and conflicting results on the age-related immune changes in middle-aged mice were reported. Identification of the characteristics of allogeneic immune responses in aging mice may offer important information for transplantation immunology. The major age-related changes in the immune cell phenotypes and function of 12 months old mice include: 1) the significantly decreased CD4+ cell population in the peripheral blood, the major peripheral CD4+ cells is CD45RBlowCD62Llow memory phenotype; 2) the in vitro responses to alloantigens and Con A of splenocytes markedly reduced; 3) the in vivo secondary humoral immune responses to alloantigens significantly declined; 4) the age-related alteration in the thymus mainly occurred in CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) stage; and 5) increased CD80+ and MHC class II+ cell population in spleens. Thus, the major age-related immune changes in 12 months old mice occurred in CD4+ T cells in the periphery and DP stage in the thymus, which may subsequently lead to the decreased allogeneic immune responses and the different sensitivity to immunosuppressive drugs and treatments. Further studies on the characteristics of allogeneic immunity in aging individuals may help to determine the appropriated treatment for transplant aging individuals. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):440-446.

  10. Autophagy-associated immune responses and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongming; Chen, Liuxi; Xu, Yinghua; Han, Weidong; Lou, Fang; Fei, Weiqiang; Liu, Shuiping; Jing, Zhao; Sui, Xinbing

    2016-04-19

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process by which cellular components are sequestered into a double-membrane vesicle and delivered to the lysosome for terminal degradation and recycling. Accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy plays a critical role in cell survival, senescence and homeostasis, and its dysregulation is associated with a variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration. Recent studies show that autophagy is also an important regulator of cell immune response. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates tumor immune responses remains elusive. In this review, we will describe the role of autophagy in immune regulation and summarize the possible molecular mechanisms that are currently well documented in the ability of autophagy to control cell immune response. In addition, the scientific and clinical hurdles regarding the potential role of autophagy in cancer immunotherapy will be discussed.

  11. Innate immune responses of Drosophila melanogaster are altered by spaceflight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Marcu

    Full Text Available Alterations and impairment of immune responses in humans present a health risk for space exploration missions. The molecular mechanisms underpinning innate immune defense can be confounded by the complexity of the acquired immune system of humans. Drosophila (fruit fly innate immunity is simpler, and shares many similarities with human innate immunity at the level of molecular and genetic pathways. The goals of this study were to elucidate fundamental immune processes in Drosophila affected by spaceflight and to measure host-pathogen responses post-flight. Five containers, each containing ten female and five male fruit flies, were housed and bred on the space shuttle (average orbit altitude of 330.35 km for 12 days and 18.5 hours. A new generation of flies was reared in microgravity. In larvae, the immune system was examined by analyzing plasmatocyte number and activity in culture. In adults, the induced immune responses were analyzed by bacterial clearance and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR of selected genes following infection with E. coli. The RNA levels of relevant immune pathway genes were determined in both larvae and adults by microarray analysis. The ability of larval plasmatocytes to phagocytose E. coli in culture was attenuated following spaceflight, and in parallel, the expression of genes involved in cell maturation was downregulated. In addition, the level of constitutive expression of pattern recognition receptors and opsonins that specifically recognize bacteria, and of lysozymes, antimicrobial peptide (AMP pathway and immune stress genes, hallmarks of humoral immunity, were also reduced in larvae. In adults, the efficiency of bacterial clearance measured in vivo following a systemic infection with E. coli post-flight, remained robust. We show that spaceflight altered both cellular and humoral immune responses in Drosophila and that the disruption occurs at multiple interacting pathways.

  12. How B cells shape the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Chan, John

    2009-03-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B-cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against non-viral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against non-viral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought.

  13. MF59- and Al(OH3-adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus (4C-Staph vaccines induce sustained protective humoral and cellular immune responses, with a critical role for effector CD4 T cells at low antibody titers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta eMonaci

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen that may cause invasive life-threatening infections like sepsis and pneumonia. Due to increasing antibiotic-resistance, the development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus is needed. Although a correlate of protection against staphylococcal diseases is not yet established, several findings suggest that both antibodies and CD4 T cells might contribute to optimal immunity. In this study, we show that adjuvanting a multivalent vaccine (4C-Staph with MF59, an oil-in-water emulsion licensed in human vaccines, further potentiated antigen-specific IgG titers and CD4 T cell responses compared to alum and conferred protection in the peritonitis model of S. aureus infection. Moreover, we showed that MF59- and alum-adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines induced persistent antigen-specific humoral and T cell responses, and protected mice from infection up to 4 months after immunization. Furthermore, 4C-Staph formulated with MF59 was used to investigate which immune compartment is involved in vaccine-induced protection. Using CD4 T cell-depleted mice or B cell deficient mice, we demonstrated that both T and B cell responses contributed to 4C-Staph vaccine-mediated protective immunity. However, the role of CD4 T cells seemed more evident in the presence of low antibody responses. This study provides preclinical data further supporting the use of the adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines against S. aureus diseases, and provides critical insights on the correlates of protective immunity necessary to combat this pathogen.

  14. Humoral and cellular immunity in cosmonauts after the ISS missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykova, M. P.; Antropova, E. N.; Larina, I. M.; Morukov, B. V.

    Spaceflight effects on the immune system were studied in 30 cosmonauts flown onto the International Space Station (ISS) for long- (125-195 d, n=15) and short-term (8-10 d, n=15) missions. Immunological investigations before launch and after landing were performed by using methods for quantitative and functional evaluation of the immunologically competent cells. Specific assays include: peripheral leukocyte distribution, natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity, phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes, proliferation of T-cells in response to a mitogen, levels of immunoglobulins IgA, IgM, IgG, virus-specific antibody and cytokine in serum. It was noticed that after long-term spaceflights the percentage of NK (CD3-/CD16+/CD56+) cells was significantly reduced compared with pre-flight data (pcytokines (IL- 1β, IL-2, IL-4 and TNF- α) in serum changed in an apparently random manner as compared with values before long- and short-term missions. Despite the fact that many improvements have been made to the living conditions of aboard the ISS our investigations demonstrate the remarkable depression of the immunological function after the ISS missions. These results suggest that the clinical health risk (related to immune dysfunction) will occur during exploration class missions.

  15. HYPOTHALAMIC NEUROHORMONES AND IMMUNE RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Luis eQuintanar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, Corticotropin-releasing hormone and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed.

  16. Medición de respuesta inmune humoral y celular frente a antígenos de Brucella abortus RB51 en bovinos (Evaluation of Humoral and cellular immune response evaluation against Brucella abortus strain RB51 antigens in bovine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Montaña S.

    1998-01-01

    strain B. abortus 2308. 30 days after challenge the protection level was evaluated. The humoral immune response was evaluated using conventional Rose Bengal agglutination test, complement fixation test, radial immunodiffusion as well as ELISA, western blot and dot blot assays at days 0, 8, 15, 30, 60 and 90. Additionally, the specific IgG2 isotype response was determined by double sandwich ELISA. To evaluate cellular immune responses, lymphocyte proliferation was measured by timidine incorporation and expressed as stimulation index (S.I., IFN-? activity by ELISA and CD4/CD8 ratio by fluorocitometry. Animals vaccinated with live strains presented 100% protection against challenge, while a 66% protection was observed in those vaccinated with purified antigens. The diagnostic advantage of B. abortus strain RB51 was evidenced by the lack of humoral immune responses against sLPS in all vaccinated groups except for the strain 19 group. No significant differences (p0.05 were detected in any of the groups by lymphoproliferation when stimulated in vitro with purified OMP-II, O-chain or sLPS. When crude soluble RB51 protein was used, S.I. turned significant (p<0.05 and indicated a better response induced by the live vaccines. IFN-?-ELISA tests with stimulated tissue cultures performed better when measured 72 hour after antigen exposure. In reference to the experimental groups, higher levels were detected in the groups immunised with live vaccine, mainly strain 19. When CD4/CD8 ratio were considered the values were constant during the observation and no differences were observed. The results confirm that B. abortus strain RB51 induced level of protection similar to strain 19, and had the advantage of differential diagnosis. Purified antigens OMP-II and OMP-II-O-chain, induced a lower level of protection but they performed similar to replicating vaccines indicating the immunodominance of OMP-II, but suggesting the need of multiple doses to reach the same level of protection. It is

  17. [Bone marrow stromal damage mediated by immune response activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojinović, J; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Branković, Lj; Dimitrijević, H

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate influence of activated immune response on hematopoiesis in vitro, using the experimental model of BCG immunized BALB/c mice and in patients with chronic immunoactivation: long-lasting infections, autoimmunity or malignancy. We correlated changes in long term bone marrow cultures (Dexter) and NBT reduction with appearance of anemia in patients and experimental model of immunization by BCG. Increased spontaneous NBT reduction pointed out role of macrophage activation in bone marrow stroma damage. Long-term bone marrow cultures showed reduced number of hematopoietic cells, with predomination of fibroblasts and loss of fat cells. This results correlated with anemia and leucocytosis with stimulated myelopoiesis in peripheral blood. Activation of immune response, or acting of any agent that directly changes extracellular matrix and cellularity of bone marrow, may result in microenviroment bone marrow damage that modify hematopoiesis.

  18. Innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shohei; Ishii, Ken J; Coban, Cevayir; Akira, Shizuo

    2008-09-01

    In viral infections the host innate immune system is meant to act as a first line defense to prevent viral invasion or replication before more specific protection by the adaptive immune system is generated. In the innate immune response, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are engaged to detect specific viral components such as viral RNA or DNA or viral intermediate products and to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in the infected cells and other immune cells. Recently these innate immune receptors and their unique downstream pathways have been identified. Here, we summarize their roles in the innate immune response to virus infection, discrimination between self and viral nucleic acids and inhibition by virulent factors and provide some recent advances in the coordination between innate and adaptive immune activation.

  19. Polarization of immune responses in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegertjes, Geert F.; Wentzel, Annelieke S.; Spaink, Herman P.; Elks, Philip M.; Fink, Inge R.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we support taking polarized immune responses in teleost fish from a 'macrophage first' point of view, a hypothesis that reverts the dichotomous T helper (TH)1 and TH2 driving forces by building on the idea of conservation of innate immune responses in lower v

  20. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, O.E.; Borregaard, N.; Cole, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de ...

  1. Mitochondrial DNA in the regulation of innate immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunju Fang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mitochondrion is known as the energy factory of the cell, which is also a unique mammalian organelle and considered to be evolved from aerobic prokaryotes more than a billion years ago. Mitochondrial DNA, similar to that of its bacterial ancestor’s, consists of a circular loop and contains significant number of unmethylated DNA as CpG islands. The innate immune system plays an important role in the mammalian immune response. Recent research has demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA activates several innate immune pathways involving TLR9, NLRP3 and STING signaling, which contributes to the signaling platforms and results in effector responses. In addition to facilitating antibacterial immunity and regulating antiviral signaling, mounting evidence suggests that mtDNA contributes to inflammatory diseases following cellular damage and stress. Therefore, in addition to its well-appreciated roles in cellular metabolism and energy production, mtDNA appears to function as a key member in the innate immune system. Here, we highlight the emerging roles of mtDNA in innate immunity.

  2. SUMO-Enriched Proteome for Drosophila Innate Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handu, Mithila; Kaduskar, Bhagyashree; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Soory, Amarendranath; Giri, Ritika; Elango, Vijay Barathi; Gowda, Harsha; Ratnaparkhi, Girish S.

    2015-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification modulates the expression of defense genes in Drosophila, activated by the Toll/nuclear factor-κB and immune-deficient/nuclear factor-κB signaling networks. We have, however, limited understanding of the SUMO-modulated regulation of the immune response and lack information on SUMO targets in the immune system. In this study, we measured the changes to the SUMO proteome in S2 cells in response to a lipopolysaccharide challenge and identified 1619 unique proteins in SUMO-enriched lysates. A confident set of 710 proteins represents the immune-induced SUMO proteome and analysis suggests that specific protein domains, cellular pathways, and protein complexes respond to immune stress. A small subset of the confident set was validated by in-bacto SUMOylation and shown to be bona-fide SUMO targets. These include components of immune signaling pathways such as Caspar, Jra, Kay, cdc42, p38b, 14-3-3ε, as well as cellular proteins with diverse functions, many being components of protein complexes, such as prosß4, Rps10b, SmD3, Tango7, and Aats-arg. Caspar, a human FAF1 ortholog that negatively regulates immune-deficient signaling, is SUMOylated at K551 and responds to treatment with lipopolysaccharide in cultured cells. Our study is one of the first to describe SUMO proteome for the Drosophila immune response. Our data and analysis provide a global framework for the understanding of SUMO modification in the host response to pathogens. PMID:26290570

  3. Probiotics and lung immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential for microbe-based therapeutic approaches to asthma and respiratory infection. However, to date, clinical trials of probiotics in the treatment of respiratory disease have met with limited success. It is becoming clear that to identify the true therapeutic potential of microbes we must move away from a purely empirical approach to clinical trials and adopt knowledge-based selection of candidate probiotics strains, dose, and means of administration. Animal models have played a key role in the identification of mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory capacity of specific bacteria. Microbe-induced changes in dendritic cell phenotype and function appear key to orchestrating the multiple pathways, involving inter alia, T cells, natural killer cells, and alveolar macrophages, associated with the protective effect of probiotics. Moving forward, the development of knowledge-based strategies for microbe-based therapeutics in respiratory disease will be aided by greater understanding of how specific bacterial structural motifs activate unique combinations of pattern recognition receptors on dendritic cells and thus direct desired immune responses.

  4. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6-35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3-17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6-35 months and 3-17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158.

  5. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  6. Complex cellular responses to reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Mark D; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W

    2005-06-01

    Genome-wide analyses of yeast provide insight into cellular responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Many deletion mutants are sensitive to at least one ROS, but no one oxidant is representative of 'oxidative stress' despite the widespread use of a single compound such as H(2)O(2). This has major implications for studies of pathological situations. Cells have a range of mechanisms for maintaining resistance that involves either induction or repression of many genes and extensive remodeling of the transcriptome. Cells have constitutive defense systems that are largely unique to each oxidant, but overlapping, inducible repair systems. The pattern of the transcriptional response to a particular ROS depends on its concentration, and 'classical' antioxidant systems that are induced by high concentrations of ROS can be repressed when cells adapt to low concentrations of ROS.

  7. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host-pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections.

  8. Maturation of the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena, van S.E.C.; Meijer, B.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system depends on features like extracellular and intracellular pattern recognition receptors (PRR) that recognize general molecular patterns. Different types of PRR have been described, identifying microbe-, pathogen-, and danger-associated molecular patterns (abbreviated as MAMP,

  9. Female postmating immune responses, immune system evolution and immunogenic males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Edward H; Innocenti, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    Females in many taxa experience postmating activation of their immune system, independently of any genital trauma or pathogenic attack arising from male-female genital contact. This response has always been interpreted as a product of natural selection as it either prepares the female immune system for antigens arising from an implanted embryo (in the case of placental mammals), or is a "pre-emptive strike" against infection or injury acquired during mating. While the first hypothesis has empirical support, the second is not entirely satisfactory. Recently, studies that have experimentally dissected the postmating responses of Drosophila melanogaster females point to a different explanation: male reproductive peptides/proteins that have evolved in response to postmating male-male competition are directly responsible for activating particular elements of the female immune system. Thus, in a broad sense, males may be said to be immunogenic to females. Here, we discuss a possible direct role of sexual selection/sexual conflict in immune system evolution, in contrast to indirect trade-offs with other life-history traits, presenting the available evidence from a range of taxa and proposing ways in which the competing hypotheses could be tested. The major implication of this review is that immune system evolution is not only a product of natural selection but also that sexual selection and potentially sexual conflict enforces a direct selective pressure. This is a significant shift, and will compel researchers studying immune system evolution and ecological immunity to look beyond the forces generated by parasites and pathogens to those generated by the male ejaculate.

  10. Cellular and Biochemical Changes of Antheraea mylitta D. on Immunization with Attenuated Antheraea mylitta Cytoplasmic Polyhedrosis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phani Kiran Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to analyze the cellular and biochemical changes noticed in tasar silkworm larva (Antheraea mylitta D. immunized with attenuated cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (AmCPV. The bioassay was carried out to confirm the no induction of disease in attenuated AmCPV inoculated larvae. Total Haemocytes count and Differential Haemocytes counts were carried out in healthy control, immunized and non immunized silkworm larvae at different time intervals. The hemolymph proteins were estimated in healthy control, immunized and non immunized silkworm larvae. The results confirm that, attenuated AmCPV provides protection against AmCPV infection for a short period (6 to 8 days. The mortality in immunized silkworms was reduced significantly as compared to non immunized inoculated control. The total haemocyte counts increased in haemolymph up to 8th day in immunized silkworms in comparison with non immunized inoculated control indicating the positive haemocyte mediated response in silkworm immunized with attenuated AmCPV. Similarly, differential haemocyte count was different in immunized silkworms from the inoculated control. The prohaemocyte, plasmatocytes and granulocytes were maximum in number whereas oenocytoids were minimum in number. The number of degenerated blood cells was increased in inoculated control up to 8th days of post inoculation. The hemolymph protein in immunized silkworms was significantly higher than non immunized control. The gradual increase 1st day to 8th day was observed in immunized silkworm. In non immunized inoculated control, the total hemolymph proteins have shown increasing trend from 1st to 5th day and decreasing from 6th day onwards.

  11. Adult Drosophila melanogaster evolved for antibacterial defense invest in infection-induced expression of both humoral and cellular immunity genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGraw Elizabeth A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the transcription of innate immunity genes in response to bacterial infection has been well-characterised in the Drosophila model, we recently demonstrated the capacity for such transcription to evolve in flies selected for improved antibacterial defense. Here we use this experimental system to examine how insects invest in constitutive versus infection-induced transcription of immunity genes. These two strategies carry with them different consequences with respect to energetic and pleiotropic costs and may be more or less effective in improving defense depending on whether the genes contribute to humoral or cellular aspects of immunity. Findings Contrary to expectation we show that selection preferentially increased the infection-induced expression of both cellular and humoral immunity genes. Given their functional roles, infection induced increases in expression were expected for the humoral genes, while increases in constitutive expression were expected for the cellular genes. We also report a restricted ability to improve transcription of immunity genes that is on the order of 2-3 fold regardless of total transcription level of the gene. Conclusions The evolved increases in infection-induced expression of the cellular genes may result from specific cross talk with humoral pathways or from generalised strategies for enhancing immunity gene transcription. A failure to see improvements in constitutive expression of the cellular genes suggests either that increases might come at too great a cost or that patterns of expression in adults are decoupled from the larval phase where increases would be most effective. The similarity in fold change increase across all immunity genes may suggest a shared mechanism for the evolution of increased transcription in small, discrete units such as duplication of cis-regulatory elements.

  12. 不同免疫状态对肉仔鸡血液生化指标和细胞免疫应答的影响%Effects of Different Immune Status on Blood Biochemical Parameters and Cellular Immune Response in Broiler Chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯焱; 杨小军; 王筱霏; 覃定奎; 尹瑞卿; 姚军虎

    2011-01-01

    [目的]研究不同免疫状态对肉仔鸡血液生化指标和细胞免疫应答的影响.[方法]选用健康情况良好1日龄AA肉公鸡180只,随机分为4组,每组5个重复,每重复9只.设定不同免疫应激模型,为无免疫组即对照组(no vaccine,NV),常规免疫组(conventional vaccine,CV),以及在常规免疫基础上注射细菌脂多糖的免疫亢进组(LPS)和环磷酰胺的免疫抑制组(CYP).采用CD3/CD4/CD8三色流式细胞术、MTT法检测肉鸡免疫状态和非免疫状态下外周血中T淋巴细胞及其亚群的变化.[结果]与NV组相比,肉仔鸡的体增重和采食量均显著降低LPS组和CYP组(P<0.05),各处理料重比无显著差异(P>0.05),NV组与CV组生产性能指标无显著差异(P> 0.05),各日龄处理间血清TP、GLU和CHL)含量均无显著差异(P>0.05).第21和35天,LPS组和CYP组血清ALB含量显著低于CV组和NV组(P<0.05);第21天,LPS组血清α-AGP和BUN含量显著低于NV组(P<0.05),CPY和LPS均抑制T、B淋巴细胞增殖,LPS组CD4+/CD8+T细胞百分比显著低于NV组(P<0.05).[结论]未进行免疫肉鸡可维持机体正常的生长性能和细胞免疫稳态,LPS和CYP的刺激可降低肉鸡采食量和体增重;随日龄增加肉鸡对CYP刺激的耐受性有所上升,LPS刺激可增强肉鸡细胞免疫应答反应.%[Objective] This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of different immune statuses on blood biochemical parameters and cellular immune response of broiler chickens. [Method] One hundred and eighty 1 -day-old AA broilers were allocated into four groups. Each treatment had 5 replicate cages of 9 broilers per replicate pen. This study will set different immune stress models, including the control group (no vaccines, NV), conventional vaccines group (CV), immune hyperthyroidism group (LPS) and immune suppression group (CYP). The T lymphocytes and subgroups were isolated from periphery blood from immunized and unvaccinated birds and were

  13. The cellular and humoral immunity assay in patients with complicated urolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceban, E; Banov, P; Galescu, A; Tanase, D

    2017-01-01

    Especially complicated, renal lithiasis contributes to the general inflammatory syndrome development that interferes with nonspecific, humoral and cellular immune system. The surgical treatment of nephrolithiasis is closely related to drug therapy of urinary infection, one of the reasons being the reduction of the immune status. The work is performed by evaluating the immunological status preoperatively in 58 patients with complicated lithiasis. The analysis of the status in these patients demonstrated that complicated urolithiasis results in significant changes in the immune system, these changes being expressed at the cellular and humoral level of immunity. PMID:28255384

  14. Autophagy as a Stress Response Pathway in the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Abhisek; Eissa, N Tony

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy, hereafter, referred to as autophagy, has long been regarded as a housekeeping pathway involved in intracellular degradation and energy recycling. These housekeeping and homeostatic functions are especially important during cellular stress, such as periods of nutrient deprivation. However, importance of autophagy extends far beyond its degradative functions. Recent evidence shows that autophagy plays an essential role in development, organization and functions of the immune system, and defects in autophagy lead to several diseases, including cancer and autoimmunity. In the immune system, autophagy is important in regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on the roles of autophagy in the adaptive immune system. We first introduce the autophagy pathway and provide a brief description of the major molecular players involved in autophagy. We then discuss the importance of autophagy as a stress integrator mechanism and provide relevant examples of this role of autophagy in adaptive immune cells. Then we proceed to describe how autophagy regulates development, activation and functions of different adaptive immune cells. In these contexts, we mention both degradative and non-degradative roles of autophagy, and illustrate their importance. We also discuss role of autophagy in antigen presenting cells, which play critical roles in the activation of adaptive immune cells. Further, we describe how autophagy regulates functions of different adaptive immune cells during infection, inflammation and autoimmunity.

  15. Effect of hyperthermic water bath on parameters of cellular immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazícková, S; Rovenský, J; Koska, J; Vigas, M

    2000-01-01

    Effects of hyperthermic water bath on selected immune parameters (lymphocyte subpopulations, natural killer (NK) cell counts and their activity) were studied in a group of 10 volunteers. Application of hyperthermic water bath (both topical and whole-body) was followed by a significant reduction of relative B lymphocyte counts. Whole-body hyperthermic water bath reduced relative total T lymphocyte counts, increased relative CD8+ T lymphocyte and NK cell counts and increased NK activity. Whole-body hyperthermic bath increased somatotropic hormone (STH) activity in eight out of 10 volunteers; higher relative counts of CD8+ lymphocytes and NK cells were observed compared with the group of volunteers not responding to hyperthermic water bath by STH secretion. In five volunteers STH was released in response to local hyperthermic water bath and the NK activity of lymphocytes also increased but their relative counts did not. The results suggest that these increases in CD8+ lymphocyte and NK cell counts are probably dependent on increased STH production.

  16. Sistema imunitário: Parte I. Fundamentos da imunidade inata com ênfase nos mecanismos moleculares e celulares da resposta inflamatória Immune system: Part I. Fundamentals of innate immunity with emphasis on molecular and cellular mechanisms of inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson de Melo Cruvinel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available O sistema imunológico é constituído por uma intrincada rede de órgãos, células e moléculas, e tem por finalidade manter a homeostase do organismo, combatendo as agressões em geral. A imunidade inata atua em conjunto com a imunidade adaptativa e caracteriza-se pela rápida resposta à agressão, independentemente de estímulo prévio, sendo a primeira linha de defesa do organismo. Seus mecanismos compreendem barreiras físicas, químicas e biológicas, componentes celulares e moléculas solúveis. A primeira defesa do organismo frente a um dano tecidual envolve diversas etapas intimamente integradas e constituídas pelos diferentes componentes desse sistema. A presente revisão tem como objetivo resgatar os fundamentos dessa resposta, que apresenta elevada complexidade e é constituída por diversos componentes articulados que convergem para a elaboração da resposta imune adaptativa. Destacamos algumas etapas: reconhecimento molecular dos agentes agressores; ativação de vias bioquímicas intracelulares que resultam em modificações vasculares e teciduais; produção de uma miríade de mediadores com efeitos locais e sistêmicos no âmbito da ativação e proliferação celulares, síntese de novos produtos envolvidos na quimioatração e migração de células especializadas na destruição e remoção do agente agressor, e finalmente a recuperação tecidual com o restabelecimento funcional do tecido ou órgão.The immune system consists of an intricate network of organs, cells, and molecules responsible for maintaining the body's homeostasis and responding to aggression in general. Innate immunity operates in conjunction with adaptive immunity and is characterized by rapid response to aggression, regardless of previous stimulus, being the organism first line of defense. Its mechanisms include physical, chemical and biological barriers, cellular components, as well as soluble molecules. The organism first line of defense against

  17. Evaluation of cellular responses for a chimeric HBsAg-HCV core DNA vaccine in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yazdanian

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Fusion of HBsAg to HCVcp in the context of a DNA vaccine modality could augment Th1-oriented cellular and CTL responses toward a protective epitope, comparable to that of HCVcp (subunit HCV vaccine immunization.

  18. Immunomodulator-based enhancement of anti smallpox immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmarie Martínez

    Full Text Available The current live vaccinia virus vaccine used in the prevention of smallpox is contraindicated for millions of immune-compromised individuals. Although vaccination with the current smallpox vaccine produces protective immunity, it might result in mild to serious health complications for some vaccinees. Thus, there is a critical need for the production of a safe virus-free vaccine against smallpox that is available to everyone. For that reason, we investigated the impact of imiquimod and resiquimod (Toll-like receptors agonists, and the codon-usage optimization of the vaccinia virus A27L gene in the enhancement of the immune response, with intent of producing a safe, virus-free DNA vaccine coding for the A27 vaccinia virus protein.We analyzed the cellular-immune response by measuring the IFN-γ production of splenocytes by ELISPOT, the humoral-immune responses measuring total IgG and IgG2a/IgG1 ratios by ELISA, and the TH1 and TH2 cytokine profiles by ELISA, in mice immunized with our vaccine formulation.The proposed vaccine formulation enhanced the A27L vaccine-mediated production of IFN-γ on mouse spleens, and increased the humoral immunity with a TH1-biased response. Also, our vaccine induced a TH1 cytokine milieu, which is important against viral infections.These results support the efforts to find a new mechanism to enhance an immune response against smallpox, through the implementation of a safe, virus-free DNA vaccination platform.

  19. Cellular immune responses of a Senegalese community recently exposed to Schistosoma mansoni: correlations of infection level with age and inflammatory cytokine production by soluble egg antigen-specific cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerite, M; Gallissot, M C; Diagne, M; Moreau, C; Diakkhate, M M; Roberts, M; Remoue, F; Thiam, A; Decam, C; Rogerie, F; Cottrez, F; Neyrinck, J L; Butterworth, A E; Sturrock, R F; Piau, J P; Daff, B; Niang, M; Wolowczuk, I; Riveau, G; Auriault, C; Capron, A

    1999-08-01

    A recently reported epidemic of Schistosoma mansoni infection in Senegal provided an opportunity to study the dynamics of the development of immunity to human schistosomiasis. We report here on the cell-mediated immune response in a population of 99 females and 95 males, with particular emphasis on the relationship between intensity of infection and age. We found that the intensity of infection correlated negatively with age in females but not in males. In men and women, both Th1- and Th2-type cytokines were detected upon in vitro stimulation of PBMCs with soluble egg antigen (SEA) or soluble adult worm antigens (SWAP). In the female group, SEA-induced PBMC proliferation was associated with the production of IFN-gamma, IL-2 and IL-5, all of which correlated negatively with intensity of infection. Most cytokine production correlated positively with age. Spontaneous production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 was higher in the infected population than in an uninfected control group. Our results suggest that immunity to infection could be more pronounced in the female population and associated with a Th0/1 + 2 pattern of cytokine secretion mediated by soluble egg antigen (SEA).

  20. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6–35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3–17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6–35 months and 3–17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158. PMID:26176592

  1. Importins and exportins regulating allergic immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankita; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of macromolecules is a well-controlled process involving importins and exportins. These karyopherins recognize and bind to receptor-mediated intracellular signals through specific signal sequences that are present on cargo proteins and transport into and out of the nucleus through nuclear pore complexes. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) present on cargo molecules to be imported while nuclear export signals (NES) on the molecules to be exported are recognized by importins and exportins, respectively. The classical NLS are found on many transcription factors and molecules that are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In addition, several immune modulators, including corticosteroids and vitamin D, elicit their cellular responses by regulating the expression and activity of importin molecules. In this review article, we provide a comprehensive list of importin and exportin molecules and their specific cargo that shuttled between cytoplasm and the nucleus. We also critically review the role and regulation of specific importin and exportin involved in the transport of activated transcription factors in allergic diseases, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and the potential target sites for developing better therapeutic approaches.

  2. Importins and Exportins Regulating Allergic Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of macromolecules is a well-controlled process involving importins and exportins. These karyopherins recognize and bind to receptor-mediated intracellular signals through specific signal sequences that are present on cargo proteins and transport into and out of the nucleus through nuclear pore complexes. Nuclear localization signals (NLS present on cargo molecules to be imported while nuclear export signals (NES on the molecules to be exported are recognized by importins and exportins, respectively. The classical NLS are found on many transcription factors and molecules that are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In addition, several immune modulators, including corticosteroids and vitamin D, elicit their cellular responses by regulating the expression and activity of importin molecules. In this review article, we provide a comprehensive list of importin and exportin molecules and their specific cargo that shuttled between cytoplasm and the nucleus. We also critically review the role and regulation of specific importin and exportin involved in the transport of activated transcription factors in allergic diseases, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and the potential target sites for developing better therapeutic approaches.

  3. The immune response to sand fly salivary proteins and its influence on Leishmania immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regis eGomes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by bites of phlebotomine sand flies. During Leishmania transmission, sand fly saliva is co-inoculated with parasites into the skin of the mammalian host. Sand fly saliva consists of roughly thirty different salivary proteins, many with known roles linked to blood feeding facilitation. Apart from the anti-hemostatic capacity of saliva, several sand fly salivary proteins have been shown to be immunogenic upon multiple contacts with a mammalian host. Immunization with single immunogenic salivary proteins or exposure to uninfected bites can produce protective immune responses against leishmaniasis. These sand fly salivary proteins induce cellular immune responses and/or antibodies. Antibodies to saliva are not required for protection in a mouse model against leishmaniasis. A strong body of evidence points to the role for saliva-specific T cells producing IFN-γ in the form of a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction at the bite site as the main protective response. Herein, we review immunity to sand fly salivary proteins in the context of its vector-parasite-host combinations and vaccine potential, as well as some recent advances to shed light on the mechanism of how an immune response to sand fly saliva protects against leishmaniasis.

  4. A novel HIV vaccine adjuvanted by IC31 induces robust and persistent humoral and cellular immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pattacini

    Full Text Available The HIV vaccine strategy that, to date, generated immune protection consisted of a prime-boost regimen using a canarypox vector and an HIV envelope protein with alum, as shown in the RV144 trial. Since the efficacy was weak, and previous HIV vaccine trials designed to generate antibody responses failed, we hypothesized that generation of T cell responses would result in improved protection. Thus, we tested the immunogenicity of a similar envelope-based vaccine using a mouse model, with two modifications: a clade C CN54gp140 HIV envelope protein was adjuvanted by the TLR9 agonist IC31®, and the viral vector was the vaccinia strain NYVAC-CN54 expressing HIV envelope gp120. The use of IC31® facilitated immunoglobulin isotype switching, leading to the production of Env-specific IgG2a, as compared to protein with alum alone. Boosting with NYVAC-CN54 resulted in the generation of more robust Th1 T cell responses. Moreover, gp140 prime with IC31® and alum followed by NYVAC-CN54 boost resulted in the formation and persistence of central and effector memory populations in the spleen and an effector memory population in the gut. Our data suggest that this regimen is promising and could improve the protection rate by eliciting strong and long-lasting humoral and cellular immune responses.

  5. Cellular changes, molecular pathways and the immune system following photodynamic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupin-Mrugalska, P; Sobotta, L; Kucinska, M; Murias, M; Mielcarek, J; Düzgüneş, N

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel medical technique involving three key components: light, a photosensitizer molecule and molecular oxygen, which are essential to achieve the therapeutic effect. There has been great interest in the use of PDT in the treatment of many cancers and skin disorders. Upon irradiation with light of a specific wavelength, the photosensitizer undergoes several reactions resulting in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS may react with different biomolecules, causing defects in many cellular structures and biochemical pathways. PDT-mediated tumor destruction in vivo involves cellular mechanisms with photodamage of mitochondria, lysosomes, nuclei, and cell membranes that activate apoptotic, necrotic and autophagic signals, leading to cell death. PDT is capable of changing the tumor microenvironment, thereby diminishing the supply of oxygen, which explains the antiangiogenic effect of PDT. Finally, inflammatory and immune responses play a crucial role in the long-lasting consequences of PDT treatment. This review is focused on the biochemical effects exerted by photodynamic treatment on cell death signaling pathways, destruction of the vasculature, and the activation of the immune system.

  6. Exosomes in the Immune Response and Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    修方明; 曹雪涛

    2004-01-01

    Exosomes, secreted by many live cells, are small non-cell vesicles with nanoparticle-grade size. In addition to the original function of discarding the uselessful membrane molecules, exosomes are involved in a range of immunoregulatory functions. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes and tumor-derived exosomes are the best characterized vesicles with potent antitumor effect by efficienfly inducing immune response. Down-regtdation of immune response or induction of immune tolerance is another interesting function of exosomes, Further functional studies of the exosomes will shed light on the application of exosomes。

  7. Paramyxovirus activation and inhibition of innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Griffith D; Alexander-Miller, Martha A

    2013-12-13

    Paramyxoviruses represent a remarkably diverse family of enveloped nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, some of which are the most ubiquitous disease-causing viruses of humans and animals. This review focuses on paramyxovirus activation of innate immune pathways, the mechanisms by which these RNA viruses counteract these pathways, and the innate response to paramyxovirus infection of dendritic cells (DC). Paramyxoviruses are potent activators of extracellular complement pathways, a first line of defense that viruses must face during natural infections. We discuss mechanisms by which these viruses activate and combat complement to delay neutralization. Once cells are infected, virus replication drives type I interferon (IFN) synthesis that has the potential to induce a large number of antiviral genes. Here we describe four approaches by which paramyxoviruses limit IFN induction: by limiting synthesis of IFN-inducing aberrant viral RNAs, through targeted inhibition of RNA sensors, by providing viral decoy substrates for cellular kinase complexes, and through direct blocking of the IFN promoter. In addition, paramyxoviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to disrupt IFN signaling pathways. We describe three general mechanisms, including targeted proteolysis of signaling factors, sequestering cellular factors, and upregulation of cellular inhibitors. DC are exceptional cells with the capacity to generate adaptive immunity through the coupling of innate immune signals and T cell activation. We discuss the importance of innate responses in DC following paramyxovirus infection and their consequences for the ability to mount and maintain antiviral T cells.

  8. Immune response to lipoproteins in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Sonia; Mundkur, Lakshmi; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  9. Role of cellular immunity in halothane hepatitis: an in vitro study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Zhijie; Miao Xuerong; Wang Xiaoyan; Wu Jingxiang; Lv Xin; Yu Weifeng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of cellular immunity in halothane hepatitis. Methods: Hepatotoxicity model was established by exposing male Hartley guinea pigs to 1% halothane via inspiration for 4 h each time for 1 or 3 times within a 42-day interval. Then their hepatocytes and lymphocytes were collected and divided into 2 parts for different cultures. Hepatocytes were cultivated with or without 1% halothane for 4 h and lymphocytes were cultivated with or without 12.5 μg/ml trifluoroacetylated guinea pig serum albumin (TFA-GSA). Then the 2 kinds of hepatocytes were co-cultivated with lymphocytes (1:100) with or without TFA-GSA induction respectively and the supernatant fluid was taken after 24, 48 and 72 h to determine the concentration of alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The halothane cultivated hepatocytes were co-cultivated with various proportion of TFA-GSA antigen induced lymphocytes and ALT was determined after 48 h to determine the proper proportion of hepatocytes and lymphocyte. Results: Lymphocytes of 3 times halothane induced guinea pigs caused a significant increase of ALT in hepatocytes with or without halothane induction. But the lymphocytes of l time halothane induced guinea pigs only caused a significant increase of ALT in hepatocytes with induction of halothane. The increase of ALT was only seen after 48- and 72-hour co-culture. The proper proportion of hepatocytes and lymphocytes was l:100 for lymphocytes cytotoxicity. Conclusion: Lymphocytes is sensitized after inhalation of halothane and generates cytotoxicity to hepatocytes. The immune response of lymphocytes to hepatocytes will be enhanced by repeated inhalation of halothane. The cellular immunity may be one of the mechanisms of halothane induced hepatotoxicity.

  10. The cellular composition of the human immune system is shaped by age and cohabitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Edward J; Dooley, James; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lee, James C; Wouters, Carine; Meyts, Isabelle; Goris, An; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Linterman, Michelle A; Liston, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Detailed population-level description of the human immune system has recently become achievable. We used a 'systems-level' approach to establish a resource of cellular immune profiles of 670 healthy individuals. We report a high level of interindividual variation, with low longitudinal variation, at the level of cellular subset composition of the immune system. Despite the profound effects of antigen exposure on individual antigen-specific clones, the cellular subset structure proved highly elastic, with transient vaccination-induced changes followed by a return to the individual's unique baseline. Notably, the largest influence on immunological variation identified was cohabitation, with 50% less immunological variation between individuals who share an environment (as parents) than between people in the wider population. These results identify local environmental conditions as a key factor in shaping the human immune system.

  11. Immune responses and Lassa virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russier, Marion; Pannetier, Delphine; Baize, Sylvain

    2012-11-05

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa and caused by Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus. It may be fatal, but most patients recover from acute disease and some experience asymptomatic infection. The immune mechanisms associated with these different outcomes have not yet been fully elucidated, but considerable progress has recently been made, through the use of in vitro human models and nonhuman primates, the only relevant animal model that mimics the pathophysiology and immune responses induced in patients. We discuss here the roles of the various components of the innate and adaptive immune systems in Lassa virus infection and in the control of viral replication and pathogenesis.

  12. Vascularized composite allograft-specific characteristics of immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Fadi

    2016-06-01

    Vascularized composite allograft (VCA) transplantation, or reconstructive transplantation, has revolutionized the treatment of complex tissue and functional defects. Despite arriving during an age in which the immunology of solid organ transplant rejection has been investigated in much detail, these transplants have offered new perspectives from which to explore the immunobiology of transplantation. VCAs have a number of unique molecular, cellular, and architectural features which alter the character and intensity of the rejection response. While much is yet to be clarified, an understanding of these distinct mechanisms affords new possibilities for the control of immune responses in an effort to improve outcomes after VCA transplantation.

  13. Humoral and cellular immunity to hepatitis B virus-derived antigens: comparative activity of Freund complete adjuvant alum, and liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Y; Ionescu-Matiu, I; Dreesman, G R; Kramp, W; Six, H R; Hollinger, F B; Melnick, J L

    1980-01-01

    Complete Freud adjuvant, aluminum gel, and liposomes were compared for their ability to enhance the immunogenicity of an intact 22-nm HBsAg particle vaccine and an HBsAg-derived polypeptide vaccine in guinea pigs. Both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were evaluated. The greatest immune response was obtained with complete Freund adjuvant, regardless of the antigen preparation. Aluminum gel appeared to be a better adjuvant for 22-nm HBsAg particles, but the liposomes rendered polypeptide preparations more immunogenic. The possibility that various proportions were entrapped in aqueous compartments instead of being inserted into the lipid bilayers of liposomes might account for this difference. The development of both humoral and cellular immunity was dependent upon the use of an adjuvant, because aqueous preparations had poor immunogenicity. PMID:7014445

  14. Mechano-biological Coupling of Cellular Responses to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mian; Wang, Yuren; Zheng, Huiqiong; Shang, Peng; Duan, Enkui; Lü, Dongyuan

    2015-11-01

    Cellular response to microgravity is a basic issue in space biological sciences as well as space physiology and medicine. It is crucial to elucidate the mechano-biological coupling mechanisms of various biological organisms, since, from the principle of adaptability, all species evolved on the earth must possess the structure and function that adapts their living environment. As a basic element of an organism, a cell usually undergoes mechanical and chemical remodeling to sense, transmit, transduce, and respond to the alteration of gravitational signals. In the past decades, new computational platforms and experimental methods/techniques/devices are developed to mimic the biological effects of microgravity environment from the viewpoint of biomechanical approaches. Mechanobiology of plant gravisensing in the responses of statolith movements along the gravity vector and the relevant signal transduction and molecular regulatory mechanisms are investigated at gene, transcription, and protein levels. Mechanotransduction of bone or immune cell responses and stem cell development and tissue histogenesis are elucidated under microgravity. In this review, several important issues are briefly discussed. Future issues on gravisensing and mechanotransducing mechanisms are also proposed for ground-based studies as well as space missions.

  15. JH modulates a cellular immunity of Tribolium castaneum in a Met-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepat, Rahul; Kim, Yonggyun

    2014-04-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates diverse physiological processes in insects during entire developmental stages. Especially, the identification of Methoprene-tolerant (Met), a JH nuclear receptor, allows us to better understand molecular actions of JH to control gene expressions related with metamorphosis. However, several physiological processes including cellular immune response and some molecular actions of JH have been suspected to be mediated via its non-genomic actions. To prove its non-genomic action, JH nuclear signals were suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi) of Met or its downstream gene, Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1), in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. These RNAi-treated larvae failed to undergo a normal development and suffered precocious metamorphosis. Hemocytes of T. castaneum exhibited their spreading behavior on extracellular matrix and nodule formation in response to bacterial challenge. When the larvae were treated with either RNAi of Met or Kr-h1, the hemocytes of the treated larvae were responsive to JH without any significant difference with those of control larvae. These results suggest that the response of hemocytes to JH is not mediated by its nuclear signal. On the other hand, the JH modulation of hemocyte behaviors of T. castaneum was significantly influenced by membrane and cytosolic protein activities, in which ethoxyzolamide (a specific inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase), calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C) or ouabain (a specific inhibitor of Na(+)-K(+) ATPase) significantly suppressed the responsiveness of hemocytes to JH.

  16. Immune Response to Ebola Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Alonso Remedios

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus belongs to the family Filoviridae and causes a highly lethal hemorrhagic fever. Affected patients show an impaired immune response as a result of the evasion mechanisms employed by the virus. Cathepsin is an enzyme present in the granules of phagocytes which cleaves viral surface glycoproteins, allowing virus entry into the host cell. In addition, this virus is resistant to the antiviral effects of type I interferon, promotes the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and induces apoptosis of monocytes and lymphocytes. It also induces an incomplete activation of dendritic cells, thus avoiding the presentation of viral antigens. Although specific antibodies are produced after the first week, their neutralizing capacity is doubtful. The virus evades the immune response and replicates uncontrollably in the host. This paper aims to summarize the main characteristics of the immune response to Ebola virus infection.

  17. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels; Cole, Alexander M

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de novo synthesis or by proteolytic cleavage from antimicrobially inactive proproteins. Studies of human diseases and animal studies have given important clues to the in vivo role of AMPs. It is now evident that dysregulation of the generation of AMPs in innate immune responses plays a role in certain diseases like Crohn's disease and atopic dermatitis. AMPs are attractive candidates for development of novel antibiotics due to their in vivo activity profile and some peptides may serve as templates for further drug development.

  18. Radiation triggering immune response and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekim, Nezih; Cetin, Zafer; Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Cort, Aysegul; Saygili, Eyup Ilker

    2015-11-28

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a well-established but still under optimization branch of Cancer Therapy (CT). RT uses electromagnetic waves or charged particles in order to kill malignant cells, by accumulating the energy onto these cells. The issue at stake for RT, as well as for any other Cancer Therapy technique, is always to kill only cancer cells, without affecting the surrounding healthy ones. This perspective of CT is usually described under the terms "specificity" and "selectivity". Specificity and selectivity are the ideal goal, but the ideal is never entirely achieved. Thus, in addition to killing healthy cells, changes and effects are observed in the immune system after irradiation. In this review, we mainly focus on the effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system and its components like bone marrow. Additionally, we are interested in the effects and benefits of low-dose ionizing radiation on the hematopoiesis and immune response. Low dose radiation has been shown to induce biological responses like inflammatory responses, innate immune system activation and DNA repair (adaptive response). This review reveals the fact that there are many unanswered questions regarding the role of radiation as either an immune-activating (low dose) or immunosuppressive (high dose) agent.

  19. The immune responses of the coral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Toledo-Hernández

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Corals are among the most ancient extant animals on earth. Currently, coral viability is threatened, due in part to the increased number of diseases affecting them in recent decades. Understanding how the innate immune systems of corals function is important if we want to predict the fate of corals and their response to the environmental and biological changes they face. In this review we discuss the latest findings regarding the innate immune systems of corals. The review is organized following the chronology of steps taken by corals from the initial encounter with a potential pathogen and recognition of threats to the orchestration of a response. We begin with the literature describing the repertory of immune-related receptors involved in the recognition of threats and the subsequent pathways leading to an immune response. We then review the effector responses that eliminate the threats described for corals. Finally, we acknowledge the literature of coral microbiology to access the potential role of microbes as an essential constituent of the coral immune system.

  20. HIV-specific humoral and cellular immunity in rabbits vaccinated with recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-like gag-env particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haffar, O.K.; Smithgall, M.D.; Moran, P.A.; Travis, B.M.; Zarling, J.M.; Hu, S.L. (Department of Virology, Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute-Seattle, WA (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-like gag-env particles produced in mammalian cells were inoculated into two New Zealand white rabbits. In parallel, two control rabbits were inoculated with the homologous HIV-1 virions inactivated by ultraviolet light (uv) and psoralen treatments. The humoral and cellular immune responses to HIV-1 were evaluated for both groups of animals. Recombinant particles elicited humoral immunity that was specific for all the viral structural proteins. The antibodies recognized both denatured and nondenatured proteins. Moreover, the sera neutralized the in vitro infectivity of the homologous virus in CEM cells. Importantly, the recombinant particles also generated a T helper response by priming with the HIV proteins. Similar results were observed with inactivated virus immunization. Therefore, the authors results suggest that the recombinant HIV-like particles elicit functional humoral immunity as well as cellular immunity and represent a novel vaccine candidate for AIDS.

  1. A nonequilibrium phase transition in immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei; Qi An-Shen

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of immune response correlated to signal transduction in immune thymic cells (T cells) is studied.In particular, the problem of the phosphorylation of the immune-receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM) is explored. A nonlinear model is established on the basis of experimental observations. The behaviours of the model can be well analysed using the concepts of nonequilibrium phase transitions. In addition, the Riemann-Hugoniot cusp catastrophe is demonstrated by the model. Due to the application of the theory of nonequilibrium phase transitions,the biological phenomena can be clarified more precisely. The results can also be used to further explain the signal transduction and signal discrimination of an important type of immune T cell.

  2. A Drosophila immune response against Ras-induced overgrowth

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    Thomas Hauling

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to characterize the innate immune response against the early stage of tumor development. For this, animal models where genetic changes in specific cells and tissues can be performed in a controlled way have become increasingly important, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Many tumor mutants in Drosophila affect the germline and, as a consequence, also the immune system itself, making it difficult to ascribe their phenotype to a specific tissue. Only during the past decade, mutations have been induced systematically in somatic cells to study the control of tumorous growth by neighboring cells and by immune cells. Here we show that upon ectopic expression of a dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (RasV12, both imaginal discs and salivary glands are affected. Particularly, the glands increase in size, express metalloproteinases and display apoptotic markers. This leads to a strong cellular response, which has many hallmarks of the granuloma-like encapsulation reaction, usually mounted by the insect against larger foreign objects. RNA sequencing of the fat body reveals a characteristic humoral immune response. In addition we also identify genes that are specifically induced upon expression of RasV12. As a proof-of-principle, we show that one of the induced genes (santa-maria, which encodes a scavenger receptor, modulates damage to the salivary glands. The list of genes we have identified provides a rich source for further functional characterization. Our hope is that this will lead to a better understanding of the earliest stage of innate immune responses against tumors with implications for mammalian immunity.

  3. Royal Decree: Gene Expression in Trans-Generationally Immune Primed Bumblebee Workers Mimics a Primary Immune Response.

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    Seth M Barribeau

    Full Text Available Invertebrates lack the cellular and physiological machinery of the adaptive immune system, but show specificity in their immune response and immune priming. Functionally, immune priming is comparable to immune memory in vertebrates. Individuals that have survived exposure to a given parasite are better protected against subsequent exposures. Protection may be cross-reactive, but demonstrations of persistent and specific protection in invertebrates are increasing. This immune priming can cross generations ("trans-generational" immune priming, preparing offspring for the prevailing parasite environment. While these phenomena gain increasing support, the mechanistic foundations underlying such immune priming, both within and across generations, remain largely unknown. Using a transcriptomic approach, we show that exposing bumblebee queens with an injection of heat-killed bacteria, known to induce trans-generational immune priming, alters daughter (worker gene expression. Daughters, even when unexposed themselves, constitutively express a core set of the genes induced upon direct bacterial exposure, including high expression of antimicrobial peptides, a beta-glucan receptor protein implicated in bacterial recognition and the induction of the toll signaling pathway, and slit-3 which is important in honeybee immunity. Maternal exposure results in a distinct upregulation of their daughters' immune system, with a signature overlapping with the induced individual response to a direct exposure. This will mediate mother-offspring protection, but also associated costs related to reconfiguration of constitutive immune expression. Moreover, identification of conserved immune pathways in memory-like responses has important implications for our understanding of the innate immune system, including the innate components in vertebrates, which share many of these pathways.

  4. The Effect of Radiation on the Immune Response to Cancers

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    Bonggoo Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, the beneficial effects of radiation can extend beyond direct cytotoxicity to tumor cells. Delivery of localized radiation to tumors often leads to systemic responses at distant sites, a phenomenon known as the abscopal effect which has been attributed to the induction and enhancement of the endogenous anti-tumor innate and adaptive immune response. The mechanisms surrounding the abscopal effect are diverse and include trafficking of lymphocytes into the tumor microenvironment, enhanced tumor recognition and killing via up-regulation of tumor antigens and antigen presenting machinery and, induction of positive immunomodulatory pathways. Here, we discuss potential mechanisms of radiation-induced enhancement of the anti-tumor response through its effect on the host immune system and explore potential combinational immune-based strategies such as adoptive cellular therapy using ex vivo expanded NK and T cells as a means of delivering a potent effector population in the context of radiation-enhanced anti-tumor immune environment.

  5. Host immune status and response to hepatitis E virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krain, Lisa J; Nelson, Kenrad E; Labrique, Alain B

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), identified over 30 years ago, remains a serious threat to life, health, and productivity in developing countries where access to clean water is limited. Recognition that HEV also circulates as a zoonotic and food-borne pathogen in developed countries is more recent. Even without treatment, most cases of HEV-related acute viral hepatitis (with or without jaundice) resolve within 1 to 2 months. However, HEV sometimes leads to acute liver failure, chronic infection, or extrahepatic symptoms. The mechanisms of pathogenesis appear to be substantially immune mediated. This review covers the epidemiology of HEV infection worldwide, the humoral and cellular immune responses to HEV, and the persistence and protection of antibodies produced in response to both natural infection and vaccines. We focus on the contributions of altered immune states (associated with pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], and immunosuppressive agents used in cancer and transplant medicine) to the elevated risks of chronic infection (in immunosuppressed/immunocompromised patients) and acute liver failure and mortality (among pregnant women). We conclude by discussing outstanding questions about the immune response to HEV and interactions with hormones and comorbid conditions. These questions take on heightened importance now that a vaccine is available.

  6. Simulating the Immune Response on a Distributed Parallel Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione, F.; Bernaschi, M.; Succi, S.

    The application of ideas and methods of statistical mechanics to problems of biological relevance is one of the most promising frontiers of theoretical and computational mathematical physics.1,2 Among others, the computer simulation of the immune system dynamics stands out as one of the prominent candidates for this type of investigations. In the recent years immunological research has been drawing increasing benefits from the resort to advanced mathematical modeling on modern computers.3,4 Among others, Cellular Automata (CA), i.e., fully discrete dynamical systems evolving according to boolean laws, appear to be extremely well suited to computer simulation of biological systems.5 A prominent example of immunological CA is represented by the Celada-Seiden automaton, that has proven capable of providing several new insights into the dynamics of the immune system response. To date, the Celada-Seiden automaton was not in a position to exploit the impressive advances of computer technology, and notably parallel processing, simply because no parallel version of this automaton had been developed yet. In this paper we fill this gap and describe a parallel version of the Celada-Seiden cellular automaton aimed at simulating the dynamic response of the immune system. Details on the parallel implementation as well as performance data on the IBM SP2 parallel platform are presented and commented on.

  7. Serum cortisol level in cerebral infarction patients with infection and its correlation with nerve function, humoral immunity and cellular immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-Min Zhai; Hui-Qi Li; Jian-Bo He; Hai-Guo Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the serum cortisol level in cerebral infarction patients with infection and its correlation with nerve function, humoral immunity and cellular immunity.Methods:A total of 86 patients with cerebral infarction were divided into observation group (cerebral infarction combined with infection) (n=40) and control group (cerebral infarction alone) (n=46) according to the combination of infection. Serum content of cortisol, nerve function-related indexes and humoral immunity indexes as well as peripheral blood levels of cellular immunity indexes of two groups of patients were determined on admission, and the correlation between serum cortisol level and the above illness-related indexes in cerebral infarction patients with infection was further analyzed.Results: Serum cortisol content of observation group was significantly higher than that of control group; serum nerve function indexes S100β, GFAP, Hcy and HO1 content were significantly higher than those of control group while IGF-1 content was significantly lower than that of control group; humoral immunity indexes IgA, IgM, IgG, C3 and C4 content in serum were significantly lower than those of control group; cellular immunity indexes CD3+, CD4+ and CD54+T lymphocyte content in peripheral blood were significantly lower than those of control group while CD19+T lymphocyte content and CD4+/CD8+ level were significantly higher than those of control group; hemodynamic indexes rCBF and rCBV levels were significantly lower than those of control group while MTT, TTP and DLY levels were significantly higher than those of control group. Serum cortisol level in cerebral infarction patients with infection was directly correlated with the levels of nerve function, humoral immunity, cellular immunity and other illness-related indexes. Conclusions:The high cortisol state in cerebral infarction patients with infection is the visual sign of severe nerve function damage and suppressed immune function, and it can be a

  8. Immune Response of Multiparous Hyper-Immunized Sows against Peptides from Non-Structural and Structural Proteins of PRRSV

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    Edgar Rascón-Castelo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the humoral and cellular responses of commercial multiparous and hyper-immunized sows against peptides from non-structural (nsp and structural proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV. We selected sows with different numbers of parities from a commercial farm. Management practices on this farm include the use of the MLV commercial vaccine four times per year, plus two vaccinations during the acclimation period. The humoral response was evaluated via the antibody recognition of peptides from nsp and structural proteins, and the cellular response was assessed by measuring the frequency of peptide and PRRSV-specific IFN-gamma-secreting cells (IFNγ-SC. Our results show that sows with six parities have more antibodies against peptides from structural proteins than against peptides from nsp. The analysis of the cellular response revealed that the number of immunizations did not affect the frequency of IFNγ-SC and that the response was stronger against peptides from structural proteins (M protein than against nsp (nsp2. In summary, these results demonstrate that multiparous, hyper-immunized sows have a stronger immune humoral response to PRRSV structural peptides than nsp, but no differences in IFNγ-SC against the same peptides were observed.

  9. Serratia marcescens suppresses host cellular immunity via the production of an adhesion-inhibitory factor against immunosurveillance cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-02-28

    Injection of a culture supernatant of Serratia marcescens into the bloodstream of the silkworm Bombyx mori increased the number of freely circulating immunosurveillance cells (hemocytes). Using a bioassay with live silkworms, serralysin metalloprotease was purified from the culture supernatant and identified as the factor responsible for this activity. Serralysin inhibited the in vitro attachment of both silkworm hemocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. Incubation of silkworm hemocytes or murine macrophages with serralysin resulted in degradation of the cellular immune factor BmSPH-1 or calreticulin, respectively. Furthermore, serralysin suppressed in vitro phagocytosis of bacteria by hemocytes and in vivo bacterial clearance in silkworms. Disruption of the ser gene in S. marcescens attenuated its host killing ability in silkworms and mice. These findings suggest that serralysin metalloprotease secreted by S. marcescens suppresses cellular immunity by decreasing the adhesive properties of immunosurveillance cells, thereby contributing to bacterial pathogenesis.

  10. Enhancing Immune Responses for Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-An Xue; Hans J Stauss

    2007-01-01

    Although the immune system possesses the means to respond to cancer, it often fails to control the spread of malignancy. Nonetheless, equipping endogenous immunity to release a strong antitumor response has significant advantages over conventional therapies. This review explores some of the options available to accomplish this,focusing first on vaccinations with tumor antigens to stimulate the immune system and empower stronger antitumor responses. We then compare and contrast the so-far limited clinical success of vaccination with the well-documented curative potential of adoptive therapy using T lymphocytes transfer. Finally, we highlight novel approaches using T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer strategy to exploit allogeneic T cell repertoires in conjunction with receptors selected in vitro for defined MHC/peptide combinations, as a basis for antigen-specific gene therapy of cancers.

  11. Stochastic optimal therapy for enhanced immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Robert F; Ghigliazza, Raffaele

    2004-10-01

    Therapeutic enhancement of humoral immune response to microbial attack is addressed as the stochastic optimal control of a dynamic system. Without therapy, the modeled immune response depends upon the initial concentration of pathogens in a simulated attack. Immune response can be augmented by agents that kill the pathogen directly, that stimulate the production of plasma cells or antibodies, or that enhance organ health. Using a generic mathematical model of immune response to the infection (i.e., of the dynamic state of the system), previous papers demonstrated optimal (open-loop) and neighboring-optimal (closed-loop) control solutions that defeat the pathogen and preserve organ health, given initial conditions that otherwise would be lethal [Optimal Contr. Appl. Methods 23 (2002) 91, Bioinformatics 18 (2002) 1227]. Therapies based on separate and combined application of the agents were derived by minimizing a quadratic cost function that weighted both system response and drug usage, providing implicit control over harmful side effects. Here, we focus on the effects that corrupted or incomplete measurements of the dynamic state may have on neighboring-optimal feedback control. Imperfect measurements degrade the precision of feedback adjustments to therapy; however, optimal state estimation allows the feedback strategy to be implemented with incomplete measurements and minimizes the expected effects of measurement error. Complete observability of the perturbed state for this four state example is provided by measurement of four of the six possible pairs of two variables, either set of three variables, or all four variables. The inclusion of state estimation extends the applicability of optimal control theory for developing new therapeutic protocols to enhance immune response.

  12. Encapsulated Cellular Implants for Recombinant Protein Delivery and Therapeutic Modulation of the Immune System

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    Aurélien Lathuilière

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ex vivo gene therapy using retrievable encapsulated cellular implants is an effective strategy for the local and/or chronic delivery of therapeutic proteins. In particular, it is considered an innovative approach to modulate the activity of the immune system. Two recently proposed therapeutic schemes using genetically engineered encapsulated cells are discussed here: the chronic administration of monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization against neurodegenerative diseases and the local delivery of a cytokine as an adjuvant for anti-cancer vaccines.

  13. Differential regional immune response in Chagas disease.

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    Juliana de Meis

    Full Text Available Following infection, lymphocytes expand exponentially and differentiate into effector cells to control infection and coordinate the multiple effector arms of the immune response. Soon after this expansion, the majority of antigen-specific lymphocytes die, thus keeping homeostasis, and a small pool of memory cells develops, providing long-term immunity to subsequent reinfection. The extent of infection and rate of pathogen clearance are thought to determine both the magnitude of cell expansion and the homeostatic contraction to a stable number of memory cells. This straight correlation between the kinetics of T cell response and the dynamics of lymphoid tissue cell numbers is a constant feature in acute infections yielded by pathogens that are cleared during the course of response. However, the regional dynamics of the immune response mounted against pathogens that are able to establish a persistent infection remain poorly understood. Herein we discuss the differential lymphocyte dynamics in distinct central and peripheral lymphoid organs following acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. While the thymus and mesenteric lymph nodes undergo a severe atrophy with massive lymphocyte depletion, the spleen and subcutaneous lymph nodes expand due to T and B cell activation/proliferation. These events are regulated by cytokines, as well as parasite-derived moieties. In this regard, identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying regional lymphocyte dynamics secondary to T. cruzi infection may hopefully contribute to the design of novel immune intervention strategies to control pathology in this infection.

  14. [Immune response genes products in human physiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaitov, R M; Alekseev, L P

    2012-09-01

    Current data on physiological role of human immune response genes' proteomic products (antigens) are discussed. The antigens are specified by a very high level of diversity that mediates a wide specter ofphysiological functions. They actually provide integrity and biological stability of human as species. These data reveal new ideas on many pathological processes as well as drafts new approaches for prophylaxis and treatment.

  15. Protective immune responses in lawsonia intracellularis infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordes, Henriette; Riber, Ulla; Boutrup, Torsten;

    and no increase in acute phase response after challenge with a pathogenic isolate. Here we show results from measurements of serology as well as cell-mediated immune responses from this experiment. We found that Lawsonia-specific IgA peaked in serum around day 17-24 after a primary infection in experimentally......Lawsonia intracellularis is the cause of porcine proliferative enteropathy, one of the major causes of antibiotics usage in modern pig production. L. intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium preferable infecting epithelial cells of pigs intestine. We have demonstrated earlier......, but exhibited a high, but short-lasting peak after re-infection. Specific IFN responses were also measured using a whole blood IFN-γ assay. These were very high in challenge infected and re-infected animals as compared to controls. These specific immune responses may contribute to the explanation of mechanisms...

  16. Innate immune sensing and response to influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulendran, Bali; Maddur, Mohan S

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses pose a substantial threat to human and animal health worldwide. Recent studies in mouse models have revealed an indispensable role for the innate immune system in defense against influenza virus. Recognition of the virus by innate immune receptors in a multitude of cell types activates intricate signaling networks, functioning to restrict viral replication. Downstream effector mechanisms include activation of innate immune cells and, induction and regulation of adaptive immunity. However, uncontrolled innate responses are associated with exaggerated disease, especially in pandemic influenza virus infection. Despite advances in the understanding of innate response to influenza in the mouse model, there is a large knowledge gap in humans, particularly in immunocompromised groups such as infants and the elderly. We propose here, the need for further studies in humans to decipher the role of innate immunity to influenza virus, particularly at the site of infection. These studies will complement the existing work in mice and facilitate the quest to design improved vaccines and therapeutic strategies against influenza.

  17. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides encapsulated in liposome as an adjuvant to promote Th1-bias immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenguang; Xing, Jie; Zheng, Sisi; Bo, Ruonan; Luo, Li; Huang, Yee; Niu, Yale; Li, Zhihua; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi

    2016-05-20

    Liposome-based vaccine delivery systems are known to enhance immune responses. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) have been widely studied as immunomodulator and it could be as inducers of strong immune responses. In the research, GLP and ovalbumin (OVA) were encapsulated into liposome as vaccine and inoculated to mice. The magnitude and kinetics of the humoral and cellular immune responses were investigated. The results showed that GLP-OVA-loaded liposomes (GLPL/OVA) could induce more powerful antigen-specific immune responses than each single-component formulation. Mice immunized with GLPL/OVA displayed higher antigen-specific IgG antibodies, better splenocytes proliferation, higher cytokine secretion by splenocytes and significant activation of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T cells. Thus the GLPL/OVA formulation produced a heightened humoral and cellular immune response, with an overall Th1 bias. Enhanced immune responses elicited by the GLPL/OVA formulation might be attributed to effective activation and mature of DC in draining lymph nodes. Overall, these findings indicate that GLPL have the potential to enhance immune responses as vaccine delivery systems.

  18. Innate immune responses of salmonid fish to viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Bertrand

    2014-04-01

    Viruses are the most serious pathogenic threat to the production of the main aquacultured salmonid species the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and the Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. The viral diseases Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis (IPN), Pancreatic Disease (PD), Infectious Haemorrhagic Necrosis (IHN), Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (VHS), and Infectious Salmon Anaemia (ISA) cause massive economic losses to the global salmonid aquaculture industry every year. To date, no solution exists to treat livestock affected by a viral disease and only a small number of efficient vaccines are available to prevent infection. As a consequence, understanding the host immune response against viruses in these fish species is critical to develop prophylactic and preventive control measures. The innate immune response represents an important part of the host defence mechanism preventing viral replication after infection. It is a fast acting response designed to inhibit virus propagation immediately within the host, allowing for the adaptive specific immunity to develop. It has cellular and humoral components which act in synergy. This review will cover inflammation responses, the cell types involved, apoptosis, antimicrobial peptides. Particular attention will be given to the type I interferon system as the major player in the innate antiviral defence mechanism of salmonids. Viral evasion strategies will also be discussed.

  19. Ovine model for studying pulmonary immune responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel, D.D.; Chanana, A.D.

    1984-11-25

    Anatomical features of the sheep lung make it an excellent model for studying pulmonary immunity. Four specific lung segments were identified which drain exclusively to three separate lymph nodes. One of these segments, the dorsal basal segment of the right lung, is drained by the caudal mediastinal lymph node (CMLN). Cannulation of the efferent lymph duct of the CMLN along with highly localized intrabronchial instillation of antigen provides a functional unit with which to study factors involved in development of pulmonary immune responses. Following intrabronchial immunization there was an increased output of lymphoblasts and specific antibody-forming cells in efferent CMLN lymph. Continuous divergence of efferent lymph eliminated the serum antibody response but did not totally eliminate the appearance of specific antibody in fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. In these studies localized immunization of the right cranial lobe served as a control. Efferent lymphoblasts produced in response to intrabronchial antigen were labeled with /sup 125/I-iododeoxyuridine and their migrational patterns and tissue distribution compared to lymphoblasts obtained from the thoracic duct. The results indicated that pulmonary immunoblasts tend to relocate in lung tissue and reappear with a higher specific activity in pulmonary lymph than in thoracic duct lymph. The reverse was observed with labeled intestinal lymphoblasts. 35 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Immune Response to Lipoproteins in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Samson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  1. Emerging Microfluidic Tools for Functional Cellular Immunophenotyping: A New Potential Paradigm for Immune Status Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqiang eChen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, accurate, and quantitative characterization of immune status of patients is of utmost importance for disease diagnosis and prognosis, evaluating efficacy of immunotherapeutics and tailoring drug treatments. Immune status of patients is often dynamic and patient-specific, and such complex heterogeneity has made accurate, real-time measurements of patient immune status challenging in the clinical setting. Recent advances in microfluidics have demonstrated promising applications of microfluidics for immune monitoring with minimum sample requirement and rapid functional immunophenotyping capability. This review will highlight recent developments of microfluidic platforms that can perform rapid and accurate cellular functional assays on patient immune cells. We will also discuss the future potential of integrated microfluidics to perform rapid, accurate, and sensitive cellular functional assays at a single-cell resolution on different types or subpopulations of immune cells, to provide an unprecedented level of information depth on the distribution of immune cell functionalities. We envision that such microfluidic immunophenotyping tools will allow comprehensive and systems-level immunomonitoring, unlocking the potential to transform experimental clinical immunology into an information-rich science.

  2. Immune Responses and Lassa Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Baize

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa and caused by Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus. It may be fatal, but most patients recover from acute disease and some experience asymptomatic infection. The immune mechanisms associated with these different outcomes have not yet been fully elucidated, but considerable progress has recently been made, through the use of in vitro human models and nonhuman primates, the only relevant animal model that mimics the pathophysiology and immune responses induced in patients. We discuss here the roles of the various components of the innate and adaptive immune systems in Lassa virus infection and in the control of viral replication and pathogenesis.

  3. Cytokines and Immune Responses in Murine Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Pascal J H; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the vessel wall characterized by activation of the innate immune system, with macrophages as the main players, as well as the adaptive immune system, characterized by a Th1-dominant immune response. Cytokines play a major role in the initiation and regulation of inflammation. In recent years, many studies have investigated the role of these molecules in experimental models of atherosclerosis. While some cytokines such as TNF or IFNγ clearly had atherogenic effects, others such as IL-10 were found to be atheroprotective. However, studies investigating the different cytokines in experimental atherosclerosis revealed that the cytokine system is complex with both disease stage-dependent and site-specific effects. In this review, we strive to provide an overview of the main cytokines involved in atherosclerosis and to shed light on their individual role during atherogenesis.

  4. Intercellular Trogocytosis Plays an Important Role in Modulation of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawaja Ashfaque Ahmed; Manjunatha Ankathatti Munegowda; Yufeng Xie; Jim Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Intercellular communication is an important means of molecular information transfer through exchange of membrane proteins from cells to cells. Advent of the latest analytical and imaging tools has allowed us to enhance our understanding of the cellular communication through the intercellular exchange of intact membrane patches, also called trogocytosis, which is a ubiquitous phenomenon. Immune responses against pathogens or any foreign antigens require fine immune regulation, where cellular communications are mediated by either soluble or cell surface molecules. It has been demonstrated that the membrane molecule transfer between immune cells such as dendritic and T cells can be derived through internalization/recycling pathway, dissociation-associated pathway, uptake of exosomes and membrane nanotube formations. Recent evidence implicates the trogocytosis as an important mechanism of the immune system to modulate immune responses. Exchange of membrane molecules/ antigens between immune cells has been observed for a long time, but the mechanisms and functional consequences of these transfers remain unclear. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms of trogocytosis and its physiological relevance to immune system, with special reference to T cells and the stimulatory or suppressive immune responses derived from T cells with acquired dendritic cell membrane molecules. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(4):261-269.

  5. Alphavirus replicon particles expressing TRP-2 provide potent therapeutic effect on melanoma through activation of humoral and cellular immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Avogadri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is refractory to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore alternative approaches to treat this disease, such as immunotherapy, are needed. Melanoma vaccine design has mainly focused on targeting CD8+ T cells. Activation of effector CD8+ T cells has been achieved in patients, but provided limited clinical benefit, due to immune-escape mechanisms established by advanced tumors. We have previously shown that alphavirus-based virus-like replicon particles (VRP simultaneously activate strong cellular and humoral immunity against the weakly immunogenic melanoma differentiation antigen (MDA tyrosinase. Here we further investigate the antitumor effect and the immune mechanisms of VRP encoding different MDAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VRP encoding different MDAs were screened for their ability to prevent the growth of the B16 mouse transplantable melanoma. The immunologic mechanisms of efficacy were investigated for the most effective vaccine identified, focusing on CD8+ T cells and humoral responses. To this end, ex vivo immune assays and transgenic mice lacking specific immune effector functions were used. The studies identified a potent therapeutic VRP vaccine, encoding tyrosinase related protein 2 (TRP-2, which provided a durable anti-tumor effect. The efficacy of VRP-TRP2 relies on a novel immune mechanism of action requiring the activation of both IgG and CD8+ T cell effector responses, and depends on signaling through activating Fcγ receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies a VRP-based vaccine able to elicit humoral immunity against TRP-2, which plays a role in melanoma immunotherapy and synergizes with tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. These findings will aid in the rational design of future immunotherapy clinical trials.

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF CELLULAR AND SERUM COMPONENTS OF MUCO-SALIVARY IMMUNE COMPARTMENT IN MATURE, AGED, AND SENESCENT PERSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Altman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Аbstract. The objective of present study was to determine the immunological features of immune system aging in mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT in the patients at different ages (mature, aging and old observed at a dental unit. A study of cellular spectrum and humoral factors in salivary gland secretions has been performed in a group of 106 persons (35 to 90 years old. A number of age-dependent features of the immune profile were revealed for the mucous-salivary area, thus characterizing involution events within MALT structures. Among specific markers determining intensity of MALT-associated aging, a decreased percentage of viable immune cells (below 40%, along with the prevalence of the neutrophilic granulocytes in the salivary secretions (over 98% (with increased expression of β2-integrins; decreased counts of mononuclear cells, i.e., mononuclear cells with low expression of CD11β adhesion molecules, B-lymhocytes, and Th-lymphocytes have been revealed. Alterations in serum factors included a general decrease in complement system activity (СН50 and anaphylotoxines (С3а,С5а; elevated protein, mucine, and IgМ levels. The revealed specific features of cellular and humoral immunity within MALT-associated muco-salivary zone may be considered as a normal response connected with natural aging processes. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 2-3, pp 167-174

  7. Chitin modulates innate immune responses of keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chitin, after cellulose the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, is an essential component of exoskeletons of crabs, shrimps and insects and protects these organisms from harsh conditions in their environment. Unexpectedly, chitin has been found to activate innate immune cells and to elicit murine airway inflammation. The skin represents the outer barrier of the human host defense and is in frequent contact with chitin-bearing organisms, such as house-dust mites or flies. The effects of chitin on keratinocytes, however, are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that chitin stimulates keratinocytes and thereby modulates the innate immune response of the skin. Here we show that chitin is bioactive on primary and immortalized keratinocytes by triggering production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Chitin stimulation further induced the expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR TLR4 on keratinocytes at mRNA and protein level. Chitin-induced effects were mainly abrogated when TLR2 was blocked, suggesting that TLR2 senses chitin on keratinocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We speculate that chitin-bearing organisms modulate the innate immune response towards pathogens by upregulating secretion of cytokines and chemokines and expression of MyD88-associated TLRs, two major components of innate immunity. The clinical relevance of this mechanism remains to be defined.

  8. Morphological and Cellular Features of Innate Immune Reaction in Helicobacter pylori Gastritis: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; Rigoli, Luciana; Fedele, Francesco; Tuccari, Giovanni; Caruso, Rosario Alberto

    2016-01-15

    Innate and adaptive immunity are both involved in acute and chronic inflammatory processes. The main cellular players in the innate immune system are macrophages, mast cells, dendritic cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and natural killer (NK), which offer antigen-independent defense against infection. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection presents peculiar characteristics in gastric mucosa infrequently occurring in other organs; its gastric colonization determines a causal role in both gastric carcinomas and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. In contrast, an active role for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been identified only in 9% of gastric carcinomas. The aim of the present review is to discuss the role of cellular morphological effectors in innate immunity during H. pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis.

  9. Characterization of human antiviral adaptive immune responses during hepatotropic virus infection in HLA-transgenic human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billerbeck, Eva; Horwitz, Joshua A; Labitt, Rachael N; Donovan, Bridget M; Vega, Kevin; Budell, William C; Koo, Gloria C; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2013-08-15

    Humanized mice have emerged as a promising model to study human immunity in vivo. Although they are susceptible to many pathogens exhibiting an almost exclusive human tropism, human immune responses to infection remain functionally impaired. It has recently been demonstrated that the expression of HLA molecules improves human immunity to lymphotropic virus infections in humanized mice. However, little is known about the extent of functional human immune responses in nonlymphoid tissues, such as in the liver, and the role of HLA expression in this context. Therefore, we analyzed human antiviral immunity in humanized mice during a hepatotropic adenovirus infection. We compared immune responses of conventional humanized NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient (NSG) mice to those of a novel NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient strain transgenic for both HLA-A*0201 and a chimeric HLA-DR*0101 molecule. Using a firefly luciferase-expressing adenovirus and in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we demonstrate a human T cell-dependent partial clearance of adenovirus-infected cells from the liver of HLA-transgenic humanized mice. This correlated with liver infiltration and activation of T cells, as well as the detection of Ag-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. When infected with a hepatitis C virus NS3-expressing adenovirus, HLA-transgenic humanized mice mounted an HLA-A*0201-restricted hepatitis C virus NS3-specific CD8(+) T cell response. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the generation of partial functional antiviral immune responses against a hepatotropic pathogen in humanized HLA-transgenic mice. The adenovirus reporter system used in our study may serve as simple in vivo method to evaluate future strategies for improving human intrahepatic immune responses in humanized mice.

  10. Impacts of cigarette smoking on immune responsiveness: Up and down or upside down?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feifei; Liang, Chun-Ling; Liu, Huazhen; Zeng, Yu-Qun; Hou, Shaozhen; Huang, Song; Lai, Xiaoping; Dai, Zhenhua

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with numerous diseases and poses a serious challenge to the current healthcare system worldwide. Smoking impacts both innate and adaptive immunity and plays dual roles in regulating immunity by either exacerbation of pathogenic immune responses or attenuation of defensive immunity. Adaptive immune cells affected by smoking mainly include T helper cells (Th1/Th2/Th17), CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells, CD8+ T cells, B cells and memory T/B lymphocytes while innate immune cells impacted by smoking are mostly DCs, macrophages and NK cells. Complex roles of cigarette smoke have resulted in numerous diseases, including cardiovascular, respiratory and autoimmune diseases, allergies, cancers and transplant rejection etc. Although previous reviews have described the effects of smoking on various diseases and regional immunity associated with specific diseases, a comprehensive and updated review is rarely seen to demonstrate impacts of smoking on general immunity and, especially on major components of immune cells. Here, we aim to systematically and objectively review the influence of smoking on major components of both innate and adaptive immune cells, and summarize cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying effects of cigarette smoking on the immune system. The molecular pathways impacted by cigarette smoking involve NFκB, MAP kinases and histone modification. Further investigations are warranted to understand the exact mechanisms responsible for smoking-mediated immunopathology and to answer lingering questions over why cigarette smoking is always harmful rather than beneficial even though it exerts dual effects on immune responses. PMID:27902485

  11. Immune Response to Lipoproteins in Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Samson; Lakshmi Mundkur; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation re...

  12. Yersinia type Ⅲ effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khavong Pha; Lorena Navarro

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type Ⅲ secretion system(T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp.(Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gramnegative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3 SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins(YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia effector

  13. Endothelial Cellular Responses to Biodegradable Metal Zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    Biodegradable zinc (Zn) metals, a new generation of biomaterials, have attracted much attention due to their excellent biodegradability, bioabsorbability, and adaptability to tissue regeneration. Compared with magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe), Zn exhibits better corrosion and mechanical behaviors in orthopedic and stent applications. After implantation, Zn containing material will slowly degrade, and Zn ions (Zn(2+)) will be released to the surrounding tissue. For stent applications, the local Zn(2+)concentration near endothelial tissue/cells could be high. However, it is unclear how endothelia will respond to such high concentrations of Zn(2+), which is pivotal to vascular remodeling and regeneration. Here, we evaluated the short-term cellular behaviors of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCECs) exposed to a concentration gradient (0-140 μM) of extracellular Zn(2+). Zn(2+) had an interesting biphasic effect on cell viability, proliferation, spreading, and migration. Generally, low concentrations of Zn(2+) promoted viability, proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while high concentrations of Zn(2+) had opposite effects. For gene expression profiles, the most affected functional genes were related to cell adhesion, cell injury, cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, vessel tone, and coagulation. These results provide helpful information and guidance for Zn-based alloy design as well as the controlled release of Zn(2+)in stent and other related medical applications.

  14. Protective immune responses in lawsonia intracellularis infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordes, Henriette; Riber, Ulla; Boutrup, Torsten;

    , that a primary L. intracellularis experimental infection in pigs protects against re-colonisation (re-infection) with a virulent L. intracellularis isolate. After re-infection the animals had reduced L. intracellularis colonisation of the intestinal mucosa compared to controls, no bacterial shedding......, but exhibited a high, but short-lasting peak after re-infection. Specific IFN responses were also measured using a whole blood IFN-γ assay. These were very high in challenge infected and re-infected animals as compared to controls. These specific immune responses may contribute to the explanation of mechanisms...... behind the observed protection against re-infection with L. intracellularis....

  15. Immunostimulatory properties and enhanced TNF- α mediated cellular immunity for tumor therapy by C60(OH)20 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Jiao, Fang; Qiu, Yang; Li, Wei; Qu, Ying; Tian, Chixia; Li, Yufeng; Bai, Ru; Lao, Fang; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying

    2009-10-01

    Publications concerning the mechanism of biological activity, especially the immunological mechanism of C60(OH)20 nanoparticles, are relatively limited. However, the structure and characteristics of this carbon allotrope have been widely investigated. In this paper, we have demonstrated that water-soluble C60(OH)20 nanoparticles have an efficient anti-tumor activity in vivo, and show specific immunomodulatory effects to the immune cells, such as T cells and macrophages, both in vivo and in vitro. For example, C60(OH)20 nanoparticles can increase the production of T-helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokines (IL-2, IFN- γ and TNF-α), and decrease the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6) in serum samples. On the other hand, C60(OH)20 nanoparticles show almost no adverse effect to the viability of immune cells in vitro but stimulate the immune cells to release more cytokines, in particular TNF- α, which plays a key role in the cellular immune process to help eliminate abnormal cells. TNF- α production increased almost three-fold in treated T lymphocytes and macrophages. Accordingly, we conclude that C60(OH)20 nanoparticles have an efficient anti-tumor activity and this effect is associated with an increased CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte ratio and the enhancement of TNF- α production. The data suggest that C60(OH)20 nanoparticles can improve the immune response to help to scavenge and kill tumor cells.

  16. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) can enhance the immune responses of swine immunized with killed PRRSV vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Zhihong [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); China Institute of Veterinary Drug Control, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Quan [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Wang, Zaishi [China Institute of Veterinary Drug Control, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Zhongqiu [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Veterinary Bureau, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100125 (China); Guo, Pengju [Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangdong 510640 (China); Zhao, Deming, E-mail: zhaodm@cau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the immunoadjuvant effects of HVJ-E on killed PRRSV vaccine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HVJ-E enhanced the humoral and cellular responses of the piglets to PRRSV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is suggested that HVJ-E could be developed as a new-type adjuvant for mammals. -- Abstract: Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically detrimental pig pathogen that causes significant losses for the pig industry. The immunostimulatory effects of hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) in cancer therapy and the adjuvant efficacy of HVJ-E have been previously evaluated. The objective of this study was to investigate the adjuvant effects of HVJ-E on immunization with killed PRRSV vaccine, and to evaluate the protective effects of this immunization strategy against virulent PRRSV infection in piglets. Next, the PRRSV-specific antibody response, lymphocyte proliferation, PRRSV-specific IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-{gamma} production, and the overall protection efficacy were evaluated to assess the immune responses of the piglets. The results showed that the piglets inoculated simultaneously with killed PRRSV vaccine and HVJ-E had a significantly stronger immune response than those inoculated with killed PRRSV vaccine alone. Our results suggest that HVJ-E could be employed as an effective adjuvant to enhance the humoral and cellular responses of piglets to PRRSV.

  17. Immune responses of Helicoverpa armigera to different kinds of pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xiao-Fan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects react against pathogens through innate immunity. The cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (H. armigera is an important defoliator and an extremely destructive pest insect of many crops. The elucidation of the mechanism of the immune response of H. armigera to various pathogens can provide a theoretical basis for new approaches to biologically control this pest. Results Four kinds of pathogens Bacillus thuringiensis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, and Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus harbored green fluorescence protein and polyhedron (AcMNPV-GFP were used to challenge the insect. The cellular and humoral immune responses to the pathogens were analyzed in the challenged H. armigera. The results show that in the five kinds of haemocytes, only granulocytes phagocytized the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. All haemocytes can be infected by AcMNPV. Fourteen immune-related genes including pattern recognition receptors (PRRs such as peptidoglycan recognition proteins (HaPGRP and HaPGRP C and Gram-Negative Bacteria-Binding Protein (HaGNBP, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs such as cecropin-1, 2 and 3 (HaCec-1, 2 and 3, lysozyme (HaLys, attacin (HaAtt, gallerimycin-like (HaGall, gloverin-like (HaGlo, moricin-like (HaMor, cobatoxin-like (HaCob, galiomicin-like (HaGali, and immune inducible protein (HaIip appeared in different expression profiles to different pathogen infections. The transcripts of 13 immune related genes (except HaPGRPC are obviously up-regulated by Gram-positive bacteria. HaCec-1 and 3, HaMor, HaAtt, HaLys, HaIip, HaPGRP and HaGNBP are greatly up-regulated after fungal infection. HaGNBP, HaCec-2, HaGall, HaGlo, HaMor, HaCob, HaGali obviously increased in Gram-negative bacterial infection. Only five genes, HaGNBP, HaCec-1, HaGali, HaGlo, and HaLys, are weakly up-regulated after viral infection. The AMP transcripts had higher expression levels than the

  18. Innate and adaptive immune responses in allergic contact dermatitis and autoimmune skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edele, Fanny; Esser, Philipp R; Lass, Christian; Laszczyk, Melanie N; Oswald, Eva; Strüh, Christian M; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Martin, Stefan F

    2007-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is induced by chemicals or metal ions. A hallmark of this T cell mediated skin disease is the activation of the innate immune system by contact allergens. This immune response results in inflammation and is a prerequisite for the activation of the adaptive immune system with tissue-specific migration of effector and regulatory T cells. Recent studies have begun to address in detail the innate immune cells as well as the innate receptors on these cells and the associated signaling pathways which lead to skin inflammation. We review here recent findings regarding innate and adaptive immune responses and immune regulation of contact dermatitis and other skin diseases as well as recent developments towards an in vitro assessment of the allergenic potential of chemicals. The elucidation of the innate inflammatory pathways, cellular components and mediators will help to identify new drug targets for more efficient treatment of allergic contact dermatitis and hopefully also for its prevention.

  19. Biochemical and Functional Insights into the Integrated Regulation of Innate Immune Cell Responses by Teleost Leukocyte Immune-Type Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Fei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Across vertebrates, innate immunity consists of a complex assortment of highly specialized cells capable of unleashing potent effector responses designed to destroy or mitigate foreign pathogens. The execution of various innate cellular behaviors such as phagocytosis, degranulation, or cell-mediated cytotoxicity are functionally indistinguishable when being performed by immune cells isolated from humans or teleost fishes; vertebrates that diverged from one another more than 450 million years ago. This suggests that vital components of the vertebrate innate defense machinery are conserved and investigating such processes in a range of model systems provides an important opportunity to identify fundamental features of vertebrate immunity. One characteristic that is highly conserved across vertebrate systems is that cellular immune responses are dependent on specialized immunoregulatory receptors that sense environmental stimuli and initiate intracellular cascades that can elicit appropriate effector responses. A wide variety of immunoregulatory receptor families have been extensively studied in mammals, and many have been identified as cell- and function-specific regulators of a range of innate responses. Although much less is known in fish, the growing database of genomic information has recently allowed for the identification of several immunoregulatory receptor gene families in teleosts. Many of these putative immunoregulatory receptors have yet to be assigned any specific role(s, and much of what is known has been based solely on structural and/or phylogenetic relationships with mammalian receptor families. As an attempt to address some of these shortcomings, this review will focus on our growing understanding of the functional roles played by specific members of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs, which appear to be important regulators of several innate cellular responses via classical as well

  20. Immune Responses Following Mouse Peripheral Nerve Xenotransplantation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai-Jin Lu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenotransplantation offers a potentially unlimited source for tissues and organs for transplantation, but the strong xenoimmune responses pose a major obstacle to its application in the clinic. In this study, we investigate the rejection of mouse peripheral nerve xenografts in rats. Severe intragraft mononuclear cell infiltration, graft distension, and necrosis were detected in the recipients as early as 2 weeks after mouse nerve xenotransplantation. The number of axons in xenografts reduced progressively and became almost undetectable at week 8. However, mouse nerve xenotransplantation only led to a transient and moderate increase in the production of Th1 cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. The data implicate that cellular immune responses play a critical role in nerve xenograft rejection but that further identification of the major effector cells mediating the rejection is required for developing effective means to prevent peripheral nerve xenograft rejection.

  1. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    to their occasional detrimental effect on rainbow trout farming. Research efforts have been focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in protective immunity. Several specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral parameters are believed to be involved, but only the antibody response has been characterised...... in detail so far. Analysis of the specificity of anti-virus trout antibodies has been complicated by a generally insufficient ability of the antibodies to bind the viral proteins in assays such as immunoblotting. However, other assays, specifically designed for detection of fish anti IHNV/VHSV antibodies......, have demonstrated that rainbow trout can produce specific and highly functional antibodies that are able to neutralise virus pathogenicity in vitro as well as in vivo. The apparently more restricted antibody response to IHNV and VHSV antigens in fish compared to mammals could possibly be explained...

  2. A Novel Chitosan CpG Nanoparticle Regulates Cellular and Humoral Immunity of Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To develop a safe and novel immunoadjuvant to enhance the immunity and resistance of animals against E.coli infection. Methods An 88-base immunostimulatory oligodeoxynuleotide containing eleven CpG motifs (CpG ODN)was synthesized and amplified by PCR. The chitosan nanoparticle (CNP) was prepared by ion linking method to entrap the CpG ODN that significantly promotes the proliferation of lymphocytes of pig in vitro. Then the CpG- CNP was inoculated into 21-day old Kunming mice, which were orally challenged with virulent K88/K99 E. Coli 35 days after inoculation. Blood was collected from the tail vein of mice on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, and 49 after inoculation to detect the changes and content of immunoglobulins, cytokines and immune cells by ELISA, such as IgG, IgA, IgM, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6. Results The CpG provoked remarkable proliferation of lymphocytes of pig in vitro in comparison with that of control group (P<0.05). The inoculation with CpG-CNP significantly raised the content of IgG, IgM, and IgA in the sera of immunized mice (P<0.05). The levels of IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6 in the mice significantly increased in comparison with those in controls (P<0.05), so was the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes in immunized mice. The humoral and cellular immunities were significantly enhanced in immunized mice, which resisted the infection of E. coli and survived, while the control mice manifested evident symptoms and lesions of infection. Conclusions CpG-CNP can significantly promote cellular and humoral immunity and resistance of mice against E. coli infection, and can be utilized as an effective adjuvant to improve the immunoprotection and resistance of porcine against infectious disease.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms associated with rubella virus-specific cellular immunity following MMR vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Haralambieva, Iana H; Lambert, Nathaniel D; Pankratz, V Shane; Poland, Gregory A

    2014-11-01

    Rubella virus causes a relatively benign disease in most cases, although infection during pregnancy can result in serious birth defects. An effective vaccine has been available since the early 1970s and outbreaks typically do not occur among highly vaccinated (≥2 doses) populations. Nevertheless, considerable inter-individual variation in immune response to rubella immunization does exist, with single-dose seroconversion rates ~95 %. Understanding the mechanisms behind this variability may provide important insights into rubella immunity. In the current study, we examined associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in selected cytokine, cytokine receptor, and innate/antiviral genes and immune responses following rubella vaccination in order to understand genetic influences on vaccine response. Our approach consisted of a discovery cohort of 887 subjects aged 11-22 at the time of enrollment and a replication cohort of 542 older adolescents and young adults (age 18-40). Our data indicate that SNPs near the butyrophilin genes (BTN3A3/BTN2A1) and cytokine receptors (IL10RB/IFNAR1) are associated with variations in IFNγ secretion and that multiple SNPs in the PVR gene, as well as SNPs located in the ADAR gene, exhibit significant associations with rubella virus-specific IL-6 secretion. This information may be useful, not only in furthering our understanding immune responses to rubella vaccine, but also in identifying key pathways for targeted adjuvant use to boost immunity in those with weak or absent immunity following vaccination.

  4. Modulation of Immune Response by Organophosphorus Pesticides: Fishes as a Potential Model in Immunotoxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. G. Díaz-Resendiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune response is modulated by different substances that are present in the environment. Nevertheless, some of these may cause an immunotoxic effect. In this paper, the effect of organophosphorus pesticides (frequent substances spilled in aquatic ecosystems on the immune system of fishes and in immunotoxicology is reviewed. Furthermore, some cellular and molecular mechanisms that might be involved in immunoregulation mechanisms of organophosphorus pesticides are discussed.

  5. Modulation of Immune Response by Organophosphorus Pesticides: Fishes as a Potential Model in Immunotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Resendiz, K. J. G.; Toledo-Ibarra, G. A.; Girón-Pérez, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    Immune response is modulated by different substances that are present in the environment. Nevertheless, some of these may cause an immunotoxic effect. In this paper, the effect of organophosphorus pesticides (frequent substances spilled in aquatic ecosystems) on the immune system of fishes and in immunotoxicology is reviewed. Furthermore, some cellular and molecular mechanisms that might be involved in immunoregulation mechanisms of organophosphorus pesticides are discussed. PMID:25973431

  6. 重组乙型肝炎疫苗和乙型肝炎表面抗原诱导细胞免疫应答%Cellular immune responses of recombinant hepatitis B(rHB)vaccine and HBsAg derived from Hansenular polymorpha cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡忠玉; 庄辉; 何鹏; 张瑞; 方鑫; 朱凤才; 邱少辉; 李河民; 汪华; 梁争论

    2008-01-01

    (ELISPOT)methods after stimulation in vitro with HBsAg MHC class Ⅰ peptide S28-39,respectively.At serial time points.the immunized mice were detected for IFN-γ by ELISPOT as above and for the lymphocytotoxicity test(CTL)by specific lysis assay.The levels of IFN-γ,IL-2,IL-5 and anti-HBs in mice induced by rHB vaccine were detected after single or three doses.Four adults were vaccinated with rHB vaccine according to 0,1 and 2 month schedule.The peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMCs)were collected at the 3,8,21,34 and 65 days after the first dose.The CD8+T cells with high purity obtained by sorting from PBMcs were stimulated with rHBsAg or HBsAg peptides.The SFC of IFN-γ,IL-2 and IL-4 of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were determined by ELISPOT.Results The cytokine of IFN-γ became detectable on day 7 and its peak value appeared on day 14 by ELISPOT.The CTL was detected on day 7 and the maximum lysis of CTL appeared on day 28.The cellular immune response of IFN-γ of MNCs were significantly correlated with the doses vaccinated from 1 μg to 8 μg(Υpositive rates=0.951,Ppositive rates=0.049<0.05;rSFC=0.996,PSFC=0.000<0.05).IFN-γSFC of CD8+T cells were significantly associated with the doses from 1 μg to 4 μg(Υ=0.999,P=0.025<0.05).The HBsAg specific cellular immune and humoral responses of mice immunized with three doses were significantly higher than that with a single dose(P<0.05).The characteristics of IFN-γ,IL-2 and IL-4 of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were variable between individuals immunized with the same rHB vaccine.The level of IL-2 and IL-4 of responders were significantly related to the titer of anti-HBs.Conclusion Data from this study showed the kinesis of cellular immunity in mice and adults vaccinated with rHBsAg or rHB vaccine respectively.and the characteristics of cellular immune response in adults induced by the vaccine.Our data provided the basis of standardizing the analysis of cellular immune response to rHB vaccine.

  7. Achievement of Cellular Immunity and Discordant Xenogeneic Tolerance in Mice by Porcine Thymus Grafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zhao; Zuyue Sun; Yimin Sun; Alan N. Langnas

    2004-01-01

    Specific cellular immune tolerance may be essential for successful xenotransplantation in humans. Thymectomized (ATX), T and NK cell-depleted immunocompetent mice grafted with xenogeneic fetal pig thymic and liver tissue (FP THY/LIV) result in efficient mouse thymopoiesis and peripheral repopulation of functional mouse CD4+ T cell. Very importantly, the reconstituted mouse T cells are specifically tolerant to pig donor antigens. Studies demonstrated that porcine MHCs mediated positive and negative selection of mouse thymocytes in FP THY grafts, whereas mouse MHCs were involved in negative selection in grafts. Therefore, T cell tolerance to xenogeneic donor antigens could be induced by grafting donor thymus tissue. Xenogeneic thymic replacement might have a potential role in the reconstitution of cellular immunity in patients with AIDS or other immunodeficiencies caused by thymus dysfunction.

  8. Achievement of Cellular Immunity and Discordant Xenogeneic Tolerance in Mice by Porcine Thymus Grafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongZhao; ZuyueSun; YiminSun; AlanN.Langnas

    2004-01-01

    Specific cellular immune tolerance may be essential for successful xenotransplantation in humans. Thymectomized (ATX), T and NK ceil-depleted immunocompetent mice grafted with xenogeneic fetal pig thymic and liver tissue (FP THY/LIV) result in efficient mouse thymopoiesis and peripheral repopulation of functional mouse CD4+ T cell.Very importantly, the reconstituted mouse T cells are specifically tolerant to pig donor antigens. Studies demonstrated that porcine MHCs mediated positive and negative selection of mouse thymocytes in FP THY grafts, whereas mouse MHCs were involved in negative selection in grafts. Therefore, T cell tolerance to xenogeneic donor antigens could be induced by grafting donor thymus tissue. Xenogeneic thymic replacement might have a potential role in the reconstitution of cellular immunity in patients with AIDS or other immunodeficiencies caused bv thvmus dvsfunction.

  9. Effect of liniment levamisole on cellular immune functions of patients with chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xia Wang; Li-Hua Zhang; Jiang-Long Peng; Yong Liang; Xue-Feng Wang; Hui Zhi; Xiang-Xia Wang; Huan-Xiong Geng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effects of liniment levamisole on cellular immune functions of patients with chronic hepatitis B.METHODS: The levels of T lymphocyte subsets and mlL-2R in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)were measured by biotin-streptavidin (BSA) technique in patients with chronic hepatitis B before and after the treatment with liniment levamisole.RESULTS: After one course of treatment with liniment levamisole, the levels of CD3+, CD4+, and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ increased as compared to those before the treatment but the level of CD8+ decreased. The total expression level of mIL-2R in PBMCs increased before and after the treatment with liniment levamisole.CONCLUSION: Liniment levamisole may reinforce cellular immune functions of patients with chronic hepatitis B.

  10. MECHANISMS OF IMMUNE RESPONSES IN CNIDARIANS

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    Iván Darío Ocampo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The immune system maintains the integrity of the organisms through a complex network of molecules, cells, and tissues that recognize internal or external antigenic substances to neutralized and eliminate them. The mechanisms of immune response have evolved in a modular fashion, where members of a given module interact strongly among them, but weakly with members of other modules, providing robustness and evolvability to the immune system. Ancestral modules are the raw material for the generation of new modules through evolution. Thus, the study of immune systems in basal metazoans such as cnidarians seeks to determine the basic tool kit from which the metazoans started to construct their immune systems. In addition, understanding the immune mechanisms in cnidarians contributes to decipher the etiopathology of coral diseases of infectious nature that are affecting coral reefs worldwide.RESUMENEl sistema inmune mantiene la integridad de los organismos vivos por medio de una red compleja de moléculas, células y tejidos que reconocen sustancias antigénicas internas o externas para neutralizarlas y eliminarlas. Los mecanismos de respuesta inmune han evolucionado de una manera modular, en donde miembros de un módulo dado interactúan fuertemente entre sí, pero débilmente con componentes de otros módulos, otorgando así robustez y potencial evolutivo al sistema inmune. Módulos ancestrales representan el material básico para la generación de nuevos módulos durante el proceso evolutivo. Así, el estudio de sistemas inmunes en metazoarios basales como los cnidarios busca determinar cuales son los módulos ancestrales a partir de los cuales se constituyen los sistemas inmunes de animales derivados. Adicionalmente, el entendimiento de los mecanismos de respuesta inmune en cnidarios eventualmente contribuirá a descifrar la etiopatología de las enfermedades de corales de carácter infeccioso que está afectando los corales en el mundo.

  11. Cyclophilin A as a potential genetic adjuvant to improve HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine immunogenicity by eliciting broad and long-term Gag-specific cellular immunity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Zhang, Qicheng; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Shuhui; Li, Dan; Liu, Chang; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that host Cyclophilin A (CyPA) can promote dendritic cell maturation and the subsequent innate immune response when incorporated into an HIV-1 Gag protein to circumvent the resistance of dendritic cells to HIV-1 infection. This led us to hypothesize that CyPA may improve HIV-1 Gag-specific vaccine immunogenicity via binding with Gag antigen. The adjuvant effect of CyPA was evaluated using a DNA vaccine with single or dual expression cassettes. Mouse studies indicated that CyPA specifically and markedly promoted HIV-1 Gag-specific cellular immunity but not an HIV-1 Env-specific cellular response. The Gag/CyPA dual expression cassettes stimulated a greater Gag-specific cellular immune response, than Gag immunization alone. Furthermore, CyPA induced a broad Gag-specific T cell response and strong cellular immunity that lasted up to 5 months. In addition, CyPA skewed to cellular rather than humoral immunity. To investigate the mechanisms of the adjuvant effect, site-directed mutagenesis in CyPA, including active site residues H54Q and F60A resulted in mutants that were co-expressed with Gag in dual cassettes. The immune response to this vaccine was analyzed in vivo. Interestingly, the wild type CyPA markedly increased Gag cellular immunity, but the H54Q and F60A mutants drastically reduced CyPA adjuvant activation. Therefore, we suggest that the adjuvant effect of CyPA was based on Gag-CyPA-specific interactions. Herein, we report that Cyclophilin A can augment HIV-1 Gag-specific cellular immunity as a genetic adjuvant in multiplex DNA immunization strategies, and that activity of this adjuvant is specific, broad, long-term, and based on Gag-CyPA interaction. PMID:26305669

  12. Cytokine, antibody and proliferative cellular responses elicited by Taenia solium calreticulin upon experimental infection in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendlovic, Fela; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Ávila, Guillermina; Vaughan, Gilberto; Flisser, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium causes two diseases in humans, cysticercosis and taeniosis. Tapeworm carriers are the main risk factor for neurocysticercosis. Limited information is available about the immune response elicited by the adult parasite, particularly the induction of Th2 responses, frequently associated to helminth infections. Calreticulin is a ubiquitous, multifunctional protein involved in cellular calcium homeostasis, which has been suggested to play a role in the regulation of immune responses. In this work, we assessed the effect of recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) on the cytokine, humoral and cellular responses upon experimental infection in Syrian Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Animals were infected with T. solium cysticerci and euthanized at different times after infection. Specific serum antibodies, proliferative responses in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen cells, as well as cytokines messenger RNA (mRNA) were analyzed. The results showed that one third of the infected animals elicited anti-rTsCRT IgG antibodies. Interestingly, mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from either infected or non-infected animals did not proliferate upon in vitro stimulation with rTsCRT. Additionally, stimulation with a tapeworm crude extract resulted in increased expression of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. Upon stimulation, rTsCRT increased the expression levels of IL-10 in spleen and MLN cells from uninfected and infected hamsters. The results showed that rTsCRT favors a Th2-biased immune response characterized by the induction of IL-10 in mucosal and systemic lymphoid organs. Here we provide the first data on the cytokine, antibody and cellular responses to rTsCRT upon in vitro stimulation during taeniasis.

  13. Cytokine, antibody and proliferative cellular responses elicited by Taenia solium calreticulin upon experimental infection in hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fela Mendlovic

    Full Text Available Taenia solium causes two diseases in humans, cysticercosis and taeniosis. Tapeworm carriers are the main risk factor for neurocysticercosis. Limited information is available about the immune response elicited by the adult parasite, particularly the induction of Th2 responses, frequently associated to helminth infections. Calreticulin is a ubiquitous, multifunctional protein involved in cellular calcium homeostasis, which has been suggested to play a role in the regulation of immune responses. In this work, we assessed the effect of recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT on the cytokine, humoral and cellular responses upon experimental infection in Syrian Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus. Animals were infected with T. solium cysticerci and euthanized at different times after infection. Specific serum antibodies, proliferative responses in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen cells, as well as cytokines messenger RNA (mRNA were analyzed. The results showed that one third of the infected animals elicited anti-rTsCRT IgG antibodies. Interestingly, mesenteric lymph node (MLN cells from either infected or non-infected animals did not proliferate upon in vitro stimulation with rTsCRT. Additionally, stimulation with a tapeworm crude extract resulted in increased expression of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. Upon stimulation, rTsCRT increased the expression levels of IL-10 in spleen and MLN cells from uninfected and infected hamsters. The results showed that rTsCRT favors a Th2-biased immune response characterized by the induction of IL-10 in mucosal and systemic lymphoid organs. Here we provide the first data on the cytokine, antibody and cellular responses to rTsCRT upon in vitro stimulation during taeniasis.

  14. Immune Response to Sipuleucel-T in Prostate Cancer

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    David I. Quinn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients’ own antigen presenting cells (APCs to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The

  15. Immune response to sipuleucel-T in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thara, Eddie; Dorff, Tanya B; Averia-Suboc, Monica; Luther, Michael; Reed, Mary E; Pinski, Jacek K; Quinn, David I

    2012-04-18

    Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients' own antigen presenting cells (APCs) to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The optimal timing for

  16. The early antitumor immune response is necessary for tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Parmiani, Giorgio; Maccalli, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Early events responsible of tumor growth in patients with a normal immune system are poorly understood. Here, we discuss, in the context of human melanoma, the Prehn hypothesis according to which a weak antitumor immune response may be required for tumor growth before weakly or non-immunogenic tumor cell subpopulations are selected by the immune system.

  17. Neuroendocrine and Immune System Responses with Spaceflights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M.; Greenleaf, John E.; Jackson, Catherine G. R.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldo-sterone. and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flight data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  18. Rotavirus Antagonism of the Innate Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M. Arnold

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is a primary cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis in infants and young children. The virus is sensitive to the antiviral effects triggered by the interferon (IFN-signaling pathway, an important component of the host cell innate immune response. To counteract these effects, rotavirus encodes a nonstructural protein (NSP1 that induces the degradation of proteins involved in regulating IFN expression, such as members of the IFN regulatory factor (IRF family. In some instances, NSP1 also subverts IFN expression by causing the degradation of a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex responsible for activating NF-κB. By antagonizing multiple components of the IFN-induction pathway, NSP1 aids viral spread and contributes to rotavirus pathogenesis.

  19. Mx bio adjuvant for enhancing immune responses against influenza virus

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    Sina Soleimani

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: These data revealed that Mx1 as biological adjuvant was able to increase antibody titer and induction memory immune responses against influenza immunization without causing any side effects.

  20. Impact of nutrition on immune function and the inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    The review utilizes data on three micronutrients (vitamin A, zinc and iron), anthropometrically defined undernutrition (stunting, wasting and underweight) and obesity to evaluate the effect on immune function, recovery of immune function in response to nutritional interventions, related health outco...

  1. Immunologic Monitoring of Cellular Responses by Dendritic/Tumor Cell Fusion Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Koido

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although dendritic cell (DC- based cancer vaccines induce effective antitumor activities in murine models, only limited therapeutic results have been obtained in clinical trials. As cancer vaccines induce antitumor activities by eliciting or modifying immune responses in patients with cancer, the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST and WHO criteria, designed to detect early effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy in solid tumors, may not provide a complete assessment of cancer vaccines. The problem may, in part, be resolved by carrying out immunologic cellular monitoring, which is one prerequisite for rational development of cancer vaccines. In this review, we will discuss immunologic monitoring of cellular responses for the evaluation of cancer vaccines including fusions of DC and whole tumor cell.

  2. Effects of the endoparasitoid Cotesia chilonis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitism, venom, and calyx fluid on cellular and humoral immunity of its host Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Zi-Wen; Xu, Gang; Gan, Shi-Yu; Chen, Xuan; Fang, Qi; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-02-01

    The larval endoparasitoid Cotesia chilonis injects venom and bracoviruses into its host Chilo suppressalis during oviposition. Here we study the effects of the polydnavirus (PDV)-carrying endoparasitoid C. chilonis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitism, venom and calyx fluid on host cellular and humoral immunity, specifically hemocyte composition, cellular spreading, encapsulation and melanization. Total hemocyte counts (THCs) were higher in parasitized larvae than in unparasitized larvae in the late stages following parasitization. While both plasmatocyte and granulocyte fractions and hemocyte mortality did not differ between parasitized and unparasitized hosts, in vitro spreading behavior of hemocytes was inhibited significantly by parasitism throughout the course of parasitoid development. C. chilonis parasitism suppressed the encapsulation response and melanization in the early stages. Venom alone did not alter cellular immune responses, including effects on THCs, mortality, hemocyte composition, cell spreading and encapsulation, but venom did inhibit humoral immunity by reducing melanization within 6h after injection. In contrast to venom, calyx fluid had a significant effect on cell spreading, encapsulation and melanization from 6h after injection. Dose-response injection studies indicated the effects of venom and calyx fluid synergized, showing a stronger and more persistent reduction in immune system responses than the effect of either injected alone.

  3. Particular Characterisation of an In-Vitro-DTH Test to Monitor Cellular Immunity - Applications for Patient Care and Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurecker, M.; Mayer, W.; Gruber, M.; Muckenthaler, F.; Draenert, R.; Bogner, J.; Kaufmann, I.; Crucian, B.; Rykova, M.; Morukov, B.; Sams, C.; Chouker, A.

    2010-01-01

    Goal:i) Characterization of the role of the main immune reactive cell types contributing to the cellular immune response in the in-vitro DTH and ii) Validation of the in-vitro DTH under different clinical and field conditions. Methods:As positive control whole blood was incubated in the in-vitro DTH, supernatants were gathered after 12, 24 and 48h. Readout parameters of this test are cytokines in the assay's supernatant. To determine the role of T-cells, monocytes and natural killer (NK), these cell populations were depleted using magnetic beads prior to in-vitro-DTH incubation. Validation of the test has occurred under clinical (HIV-patients, ICU) and field-conditions (parabolic/space-flights, confinement). Results:T-cell depletion abandoned almost any IL-2 production and reduced IFN-gamma production irrespective of the type of antigen, whereas CD56 depleted cultures tended to lower IL-2 secretion and IFN-gamma and to parallel a IL-10-increase after viral challenge. This IL-10-increase was seen also in CD14-depleted setups. DTH read-out was significantly different under acute stress (parabolic flight) or chronic stress (ISS), respectively. Preliminary data of HIV infected patients demonstrate that this test can display the contemporary immune status during an antiviral therapy. Conclusion:The in-vitro DTH mirrors adaptive and innate immune activation and may serve as tool also for longitudinal follow up of Th1/Th2 weighed immune response under adverse life conditions on earth and in space. It is planned to implement the assay in the on the ISS (MoCISS).

  4. Effect on Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses of the AS03 Adjuvant System in an A/H1N1/2009 Influenza Virus Vaccine Administered to Adults during Two Randomized Controlled Trials ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, François; Clément, Frédéric; Dewé, Walthère; Walravens, Karl; Maes, Cathy; Willekens, Julie; De Boever, Fien; Hanon, Emmanuel; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2011-01-01

    The influence of AS03A, a tocopherol oil-in-water emulsion-based adjuvant system, on humoral and cell-mediated responses to A/California/7/2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccine was investigated. In two observer-blind studies, a total of 261 healthy adults aged 18 to 60 years were randomized to receive either AS03A-adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine containing 3.75 μg hemagglutinin (HA) or nonadjuvanted H1N1 vaccine containing 15 or 3.75 μg HA on days 0 and 21. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody and T-cell responses were analyzed up to day 42. A first dose of AS03A-adjuvanted vaccine (3.75 μg HA) or nonadjuvanted vaccine (15 μg HA) induced HI responses of similar magnitudes that exceeded licensure criteria (e.g., 94 to 100% with titers of ≥40). A lower response following 3.75 μg HA without adjuvant was observed (73% with titers of ≥40). Following a second dose, geometric mean HI titers at day 42 were higher for AS03A-adjuvanted vaccine (636 and 637) relative to nonadjuvanted vaccine (341 for 15 μg HA and 150 for 3.75 μg HA). Over the 42-day period, the increase in frequency of A/H1N1/2009-specific CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in the adjuvanted group than in the nonadjuvanted group. There was no evidence of correlation between baseline CD4+ T-cell frequencies and day 21 HI antibody titers, while there was some correlation (R = 0.35) between day 21 CD4+ T-cell frequencies and day 42 HI titers. AS03A adjuvant enhanced the humoral and CD4+ T-cell-mediated responses to A/H1N1/2009 vaccine. Baseline A/H1N1/2009-specific CD4+ T-cell frequencies did not predict post-dose 1 antibody responses, but there was some correlation between post-dose 1 CD4+ T-cell frequencies and post-dose 2 antibody responses. PMID:21450978

  5. Cellular responses and cytokine profiles in Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Stefan M; Massara, Cristiano L; Bethony, Jeffrey; Soboslay, Peter T; Carvalho, Omar S; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2002-01-01

    The impact of intestinal helminth infection, i.e. Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura, on cellular responsiveness and cytokine production was investigated in young adults. Ascaris-specific cellular responsiveness was higher in parasite-free endemic controls than in patients infected with T. trichiura, or A. lumbricoides, or patients co-infected with both parasites. Also, mitogen-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-12 and interferon (IFN)-gamma secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was higher in negative endemic controls than in infected individuals. Ascaris antigen-specific production of TNF-alpha, IL-12 and IFN-gamma was low in singly Ascaris as well as in co-infected patients, whereas secretion of IL-10 and IL-13 was elevated and similarly high in all patient groups. The detection of Trichuris-specific and Ascaris-specific IgG4 revealed significantly higher serum antibody levels in Trichuris or Ascaris patients when compared to endemic controls (P Trichuris patients with a high parasite load presented reduced cellular reactivity and lower type 1 TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-12 responses when compared with endemic controls, whereas type 2 IL-10 and IL-13 productions were similar in all groups from the endemic area. The former may support parasite persistence, whereas substantial type 2 cytokine release may promote protective immunity, suggesting an adaptation of the host to control the parasite burden while minimizing immune-mediated host self-damage.

  6. Modeling In Vitro Cellular Responses to Silver Nanoparticles

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    Dwaipayan Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanoparticles (NPs have been widely demonstrated to induce toxic effects to various cell types. In vitro cell exposure systems have high potential for reliable, high throughput screening of nanoparticle toxicity, allowing focusing on particular pathways while excluding unwanted effects due to other cells or tissue dosimetry. The work presented here involves a detailed biologically based computational model of cellular interactions with NPs; it utilizes measurements performed in human cell culture systems in vitro, to develop a mechanistic mathematical model that can support analysis and prediction of in vivo effects of NPs. The model considers basic cellular mechanisms including proliferation, apoptosis, and production of cytokines in response to NPs. This new model is implemented for macrophages and parameterized using in vitro measurements of changes in cellular viability and mRNA levels of cytokines: TNF, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. The model includes in vitro cellular dosimetry due to nanoparticle transport and transformation. Furthermore, the model developed here optimizes the essential cellular parameters based on in vitro measurements, and provides a “stepping stone” for the development of more advanced in vivo models that will incorporate additional cellular and NP interactions.

  7. Paradoxical Immune Responses in Non-HIV Cryptococcal Meningitis.

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    Anil A Panackal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Cryptococcus is a major cause of meningoencephalitis in HIV-infected as well as HIV-uninfected individuals with mortalities in developed countries of 20% and 30%, respectively. In HIV-related disease, defects in T-cell immunity are paramount, whereas there is little understanding of mechanisms of susceptibility in non-HIV related disease, especially that occurring in previously healthy adults. The present description is the first detailed immunological study of non-HIV-infected patients including those with severe central nervous system (s-CNS disease to 1 identify mechanisms of susceptibility as well as 2 understand mechanisms underlying severe disease. Despite the expectation that, as in HIV, T-cell immunity would be deficient in such patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF immunophenotyping, T-cell activation studies, soluble cytokine mapping and tissue cellular phenotyping demonstrated that patients with s-CNS disease had effective microbiological control, but displayed strong intrathecal expansion and activation of cells of both the innate and adaptive immunity including HLA-DR+ CD4+ and CD8+ cells and NK cells. These expanded CSF T cells were enriched for cryptococcal-antigen specific CD4+ cells and expressed high levels of IFN-γ as well as a lack of elevated CSF levels of typical T-cell specific Th2 cytokines -- IL-4 and IL-13. This inflammatory response was accompanied by elevated levels of CSF NFL, a marker of axonal damage, consistent with ongoing neurological damage. However, while tissue macrophage recruitment to the site of infection was intact, polarization studies of brain biopsy and autopsy specimens demonstrated an M2 macrophage polarization and poor phagocytosis of fungal cells. These studies thus expand the paradigm for cryptococcal disease susceptibility to include a prominent role for macrophage activation defects and suggest a spectrum of disease whereby severe neurological disease is characterized by immune

  8. Paradoxical Immune Responses in Non-HIV Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panackal, Anil A; Wuest, Simone C; Lin, Yen-Chih; Wu, Tianxia; Zhang, Nannan; Kosa, Peter; Komori, Mika; Blake, Andrew; Browne, Sarah K; Rosen, Lindsey B; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques; Levitz, Stuart M; Quezado, Martha; Hammoud, Dima; Bennett, John E; Bielekova, Bibi; Williamson, Peter R

    2015-05-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus is a major cause of meningoencephalitis in HIV-infected as well as HIV-uninfected individuals with mortalities in developed countries of 20% and 30%, respectively. In HIV-related disease, defects in T-cell immunity are paramount, whereas there is little understanding of mechanisms of susceptibility in non-HIV related disease, especially that occurring in previously healthy adults. The present description is the first detailed immunological study of non-HIV-infected patients including those with severe central nervous system (s-CNS) disease to 1) identify mechanisms of susceptibility as well as 2) understand mechanisms underlying severe disease. Despite the expectation that, as in HIV, T-cell immunity would be deficient in such patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunophenotyping, T-cell activation studies, soluble cytokine mapping and tissue cellular phenotyping demonstrated that patients with s-CNS disease had effective microbiological control, but displayed strong intrathecal expansion and activation of cells of both the innate and adaptive immunity including HLA-DR+ CD4+ and CD8+ cells and NK cells. These expanded CSF T cells were enriched for cryptococcal-antigen specific CD4+ cells and expressed high levels of IFN-γ as well as a lack of elevated CSF levels of typical T-cell specific Th2 cytokines -- IL-4 and IL-13. This inflammatory response was accompanied by elevated levels of CSF NFL, a marker of axonal damage, consistent with ongoing neurological damage. However, while tissue macrophage recruitment to the site of infection was intact, polarization studies of brain biopsy and autopsy specimens demonstrated an M2 macrophage polarization and poor phagocytosis of fungal cells. These studies thus expand the paradigm for cryptococcal disease susceptibility to include a prominent role for macrophage activation defects and suggest a spectrum of disease whereby severe neurological disease is characterized by immune-mediated host cell

  9. Cellular response of Campylobacter jejuni to trisodium phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, Charlotte Tandrup; Cohn, M. T.; Stabler, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    The highly alkaline compound trisodium phosphate (TSP) is used as an intervention to reduce the load of Campylobacter on poultry meat in U.S. poultry slaughter plants. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cellular responses of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168 when exposed to sublethal...

  10. Simulating Quantitative Cellular Responses Using Asynchronous Threshold Boolean Network Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    With increasing knowledge about the potential mechanisms underlying cellular functions, it is becoming feasible to predict the response of biological systems to genetic and environmental perturbations. Due to the lack of homogeneity in living tissues it is difficult to estimate t...

  11. The immune response and its therapeutic modulation in bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daheshia, Massoud; Prahl, James D; Carmichael, Jacob J; Parrish, John S; Seda, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Bronchiectasis (BC) is a chronic pulmonary disease with tremendous morbidity and significant mortality. As pathogen infection has been advocated as a triggering insult in the development of BC, a central role for the immune response in this process seems obvious. Inflammatory cells are present in both the airways as well as the lung parenchyma, and multiple mediators of immune cells including proteases and cytokines or their humoral products are increased locally or in the periphery. Interestingly, a defect in the immune system or suppression of immune response during conditions such as immunodeficiency may well predispose one to the devastating effects of BC. Thus, the outcome of an active immune response as detrimental or protective in the pathogenesis of BC may be dependent on the state of the patient's immunity, the severity of infection, and the magnitude of immune response. Here we reassess the function of the innate and acquired immunity in BC, the major sites of immune response, and the nature of the bioactive mediators. Furthermore, the potential link(s) between an ongoing immune response and structural alterations accompanying the disease and the success of therapies that can modulate the nature and extent of immune response in BC are elaborated upon.

  12. Nanomaterial Induced Immune Responses and Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ashraf; Suhail, Mohd; Mathew, Shilu; Shah, Muhammad Ali; Harakeh, Steve M; Ahmad, Sultan; Kazmi, Zulqarnain; Alhamdan, Mohammed Abdul Rahman; Chaudhary, Adeel; Damanhouri, Ghazi Abdullah; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are utilized in a wide array of end user products such as pharmaceuticals, electronics, clothes and cosmetic products. Due to its size (< 100 nm), nanoparticles have the propensity to enter through the airway and skin, making its path perilous with the potential to cause damages of varying severity. Once within the body, these particles have unconstrained access to different tissues and organs including the brain, liver, and kidney. As a result, nanomaterials may cause the perturbation of the immune system eliciting an inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. This potential role is dependent on many factors such as the characteristics of the nanomaterials, presence or absence of diseases, and genetic predisposition. Cobalt and nickel nanoparticles, for example, were shown to have inflammogenic properties, while silver nanoparticles were shown to reduce allergic inflammation. Just as asbestos fibers, carbon nanotubes were shown to cause lungs damage. Some nanomaterials were shown, based on animal studies, to result in cell damage, leading to the formation of pre-cancerous lesions. This review highlights the impact of nanomaterials on immune system and its effect on human health with toxicity consideration. It recommends the development of suitable animal models to study the toxicity and bio-clearance of nanomaterials and propose safety guidelines.

  13. Wolbachia symbiosis and insect immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefanos Siozios; Panagiotis Sapountzis; Panagiotis Ioannidis; Kostas Bourtzis

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial intracellular symbiosis is very common in insects, having significant consequences in promoting the evolution of life and biodiversity. The bacterial group that has recently attracted particular attention is Wolbachia pipientis which probably represents the most ubiquitous endosymbiont on the planet. W. pipientis is a Gram-negative obligatory intracellular and maternally transmitted α-proteobacterium, that is able to establish symbiotic associations with arthropods and nematodes. In arthropods, Wolbachia pipientis infections have been described in Arachnida, in Isopoda and mainly in Insecta. They have been reported in almost all major insect orders including Diptera, Coleoptera, Hemiptera,Hymenoptera, Orthoptera and Lepidoptera. To enhance its transmission, W. pipientis can manipulate host reproduction by inducing parthenogenesis, feminization, male killing and cytoplasmic incompatibility. Several polymerase chain reaction surveys have indicated that up to 70% of all insect species may be infected with W. pipientis. How does W. pipientis manage to get established in diverse insect host species? How is this intracellular bacterial symbiont species so successful in escaping the host immune response? The present review presents recent advances and ongoing scientific efforts in the field. The current body of knowledge in the field is summarized, revelations from the available genomic information are presented and as yet unanswered questions are discussed in an attempt to present a comprehensive picture of the unique ability of W. pipientis to establish symbiosis and to manipulate reproduction while evading the host's immune system.

  14. Vaccines expressing the innate immune modulator EAT-2 elicit potent effector memory T lymphocyte responses despite pre-existing vaccine immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Yasser Ali; Seregin, Sergey S; Schuldt, Nathaniel J; Rastall, David P W; Liu, Chyong-Jy J; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The mixed results from recent vaccine clinical trials targeting HIV-1 justify the need to enhance the potency of HIV-1 vaccine platforms in general. Use of first-generation recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) platforms failed to protect vaccinees from HIV-1 infection. One hypothesis is that the rAd5-based vaccine failed due to the presence of pre-existing Ad5 immunity in many vaccines. We recently confirmed that EAT-2-expressing rAd5 vectors uniquely activate the innate immune system and improve cellular immune responses against rAd5-expressed Ags, inclusive of HIV/Gag. In this study, we report that use of the rAd5-EAT-2 vaccine can also induce potent cellular immune responses to HIV-1 Ags despite the presence of Ad5-specific immunity. Compared to controls expressing a mutant SH2 domain form of EAT-2, Ad5 immune mice vaccinated with an rAd5-wild-type EAT-2 HIV/Gag-specific vaccine formulation significantly facilitated the induction of several arms of the innate immune system. These responses positively correlated with an improved ability of the vaccine to induce stronger effector memory T cell-biased, cellular immune responses to a coexpressed Ag despite pre-existing anti-Ad5 immunity. Moreover, inclusion of EAT-2 in the vaccine mixture improves the generation of polyfunctional cytolytic CD8(+) T cell responses as characterized by enhanced production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, cytotoxic degranulation, and increased in vivo cytolytic activity. These data suggest a new approach whereby inclusion of EAT-2 expression in stringent human vaccination applications can provide a more effective vaccine against HIV-1 specifically in Ad5 immune subjects.

  15. Experimental studies on extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic field inhibiting sarcoma and enhancing cellular immune functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张沪生; 叶晖; 张传清; 曾繁清; 黄兴鼎; 张晴川; 李宗山; 杜碧

    1997-01-01

    The previous observation with an electron microscope showed that extremely low frequency (ELF) pulsed magnetic field (PMF) (with the maximum intensity of 0. 6-2. 0 T, gradient of 10-100 T. M-1, pulse width of 20-200 ms and frequency of 0. 16-1. 34 Hz) inhibited the growth of S-180 sarcoma in mice and enhanced the ability of immune cell’s dissolving sarcoma cells. In this study, the DNA contents of nuclei were assayed by using Faulgen Staining method. With an electron microscope and cell stereoscopy technology it was observed that magnetic field affected the sarcoma cell’s metabolism, lowered its malignancy, and restrained its rapid and heteromorphic growth. The magnetic field enhanced the cellular immune ability and the reaction of lymphocytes and plasma. Since ELF pulsed magnetic fields can inhibit the growth of sarcomas and enhance the cellular immune ability, it is possible to use it as a new method to treat cancer.

  16. Neuroendocrine system response modulates oxidative cellular damage in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiao-Qi; Shinozawa, Yotaro; Sasaki, Junichi; Takuma, Kiyotsugu; Akaishi, Satoshi; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Endo, Tomoyuki; Nomura, Ryosuke; Kobayashi, Michio; Kudo, Daisuke; Hojo, Nobuko

    2007-02-01

    Oxygen-derived free radicals play important roles in pathophysiological processes in critically ill patients, but the data characterizing relationships between radicals and neuroendocrine system response are sparse. To search the cue to reduce the oxidative cellular damage from the point of view of neuroendocrine system response, we studied the indicators of neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses excreted in urine in 14 burn patients (42.3 +/- 31.4 years old, and 32.3 +/- 27.6% burn of total body surface area [%TBSA]) during the first seven days post burn. The daily mean amounts of urinary excretion of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG), a marker of oxidative cellular damage, were above the upper limit of the standard value during the studied period. The total amount of urinary excretion of 8-OHdG in the first day post burn correlated with burn severity indices: %TBSA (r = 0.63, p = 0.021) and burn index (r = 0.70, p = 0.008). The daily urinary excretion of 8-OHdG correlated with the daily urinary excretion of norepinephrine and nitrite plus nitrate (NOx) during the studied period except day 2 post burn, and correlated with the daily urinary excretion of 17-hydroxycorticosteriod (17-OHCS) in days 2, 3, and 7 post burn. These data suggest that oxidative cellular damage correlates with burn severity and neuroendocrine system response modulates inflammation and oxidative cellular damage. Modulation of neuroendocrine system response and inflammation in the treatment in the early phase of burn may be useful to reduce the oxidative cellular damage and to prevent multiple organ failures in patients with extensive burn.

  17. Immune and cellular impacts in the autogenous Aedes caspius larvae after experimentally-induced stress: Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects possess effective defense mechanisms against pathogens via induction of antimicrobial immune and oxidative stress responses. In this study, immune impact and histological damages in the gastric caeca have been investigated in the 3rd instar larvae of the autogenous Aedes caspius upon infection with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt. Data showed a significant increase in phenoloxidase (PO activity by 1.23 folds at 4 h post-infection which then reduced to the normal level at 8 h post-infection and until larval death. Besides, the nitric oxide (NO titer was significantly increased by 1.4 folds at 4 h post-infection, then, reduced down to its normal level at 8 h post-infection, after which, it was significantly decreasing by time until being hardly detected at 44 h post-infection compared to that of control mosquitoes. Moreover, percentages of cellular apoptosis were significantly elevating from 6 to 48 h post-infection. Consequently, cytological damages in the epithelium and the microvilli of the gastric caeca were observed at 48 h post-infection. Finally, larval body sizes were significantly smaller prior to death (at 48 h post-infection. Taken together, these data suggest further modes of action of Bt as inhibiting the antibacterial immune responses, inducing cellular apoptosis prior to damaging the epithelium of gastric caeca. This may explain – partially at least – the irresistibility and high pathogenicity of Bt against mosquito vector, which may help in understanding, and hence, overcoming the developing resistance by some mosquito vectors to some mosquitocidal bacteria. This may help in improving the biocontrol measures against mosquito vectors.

  18. Flavobacterium psychrophilum - Experimental challenge and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maya Maria Mihályi

    use of antibiotics, further knowledge of the disease is needed. Previous studies focusing on various types of aquacultures demonstrated the presence of F. psychrophilum in all examined farms. The bacterium was demonstrated in gills, skin, internal organs and wounds both during RTFS outbreaks......) Establish an experimental infection model imitating natural infection, 2) examine the immune response in blood and selected organs, and 3) examine potential portals of entry for the bacterium. Previous experimental immersion-challenges involving F. psychrophilum have resulted in none or low mortality...... in rainbow trout fry, unless the fish are stressed or have their surface compromised through e.g. injuries to the skin. The effect of a range of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations was tested on fry in order to assess mortality. An appropriate dose was subsequently combined with immersion in a diluted...

  19. A novel single-dose dengue subunit vaccine induces memory immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yi Chiang

    Full Text Available To protect against dengue viral infection, a novel lipidated dengue subunit vaccine was rationally designed to contain the consensus amino acid sequences derived from four serotypes of dengue viruses. We found that the lipidated consensus dengue virus envelope protein domain III (LcED III is capable of activating antigen-presenting cells and enhancing cellular and humoral immune responses. A single-dose of LcED III immunization in mice without extra adjuvant formulation is sufficient to elicit neutralizing antibodies against all four serotypes of dengue viruses. In addition, strong memory responses were elicited in mice immunized with a single-dose of LcED III. Quick, anamnestic neutralizing antibody responses to a live dengue virus challenge were elicited at week 28 post-immunization. These results demonstrate the promising possibility of a future successful tetravalent vaccine against dengue viral infections that utilizes one-dose vaccination with LcED III.

  20. 人博卡病毒VP2病毒样颗粒诱导特异性细胞免疫反应的研究%Enzyme-linked immunospot test detected specific cellular immune response induced by human Bocavirus VP2 virus-like particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓中华; 谢志萍; 姚立红; 谢乐云; 李金松; 张兵; 段招军; 曹友德

    2013-01-01

    Objective To discuss the enzyme linked immune spot test (ELISPOT) detected the cellular immune response induced by human Bocavirus(HBoV) VP2 virus-like particles(VLPs).Methods After immunized by HBoV VP2 VLPs,the specific cellular immune response in mice were detected by ELISPOT assay,observe the ELISPOT results at the conditions of different polypeptide stimulate,different cell culture time,different cell concentration and different specific stimulus peptide concentration,then screening the right ELISPOT experimental conditions and establish the ELISPOT method.Results The spots induced by HBoV1 VLPs immunized mice spleen lymphocytes stimulate with polypeptide P3 (GYIPIENEL) and P5 (LYQMPFFLL)were 233 spots/10(6) cells and 157 spots/10(6) cells,spots induced by HBoV2 VLPs immunized mice spleen lymphocytes stimulate with polypeptide P8 (GYIPVIHEL)were 113 spots/10(6) cells; 24 hours is the best time for culture,at this time HBoV1 and HBoV2 groups specificity secretion IFN-gamma ratio were 232 spots/10(6) cells and 119/10(6) cells; Best concentration of mice spleen lymphocyte is 5 × 10(5),right now HBoV1 and HBoV2 group specificity secretion IFN-gamma ratio were 232 spots/10(6) cells and 108/10(6) cells; Best concentration of polypeptides is 10 μg/ml,HBoV1 and HBoV2 group specificity secretion IFN-gamma ratio were 233 spots/10(6) cells and 96/10(6) cells.Conclusions HBoV1 and HBoV2 specificT-cell epitope in BABL/c mice were P3,P5 (HBoV1)and P8 (HBoV2).The best experiment condition were:cell cultivated for 24 h,cells concentration for 5 × 10(5) cells/well,stimulating polyperides concentration for 10 μg/ml,it can use to study the cellular immune induced by HBoV in mice.%目的 探讨酶联免疫斑点试验(ELISPOT)检测人博卡病毒(HBoV) VP2病毒样颗粒(VLPs)诱导特异性细胞免疫反应的最佳条件.方法 HBoV VP2 VLPs免疫小鼠后,用ELISPOT方法检测小鼠的特异性细胞免疫反应,观察不同多肽刺激、不同细胞培养时间、不

  1. Adaptation of the immune system as a response to pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milašinović Ljubomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pregnancy is an intriguing immunologic phenomenon. In spite of genetic differences, maternal and fetal cells are in close contact over the whole course of pregnancy with no evidence of either humoral and/or cellular immunologic response of mother to fetus as an allotransplant. The general opinion is that the fundamental protective mechanism must be located locally at the contact-plate, between the maternal and fetal tissues. Immunologic investigations proved the presence of specific systems which block the function of antipaternal maternal antibodies, as well as formation of cytotoxic maternal T-cells to paternal antigens. The system preventing rejection of graft during pregnancy is functioning at the level of maternal and fetal tissues. The protective mechanisms are coded by genes of MCH region, locus HLA-G. Protective mechanisms in the placenta The placenta protects itself against antibody-mediated damage. A high level of complement-regulatory proteins (CD46, CD55 and CD59, being the response to the synthesis of complement-fixing maternal antibodies to paternal antigens and regulation of the placental HLA expression as a preventive reaction of the feto-placental unit to the influence of maternal CTL, are the most important protective mechanisms of placenta. Protective mechanisms shared by the placenta and uterus Protective mechanisms common both for placenta and uterus are as follows: expressions of Fas ligand prevention of infiltration of activated immune cells, regulation of immunosuppression which prevents proliferation of immune cells and high natural immunity (Na cells and macrophages of the decidua.

  2. The responses of immune cells to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer A; Lackey, Kimberly H; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Immune cells play an important role in recognizing and removing foreign objects, such as nanoparticles. Among various parameters, surface coatings of nanoparticles are the first contact with biological system, which critically affect nanoparticle interactions. Here, surface coating effects on nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and ability to trigger immune response were evaluated on a human monocyte cell line using iron oxide nanoparticles. The cells were treated with nanoparticles of three types of coatings (negatively charged polyacrylic acid, positively charged polyethylenimine and neutral polyethylene glycol). The cells were treated at various nanoparticle concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 50 μg ml(-1) or 2, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg cm(-2)) with 6 h incubation or treated at a nanoparticle concentration of 50 μg ml(-1) (20 μg cm(-2)) at different incubation times (6, 12, 24, 48 or 72 h). Cell viability over 80% was observed for all nanoparticle treatment experiments, regardless of surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. The much lower cell viability for cells treated with free ligands (e.g. ~10% for polyethylenimine) suggested that the surface coatings were tightly attached to the nanoparticle surfaces. The immune responses of cells to nanoparticles were evaluated by quantifying the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and toll-like receptor 2 were not significant in any case of the surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. These results provide useful information to select nanoparticle surface coatings for biological and biomedical applications.

  3. The Murine Humoral Immune Response to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen: Idiotype Network Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Michael Roy

    Recognition of a wide spectrum in disease outcomes following Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection has led to the suggestion that individual differences may be due to characteristics of the immune response. HBV, a hepatotropic virus, is not directly cytopathic to the host hepatocytes but the cellular damage which does not occur may be due to the host's own immune response. It is this variety in immune response capabilities following natural infection or vaccination which led to the present study in which the murine humoral immune response to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was examined. Following immunization with purified HBsAg an anti-HBs response could be detected in 19 inbred strains of mice. The response, which varied among the strains, was linked to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Among high responders to HBsAg were two strains in which a poor response to a single epitope could be detected. Although quantitatively serum from these strains resembled serum from other high responders, there was a major difference in the qualitative aspects. Included within this study was the role of idotype networks within the murine anti-HBs response. By directly targeting HBsAg-specific B cells within the framework of an idiotype network by an Ab-2, it was possible to circumvent T cell-dependent regulation of an immune response. In each of five inbred strains of mice immunized with a polyclonal rabbit Ab-2 an Ab-3 population with HBsAg-specificity (Ab -1^') was induced. These mice were also immunized with HBsAg resulting in a higher anti-HBs response as compared to HBsAg immunization alone in all of the strains tested except for one. The response in this strain, normally a low responder to HBsAg, indicated that the mechanisms for genetic restriction of the anti -HBs response was still active, although it was not apparent during anti-Id immunization. The effects of an anti-Id on the murine antibody response to HBsAg may lead to insights on the presence of idiotype

  4. Effect of Astragalus Injection on Serious Abdominal Traumatic Patients' Cellular Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the change of serious abdominal traumatic patients' cellular immunity and the effect of Astragalus Injection (Al) on it. Methods: Sixty-three serious abdominal traumatic patients were randomly assigned into two groups, the conventional group and the treated group, patients in the conventional group were given conventional treatment, while others in the treated group were given conventional treatment as the basis, with Al 20 mi was added into 250 mi of 5% glucose solution given through intravenous dripping, and then on the first day and 14th day, their T cell activated antigens as well as that of 10 healthy subjects were monitored.Results: On the first day, in the conventional group and treated group, the levels of CD3 + , CD4 + , CD4 +/CD8 + ,CD16+ , CD69 + and CD3 +/homologous leucocytic antigen-DR (HLA-DR+) were apparently lower than those in the healthy group (P<0.05), while the CD8 + was significantly higher than that in the healthy group ( P<0.05), and there was no significant difference between the conventional group and the treated group (P>0.05) ; on the 14th days, the levels of CD3+, CD4+, CD4+/CD8+, CD16+, CD69+ and CD3+/HLA-DR+ of the treated group gotclosed to healthy subject value, and got even higher than those of conventional group (P<0.05); CD8 + got close to that of healthy subjects, while obviously lower than that of conventional group (P<0.05). Conclusion: After serious abdominal trauma, cellular immunity lowered, auxiliary use of Al was beneficial to the restoration of cellular immunity.

  5. Vaccines against Human Carcinomas: Strategies to Improve Antitumor Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Palena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple observations in preclinical and clinical studies support a role for the immune system in controlling tumor growth and progression. Various components of the innate and adaptive immune response are able to mediate tumor cell destruction; however, certain immune cell populations can also induce a protumor environment that favors tumor growth and the development of metastasis. Moreover, tumor cells themselves are equipped with various mechanisms that allow them to evade surveillance by the immune system. The goal of cancer vaccines is to induce a tumor-specific immune response that ultimately will reduce tumor burden by tipping the balance from a protumor to an antitumor immune environment. This review discusses common mechanisms that govern immune cell activation and tumor immune escape, and some of the current strategies employed in the field of cancer vaccines aimed at enhancing activation of tumor-specific T-cells with concurrent reduction of immunosuppression.

  6. Study on Effect of Aloe Glue on Cytogenetics, Cellular Immunity and Cell Proliferation of Human Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jiahua; WEN Shaluo; XIA Yun; ZHANG Lijun

    2002-01-01

    Objective To provide the scientific evidence for the exploiture of aloe resource. Methods Cytological combined determination was used to study the effect of aloe glue(0.01 ~ 0.3ml) on cytogenetics, cellular immunity and cell proliferation of human cells. Results SCE and MNR in varying dose groups had no significant differences as compared with control group( P > 0.05). LTR was significantly higher than that of control group(P < 0.005). MI was significantly higher than that of control group ( P < 0.05). M3 and PRI in highest dose group had significant differences as compared with control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion Aloe gel had no significant effect on cytogenetics. But it had activating effects on immunity and proliferation of cells.

  7. Cellular and humoral cross-immunity against two H3N2v influenza strains in presumably unexposed healthy and HIV-infected subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Agrati

    Full Text Available Human cases of infection due to a novel swine-origin variant of influenza A virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2v have recently been identified in the United States. Pre-existing humoral and cellular immunity has been recognized as one of the key factors in limiting the infection burden of an emerging influenza virus strain, contributing to restrict its circulation and to mitigate clinical presentation. Aim of this study was to assess humoral and cell-mediated cross immune responses to H3N2v in immuno-competent (healthy donors, n = 45 and immuno-compromised hosts (HIV-infected subjects, n = 46 never exposed to H3N2v influenza strain. Humoral response against i H3N2v (A/H3N2/Ind/08/11, ii animal vaccine H3N2 strain (A/H3N2/Min/11/10, and iii pandemic H1N1 virus (A/H1N1/Cal/07/09 was analysed by hemagglutination inhibition assay; cell-mediated response against the same influenza strains was analysed by ELISpot assay. A large proportion of healthy and HIV subjects displayed cross-reacting humoral and cellular immune responses against two H3N2v strains, suggesting the presence of B- and T-cell clones able to recognize epitopes from emerging viral strains in both groups. Specifically, humoral response was lower in HIV subjects than in HD, and a specific age-related pattern of antibody response against different influenza strains was observed both in HD and in HIV. Cellular immune response was similar between HD and HIV groups and no relationship with age was reported. Finally, no correlation between humoral and cellular immune response was observed. Overall, a high prevalence of HD and HIV patients showing cross reactive immunity against two H3N2v strains was observed, with a slightly lower proportion in HIV persons. Other studies focused on HIV subjects at different stages of diseases are needed in order to define how cross immunity can be affected by advanced immunosuppression.

  8. Recombinant lipidated dengue-3 envelope protein domain III stimulates broad immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chen-Yi; Liu, Shih-Jen; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Yu; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Liu, Hsueh-Hung; Chen, I-Hua; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2016-02-17

    The linkage of an immunogen with a toll-like receptor ligand has great potential to induce highly potent immune responses with the initial features of antigen-presenting cell activation. In the current study, we expressed recombinant dengue-3 envelope protein domain III (D3ED III) in lipidated form using an Escherichia coli-based system. The recombinant lipidated dengue-3 envelope protein domain III (LD3ED III) augments the expression levels of IL-12 family cytokines. LD3ED III-immunized mice enhance wide ranges of T cell responses as indicated by IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-21 production. Additionally, LD3ED III-immunized mice increase the frequencies of anti-D3ED III antibody producing cells. The boosted antibody titers cover various IgG isotypes, including IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3. Importantly, LD3ED III-immunized mice induce neutralizing antibody capacity associated with a reduction of viremia levels after challenges. In contrast, mice that are immunized with D3ED III formulated with aluminum phosphate (D3ED III/Alum) only enhance Th2 responses and boost IgG1 antibody titers. Neither neutralizing antibody responses nor the inhibition of viremia levels after challenge is observed in mice that are immunized with D3ED III/Alum. These results suggest that LD3ED III can induce broad profiles of cellular and humoral immune responses.

  9. Spaceflight and immune responses of rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Morton, Darla S.; Swiggett, Jeanene P.; Hakenewerth, Anne M.; Fowler, Nina A.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of restraint on immunological parameters was determined in an 18 day ARRT (adult rhesus restraint test). The monkeys were restrained for 18 days in the experimental station for the orbiting primate (ESOP), the chair of choice for Space Shuttle experiments. Several immunological parameters were determined using peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymph node specimens from the monkeys. The parameters included: response of bone marrow cells to GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), leukocyte subset distribution, and production of IFN-a (interferon-alpha) and IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). The only parameter changed after 18 days of restraint was the percentage of CD8+ T cells. No other immunological parameters showed changes due to restraint. Handling and changes in housing prior to the restraint period did apparently result in some restraint-independent immunological changes. Handling must be kept to a minimum and the animals allowed time to recover prior to flight. All experiments must be carefully controlled. Restraint does not appear to be a major issue regarding the effects of space flight on immune responses.

  10. Spaceflight and Immune Responses of Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    In the grant period, we perfected techniques for determination of interleukin production and leukocyte subset analysis of rhesus monkeys. These results are outlined in detail in publication number 2, appended to this report. Additionally, we participated in the ARRT restraint test to determine if restraint conditions for flight in the Space Shuttle could contribute to any effects of space flight on immune responses. All immunological parameters listed in the methods section were tested. Evaluation of the data suggests that the restraint conditions had minimal effects on the results observed, but handling of the monkeys could have had some effect. These results are outlined in detail in manuscript number 3, appended to this report. Additionally, to help us develop our rhesus monkey immunology studies, we carried out preliminary studies in mice to determine the effects of stressors on immunological parameters. We were able to show that there were gender-based differences in the response of immunological parameters to a stressor. These results are outlined in detail in manuscript number 4, appended to this report.

  11. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  12. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  13. Dynamic modeling of cellular response to DNA damage based on p53 stress response networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinpeng Qi; Yongsheng Ding; Shihuang Shao

    2009-01-01

    Under acute perturbations from the outside, cells can trigger self-defensive mechanisms to fight against genome stress. To investigate the cellular response to continuous ion radiation (IR), a dynamic model for p53 stress response networks at the cellular level is proposed. The model can successfully be used to simulate the dynamic processes of double-strand breaks (DSBs) generation and their repair, switch-like ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation, oscillations occurring in the p53-MDM2 feedback loop, as well as toxins elimination triggered by p53 stress response networks. Especially, the model can predict the plausible outcomes of cellular response under different IR dose regimes.

  14. Human papillomavirus clade A9 specific cellular immunity during the natural course of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hende, Muriel van den

    2012-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the balance between viral clearance and viral persistence in HPV related (pre)malignant lesions. In this thesis, we analyzed HPV clade A9-specific T-cell responses in relation to virological and clinical outcome to gain further insight into HPV-specific

  15. Immune responses of orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, against virus-like particles of betanodavirus produced in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Xiong; Jin, Bao-Lei; Xu, Yu; Huang, Li-Jie; Huang, Run-Qing; Zhang, Yong; Kwang, Jimmy; He, Jian-Guo; Xie, Jun-Feng

    2014-01-15

    Betanodaviruses are the causative agents of viral nervous necrosis (VNN), a serious disease of cultured marine fish worldwide. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the good novel vaccine candidates to control this disease. Until now, betanodavirus vaccine studies mainly focused on the humoral immune response and mortality after virus challenge. However, little is known about the activation of genes responsible for cellular and innate immunity by vaccines. In the present study, VLPs of orange-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (OGNNV) were produced in prokaryotes and their ability to enter Asian sea bass cells was the same as native virus, suggesting that they possess a similar structure to OGNNV. VLPs immunogenicity was then determined by intramuscularly vaccinating Epinephelus coioides at different concentrations (1.5 or 15 μg g(-1) fish body weight, FBW) and immunizing frequencies (administration once, twice and thrice). A single vaccination with the dosage of 1.5 μg g(-1) FBW is enough to provoke high titer antibodies (average 3 fold higher than that of negative control) with strong neutralizing antibody titer as early as 1 week post immunization. Furthermore, quantitative PCR analysis revealed that eleven genes associated with humoral, cellular and innate immunities were up-regulated in the liver, spleen and head kidney at 12h post immunization, correlating with the early antibody response. In conclusion, we demonstrated that VLP vaccination induced humoral immune responses and activated genes associated with cellular and innate immunity against betanodavirus infection in orange-spotted grouper.

  16. Meningococcal C specific immune responses: immunity in an era of immunization with vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voer, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Meningococcal serogroup C conjugate immunization was introduced in the Dutch national immunization schedule at the age of 14 months, together with a large catch-up campaign in 2002. After introduction of this MenC immunization, the incidence of MenC completely disappeared from the immunized populati

  17. Negative Regulation of IRF7 Activation by ATF4 Suggests a Cross Regulation Between the Interferon Responses and the Cellular Integrated Stress Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Qiming; Deng, Hongying; Sun, Chiao-Wang; Tim M. Townes; Zhu, Fanxiu

    2010-01-01

    Cells react to viral infection by exhibiting interferon (IFN)-based innate immune responses and integrated stress responses, but little is known about the interrelationships between the two. We here report a linkage between these two host protective cellular mechanisms. We found that IRF7, the master regulator of type I IFN gene expression, interacts with ATF4, a key component of the integrated stress responses whose translation is induced by viral infection and various stresses. We have demo...

  18. Mgat1-dependent N-glycosylation of membrane components primes Drosophila melanogaster blood cells for the cellular encapsulation response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Mortimer

    Full Text Available In nature, larvae of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster are commonly infected by parasitoid wasps, and so have evolved a robust immune response to counter wasp infection. In this response, fly immune cells form a multilayered capsule surrounding the wasp egg, leading to death of the parasite. Many of the molecular mechanisms underlying this encapsulation response are conserved with human immune responses. Our findings suggest that protein N-glycosylation, a common protein post-translational modification of human immune proteins, may be one such conserved mechanism. We found that membrane proteins on Drosophila immune cells are N-glycosylated in a temporally specific manner following wasp infection. Furthermore we have identified mutations in eight genes encoding enzymes of the N-glycosylation pathway that decrease fly resistance to wasp infection. More specifically, loss of protein N-glycosylation in immune cells following wasp infection led to the formation of defective capsules, which disintegrated over time and were thereby unsuccessful at preventing wasp development. Interestingly, we also found that one species of Drosophila parasitoid wasp, Leptopilina victoriae, targets protein N-glycosylation as part of its virulence mechanism, and that overexpression of an N-glycosylation enzyme could confer resistance against this wasp species to otherwise susceptible flies. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that protein N-glycosylation is a key player in Drosophila cellular encapsulation and suggest that this response may provide a novel model to study conserved roles of protein glycosylation in immunity.

  19. Standardized Whole-Blood Transcriptional Profiling Enables the Deconvolution of Complex Induced Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Urrutia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Systems approaches for the study of immune signaling pathways have been traditionally based on purified cells or cultured lines. However, in vivo responses involve the coordinated action of multiple cell types, which interact to establish an inflammatory microenvironment. We employed standardized whole-blood stimulation systems to test the hypothesis that responses to Toll-like receptor ligands or whole microbes can be defined by the transcriptional signatures of key cytokines. We found 44 genes, identified using Support Vector Machine learning, that captured the diversity of complex innate immune responses with improved segregation between distinct stimuli. Furthermore, we used donor variability to identify shared inter-cellular pathways and trace cytokine loops involved in gene expression. This provides strategies for dimension reduction of large datasets and deconvolution of innate immune responses applicable for characterizing immunomodulatory molecules. Moreover, we provide an interactive R-Shiny application with healthy donor reference values for induced inflammatory genes.

  20. MicroRNAs in inflammation and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, J; Rao, D S

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression in the immune system. In a few short years, their mechanism of action has been described in various cell lineages within the immune system, targets have been defined and their unique contributions to immune cell function have been examined. Certain miRNAs serve in important negative feedback loops in the immune system, whereas others serve to amplify the response of the immune system by repressing inhibitors of the response. Here, we review some of the better understood mechanisms as well as some emerging concepts of miRNA function. Future work will likely involve defining the function of specific miRNAs in specific immune cell lineages and to utilize them in the design of therapeutic strategies for diseases involving the immune system.

  1. Innate immune response development in nestling tree swallows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, T.; Houdek, B.J.; Lombardo, M.P.; Thorpe, P.A.; Caldwell, Hahn D.

    2011-01-01

    We tracked the development of innate immunity in nestling Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and compared it to that of adults using blood drawn from nestlings during days 6, 12, and 18 of the ???20-day nestling period and from adults. Innate immunity was characterized using an in vitro assay of the ability of whole blood to kill Escherichia coli. The ability of whole blood to kill E. coli increased as nestlings matured. Neither this component of innate immunity nor right wing chord length on day18 were as developed as in adults indicating that development of the innate immune system and growth both continued after fledging. Narrow sense heritability analyses suggest that females with strong immune responses produced nestlings with strong immune responses. These data suggest nestling Tree Swallows allocated sufficient energy to support rapid growth to enable fledging by day 18, but that further development of innate immunity occurred post-fledging. ?? 2011 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  2. A New Mechanism to Curb Over-reactive Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The human immune system is a truly amazing constellation of responses to attacks from the outside. It could defend you against millions of bacteria, microbes, viruses, toxins and parasites that would invade your body. However, there are cases where the immune response to innocuous substances is inappropriate and over-reactive, leading to diseases such as allergies and arthritis.

  3. Single Cell Functional Proteomics for Monitoring Immune Response in Cancer Therapy: Technology, Methods and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eMa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, significant progresses have taken place in the field of cancer immunotherapeutics, which are being developed for most human cancers. New immunotherapeutics, such as Ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4, have been approved for clinical treatment; cell-based immunotherapies such as adoptive cell transfer (ACT have either passed the final stage of human studies (i.e., sipuleucel-T for the treatment of selected neoplastic malignancies or reached the stage of phase II/III clinical trials. Immunotherapetics has become a sophisticated field. Multimodal therapeutic regimens comprising several functional modules (up to 5 in the case of ACT have been developed to provide focused therapeutic responses with improved efficacy and reduced side-effects. However, a major challenge remains: the lack of effective and clinically-applicable immune assessment methods. Due to the complexity of antitumor immune responses within patients, it is difficult to provide comprehensive assessment of therapeutic efficacy and mechanism. To address this challenge, new technologies have been developed to directly profile the cellular immune functions and the functional heterogeneity. With the goal to measure the functional proteomics of single immune cells, these technologies are informative, sensitive, high-throughput and highly-multiplex. They have been used to uncover new knowledge of cellular immune functions and have be utilized for rapid, informative, and longitudinal monitoring of immune response in clinical anti-cancer treatment. In addition, new computational tools are required to integrate high dimensional data sets generated from the comprehensive, single-cell level measurements of patient’s immune responses to guide accurate and definitive diagnostic decision. These single-cell immune function assessment tools will likely contribute to new understanding of therapy mechanism, pre-treatment stratification of patients and ongoing therapeutic monitoring and

  4. Mucosal vaccination against serogroup B meningococci: induction of bactericidal antibodies and cellular immunity following intranasal immunization with NadA of Neisseria meningitidis and mutants of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Frances; Lavelle, Ed C; McNeela, Edel A; Hale, Christine; Clare, Simon; Arico, Beatrice; Giuliani, Marzia M; Rae, Aaron; Huett, Alan; Rappuoli, Rino; Dougan, Gordon; Mills, Kingston H G

    2004-07-01

    Conjugated polysaccharide vaccines protect against serogroup C meningococci. However, this approach cannot be applied to serogroup B, which is still a major cause of meningitis. We evaluated the immunogenicity of three surface-exposed proteins from serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (App, NhhA, and NadA) identified during whole-genome sequencing. Mice were immunized intranasally with individual proteins in the presence of wild-type Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LTwt), LTR72, a partially inactivated mutant, or LTK63, a completely nontoxic mutant, as the adjuvant. Each of the meningococcal proteins induced significant cellular responses; NhhA and NadA induced strong antibody responses, but only NadA induced bactericidal antibody when administered intranasally with mucosal adjuvants. In addition, immunoglobulin A and bactericidal antibodies were detected in the respiratory tract following intranasal delivery of NadA. Analysis of antigen-specific cytokine production by T cells from immunized mice revealed that intranasal immunization with NadA alone failed to generate detectable cellular immune responses. In contrast, LTK63, LTR72, and LTwt significantly augmented NadA-specific gamma interferon, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and IL-10 production by spleen and lymph node cells, suggesting that both Th1 and Th2 cells were induced in vivo. The strongest cellular responses and highest bactericidal antibody titers were generated with LTR72 as the adjuvant. These findings demonstrate that the quality and magnitude of the immune responses generated by mucosal vaccines are influenced by the antigen as well as the adjuvant and suggest that nasal delivery of NadA with mucosal adjuvants has considerable potential in the development of a mucosal vaccine against serogroup B meningococci.

  5. Tetraspanins in the immune response against cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenbergen, S.; Spriel, A.B. van

    2011-01-01

    The role of the immune system in the defense against cancer, a process termed tumor immunosurveillance, has been extensively studied. Evidence is accumulating that the molecular organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of immune cells is of critical importance. Tetraspanin proteins

  6. Enhancement of cellular and humoral immunity following embryonic exposure to melatonin in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C B; Siopes, T D

    2005-09-01

    Two experiments were performed to determine the effect of in ovo melatonin supplementation on the ontogeny of immunity in the Large White turkey poult. Different levels of melatonin were injected into the air cell of the egg 4 days prior to hatch. In Experiment 1, turkey embryos received 3 ml of solution containing 200, 100, 50, 25, 10, or 1 microg/ml of melatonin. The hatchability at each dose was determined and compared to vehicle-injected controls. In Experiment 2, only poults from melatonin treatments in Experiment 1 that resulted in normal hatchability (10 and 1 microg/ml) were used. Lymphoproliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA-P) and primary antibody responses to Chukar red blood cells (CRBC) were determine at five time intervals: 0, 1, 7, 14, and 21 days post-hatch. At each of these times, including 28 days post-hatch, treatment effects on body weights were determined. At 28 days post-hatch, bursal, thymic, and splenic weights were obtained. In ovo melatonin administration significantly accelerated (P0.05) the development of cell-mediated (PHA-P) and humoral (CRBC) immune responses, and these responses were significantly elevated above vehicle-injected controls through 21 days post-hatch. No effect was observed on bursal, thymic, splenic or body weights. These data suggest that embryonic exposure to melatonin enhances post-hatch immune development and responsiveness.

  7. Evaluating immune responses after sipuleucel-T therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Julius; Madan, Ravi A; Figg, William D

    2015-01-01

    Following FDA approval of sipuleucel-T in 2010 for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), several studies have described the effect of sipuleucel-T on peripheral immune responses. Retrospective associations have also been made with immune responses and survival. A recently published study by Fong et al. was the first to characterize the immune response of sipuleucel-T in the tumor microenvironment. The findings of this study have been hypothesis generating, yet it remains unclear whether the peri-tumor immune response described is predictive of survival. Increasing evidence suggests that radiographic or PSA progression does not accurately reflect survival with sipuleucel-T and other immunotherapies. Finding an immune biomarker which can accurately reflect clinical benefit and validating it prospectively offers the potential for a predictive indicator of response in an area where none currently exists.

  8. Susceptibility and resistance to Echinococcus granulosus infection: Associations between mouse strains and early peritoneal immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Merlino, Alicia; Capurro, Rafael; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    In helminth infections, there are no easy associations between host susceptibility and immune responses. Interestingly, immunity to cestodes - unlike most helminths - seems to require Th1-type effectors. In this sense, we reported recently that Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice are high and low susceptible strains, respectively, to experimental infection by Echinococcus granulosus. However, the role of the early cellular peritoneal response in such differential susceptibility is unknown. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of cytokines expression and cellular phenotypes in peritoneal cells from infected Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice. Additionally, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted to highlight the most relevant differences between strains. Finally, the anti-parasite activities of peritoneal cells were assessed through in vitro systems. PCAs clustered C57Bl/6 mice by their early mixed IL-5/TNF-α responses and less intense expression of Th2-type cytokines. Moreover, they exhibited lower counts of eosinophils and higher numbers of macrophages and B cells. Functional studies showed that peritoneal cells from infected C57Bl/6 mice displayed greater anti-parasite activities, in accordance with higher rates of NO production and more efficient ADCC responses. In conclusion, mild Th2-responses and active cellular mechanisms are key determinants in murine resistance to E. granulosus infection, supporting the cestode immune exception among helminth parasites.

  9. Seasonal variation and innate immune responses of spleen in fresh-water snake, Natrix piscator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar Tripathi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity provides first line defense in all animals against pathogens and parasites. There is seasonal variation in pathogen prevalence and disease because of the seasonal lifecycle of the parasite and due to annual variation in the infectivity of pathogens. Organisms face seasonal stress by regulating their internal physiology, i.e. by secreting hormones. Melatonin and sex steroids contribute to the seasonal redistribution of immunological activity including winter-time up-regulation of some immune responses, and reproduction-related immunosuppression. Present study aims to understand seasonal variation in splenocyte innate immune response in the fresh-water snake, Natrix piscator. Reptiles represent the pivotal phylogenic group as they were the ancestor of both birds and mammals and they are the only ectothermic amniotes providing the key link between ectothermic anamniotic fishes and amphibians, and endothermic amniotic birds and mammals; a greater study of reptilian innate immune response will provide important insights into the evolutionary history of vertebrate immunity. Animals were mildly anaesthetized and the spleen was isolated aseptically. Spleen was used for calculating splenosomatic index, cellularity and macrophage phagocytosis. Spleen size has a trend to be high in autumn and winter months and low in spring and summer, though data were not significant. Spleen cellularity was recorded high in winter months and again in September; while it remained low during rest of the year. No definite pattern was observed in phagocytosis by splenic macrophages. The percent phagocytosis varied between 42 to 60 %, being highest in month of February. It is concluded that seasonal variation in splenocyte immune response provides a mechanism that suites best to the organism and which might coincide with the pathogen prevalence. Seasonal cycle of immune response is helpful in understanding the disease processes in animals and the direct

  10. GITR Activation Positively Regulates Immune Responses against Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Frederico R. C.; Mota, Caroline M.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Silva, Murilo V.; Ferreira, Marcela D.; Fonseca, Denise M.; Silva, João S.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite responsible for causing clinical diseases especially in pregnant and immunosuppressed individuals. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor (GITR), which is also known as TNFRS18 and belongs to the TNF receptor superfamily, is found to be expressed in various cell types of the immune system and provides an important costimulatory signal for T cells and myeloid cells. However, the precise role of this receptor in the context of T. gondii infection remains elusive. Therefore, the current study investigated the role of GITR activation in the immunoregulation mechanisms induced during the experimental infection of mice with T. gondii. Our data show that T. gondii infection slightly upregulates GITR expression in Treg cells and B cells, but the most robust increment in expression was observed in macrophages and dendritic cells. Interestingly, mice infected and treated with an agonistic antibody anti-GITR (DTA-1) presented a robust increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production at preferential sites of parasite replication, which was associated with the decrease in latent brain parasitism of mice under treatment with DTA-1. Several in vivo and in vitro analysis were performed to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in GITR activation upon infection, however no clear alterations were detected in the phenotype/function of macrophages, Tregs and B cells under treatment with DTA-1. Therefore, GITR appears as a potential target for intervention during infection by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, even though further studies are still necessary to better characterize the immune response triggered by GITR activation during T. gondii infection. PMID:27027302

  11. Immune response induction in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Babcock, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    The primary function of the immune response is protection of the host against infection with pathogens, including viruses. Since viruses can infect any tissue of the body, including the central nervous system (CNS), it is logical that cells of the immune system should equally have access to all...... tissues. Nevertheless, the brain and spinal cord are noted for their lack of immune presence. Relative to other organ systems, the CNS appears immunologically privileged. Furthermore, when immune responses do occur in the CNS, they are frequently associated with deleterious effects such as inflammatory...

  12. Immunosuppressive activity of Semen Persicae ethanol extract on specific antibody and cellular response to ovalbumin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Bin; Qin, Feng; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2006-09-01

    The immunosuppressive activity of the ethanol extract of Semen Persicae (EESP) was studied with respect to specific antibody and cellular response to ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. The effects of EESP on mice splenocyte proliferation in vitro were measured. EESP significantly suppressed concanavalin A (ConA)- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated splenocyte proliferation in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the effects of EESP at three dose levels on the humoral and cellular immune responses in the OVA-immunized mice were examined. ICR Mice were immunized subcutaneously with OVA on day 0 and 14. Starting on the day of immunization, the mice were administered intraperitoneally with EESP at a single dose of 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg, and cyclosporin A (CsA, positive drug) at a single dose of 0.1 mg at intervals of 7 days. On day 28, mitogen- and OVA-induced splenocyte proliferation and OVA-specific antibody level in serum were measured. EESP significantly decreased ConA-, LPS-, and OVA-induced splenocyte proliferation in the OVA-immunized mice at the dose of 1.0 mg. Meanwhile, the OVA-specific serum IgG, IgG1, and IgG2b antibody levels in the OVA-immunized mice were markedly reduced by EESP in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest that EESP could suppress the cellular and humoral immune response in mice, and deserve further research to be developed as immunosuppressant.

  13. Antioxidant responses and cellular adjustments to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Miguel, Verónica; Mennerich, Daniela; Kietzmann, Thomas; Sánchez-Pérez, Patricia; Cadenas, Susana; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-12-01

    Redox biological reactions are now accepted to bear the Janus faceted feature of promoting both physiological signaling responses and pathophysiological cues. Endogenous antioxidant molecules participate in both scenarios. This review focuses on the role of crucial cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, and their capacity to interact with oxidants and to establish networks with other critical enzymes such as peroxiredoxins. We discuss the importance of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway as an example of a transcriptional antioxidant response and we summarize transcriptional routes related to redox activation. As examples of pathophysiological cellular and tissular settings where antioxidant responses are major players we highlight endoplasmic reticulum stress and ischemia reperfusion. Topologically confined redox-mediated post-translational modifications of thiols are considered important molecular mechanisms mediating many antioxidant responses, whereas redox-sensitive microRNAs have emerged as key players in the posttranscriptional regulation of redox-mediated gene expression. Understanding such mechanisms may provide the basis for antioxidant-based therapeutic interventions in redox-related diseases.

  14. Antioxidant responses and cellular adjustments to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Miguel, Verónica; Mennerich, Daniela; Kietzmann, Thomas; Sánchez-Pérez, Patricia; Cadenas, Susana; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Redox biological reactions are now accepted to bear the Janus faceted feature of promoting both physiological signaling responses and pathophysiological cues. Endogenous antioxidant molecules participate in both scenarios. This review focuses on the role of crucial cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, and their capacity to interact with oxidants and to establish networks with other critical enzymes such as peroxiredoxins. We discuss the importance of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway as an example of a transcriptional antioxidant response and we summarize transcriptional routes related to redox activation. As examples of pathophysiological cellular and tissular settings where antioxidant responses are major players we highlight endoplasmic reticulum stress and ischemia reperfusion. Topologically confined redox-mediated post-translational modifications of thiols are considered important molecular mechanisms mediating many antioxidant responses, whereas redox-sensitive microRNAs have emerged as key players in the posttranscriptional regulation of redox-mediated gene expression. Understanding such mechanisms may provide the basis for antioxidant-based therapeutic interventions in redox-related diseases. PMID:26233704

  15. Immune response against Sporothrix schenckii in TLR-4-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassá, Micheli Fernanda; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Ribeiro, Livia Carolina de Abreu; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2012-07-01

    For many fungal diseases, macrophages are the major cell population implicated in host protection, primarily by their ability to eliminate the invading fungal pathogen through phagocytosis. In sporotrichosis, this remains true, because of macrophages’ ability to recognize Sporothrix schenckii through specific receptors for some of the fungus’ cellular surface constituents. Further confirmation for macrophages’ pivotal role in fungal diseases came with the identification of toll-like receptors, and the subsequent numerous associations found between TLR-4 deficiency and host susceptibility to diverse fungal pathogens. Involvement of TLR-4 in immune response against sporotrichosis has been conducted to investigate how TLR-4 signaling could affect inflammatory response development through evaluation of H2O2 production and IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β release during the course of S. schenckii infection on TLR-4-deficient mice. The results showed that macrophages are largely dependent on TLR-4 for inflammatory activation and that in the absence of TLR-4 signaling, increased TGF-β release may be one of the contributing factors for the abrogated inflammatory activation of peritoneal exudate cells during mice sporotrichosis.

  16. The local immune response in ulcerative lesions of Buruli disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiszewski, A E; Becerril, E; Aguilar, L D; Kader, I T A; Myers, W; Portaels, F; Hernàndez Pando, R

    2006-01-01

    Buruli disease (BU) is a progressive necrotic and ulcerative disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU is considered the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. Three clinical stages of the cutaneous lesions have been described in BU: pre-ulcerative, ulcerative and healed lesions. In this study we used immunohistochemistry and automated morphometry to determine the percentage of macrophages and of CD4/CD8 lymphocytes and their expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Expression of these cytokines was correlated with the inflammatory response evaluated by histopathology. All the studied BU ulcerative cases showed extensive necrosis and chronic inflammation. The most important feature was the presence or absence of granulomas co-existing with a mixed pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. When granulomas were present significantly higher expression of IFN-γ was seen, whereas in ulcerative lesions without granulomas there was increased expression of IL-10 and significantly higher bacillary counts. These features correlated with the chronicity of the lesions; longer-lasting lesions showed granulomas. Thus, granulomas were absent from relatively early ulcerative lesions, which contained more bacilli and little IFN-γ, suggesting that at this stage of the disease strong suppression of the protective cellular immune response facilitates proliferation of bacilli. PMID:16487243

  17. Polycation-decorated PLA microspheres induce robust immune responses via commonly used parenteral administration routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Wang, Lianyan; Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Weifeng; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    Recombinant viral subunit-based vaccines have gained increasing attention due to their enhanced safety over the classic live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines. The low immunogenicity of the subunit antigen alone, however, requires the addition of an adjuvant to induce immunity. Particulate-based delivery systems have great potential for developing new vaccine adjuvants, compared to traditional aluminum-based saline adjuvants. The physicochemical properties of particulate vaccines have been extensively investigated; however, few studies have focused on how the administration route of various adjuvant-antigen combinations impacts the efficacy of the immune response. Here, for the first time, the viral Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was combined with aluminum-based or cationic-microsphere (MP) based adjuvants to investigate the characteristics of immune responses elicited after immunization via the subcutaneous, intramuscular, or intraperitoneal routes respectively. In vitro, the MP-based vaccine significantly increased dendritic cell (DC) activation with up-regulated CD40 and CD80 expression and IL-12 production compared to alum-based vaccine. After immunization, both MP and alum-based vaccines produced increased IgG titers in mice. The administration route of these vaccines did influenced immune responses. The MP-based vaccine delivered via the intramuscular route yielded the highest levels of the IgG2a isotype. The alum-based vaccine, delivered via the same route, produced an IgG1-dominated humoral immune response. Moreover, subcutaneous and intramuscular immunizations with MP-based vaccine augmented Granzyme B, Th1-type cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ), and Th2 cytokine IL-4 secretions. These results demonstrate that MP-based vaccines have the capacity to induce higher cellular and humoral immune response especially via an intramuscular administration route than an alum-based vaccine.

  18. Analysis of immune responses in dogs with canine visceral leishmaniasis before, and after, drug treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhalem, A; Sahibi, H; Lasri, S; Jaffe, C L

    1999-10-01

    The incidence of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is increasing in the Mediterranean region. Many drugs have been tested for treatment of CVL, but little is known regarding their effect on test immune responses. In our study, three dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum and five dogs experimentally infected with the same strain, were treated with dimethasulfonate pentamidine (Lomidine) and the immune response evaluated before, and after, treatment. After the last injection, animals began to gain weight and the major clinical signs disappeared. Antibody titers gradually decreased to low levels, six months after treatment. At the same time, antigen specific lymphoproliferation reappeared in the sampled animals. This study shows that, after treatment, immune cellular responses to leishmanial antigens, involved in protection against Leishmania infection, were established.

  19. 不同毒力疟原虫感染早期根治性治疗对再感染细胞免疫应答的影响%Effect of radical treatment in early phase of primary infection with different toxicity plasmodium on cellular immune response to homologous reinfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘英杰; 潘艳艳; 李莹; 冯辉; 刘军; 曹雅明

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of radical treatment in early phase of primary infection with different toxicity plasmodium on cellular immune response to homologous reinfection, DBA/2 mice were infected respectively with Py17XL and Pyl7XNL parasited erythrocytes, and radically treated on day 3 after infection. The mice were reinfected respectively with Py17XL and Py17XNL on day 90 after primary infection, then the level of parasitemia was observed by mean of the Giemsa staining of thin blood smears, and applying flow cytometry to quantitively analyze the percentage of actived T cells in spleen T cells on days 0, 1,3 and 5 post-reinfection, respectively, the levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10 in spleen cell culture supernatant were also measured by ELISA at the same time. Results showed that parasitemia in two groups of radically treated mice post-reinfection was all transient and extremely low, and percentage of actived T cells, levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-4 began to rise from day 1 to day 5 after reinfection, respectively, in each testing time point, however, the levels of parasitemia and percentage of actived T cells as well as levels of these cytokines from two groups of mice were not significantly different. These results suggest that host radically treated in early phase of primary infection with different toxicity malarial parasite may produce a similar pattern and intensity of cellular immune responses to homologous reinfection.%目的 探讨不同毒力疟原虫感染早期根治性治疗对再感染细胞免疫应答的影响.方法 用2种毒力不同约氏疟原虫感染DBA/2小鼠,感染后3 d进行根治性治疗,并于感染后90 d进行再感染.吉姆萨薄血膜染色法计数红细胞感染率,流式细胞术检测再感染前后不同时间点脾T细胞中活化性T细胞百分率,ELISA检测脾细胞培养上清中细胞因子水平.结果 两组根治性治疗小鼠再感染后均出现了短暂的低水平虫体血症;活化性T

  20. Social Behavior, Prolactin and the Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    on the immune processes. (Locke, Ader, Besedovsky, Hall, Solomon & Strom, 1985). The term psychoneuroimmunology has been coined by researchers to...34mind and immunity" covering a five year period (Locke and Hornig-Rohan, 1983) and a collection of seminal papers on psychoneuroimmunology (Locke, et...In: Psychoneuroimmunology (R. Ader, ed.), Academic Press, NY, 1981, 609-617. Friedman, S. B., Glasgow, L. A. and Ader, R. Psychological factors

  1. Mosaic vaccines elicit CD8+ T cell responses in monkeys that confer immune coverage of diverse HIV strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Will [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Creation of a successful HIV vaccine will require the development of a strategy to generate cellular immunity with sufficient cross-clade breadth to deal with the extreme genetic diversity of the virus. Polyvalent mosaic immunogens derived from in silica recombination of natural strains of HIV are designed to induce cellular immune responses that maximally cover the sequence diversity of circulating virus isolates. Immunization of rhesus monkeys with plasmid DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine constructs expressing either consensus immunogens or polyvalent mosaic immunogens elicited a CD4+ T lymphocyte-biased response with comparably broad epitope-specific total T lymphocyte specificities. However, immunization with the mosaic immunogens induced HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte responses with markedly greater depth and breadth. Therefore, the use of polyvalent mosaic immunogens is a promising strategy for a global vaccine for HIV.

  2. Innate immune response to viral infection of the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Hayley; Wark, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections are the most common infectious illnesses, though they are usually self-limiting and confined to the respiratory tract. The rapid identification of viruses and their effective elimination with minimal local and systemic inflammation is a testament to the efficiency of the innate immune response within the airways and lungs. A failure of this response appears to occur in those with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, where viral infection is an important trigger for acute exacerbations. The innate immune response to viruses requires their early detection through pathogen recognition receptors and the recruitment of the efficient antiviral response that is centred around the release of type 1 interferons. The airway epithelium provides both a barrier and an early detector for viruses, and interacts closely with cells of the innate immune response, especially macrophages and dendritic cells, to eliminate infection and trigger a specific adaptive immune response.

  3. The X-files in immunity: sex-based differences predispose immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Eleanor N

    2008-09-01

    Despite accumulating evidence in support of sex-based differences in innate and adaptive immune responses, in the susceptibility to infectious diseases and in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases, health research and clinical practice do not address these distinctions, and most research studies of immune responses do not stratify by sex. X-linked genes, hormones and societal context are among the many factors that contribute to disparate immune responses in males and females. It is crucial to address sex-based differences in disease pathogenesis and in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of therapeutic medications to provide optimal disease management for both sexes.

  4. Cell mediated immune responses in the placenta following challenge of vaccinated pregnant heifers with Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Y P; Cantón, G; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Chianini, F; Morrell, E; Lischinsky, L; Ortega-Mora, L M; Innes, E A; Odeón, A; Campero, C M; Moore, D P

    2015-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate and correlate the cell-mediated immune response and pathological changes at the maternal-fetal interface of Neospora-challenged pregnant cattle previously immunized with live and inactivated experimental vaccines. Pregnant heifers naïve to Neospora caninum were divided in 5 groups of 4 animals, each one immunized before mating: Group A heifers were intravenously (iv) immunized with 6.25 × 10(7) live tachyzoites of the NC-6 strain; group B heifers were immunized twice subcutaneously (sc) 3 weeks apart with native antigen extract of the NC-6 strain formulated with ISCOMs; group C heifers were sc immunized twice 3 weeks apart with three recombinant proteins (rNcSAG1, rNcHSP20, rNcGRA7) of the NC-1 strain formulated with ISCOMs; group D heifers were sc injected with sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and group E heifers received sc ISCOM-matrix (ISCOMs without antigen). All groups were iv-challenged with 4.7 × 10(7) NC-1 tachyzoites at 70 days of gestation. Heifers were culled at day 104 of gestation and placentomes were examined to evaluate lesions and local cellular immune responses using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed using bovine leucocyte specific antibodies. Cytokine expression and levels (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) were measured using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Minimal inflammation was observed in group A placentomes; while placentomes from group B, C, D and E had moderate to severe infiltration with CD3(+), CD4(+), γδ-T cells, CD8(+) cells and macrophages being more numerous in groups B and E placentomes, when compared with groups C and D (P<0.001). Cytokine levels were significantly increased in the caruncles of animals of groups B and C in comparison with the other animal groups (P < 0.001). The results from this study showed that the strongest cellular immune responses were observed in the

  5. Interplay between behavioural thermoregulation and immune response in mealworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Tamara P; Niemeyer, Hermann M; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2012-11-01

    Since the preferential body temperature should positively correlate with physiological performance, behavioural fever should enhance an organism's immune response under an immune challenge. Here we have studied the preferential body temperature (T(p)) and its consequences on immune response performance after an immune challenge in larvae of Tenebrio molitor. We evaluated T(p) and immune responses of larvae following a challenge with various concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and we studied the correlation between T(p) and two immune traits, namely antibacterial and phenoloxidase (PO) activities. Larvae that were immune challenged with higher LPS concentrations (C(50) and C(100)) preferred in average, warmer temperatures than did larvae challenged with lower concentrations (C(0) and C(25)). T(p) of C(25)-C(100) (challenged)-mealworms was 2.3°C higher than of C(0) (control) larvae. At lower LPS concentration immune challenge (C(0) and C(25)) antibacterial activity correlated positively with T(p), but at C(50) and C(100) correlation was lose. PO activity was higher at higher LPS concentration, but its magnitude of response did not correlate with T(p) Our data suggest that behavioural fever may have a positive effect on host performance by enhancing antibacterial response under a low pathogen load situation.

  6. The immune response to Trypanoplasma borreli: kinetics of immune gene expression and polyclonal lymphocyte activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeij, J.P.J.; Vries, de B.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2003-01-01

    Although Trypanoplasma borreli induces the production of non-specific antibodies, survival of infection is associated with the production of T. borreli specific antibodies, able to lyse this parasite in the presence of complement. During the lag phase of this acquired immune response, innate immune

  7. Cellular Interferon Gamma and Granzyme B Responses to Cytomegalovirus-pp65 and Influenza N1 Are Positively Associated in Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeten, Heidi; Mathei, Catharina; Peeters, Kelly; Ogunjimi, Benson; Goossens, Herman; Ieven, Margareta; Van Damme, Pierre; Cools, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Morbidity and mortality in the elderly are associated with viral infections, including influenza and cytomegalovirus (CMV). With increasing age, cellular immunity gains importance in protection to influenza, but latent CMV is highly prevalent and associated with immune dysfunction. An insight into the association between immunity against influenza and CMV adds to the understanding of healthy aging. Here we first aimed to measure influenza-specific cellular immunity using granzyme B (GrzB) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-ELISpot. Next, influenza-specific cellular immunity was associated with humoral and cellular CMV-specific immunity in healthy 65+ elderly. Vaccine trial participants gave additional blood samples 3 weeks after receiving a H1N1 containing vaccine. CMV serology was determined and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with influenza N1 or CMV pp65-derived peptide pools for 7 days and rechallenged to assess antigen-specific GgrzB and IFN-γ responses using ELISpot assays. Results were compared using chi-square and correlation analysis. Eighty-three individuals (60% men, 65% CMV IgG+, age range 65-78y) participated. We found significant positive associations between IFN-γ and GrzB responses to both influenza and CMV, but also between a positive CMV serostatus and an influenza N1-specific activation marker response (p = 0.013). CMV pp65 responses were detected in CMV IgG+ individuals, but remarkably also in CMV IgG- individuals (27%). In this study, following influenza vaccination, elderly with cellular immunity against CMV were more likely to have cellular immunity against influenza vaccine N1 antigen. These findings stress the need to continue exploring the possible role of CMV in immunosenescence.

  8. Local and regional re-establishment of cellular immunity during curative antibiotherapy of murine Mycobacterium ulcerans infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa G Martins

    several months after lesion sterilization. This RS regimen prevented DLN destruction, allowing the rapid re-establishment of local and regional cell mediated immune responses associated with macrophage activation. Therefore it is likely that this re-establishment of protective cellular immunity synergizes with antibiotherapy.

  9. Chemical Tools To Monitor and Manipulate Adaptive Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Todd M; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-05-18

    Methods to monitor and manipulate the immune system are of enormous clinical interest. For example, the development of vaccines represents one of the earliest and greatest accomplishments of the biomedical research enterprise. More recently, drugs capable of "reawakening" the immune system to cancer have generated enormous excitement. But, much remains to be done. All drugs available today that manipulate the immune system cannot distinguish between "good" and "bad" immune responses and thus drive general and systemic immune suppression or activation. Indeed, with the notable exception of vaccines, our ability to monitor and manipulate antigen-specific immune responses is in its infancy. Achieving this finer level of control would be highly desirable. For example, it might allow the pharmacological editing of pathogenic immune responses without restricting the ability of the immune system to defend against infection. On the diagnostic side, a method to comprehensively monitor the circulating, antigen-specific antibody population could provide a treasure trove of clinically useful biomarkers, since many diseases expose the immune system to characteristic molecules that are deemed foreign and elicit the production of antibodies against them. This Perspective will discuss the state-of-the-art of this area with a focus on what we consider seminal opportunities for the chemistry community to contribute to this important field.

  10. Humoral and cell mediated immune responses to a pertussis containing vaccine in pregnant and nonpregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygen, Kris; Caboré, Raïssa Nadège; Maertens, Kirsten; Van Damme, Pierre; Leuridan, Elke

    2015-08-07

    Vaccination of pregnant women is recommended for some infectious diseases in order to protect both women and offspring through high titres of maternal IgG antibodies. Less is known on the triggering of cellular immune responses by vaccines administered during pregnancy. In an ongoing study on maternal pertussis vaccination (2012-2014) 18 pregnant women were vaccinated with a tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) containing vaccine (Boostrix®) during the third pregnancy trimester. Sixteen age-matched nonpregnant women received the same vaccine in the same time period. A blood sample was taken at the moment of, but before vaccination and one month and one year after vaccination. Anti-Pertussis Toxin (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), pertactin (Prn), tetanus toxin (TT) and diphtheria toxin (DT) antibodies were measured by ELISA. Cellular immune responses were analyzed using a diluted whole blood assay, measuring proliferation, and cytokine release in response to vaccine antigens PT, FHA, TT, and to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) as polyclonal stimulus. Antibody levels to all five vaccine components increased significantly and to the same extent after vaccination in pregnant and nonpregnant women. One year after vaccination, antibody titres had decreased particularly to PT, but they were still significantly higher to all antigens than before vaccination. In contrast, proliferative and IFN-γ responses were increased to TT, PT, and FHA in nonpregnant women one month after vaccination, whereas in pregnant women only TT specific T cell responses were increased and to a lesser extent than in the control group. One year after vaccination, cellular responses equaled the baseline levels detected prior to vaccination in both groups. In conclusion, a Tdap vaccination can increase vaccine specific IgG antibodies to the same extent in pregnant and in nonpregnant women, whereas the stimulation of vaccine specific Th1 type cellular immune responses with this acellular vaccine

  11. ANTI-TUMOR ACTIVITY AND IMMUNE RESPONSES INDUCED BY HUMAN CANCER-ASSOCIATED MUCIN CORE PEPTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yunguo; Yuan Mei; Fei Lihua; Li Li

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the immune responses induced by apomucin which is a mixture of mucin core peptide, in mice for elucidating the role of mucin core peptide in the modulation of cancers. Methods:Apomucin was isolated from human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. The mice were immunized with this apomucin (10μg/time×6) plus DETOX. Results: When immunized, all mice developed delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) after challenged with apomucin or synthetic peptide MUC-2 or MUC-3, while the mice immunized with apomucin alone did not develop DTH.No antibodies were detected by ELISA after immunization. When the spleen cells of vaccinated mice were cocultured with this apomucin (10-50μg/ml) and rhIL-2(50U/ml) in vitro, the proliferated lymphocytes showed cytotoxicity against human cancer cells, including colon cancer, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer and leukemia as measured by Cr-51 release assay. Antibodies against MUC-2 and MUC-3 could block the cytotoxicity. Conclusion: It was identified that a vaccine combined of apomucin and immune adjuvant DETOX can induce cellular immune response and anti-tumor cytotoxicity in mice.

  12. Activation of unfolded protein response and autophagy during HCV infection modulates innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrabaud, Emilie; De Muynck, Simon; Asselah, Tarik

    2011-11-01

    Autophagy, a process for catabolizing cytoplasmic components, has been implicated in the modulation of interactions between RNA viruses and their host. However, the mechanism underlying the functional role of autophagy in the viral life cycle still remains unclear. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense, membrane-enveloped RNA virus that can cause chronic liver disease. Here we report that HCV induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), which in turn activates the autophagic pathway to promote HCV RNA replication in human hepatoma cells. Further analysis revealed that the entire autophagic process through to complete autolysosome maturation was required to promote HCV RNA replication and that it did so by suppressing innate antiviral immunity. Gene silencing or activation of the UPR-autophagy pathway activated or repressed, respectively, IFN-β activation mediated by an HCV-derived pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). Similar results were achieved with a PAMP derived from Dengue virus (DEV), indicating that HCV and DEV may both exploit the UPR-autophagy pathway to escape the innate immune response. Taken together, these results not only define the physiological significance of HCV-induced autophagy, but also shed light on the knowledge of host cellular responses upon HCV infection as well as on exploration of therapeutic targets for controlling HCV infection.

  13. Global analysis of the immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Leonardo C.; Dickman, Ronald; Bernardes, Américo T.

    2008-10-01

    The immune system may be seen as a complex system, characterized using tools developed in the study of such systems, for example, surface roughness and its associated Hurst exponent. We analyze densitometric (Panama blot) profiles of immune reactivity, to classify individuals into groups with similar roughness statistics. We focus on a population of individuals living in a region in which malaria endemic, as well as a control group from a disease-free region. Our analysis groups individuals according to the presence, or absence, of malaria symptoms and number of malaria manifestations. Applied to the Panama blot data, our method proves more effective at discriminating between groups than principal-components analysis or super-paramagnetic clustering. Our findings provide evidence that some phenomena observed in the immune system can be only understood from a global point of view. We observe similar tendencies between experimental immune profiles and those of artificial profiles, obtained from an immune network model. The statistical entropy of the experimental profiles is found to exhibit variations similar to those observed in the Hurst exponent.

  14. Cervical Carcinogenesis and Immune Response Gene Polymorphisms: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Merel

    2017-01-01

    The local immune response is considered a key determinant in cervical carcinogenesis after persistent infection with oncogenic, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. Genetic variation in various immune response genes has been shown to influence risk of developing cervical cancer, as well as progression and survival among cervical cancer patients. We reviewed the literature on associations of immunogenetic single nucleotide polymorphism, allele, genotype, and haplotype distributions with risk and progression of cervical cancer. Studies on HLA and KIR gene polymorphisms were excluded due to the abundance on literature on that subject. We show that multiple genes and loci are associated with variation in risk of cervical cancer. Rather than one single gene being responsible for cervical carcinogenesis, we postulate that variations in the different immune response genes lead to subtle differences in the effectiveness of the antiviral and antitumour immune responses, ultimately leading to differences in risk of developing cervical cancer and progressive disease after HPV infection. PMID:28280748

  15. Cervical Carcinogenesis and Immune Response Gene Polymorphisms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash M. Mehta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The local immune response is considered a key determinant in cervical carcinogenesis after persistent infection with oncogenic, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV infections. Genetic variation in various immune response genes has been shown to influence risk of developing cervical cancer, as well as progression and survival among cervical cancer patients. We reviewed the literature on associations of immunogenetic single nucleotide polymorphism, allele, genotype, and haplotype distributions with risk and progression of cervical cancer. Studies on HLA and KIR gene polymorphisms were excluded due to the abundance on literature on that subject. We show that multiple genes and loci are associated with variation in risk of cervical cancer. Rather than one single gene being responsible for cervical carcinogenesis, we postulate that variations in the different immune response genes lead to subtle differences in the effectiveness of the antiviral and antitumour immune responses, ultimately leading to differences in risk of developing cervical cancer and progressive disease after HPV infection.

  16. The immune response of bovine mammary epithelial cells to live or heat-inactivated Mycoplasma bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, Christina; Pilo, Paola; Frey, Joachim; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Wellnitz, Olga

    2015-09-30

    Mycoplasma bovis is an emerging bacterial agent causing bovine mastitis. Although these cell wall-free bacteria lack classical virulence factors, they are able to activate the immune system of the host. However, effects on the bovine mammary immune system are not yet well characterized and detailed knowledge would improve the prevention and therapy of mycoplasmal mastitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunogenic effects of M. bovis on the mammary gland in an established primary bovine mammary epithelial cell (bMEC) culture system. Primary bMEC of four different cows were challenged with live and heat-inactivated M. bovis strain JF4278 isolated from acute bovine mastitis, as well as with the type strain PG45. The immune response was evaluated 6 and 24h after mycoplasmal challenge by measuring the relative mRNA expression of selected immune factors by quantitative PCR. M. bovis triggered an immune response in bMEC, reflected by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin(IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, lactoferrin, Toll-like receptor-2, RANTES, and serum amyloid A mRNA. Interestingly, this cellular reaction was only observed in response to live, but not to heat-inactivated M. bovis, in contrast to other bacterial pathogens of mastitis such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study provides evidence that bMEC exhibit a strong inflammatory reaction in response to live M. bovis. The lack of a cellular response to heat-inactivated M. bovis supports the current hypothesis that mycoplasmas activate the immune system through secreted secondary metabolites.

  17. Sublingual nucleotides and immune response to exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojic Sergej M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evidence exists regarding the potential role of exogenous nucleotides as regulators of the immune function in physically active humans, yet the potential use of nucleotides has been hindered by their low bioavailability after oral administration. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial to assess the effect of sublingual nucleotides (50 mg/day on salivary and serum immunity indicators as compared to placebo, both administered to healthy males aged 20 to 25 years for 14 days. Sublingual administration of nucleotides for 14 days increased serum immunoglobulin A, natural killer cells count and cytotoxic activity, and offset the post-exercise drop of salivary immunoglobulins and lactoferrin (P  0.05. It seems that sublingual administration of nucleotides for two weeks considerably affected immune function in healthy males.

  18. Immune Response Evaluation in Sheep Infected with Larvae of Wohlfahrtia Magnifica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marina Mot

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The sheep myiasis is a seriously debilitating disease that has the potential to generate a substantial stress to affected animals. All lesions severity and animals state of health can be retrieved in immunological parameters detection, because always results an immune response to challenge factors which intercede in their productive life. Today is important to find non-chemical methods of ectoparasites control, from natural resistance or vaccine induced resistance. The study was carried out to infected and uninfected sheep with larvae of Wohlfahrtia magnifica. From two groups of healthy and parasited sheep were been taken blood samples. From the group from sheep with myiasis were been detected the cutaneous lesions with W. magnifica maggots and these maggots were been collected. The mechanisms of unspecific immune defending were been studied through cellular effectors by leucogram. In leucogram appear quantitative differences between different categories of cells which take part in immune response, such as polymorphonuclears (neutrophiles, eozinophiles and mononuclears (limphocytes.  The immune specific answer were been detected through radial simple immunodiffusion test made with antigen prepared from W. magnifica maggots from the third stage of development, in the view of estimating the presence of an immune reaction through antibodies synthesis in infested sheep. In both studies were been detected immune responses of parasite hosts. All immunological studies may allow a sustainable ectoparasites control utilizing host resistance which seems to be attainable in the near future.

  19. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Kieber-Emmons; Anastas Pashov; Behjatolah Monzavi-Karbassi; Fariba Jousheghany; Cecile Artaud; Leah Hennings

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- an...

  20. Expression of Drosophila adenosine deaminase in immune cells during inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Milena; Dolezal, Tomas

    2011-03-11

    Extra-cellular adenosine is an important regulator of inflammatory responses. It is generated from released ATP by a cascade of ectoenzymes and degraded by adenosine deaminase (ADA). There are two types of enzymes with ADA activity: ADA1 and ADGF/ADA2. ADA2 activity originates from macrophages and dendritic cells and is associated with inflammatory responses in humans and rats. Drosophila possesses a family of six ADGF proteins with ADGF-A being the main regulator of extra-cellular adenosine during larval stages. Herein we present the generation of a GFP reporter for ADGF-A expression by a precise replacement of the ADGF-A coding sequence with GFP using homologous recombination. We show that the reporter is specifically expressed in aggregating hemocytes (Drosophila immune cells) forming melanotic capsules; a characteristic of inflammatory response. Our vital reporter thus confirms ADA expression in sites of inflammation in vivo and demonstrates that the requirement for ADA activity during inflammatory response is evolutionary conserved from insects to vertebrates. Our results also suggest that ADA activity is achieved specifically within sites of inflammation by an uncharacterized post-transcriptional regulation based mechanism. Utilizing various mutants that induce melanotic capsule formation and also a real immune challenge provided by parasitic wasps, we show that the acute expression of the ADGF-A protein is not driven by one specific signaling cascade but is rather associated with the behavior of immune cells during the general inflammatory response. Connecting the exclusive expression of ADGF-A within sites of inflammation, as presented here, with the release of energy stores when the ADGF-A activity is absent, suggests that extra-cellular adenosine may function as a signal for energy allocation during immune response and that ADGF-A/ADA2 expression in such sites of inflammation may regulate this role.

  1. Cellular immune correlates analysis of an HIV-1 preexposure prophylaxis trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebler, Peter J.; Mehrotra, Megha L.; McConnell, J. Jeff; Holditch, Sara J.; Shaw, Brian I.; Tarosso, Leandro F.; Leadabrand, Kaitlyn S.; Milush, Jeffrey M.; York, Vanessa A.; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Cheng, Rex G.; Eriksson, Emily M.; McMahan, Vanessa; Glidden, David V.; Shiboski, Stephen; Grant, Robert M.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Kallás, Esper G.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1–specific T-cell responses in exposed seronegative subjects suggest that a viral breach of the exposure site is more common than current transmission rates would suggest and that host immunity can extinguish subsequent infection foci. The Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative (iPrEx) chemoprophylaxis trial provided an opportunity to rigorously investigate these responses in a case–control immunology study; 84 preinfection peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from individuals enrolled in the iPrEx trial who later seroconverted were matched with 480 samples from enrolled subjects who remained seronegative from both the placebo and active treatment arms. T-cell responses to HIV-1 Gag, Protease, Integrase, Reverse Transcriptase, Vif, and Nef antigens were quantified for all subjects in an IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay. IFN-γ responses varied in magnitude and frequency across subjects. A positive response was more prevalent in those who remained persistently HIV-1–negative for Gag (P = 0.007), Integrase (P < 0.001), Vif (P < 0.001), and Nef (P < 0.001). When correlated with outcomes in the iPrEx trial, Vif- and Integrase-specific T-cell responses were associated with reduced HIV-1 infection risk [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.36, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.19–0.66 and HR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.28–0.96, respectively]. Antigen-specific responses were independent of emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate use. IFN-γ secretion in the ELISpot was confirmed using multiparametric flow cytometry and largely attributed to effector memory CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Our results show that HIV-1–specific T-cell immunity can be detected in exposed but uninfected individuals and that these T-cell responses can differentiate individuals according to infection outcomes. PMID:26100867

  2. Subversion of the Immune Response by Rabies Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence P. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rabies has affected mankind for several centuries and is one of the oldest known zoonoses. It is peculiar how little is known regarding the means by which rabies virus (RABV evades the immune response and kills its host. This review investigates the complex interplay between RABV and the immune system, including the various means by which RABV evades, or advantageously utilizes, the host immune response in order to ensure successful replication and spread to another host. Different factors that influence immune responses—including age, sex, cerebral lateralization and temperature—are discussed, with specific reference to RABV and the effects on host morbidity and mortality. We also investigate the role of apoptosis and discuss whether it is a detrimental or beneficial mechanism of the host’s response to infection. The various RABV proteins and their roles in immune evasion are examined in depth with reference to important domains and the downstream effects of these interactions. Lastly, an overview of the means by which RABV evades important immune responses is provided. The research discussed in this review will be important in determining the roles of the immune response during RABV infections as well as to highlight important therapeutic target regions and potential strategies for rabies treatment.

  3. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas, E-mail: tke@uams.edu [Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute and Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  4. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kieber-Emmons

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs. To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I, and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  5. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses. PMID:24213131

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in host antiviral genes: associations with humoral and cellular immunity to measles vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralambieva, Iana H; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Umlauf, Benjamin J; Vierkant, Robert A; Shane Pankratz, V; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2011-11-08

    Host antiviral genes are important regulators of antiviral immunity and plausible genetic determinants of immune response heterogeneity after vaccination. We genotyped and analyzed 307 common candidate tagSNPs from 12 antiviral genes in a cohort of 745 schoolchildren immunized with two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Associations between SNPs/haplotypes and measles virus-specific immune outcomes were assessed using linear regression methodologies in Caucasians and African-Americans. Genetic variants within the DDX58/RIG-I gene, including a coding polymorphism (rs3205166/Val800Val), were associated as single-SNPs (p≤0.017; although these SNPs did not remain significant after correction for false discovery rate/FDR) and in haplotype-level analysis, with measles-specific antibody variations in Caucasians (haplotype allele p-value=0.021; haplotype global p-value=0.076). Four DDX58 polymorphisms, in high LD, demonstrated also associations (after correction for FDR) with variations in both measles-specific IFN-γ and IL-2 secretion in Caucasians (p≤0.001, q=0.193). Two intronic OAS1 polymorphisms, including the functional OAS1 SNP rs10774671 (p=0.003), demonstrated evidence of association with a significant allele-dose-related increase in neutralizing antibody levels in African-Americans. Genotype and haplotype-level associations demonstrated the role of ADAR genetic variants, including a non-synonymous SNP (rs2229857/Arg384Lys; p=0.01), in regulating measles virus-specific IFN-γ Elispot responses in Caucasians (haplotype global p-value=0.017). After correction for FDR, 15 single-SNP associations (11 SNPs in Caucasians and 4 SNPs in African-Americans) still remained significant at the q-valuemeasles vaccine in Caucasians and African-Americans.

  7. Nanoparticles for nasal delivery of vaccines : monitoring adaptive immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, C.

    2013-01-01

    The continuous emergence of new pathogens and growing drug resistance of microorganisms asks for innovative vaccination strategies. An alternative to conventional multiple injection vaccines is the nasal route of vaccine delivery. The immune response induced following nasal antigen delivery depends

  8. Induction of the immune response suppression in mice inoculated with Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, J C; Mesón, D E; Sirena, A; de Petrino, S F; Eugenia, M; de Jorrat, B B; de Valdex, M G

    1986-03-01

    There is a controversy in respect to the immunological response (humoral or cellular) concerning the defense against Candida albicans. Candidosis would induce sub-populations of suppressor cells in the host cell-immune response. This report tries to show the effect of different doses of C. albicans (alive or heat-killed) on the expression of cell-mediated and humoral immunity. The effect upon cell immunity was determined by inoculating different lots of singeneic mice, doses of varied concentration of C. albicans and checking for delayed-type hipersensitivity (D.T.H.). D.T.H. was also controlled in syngeneic normal mice which had previously been injected with inoculated mice spleen cells. Humoral immunity was assayed by measuring the induced blastogenesis by Pokeweed Mitogen on spleen mononuclear cells with different doses of C. albicans. Results obtained show that the different doses gave origin to: Suppression of humoral and cell response (10(8) alive); Suppression of only humoral response (10(6) alive); Suppression of cell response and increase of humoral response (10(9) dead); Increase of both responses (10(8) dead).

  9. Local Immune Response to Upper Urinary Tract Infections in Children▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kantele, Anu; Palkola, Nina; Arvilommi, Heikki; Honkinen, Olli; Jahnukainen, Timo; Mertsola, Jussi; Kantele, Jussi M.

    2008-01-01

    Vaccines are needed against urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children, as episodes of pyelonephritis (PN) may cause renal scarring. Local immune mechanisms are regarded to confer protection, yet they have been poorly characterized for children. This study explores the local immune response in children by looking for newly activated pathogen-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC), expected to appear transiently in the circulation as a response to UTI. Urinary tract-originating ASC specific ...

  10. Gastric cancer progression associated with local humoral immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Yolanda, López-Vidal; Sergio, Ponce-de-León; Hugo, Esquivel-Solís; Isabel, Amieva-Fernández Rosa; Rafael, Barreto-Zúñiga; Aldo, Torre-Delgadillo; Gonzalo, Castillo-Rojas

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the association between H. pylori and gastric cancer has been well described, the alterations studies are scarce in the humoral immune response in specific anatomical areas of stomach and during the stages of gastric cancer. The aim in this study was to determine the influence of humoral immune responses against H. pylori infection on gastric carcinoma. Methods We selected 16 gastric cancer cases and approximately one matched control per case at the National Institute of M...

  11. Immune response against large tumors eradicated by treatment with cyclophosphamide and IL-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, K; Meko, J B; Tsung, Y L; Peplinski, G R; Norton, J A

    1998-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated eradication of small (4-8 mm) established murine MCA207 sarcomas by treatment with systemic IL-12. Analysis of the mechanism has revealed a cellular and molecular immune response at the tumor typical of a Th1 cell-mediated, macrophage-effected, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. In the current study we investigate the immune response against long term established, large MCA207 tumors induced by combined treatment with IL-12 and cyclophosphamide (Cy), an agent known to potentiate the DTH response. Our results demonstrate that s.c. large MCA207 tumors (15-20 mm) that are refractory to treatment by either IL-12 or Cy alone can be completely eradicated by the combination of Cy and IL-12. IL-12 is apparently the only cytokine capable of mediating tumor eradication, and the effect is dependent on IFN-gamma. The contribution of Cy is probably due to immunopotentiation of DTH rather than to direct cytotoxicity to the tumor. The regression of these large tumors takes >4 wk and, in many cases, is self-sustained, in that little or no additional IL-12 is needed beyond the initial week of administration. Analysis of the cellular and molecular events at the tumor site suggests that the mechanism is a Th1-mediated antitumor immune response.

  12. Influence of postoperative enteral nutrition on cellular immunity. A random double-blinded placebo controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier-Holgersen, R; Brandstrup, B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discover if the cellular immunological response is different in patients receiving early postoperative enteral nutrition compared to patients who only receive "water".......The aim of this study was to discover if the cellular immunological response is different in patients receiving early postoperative enteral nutrition compared to patients who only receive "water"....

  13. Innate immune responses to Helicobacter pylori infection: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milan K; Trombly, Melanie I; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2012-01-01

    Innate immune receptors detect Helicobacter pylori infection and trigger downstream signaling events that result in the production of cytokines and interferon-β. This chapter gives an overview of the receptors and their roles in responding to H. pylori infection and details the downstream signaling events. The tools that have been developed to study the innate immune response to H. pylori are also discussed. Understanding the immune response to H. pylori is critical to develop better treatments for H. pylori-induced disease states including gastric malignancies and cancer.

  14. Innate immune interferon responses to human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rose; Towers, Greg; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2012-07-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) responses represent the canonical host innate immune response to viruses, which serves to upregulate expression of antiviral restriction factors and augment adaptive immune defences. There is clear evidence for type I IFN activity in both acute and chronic HIV-1 infection in vivo, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells have been identified as one important source for these responses, through innate immune detection of viral RNA by Toll-like receptor 7. In addition, new insights into the molecular mechanisms that trigger induction of type I IFNs suggest innate immune receptors for viral DNA may also mediate these responses. It is widely recognised that HIV-1 restriction factors share the characteristic of IFN-inducible expression, and that the virus has evolved to counteract these antiviral mechanisms. However, in some target cells, such as macrophages, IFN can still effectively restrict virus. In this context, HIV-1 shows the ability to evade innate immune recognition and thereby avoid induction of type I IFN in order to successfully establish productive infection. The relative importance of evasion of innate immune detection and evasion of IFN-inducible restriction in the natural history of HIV-1 infection is not known, and the data suggest that type I IFN responses may play a role in both viral control and in the immunopathogenesis of progressive disease. Further study of the relationship between HIV-1 infection and type I IFN responses is required to unravel these issues and inform the development of novel therapeutics or vaccine strategies.

  15. Advances in Overcoming Immune Responses following Hemophilia Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Carol H

    2011-12-23

    Both Clinical trials and pre-clinical experiments for hemophilia gene therapy showed that it is important to overcome potential immune responses against gene transfer vectors and/or transgene products to ensure the success of gene therapy. Recently various approaches have been investigated to prevent or modulate such responses. Gene transfer vectors have been specifically engineered and immunosuppressive regimens have been administered to avoid or manipulate the immune responses against the vectors. In order to prevent cytotoxic lymphocyte or antibody formation induced by transgene expression, novel approaches have been developed, including methods to manipulate antigen presentation, development of variant genes encoding less immunogenic proteins or gene transfer protocols to evade immune responses, as well as immunosuppressive strategies to target either T and/or B cell responses. Most of these successful protocols involve the induction of activated regulatory T cells to create a regulatory immune environment during tolerance induction. Recent development of these strategies to evade vector-specific immune responses and induce long-term immune tolerance specific to the transgene product will be discussed.

  16. Modeling the interactions between pathogenic bacteria, bacteriophage and immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chung Yin (Joey); Weitz, Joshua S.

    The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria has led to renewed interest in the use of bacteriophage (phage), or virus that infects bacteria, as a therapeutic agent against bacterial infections. However, little is known about the theoretical mechanism by which phage therapy may work. In particular, interactions between the bacteria, the phage and the host immune response crucially influences the outcome of the therapy. Few models of phage therapy have incorporated all these three components, and existing models suffer from unrealistic assumptions such as unbounded growth of the immune response. We propose a model of phage therapy with an emphasis on nonlinear feedback arising from interactions with bacteria and the immune response. Our model shows a synergistic effect between the phage and the immune response which underlies a possible mechanism for phage to catalyze the elimination of bacteria even when neither the immune response nor phage could do so alone. We study the significance of this effect for different parameters of infection and immune response, and discuss its implications for phage therapy.

  17. Respons imun humoral pada pulpitis (Humoral immune response on pulpitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trijoedani Widodo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulpitis is an inflammation process on dental pulp tissue, and usually as the continuous of caries. The microorganism in the caries is a potential immunogenic triggering the immune respons, both humoral and celluler immune responses. The aim of this research is to explain the humoral immune response changes in the dental pulp tissues of pulpitis. This research was done on three group samples: Irreversible pulpitis, Reversible pulpitis and sound teeth as the control group. The result showed that there were three pulpitis immunopathologic patterns: the sound teeth immunopathologic pattern showing a low humoral immune response, in a low level of IgG, IgA and IgM, the reversible pulpitis pattern showing that in a higher humoral immune response, IgG and IgA decreased but IgM increased, the irreversible pulpitis pattern showing that IgG and IgM increased, but it couldn't be repaired although it has highly immunity, and it showed an unusually low level of IgA. This low level of IgA meant that irreversible pulpitis had a low mucosal immunity.

  18. Chemical modulators of the innate immune response alter gypsy moth larval susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broderick Nichole A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gut comprises an essential barrier that protects both invertebrate and vertebrate animals from invasion by microorganisms. Disruption of the balanced relationship between indigenous gut microbiota and their host can result in gut bacteria eliciting host responses similar to those caused by invasive pathogens. For example, ingestion of Bacillus thuringiensis by larvae of some species of susceptible Lepidoptera can result in normally benign enteric bacteria exerting pathogenic effects. Results We explored the potential role of the insect immune response in mortality caused by B. thuringiensis in conjunction with gut bacteria. Two lines of evidence support such a role. First, ingestion of B. thuringiensis by gypsy moth larvae led to the depletion of their hemocytes. Second, pharmacological agents that are known to modulate innate immune responses of invertebrates and vertebrates altered larval mortality induced by B. thuringiensis. Specifically, Gram-negative peptidoglycan pre-treated with lysozyme accelerated B. thuringiensis-induced killing of larvae previously made less susceptible due to treatment with antibiotics. Conversely, several inhibitors of the innate immune response (eicosanoid inhibitors and antioxidants increased the host's survival time following ingestion of B. thuringiensis. Conclusions This study demonstrates that B. thuringiensis infection provokes changes in the cellular immune response of gypsy moth larvae. The effects of chemicals known to modulate the innate immune response of many invertebrates and vertebrates, including Lepidoptera, also indicate a role of this response in B. thuringiensis killing. Interactions among B. thuringiensis toxin, enteric bacteria, and aspects of the gypsy moth immune response may provide a novel model to decipher mechanisms of sepsis associated with bacteria of gut origin.

  19. The cellular bases of antibody responses during dengue virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Yam-Puc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic or memory B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections.This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events like the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation and germinal centers (GCs formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs, till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated.

  20. Simulating Quantitative Cellular Responses Using Asynchronous Threshold Boolean Network Ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Imran

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increasing knowledge about the potential mechanisms underlying cellular functions, it is becoming feasible to predict the response of biological systems to genetic and environmental perturbations. Due to the lack of homogeneity in living tissues it is difficult to estimate the physiological effect of chemicals, including potential toxicity. Here we investigate a biologically motivated model for estimating tissue level responses by aggregating the behavior of a cell population. We assume that the molecular state of individual cells is independently governed by discrete non-deterministic signaling mechanisms. This results in noisy but highly reproducible aggregate level responses that are consistent with experimental data. Results We developed an asynchronous threshold Boolean network simulation algorithm to model signal transduction in a single cell, and then used an ensemble of these models to estimate the aggregate response across a cell population. Using published data, we derived a putative crosstalk network involving growth factors and cytokines - i.e., Epidermal Growth Factor, Insulin, Insulin like Growth Factor Type 1, and Tumor Necrosis Factor α - to describe early signaling events in cell proliferation signal transduction. Reproducibility of the modeling technique across ensembles of Boolean networks representing cell populations is investigated. Furthermore, we compare our simulation results to experimental observations of hepatocytes reported in the literature. Conclusion A systematic analysis of the results following differential stimulation of this model by growth factors and cytokines suggests that: (a using Boolean network ensembles with asynchronous updating provides biologically plausible noisy individual cellular responses with reproducible mean behavior for large cell populations, and (b with sufficient data our model can estimate the response to different concentrations of extracellular ligands. Our

  1. Protective immune responses to fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, A

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of fungal infections has been on the rise over several decades. Fungal infections threaten animals, plants and humans alike and are thus of significant concern to scientists across disciplines. Over the last decade, significant advances on fungal immunology have lead to a better understanding of important mechanisms of host protection against fungi. In this article, I review recent advances of relevant mechanisms of immune-mediated protection to fungal infections.

  2. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Oanh H.; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host–pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participat...

  3. Immune Responses and Lassa Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvain Baize; Marion Russier; Delphine Pannetier

    2012-01-01

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa and caused by Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus. It may be fatal, but most patients recover from acute disease and some experience asymptomatic infection. The immune mechanisms associated with these different outcomes have not yet been fully elucidated, but considerable progress has recently been made, through the use of in vitro human models and nonhuman primates, the only relevant animal model that mimics the pathophysiology and i...

  4. Role of toll-like receptors 3, 4 and 7 in cellular uptake and response to titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen, Koki Kanehira and Akiyoshi Taniguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune response is believed to be among the earliest provisional cellular responses, and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are critical to these interactions. We hypothesize that TLRs also play an important role in interactions between nanoparticles (NPs and cells, although little information has been reported concerning such an interaction. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7 in cellular uptake of titanium dioxide NP (TiO2 NP agglomerates and the resulting inflammatory responses to these NPs. Our data indicate that TLR4 is involved in the uptake of TiO2 NPs and promotes the associated inflammatory responses. The data also suggest that TLR3, which has a subcellular location distinct from that of TLR4, inhibits the denaturation of cellular protein caused by TiO2 NPs. In contrast, the unique cellular localization of TLR7 has middle-ground functional roles in cellular response after TiO2 NP exposure. These findings are important for understanding the molecular interaction mechanisms between NPs and cells.

  5. A role for effectors of cellular immunity in epimorphic regeneration of amphibian limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Gehan H; Sicard, Raymond E

    2002-01-01

    Immune modulation of regeneration of amphibian appendages is suggested, but not proven, by previous studies. Earlier studies have not demonstrated effects of treatments on both epimorphic regeneration and immune responses or restoration of regeneration by specific reversal of immunomodulation. Cyclosporin A (CsA) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) were used in this study to demonstrate the effects of immune suppression and its reversal, on allograft rejection and forelimb regeneration. When administered alone, CsA suppressed rejection of skin allografts and induced a dose-dependent retardation of regeneration. IL-2, administered alone, did not affect allograft rejection or regeneration. However, when combined with CsA, IL-2 abrogated or reversed effects of CsA on both allograft rejection and forelimb regeneration, in a dose-dependent manner. The selective focus of CsA's action and the ability of IL-2 to overcome and reverse these effects strongly suggest that T-lymphocytes participate in or contribute to expression of epimorphic regeneration of amphibian appendages. Further studies are required to better characterize this role.

  6. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with physiological responses during rat liver regeneration: Innate immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Wen Chen; Ming-Zhen Zhang; Li-Feng Zhao; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between innate immune response and liver regeneration (LR) at transcriptional level.METHODS: Genes associated with innate immunity response were obtained by collecting the data from databases and retrieving articles. Gene expression changes in rat regenerating liver were detected by rat genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: A total of 85 genes were found to be associated with LR. The initially and totally expressed number of genes at the phases of initiation [0.5-4 h after partial hepatectomy (PH)], transition from Go to G1 (4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH),cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction (66-168 h after PH) was 36, 9, 47, 4 and 36, 26, 78,50, respectively, illustrating that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the initial phase of LR and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity, these genes were classified into 5 types: 41 up-regulated, 4 predominantly up-regulated, 26 downregulated, 6 predominantly down-regulated, and 8 approximately up/down-regulated genes, respectively.The expression of these genes was up-regulated 350 times and down-regulated 129 times respectively,demonstrating that the expression of most genes was enhanced while the expression of a small number of genes was decreased during LR. Their time relevance was classified into 14 groups, showing that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities during LR were staggered. According to the gene expression patterns,they were classified into 28 types, indicating that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities were diverse and complicated during LR.CONCLUSION: Congenital cellular immunity is enhanced mainly in the forepart, prophase and anaphase of LR while congenital molecular immunity is increased dominantly in the forepart and anaphase of LR. A total of 85 genes associated with LR play an important role in innate immunity.

  7. Delayed type hypersensitivity reaction as indicator of cellular immune competence in broiler chickens exposed to dietary corticosterone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Gielkens, A.; Huurne, ter A.A.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Three experiments were performed to evaluate the delayed type hypersensitivity test against keyhole limpet haemocyanin as a parameter to measure stress-induced cellular immune suppression. The test was optimised for broiler chickens and evaluated in a stress model in which plasma corticosterone leve

  8. The DNA damage response in viral-induced cellular transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, P A; Luftig, M A

    2012-01-31

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has emerged as a critical tumour suppressor pathway responding to cellular DNA replicative stress downstream of aberrant oncogene over-expression. Recent studies have now implicated the DDR as a sensor of oncogenic virus infection. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which tumour viruses activate and also suppress the host DDR. The mechanism of tumour virus induction of the DDR is intrinsically linked to the need for these viruses to promote an S-phase environment to replicate their nucleic acid during infection. However, inappropriate expression of viral oncoproteins can also activate the DDR through various mechanisms including replicative stress, direct interaction with DDR components and induction of reactive oxygen species. Given the growth-suppressive consequences of activating the DDR, tumour viruses have also evolved mechanisms to attenuate these pathways. Aberrant expression of viral oncoproteins may therefore promote tumourigenesis through increased somatic mutation and aneuploidy due to DDR inactivation. This review will focus on the interplay between oncogenic viruses and the DDR with respect to cellular checkpoint control and transformation.

  9. A novel method of modifying immune responses by vaccination with lipiodol-siRNA mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijian Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The dendritic cell (DC possesses the ability to stimulate both T helper 1 (Th1 and Th2 responses depending on activation stimuli. Although it is known that chemically or genetically modified DC can be used therapeutically to steer immune responses towards either Th1 or Th2, cellular therapy with ex vivo manipulated DC is clinically difficult. Here we demonstrate a novel method of switching immune responses from Th1 to Th2 through in vivo immune modulation by administration of siRNA. We demonstrate that siRNA targeting of the IL-12p35 gene leads to a Th2 bias in vitro through an IL-10 dependent mechanism. In vivo administration of siRNA admixed with the oil-based contrast agent lipiodol in the presence of antigen and adjuvant induced a deviation in recall response to reduced production of IFN-γ and augmented IL-4 response using either KLH or ovalbumin. This simple method of in vivo modification of immune response possesses therapeutic potential in Th1-mediated diseases such as multiple sclerosis and autoimmune diabetes.

  10. Interleukin-27 inhibits vaccine-enhanced pulmonary disease following respiratory syncytial virus infection by regulating cellular memory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ruihong; Zhang, Huixian; Hai, Yan; Cui, Yuxiu; Wei, Lin; Li, Na; Liu, Jianxun; Li, Caixia; Liu, Ying

    2012-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of lower respiratory tract disease in young children. In the 1960s, infants vaccinated with formalin-inactivated RSV developed a more severe disease characterized by excessive inflammatory immunopathology in lungs upon natural RSV infection. The fear of causing the vaccine-enhanced disease (VED) is an important obstacle for development of safe and effective RSV vaccines. The recombinant vaccine candidate G1F/M2 immunization also led to VED. It has been proved that cellular memory induced by RSV vaccines contributed to VED. Interleukin-27 (IL-27) and IL-23 regulate Th1, Th17, and/or Th2 cellular immune responses. In this study, mice coimmunized with pcDNA3-IL-27 and G1F/M2 were fully protected and, importantly, did not develop vaccine-enhanced inflammatory responses and immunopathology in lungs after RSV challenge, which was correlated with moderate Th1-, suppressed Th2-, and Th17-like memory responses activated by RSV. In contrast, G1F/M2- or pcDNA3-IL-23+G1F/M2-immunized mice, in which robust Th2- and Th17-like memory responses were induced, developed enhanced pulmonary inflammation and severe immunopathology. Mice coimmunized with G1F/M2 and the two cytokine plasmids exhibited mild inflammatory responses as well as remarkable Th1-, suppressed Th2-, and Th17-like memory responses. These results suggested that Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-like memory responses and, in particular, excessive Th2- and Th17-like memory responses were closely associated with VED; IL-27 may inhibit VED following respiratory syncytial virus infection by regulating cellular memory responses.

  11. Earthworms and Humans in Vitro: Characterizing Evolutionarily Conserved Stress and Immune Responses to Silver Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Engelmann, Péter; Foldbjerg, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the potential threats of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to ecosystem health, with no detailed report existing on the stress and immune responses of soil invertebrates. Here we use earthworm primary cells, cross-referencing to human cell cultures with a particular emphasis...... on the conserved biological processes, and provide the first in vitro analysis of molecular and cellular toxicity mechanisms in the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to AgNPs (83 ± 22 nm). While we observed a clear difference in cytotoxicity of dissolved silver salt on earthworm coelomocytes and human cells (THP-1...... in the coelomocytes and THP-1 cells. Our findings provide mechanistic clues on cellular innate immunity toward AgNPs that is likely to be evolutionarily conserved across the animal kingdom....

  12. Optimal approximation of linear systems by artificial immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper puts forward a novel artificial immune response algorithm for optimal approximation of linear systems. A quaternion model of artificial immune response is proposed for engineering computing. The model abstracts four elements, namely, antigen, antibody, reaction rules among antibodies, and driving algorithm describing how the rules are applied to antibodies, to simulate the process of immune response. Some reaction rules including clonal selection rules, immunological memory rules and immune regulation rules are introduced. Using the theorem of Markov chain, it is proofed that the new model is convergent. The experimental study on the optimal approximation of a stable linear system and an unstable one show that the approximate models searched by the new model have better performance indices than those obtained by some existing algorithms including the differential evolution algorithm and the multi-agent genetic algorithm.

  13. The role of lysosomal cysteine proteases in crustacean immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FL Garcia-Carreño

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the long course of evolution and under the selective pressure exerted by pathogens and parasites, animals have selectively fixed a number of defense mechanisms against the constant attack of intruders. The immune response represents a key component to optimize the biological fitness of individuals. Two decades ago, prevention and control of diseases in crustacean aquaculture systems were considered priorities in most shrimp-producing countries, but knowledge was scarce and various pathogens have severely affected aquaculture development around the world. Scientific contributions have improved our understanding of the crustacean immune response. Several studies confirm the central role played by proteases in the immune response of animals, and the cooperative interaction of these enzymes in a wide variety of organisms is well known. This review summarizes the current information regarding the role of cysteine proteases in the immune system of Crustacea and points to aspects that are needed to provide a better integration of our knowledge.

  14. Response to Hepatocarcinoma Hca-F of Mice Immunized with Heat Shock Protein 70 from Elemene Combo Tumor Cell Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianying Guo; Guangxia Shi; Zhihong Gao; Jie Shen; Rong Xing; Zhenchao Qian

    2006-01-01

    To analyze immune response to murine hepatocarcinoma Hca-F of mice immunized with heat shock protein 70(HSP70) derived from elemene combo tumor cell vaccine (EC-TCV) of Hca-F, HSP70 was isolated from EC-TCV by ADP affinity chromatography. Mice were immunized with HSP70 intraperitoneally three times and spleen cells were sampled. For cells, their proliferation and cytotoxicity against Hca-F were measured with MTT assay and their phenotypes were analyzed with flow cytometry. Spleen cells of immunized mice with HSP70 exhibited more potent cytotoxicity against Hca-F and proliferation than that of normal control mice, but less potent than that of mice immunized with EC-TCV. Among three groups, the percent of γδ T lymphocytes in the mice immunized with HSP70 (35.5%) was the highest compared with 6.25% in normal mice, and 28.4% in the mice immunized with EC-TCV. Immunization of HSP70 derived from EC-TCV could elicit potent immune response to Hca-F. HSP70 is one of elements inducing anti-tumor immune responses against Hca-F. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):291-295.

  15. Evaluation of mucosal and systemic immune responses elicited by GPI-0100- adjuvanted influenza vaccine delivered by different immunization strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    Full Text Available Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN or the intrapulmonary (IPL route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses.

  16. Cellular responses in sea fan corals: granular amoebocytes react to pathogen and climate stressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura D Mydlarz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Climate warming is causing environmental change making both marine and terrestrial organisms, and even humans, more susceptible to emerging diseases. Coral reefs are among the most impacted ecosystems by climate stress, and immunity of corals, the most ancient of metazoans, is poorly known. Although coral mortality due to infectious diseases and temperature-related stress is on the rise, the immune effector mechanisms that contribute to the resistance of corals to such events remain elusive. In the Caribbean sea fan corals (Anthozoa, Alcyonacea: Gorgoniidae, the cell-based immune defenses are granular acidophilic amoebocytes, which are known to be involved in wound repair and histocompatibility. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate for the first time in corals that these cells are involved in the organismal response to pathogenic and temperature stress. In sea fans with both naturally occurring infections and experimental inoculations with the fungal pathogen Aspergillus sydowii, an inflammatory response, characterized by a massive increase of amoebocytes, was evident near infections. Melanosomes were detected in amoebocytes adjacent to protective melanin bands in infected sea fans; neither was present in uninfected fans. In naturally infected sea fans a concurrent increase in prophenoloxidase activity was detected in infected tissues with dense amoebocytes. Sea fans sampled in the field during the 2005 Caribbean Bleaching Event (a once-in-hundred-year climate event responded to heat stress with a systemic increase in amoebocytes and amoebocyte densities were also increased by elevated temperature stress in lab experiments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The observed amoebocyte responses indicate that sea fan corals use cellular defenses to combat fungal infection and temperature stress. The ability to mount an inflammatory response may be a contributing factor that allowed the survival of even infected sea fan corals during a

  17. The effect of doxycycline treatment on the postvaccinal immune response in pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata, E-mail: mpomorska@piwet.pulawy.pl; Kwit, Krzysztof; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2014-07-01

    The effect of a seven-day antibiotic therapy with doxycycline was investigated on the postvaccinal humoral and cellular immune response in pigs. The selected parameters of non-specific immunity were also studied. Fifty pigs were used (control not vaccinated (C, n = 10), control vaccinated (CV, n = 20), and experimental — received doxycycline (DOXY, n = 20)). For vaccination live-attenuated vaccine against pseudorabies (PR) was used. From day − 1 to day 5 pigs from DOXY group received doxycycline orally with drinking water, at the recommended dose. Pigs from DOXY and CV groups were vaccinated at 8 and 10 weeks of age. The results of the present study showed that cell-mediated postvaccinal immune response can be modulated by oral treatment with doxycycline. Significantly lower values of stimulation index were observed after PRV restimulation in doxycycline-treated pigs. Moreover, in the DOXY group a significant decrease in IFN-γ production after PRV restimulation was noted. The significantly lower number of CD4+CD8 + cells was also observed in doxy-treated, vaccinated pigs, 2 weeks after final vaccination. Simultaneously, specific humoral response was not disturbed. This study demonstrated the importance of defining the immune modulatory activity of doxycycline because it may alter the immune responses to vaccines. The exact mechanism of T-cell response suppression by doxycycline remains to be elucidated, however the influence of doxycycline on the secretion of various cytokines, including IFN-γ, may be considered as a possible cause. The present observations should prompt further studies on the practical significance of such phenomena in terms of clinical implications. - Highlights: • We examine the postvaccinal immune response in pigs treated with doxycycline. • Doxycycline negatively influenced the specific proliferation after recall stimulation. • Doxycycline negatively influenced secretion of IFN-γ after recall stimulation. • The lower number of

  18. A cognitive computational model inspired by the immune system response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo Abd Al-Hady, Mohamed; Badr, Amr Ahmed; Mostafa, Mostafa Abd Al-Azim

    2014-01-01

    The immune system has a cognitive ability to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy cells. The immune system response (ISR) is stimulated by a disorder in the temporary fuzzy state that is oscillating between the healthy and unhealthy states. However, modeling the immune system is an enormous challenge; the paper introduces an extensive summary of how the immune system response functions, as an overview of a complex topic, to present the immune system as a cognitive intelligent agent. The homogeneity and perfection of the natural immune system have been always standing out as the sought-after model we attempted to imitate while building our proposed model of cognitive architecture. The paper divides the ISR into four logical phases: setting a computational architectural diagram for each phase, proceeding from functional perspectives (input, process, and output), and their consequences. The proposed architecture components are defined by matching biological operations with computational functions and hence with the framework of the paper. On the other hand, the architecture focuses on the interoperability of main theoretical immunological perspectives (classic, cognitive, and danger theory), as related to computer science terminologies. The paper presents a descriptive model of immune system, to figure out the nature of response, deemed to be intrinsic for building a hybrid computational model based on a cognitive intelligent agent perspective and inspired by the natural biology. To that end, this paper highlights the ISR phases as applied to a case study on hepatitis C virus, meanwhile illustrating our proposed architecture perspective.

  19. Pattern recognition receptors and the innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mikayla R; Kaminski, John J; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2011-06-01

    The innate immune response to viral pathogens is critical in order to mobilize protective immunity. Cells of the innate immune system detect viral infection largely through germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) present either on the cell surface or within distinct intracellular compartments. These include the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), the retinoic acid-inducble gene I-like receptors (RLRs), the nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, also called NACHT, LRR and PYD domain proteins) and cytosolic DNA sensors. While in certain cases viral proteins are the trigger of these receptors, the predominant viral activators are nucleic acids. The presence of viral sensing PRRs in multiple cellular compartments allows innate cells to recognize and quickly respond to a broad range of viruses, which replicate in different cellular compartments. Here, we review the role of PRRs and associated signaling pathways in detecting viral pathogens in order to evoke production of interferons and cytokines. By highlighting recent progress in these areas, we hope to convey a greater understanding of how viruses activate PRR signaling and how this interaction shapes the anti-viral immune response.

  20. Pattern Recognition Receptors and the Innate Immune Response to Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Fitzgerald

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune response to viral pathogens is critical in order to mobilize protective immunity. Cells of the innate immune system detect viral infection largely through germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs present either on the cell surface or within distinct intracellular compartments. These include the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, the retinoic acid-inducble gene I-like receptors (RLRs, the nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, also called NACHT, LRR and PYD domain proteins and cytosolic DNA sensors. While in certain cases viral proteins are the trigger of these receptors, the predominant viral activators are nucleic acids. The presence of viral sensing PRRs in multiple cellular compartments allows innate cells to recognize and quickly respond to a broad range of viruses, which replicate in different cellular compartments. Here, we review the role of PRRs and associated signaling pathways in detecting viral pathogens in order to evoke production of interferons and cytokines. By highlighting recent progress in these areas, we hope to convey a greater understanding of how viruses activate PRR signaling and how this interaction shapes the anti-viral immune response.

  1. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-05-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes.

  2. Biophysical responses upon the interaction of nanomaterials with cellular interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Long; Putcha, Nirupama; Ng, Kee Woei; Leong, David Tai; Lim, Chwee Teck; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Chen, Xiaodong

    2013-03-19

    The explosion of study of nanomaterials in biological applications (the nano-bio interface) can be ascribed to nanomaterials' growing importance in diagnostics, therapeutics, theranostics (therapeutic diagnostics), and targeted modulation of cellular processes. However, a growing number of critics have raised concerns over the potential risks of nanomaterials to human health and safety. It is essential to understand nanomaterials' potential toxicity before they are tested in humans. These risks are complicated to unravel, however, because of the complexity of cells and their nanoscale macromolecular components, which enable cells to sense and respond to environmental cues, including nanomaterials. In this Account, we explore these risks from the perspective of the biophysical interactions between nanomaterials and cells. Biophysical responses to the uptake of nanomaterials can include conformational changes in biomolecules like DNA and proteins, and changes to the cellular membrane and the cytoskeleton. Changes to the latter two, in particular, can induce changes in cell elasticity, morphology, motility, adhesion, and invasion. This Account reviews what is known about cells' biophysical responses to the uptake of the most widely studied and used nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, metal, metal-oxide, and semiconductor nanomaterials. We postulate that the biophysical structure impairment induced by nanomaterials is one of the key causes of nanotoxicity. The disruption of cellular structures is affected by the size, shape, and chemical composition of nanomaterials, which are also determining factors of nanotoxicity. Currently, popular nanotoxicity characterizations, such as the MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays, only provide end-point results through chemical reactions. Focusing on biophysical structural changes induced by nanomaterials, possibly in real-time, could deepen our understanding of the normal and altered states of subcellular structures and

  3. Imaging the choreography of lymphocyte trafficking and the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Michael D; Parker, Ian

    2006-08-01

    The functioning of the immune system depends upon exquisitely choreographed interactions between its cellular constituents. Two-photon microscopy now enables us to visualize cell motility and cell-cell interactions deep within intact tissues and organs, both in explanted preparations and in vivo. Real-time immunoimaging techniques have illuminated the roles of random and chemokine-driven motility for cellular search strategies, the complex dynamics of cellular interactions, and the micro-anatomical localization and control of lymphocyte trafficking. Recently, advances have been made in these areas of research, as exemplified by studies investigating T cell-dendritic cell interactions, T cell-B cell interactions, and the regulation of lymphocyte egress from the lymph node.

  4. Human Immune Responses to Dengue Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    FA titer of these antisera. We found using these hyper- immunized murine ascitis fluids that the homologous antiserum was most active in augmenting...statistically significant (pɘ.05). CHyperimmune mouse ascitis fluid was used as a source of anti-dengue 2 anti- body at a 1:20 dilution. dAx...by PBL without anti-dengue 2 antibody. *statistically significant (pɘ.05), l1not significant. bHyperimmune mouse ascitis fluid was used as a source

  5. Immune allergic response in Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Elizabeth S; Pinto-Mariz, Fernanda; Bastos-Pinto, Sandra; Pontes, Adailton T; Prado, Evandro A; deAzevedo, Leonardo C

    2009-11-30

    Asperger's syndrome is a subgroup of autism characterized by social deficits without language delay, and high cognitive performance. The biological nature of autism is still unknown but there are controversial evidence associating an immune imbalance and autism. Clinical findings, including atopic family history, serum IgE levels as well as cutaneous tests showed that incidence of atopy was higher in the Asperger group compared to the healthy controls. These findings suggest that atopy is frequent in this subgroup of autism implying that allergic inflammation might be an important feature in Asperger syndrome.

  6. Robust network topologies for generating switch-like cellular responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najaf A Shah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Signaling networks that convert graded stimuli into binary, all-or-none cellular responses are critical in processes ranging from cell-cycle control to lineage commitment. To exhaustively enumerate topologies that exhibit this switch-like behavior, we simulated all possible two- and three-component networks on random parameter sets, and assessed the resulting response profiles for both steepness (ultrasensitivity and extent of memory (bistability. Simulations were used to study purely enzymatic networks, purely transcriptional networks, and hybrid enzymatic/transcriptional networks, and the topologies in each class were rank ordered by parametric robustness (i.e., the percentage of applied parameter sets exhibiting ultrasensitivity or bistability. Results reveal that the distribution of network robustness is highly skewed, with the most robust topologies clustering into a small number of motifs. Hybrid networks are the most robust in generating ultrasensitivity (up to 28% and bistability (up to 18%; strikingly, a purely transcriptional framework is the most fragile in generating either ultrasensitive (up to 3% or bistable (up to 1% responses. The disparity in robustness among the network classes is due in part to zero-order ultrasensitivity, an enzyme-specific phenomenon, which repeatedly emerges as a particularly robust mechanism for generating nonlinearity and can act as a building block for switch-like responses. We also highlight experimentally studied examples of topologies enabling switching behavior, in both native and synthetic systems, that rank highly in our simulations. This unbiased approach for identifying topologies capable of a given response may be useful in discovering new natural motifs and in designing robust synthetic gene networks.

  7. Ethanol cellular defense induce unfolded protein response in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet eNavarro-Tapia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CECT10094 and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus

  8. Dammarane triterpenes from the leaves of Panax ginseng enhance cellular immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Tien-Lam; Kim, Young-Ran; Yang, Jun-Li

    2014-01-01

    In our search for immune stimulating materials from natural source, bioassay-guided fractionation of a methanol extract of Panax ginseng leaves led to the isolation of three dammarane triterpenes (1-3), including two previously unknown compounds 27-demethyl-(E,E)-20(22),23-dien-3β,6α,12β-trihydro......In our search for immune stimulating materials from natural source, bioassay-guided fractionation of a methanol extract of Panax ginseng leaves led to the isolation of three dammarane triterpenes (1-3), including two previously unknown compounds 27-demethyl-(E,E)-20(22),23-dien-3β,6α,12β...... expression in LPS-activated mouse peritoneal macrophage at a concentration of 100 ng/mL. Furthermore, compound 1 strongly increased the Th1 response-mediated cytokine IL-2, and decreased Th2 response-mediated cytokines IL-4 and IL-6 expression at 100 ng/mL on ConA-activated splenocytes. This study indicated...

  9. The serological response to heartwater immunization in cattle is an indicator of protective immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrence, J A; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Whiteland, A P

    1995-01-01

    A significant correlation was demonstrated in Friesian-cross steers between the serological response to previous vaccination with the Ball 3 strain of Cowdria ruminantium and the development of protective immunity against the Kalota isolate from Malawi. Of 10 animals which seroconverted after...... vaccination, all were completely or partially immune to challenge. Ten of the 14 animals which failed to seroconvert were immune but the proportion was not significantly different from that in the unvaccinated controls (4/10). Of 29 animals vaccinated and treated simultaneously with a slow-release doxycycline...

  10. Morbidity from malaria and immune responses to defined Plasmodium falciparum antigens in children with sickle cell trait in The Gambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, S J; Bennett, S; Riley, E M

    1993-01-01

    Morbidity from Plasmodium falciparum malaria and humoral and in vitro cellular immune responses to defined malaria antigens were measured in rural Gambian children with haemoglobin phenotype AS (HbAS) and in those with a normal haemoglobin (HbAA). In a survey undertaken during the dry season, HbA...

  11. TUMOR-SPECIFIC IMMUNE RESPONSE AFTER PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Anokhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased incidence of malignancies requires a search for new therapeutic approaches. E.g., photodynamic therapy (PDT is an effective anti-cancer treatment that involves administration of a photosensitizing dye followed by visible light irradiation of the tumor. Pre-clinical studies have shown that local photodynamic therapy enhances systemic antitumor immunity. Moreover, it is well known that the long-term effects of PDT depend on functioning of intact adaptive immune response. In this context, the immune system plays a fundamental role. Interestingly, the PDT action is associated with stimulation of systemic immune response against a locally treated tumor. In fact, PDT has been shown to effectively stimulate both innate and adaptive immune systems of the host, by triggering the release of various pro-inflammatory and acutephase response mediators thus leading to massive infiltration of the treated site with neutrophils, dendritic cells and other inflammatory cells. PDT efficacy depends, in part, on induction of tumor-specific immune response which is dependent on cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK cells. The set of specific receptors enables NK cells to recognize surface molecules on the target cells. Expression of the latter molecules is indicative of viral infection, tumor formation, or cell stress (e.g., DNA damage. The NK cells are also involved into various biological processes in the organism, playing a critical role in immune surveillance, thus representing a potential tool for cancer therapy. It was shown that the tumor cells have increased sensitivity to NK cell-mediated lytic action following PDT. In this review, we further discuss potential relationships between PDT and antitumor immune response.

  12. Transgenerational effects enhance specific immune response in a wild passerine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juli Broggi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate mothers transfer diverse compounds to developing embryos that can affect their development and final phenotype (i.e., maternal effects. However, the way such effects modulate offspring phenotype, in particular their immunity, remains unclear. To test the impact of maternal effects on offspring development, we treated wild breeding house sparrows (Passer domesticus in Sevilla, SE Spain with Newcastle disease virus (NDV vaccine. Female parents were vaccinated when caring for first broods, eliciting a specific immune response to NDV. The immune response to the same vaccine, and to the PHA inflammatory test were measured in 11-day-old chicks from their following brood. Vaccinated chicks from vaccinated mothers developed a stronger specific response that was related to maternal NDV antibody concentration while rearing their chicks. The chicks’ carotenoid concentration and total antioxidant capacity in blood were negatively related to NDV antibody concentration, whereas no relation with PHA response was found. Specific NDV antibodies could not be detected in 11-day-old control chicks from vaccinated mothers, implying that maternally transmitted antibodies are not directly involved but may promote offspring specific immunity through a priming effect, while other immunity components remain unaffected. Maternally transmitted antibodies in the house sparrow are short-lived, depend on maternal circulation levels and enhance pre-fledging chick specific immunity when exposed to the same pathogens as the mothers.

  13. Innate immune responses in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busca, Aurelia; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-02-07

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has a low rate of chronicity compared to HCV infection, but chronic liver inflammation can evolve to life threatening complications. Experimental data from HBV infected chimpanzees and HBV transgenic mice have indicated that cytotoxic T cells are the main cell type responsible for inhibition of viral replication, but also for hepatocyte lysis during chronic HBV infection. Their lower activation and impaired function in later stages of infection was suggested as a possible mechanism that allowed for low levels of viral replication. The lack of an interferon response in these models also indicated the importance of adaptive immunity in clearing the infection. Increased knowledge of the signalling pathways and pathogen associated molecular patterns that govern activation of innate immunity in the early stages of viral infections in general has led to a re-evaluation of the innate immune system in HBV infection. Numerous studies have shown that HBV employs active strategies to evade innate immune responses and induce immunosuppression. Some of the immune components targeted by HBV include dendritic cells, natural killer cells, T regulatory cells and signalling pathways of the interferon response. This review will present the current understanding of innate immunity in HBV infection and of the challenges associated with clearing of the HBV infection.

  14. Signaling molecules involved in immune responses in mussels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Koutsogiannaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune system of molluscs is constituted by hemocytes and humoral factors that cooperate for the protection of the organism, triggering a wide range of immune responses. In molluscs, immune responses include phagocytosis, encapsulation, respiratory burst leading to reactive oxygen species (ROS production and nitric oxide (NO synthesis, release of antimicrobial molecules and the activation of phenoloxidase system. These responses are mediated firstly by a variety of hemocyte receptors binding to ligands that results to a cascade of signaling events. The processes of hemocytes adhesion to and migration through extracellular matrix (ECM proteins play a crucial role in cell immunity. Results suggest that cadmium and oxidants induce adhesion to and migration through ECM proteins in Mytilus gallorovincialis hemocytes with the involvement of Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K, protein kinase C (PKC, NADPH oxidase, ROS and NO as well as with α2 integrin subunit. Furthermore, the data so far suggests the involvement of additional signaling molecules such as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, responsive element binding protein (CREB and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB in molluscs immunity. Further research in mollusc immune system may lead to a more sufficient protection and to a better control of these economically important organisms.

  15. Immune cell-based screening assay for response to anticancer agents: applications in pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frick A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amber Frick,1 Yuri Fedoriw,2 Kristy Richards,3,4 Blossom Damania,3,5 Bethany Parks,6 Oscar Suzuki,1 Cristina S Benton,1 Emmanuel Chan,1 Russell S Thomas,7 Tim Wiltshire1,3 1Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, 3Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, 4Department of Genetics, School of Medicine, 5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 6The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 7Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Background: Interpatient variability in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely due to complex genetic differences and is difficult to ascertain in humans. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at examining interstrain differences in viability on normal, noncancerous immune cells following chemotherapeutic cytotoxic insult. Drug effects were investigated by comparing selective chemotherapeutic agents, such as BEZ-235 and selumetinib, against conventional cytotoxic agents targeting multiple pathways, including doxorubicin and idarubicin. Methods: Splenocytes were isolated from 36 isogenic strains of mice using standard procedures. Of note, the splenocytes were not stimulated to avoid attributing responses to pathways involved with cellular stimulation rather than toxicity. Cells were incubated with compounds on a nine-point logarithmic dosing scale ranging from 15 nM to 100 µM (37°C, 5% CO2. At 4 hours posttreatment, cells were labeled with antibodies and physiological indicator dyes and fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde. Cellular phenotypes (eg, viability were collected and analyzed using flow cytometry. Dose-response curves with response normalized to the zero dose as a function of log concentration

  16. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of adaptive immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information-processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS that we call an adaptive immune response simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system that responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner that is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate AIS, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices.

  17. Immune responses and immune-related gene expression profile in orange-spotted grouper after immunization with Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Tuan-Wei; Li, Yan-Wei; Li, An-Xing

    2013-03-01

    In order to elucidate the immune-protective mechanisms of inactivated Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine, different doses of C. irritans theronts were used to immunize orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We measured serum immobilization titer, blood leukocyte respiratory burst activity, serum alternative complement activity, and serum lysozyme activity weekly. In addition, the expression levels of immune-related genes such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), major histocompatibility complexes I and II (MHC I and II), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were determined in spleen and gills. The results showed that the immobilization titer, respiratory burst activity, and alternative complement activity of immunized fish were significantly increased, and the levels of the last two immune parameters in the high-dose vaccine group were significantly higher than in the low-dose vaccine group. Serum lysozyme activity in the high-dose vaccine group was significantly higher than in the PBS control group. Vaccination also regulated host immune-related gene expression. For example, at 2- and 3- weeks post immunization, IL-1β expression in the high-dose vaccine group spleen was significantly increased. At 4-weeks post immunization, the fish were challenged with a lethal dose of parasite, and the survival rates of high-dose vaccine group, low-dose vaccine group, PBS control group, and adjuvant control group were 80%, 40%, 0%, and 10% respectively. These results demonstrate that inactivated C. irritans vaccination improves specific and nonspecific immune responses in fish, enhancing their anti-parasite ability. These effects are vaccine antigen dose-dependent.

  18. The immune response against Candida spp. and Sporothrix schenckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Álvarez, José A; Pérez-García, Luis A; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the main causative agent of systemic candidiasis, a condition with high mortality rates. The study of the interaction between C. albicans and immune system components has been thoroughly studied and nowadays there is a model for the anti-C. albicans immune response; however, little is known about the sensing of other pathogenic species of the Candida genus. Sporothrix schenckii is the causative agent of sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis, and thus far there is limited information about its interaction with the immune system. In this paper, we review the most recent information about the immune sensing of species from genus Candida and S. schenckii. Thoroughly searches in scientific journal databases were performed, looking for papers addressing either Candida- or Sporothrix-immune system interactions. There is a significant advance in the knowledge of non-C. albicans species of Candida and Sporothrix immune sensing; however, there are still relevant points to address, such as the specific contribution of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for sensing by different immune cells and the immune receptors involved in such interactions. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  19. Functional characterization of Foxp3-specific spontaneous immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Susanne Købke; Munir, S; Andersen, Anders Woetmann;

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are associated with an impaired prognosis in several cancers. The transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) is generally expressed in Tregs. Here, we identify and characterize spontaneous cytotoxic immune responses to Foxp3-expressing cells...... in peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cancer patients. These immune responses were directed against a HLA-A2-restricted peptide epitope derived from Foxp3. Foxp3-reactive T cells were characterized as cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. These cells recognized dendritic cells incubated with recombinant Foxp3 protein...... readily killed by the Foxp3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The spontaneous presence of Foxp3-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses suggest a general role of such T cells in the complex network of immune regulation as such responses may eliminate Tregs, that is, suppression of the suppressors...

  20. Endocine™, N3OA and N3OASq; three mucosal adjuvants that enhance the immune response to nasal influenza vaccination.

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    Tina Falkeborn

    Full Text Available Annual outbreaks of seasonal influenza are controlled or prevented through vaccination in many countries. The seasonal vaccines used are either inactivated, currently administered parenterally, or live-attenuated given intranasally. In this study three mucosal adjuvants were examined for the influence on the humoral (mucosal and systemic and cellular influenza A-specific immune responses induced by a nasally administered vaccine. We investigated in detail how the anionic Endocine™ and the cationic adjuvants N3OA and N3OASq mixed with a split inactivated influenza vaccine induced influenza A-specific immune responses as compared to the vaccine alone after intranasal immunization. The study showed that nasal administration of a split virus vaccine together with Endocine™ or N3OA induced significantly higher humoral and cell-mediated immune responses than the non-adjuvanted vaccine. N3OASq only significantly increased the cell-mediated immune response. Furthermore, nasal administration of the influenza vaccine in combination with any of the adjuvants; Endocine™, N3OA or N3OASq, significantly enhanced the mucosal immunity against influenza HA protein. Thus the addition of these mucosal adjuvants leads to enhanced immunity in the most relevant tissues, the upper respiratory tract and the systemic circulation. Nasal influenza vaccination with an inactivated split vaccine can therefore provide an important mucosal immune response, which is often low or absent after traditional parenteral vaccination.

  1. Modulation of Human Immune Response by Fungal Biocontrol Agents

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    Konstantinovas, Cibele; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago A.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Lima-Santos, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Although the vast majority of biological control agents is generally regarded as safe for humans and environment, the increased exposure of agriculture workers, and consumer population to fungal substances may affect the immune system. Those compounds may be associated with both intense stimulation, resulting in IgE-mediated allergy and immune downmodulation induced by molecules such as cyclosporin A and mycotoxins. This review discusses the potential effects of biocontrol fungal components on human immune responses, possibly associated to infectious, inflammatory diseases, and defective defenses. PMID:28217107

  2. Semantic annotation of biological concepts interplaying microbial cellular responses

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    Carreira Rafael

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated extraction systems have become a time saving necessity in Systems Biology. Considerable human effort is needed to model, analyse and simulate biological networks. Thus, one of the challenges posed to Biomedical Text Mining tools is that of learning to recognise a wide variety of biological concepts with different functional roles to assist in these processes. Results Here, we present a novel corpus concerning the integrated cellular responses to nutrient starvation in the model-organism Escherichia coli. Our corpus is a unique resource in that it annotates biomedical concepts that play a functional role in expression, regulation and metabolism. Namely, it includes annotations for genetic information carriers (genes and DNA, RNA molecules, proteins (transcription factors, enzymes and transporters, small metabolites, physiological states and laboratory techniques. The corpus consists of 130 full-text papers with a total of 59043 annotations for 3649 different biomedical concepts; the two dominant classes are genes (highest number of unique concepts and compounds (most frequently annotated concepts, whereas other important cellular concepts such as proteins account for no more than 10% of the annotated concepts. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, a corpus that details such a wide range of biological concepts has never been presented to the text mining community. The inter-annotator agreement statistics provide evidence of the importance of a consolidated background when dealing with such complex descriptions, the ambiguities naturally arising from the terminology and their impact for modelling purposes. Availability is granted for the full-text corpora of 130 freely accessible documents, the annotation scheme and the annotation guidelines. Also, we include a corpus of 340 abstracts.

  3. Balancing immune protection and immune pathology by CD8+ T cell responses to influenza infection

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    Susu eDuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity contributes to clearance of virus-infected cells; CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, their cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL anti-viral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated nonspecific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity.

  4. FEATURES OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE DURING INFECTION AND PROSPECTS FOR THE VACCINES CREATION

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    Davidova T.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The influenza virus belongs to the family Orthomyxoviridae and is a major cause of respiratory infections in humans. Each year, influenza viruses cause, according to experts, 3-5 million severe course of the disease and 250 000-500 000 deaths. Influenza A viruses are divided into serotypes based on their surface glycoproteins - known currently 17 subtypes of HA and NA subtypes ten. Upon infection with an influenza virus, both innate and adaptive immune responses are inducing. In recent years the annual seasonal epidemics were causing strains of the virus A (H1N1 and H3N2 and virus B. This may be due to their ability to be unrecognizable virus specific antibodies due to antigenic drift (Figure 1. Seasonal flu vaccine, to be effective, must be updated almost annually, according to new epidemic strains. In this work will discuss various strategies used by influenza viruses to evade innate immune responses and recognition by components of the humoral and cellular immune response, which consequently may result in reduced clearing of the virus and virus-infected cells.The primary targets for influenza viruses are the epithelial cells that line the respiratory tract and which initiate an antiviral immune response upon detection of the virus. The first line of defense is formed by the innate immune system, which is quick but lacks specificity and memory. Innate immunity is formed by physical barriers and innate cellular immune responses. Here, we outline several of the innate defense mechanisms directed against influenza infections. During homeostasis, alveolar macrophages exhibit a relatively quiescent state, producing only low levels of cytokines, and suppress the induction of innate and adaptive immunity. Activated macrophages enhance their pro-inflammatory cytokine response, including IL-6 and TNF-α. Alveolar macrophages have a direct role in limiting viral spread by phagocytosis of apoptotic infected cells and by phagocyte

  5. Latent viral immune inflammatory response model for chronic multisymptom illness.

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    Maloney, Sean R; Jensen, Susan; Gil-Rivas, Virginia; Goolkasian, Paula

    2013-03-01

    A latent viral immune inflammatory response (LVIIR) model is presented which integrates factors that contribute to chronic multisymptom illness (CMI) in both the veteran and civilian populations. The LVIIR model for CMI results from an integration of clinical experience with a review of the literature in four distinct areas: (1) studies of idiopathic multisymptom illness in the veteran population including two decades of research on Gulf War I veterans with CMI, (2) new evidence supporting the existence of chronic inflammatory responses to latent viral antigens and the effect these responses may have on the nervous system, (3) recent discoveries concerning the role of vitamin D in maintaining normal innate and adaptive immunity including suppression of latent viruses and regulation of the immune inflammatory response, and (4) the detrimental effects of extreme chronic repetitive stress (ECRS) on the immune and nervous systems. The LVIIR model describes the pathophysiology of a pathway to CMI and presents a new direction for the clinical assessment of CMI that includes the use of neurological signs from a physical exam, objective laboratory data, and a new proposed latent viral antigen-antibody imaging technique for the peripheral and central nervous system. The LVIIR model predicts that CMI can be treated by a focus on reversal of immune system impairment, suppression of latent viruses and their antigens, and healing of nervous system tissue damaged by chronic inflammation associated with latent viral antigens and by ECRS. In addition, the LVIIR model suggests that maintaining optimal serum 25 OH vitamin D levels will maximize immune system suppression of latent viruses and their antigens and will minimize immune system inflammation. This model also emphasizes the importance of decreasing ECRS to improve immune system function and to minimize nervous system injury from excess serum glucocorticoid levels. The proposed model supports growing evidence that increasing

  6. ENDOCANNABINOIDS AND EICOSAMOIDS: BIOSYNTHESIS AND INTERACTIONS WITH IMMUNE RESPONSE

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    Yu. K. Karaman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is dedicated to modern concepts of arachidonic acid metabolites, i.e., endocannabinoids and eicosanoids, their biosynthetic pathways, cross-talk mechanisms and participation in immune response. New information from literature and own results include data concerning overlapping enzymatic pathways controlling biosynthesis of endocannabinoids and eicosanoids. Impact of synthetic cannabinoid receptor ligands upon production rates of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids is discussed, as like as relationships among immune system reactivity and expression levels of cannabinoid receptors.

  7. The architects of B and T cell immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Peter J L

    2008-08-15

    Published work links adult lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) with T cell-dependent antibody responses. In this issue of Immunity, Tsuji et al. (2008) associate LTi with T cell-independent IgA antibody responses in the gut.

  8. 连续性血液净化治疗对全身炎症反应综合征及脓毒症患者细胞免疫功能的影响%Effects of continuous blood purification (CBP) therapy on the cellular immune function of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and SEPSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞晓璐; 王丽丽; 孟凡茹; 王莉华

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨连续性血液净化(CBP)治疗对全身炎症反应综合征(SIRS)及脓毒症(SEPSIS)患者细胞免疫功能的影响.方法 38例行CBP治疗的患者分为SEPSIS组和SIRS组,均行连续血液净化,分别于治疗0、5、10、15、20 h留取EDTA抗凝血标本,用流式细胞分析法测定CD3+、CD4+、CD8+、CD4+CD25+T细胞亚群频率,并用ELISA方法测定血清中IL-2、IL-10的浓度.同时于0、10和20对患者行APACHE II评分.结果 CBP治疗后SIRS组与SEPSIS组CD3+琳巴细胞及CD4+T细胞亚群均逐渐升高,但SIRS组在治疗后5h即出现明显升高,而SEPSIS组直至治疗后20h才出现显著升高.CD4+CD25+亚群在两组均表现逐渐升高,治疗20h时与0h相比差异有统计学意义.SIRS组血清中IL-2和IL-10分别于CBP治疗后5h和10h开始出现显著降低,而这2种细胞因子在SEPSIS组于治疗前后均未出现明显变化.SEPSIS组患者在治疗之前其APACHE Ⅱ评分明显高于SIRS组,治疗后两组均呈现APACHEⅡ评分在治疗10h后开始显著降低.结论 CBP治疗对于高水平的炎症因子有较好的清除作用;还可双向调节T淋巴细胞亚群,改善SIRS患者的免疫系统,促进SEPSIS患者免疫系统的活化及重建,从而达到调节免疫平衡的作用.%This study was designed to evaluate the effects of high volume continuous venovenous hemofiltration (HV-CVVHF) on cellular immune function of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and SEPSIS, in order to provide evidence for clinical application of HV-CVVHF. Total of 38 patients were divided into SEPSIS group (16 cases with clear infection evidence) and SIRS group (22 cases without infection evidence), and all the patients received HV-CVVH therapy. Then flow cytometry (FCM) was employed to detect CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD25+ T lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood. Results showed that after treatment, the frequencies of CD3+ and CD4+ T lymphocyte increased markedly in SIRS group after 5

  9. The immune cellular effectors of terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare: meeting with their invaders, Wolbachia.

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    Frédéric Chevalier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most of crustacean immune responses are well described for the aquatic forms whereas almost nothing is known for the isopods that evolved a terrestrial lifestyle. The latter are also infected at a high prevalence with Wolbachia, an endosymbiotic bacterium which affects the host immune system, possibly to improve its transmission. In contrast with insect models, the isopod Armadillidium vulgare is known to harbor Wolbachia inside the haemocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In A. vulgare we characterized three haemocyte types (TEM, flow cytometry: the hyaline and semi-granular haemocytes were phagocytes, while semi-granular and granular haemocytes performed encapsulation. They were produced in the haematopoietic organs, from central stem cells, maturing as they moved toward the edge (TEM. In infected individuals, live Wolbachia (FISH colonized 38% of the haemocytes but with low, variable densities (6.45±0.46 Wolbachia on average. So far they were not found in hyaline haemocytes (TEM. The haematopoietic organs contained 7.6±0.7×10(3Wolbachia, both in stem cells and differentiating cells (FISH. While infected and uninfected one-year-old individuals had the same haemocyte density, in infected animals the proportion of granular haemocytes in particular decreased by one third (flow cytometry, Pearson's test = 12 822.98, df = 2, p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The characteristics of the isopod immune system fell within the range of those known from aquatic crustaceans. The colonization of the haemocytes by Wolbachia seemed to stand from the haematopoietic organs, which may act as a reservoir to discharge Wolbachia in the haemolymph, a known route for horizontal transfer. Wolbachia infection did not affect the haemocyte density, but the quantity of granular haemocytes decreased by one third. This may account for the reduced prophenoloxidase activity observed previously in these animals.

  10. The Immune Cellular Effectors of Terrestrial Isopod Armadillidium vulgare: Meeting with Their Invaders, Wolbachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux, Joanne; Raimond, Maryline; Morel, Franck; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background Most of crustacean immune responses are well described for the aquatic forms whereas almost nothing is known for the isopods that evolved a terrestrial lifestyle. The latter are also infected at a high prevalence with Wolbachia, an endosymbiotic bacterium which affects the host immune system, possibly to improve its transmission. In contrast with insect models, the isopod Armadillidium vulgare is known to harbor Wolbachia inside the haemocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings In A. vulgare we characterized three haemocyte types (TEM, flow cytometry): the hyaline and semi-granular haemocytes were phagocytes, while semi-granular and granular haemocytes performed encapsulation. They were produced in the haematopoietic organs, from central stem cells, maturing as they moved toward the edge (TEM). In infected individuals, live Wolbachia (FISH) colonized 38% of the haemocytes but with low, variable densities (6.45±0.46 Wolbachia on average). So far they were not found in hyaline haemocytes (TEM). The haematopoietic organs contained 7.6±0.7×103 Wolbachia, both in stem cells and differentiating cells (FISH). While infected and uninfected one-year-old individuals had the same haemocyte density, in infected animals the proportion of granular haemocytes in particular decreased by one third (flow cytometry, Pearson's test = 12 822.98, df = 2, p<0.001). Conclusions/Significance The characteristics of the isopod immune system fell within the range of those known from aquatic crustaceans. The colonization of the haemocytes by Wolbachia seemed to stand from the haematopoietic organs, which may act as a reservoir to discharge Wolbachia in the haemolymph, a known route for horizontal transfer. Wolbachia infection did not affect the haemocyte density, but the quantity of granular haemocytes decreased by one third. This may account for the reduced prophenoloxidase activity observed previously in these animals. PMID:21533137

  11. Study on the Functional Dynamic Changes of Peri-Operative Cellular Immunity in Esophageal and Cardiac Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Sheng; Li Shiting; Fang Youping

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the systemic and local cellular immune function of patients with esophageal carcinoma or cardiac cancer. Methods: The distribution of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) and cancer-associated macrophage (TAM) in local tumor tissues of 52 patients with esophageal cancer or cardiac cancer were observed by immunehistochemical method. The level of peripheral SIL-2R and TNF-α of preoperative and postoperative 1, 2, 3 weeks were detected by ELISA and ABC-ELISA methods respectively, then the acquired results were compared with 30 cases of normal control group. Results:The peritumor inifltration densities of TIL and TAM was greater than that of cancer nest stroma (P<0.05). Compared with the normal control group, the levels of sIL-2R and TNF-α increased signiifcantly (P<0.01). Immune function could be suppressed by operative wound in a short time of post-operation, whose damage severity was closely associated with tumor TNM stages. Conclusion: Patients with esophageal or cardiac cancer have cellular immune function disorders. Dynamic testing of peripheral sIL-2R and TNT-α level in patients with esophageal or cardiac cancer has positive clinical signiifcance in the evaluation of cellular immune function, tumor lesion degree and curative effect.

  12. More Than a Pore: The Cellular Response to Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysins

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    Sara K. B. Cassidy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Targeted disruption of the plasma membrane is a ubiquitous form of attack used in all three domains of life. Many bacteria secrete pore-forming proteins during infection with broad implications for pathogenesis. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDC are a family of pore-forming toxins expressed predominately by Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The structure and assembly of some of these oligomeric toxins on the host membrane have been described, but how the targeted cell responds to intoxication by the CDCs is not as clearly understood. Many CDCs induce lysis of their target cell and can activate apoptotic cascades to promote cell death. However, the extent to which intoxication causes cell death is both CDC- and host cell-dependent, and at lower concentrations of toxin, survival of intoxicated host cells is well documented. Additionally, the effect of CDCs can be seen beyond the plasma membrane, and it is becoming increasingly clear that these toxins are potent regulators of signaling and immunity, beyond their role in intoxication. In this review, we discuss the cellular response to CDC intoxication with emphasis on the effects of pore formation on the host cell plasma membrane and subcellular organelles and whether subsequent cellular responses contribute to the survival of the affected cell.

  13. Modulation of immune responses in stress by Yoga

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    Arora Sarika

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a constant factor in today′s fastpaced life that can jeopardize our health if left unchecked. It is only in the last half century that the role of stress in every ailment from the common cold to AIDS has been emphasized, and the mechanisms involved in this process have been studied. Stress influences the immune response presumably through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis, hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal axis, and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system. Various neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, hormones, and cytokines mediate these complex bidirectional interactions between the central nervous system (CNS and the immune system. The effects of stress on the immune responses result in alterations in the number of immune cells and cytokine dysregulation. Various stress management strategies such as meditation, yoga, hypnosis, and muscle relaxation have been shown to reduce the psychological and physiological effects of stress in cancers and HIV infection. This review aims to discuss the effect of stress on the immune system and examine how relaxation techniques such as Yoga and meditation could regulate the cytokine levels and hence, the immune responses during stress.

  14. Clearance of low levels of HCV viremia in the absence of a strong adaptive immune response

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    Manns Michael P

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV has frequently been associated with the presence of HCV-specific cellular immunity. However, there had been also reports in chimpanzees demonstrating clearance of HCV-viremia in the absence of significant levels of detectable HCV-specific cellular immune responses. We here report seven asymptomatic acute hepatitis C cases with peak HCV-RNA levels between 300 and 100.000 copies/ml who all cleared HCV-RNA spontaneously. Patients were identified by a systematic screening of 1176 consecutive new incoming offenders in a German young offender institution. Four of the seven patients never developed anti-HCV antibodies and had normal ALT levels throughout follow-up. Transient weak HCV-specific CD4+ T cell responses were detectable in five individuals which did not differ in strength and breadth from age- and sex-matched patients with chronic hepatitis C and long-term recovered patients. In contrast, HCV-specific MHC-class-I-tetramer-positive cells were found in 3 of 4 HLA-A2-positive patients. Thus, these cases highlight that clearance of low levels of HCV viremia is possible in the absence of a strong ada