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Sample records for cellular hla class

  1. Association of high HLA-E expression during acute cellular rejection and numbers of HLA class I leader peptide mismatches with reduced renal allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberina, Hana; Rebmann, Vera; Wagner, Bettina; da Silva Nardi, Fabiola; Dziallas, Phillip; Dolff, Sebastian; Bienholz, Anja; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Heinemann, Falko M; Witzke, Oliver; Zoet, Yvonne M; Claas, Frans H J; Horn, Peter A; Kribben, Andreas; Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2017-03-01

    Non-classical Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E preferentially presents leader peptides derived from classical HLA-class I molecules. HLA-E can trigger opposed immune responses by interacting with inhibitory NKG2A or by activating NKG2C receptors on NK and T-cells. We studied the impact of HLA-E on renal allograft survival during acute cellular rejection. HLA-E expression was up-regulated in acute cellular rejection (ACR) biopsies (n=12) compared to biopsies from 13 renal allografts with no rejection-signs. HLA-E up-regulation was correlated with numbers of HLA-class I leader peptide mismatches (p=0.04). CD8+ and CD56+ infiltrating cells correlated with HLA-E expression (pE-mediated immune activation. Moreover, HLA-E expression correlated with deterioration in renal allograft function (pE along with high numbers of mismatched HLA-class I leader peptides might represent additional targets for immune-activating responses.

  2. HLA class II genes: typing by DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, J L; Bidwell, E A; Bradley, B A

    1990-04-01

    A detailed understanding of the structure and function of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has ensued from studies by molecular biologist during the last decade. Virtually all of the HLA genes have now been cloned, and the nucleotide sequences of their different allelic forms have been determined. Typing for these HLA alleles is a fundamental prerequisite for tissue matching in allogeneic organ transplantation. Until very recently, typing procedures have been dominated by serological and cellular methods. The availability of cloned DNA from HLA genes has now permitted the technique of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to be applied, with remarkable success and advantage, to phenotyping of both HLA Class I and Class II determinants. For the HLA Class II genes DR and DQ, a simple two-stage RFLP analysis permits the accurate identification of all specificities defined by serology, and of many which are defined by cellular typing. At the present time, however, RFLP typing of HLA Class I genes is not as practicable or as informative as that for HLA Class II genes. The present clinical applications of HLA-DR and DQ RFLP typing are predominantly in phenotyping of living donors, including selection of HLA-matched volunteer bone marrow donors, in allograft survival studies, and in studies of HLA Class II-associated diseases. However, the time taken to perform RFLP analysis precludes its use for the typing of cadaveric kidney donors. Nucleotide sequence data for the alleles of HLA Class II genes have now permitted the development of allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) typing, a second category of DNA analysis. This has been greatly facilitated by the ability to amplify specific HLA Class II DNA 'target' sequences using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The accuracy of DNA typing techniques should ensure that this methodology will eventually replace conventional HLA phenotyping.

  3. HLA class I expression in bladder carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, T; Pedrajas, G; Cozar, J M; Garrido, A; Vicente, J; Tallada, M; Garrido, F

    2003-10-01

    HLA class I molecules are frequently lost in a large variety of human carcinomas, possibly because of T-cell immune selection of major histocompatibility complex class I deficient tumor variants. We report that this phenomenon is also a frequent event in bladder carcinomas. Of a total of 72 bladder carcinomas, 72% of the tumors had at least one alteration in HLA class I expression. These altered HLA class I phenotypes were classified as total HLA class I loss (25%; phenotype I); HLA-A or/and HLA-B locus-specific loss (12%; phenotype III); and HLA class I allelic loss (35%; phenotype II or IV). Comparison of histopathological parameters with HLA class I expression showed a statistically significant relationship with the degree of differentiation and tumor recurrence.

  4. HIV-1 proteins in infected cells determine the presentation of viral peptides by HLA class I and class II molecules and the nature of the cellular and humoral antiviral immune responses--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Y

    1994-07-01

    The goals of molecular virology and immunology during the second half of the 20th century have been to provide the conceptual approaches and the tools for the development of safe and efficient virus vaccines for the human population. The success of the vaccination approach to prevent virus epidemics was attributed to the ability of inactivated and live virus vaccines to induce a humoral immune response and to produce antiviral neutralizing antibodies in the vaccinees. The successful development of antiviral vaccines and their application to most of the human population led to a marked decrease in virus epidemics around the globe. Despite this remarkable achievement, the developing epidemics of HIV-caused AIDS (accompanied by activation of latent herpesviruses in AIDS patients), epidemics of Dengue fever, and infections with respiratory syncytial virus may indicate that conventional approaches to the development of virus vaccines that induce antiviral humoral responses may not suffice. This may indicate that virus vaccines that induce a cellular immune response, leading to the destruction of virus-infected cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may be needed. Antiviral CD8+ CTLs are induced by viral peptides presented within the peptide binding grooves of HLA class I molecules present on the surface of infected cells. Studies in the last decade provided an insight into the presentation of viral peptides by HLA class I molecules to CD8+ T cells. These studies are here reviewed, together with a review of the molecular events of virus replication, to obtain an overview of how viral peptides associate with the HLA class I molecules. A similar review is provided on the molecular pathway by which viral proteins, used as subunit vaccines or inactivated virus particles, are taken up by endosomes in the endosome pathway and are processed by proteolytic enzymes into peptides that interact with HLA class II molecules during their transport to the plasma membrane of antigen

  5. Interaction of the LILRB1 inhibitory receptor with HLA class Ia dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baía, Diogo; Pou, Jordi; Jones, Des; Mandelboim, Ofer; Trowsdale, John; Muntasell, Aura; López-Botet, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B member 1 (LILRB1) has been reported to interact with a wide spectrum of HLA class I (HLA-I) molecules, albeit with different affinities determined by allelic polymorphisms and conformational features. HLA-G dimerization and the presence of intracellular Cys residues in HLA-B7 have been shown to be critical for their recognition by LILRB1. We hypothesized that dimerization of classical HLA class Ia molecules, previously detected in exosomes, might enhance their interaction with LILRB1. A soluble LILRB1-Fc fusion protein and a sensitive cellular reporter system expressing a LILRB1-ζ chimera were employed to assess receptor interaction with different HLA class Ia molecules transfected in the human lymphoblastoid 721.221 cell line. Under these conditions, intracellular Cys residues and HLA-I dimerization appeared associated with increased LILRB1 recognition. On the other hand, a marginal interaction of LILRB1 with primary monocytic cells, irrespective of their high HLA-I expression, was enhanced by type I interferon (IFN). This effect appeared disproportionate to the cytokine-induced increase of surface HLA-I expression and was accompanied by detection of HLA class Ia dimers. Altogether, the results support that a regulated assembly of these noncanonical HLA-I conformers during the immune response may enhance the avidity of their interaction with LILRB1.

  6. Expression of HLA Class I and HLA Class II by Tumor Cells in Chinese Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Xin; van den Berg, Anke; Gao, Zifen; Visser, Lydia; Nolte, Ilja; Vos, Hans; Hepkema, Bouke; Kooistra, Wierd; Poppema, Sibrand; Diepstra, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    Background: In Caucasian populations, the tumor cells of Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-positive classical Hodgkin Lymphomas (cHL) patients more frequently express HLA class I and HLA class II molecules compared to EBV-negative cHL patients. HLA expression (in relation to EBV) in Asian cHL patients has no

  7. A common minimal motif for the ligands of HLA-B*27 class I molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Barriga

    Full Text Available CD8(+ T cells identify and kill infected cells through the specific recognition of short viral antigens bound to human major histocompatibility complex (HLA class I molecules. The colossal number of polymorphisms in HLA molecules makes it essential to characterize the antigen-presenting properties common to large HLA families or supertypes. In this context, the HLA-B*27 family comprising at least 100 different alleles, some of them widely distributed in the human population, is involved in the cellular immune response against pathogens and also associated to autoimmune spondyloarthritis being thus a relevant target of study. To this end, HLA binding assays performed using nine HLA-B*2705-restricted ligands endogenously processed and presented in virus-infected cells revealed a common minimal peptide motif for efficient binding to the HLA-B*27 family. The motif was independently confirmed using four unrelated peptides. This experimental approach, which could be easily transferred to other HLA class I families and supertypes, has implications for the validation of new bioinformatics tools in the functional clustering of HLA molecules, for the identification of antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, and for future vaccine development.

  8. HLA-DPB1 and HLA Class I Confer Risk of and Protection from Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, Hanna M.; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang; Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Xiuwen; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves; Pizza, Fabio; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Dong, Xiao Song; Yan, Han; Hong, Heeseung; Coquillard, Cristin; Mahlios, Joshua; Jolanki, Otto; Einen, Mali; Lavault, Sophie; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Crowe, Catherine; Partinen, Markku; Huang, Yu Shu; Bourgin, Patrice; Vaarala, Outi; Désautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Mack, Steven J.; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1∗01:02-DQB1∗06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza H1N1, suggesting autoimmunity triggered by upper-airway infections. Additional effects of other HLA-DQ alleles have been reported consistently across multiple ethnic groups. Using over 3,000 case and 10,000 control individuals of European and Chinese background, we examined the effects of other HLA loci. After careful matching of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in case and control individuals, we found strong protective effects of HLA-DPA1∗01:03-DPB1∗04:02 (DP0402; odds ratio [OR] = 0.51 [0.38–0.67], p = 1.01 × 10−6) and HLA-DPA1∗01:03-DPB1∗04:01 (DP0401; OR = 0.61 [0.47–0.80], p = 2.07 × 10−4) and predisposing effects of HLA-DPB1∗05:01 in Asians (OR = 1.76 [1.34–2.31], p = 4.71 × 10−05). Similar effects were found by conditional analysis controlling for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ with DP0402 (OR = 0.45 [0.38–0.55] p = 8.99 × 10−17) and DP0501 (OR = 1.38 [1.18–1.61], p = 7.11 × 10−5). HLA-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A∗11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13–1.54], p = 4.92 × 10−4), HLA-B∗35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41–2.70], p = 5.14 × 10−5), and HLA-B∗51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25–1.78], p = 1.09 × 10−5) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza. PMID:25574827

  9. HLA-DPB1 and HLA class I confer risk of and protection from narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, Hanna M; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang;

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1(∗)01:02-DQB1(∗)06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza...

  10. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    of the serologically defined HLA-DQw7 specificity. Individuals who carried both DQA1*0501 and DQB1*0301 seemed to have a further increased risk of developing AA compared to individuals carrying only one of these HLA class II genes. Analysis of the combined presence of DQB1*0301 and DPA1*0103 in AA suggests......We investigated the DNA restriction polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DQA, -DQB, -DPA, and -DPB in 20 Danish patients with alopecia areata (AA) and in healthy Danes. The frequency in AA of the DQB1*0301 and DQw7 associated DQB Bgl/II 4.2 kb...... that an additive risk effect (synergism or interaction) exists between the DQB1*0301 and DPA1*0103 alleles which are situated at different HLA class II loci....

  11. HLA II class antigens and susceptibility to coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease (CD is a systemic autoimmune, complex and multifactorial disorder, which is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The only established genetic risk factors so far are the human leucocyte antigens. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of II class human leukocyte antigens (HLA in patients with coeliac disease and to investigate the susceptibility to coeliac disease in family members. We typed HLA DR and DQ antigens in 37 patients from Vojvodina with coeliac disease, 23 first-degree relatives, and 210 controls, serologically using standard lymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA DQ5(1, DQ6(1, DR11(5, DQ7(3, DQ2 and DR15(2 were the most common antigens in the control group. Frequency of HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR7 was higher in CD patients than in the control group. The relative risks for HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR7 were 4.846, 6.986 and 2.106, respectively, while positive association was found between HLA DQ2 and DR3 and CD. Frequency of HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR16(2 was higher in first-degree relatives than in the control group while a positive association was found between HLA DQ2 and DR3. A negative association was found between HLA DQ5(1 and DQ6(1 in coeliac patients from Vojvodina and their relatives, in addition to HLA DR11(5 in the group of relatives (RR=0.363,PF=0.232. These findings indicate the impact of the HLA testing for CD in clinical practice in order to rule out the possibility to CD in doubtful cases or in at-risk subjects.

  12. HLA Class I and Class II Associations with ESRD in Saudi Arabian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Nuha Mahmoud Hamdi; Fadel Hassan Al-Hababi; Amr Ekhlas Eid

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic renal failure (CRF) leads in the majority of instances to end stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of HLA class I and class II antigens with ESRD independent of other factors, in Saudi Arabia population. METHODOLOGY: A retrospective study to determine the HLA class I and class II polymorphisms and their association with ESRD, was performed on 350 patients with ESRD, and 105 healthy unrelated ...

  13. HLA-G and classical HLA class I expression in primary colorectal cancer and associated liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swets, Marloes; König, Marion H; Zaalberg, Anniek; Dekker-Ensink, Neeltje G; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van den Elsen, Peter J; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-09-01

    De novo expression of HLA-G has been demonstrated in colorectal cancer. HLA-G, amongst others, inhibits natural killer cell function, contributing to host immune defense evasion. Another mechanism to escape anti-tumor immunity is loss of HLA class I. Therefore, we determined HLA-G and HLA class I expression on primary colorectal tumors and associated liver metastases, in order to get insight in the metastasizing process regarding escaping anti-tumor immunity. HLA-G expression was evaluated using three mAbs; 4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2. In total 81 colorectal cancer patients were evaluated. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of primary tumors and associated liver metastases, were immunohistochemically stained. A concordance between expression or loss/downregulation in the primary tumor and associated liver metastasis regarding HLA class I expression was observed in 80% of the cases. In contrast with the hypothesis of escaping NK cell-killing, we demonstrated for each HLA-G detecting mAbs used in this study, that the majority of the primary tumors that positively stained for HLA-G did not express HLA-G in the associated liver metastasis. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of non-specific binding and in addition we found that the different epitopes of HLA-G detected by 4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2 mAbs were expressed differentially in colorectal tumor tissues.

  14. HLA class I and class II associations with ESRD in Saudi Arabian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha Mahmoud Hamdi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic renal failure (CRF leads in the majority of instances to end stage renal disease (ESRD requiring renal replacement therapy. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of HLA class I and class II antigens with ESRD independent of other factors, in Saudi Arabia population. METHODOLOGY: A retrospective study to determine the HLA class I and class II polymorphisms and their association with ESRD, was performed on 350 patients with ESRD, and 105 healthy unrelated control. Patients and control groups were typed by SSOP lumenix techniques. The alleles positively associated to the ESRD were: HLA-B*15, B*18, B*49 - DRB1*03, negatively associated alleles were A*26, HLA-B*39, B*50. The haplotypes positively associated with ESRD were: HLA-A*01-DRB1*13 and HLA-A*30-DRBI*03. The negatively associated haplotypes were: HLA-A*02-B*39, A*02-B*50, A*24-B*35, A*24-B*58, A*24-DRB1*16, A*68-DRB1*04, A*02-DQB1*03, A*29-DQB1*02, A*29-DOB1*05 and B*27-DRB1*07 and the last one is the most significant protective haplotypes. CONCLUSION: The high Relative Risk (RR observed and its statistical correlation reflect the strength of the described association between HLA antigens and ESRD.

  15. Peptide Binding to HLA Class I Molecules: Homogenous, High-Throughput Screening, and Affinity Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl; Lamberth, Kasper;

    2009-01-01

    present a homogenous, proximity-based assay for detection of peptide binding to HLA class I molecules. It uses a conformation-dependent anti-HLA class I antibody, W6/32, as one tag and a biotinylated recombinant HLA class I molecule as the other tag, and a proximity-based signal is generated through...

  16. HLA class I expression in primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Huang; Mei-Ying Cai; Da-Peng Wei

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether CTL vaccine therapy issuitable for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)from the viewpoint of HLA class I antigens expression.METHODS: The immunocytochemistry, image analysis,flow cytometry, and labeled streptavidin biotin (LSAB)method of immunohistochemistry were appliedrespectively to study 4 HCC cell lines (e.g. Alexander,HepG2, SMMC-7721, and QGY-7703) cultured in vitroand 6 frozen tissue specimens of HCC. RESULTS: The positive control cell line Raji had verystrong positive staining. Most mitotic and nonmitoticcells of the 4 HCC cell lines had various intensity ofHLA class Ⅰ antigens expression. The negative controlcell K562 and the control slides of all the cell lines hadno positive staining. In the 6 HCC specimensimmunohistochemically studied, histological normalhepatocytes had no or very weak positive staining andthe liver sinus had very strong positive staining. MostHCC cells in the sections from the 6 HCC specimenshad strong positive HLA class Ⅰ antigens staining. Thepositive staining was located in the cytoplasm, theperinuclear area, and at the cell membrane of the livercancer cells. Flow cytometry also revealed that Raji andthose 4 HCC cell lines had strong HLA class Ⅰ antigensexpression, which was confirmed quantitatively by theimage analysis. Tt showed that the objective grayscalevalues of Raji and those 4 HCC cell lines weresignificantly different from that of K562 (Raji 124.04+10.94, Alexander 165.97+5.35, HepG2 167.02+12.60,QGY-7703 161.46+7.13, SMMC-7721 165.93+5.21,K562 244.89+4.60, P<0.01). Significant differenceswere also found between Raji and the 4 HCC cell lines.CONCLUSION: HCC cells express HLA class I antigensstrongly. From this point of view, the active specificimmunotherapy of CTL vaccine is suitable andpracticable for HCC.

  17. Mutations in the HLA class II genes leading to loss of expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordanova, ES; Philippo, K; Giphart, MJ; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    2003-01-01

    Loss of expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules on tumor cells affects the onset and modulation of the immune response through lack of activation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Previously, we showed that the frequent loss of expression of HLA class II in diffuse large B-cell lymphom

  18. HLA class I supertypes: a revised and updated classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brander Christian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules bind, and present to T cells, short peptides derived from intracellular processing of proteins. The peptide repertoire of a specific molecule is to a large extent determined by the molecular structure accommodating so-called main anchor positions of the presented peptide. These receptors are extremely polymorphic, and much of the polymorphism influences the peptide-binding repertoire. However, despite this polymorphism, class I molecules can be clustered into sets of molecules that bind largely overlapping peptide repertoires. Almost a decade ago we introduced this concept of clustering human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles and defined nine different groups, denominated as supertypes, on the basis of their main anchor specificity. The utility of this original supertype classification, as well several other subsequent arrangements derived by others, has been demonstrated in a large number of epitope identification studies. Results Following our original approach, in the present report we provide an updated classification of HLA-A and -B class I alleles into supertypes. The present analysis incorporates the large amount of class I MHC binding data and sequence information that has become available in the last decade. As a result, over 80% of the 945 different HLA-A and -B alleles examined to date can be assigned to one of the original nine supertypes. A few alleles are expected to be associated with repertoires that overlap multiple supertypes. Interestingly, the current analysis did not identify any additional supertype specificities. Conclusion As a result of this updated analysis, HLA supertype associations have been defined for over 750 different HLA-A and -B alleles. This information is expected to facilitate epitope identification and vaccine design studies, as well as investigations into disease association and correlates of immunity. In addition, the approach

  19. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafti, M.; Lammers, G.J.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Overeem, S.; Mayer, G.; Nowak, J.; Pfister, C.; Dubois, V.; Eliaou, J.F.; Eberhard, H.P.; Liblau, R.; Wierzbicka, A.; Geisler, P.; Bassetti, C.L.; Mathis, J.; Lecendreux, M.; Khatami, R.; Heinzer, R.; Haba-Rubio, J.; Feketeova, E.; Baumann, C.R.; Kutalik, Z.; Tiercy, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoi

  20. Characterization of recombination in the HLA class II region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, M.; Carrington, M. [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (United States); Noble, J. [Roche Molecular Systems, Almeda, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Studies of linkage disequilibrium across the HLA class II region have been useful in predicting where recombination is most likely to occur. The strong associations between genes within the 85-kb region from DQB1 to DRB1 are consistent with low frequency of recombination in this segment of DNA. Conversely, a lack of association between alleles of TAP1 and TAP2 ({approximately}15 kb) has been observed, suggesting that recombination occurs here with relatively high frequency. Much of the HLA class II region has now been sequenced, providing the tools to undertake detailed analysis of recombination. Twenty-seven families containing one or two recombinant chromosomes within the 500-kb interval between the DPB1 and DRB1 genes were used to determine patterns of recombination across this region. SSCP analysis and microsatellite typing yielded identification of 127 novel polymorphic markers distributed throughout the class II region, allowing refinement of the site of crossover in 30 class II recombinant chromosomes. The three regions where recombination was observed most frequently are as follows: the 45-kb interval between HLA-DNA and RING3 (11 cases), the 50-kb interval between DQB3 and DQB1 (6 cases), and an 8.8-kb segment of the TAP2 gene (3 cases). Six of the 10 remaining recombinants await further characterization, pending identification of additional informative markers, while four recombinants were localized to other intervals (outliers). Analysis of association between markers flanking HLA-DNA to RING3 (45 kb), as well as TAP1 to TAP2 (15 kb), by use of independent CEPH haplotypes indicated little or no linkage disequilibrium, supporting the familial recombination data. A notable sequence motif located within a region associated with increased rates of recombination consisted of a (TGGA){sub 12} tandem repeat within the TAP2 gene. 74 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Proteome sampling by the HLA class I antigen processing pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Hoof

    Full Text Available The peptide repertoire that is presented by the set of HLA class I molecules of an individual is formed by the different players of the antigen processing pathway and the stringent binding environment of the HLA class I molecules. Peptide elution studies have shown that only a subset of the human proteome is sampled by the antigen processing machinery and represented on the cell surface. In our study, we quantified the role of each factor relevant in shaping the HLA class I peptide repertoire by combining peptide elution data, in silico predictions of antigen processing and presentation, and data on gene expression and protein abundance. Our results indicate that gene expression level, protein abundance, and rate of potential binding peptides per protein have a clear impact on sampling probability. Furthermore, once a protein is available for the antigen processing machinery in sufficient amounts, C-terminal processing efficiency and binding affinity to the HLA class I molecule determine the identity of the presented peptides. Having studied the impact of each of these factors separately, we subsequently combined all factors in a logistic regression model in order to quantify their relative impact. This model demonstrated the superiority of protein abundance over gene expression level in predicting sampling probability. Being able to discriminate between sampled and non-sampled proteins to a significant degree, our approach can potentially be used to predict the sampling probability of self proteins and of pathogen-derived proteins, which is of importance for the identification of autoimmune antigens and vaccination targets.

  2. [Routine application of HLA class II oligotyping. Value of automatization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillat-Zucman, S; Bach, J F

    1992-12-02

    HLA class II typing by DNA amplification and hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotides has led to an improvement of the overall typing accuracy. In an attempt to apply this procedure to a large-scale analysis, we sought to implement an automation system using the Biomek 1,000 robotic work-station. This system allows a rapid preparation of many consecutive samples and avoids the risk of human errors. It is now routinely used in several laboratories.

  3. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton, Jr

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV...

  4. HLA-class II genes in Mexican Amerindian Mayas: relatedness with Guatemalan Mayans and other populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Areces, Cristina; Gómez-Prieto, Pablo; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the HLA class II allele frequencies in 50 healthy unrelated Mayan individuals. The relationship with other worldwide populations was studied by using HLA data from 71 different populations. The most frequent alleles were HLA-DRB1*04, HLA-DRB1*01, HLA-DQB1*0302 and HLA-DQB1*0501. When comparisons with other Mexican Amerindian groups were made, some differences were observed. Mayans showed an increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*01 when compared to Nahuas, Mayos, Teenek and Mazatecans (p Mayas showing that languages do not correlate with genes, particularly in Amerindians. The data corroborate the restricted polymorphism of HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and the high frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 and HLA-DQB1*0302 in Mayans from Mexico.

  5. Homotypic aggregation of human cell lines by HLA class II-, class Ia- and HLA-G-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Ledbetter, J A; Martin, P

    1991-01-01

    adhesion between T and B cells by activating the CD18/CD11a (LFA-1) adhesion pathway. Here we report that monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HLA-DR (L243, p4.1, HB10a, VI15) and certain broad class II reacting mAb (TU35, TU39), but not anti-DQ (TU22, Leu-10) mAb, induced homotypic aggregation of human......, but not the class I-negative parental line, 221, showed homotypic aggregation in response to an HLA-G specific mAb (87G) and a broad reacting class I-specific mAb (IOT2). Both cell lines responded with aggregation to anti-class II mAb (TU35). The anti-class I mAb, W6/32, had no effect on all cell lines tested...... and two anti-beta 2-microglobulin mAb had variable, weak effects. The aggregation response was an active, temperature-sensitive process which was almost totally abrogated by azide and by cytochalasins B and E, but unaffected by colchicine, EDTA, aphidicolin, actinomycin D and protein tyrosine kinase...

  6. Signal transduction by HLA class II antigens expressed on activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L;

    1991-01-01

    Human T cells express HLA class II antigens upon activation. Although activated, class II+ T cells can present alloantigens under certain circumstances, the functional role of class II antigens on activated T cells remains largely unknown. Here, we report that cross-linking of HLA-DR molecules ex...

  7. Vaccination and Infection as Causative Factors in Japanese Patients With Rasmussen Syndrome: Molecular Mimicry and HLA Class I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukitoshi Takahashi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen syndrome is an intractable epilepsy with a putative causal relation with cellular and humoral autoimmunity. Almost half of the patients have some preceding causative factors, with infections found in 38.2%, vaccinations in 5.9% and head trauma in 8.9% of Japanese patients. In a patient with seizure onset after influenza A infections, cross-reaction of the patient's lymphocytes with GluRε2 and influenza vaccine components was demonstrated by lymphocyte stimulation test. Database analyses revealed that influenza A virus hemagglutinin and GluRε2 molecules contain peptides with the patient's HLA class I binding motif (HLA ࢤ A*0201. The relative risks of HLA class I genotypes for Rasmussen syndrome are 6.1 (A*2402, 6.4 (A*0201, 6.3 (A*2601 and 11.4 (B*4601. The relative risks of HLA class I-A and B haplotypes are infinity (A*2601+B*5401, 21.1 (A*2402+B*1501, 13.3 (A*2402+B*4801 and 5.1 (A*2402+B*5201. Some alleles and haplotypes of HLA class I may be the risk factors in Japanese patients. Cross-reactivity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes may contribute to the processes leading from infection to the involvement of CNS.

  8. HLA class I and class II alleles and haplotypes in Mexican mestizos established from serological typing of 50 families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, C; Castelan, N; Lopez, M; Gonzalez, N; Weckmann, A L; Melin-Aldana, H; Vargas-Alarcon, G; Bordes, J; Alarcon-Segovia, D; Granados, J; Ramirez, E; Lisker, R

    1997-12-01

    We describe new information on the frequency and association of class II antigens (HLA-DR and HLA-DQ) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in Mexicans. The study includes HLA-B typing and its association with the HLA-DR antigens determined in 50 families, which included 100 individuals. This family study allowed the establishment of the precise composition of the 200 HLA haplotypes, which cannot be obtained from unrelated individuals. The predominant antigens in decreasing order of frequency were B35, B39, and B61 at the B locus; DR4, DR5, and DR8 at the DR locus; and DQ3 at the DQ locus. The most common HLA-B,HLA-DR haplotype (considering broad specificities) was B16,DR4, with a frequency of 8.0%. Five HLA-B,HLA-DR haplotypes showed significant delta values (observed vs. expected frequencies) after correcting for the number of comparisons. On the other hand, the most common HLA-DR,HLA-DQ haplotypes were DR4,DQ3 and DR5,DQ3 with a frequency higher than 10%. Ten of the 17 HLA-DR,HLA-DQ haplotypes had significant postcorrection delta values.

  9. HLA-G and MHC Class II Protein Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Bojo, Marcin; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Szumera-Ciećkiewicz, Anna; Jabłońska, Joanna; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Kordek, Radzisław; Młynarski, Wojciech; Robak, Tadeusz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lech-Maranda, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and HLA class II protein was studied by immunohistochemical staining of lymph nodes from 148 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and related to the clinical course of the disease. Negative HLA-G expression was associated with a lower probability of achieving a complete remission (p = 0.04). Patients with negative HLA-G expression tended towards a lower 3-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with positive expression of HLA-G (p = 0.08). When restricting the analysis to patients receiving chemotherapy with rituximab, the estimated 3-year OS rate of patients with positive HLA-G expression was 73.3 % compared with 47.5 % (p = 0.03) in those with negative expression. Patients with negative HLA class II expression presented a lower 3-year OS rate compared to subjects with positive expression (p = 0.04). The loss of HLA class II expression (p = 0.05) and belonging to the intermediate high/high IPI risk group (p = 0.001) independently increased the risk of death. HLA class II expression also retained its prognostic value in patients receiving rituximab; the 3-year OS rate was 65.3 % in patients with positive HLA class II expression versus 29.6 % (p = 0.04) in subjects that had loss of HLA class II expression. To our knowledge, for the first time, the expression of HLA-G protein in DLBCL and its association with the clinical course of the disease was demonstrated. Moreover, the link between losing HLA class II protein expression and poor survival of patients treated with immunochemotherapy was confirmed.

  10. HLA-DRB1 alleles in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: renal histologic class correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.L. Liphaus

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigens (HLA DRB1*03 and DRB1*02 have been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in Caucasians and black populations. It has been observed that certain HLA alleles show stronger associations with SLE autoantibodies and clinical subsets, although they have rarely been associated with lupus renal histologic class. In the present study, HLA-DRB1 allele correlations with clinical features, autoantibodies and renal histologic class were analyzed in a cohort of racially mixed Brazilian patients with juvenile-onset SLE. HLA-DRB1 typing was carried out by polymerase chain reaction amplification with sequence-specific primers using genomic DNA from 55 children and adolescents fulfilling at least four of the American College of Rheumatology criteria for SLE. Significance was determined by the chi-square test applied to 2 x 2 tables. The HLA-DRB1*15 allele was most frequent in patients with renal, musculoskeletal, cutaneous, hematologic, cardiac, and neuropsychiatric involvement, as well as in patients positive for anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, anti-U1-RNP, and anti-SSA/Ro antibodies, although an association between HLA alleles and SLE clinical features and autoantibodies could not be observed. The HLA-DRB1*17, HLA-DRB1*10, HLA-DRB1*15, and HLA-DRB1*07 alleles were significantly higher in patients with renal histologic class I, class IIA, class IIB, and class V, respectively. The present results suggest that the contribution of HLA- DRB1 alleles to juvenile-onset SLE could not be related to clinical or serological subsets of the disease, but it may be related to renal histologic classes, especially class I, class II A, class II B, and class V. The latter correlations have not been observed in literature.

  11. EXPRESSION OF HLA-CLASS Ⅱ GENESOF IDDM PATIENTS ON THE SURFACE OF THE LTK- CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王姮; 孙琦

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the function of HLA-class Ⅱ genes in the autoimmune response of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus(DDM),the HLA-class Ⅱ gene of IDDM patients was introd uced into Ltk-cells with pSV2-neo plas-mid,using the calcium phosphate precipitation technique.We obtained a stable cell line expressing the HLA-class Ⅱ gene from lymphocytes of IDDM patients.Expression was identified by direct ox erythocyte-CrCl3-HLA DR monoclonal antibody rosetting.

  12. Study of HLA Class I gene in Indian schizophrenic patients of Siliguri, West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bisu; Bera, Nirmal Kumar; De, Santanu; Nayak, Chittaranjan; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar

    2011-09-30

    The authors studied the prevalence of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class I gene in 136 (85 male, 51 female) India-born schizophrenia patients residing in and around the Siliguri subdivision of West Bengal by the PCR-SSP method. The control group consisted of 150 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals from the same ethnic group as the patients. Increased frequency of HLA A*03 as well as decreased frequencies of HLA A*31 and HLA B*51, was noted. The study suggests the possible existence of a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia within the HLA region.

  13. HLA class I-mediated control of HIV-1 in the Japanese population, in which the protective HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*27 alleles are absent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruto, Takuya; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Nelson, George; Sakai, Keiko; Carrington, Mary; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the effect of HLA class I alleles on clinical parameters for HIV-1 disease progression in the Japanese population, where two strongly protective alleles, HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*27, are virtually nonexistent. HLA-B alleles showed a dominant role, primarily through HLA-B*67:01 and the HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 haplotype. Neither a rare-allele nor a heterozygote advantage was found, suggesting that the effect of HLA alleles in the Japanese population is either different from those observed in Africans and Caucasians or undetectable due to limited power.

  14. Structural analysis of the HLA-A/HLA-F subregion: Precise localization of two new multigene families closely associated with the HLA class I sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, L.; Carn, G.; Bouric, P. [CNRS, Rennes (France)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Positional cloning strategies for the hemochromatosis gene have previously concentrated on a target area restricted to a maximum genomic expanse of 400 kb around the HLA-A and HLA-F loci. Recently, the candidate region has been extended to 2-3 Mb on the distal side of the MHC. In this study, 10 coding sequences [hemochromatosis candidate genes (HCG) I to X] were isolated by cDNA selection using YACs covering the HLA-A/HLA-F subregion. Two of these (HCG II and HCG IV) belong to multigene families, as well as other sequences already described in this region, i.e., P5, pMC 6.7, and HLA class I. Fingerprinting of the four YACSs overlapping the region was performed and allowed partial localization of the different multigene family sequences on each YAC without defining their exact positions. Fingerprinting on cosmids isolated from the ICRF chromosome 6-specific cosmid library allowed more precise localization of the redundant sequences in all of the multigene families and revealed their apparent organization in clusters. Further examination of these intertwined sequences demonstrated that this structural organization resulted from a succession of complex phenomena, including duplications and contractions. This study presents a precise description of the structural organization of the HLA-A/HLA-F region and a determination of the sequences involved in the megabase size polymorphism observed among the A3, A24, and A31 haplotypes. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02......:01 and HLA-DRB1*01:01 molecules were identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. Immunization of transgenic HLA-A*02:01/HLA-DRB1*01:01 mice with four of these double binding peptides gave rise to both HLA class I and class II restricted responses by CD8 and CD4 T cells, respectively, whereas...... with this, peptide vaccination did not decrease virus titres in the lungs of intranasally influenza challenged mice. Our data show that HLA class I and class II double binding peptides can be identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. By immunization, double binding peptides can give rise...

  16. HLA class I homologous transcripts in the human embryonal carcinoma cell line Tera-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke de Wit, T F; Struyk, L; Vloemans, S; Glazebrook, J; Boyle, J M; Stern, P L; van den Elsen, P J

    1990-01-01

    We have used the human teratocarcinoma-derived embryonal carcinoma cell line Tera-2 cl. 13 to explore the putative expression of novel HLA class I(-like) genes. Serological analyses revealed that Tera-2 cells do not express polymorphic HLA class I (-A, -B, -C) specificities, but do express HLA class I-like antigens. These phenotypic properties parallel those of certain mouse embryonal carcinoma cells. To study the expression of HLA class I(-like) genes in the Tera-2 cells two different approaches were used. Screening of a Tera-2 cDNA library with a full-length HLA class I cDNA probe under conditions that would allow for the identification of relatively distinct HLA class I-like sequences yielded 27 positive clones, all of which were of the regular HLA-A, -B, -C type. Reverse northern hybridizations of the restriction enzyme-digested Tlab region comprising cosmids with Tera-2 cDNA as the probe resulted in the identification of several putative human genes whose equivalents map within the mouse Tla region. However, none of these genes appeared to be structurally related to HLA class I. A putative H3.3 histone gene was identified in the proximal Tla region of the C57BL/10 mouse. It is concluded that no structural homologues of mouse Qa/Tla genes are expressed in the human developmental cell line Tera-2.

  17. KIR/HLA interactions negatively affect rituximab- but not GA101 (obinutuzumab)-induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terszowski, Grzegorz; Klein, Christian; Stern, Martin

    2014-06-15

    Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by NK cells is regulated by inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs), which interact with target cell HLA class I. We analyzed how KIR/HLA interactions influence ADCC induced by rituximab and by GA101, a novel type II CD20 Ab glycoengineered for increased FcgRIII binding and ADCC capacity. We found that KIR/HLA interactions strongly and selectively inhibit rituximab-induced in vitro ADCC toward target cells expressing cognate HLA KIR ligands. NK cells of donors carrying all three ligands to inhibitory KIR showed weak activation and target cell depletion capacity when incubated with rituximab and KIR-ligand matched target B cells. In contrast, NK cells from individuals missing one or more KIR ligands activated more strongly and depleted KIR ligand-matched target B cells more efficiently in the presence of rituximab. NK cells expressing a KIR for which the ligand was absent were the main effectors of ADCC in these donors. Notably, the influence of KIR/HLA interactions on NK cell activation was synergistic with the effect of the V158F FCGR3A single nucleotide polymorphism. In contrast, GA101 induced activation of NK cells irrespective of inhibitory KIR expression, and efficiency of target cell depletion was not negatively affected by KIR/HLA interactions. These data show that modification of the Fc fragment to enhance ADCC can be an effective strategy to augment the efficacy of therapeutic mAbs by recruiting NK cells irrespective of their inhibitory KIR expression.

  18. Prediction of HLA class II alleles using SNPs in an African population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasil Tekola Ayele

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA gene locus in research and clinical practice, direct HLA typing is laborious and expensive. Furthermore, the analysis requires specialized software and expertise which are unavailable in most developing country settings. Recently, in silico methods have been developed for predicting HLA alleles using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. However, the utility of these methods in African populations has not been systematically evaluated.In the present study, we investigate prediction of HLA class II (HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles using SNPs in the Wolaita population, southern Ethiopia. The subjects comprised 297 Ethiopians with genome-wide SNP data, of whom 188 had also been HLA typed and were used for training and testing the model. The 109 subjects with SNP data alone were used for empirical prediction using the multi-allelic gene prediction method. We evaluated accuracy of the prediction, agreement between predicted and HLA typed alleles, and discriminative ability of the prediction probability supplied by the model. We found that the model predicted intermediate (two-digit resolution for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles at accuracy levels of 96% and 87%, respectively. All measures of performance showed high accuracy and reliability for prediction. The distribution of the majority of HLA alleles in the study was similar to that previously reported for the Oromo and Amhara ethnic groups from Ethiopia.We demonstrate that HLA class II alleles can be predicted from SNP genotype data with a high level of accuracy at intermediate (two-digit resolution in an African population. This finding offers new opportunities for HLA studies of disease epidemiology and population genetics in developing countries.

  19. Human monoclonal HLA antibodies reveal interspecies crossreactive swine MHC class I epitopes relevant for xenotransplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, A.; Kardol, M.J.; Arn, J.S.; Eijsink, C.; Franke, M.E.; Schreuder, G.M.; Haasnoot, G.W.; Doxiadis, I.I.; Sachs, D.H.; Smith, D.M.; Claas, F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Crossreactivity of anti-HLA antibodies with SLA alleles may limit the use of pig xenografts in some highly sensitized patients. An understanding of the molecular basis for this crossreactivity may allow better selection of xenograft donors. We have tested 68 human monoclonal HLA class I antibodies (

  20. The role of antigens and HLA class I haplotypes in indigenous women in Tashkent with hysteromyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landish Isanbaeva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunogenetic analysis on HLA I class in 177 indigenous women with uterine myoma showed the positive association in the risk of uterine fibroids with antigens HLA-B8/B22 and haplotype A28/B22; antigens HLA-A28, Cw5 and haplotype B17-Sw5 played role of auxiliary markers. HLA-antigens A2, B35, Cw4 and haplotypes A2-B35, B5-Cw4 showed the negative association. Carrying immunogenetic studies may be useful to search for individual genes involved in the determination of the disease - uterine fibroids, especially among patients with hereditary anamnesis.

  1. Effects of CIITA antisense RNA on the expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the effect of the major histocompatibility complex class Ⅱ (MHCⅡ) transactivator (CIITA) antisense RNA on the expression of the human leukemia (HLA) class Ⅱ molecules, 5′ end cDNA sequence of CIITA gene was cloned, and antisense RNA expression vector pcDNA-Ⅱ was constructed. HeLa cells transfected with pcDNA-Ⅱ and pcDNA3 were induced by IFN-g for 3 d. The expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules on HeLa/pcDNA-Ⅱ cells was significantly decreased, while it has no effect on the expression of HLA class Ⅰ molecules. This result suggests that the CIITA antisense RNA can inhibit the expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules in HeLa cells. It also implies a promising approach to generate immune tolerance in graft transplantation.

  2. HLA-A*01:03, HLA-A*24:02, HLA-B*08:01, HLA-B*27:05, HLA-B*35:01, HLA-B*44:02, and HLA-C*07:01 Monochain Transgenic/H-2 Class I Null Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boucherma, Rachid; Kridane-Miledi, Hédia; Bouziat, Romain;

    2013-01-01

    surface expression of several transgenes was markedly reduced in recipient mice that coexpressed endogenous H-2 class I molecules, substantial surface expression of all human transgenes was observed in mice lacking H-2 class I molecules. In these HLA monochain transgenic/H-2 class I null mice, we observed...

  3. IMPORTANCE OF RESEARCH HLA ANTIBODIES CLASS I AND II, AND MICA ANTIBODIES IN KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Khubutia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of HLA and MICA antibodies in patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation and their influence on the course of post-transplant period. Determination of HLA antibodies class I and II, and MICA antibodies was performed on a platform of Luminex (xMAP-tech- nology using sets LABScreen ONE LAMBDA (U.S.. A total of 156 patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Revealed the presence of HLA and MICA antibodies in the serum of 31.4% of patients. Regraf- ted patients increased the content of antibodies to the antigens of HLA system was noted in 88.2% of cases, 47% met the combination of antibodies to the I, II classes and MICA. In patients awaiting first kidney transplantation, HLA and MICA antibodies were determined in 23.7% of cases. The presence of pretransplant HLA and MICA antibodies had a significant influence on the course of post-transplant period. Patients with the presence of HLA and MICA in 50% of cases delayed graft function. Sessions of plasmapheresis can reduce the concentration of HLA and MICA antibodies on average by 61.1%. 

  4. HLA class I donor-specific triplet antibodies detected after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnavidou-Nicolaidou, A; Doxiadis, I I N; Iniotaki-Theodoraki, A; Patargias, T; Stavropoulos-Giokas, C; Kyriakides, G K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether IgG, non-donor-specific anti-HLA class I antibodies (HLAabI) detected after renal transplantation recognize immunogenic amino acid triplets expressed on the foreign graft. In addition, we sought to evaluate the effect of these antibodies as well as other posttransplant HLAabI on graft outcome. Posttransplant sera from 264 renal recipients were tested for the presence of IgG HLAabI and HLA class II-specific alloantibodies (HLAabII) by ELISA. The HLAMatchmaker computer algorithm was used to define the HLA class I non-donor-specific antibodies, which seem to recognize immunogenic amino acid triplets. Donor-specific triplet antibodies (DSTRab) were detected in 16 of 22 (72.7%) recipients based on at least one HLA-A or -B mismatched antigen with the donor. DSTRab were found either without (n = 7) or with (n = 9) HLA donor-specific antibodies (HLA-DSA). The presence of DSTRab alone in the periphery was associated with acute rejection, whereas the presence of both DSTRab and HLA-DSA was associated with chronic rejection and graft failure.

  5. Selective changes in expression of HLA class I polymorphic determinants in human solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, P.G.; Nicotra, M.R.; Bigotti, A.; Venturo, I.; Giacomini, P. (Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)); Marcenaro, L.; Russo, C. (Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Analysis of surgical biopsies with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to framework determinants of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens has shown that malignant transformation is frequently associated with a marked loss of these cell surface molecules. The present study sought to determine whether more selective losses of major histocompatibility complex class I expression occur. Multiple specimens from 13 different types of primary and metastatic tumors were tested utilizing mAb BB7.2, which recognizes a polymorphic HLA-A2 epitope. In each case, expression of HLA-A,B,C molecules was determined by testing with mAb W6/32 directed to a framework HLA class I determinant. The authors have found that in HLA-A2-positive patients, HLA-A2 products are not detectable or are reduced in their expression in 70-80% of endometrial, colorectal, mammary, and renal tumors; in 40-60% of soft-tissue, skin, ovary, urinary bladder, prostate, and stomach tumors; and in 25-30% of melanomas and lung carcinomas tested. All tumors expressed the framework HLA-A,B.C determinant. The HLA-A2 epitope recognized by mAb BB7.2 is located in a portion of the HLA-A2 molecule postulated to react with the T-cell receptor. The selective loss of an HLA class I polymorphic epitope shown in this study may explain the mechanism by which tumor cells escape both T-cell recognition and natural killer cell surveillance.

  6. Association between HLA-Class I and HLA-Class II Alleles and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection in Iraqi Patients from Baghdad City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhal Abdulmohaimen Mohammed

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (PT is one of the endemic diseases in Iraq, and among the suggested predisposing factors are alleles of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA system. We sought to investigate the association between HLA-class I (A and B and -class II (DR and DQ alleles in a sample of PT Iraqi patients. Methods: lymphocytes of 105 PT patients and 40 controls were phenotyped for HLA-A, -B, -DR, and -DQ alleles by means of the microlymphocytotoxicity test using a panel of monoclonal antisera. Results: HLA frequencies of B18 (16.2 vs. 2.5%; OD=7.53 and DR1 (51.4 vs. 10.0%; OD=9.53 alleles were significantly increased in the patients as compared with the controls, while B5 (6.7 vs. 25.0%, DR8 (1.9 vs. 17.5%, and DQ3 (11.4 vs. 45.0% alleles were significantly decreased. However, a significant corrected level was maintained for only DR1, DR8, and DQ3 alleles (Pc=1.9×10-5, 0.02 and 1.0×10-4, respectively. Conclusion: The results confirm the predisposing and protecting roles of HLA alleles in PT.

  7. Diversity of natural self-derived ligands presented by different HLA class I molecules in transporter antigen processing-deficient cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lorente

    Full Text Available The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP translocates the cytosol-derived proteolytic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen where they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules. Non-functional TAP complexes and viral or tumoral blocking of these transporters leads to reduced HLA class I surface expression and a drastic change in the available peptide repertoire. Using mass spectrometry to analyze complex human leukocyte antigen HLA-bound peptide pools isolated from large numbers of TAP-deficient cells, we identified 334 TAP-independent ligands naturally presented by four different HLA-A, -B, and -C class I molecules with very different TAP dependency from the same cell line. The repertoire of TAP-independent peptides examined favored increased peptide lengths and a lack of strict binding motifs for all four HLA class I molecules studied. The TAP-independent peptidome arose from 182 parental proteins, the majority of which yielded one HLA ligand. In contrast, TAP-independent antigen processing of very few cellular proteins generated multiple HLA ligands. Comparison between TAP-independent peptidome and proteome of several subcellular locations suggests that the secretory vesicle-like organelles could be a relevant source of parental proteins for TAP-independent HLA ligands. Finally, a predominant endoproteolytic peptidase specificity for Arg/Lys or Leu/Phe residues in the P(1 position of the scissile bond was found for the TAP-independent ligands. These data draw a new and intricate picture of TAP-independent pathways.

  8. HLA-E: strong association with beta2-microglobulin and surface expression in the absence of HLA class I signal sequence-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Melucci, Elisa; Tremante, Elisa; Suchànek, Miloslav; Horejsi, Vaclav; Martayan, Aline; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2008-10-15

    The nonclassical class I HLA-E molecule folds in the presence of peptide ligands donated by the signal sequences of permissive class I HLA alleles, with the aid of TAP and tapasin. To identify HLA-E-specific Abs, four monoclonals of the previously described MEM series were screened by isoelectric focusing (IEF) blot and immunoprecipitation/IEF on >30 single-allele class I transfectants and HLA-homozygous B lymphoid cells coexpressing HLA-E and HLA-A, -B, -C, -F, or -G. Despite their HLA-E-restricted reactivity patterns (MEM-E/02 in IEF blot; MEM-E/07 and MEM-E/08 in immunoprecipitation), all of the MEM Abs unexpectedly reacted with beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m)-free and denatured (but not beta(2)m-associated and folded) HLA-E H chains. Remarkably, other HLA-E-restricted Abs were also reactive with free H chains. Immunodepletion, in vitro assembly, flow cytometry, and three distinct surface-labeling methods, including a modified (conformation-independent) biotin-labeling assay, revealed the coexistence of HLA-E conformers with unusual and drastically antithetic features. MEM-reactive conformers were thermally unstable and poorly surface expressed, as expected, whereas beta(2)m-associated conformers were either unstable and weakly reactive with the prototypic conformational Ab W6/32, or exceptionally stable and strongly reactive with Abs to beta(2)m even in cells lacking permissive alleles (721.221), TAP (T2), or tapasin (721.220). Noncanonical, immature (endoglycosidase H-sensitive) HLA-E glycoforms were surface expressed in these cells, whereas mature glycoforms were exclusively expressed (and at much lower levels) in cells carrying permissive alleles. Thus, HLA-E is a good, and not a poor, beta(2)m assembler, and TAP/tapasin-assisted ligand donation is only one, and possibly not even the major, pathway leading to its stabilization and surface expression.

  9. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  10. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zilian

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I (HLA I antibodies (Abs play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs. The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation.

  11. New susceptibility variants to narcolepsy identified in HLA class II region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Hirataka, Akane; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Imanishi, Aya; Sagawa, Yohei; Kotorii, Nozomu; Kotorii, Tatayu; Hashizume, Yuji; Ogi, Kimihiro; Hiejima, Hiroshi; Kamei, Yuichi; Hida, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Imai, Makoto; Fujimura, Yota; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Ikegami, Azusa; Wada, Yamato; Moriya, Shunpei; Furuya, Hirokazu; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Omata, Naoto; Kojima, Hiroto; Kashiwase, Koichi; Saji, Hiroh; Khor, Seik-Soon; Yamasaki, Maria; Wada, Yuji; Ishigooka, Jun; Kuroda, Kenji; Kume, Kazuhiko; Chiba, Shigeru; Yamada, Naoto; Okawa, Masako; Hirata, Koichi; Uchimura, Naohisa; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Yutaka; Mishima, Kazuo; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-02-01

    Narcolepsy, a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities, is tightly associated with human leukocyte antigen HLA-DQB1*06:02. DQB1*06:02 is common in the general population (10-30%); therefore, additional genetic factors are needed for the development of narcolepsy. In the present study, HLA-DQB1 in 664 Japanese narcoleptic subjects and 3131 Japanese control subjects was examined to determine whether HLA-DQB1 alleles located in trans of DQB1*06:02 are associated with narcolepsy. The strongest association was with DQB1*06:01 (P = 1.4 × 10(-10), odds ratio, OR = 0.39), as reported in previous studies. Additional predisposing effects of DQB1*03:02 were also found (P = 2.5 × 10(-9), OR = 1.97). A comparison between DQB1*06:02 heterozygous cases and controls revealed dominant protective effects of DQB1*06:01 and DQB1*05:01. In addition, a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based conditional analysis controlling for the effect of HLA-DQB1 was performed to determine whether there were other independent HLA associations outside of HLA-DQB1. This analysis revealed associations at HLA-DPB1 in the HLA class II region (rs3117242, P = 4.1 × 10(-5), OR = 2.45; DPB1*05:01, P = 8.1 × 10(-3), OR = 1.39). These results indicate that complex HLA class II associations contribute to the genetic predisposition to narcolepsy.

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease associations with HLA Class II genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, H.; Targan, S. [Roche Molecular Systems, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A PCR-SSOP assay has been used to analyze HLA-Class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles in 378 Caucasians from a population in Southern California. The data has been analyzed separately for the Ashkenasi Jews and non-Jewish patients (n=286) and controls (n=92). Two common clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn`s disease (CD). In CD, we observed a susceptible effect with the rare DR1 allele - DRB*0103 [O.R.=4.56; 95% CI (0.96, 42.97); p=0.03]; a trend for an increase in DRB1*0103 was also observed in UC patients. A susceptible effect with DRB1*1502 [O.R.=5.20; 95% CI (1.10, 48.99); p=0.02] was observed in non-Jewish UC patients. This susceptible effect was restricted to UC ANCA-positive (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) patients. In addition, a significant association with DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301 [O.R.=9.46; 95% CI (1.30, 413.87); p=0.01] was seen with UC among non-Jewish patients: this haplotype was increased with CD among non-Jewish patients. Two protective haplotypes were detected among CD non-Jewish patients: DRB1*1301-DQB1*0603 [O.R.=0.34; 95% CI (0.09, 1.09); p=0.04], and DRB*0404-DQB1*0302 [O.R.=<0.08; 95% CI (0.0, 0.84); p=0.01]. When the same data were analyzed at the serology level, we observed a positive association in UC with DR2 [O.R.6.77; 95% CI (2.47, 22.95); p=2 x 10{sup -4}], and a positive association in CD with DR1 [O.R.=2.63; 95% CI (1.14, 6.62); p=0.01] consistent with previous reports. Thus, some IBD disease associations appear to be common to both UC and CD, while some are unique to one disease.

  13. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However...... this complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  14. Extensive HLA class Ⅱ studies in Chinese narcoleptic patients.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Narcolepsy is a debilitating, lifelong sleep disorder. Its familial occurrence suggests that genetic factors may be of importance in the etiology. Narcolepsy is a very rare disease among Chinese, thus it was of interest to study the association of narcolepsy with the HLA system in Chinese narcoleptic patients.

  15. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moutsianas, Loukas; Jostins, Luke; Beecham, Ashley H;

    2015-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on ...

  16. Frequency of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies in patients infected by HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Regina Manzolli Leite

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies in patients infected by HIV-1 and relate it with the different clinical courses of the disease. Blood samples were collected in EDTA tubes from 145 individuals. HIV-1 infection was confirmed by ELISA test. The presence of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies and HLA allele's were determined. Clinical evolution was set as fast (3 years. Class I anti-HLA alloantibodies presence was lower in healthy individuals than in those infected by HIV-1 (4.2% against 32.4%. However, an equal distribution of these alloantibodies was found among the individuals infected, independent on the clinical evolution. Thus, class I anti-HLA alloantibodies was not a determinant factor for patient worsening.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I em pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1 e relacioná-la aos diferentes cursos clínicos da doença. Amostras de sangue de 145 indivíduos HIV positivo foram coletadas em tubos com EDTA. A infecção pelo HIV-1 foi confirmada por teste ELISA e a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I determinada em seguida. A evolução clínica foi definida como rápida (3 anos. A presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I foi menor em indivíduos saudáveis em relação aos infectados pelo HIV-1 (4,2% contra 32,4%. Porém, a distribuição destes aloanticorpos entre os indivíduos infectados foi igual, independente da evolução clínica. Deste modo, a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I não é um fator determinante na piora clínica do paciente.

  17. Pan-specific MHC class I predictors: A benchmark of HLA class I pan-specific prediction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hao; Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    emerging pathogens. Methods have recently been published that are able to predict peptide binding to any human MHC class I molecule. In contrast to conventional allele-specific methods, these methods do allow for extrapolation to un-characterized MHC molecules. These pan-specific HLA predictors have...... not previously been compared using independent evaluation sets. Results: A diverse set of quantitative peptide binding affinity measurements was collected from IEDB, together with a large set of HLA class I ligands from the SYFPEITHI database. Based on these data sets, three different pan-specific HLA web......-accessible predictors NetMHCpan, Adaptive-Double-Threading (ADT), and KISS were evaluated. The performance of the pan-specific predictors was also compared to a well performing allele-specific MHC class I predictor, NetMHC, as well as a consensus approach integrating the predictions from the NetMHC and Net...

  18. COMPARISON OF HLA CLASS I ANIIGEN BY SEROLOGY AND PCR- SSP TYPING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭建明; 唐孝达; 谢桐

    1999-01-01

    Objeetive A dcuble blind study was canied cut to evaluate the relative performance and reliability of PCR-SSP assay compared to standard serollgical typing in identifying HLA class I alleles in Chinses population, Methods A total of 525 consecutive samples were entered into the study-HLA-A and B antigens were typed by serology with two - stage microlympbocytotoxicity and by PCR arnplification with sequence - specific primers, Reliability, reproducibility and clinical practicability wine compared acocrding to typing results by both methods. Results All sarnples were successfully typed by both methods THe serological discrepancy far HLA - A was 8.95 %, consisting of 21 antigens being iocorrectly interpreced and 26 of serologic blankx tuming out to be second definable alleles by SSP typing, Misassignments of HLA-B by serology were 12.19%. In 4.8% (25/525)a serologic blank tumed out to be a definable allele by SSP, while in 7,4 % (39/525) an allele was incorrectly interpreted by serology. The results of this study study showed that PCR- SSP technique could proved ta be equivalent to or surpass deal serology, suitable for routine clinical typing of patients and donors for transplantation. Conclusion PCR-SSP typing for HLA-A and B araigens could offer the advantages 4 hettre reagent availability and greater precision than setology in Chinese population, It is necessary to adopt the DNA typing for HLA class I in whcm serology often fails with“blank”,“difficult", or cross-reactive antigens.

  19. Analysis of KIR gene frequencies and HLA class I genotypes in breast cancer and control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobim, Maria Regina; Jobim, Mariana; Salim, Patrícia H; Portela, Pâmela; Jobim, Luiz Fernando; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Bittelbrunn, Ana Cristina; Menke, Carlos Henrique; Biazús, Jorge Villanova; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the main cause of cancer-related death among women, with a 0.5% increase in incidence per year. Natural killer cells (NK) are part of the innate immune system recognizing class I HLA molecules on target cells through their membrane receptors, called killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between the KIR genes and HLA alleles in patients with breast cancer and healthy controls. Two hundred thirty patients with breast cancer and 272 healthy controls were typed for HLA class I and KIR genes by PCR-SSO. When both groups were compared, the presence of inhibitory KIR2DL2 receptors was significantly higher in breast cancer patients than in healthy controls. No significant differences were found for HLA-C2 and HLA-Bw4. However, a higher frequency of HLA-C1 in breast cancer patients was observed. These findings suggest a potential role for the KIR gene system in breast cancer. Further studies to confirm this observation are warranted.

  20. Analysis of KIR gene frequencies and HLA class I genotypes in prostate cancer and control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, P; Jobim, L F; Salim, P H; Koff, W J; Wilson, T J; Jobim, M R; Schwartsmann, G; Roesler, R; Jobim, M

    2012-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men, with a significant increase in incidence and mortality in men over 50 years of age. Natural killer cells (NK) are part of the innate immune system recognizing class I HLA molecules on target cells through their membrane receptors, called killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). The aim of our study is to evaluate the association between the KIR genes and HLA alleles in patients with prostate cancer and healthy controls. Two hundred patients with prostate cancer and 185 healthy controls were typed for HLA class I and KIR genes by PCR-SSP. When both groups were compared, no significant differences were found for HLA-C group 1 and group 2, HLA-Bw4, HLA-A3 and A11. No difference was seen either in KIR frequency between patients with prostate cancer and controls. In conclusion, our data suggest no potential role for the KIR gene system in prostate cancer.

  1. HLA class II alleles and risk for peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmad Marzban; Javad Kiani; Mehrdad Hajilooi; Hamzeh Rezaei; Zohreh Kahramfar; Ghasem Solgi

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype variations on development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is not well determined. hTis study aimed to identify the association of HLA class II alleles with DPN in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Totally 106 T2D patients, 49 with DPN and 57 without DPN, and 100 ethnic-matched healthy controls were analyzed. Both groups of the patients were matched based on sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and duration of T2D. Polyneuropathy was diagnosed using electrodiagnostic methods. HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 genotyping was performed in all subjects by the polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. T2D patients with DPN showed higher frequencies of HLA-DRB1*10 and DRB1*12 alleles compared to control group (P = 0.04). HLA-DQB1*02 allele and HLA-DRB1*07-DQB1*02 haplotype were associated with a decreased risk for developing DPN in T2D patients (P = 0.02 andP = 0.05 respectively). Also, patients with severe neurop-athy showed higher frequencies of DRB1*07 (P = 0.003) and DQB1*02 (P = 0.02) alleles than those with mild-to-moderate form of neuropathy. The distribution of DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and haplotypes were not statistically different between all patients and healthy controls. Our ifndings implicate a possible protective role of HLA-DQB1*02 allele and HLA-DRB1*07-DQB1*02 haplotype against development of peripheral neuropathy in T2D patients. Therefore, variations in HLA genotypes might be used as genetic markers for prediction and potentially management of neuropathy in T2D patients.

  2. Identification of class I HLA T cell control epitopes for West Nile virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghar Kaabinejadian

    Full Text Available The recent West Nile virus (WNV outbreak in the United States underscores the importance of understanding human immune responses to this pathogen. Via the presentation of viral peptide ligands at the cell surface, class I HLA mediate the T cell recognition and killing of WNV infected cells. At this time, there are two key unknowns in regards to understanding protective T cell immunity: 1 the number of viral ligands presented by the HLA of infected cells, and 2 the distribution of T cell responses to these available HLA/viral complexes. Here, comparative mass spectroscopy was applied to determine the number of WNV peptides presented by the HLA-A*11:01 of infected cells after which T cell responses to these HLA/WNV complexes were assessed. Six viral peptides derived from capsid, NS3, NS4b, and NS5 were presented. When T cells from infected individuals were tested for reactivity to these six viral ligands, polyfunctional T cells were focused on the GTL9 WNV capsid peptide, ligands from NS3, NS4b, and NS5 were less immunogenic, and two ligands were largely inert, demonstrating that class I HLA reduce the WNV polyprotein to a handful of immune targets and that polyfunctional T cells recognize infections by zeroing in on particular HLA/WNV epitopes. Such dominant HLA/peptide epitopes are poised to drive the development of WNV vaccines that elicit protective T cells as well as providing key antigens for immunoassays that establish correlates of viral immunity.

  3. Maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies are associated with reduced birth weight in thrombocytopenic neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, J; Husebekk, A; Acharya, G; Flo, K; Stuge, T B; Skogen, B; Straume, B; Tiller, H

    2016-02-01

    In this comparative cross-sectional study, possible associations between maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies and birth weight in neonatal thrombocytopenia are explored. Although commonly detected in pregnancies and generally regarded as harmless, it has been suggested that such antibodies might be associated with fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). As a link between FNAIT due to human platelet antigen 1a-specific antibodies and reduced birth weight in boys has previously been demonstrated, we wanted to explore whether maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies might also affect birth weight. To examine this, suspected cases of FNAIT referred to the Norwegian National Unit for Platelet Immunology during the period 1998-2009 were identified. Pregnancies where the only finding was maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies were included. An unselected group of pregnant women participating in a prospective study investigating maternal-fetal hemodynamics at the University Hospital North Norway during the years 2006-2010 served as controls. Twenty-nine percent of controls had anti-HLA class I antibodies. The thrombocytopenic neonates had a significantly lower adjusted birth weight (linear regression, P=0.036) and significantly higher odds of being small for gestational age (OR=6.72, P<0.001) compared with controls. Increasing anti-HLA class I antibody levels in the mother were significantly associated with lower birth weight and placental weight among thrombocytopenic neonates, but not among controls. These results indicate that maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies in thrombocytopenic neonates are associated with reduced fetal growth. Further studies are needed to test if placental function is affected.

  4. HLA class II haplotypes distinctly associated with vaso-occlusion in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Najat; Al-Ola, Khadija; Al-Subaie, Abeer M; Ali, Muhallab E; Al-Irhayim, Zaid; Al-Irhayim, A Qader; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the association of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes with sickle cell anemia vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC). DRB1*100101 was positively associated, while DRB1*140101, DRB1*150101, and DQB1*060101 were negatively associated, with VOC. Both susceptible (DRB1*100101-DQB1*050101) and protective (DRB1*110101-DQB1*030101 and DRB1*150101-DQB1*060101) haplotypes were identified, indicating that HLA class II haplotypes influence VOC risk.

  5. HLA class II allele and haplotype frequencies in Ethiopian Amhara and Oromo populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, M; de Stefano, G F; Cambon-Thomsen, A; Giraldo-Alvarez, P; Dugoujon, J M; Ohayon, E; Scano, G; Abbal, M

    1998-04-01

    HLA class II alleles were identified in 181 healthy unrelated Ethiopian children of both sexes and in 350 European controls from the South of France. The Ethiopian individuals belonged to the two major ethnic groups of the country: Oromo (N=83) and Amhara (N=98). In both panels, genetic polymorphism of HLA class II alleles was analysed for the first time by molecular typing of DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci. Allelic and phenotypic frequencies were compared with those of European controls and other African populations. Construction of HLA class II three-locus haplotypes was also performed. The study revealed some differences between the two groups. Characteristic features of Central and North African populations appeared on the Ethiopian HLA genotypes. Surprisingly, DRB1*11 presented one of the lowest gene frequencies in both Ethiopian ethnic groups in contrast to Europeans and West Africans. Furthermore, this decrease was more marked than those observed using serological techniques in other geographically close East African countries. Oromo and Amhara only showed minor differences in spite of their different origins and histories. One significant difference consisted of a lower DRB1*01 gene frequency in Oromo as reported in most West African people. Some new or rare haplotypes were also observed in the Oromo group. Our results underline the distinctive features of the Ethiopian populations among the few HLA genotyping data available for East African groups and emphasise the major interest of such investigations in this region of Africa.

  6. Mapping and characterization of non-HLA multigene assemblages in the human MHC class I region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venditti, C.P.; Harris, J.M.; Geraghty, D.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ. College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-15

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I region has been shown to be associated with a variety of immune and nonimmune disorders. In an effort to initiate steps designed to identify the idiopathic hemochromatosis disease gene (HFE), the authors have cloned and mapped two expressed messages using probes from the HLA-H subregion that lie immediately distal to the HLA-A9 breakpoint. Although the cDNA clones identify distinct multifragment families that are dispersed throughout the MHC, the gene sequences from which the two cDNA clones derive map centromeric to the HLA-B locus and are absent from the genomes of higher nonhuman primates. This suggests that a syntenic coding segment arose within a highly polymorphic region (TNF to HLA-B interval) as the result of an insertion event following the emergence of Homo sapiens. An additional syntenic cluster exists within a peak of linkage disequilibrium with the HFE gene and may define coding sequences that underlie the defect in genetic iron overload. These data generally support the concept that the class I region is potentially gene-rich and further highlight the possibility that these new coding sequences may play a role in the development of a variety of HLA-linked diseases. The observations presented suggest that interlocus exchanges have played a structural role in the genesis of the human class I region. 46 refs., 6 refs.

  7. HLA class I and II expression in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in relation to tumor HPV status and clinical outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Näsman

    Full Text Available HPV-DNA positive (HPVDNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC has better clinical outcome than HPV-DNA negative (HPVDNA- OSCC. Current treatment may be unnecessarily extensive for most HPV+ OSCC, but before de-escalation, additional markers are needed together with HPV status to better predict treatment response. Here the influence of HLA class I/HLA class II expression was explored. Pre-treatment biopsies, from 439/484 OSCC patients diagnosed 2000-2009 and treated curatively, were analyzed for HLA I and II expression, p16(INK4a and HPV DNA. Absent/weak as compared to high HLA class I intensity correlated to a very favorable disease-free survival (DFS, disease-specific survival (DSS and overall survival (OS in HPVDNA+ OSCC, both in univariate and multivariate analysis, while HLA class II had no impact. Notably, HPVDNA+ OSCC with absent/weak HLA class I responded equally well when treated with induction-chemo-radiotherapy (CRT or radiotherapy (RT alone. In patients with HPVDNA- OSCC, high HLA class I/class II expression correlated in general to a better clinical outcome. p16(INK4a overexpression correlated to a better clinical outcome in HPVDNA+ OSCC. Absence of HLA class I intensity in HPVDNA+ OSCC suggests a very high survival independent of treatment and could possibly be used clinically to select patients for randomized trials de-escalating therapy.

  8. The Cancer Exome Generated by Alternative mRNA Splicing Dilutes Predicted HLA Class I Epitope Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranzl, Thomas; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lund, Ole;

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes...... is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based...... on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I...

  9. HLA class II allele polymorphism in an outbreak of chikungunya fever in Middle Andaman, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaithanya, Itta Krishna; Muruganandam, Nagarajan; Anwesh, Maile; Rajesh, Reesu; Ghosal, Sruti R; Kartick, Chinnaiah; Prasad, Kadiyala Nageswara; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Vijayachari, Paluru

    2013-10-01

    A sudden upsurge of fever cases with joint pain was observed in the outpatient department, Community Health Centre, Rangat during July-August 2010 in Rangat Middle Andaman, India. The aetiological agent responsible for the outbreak was identified as chikungunya virus (CHIKV), by using RT-PCR and IgM ELISA. The study investigated the association of polymorphisms in the human leucocyte antigen class II genes with susceptibility or protection against CHIKV. One hundred and one patients with clinical features suggestive of CHIKV infection and 104 healthy subjects were included in the study. DNA was extracted and typed for HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles. Based on the amino acid sequences of HLA-DQB1 retrieved from the IMGT/HLA database, critical amino acid differences in the specific peptide-binding pockets of HLA-DQB1 molecules were investigated. The frequencies of HLA-DRB1 alleles were not significantly different, whereas lower frequency of HLA-DQB1*03:03 was observed in CHIKV patients compared with the control population [P = 0·001, corrected P = 0·024; odds ratio (OR)  = 0, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0·0-0·331; Peto's OR = 0·1317, 95% CI 0·0428-0·405). Significantly lower frequency of glutamic acid at position 86 of peptide-binding pocket 1 coding HLA-DQB1 genotypes was observed in CHIKV patients compared with healthy controls (P = 0·004, OR = 0·307, 95% CI 0·125-0·707). Computational binding predictions of CD4 epitopes of CHIKV by NetMHCII revealed that HLA-DQ molecules are known to bind more CHIKV peptides than HLA-DRB1 molecules. The results suggest that HLA-DQB1 alleles and critical amino acid differences in the peptide-binding pockets of HLA-DQB1 alleles might have role in influencing infection and pathogenesis of CHIKV.

  10. Association between HLA class Ⅱ gene and susceptibility or resistance to chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye-Gui Jiang; Yu-Ming Wang; Tong-Hua Liu; Jun Liu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between the polymorphism of HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles and viral hepatitis B.METHODS: HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles in 54patients with chronic hepatitis B, 30 patients with acute hepatitis B and 106 normal control subjects were analyzed by using the polymerase chain reaction/sequence specific primer (PCR/SSP) technique.RESULTS: The allele frequency of HLA-DRB1*0301 in the chronic hepatitis B group was markedly higher than that in the normal control group (17.31% VS 5.67%), there was a significant correlation between them (χ2= 12.3068,Pc=0.0074, RR=4.15). The allele frequency of HLADQA1*0501 in the chronic hepatitis B group was significantly higher than that in the normal control group (25.96% VS 13.68%), there was a significant correlation between them (χ2=9.2002, PC=0.0157, RR=2.87). The allele frequency of HLA-DQB1*0301 in the chronic hepatitis B group was notably higher than that in the normal control group (35.58%vs 18.87%), there was a significant correlation between them (χ2=15.5938, PC=0.0075, RR=4.07). The allele frequency of HLA-DRB1*1101/1104 in the chronic hepatitis B group was obviously lower than that in the normal control group (0.96% VS 13.33%), there was a significant correlation between them (χ2=11.9206, PC=0.0145, RR=18.55). The allele frequency of HLA-DQA1*0301 in the chronic hepatitis B group was remarkably lower than that in the normal control group (14.42% VS30%), there was a significant correlation between them (χ2=8.7396, Pc=0.0167, RR=0.35).CONCLUSION: HLA-DRB1*0301, HLA-DQA1*0501 and HLA-DQB1*0301 are closely related with susceptibility to chronic hepatitis B, and HLA-DRB1*1101/1104 and HLADQA1*0301 are closely related with resistance to chronic hepatitis B. These findings suggest that host HLA class Ⅱ gene is an important factor determining the outcome of HBV infection.

  11. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

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    Barquera Rodrigo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. Methods We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. Results HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031. HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670. DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001. Conclusion Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the

  12. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Friis, J; Fugger, L;

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, and -DPB in 54 patients with pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (PJRA) and in healthy Danes. The frequencies of DNA fragments a...

  13. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    % of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T-cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I-binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus-specific antigenic peptide presentation...

  14. A novel role of HLA class I in the pathology of medulloblastoma

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    Rood Brian R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC class I expression by cancer cells enables specific antigen recognition by the immune system and protection of the host. However, in some cancer types MHC class I expression is associated with an unfavorable outcome. We explored the basis of MHC class I association with unfavorable prognostic marker expression in the case of medulloblastoma. Methods We investigated expression of four essential components of MHC class I (heavy chain, β2m, TAP1 and TAP2 in 10 medulloblastoma mRNA samples, a tissue microarray containing 139 medulloblastoma tissues and 3 medulloblastoma cell lines. Further, in medulloblastoma cell lines we evaluated the effects of HLA class I engagement on activation of ERK1/2 and migration in vitro. Results The majority of specimens displayed undetectable or low levels of the heavy chains. Medulloblastomas expressing high levels of HLA class I displayed significantly higher levels of anaplasia and c-myc expression, markers of poor prognosis. Binding of β2m or a specific antibody to open forms of HLA class I promoted phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in medulloblastoma cell line with high levels, but not in the cell line with low levels of HLA heavy chain. This treatment also promoted ERK1/2 activation dependent migration of medulloblastoma cells. Conclusion MHC class I expression in medulloblastoma is associated with anaplasia and c-myc expression, markers of poor prognosis. Peptide- and/or β2m-free forms of MHC class I may contribute to a more malignant phenotype of medulloblastoma by modulating activation of signaling molecules such as ERK1/2 that stimulates cell mobility.

  15. HLA Class I Binding 9mer Peptides from Influenza A Virus Induce CD4(+) T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M. J.; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Nielsen, Morten;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Identification of human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes from influenza virus is of importance for the development of new effective peptide-based vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings: In the present work, bioinformatics was used to predict...... 9mer peptides derived from available influenza A viral proteins with binding affinity for at least one of the 12 HLA-I supertypes. The predicted peptides were then selected in a way that ensured maximal coverage of the available influenza A strains. One hundred and thirty one peptides were...... of the pan-specific anti-HLA class II (HLA-II) antibody IVA12. Blocking of HLA-II subtype reactivity revealed that 8 and 6 peptide responses were blocked by anti-HLA-DR and -DP antibodies, respectively. Peptide reactivity of PBMC depleted of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells prior to the ELISPOT culture revealed...

  16. Association of HLA class II alleles and CTLA-4 polymorphism with type 1 diabetes

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    Rana J EI Wafai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is a progressive complex autoimmune disease in which combinations of environmental as well as genetic factors contribute to T-cell mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells of the pancreas. HLA class II alleles on chromosome 6p21 [insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 1 (IDDM1], especially DR and DQ, show strong association with T1DM. In addition, several studies have suggested that polymorphisms in the CTLA-4 gene (IDDM12 on chromosome 2q33 form part of the genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to analyze HLA alleles of the DQB1 and DRB1 genes using polymerase chain reaction using sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP technique and to investigate the asso-ciation of the A49G CTLA-4 polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in Lebanese T1DM patients. The study was conduc-ted on 39 Lebanese T1DM patients. Results of HLA typing showed an increased frequency of the HLA-DQB1FNx010201, HLA-DQB1FNx010302, HLA-DRB1FNx010301 and HLA-DRB1FNx010401 alleles, sugges-ting risk association and thus can be considered as susceptibility alleles. On the other hand, strong protection against the disease was conferred by the HLA-DRB1FNx01110101, HLA-DQB1FNx010301 and HLADQB1FNx010601 alleles. RFLP analysis of the A49G polymorphism showed a significant increase in the G allele and GG genotype frequencies in patients, suggesting that CTLA-4 may be considered as a susceptibility gene for the development of T1DM in the Lebanese population. Analysis of the two polymorphisms showed no detectable association between the two genes. However, a significant negative association of the G allele with the DQB1FNx010201 allele was ob-served. This might indicate that the two genetic risk factors, namely HLA and CTLA-4, act independently of each other with no additive effect.

  17. Inhibition of HLA-DM mediated MHC class II peptide loading by HLA-DO promotes self tolerance

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    Lisa K. Denzin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility class II (MHCII molecules are loaded with peptides derived from foreign and self-proteins within the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen presenting cells (APCs. This process is mediated by interaction of MHCII with the conserved, nonpolymorphic MHCII-like molecule HLA-DM (DM. DM activity is directly opposed by HLA-DO (DO, another conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule. DO is an MHCII substrate mimic. Binding of DO to DM prevents MHCII from binding to DM, thereby inhibiting peptide loading. Inhibition of DM function enables low stability MHC complexes to survive and populate the surface of APCS. As a consequence, DO promotes the display of a broader pool of low abundance self-peptides. Broadening the peptide repertoire theoretically reduces the likelihood of inadvertently acquiring a density of self-ligands that is sufficient to activate self-reactive T cells. One function of DO, therefore, is to promote T cell tolerance by shaping the visible image of self. Recent data also shows that DO influences the adaptive immune response by controlling B cell entry into the germinal center reaction. This review explores the data supporting these concepts.

  18. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Dalhoff, K; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, -DPB, the serologically defined HLA-A, B, C, DR antigens, and the primed lymphocyte typing defined HLA-DP antigens in 23 Danish patients with primary......) associated DRB Bgl II 9.1 kilobase (kb) fragment (RR = 2.9; P less than 0.05, 'corrected' P greater than 0.05), the DQA1*0501 associated DQA Taq I 4.8 kb fragment (RR = 3.1; P less than 0.05, 'corrected' P greater than 0.05), the DQB1*0201 (DQw2) associated DQB Hin dIII 11.5 kb fragment (RR = 3.1; P less...

  19. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Federico; Perea, Francisco; Bernal, Mónica; Sánchez-Palencia, Abel; Aptsiauri, Natalia; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I) expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). PMID:28264447

  20. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Garrido

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL.

  1. HLA class I and class II conserved extended haplotypes and their fragments or blocks in Mexicans: implications for the study of genetic diversity in admixed populations.

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    Joaquín Zúñiga

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes are highly polymorphic and informative in disease association, transplantation, and population genetics studies with particular importance in the understanding of human population diversity and evolution. The aim of this study was to describe the HLA diversity in Mexican admixed individuals. We studied the polymorphism of MHC class I (HLA-A, -B, -C, and class II (HLA-DRB1, -DQB1 genes using high-resolution sequence based typing (SBT method and we structured the blocks and conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs in 234 non-related admixed Mexican individuals (468 haplotypes by a maximum likelihood method. We found that HLA blocks and CEHs are primarily from Amerindian and Caucasian origin, with smaller participation of African and recent Asian ancestry, demonstrating a great diversity of HLA blocks and CEHs in Mexicans from the central area of Mexico. We also analyzed the degree of admixture in this group using short tandem repeats (STRs and HLA-B that correlated with the frequency of most probable ancestral HLA-C/-B and -DRB1/-DQB1 blocks and CEHs. Our results contribute to the analysis of the diversity and ancestral contribution of HLA class I and HLA class II alleles and haplotypes of Mexican admixed individuals from Mexico City. This work will help as a reference to improve future studies in Mexicans regarding allotransplantation, immune responses and disease associations.

  2. MHC class II super-enhancer increases surface expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ and affects cytokine production in autoimmune vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Giulio; Hayashi, Masahiro; Jin, Ying; Yorgov, Daniel; Santorico, Stephanie A; Holcomb, Cherie; Rastrou, Melinda; Erlich, Henry; Tengesdal, Isak W; Dagna, Lorenzo; Neff, C Preston; Palmer, Brent E; Spritz, Richard A; Dinarello, Charles A

    2016-02-02

    Genetic risk for autoimmunity in HLA genes is most often attributed to structural specificity resulting in presentation of self-antigens. Autoimmune vitiligo is strongly associated with the MHC class II region. Here, we fine-map vitiligo MHC class II genetic risk to three SNPs only 47 bp apart, located within a predicted super-enhancer in an intergenic region between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1, localized by a genome-wide association study of 2,853 Caucasian vitiligo patients. The super-enhancer corresponds to an expression quantitative trait locus for expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ RNA; we observed elevated surface expression of HLA-DR (P = 0.008) and HLA-DQ (P = 0.02) on monocytes from healthy subjects homozygous for the high-risk SNP haplotype. Unexpectedly, pathogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects homozygous for the high-risk super-enhancer haplotype exhibited greater increase in production of IFN-γ and IL-1β than cells from subjects homozygous for the low-risk haplotype. Specifically, production of IFN-γ on stimulation of dectin-1, mannose, and Toll-like receptors with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 2.5- and 2.9-fold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects, respectively (P = 0.007 and P = 0.01). Similarly, production of IL-1β was fivefold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects (P = 0.02). Increased production of immunostimulatory cytokines in subjects carrying the high-risk haplotype may act as an "adjuvant" during the presentation of autoantigens, tying together genetic variation in the MHC with the development of autoimmunity. This study demonstrates that for risk of autoimmune vitiligo, expression level of HLA class II molecules is as or more important than antigen specificity.

  3. KIR genes and HLA class I ligands in a Caucasian Brazilian population with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Pâmela; Merzoni, Joice; Lindenau, Juliana D; Damin, Daniel C; Wilson, Timothy John; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Jobim, Luiz Fernando; Jobim, Mariana

    2017-01-11

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) can occur anywhere in the colon or rectum and represents the third most common cancer in the world in both sexes. Natural killer cells (NK) are part of the innate immune system recognizing class I HLA molecules on target cells through their membrane receptors, called killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between the KIR genes and HLA ligands in patients with colorectal cancer and healthy controls. We examined the polymorphism of 16 KIR genes and their HLA ligands in 154 caucasoid CRC patients and 216 controls. When both groups were compared, no significant differences were found for HLA ligands and KIR genes after Bonferroni correction. However, the Bx haplotypes (heterozygous and homozygous for the haplotype B) were more frequent in controls, when compared with patients. These findings suggest that individuals with Bx haplotypes could have some protection to colorectal cancer. The hypothesis is not related with the presence of a special KIR gene and HLA ligand related to the disease, but to the presence of several activating genes in the individuals with no better action of one in relation to other. Further studies to confirm this observation are warranted.

  4. Post-transplant anti-HLA class II antibodies as risk factor for late kidney allograft failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, E F; Tedesco-Silva, H; Machado, P G; Franco, M; Medina-Pestana, J O; Gerbase-DeLima, M

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyze the relationship between the post-transplant anti-HLA class I and/or class II panel reactive antibodies and graft failure due to chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). We studied 512 first kidney recipients transplanted at a single center, with a graft functioning for at least 3 years. A single blood sample was collected from each patient for antibody evaluation. The median posttransplant time after blood collection was 4.4 years and did not differ between patients with (n = 91) or without anti-HLA antibodies (n = 421). Female gender, pregnancies and blood transfusions were associated with the presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies. Graft function deterioration was associated with anti-HLA class II antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed independent association for creatinine levels (RR = 7.5), acute rejection (RR = 2.6), recipient male gender (RR = 3.6) and anti-HLA class II antibodies (RR = 2.9) and CAN-associated graft loss. In conclusion, the presence of anti-HLA class II antibodies conferred a risk for graft loss before a decline in renal function and increased the risk of graft failure in patients who already had a decline in graft function. Thus, anti-HLA class II antibody monitoring is a useful tool for the management of long-term kidney recipients.

  5. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Anderson, Robert P. [Autoimmunity and Transplantation Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, 1G Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan Street, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); McCluskey, James [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rossjohn, Jamie, E-mail: jamie.rossjohn@med.monash.edu.au [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  6. Role of metalloproteases in vaccinia virus epitope processing for transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-independent human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B7 class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; García, Ruth; Mir, Carmen; Barriga, Alejandro; Lemonnier, François A; Ramos, Manuel; López, Daniel

    2012-03-23

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the viral proteolytic peptides generated by the proteasome and other proteases in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. There, they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, which are subsequently recognized by the CD8(+) lymphocyte cellular response. However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or tumor or infected cells with blocked TAP molecules are able to present HLA class I ligands generated by TAP-independent processing pathways. Herein, using a TAP-independent polyclonal vaccinia virus-polyspecific CD8(+) T cell line, two conserved vaccinia-derived TAP-independent HLA-B*0702 epitopes were identified. The presentation of these epitopes in normal cells occurs via complex antigen-processing pathways involving the proteasome and/or different subsets of metalloproteinases (amino-, carboxy-, and endoproteases), which were blocked in infected cells with specific chemical inhibitors. These data support the hypothesis that the abundant cellular proteolytic systems contribute to the supply of peptides recognized by the antiviral cellular immune response, thereby facilitating immunosurveillance. These data may explain why TAP-deficient individuals live normal life spans without any increased susceptibility to viral infections.

  7. HLA class II sequence variants influence tuberculosis risk in populations of European ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kristinsson, Karl G.; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Gudmundsson, Larus J.; Blondal, Kai; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon Axel; Helgadottir, Hafdis T.; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Karason, Ari; Kardum, Ljiljana Bulat; Knežević, Jelena; Kristjansson, Helgi; Kristjansson, Mar; Love, Arthur; Luo, Yang; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Sulem, Patrick; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Dembic, Zlatko; Nejentsev, Sergey; Blondal, Thorsteinn; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infections cause 9.0 million new tuberculosis (TB) cases and 1.5 million deaths annually1. To search for sequence variants that confer risk of TB we tested 28.3 million variants identified through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders for association with TB (8,162 cases and 277,643 controls), pulmonary TB (PTB), and M. tuberculosis infection. We found association of three sequence variants in the HLA class II region: rs557011[T] (MAF=40.2%) with M. tuberculosis infection (OR =1.14, P=3.1×10-13) and PTB (OR=1.25, P=5.8×10-12) and rs9271378[G] (MAF=32.5%) with PTB (OR=0.78, P=2.5×10-12), both located between HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DRB1. Finally, a missense variant p.Ala210Thr in HLA-DQA1, (MAF=19.1%, rs9272785) shows association with M. tuberculosis infection (P=9.3×10-9, OR=1.14). The association of these variants with PTB was replicated in large samples of European ancestry from Russia and Croatia (Ptuberculosis, possibly through reduced presentation of protective M. tuberculosis antigens to T cells. PMID:26829749

  8. Immunological and clinical significance of HLA class I antigen processing machinery component defects in malignant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha-Benavente, Fernando; Srivastava, Raghvendra; Ferrone, Soldano; Ferris, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental as well as clinical studies demonstrate that the immune system plays a major role in controlling generation and progression of tumors. The cancer immunoediting theory supports the notion that tumor cell immunogenicity is dynamically shaped by the immune system, as it eliminates immunogenic tumor cells in the early stage of the disease and then edits their antigenicity. The end result is the generation of a tumor cell population able to escape from immune recognition and elimination by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Two major mechanisms, which affect the target cells and the effector phase of the immune response, play a crucial role in the editing process. One is represented by the downregulation of tumor antigen (TA) processing and presentation because of abnormalities in the HLA class I antigen processing machinery (APM). The other one is represented by the anergy of effector immune infiltrates in the tumor microenvironment caused by aberrant inhibitory signals triggered by immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) ligands, such as programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1). In this review, we will focus on tumor immune escape mechanisms caused by defects in HLA class I APM component expression and/or function in different types of cancer, with emphasis on head and neck cancer (HNC). We will also discuss the immunological implications and clinical relevance of these HLA class I APM abnormalities. Finally, we will describe strategies to counteract defective TA presentation with the expectation that they will enhance tumor recognition and elimination by tumor infiltrating effector T cells. PMID:27264839

  9. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany; Remesh, Soumya G; Kaever, Thomas; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Kenneth; McLeod, Rima; Sette, Alessandro; Nielsen, Morten; Zajonc, Dirk M; Blader, Ira J; Peters, Bjoern; Hildebrand, William

    2016-01-29

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T-cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected cells and characterize the peptide ligands using LCMS. We identify 195 T. gondii encoded ligands originating from both secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Surprisingly, T. gondii ligands are significantly longer than uninfected host ligands, and these longer pathogen-derived peptides maintain a canonical N-terminal binding core yet exhibit a C-terminal extension of 1-30 amino acids. Structural analysis demonstrates that binding of extended peptides opens the HLA class I F' pocket, allowing the C-terminal extension to protrude through one end of the binding groove. In summary, we demonstrate that unrealized structural flexibility makes MHC class I receptive to parasite-derived ligands that exhibit unique C-terminal peptide extensions.

  10. Lack of association between alopecia areata and HLA class I and II in a southeastern Brazilian population*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ângela Marques; Prestes-Carneiro, Luiz Euribel; Sobral, Aldri Roberta Sodoschi; Sakiyama, Marcelo Jun; Lemos, Bruna Cerávolo; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado; Martos, Luciana Leite Crivelin; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Alopecia areata (AA) is a common disorder of unknown etiology that affects approximately 0.7% to 3.8% of patients among the general population. Currently, genetic and autoimmune factors are emphasized as etiopathogenic. Studies linking Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) to AA have suggested that immunogenetic factors may play a role in the disease's onset/development. Objectives To investigate an association between AA and HLA class I/II in white Brazilians. Methods: Patients and control groups comprised 33 and 112 individuals, respectively. DNA extraction was performed by column method with BioPur kit. Allele's classification was undertaken using the PCR-SSO technique. HLA frequencies were obtained through direct counting and subjected to comparison by means of the chi-square test. Results Most patients were aged over 16, with no familial history, and developed partial AA, with no recurrent episodes. Patients showed a higher frequency of HLA-B*40, HLA-B*45, HLA-B*53 and HLA-C*04 compared with controls, although P was not significant after Bonferroni correction. Regarding HLA class II, only HLA-DRB1*07 revealed statistical significance; nevertheless, it featured more prominently in controls than patients (P=0.04; Pc=0.52; OR=0.29; 95%; CI=0.07 to 1.25). P was not significant after Bonferroni correction. Conclusions The development of AA does not seem to be associated with HLA in white Brazilians, nor with susceptibility or resistance. The studies were carried out in populations with little or no miscegenation, unlike the Brazilian population in general, which could explain the inconsistency found. PMID:27438193

  11. HLA class II variation in the Gila River Indian Community of Arizona: alleles, haplotypes, and a high frequency epitope at the HLA-DR locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R C; McAuley, J E

    1992-01-01

    A genetic distribution for the HLA class II loci is described for 349 "full-blooded" Pima and Tohono O'odham Indians (Pimans) in the Gila River Indian Community. A high frequency epitope in the *DRw52 family was defined by reactions with 31 alloantisera, which we have designated *DR3X6. It segregates as a codominant allele at HLA-DR with alleles *DR2, *DR4, and *DRw8, and has the highest frequency yet reported for an HLA-DR specificity, 0.735. It forms a common haplotype with *DRw52 and *DQw3 that is a valuable marker for genetic admixture and anthropological studies. Phenotype and allele frequencies, and haplotype frequencies for two and three loci, are presented. Variation at these loci is highly restricted, the mean heterozygosity for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ being 0.361. The Pimans represent a contemporary model for the Paleo-Indians who first entered North America 20,000 to 40,000 years ago.

  12. Clinical and immunological significance of HLA-E in stem cell transplantation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieten, L; Mahaweni, N M; Voorter, C E M; Bos, G M J; Tilanus, M G J

    2014-12-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule that canonically binds peptides derived from the leader sequence of classical HLA class I. HLA-E can also bind peptides from stress protein [e.g. heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60)] and pathogens, illustrating the importance of HLA-E for anti-viral and anti-tumor immunity. Like classical HLA class I molecules, HLA-E is ubiquitously expressed, however, it is characterized by only a very limited sequence variability and two dominant protein forms have been described (HLA-E*01:01 and HLA-E*01:03). HLA-E influences both the innate and the adaptive arms of the immune system by the engagement of inhibitory (e.g. NKG2A) and activating receptors [e.g. αβ T cell receptor (αβTCR) or NKG2C] on NK cells and CD8 T cells. The effects of HLA-E on the cellular immune response are therefore complex and not completely understood yet. Here, we aim to provide an overview of the immunological and clinical relevance of HLA-E and HLA-E polymorphism in stem cell transplantation and in cancer. We review novel insights in the mechanism via which HLA-E expression levels are controlled and how the cellular immune response in transplantation and cancer is influenced by HLA-E.

  13. Association of high CD4-positive T cell infiltration with mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmann, Eva-Maria; Voigt, Anita Y; Michel, Sara; Bauer, Kathrin; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Ferrone, Soldano; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Besides being expressed on professional antigen-presenting cells, HLA class II antigens are expressed on various tumors of non-lymphoid origin, including a subset of colorectal cancers (CRC). Information about the regulation of HLA class II antigen expression is important for a better understanding of their role in the interactions between tumor and immune cells. Whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in tumors reflects the selective immune destruction of HLA class II antigen-expressing tumor cells is unknown. To address this question, we tested whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in CRC was associated with immune cell infiltration. We selected microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) CRC, because they show pronounced tumor antigen-specific immune responses and, in a subset of tumors, lack of HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations inactivating HLA class II-regulatory genes. We examined HLA class II antigen expression, mutations in regulatory genes, and CD4-positive T cell infiltration in 69 MSI-H CRC lesions. Mutations in RFX5, CIITA, and RFXAP were found in 13 (28.9%), 3 (6.7%), and 1 (2.2%) out of 45 HLA class II antigen-negative tumors. CD4-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in HLA class II antigen-negative tumors harboring mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes (107.4 T cells per 0.25 mm(2)) compared to tumors without mutations (55.5 T cells per 0.25 mm(2), p = 0.008). Our results suggest that the outgrowth of tumor cells lacking HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations of regulatory genes is favored in an environment of dense CD4-positive T cell infiltration.

  14. High-accuracy imputation for HLA class I and II genes based on high-resolution SNP data of population-specific references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, S-S; Yang, W; Kawashima, M; Kamitsuji, S; Zheng, X; Nishida, N; Sawai, H; Toyoda, H; Miyagawa, T; Honda, M; Kamatani, N; Tokunaga, K

    2015-12-01

    Statistical imputation of classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles is becoming an indispensable tool for fine-mappings of disease association signals from case-control genome-wide association studies. However, most currently available HLA imputation tools are based on European reference populations and are not suitable for direct application to non-European populations. Among the HLA imputation tools, The HIBAG R package is a flexible HLA imputation tool that is equipped with a wide range of population-based classifiers; moreover, HIBAG R enables individual researchers to build custom classifiers. Here, two data sets, each comprising data from healthy Japanese individuals of difference sample sizes, were used to build custom classifiers. HLA imputation accuracy in five HLA classes (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DPB1) increased from the 82.5-98.8% obtained with the original HIBAG references to 95.2-99.5% with our custom classifiers. A call threshold (CT) of 0.4 is recommended for our Japanese classifiers; in contrast, HIBAG references recommend a CT of 0.5. Finally, our classifiers could be used to identify the risk haplotypes for Japanese narcolepsy with cataplexy, HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*06:02, with 100% and 99.7% accuracy, respectively; therefore, these classifiers can be used to supplement the current lack of HLA genotyping data in widely available genome-wide association study data sets.

  15. Anti-cofactor autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: prevalence, clinical and HLA class II associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Morozzi, Gabriella; Bellisai, Francesca; Fineschi, Irene; Bacarelli, Maria Romana; Simpatico, Antonella; Font, Josep; Cervera, Ricard; Houssiau, Frederic; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; De Ramon Garrido, Enrique; De Pità, Ornella; Smolen, Josef; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical and HLA-class II allele associations of some anti-cofactor antibodies in a homogeneous group of European patients with SLE. One hundred thirty-six patients with SLE, fulfilling four or more of the ACR 1997 revised criteria for the classification of the disease, coming from 7 European countries, were enrolled consecutively. Anti-prothrombin (anti-PT), anti-annexin V (anti-AnnV), anti-protein C (anti-Cprot) and anti-protein S (anti-Sprot) were determined by using commercial ELISA kits. Molecular typing of HLA-DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 loci was performed by using PCR-SSOP method, carried out using digoxygenin (DIG) labeled probes. The prevalence of anti-AnnV, anti-PT, anti-Cprot and anti-Sprot was 19%, 10.4%, 4.4% and 8.1%, respectively. Twenty-seven % of anti-AnnV positive patients reported migraine vs 5.5% of anti-AnnV negatives (p = 0.003, but p not significant, odds ratio (OR) = 6.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2-21). Anti-PT, anti-AnnV and anti-Sprot were positively associated with some HLA alleles, but pc was not significant. In this study we have shown that some HLA alleles carry the risk to produce antibodies against phospholipid-binding proteins, but these association need confirmation in other studies, because they have never been reported and appear to be weak associations.

  16. Association of HLA class II alleles with sensitization to cow dander Bos d 2, an important occupational allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Anu; Peräsaari, Juha; Taivainen, Antti; Kinnunen, Tuure; Saarelainen, Soili; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja; Jeal, Hayley; Jones, Meinir; Virtanen, Tuomas

    2012-01-01

    Allergic sensitization results from a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Earlier studies have shown that highly polymorphic HLA genes are associated with a variety of allergies. Several important respiratory allergens belong to the family of lipocalin proteins. These include occupational sensitizers, such as cow Bos d 2 or rat Rat n 1, and prevalent indoor sensitizers, such as dog Can f 1 or cockroach Bla g 4. HLA associations with sensitization to lipocalin allergens are incompletely known. In the present study we have investigated an association between HLA alleles and sensitization to the major cow allergen Bos d 2. The HLA-DR/DQ genotypes of 40 Bos d 2-sensitized subjects having occupational asthma were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the results were compared with the genotypes of 151 unrelated Finnish subjects. The frequencies of HLA class II alleles DRB1*0101, DRB1*0404, DQB1*0302, and DQB1*0501 were significantly higher among Bos d 2-sensitized than among control subjects. In addition, the allergic subjects expressed significantly lower frequencies of HLA-DRB1*0301 and DQB1*0201 alleles than did the control subjects. These data suggest that the HLA class II alleles DRB1*0101, DRB1*0404, DQB1*0302, and DQB1*0501, and the haplotypes that include them, are associated with sensitization to the major cow allergen Bos d 2, whereas HLA-DRB1*0301 and DQB1*0201 are dissociated with it. Amino acid analysis provides a biologically plausible explanation for the HLA associations.

  17. Set Theory Applied to the Mathematical Characterization of HLA Class II Binding Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rodríguez Velásquez, MD, esp.1

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Antigen presentation contains the molecularbasis for antigenic identification and immuneresponses. The set theory and experimental datawere used in order to develop an union core regionmathematic characterization through the definitionof 8 laws associated to HLA class II binding.The laws were applied to 4 promiscuous peptides,25 natural peptides sequences of core region: 13binding peptides and 12 no binding peptides; and19 synthetic peptides looking to differentiate peptides.Only one peptide was not rightly characterized.This methodology may be used to choose keypeptides in the development of vaccine.

  18. Lack of association between parenchymal neurocysticercosis and HLA Class I and Class II antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Picchioni Bompeixe

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis, caused by encysted larvae of the tapeworm Taenia solium, is the most common infection of the central nervous system and a major public health problem in many countries. Prevalence in the region of Curitiba, located in the southern Brazilian State of Paraná, is one of the highest in the world. The genetics of host susceptibility to neurocysticercosis (NCC is still obscure. To investigate if major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes influence individual susceptibility to NCC, we performed a case-control association analysis. Fifty-two Caucasoid patients and 149 matched controls were typed for antigens of the HLA-A, B, C, DR and DQ loci. All patients had computerized tomography and clinical features compatible with parenchymal NCC. Indirect immunofluorescence of cerebrospinal fluid showed that 19 (37% of the patients presented anti-cysticercus antibodies at titers ³ 1:10. Frequencies of HLA specificities in the whole group of patients and in the subgroup with antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid were compared to those of the control group. No significant difference was found. These results do not support the hypothesis of HLA gene participation in susceptibility to parenchymal neurocysticercosis.A neurocisticercose, causada pelo cisticerco, a larva do cestóide Taenia solium, é a infecção mais comum do sistema nervoso central e constitui importante problema de saúde pública em muitos países. A sua prevalência na região de Curitiba, localizada no Estado do Paraná, foi estimada em 9%, situando-se entre as mais elevadas do mundo. Os aspectos genéticos de suscetibilidade à neurocisticercose (NCC ainda são pouco conhecidos. Com o objetivo de investigar se genes do MHC influenciam a suscetibilidade individual à NCC, realizamos uma análise de associação caso-controle. Cinqüenta e dois pacientes caucasóides e 149 indivíduos-controle pareados foram tipados para antígenos dos locos HLA-A, B, C, DR e DQ. Todos os

  19. A new human leukocyte antigen class Ⅰ allele, HLA- B * 52:11*%HLA-Ⅰ类基因新等位基因HLA-B*52:11的序列分析及确认

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓丰; 章旭; 张坤莲; 陈阳; 刘显智; 李剑平

    2011-01-01

    目的 序列分析及确定1个HLA新等位基因.方法 应用基于Luminex平台的聚合酶链式反应-序列特异性寡核苷酸探针(polymerase chain reaction- sequence specific oligonucleotide probes,PCR-SSOP)基因分型方法、PCR产物测序和基因克隆测序方法,通过软件分析该基因序列及与最相近等位基因的序列差异.结果 PCR-SSOP结果显示,该样品HLA-Ⅰ类基因B位点反应格局出现异常提示;测序结果最终表明其B位点第3外显子序列与所有已知HLA-B等位基因序列均不一致,在所检测的外显子第2、3、4区域中,与序列最相近的等位基因HLA-B* 52:01:01的差异只是在第3外显子产生了nt 583 C→T一个核苷酸替代,并导致相应的195位密码子由CAC(H)→TAC(Y),氨基酸组成由组氨酸变为酪氨酸.结论 经序列分析1个HLA-Ⅰ类基因的新等位基因被确认,已被世界卫生组织HLA因子命名委员会正式命名为HLA-B* 52:11.%Objective To identify and confirm a novel HLA allele.Methods A new human leukocyte antigen class Ⅰ allele was found during routine HLA genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific oligonucleotide probes(PCR-SSOP) and sequencing-based typing (SBT).Results The novel HLA-B * 52 allele was identical to B * 52:01:01 with an exception of one base substitution at position 583 of exon 3 where a ‘C' was changed to ‘T' resulting in codon 195 changed from CAC(H) to TAC(Y).Conclusion A new HLA class Ⅰ allele,B * 52:11,is identified,and is named officially by the WHO Nomenclature Committee.

  20. The Presence, Persistence and Functional Properties of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein II Antibodies Are Influenced by HLA Class II Allelic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leticia M.; Lima, Barbara A. S.; Sousa, Taís N.; Alves, Jéssica R. S.; Rocha, Roberto S.; Fontes, Cor J. F.; Sanchez, Bruno A. M.; Adams, John H.; Brito, Cristiana F. A.; Pires, Douglas E. V.; Ascher, David B.; Sell, Ana Maria; Carvalho, Luzia H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax infects red blood cells through a key pathway that requires interaction between Duffy binding protein II (DBPII) and its receptor on reticulocytes, the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC). A high proportion of P. vivax-exposed individuals fail to develop antibodies that inhibit DBPII-DARC interaction, and genetic factors that modulate this humoral immune response are poorly characterized. Here, we investigate if DBPII responsiveness could be HLA class II-linked. Methodology/Principal Findings A community-based open cohort study was carried out in an agricultural settlement of the Brazilian Amazon, in which 336 unrelated volunteers were genotyped for HLA class II (DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci), and their DBPII immune responses were monitored over time (baseline, 6 and 12 months) by conventional serology (DBPII IgG ELISA-detected) and functional assays (inhibition of DBPII–erythrocyte binding). The results demonstrated an increased susceptibility of the DRB1*13:01 carriers to develop and sustain an anti-DBPII IgG response, while individuals with the haplotype DRB1*14:02-DQA1*05:03-DQB1*03:01 were persistent non-responders. HLA class II gene polymorphisms also influenced the functional properties of DBPII antibodies (BIAbs, binding inhibitory antibodies), with three alleles (DRB1*07:01, DQA1*02:01 and DQB1*02:02) comprising a single haplotype linked with the presence and persistence of the BIAbs response. Modelling the structural effects of the HLA-DRB1 variants revealed a number of differences in the peptide-binding groove, which is likely to lead to altered antigen binding and presentation profiles, and hence may explain the differences in subject responses. Conclusions/Significance The current study confirms the heritability of the DBPII antibody response, with genetic variation in HLA class II genes influencing both the development and persistence of IgG antibody responses. Cellular studies to increase

  1. Structure of a SARS coronavirus-derived peptide bound to the human major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-B*1501

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Gustav; Kristensen, Ole; Kastrup, Jette S;

    2008-01-01

    , the crystal structure of HLA-B*1501 in complex with a SARS coronavirus-derived nonapeptide (VQQESSFVM) has been determined at high resolution (1.87 A). The peptide is deeply anchored in the B and F pockets, but with the Glu4 residue pointing away from the floor in the peptide-binding groove, making......The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I system comprises a highly polymorphic set of molecules that specifically bind and present peptides to cytotoxic T cells. HLA-B*1501 is a prototypical member of the HLA-B62 supertype and only two peptide-HLA-B*1501 structures have been determined. Here...

  2. Evidence of differential HLA class I-mediated viral evolution in functional and accessory/regulatory genes of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabrina L Brumme

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the formidable mutational capacity and sequence diversity of HIV-1, evidence suggests that viral evolution in response to specific selective pressures follows generally predictable mutational pathways. Population-based analyses of clinically derived HIV sequences may be used to identify immune escape mutations in viral genes; however, prior attempts to identify such mutations have been complicated by the inability to discriminate active immune selection from virus founder effects. Furthermore, the association between mutations arising under in vivo immune selection and disease progression for highly variable pathogens such as HIV-1 remains incompletely understood. We applied a viral lineage-corrected analytical method to investigate HLA class I-associated sequence imprinting in HIV protease, reverse transcriptase (RT, Vpr, and Nef in a large cohort of chronically infected, antiretrovirally naïve individuals. A total of 478 unique HLA-associated polymorphisms were observed and organized into a series of "escape maps," which identify known and putative cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL epitopes under selection pressure in vivo. Our data indicate that pathways to immune escape are predictable based on host HLA class I profile, and that epitope anchor residues are not the preferred sites of CTL escape. Results reveal differential contributions of immune imprinting to viral gene diversity, with Nef exhibiting far greater evidence for HLA class I-mediated selection compared to other genes. Moreover, these data reveal a significant, dose-dependent inverse correlation between HLA-associated polymorphisms and HIV disease stage as estimated by CD4(+ T cell count. Identification of specific sites and patterns of HLA-associated polymorphisms across HIV protease, RT, Vpr, and Nef illuminates regions of the genes encoding these products under active immune selection pressure in vivo. The high density of HLA-associated polymorphisms in Nef compared to other

  3. Dengue fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus synthetic peptides, with motifs to fit HLA class I haplotypes prevalent in human populations in endemic regions, can be used for application to skin Langerhans cells to prime antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs)--a novel approach to the protection of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Y

    1994-09-01

    Flaviviruses were reported to induce CD8+ cytotoxic T cells in infected individuals, indicating that nonapeptides, proteolytic cleavage products of the viral precursor protein, enter the endoplasmic reticulum in infected cells and interact with HLA class I molecules. The assembled HLA class I molecules are transported to the plasma membrane and prime CD8+ T cells. Current knowledge of the interaction of viral peptides with HLA molecules is reviewed. Based on this review, an idea is presented to use synthetic flavivirus peptides with an amino acid motif to fit with the HLA class I peptide binding group of HLA haplotypes prevalent in a given population in an endemic area. These synthetic viral peptides may be introduced into the human skin using a lotion containing the peptides ("Peplotion") together with substances capable of enhancing the penetration of these peptides into the skin to reach Langerhans cells. The peptide-treated Langerhans cells, professional antigen-presenting cells, may bind the synthetic viral peptides by their HLA class I peptide-binding grooves. Antigens carrying Langerhans cells are able to migrate and induce the cellular immune response in the lymph nodes. This approach to the priming of antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T cells may provide cellular immune protection from flavivirus infection without inducing the humoral immune response, which can lead to the shock syndrome in Dengue fever patients. To be able to develop anti-Dengue virus synthetic peptides for populations with different HLA class I haplotypes, it is necessary to develop computational studies to design HLA class I Dengue virus synthetic peptides with motifs to fit the HLA haplotypes of the population living in an endemic region for Dengue fever. Experiments to study Dengue virus and Japanese encephalitis peptides vaccines and their effectiveness in protection against Dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis are needed. The development of human antiviral vaccines for application of viral

  4. Alloactivated HLA class II-positive T-cell lines induce IL-2 reactivity but lack accessory cell function in mixed leukocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, N; Dickmeiss, E; Hofmann, B

    1989-01-01

    ). From 70 to 90% of the Ta were HLA class II-positive as judged by the reactions with HLA class II-reactive monoclonal antibodies, and the Ta carried the DR allospecificities of the original T-cell donor when typed in the microcytotoxic test using DR-specific alloantisera. Neither irradiated nor...

  5. Superantigen and HLA-DR ligation induce phospholipase-C gamma 1 activation in class II+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanner, S B; Odum, Niels; Grosmaire, L;

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial enterotoxin superantigens bind directly to HLA class II molecules (HLA-DR) expressed on both APC and activated human T cells, and simultaneously bind to certain V beta chains of the TCR. In this report, we compared early T cell signaling events in human alloantigen-stimulated T cells when...... activated by HLA-DR ligation through antibody cross-linking or by direct enterotoxin superantigen binding. Both types of stimuli induced tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and an increase in intracellular calcium concentration; however....... In addition, down-modulation of CD3 receptors with antibody demonstrated that superantigen-induced signaling events were CD3-dependent. Superantigen signaling was also class II-dependent, in that resting T cells were not responsive to direct enterotoxin stimulation. To address how early signal transducing...

  6. Identification of 2127 new HLA class I alleles in potential stem cell donors from Germany, the United States and Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Frederick, C J; Giani, A S; Cereb, N; Sauter, J; Silva-González, R; Pingel, J; Schmidt, A H; Ehninger, G; Yang, S Y

    2014-03-01

    We describe 2127 new human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles found in registered stem cell donors. These alleles represent 28.9% of the currently known class I alleles. Comparing new allele sequences to homologous sequences, we found 68.1% nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions, 28.9% silent mutations and 3.0% nonsense mutations. Many substitutions occurred at positions that have not been known to be polymorphic before. A large number of HLA alleles and nucleotide variations underline the extreme diversity of the HLA system. Strikingly, 156 new alleles were found not only multiple times, but also in carriers of various parentage, suggesting that some new alleles are not necessarily rare. Moreover, new alleles were found especially often in minority donors. This emphasizes the benefits of specifically recruiting such groups of individuals.

  7. SNP variants associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) correlate with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, Lik-Chin; Chin, Yoon-Ming; Tai, Mei-Chee; Chin, Edmund Fui-Min; Lim, Yat-Yuen; Suthandiram, Sujatha; Chang, Kian-Meng; Ong, Tee-Chuan; Bee, Ping-Chong; Mohamed, Zahurin; Gan, Gin-Gin; Ng, Ching-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Large consortia efforts and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have linked a number of genetic variants within the 6p21 chromosomal region to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Complementing these efforts, we genotyped previously reported SNPs in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I (rs6457327) and class II (rs9271100, rs2647012 and rs10484561) regions in a total of 1,145 subjects (567 NHL cases and 578 healthy controls) from two major ethnic groups in Malaysia, the Malays and the Chinese. We identified a NHL-associated (PNHL_add = 0.0008; ORNHL_add = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.37–0.77) and B-cell associated (PBcell_add = 0.0007; ORBcell_add = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.35–0.76) SNP rs2647012 in the Malaysian Malays. In silico cis-eQTL analysis of rs2647012 suggests potential regulatory function of nearby HLA class II molecules. Minor allele rs2647012-T is linked to higher expression of HLA-DQB1, rendering a protective effect to NHL risk. Our findings suggest that the HLA class II region plays an important role in NHL etiology. PMID:28139690

  8. Machine learning competition in immunology – Prediction of HLA class I binding peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Ansari, Hifzur Rahman; Bradley, Phil

    2011-01-01

    from pathogens or cancer proteomes involve either reverse immunology or high-throughput mass spectrometry (HTMS). Reverse immunology approaches involve pre-screening of proteomes by computational algorithms, followed by experimental validation of selected targets ( [Mora et al., 2006], [De Groot et al......). Hundreds of naturally processed HLA class I associated peptides have been identified in individual studies using HTMS in normal (Escobar et al., 2008), cancer ( [Antwi et al., 2009] and [Bassani-Sternberg et al., 2010]), autoimmunity-related (Ben Dror et al., 2010), and infected samples (Wahl et al, 2010......). Computational algorithms are essential steps in high-throughput identification of T-cell epitope candidates using both reverse immunology and HTMS approaches. Peptide binding to MHC molecules is the single most selective step in defining T cell epitope and the accuracy of computational algorithms for prediction...

  9. Elevation of c-MYC disrupts HLA class II-mediated immune recognition of human B cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    God, Jason M; Cameron, Christine; Figueroa, Janette; Amria, Shereen; Hossain, Azim; Kempkes, Bettina; Bornkamm, Georg W; Stuart, Robert K; Blum, Janice S; Haque, Azizul

    2015-02-15

    Elevated levels of the transcription factor c-myc are strongly associated with various cancers, and in particular B cell lymphomas. Although many of c-MYC's functions have been elucidated, its effect on the presentation of Ag through the HLA class II pathway has not been reported previously. This is an issue of considerable importance, given the low immunogenicity of many c-MYC-positive tumors. We report in this paper that increased c-MYC expression has a negative effect on the ability of B cell lymphomas to functionally present Ags/peptides to CD4(+) T cells. This defect was associated with alterations in the expression of distinct cofactors as well as interactions of antigenic peptides with class II molecules required for the presentation of class II-peptide complexes and T cell engagement. Using early passage Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) tumors and transformed cells, we show that compared with B lymphoblasts, BL cells express decreased levels of the class II editor HLA-DM, lysosomal thiol-reductase GILT, and a 47-kDa enolase-like protein. Functional Ag presentation was partially restored in BL cells treated with a c-MYC inhibitor, demonstrating the impact of this oncogene on Ag recognition. This restoration of HLA class II-mediated Ag presentation in early passage BL tumors/cells was linked to enhanced HLA-DM expression and a concurrent decrease in HLA-DO in BL cells. Taken together, these results reveal c-MYC exerts suppressive effects at several critical checkpoints in Ag presentation, which contribute to the immunoevasive properties of BL tumors.

  10. Alloantibodies to human platelet glycoprotein antigens (HPA) and HLA class 1 in a cross section of Nigerian antenatal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah, Zaccheaus Awortu; Atiegoba, Anne Ifeanyi; Mgbere, Osaro

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to human platelet antigens (HPA) and human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class 1 antigens among Nigerian pregnant women has not been reported in our country. This study was therefore aimed at screening the obstetric population for evidence of alloimmunization due to human platelet and HLA class 1 antigens. One hundred and forty four (144) pregnant women attending the obstetric clinic of Military Hospital, Port Harcourt, participated in the study. Their sera were tested for antibodies to HPA and HLA class 1 antigens using GTI PakPlus solid phase ELISA Kit. The total prevalence rate of antibody production was 60.5% (87 out of 144). Among the positive samples, 60 had platelet glycoprotein specific antibodies (41.7%) and 27 had HLA class 1 antibodies (18.8%). In 39.6% of the pregnant women, both platelet specific antibodies and HLA class 1 antibodies appeared. The prevalence of platelet specific glycoprotein antibodies were obtained as follows: GP 11b/111a 12 (8.3%), GP 1a/11a 35 (20.8%), GP Ib/IX 18 (12.5%) and GP IV 9 (6.3%). The prevalence of each platelet antibody subgroup was obtained as follows: anti-HPA-1a,-3a,-4a (4.2%), anti-HPA-1b,-3b,-4a (4.2%), anti-HPA-30 5a and anti-GP Ib/IX (12.5% each), anti-HPA-5b (8.3%) and anti-GP IV (6.3%). A high prevalence rate of human platelet arid cytotoxic antibodies has been observed in our obstetric population. There is need to establish platelet serology laboratory for the proper antenatal and postnatal management of pregnant mothers in this region.

  11. Elevation of c-MYC Disrupts HLA Class II-mediated Immune Recognition of Human B-cell Tumors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    God, Jason M.; Cameron, Christine; Figueroa, Janette; Amria, Shereen; Hossain, Azim; Kempkes, Bettina; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Stuart, Robert K.; Blum, Janice S.; Haque, Azizul

    2014-01-01

    Elevated levels of the transcription factor c-myc are strongly associated with various cancers, and in particular B-cell lymphomas. While many of c-MYC’s functions have been elucidated, its effect on the presentation of antigen (Ag) through the HLA class II pathway has not previously been reported. This is an issue of considerable importance, given the low immunogenicity of many c-MYC-positive tumors. We report here that increased c-MYC expression has a negative effect on the ability of B-cell lymphomas to functionally present Ags/peptides to CD4+ T cells. This defect was associated with alterations in the expression of distinct co-factors as well as interactions of antigenic peptides with class II molecules required for the presentation of class II-peptide complexes and T cell engagement. Using early passage Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) tumors and transformed cells, we show that compared to B-lymphoblasts, BL cells express decreased levels of the class II editor HLA-DM, lysosomal thiol-reductase GILT, and a 47kDa enolase-like protein. Functional Ag presentation was partially restored in BL cells treated with a c-MYC inhibitor, demonstrating the impact of this oncogene on Ag recognition. This restoration of HLA class II-mediated Ag presentation in early passage BL tumors/cells was linked to enhanced HLA-DM expression and a concurrent decrease in HLA-DO in BL cells. Taken together, these results reveal c-MYC exerts suppressive effects at several critical checkpoints in Ag presentation which contribute to the immunoevasive properties of BL tumors. PMID:25595783

  12. Evidence for HLA class II susceptible and protective haplotypes for osteomyelitis in pediatric patients with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ola, K; Mahdi, N; Al-Subaie, A M; Ali, M E; Al-Absi, I K; Almawi, W Y

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles and haplotypes with the pathogenesis of sickle cell anemia (SCA) osteomyelitis. SCA patients comprised 42 patients with osteomyelitis and 150 patients without osteomyelitis; HLA-DRB1* and HLA-DQB1* genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific priming (SSP). DRB1*100101 (P value corrected for the number of different alleles tested, Pc=0.003) was positively associated with osteomyelitis. At the haplotype level, DRB1*100101-DQB1*050101 (Pc=0.001) was more prevalent among patients, while DRB1*030101-DQB1*0201 (Pc=0.020) and DRB1*040101-DQB1*0302 (Pc=0.039) were more prevalent among SCA controls, thereby conferring disease susceptibility or protection to these haplotypes, respectively. These results show that specific HLA haplotypes influence SCA osteomyelitis risk and that specific HLA types may serve as markers for identifying SCA patients at high risk for osteomyelitis.

  13. Shared HLA Class II in Six Autoimmune Diseases in Latin America: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cruz-Tapias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and genetic susceptibility of autoimmune diseases (ADs may vary depending on latitudinal gradient and ethnicity. The aims of this study were to identify common human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II alleles that contribute to susceptibility to six ADs in Latin Americans through a meta-analysis and to review additional clinical, immunological, and genetic characteristics of those ADs sharing HLA alleles. DRB1∗03:01 (OR: 4.04; 95%CI: 1.41–11.53 was found to be a risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Sjögren's syndrome (SS, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. DRB1∗04:05 (OR: 4.64; 95%CI: 2.14–10.05 influences autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and T1D; DRB1∗04:01 (OR: 3.86; 95%CI: 2.32–6.42 is a susceptibility factor for RA and T1D. Opposite associations were found between multiple sclerosis (MS and T1D. DQB1∗06:02 and DRB1∗15 alleles were risk factors for MS but protective factors for T1D. Likewise, DQB1∗06:03 allele was a risk factor for AIH but a protective one for T1D. Several common autoantibodies and clinical associations as well as additional shared genes have been reported in these ADs, which are reviewed herein. These results indicate that in Latin Americans ADs share major loci and immune characteristics.

  14. Tumor-associated Tn-MUC1 glycoform is internalized through the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin and delivered to the HLA class I and II compartments in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napoletano, Chiara; Rughetti, Aurelia; Agervig Tarp, Mads P;

    2007-01-01

    and ELISA done on subcellular fractions of iDCs showed that the Tn-MUC1 glycopeptides colocalized with HLA class I and II compartments after internalization. Importantly, although Tn-MUC1 recombinant protein was bound and internalized by MGL, the glycoprotein entered the HLA class II compartment......, but not the HLA class I pathway. These data indicate that MGL expressed on iDCs is an optimal receptor for the internalization of short GalNAcs carrying immunogens to be delivered into HLA class I and II compartments. Such glycopeptides therefore represent a new way of targeting the HLA class I and II pathways...

  15. The impact of HLA class I and EBV latency-II antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells on the pathogenesis of EBV(+) Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K; Wockner, L; Brennan, R M; Keane, C; Chattopadhyay, P K; Roederer, M; Price, D A; Cole, D K; Hassan, B; Beck, K; Gottlieb, D; Ritchie, D S; Seymour, J F; Vari, F; Crooks, P; Burrows, S R; Gandhi, M K

    2016-02-01

    In 40% of cases of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency-II antigens [EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)/latent membrane protein (LMP)1/LMP2A] are present (EBV(+) cHL) in the malignant cells and antigen presentation is intact. Previous studies have shown consistently that HLA-A*02 is protective in EBV(+) cHL, yet its role in disease pathogenesis is unknown. To explore the basis for this observation, gene expression was assessed in 33 cHL nodes. Interestingly, CD8 and LMP2A expression were correlated strongly and, for a given LMP2A level, CD8 was elevated markedly in HLA-A*02(-) versus HLA-A*02(+) EBV(+) cHL patients, suggesting that LMP2A-specific CD8(+) T cell anti-tumoral immunity may be relatively ineffective in HLA-A*02(-) EBV(+) cHL. To ascertain the impact of HLA class I on EBV latency antigen-specific immunodominance, we used a stepwise functional T cell approach. In newly diagnosed EBV(+) cHL, the magnitude of ex-vivo LMP1/2A-specific CD8(+) T cell responses was elevated in HLA-A*02(+) patients. Furthermore, in a controlled in-vitro assay, LMP2A-specific CD8(+) T cells from healthy HLA-A*02 heterozygotes expanded to a greater extent with HLA-A*02-restricted compared to non-HLA-A*02-restricted cell lines. In an extensive analysis of HLA class I-restricted immunity, immunodominant EBNA3A/3B/3C-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were stimulated by numerous HLA class I molecules, whereas the subdominant LMP1/2A-specific responses were confined largely to HLA-A*02. Our results demonstrate that HLA-A*02 mediates a modest, but none the less stronger, EBV-specific CD8(+) T cell response than non-HLA-A*02 alleles, an effect confined to EBV latency-II antigens. Thus, the protective effect of HLA-A*02 against EBV(+) cHL is not a surrogate association, but reflects the impact of HLA class I on EBV latency-II antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell hierarchies.

  16. Combining positional scanning peptide libraries, HLA-DR transfectants and bioinformatics to dissect the epitope spectrum of HLA class II cross-restricted CD4+ T cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sospedra, Mireia; Zhao, Yingdong; Giulianotti, Marc; Simon, Richard; Pinilla, Clemencia; Martin, Roland

    2010-02-28

    The use of positional scanning peptide libraries in combination with biometrical analysis is one of the few approaches, which allows the identification of stimulatory peptides for T cells of unknown specificity. Despite the successful application of this strategy in different studies, not every T cell is suited for analysis. For as yet unknown reasons some T cells do not recognize these highly complex libraries, and even more importantly the predictive capacity of the current approach shows high variability among individual T cell clones and their TCRs. A number of factors probably contribute to differences in T cell recognition and have to be taken into account in order to overcome these difficulties. Our results suggest that the ability of some T cells to recognize peptides in the context of more than one HLA class II molecule expressed by autologous APCs could diminish the predictive capacity of the approach. In contrast, the use of B cell lines expressing single HLA class II molecules as APCs instead of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells markedly improves the capacity to identify target peptides for this type of T cells.

  17. Polymorphic SVA retrotransposons at four loci and their association with classical HLA class I alleles in Japanese, Caucasians and African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulski, Jerzy K; Shigenari, Atsuko; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2010-04-01

    Polymorphic insertion frequencies of the retrotransposons known as the "SVA" elements were investigated at four loci in the MHC class I genomic region to determine their allele and haplotype frequencies and associations with the HLA-A, -B or -C genes for 100 Japanese, 100 African Americans, 174 Australian Caucasians and 66 reference cell lines obtained from different ethnic groups. The SVA insertions representing different subfamily members varied in frequency between none for SVA-HF in Japanese and 65% for SVA-HB in Caucasians or African Americans with significant differences in frequencies between the three populations at least at three loci. The SVA loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium except for the SVA-HA locus which deviated significantly in African Americans and Caucasians possibly because of a genomic deletion of this locus in individuals with the HLA-A*24 allele. Strong linkage disequilibria and high percentage associations between the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I gene alleles and some of the SVA insertions were detected in all three populations in spite of significant frequency differences for the SVA and HLA class I alleles between the three populations. The highest percentage associations (>86%) were between SVA-HB and HLA-B*08, -B*27, -B*37 to -B*41, -B*52 and -B*53; SVA-HC and HLA-B*07; SVA-HA and HLA-A*03, -A*11 and -A*30; and SVA-HF and HLA-A*03 and HLA-B*47. From pairwise associations in the three populations and the homozygous cell line results, it was possible to deduce the SVA and HLA class I allelic combinations (haplotypes), population differences and the identity by descent of several common HLA-A allelic lineages.

  18. Hereditary hemochromatosis: Generation of a transcription map within a refined and extended map of the HLA class I region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totaro, A.; Grifa, A.; Gasparini, P. [and others

    1996-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis, a common severe inherited disease, maps to the short arm of chromosome 6 close to the HLA-A locus. Recently, linkage data on Italian and French populations confirmed this location, while a similar analysis on Australian and British populations located the gene closer to D6S105, a marker residing telomeric of HLA-A. To increase our knowledge on the region of highest linkage disequilibrium in our population and possibly to identify the disease gene, a 1.2-Mb detailed physical and transcription map was generated, spanning the HLA class I region. Thirty-eight unique cDNA fragments, retrieved following the hybridization of immobilized YACs to primary pools of cDNAs prepared from RNA of fetal brain, adult brain, liver, placenta, and the CaCo{sub 2} cell line, were characterized. All cDNA fragments were positioned in a refined and extended map of the human major histocompatibility complex spanning from HLA-E to approximately 500 kb telomeric of HLA-F. The localization of known genes was refined, and a new gene from the RNA helicase superfamily was identified. Overall, 14 transcription units in addition to the HLA genes have been detected and integrated in the map. Thirteen cDNA fragments show no similarity with known sequences and could be candidates for the disease. Their characterization and assessment for involvement in hemochromatosis are still under investigation. Seven new polymorphisms, some tightly linked to the disease, were also identified and localized. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies new HLA class II haplotypes strongly protective against narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hor, Hyun; Kutalik, Zoltán; Dauvilliers, Yves;

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder with the strongest human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association ever reported. Since the associated HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype is common in the general population (15-25%), it has been suggested that it is almost necessary but not sufficient for developing ...

  20. MHC Class I Chain-Related Gene A Polymorphisms and Linkage Disequilibrium with HLA-B and HLA-C Alleles in Ocular Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Camargo, Ana Vitória da Silveira; Frederico, Fábio Batista; Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Previato, Mariana; Murata, Fernando Henrique Antunes; Silveira-Carvalho, Aparecida Perpétuo; Barbosa, Amanda Pires; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara de Cássia; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether polymorphisms of the MICA (major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A) gene are associated with eye lesions due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in a group of immunocompetent patients from southeastern Brazil. The study enrolled 297 patients with serological diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. Participants were classified into two distinct groups after conducting fundoscopic exams according to the presence (n = 148) or absence (n = 149) of ocular scars/lesions due to toxoplasmosis. The group of patients with scars/lesions was further subdivided into two groups according to the type of the ocular manifestation observed: primary (n = 120) or recurrent (n = 28). Genotyping of the MICA and HLA alleles was performed by the polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific oligonucleotide technique (PCR-SSO; One Lambda®) and the MICA-129 polymorphism (rs1051792) was identified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR-RFLP). Significant associations involving MICA polymorphisms were not found. Although the MICA*002~HLA-B*35 haplotype was associated with increased risk of developing ocular toxoplasmosis (P-value = 0.04; OR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.05-4.60), and the MICA*008~HLA-C*07 haplotype was associated with protection against the development of manifestations of ocular toxoplasmosis (P-value = 0.009; OR: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.22-0.76), these associations were not statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. MICA polymorphisms do not appear to influence the development of ocular lesions in patients diagnosed with toxoplasmosis in this study population.

  1. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C; Rosenberg, Eric S; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E; Rubin, David S; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R; Sanchez, William C; Sanjana, Veeraf M; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N; Silebi, Vanessa I; Sizemore, James M; Skolnik, Paul R; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F Lisa; Stone, Valerie E; Stone, David R; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A; Tedaldi, Ellen M; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A; Trinh, Phuong D; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J; Warner, Daniel A; Weber, Robert D; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A; White, David J; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P; Yang, Otto O; Yurdin, David L; Zabukovic, Brandon W; Zachary, Kimon C; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection.

  2. HLAMatchmaker-based strategy to identify acceptable HLA class I mismatches for highly sensitized kidney transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, Rene J; Witvliet, Marian; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; de Fijter, Hans; Claas, Frans H J

    2004-01-01

    HLAMatchmaker determines HLA compatibility at the level of polymorphic amino acid triplets in antibody-accessible sequence positions. Recent studies have shown that among HLA-DR-matched kidney transplants, the HLA-A,B antigen mismatches which are compatible at the triplet level have almost identical graft survival rates as the zero-HLA-A,B antigen mismatches. This finding provides the basis of a new strategy to identify HLA-mismatched organs that have similar success rates as the zero-HLA-antigen mismatches. This report describes how in conjunction with the Acceptable Mismatch program in Eurotransplant, HLAMatchmaker can expand the pool of potential donors for highly sensitized patients, for whom it is very difficult to find a compatible transplant. Sera from 35 highly sensitized kidney transplant candidates with an average PRA of 96% were screened by lymphocytotoxicity with HLA-typed panels that included cells that were selectively mismatched for one or two HLA antigens for each patient. Acceptable and unacceptable HLA-A,B antigen mismatches were determined from the serum reactivity with the cell panel. HLAMatchmaker analysis was applied to identify additional HLA class I antigens that were matched at the triplet level. For each patient, we calculated the probability of finding a donor (PFD) in the different match categories from HLA gene frequencies in the kidney donor population. The median PFD for a zero-antigen mismatch was 0.025%. Matching at the triplet level increased the median PFD to 0.037% ( P = 0.008). The median PFD was 0.058% for a 0-1-triplet mismatch and 0.226% for a 0-2-triplet mismatch. Serum screening identified acceptable antigen mismatches for 28 of 35 highly sensitized patients, and the median PFD increased to 0.307% for a zero/acceptable antigen mismatch. The application of HLAMatchmaker permitted for 33 patients (or 92%) the identification of additional antigens that were acceptable at the triplet level, and the median PFD for a zero

  3. Insights into the Role of GILT in HLA Class II Antigen Processing and Presentation by Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan L. Norton

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic melanoma is one of the deadliest of skin cancers and is increasing in incidence. Since current treatment regimens are ineffective at controlling and/or curing the disease, novel approaches, such as immunotherapy, for treating this malignant disease are being explored. In this review, we discuss potential melanoma antigens (Ags and their role in utilizing the HLA class II pathway to elicit tumor Ag-specific CD4+ T cell responses in order to effectively induce long-lasting CD8+ antitumor memory. We also discuss the role of endolysosomal cathepsins and Gamma-Interferon-inducible Lysosomal Thiol reductase (GILT in Ag processing and presentation, and at enhancing CD4+ T cell recognition of melanoma cells. This review also summarizes our current knowledge on GILT and highlights a novel mechanism of GILT-mediated immune responses against melanoma cells. At the end, we propose a strategy employing GILT in the development of a potential whole cell vaccine for combating metastatic melanoma.

  4. HLA class I and class II of the Nivkhi, an indigenous population carrying HTLV-I in Sakhalin, Far Eastern Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, H; Li, H C; Kuwayama, M; Yashiki, S; Fujiyoshi, T; Suehara, M; Osame, M; Yamashita, M; Hayami, M; Gurtsevich, V; Ballas, M; Imanishi, T; Sonoda, S

    1998-11-01

    The Nivkhi are a native people isolated in the Nogliki region of Sakhalin, Far East Russia, where our group recently recognized human T-cell lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) infection. In order to trace the Nivkhi's ethnic background and the HTLV-I carriers, we investigated HLA class I and II allele types of 53 Nivkhi (including four HTLV-I carriers). Major HLA class I alleles of the Nivkhi were A*24, A*02, B*40, B*48, B*27, B*35 with allele frequencies similar to the Orochon, a native people isolated in Northeast China. Major Nivkhi class II alleles were DRB1*0901, DRB1*1401, DRB1*1201, DRB1*1106 with allele frequencies similar to the Ainu in Hokkaido, Japan, but dissimilar to other Asian Mongoloids, including the general Japanese population. The same HLA class I and II allele frequencies are found in both Nivkhi HTLV-I carriers and the background population. A dendrogram of HLA class I alleles showed that the Nivkhi were closely related to the Orochon and Yakut, and remotely related to the Japanese, Ainu and other Asian Mongoloids. Interestingly, the Nivkhi were intermediately related to the Amerindians (Inuit, Tlingit and Andeans), a relationship closer than to the Japanese and Asian Mongoloids. These results suggested the Nivkhi might be related to some genetic group of Northeast Asian Mongoloids like the Orochon and Yakut, being infected with HTLV-I in the distant past before diverging into the current major Mongoloid ethnic groups.

  5. KIR3DL2 binds to HLA-B27 dimers and free heavy chains more strongly than other HLA class I and promotes the expansion of T cells in ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Ridley, Anna; Shaw, Jackie; Hatano, Hiroko; Rysnik, Oliwia; McHugh, Kirsty; Piper, Christopher; Brackenbridge, Simon; Fernandes, Ricardo; Chan, Anthoni; Bowness, Paul; Kollnberger, Simon

    2013-01-01

    1Abstract The Human Leukocyte Antigen HLA-B27(B27) is strongly associated with the spondyloarthritides. B27 can be expressed at the cell surface of antigen presenting cells (APC) as both classical β2m-associated B27 and as B27 free heavy chain forms (FHC) including disulphide-bonded heavy chain homodimers (termed B272). B27 FHC forms but not classical B27 bind to KIR3DL2. HLA-A3 which is not associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA) is also a ligand for KIR3DL2. Here we show that B272 and B27 FHC bind more strongly to KIR3DL2 than other HLA-class I, including HLA-A3. B272 tetramers bound KIR3DL2 transfected cells more strongly than HLA-A3. KIR3DL2Fc bound to HLA-B27-transfected cells more strongly than to cells transfected with other HLA-class I. KIR3DL2Fc pulled down multimeric, dimeric and monomeric free heavy chains from HLA-B27 expressing cell lines. Binding to B272 and B27 FHC stimulated greater KIR3DL2 phosphorylation than HLA-A3. B272 and B27 FHC stimulated KIR3DL2CD3ε–transduced T cell IL-2 production to a greater extent than control HLA-class I. KIR3DL2 binding to B27 inhibited NK IFNγ secretion and promoted greater survival of KIR3DL2+CD4 T and NK cells than binding to other HLA-class I. KIR3DL2+ T cells from B27+SpA patients proliferated more in response to antigen presented by syngeneic APC than the same T cell subset from healthy and disease controls. Our results suggest that expansion of KIR3DL2-expressing leukocytes observed in B27+ SpA may be explained by the stronger interaction of KIR3DL2 with B27 FHC. PMID:23440420

  6. Adjuvant Vaccine Immunotherapy of Resected, Clinically Node-negative Melanoma: Long-Term Outcome and Impact of HLA Class I Antigen Expression on Overall Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, William E.; Unger, Joseph M.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Tuthill, Ralph J.; Porter, Mark J.; Thompson, John A.; Kempf, Raymond A.; Othus, Megan; Ribas, Antoni; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Associations between HLA class I antigen expression and efficacy of a melanoma vaccine (Melacine) were initially described in stage IV melanoma. Similar associations were observed in S9035, a phase III adjuvant trial evaluating Melacine for two years versus observation in patients with stage II melanoma. This report provides long-term results. The effects of treatment on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated, and pre-specified analyses investigated associations between treatment and HLA expression. Multivariable analyses were adjusted for tumor thickness, ulceration and site, method of nodal staging and sex. P=.01 was considered significant in subset analyses to account for multiple comparisons. For the entire study population of 689 patients, there were no significant differences in RFS or OS by arm. HLA serotyping was performed on 553 (80%) patients (vaccine 294, observation 259). Among the subpopulation with HLA-A2 and/or HLA-Cw3 serotype, vaccine arm patients (n=178) had marginally improved RFS (adjusted P=.02) and significantly improved OS compared with observation arm patients (n=145), with 10-year OS of 75% and 63%, respectively (hazard ratio 0.62, 99% CI 0.37-1.02, P=.01). There was no impact of HLA-A2 and/or HLA-Cw3 expression among observation arm patients. Analysis of mature data from S9035 indicates a significant OS benefit from adjuvant vaccine therapy for HLA-A2- and/or HLA-Cw3-expressing melanoma patients. The possibility of interactions between HLA type and outcome should be considered in future immunotherapy trials. Further investigations of melanoma-associated antigens present in Melacine and presented by HLA-A2 and HLA-Cw3 may be warranted. PMID:24994597

  7. HLA class II genotypes in Mexican Mestizos with familial and nonfamilial multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-de la Barrera, C; Zúñiga-Ramos, J; Ruíz-Morales, J A; Estañol, B; Granados, J; Llorente, L

    2000-12-26

    Predisposition to MS is associated with the HLA-DR2 antigen in white patients. The authors investigated the genetic factors behind the increasing frequency of MS in the Mexican population. HLA-DR and DQ were analyzed in 17 patients with MS, 15 of their first-degree relatives, and 99 healthy ethnically matched controls. DR2 or DR3 was found in 15 of 17 patients. In controls, both alleles had frequencies less than 0.05. MS in Mexican patients was associated with HLA-DR2 and DR3.

  8. The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Telenti, Amalio; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Pereyra, Florencia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Graham, Robert R.; Plenge, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Walker, Bruce D.; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M.; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P.; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Carrington, Mary; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Pereyra, Florencia; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L.; Lemay, Paul; O’Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L.; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Haas, David W.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Shafer, Robert W.; Gulick, Roy M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L.; Allen, Brady L.; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L.; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J.; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Benson, Anne M.; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F.; Bernard, Annette M.; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J.; Bolan, Robert K.; Boudreaux, Emilie T.; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F.; Brndjar, Jon E.; Brown, Stephen J.; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T.; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M.; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H.; Carmichael, J. Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K.; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T.; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M.; Cimoch, Paul J.; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E.; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A.; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T.; Cristofano, Michael V.; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L.; Dahman, Joseph M.; Daly, Jennifer S.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M.; Deeks, Steven G.; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A.; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E.; Ellerin, Todd B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Fangman, John J.W.; Farel, Claire E.; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; French, Neel K.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Fuller, Jon D.; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C.; Gaultier, Cyril R.; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D.; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A.; Gottlieb, Michael S.; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K.; Gurley, T. Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W. David; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M.; Henry, W. Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P.; Horton, James M.; Hsu, Ricky K.; Huhn, Gregory D.; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J.; Illeman, Mark L.; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M.; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Kristin L.; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Kim, David D.; Kinder, Clifford A.; Kirchner, Jeffrey T.; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P. Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S.; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M.; Lee, David M.; Lee, Jean M.L.; Lee, Marah J.; Lee, Edward T.Y.; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A.; Llibre, Josep M.; Liguori, Michael A.; Little, Susan J.; Liu, Anne Y.; Lopez, Alvaro J.; Loutfy, Mono R.; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y.; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Harold L.; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M. Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A.; McGovern, Barbara H.; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X.; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E.; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O.; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G.; Nelson, Margret O.; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L.; O’Connor, David H.; Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O.; Oldfield, Edward C.; Olender, Susan A.; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F.; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M.; Perlmutter, Aaron M.; Pierce, Michael N.; Pincus, Jonathan M.; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C.; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J.; Rhame, Frank S.; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E.; Rubin, David S.; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R.; Sanchez, William C.; Sanjana, Veeraf M.; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M.; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N.; Silebi, Vanessa I.; Sizemore, James M.; Skolnik, Paul R.; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M.; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T.; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F. Lisa; Stone, Valerie E.; Stone, David R.; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A.; Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A.; Trinh, Phuong D.; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J.; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M.; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H.; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J.; Warner, Daniel A.; Weber, Robert D.; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A.; White, David J.; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G.; Wout, Angelique van’t; Wright, David P.; Yang, Otto O.; Yurdin, David L.; Zabukovic, Brandon W.; Zachary, Kimon C.; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2011-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA–viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

  9. Post-transplant anti-HLA class II antibodies as risk factor for late kidney allograft failure

    OpenAIRE

    Campos,E.F.; Tedesco-Silva, H.; P.G. Machado; Franco., M; J.O. Medina-Pestana; Gerbase-Delima, Maria

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyze the relationship between the post-transplant anti-HLA class I and/or class II panel reactive antibodies and graft failure due to chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). We studied 512 first kidney recipients transplanted at a single center, with a graft functioning for at least 3 years. A single blood sample was collected from each patient for antibody evaluation. the median posttransplant time after blood collection was 4.4 years and did no...

  10. Regulatory polymorphisms modulate the expression of HLA class II molecules and promote autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Prithvi; Rai, Ekta; Song, Ran; Khan, Shaheen; Wakeland, Benjamin E; Viswanathan, Kasthuribai; Arana, Carlos; Liang, Chaoying; Zhang, Bo; Dozmorov, Igor; Carr-Johnson, Ferdicia; Mitrovic, Mitja; Wiley, Graham B; Kelly, Jennifer A; Lauwerys, Bernard R; Olsen, Nancy J; Cotsapas, Chris; Garcia, Christine K; Wise, Carol A; Harley, John B; Nath, Swapan K; James, Judith A; Jacob, Chaim O; Tsao, Betty P; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Karp, David R; Li, Quan Zhen; Gaffney, Patrick M; Wakeland, Edward K

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of sixteen SLE risk loci among 1349 Caucasian cases and controls produced a comprehensive dataset of the variations causing susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Two independent disease association signals in the HLA-D region identified two regulatory regions containing 3562 polymorphisms that modified thirty-seven transcription factor binding sites. These extensive functional variations are a new and potent facet of HLA polymorphism. Variations modifying the consensus binding motifs of IRF4 and CTCF in the XL9 regulatory complex modified the transcription of HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 in a chromosome-specific manner, resulting in a 2.5-fold increase in the surface expression of HLA-DR and DQ molecules on dendritic cells with SLE risk genotypes, which increases to over 4-fold after stimulation. Similar analyses of fifteen other SLE risk loci identified 1206 functional variants tightly linked with disease-associated SNPs and demonstrated that common disease alleles contain multiple causal variants modulating multiple immune system genes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12089.001 PMID:26880555

  11. Activation of ERα signaling differentially modulates IFN-γ induced HLA-class II expression in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A Mostafa

    Full Text Available The coordinate regulation of HLA class II (HLA-II is controlled by the class II transactivator, CIITA, and is crucial for the development of anti-tumor immunity. HLA-II in breast carcinoma is associated with increased IFN-γ levels, reduced expression of the estrogen receptor (ER and reduced age at diagnosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that estradiol (E₂ and ERα signaling contribute to the regulation of IFN-γ inducible HLA-II in breast cancer cells. Using a panel of established ER⁻ and ER⁺ breast cancer cell lines, we showed that E₂ attenuated HLA-DR in two ER⁺ lines (MCF-7 and BT-474, but not in T47D, while it augmented expression in ER⁻ lines, SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-231. To further study the mechanism(s, we used paired transfectants: ERα⁺ MC2 (MDA-MB-231 c10A transfected with the wild type ERα gene and ERα⁻ VC5 (MDA-MB-231 c10A transfected with the empty vector, treated or not with E₂ and IFN-γ. HLA-II and CIITA were severely reduced in MC2 compared to VC5 and were further exacerbated by E₂ treatment. Reduced expression occurred at the level of the IFN-γ inducible CIITA promoter IV. The anti-estrogen ICI 182,780 and gene silencing with ESR1 siRNA reversed the E2 inhibitory effects, signifying an antagonistic role for activated ERα on CIITA pIV activity. Moreover, STAT1 signaling, necessary for CIITA pIV activation, and selected STAT1 regulated genes were variably downregulated by E₂ in transfected and endogenous ERα positive breast cancer cells, whereas STAT1 signaling was noticeably augmented in ERα⁻ breast cancer cells. Collectively, these results imply immune escape mechanisms in ERα⁺ breast cancer may be facilitated through an ERα suppressive mechanism on IFN-γ signaling.

  12. Viral genotype and HLA class II alleles influence on extra-hepatic manifestations of chronic HCV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Galeazzi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test whether an association between HCV genotype, HLA class II alleles distribution and extra-hepatic manifestations (EHM can be demonstrated in a group of Italian patients with chronic HCV infection . Methods: Sixty patients affected by HCV infection with EHM were consecutively enrolled. 163 HCV patients without EHM were tested as controls for the prevalence of HCV genotypes, while we referred to literature as to the controls for HLA distribution. HCV-RNA was quantified by a RT-PCR. HLA class II alleles typing was performed using a standard microlymphocytotoxicity assay. We used chi-square or Fisher test (p<0.05 significant. Odds Ratio (OR was performed by 2X2 contingency table. Results: HCV 2c genotype was found in 63.46% of patients compared to 19.63% of controls (p<0.0001; OR=7.11. Furthermore, it correlated with carpal tunnel syndrome (p=0.03; OR=4.5 and autoimmune thyroiditis (p=0.02; OR=9.2. On the contrary, 1b genotype protected from EHM in toto (p=0.0004; OR=0.21 and particularly from carpal tunnel syndrome (p=0.0014; OR=0.07. Moreover, 3a genotype prevented HCV people from having cryoglobulinemia (p=0.05; OR=0.11. As to HLA, DR6 seemed to facilitate EHM in HCV patients (p=0.041; OR=1.61, while DQ2 (p=0.03; OR=0.5 and DQ3 (p=0.002; OR= 0.5 may play a protective role. In addition, HLA DR3 was associated with cryoglobulinemia (p=0.02; OR=9.5. Conclusions: According to our findings, 2c genotype can be considered as a major risk factor for developing HCVrelated EHM, while 1b genotype seems to prevent their onset; there are also evidences suggesting that HLA might play a role in chronic HCV infected patients.

  13. Immunogenetics of rheumatoid arthritis and primary Sjögren's syndrome: DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Andersen, V; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    .05). The frequencies in RA of other HLA class II associated DNA fragments including DPA and DPB and the antigens DPw1-w6 defined by primed lymphocyte stimulation, did not differ significantly from those in controls. In primary SS, the frequency of HLA-B8 was significantly increased (RR = 9.0, P less than 10......(-3). Positive associations were found between primary SS and DNA fragments associated with DRB1*03/13 (RR = 6.8, P less than 10(-3), DRB3*0101 (DRw52) (RR = 5.7, P less than 10(-2), DQA1*0501 (RR = 6.8, P less than 10(-3), DQB1*0201 (DQw2) (RR = 11.6, P less than 10(-5), and DQB1*0602 (DQw6) (RR = 2.7, P less...

  14. Study of the possible association of HLA Class II, CD4, and CD3 polymorphisms with schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, M.G.; Spaepen, M.; Marynen, P. [Univ. of Leuven (Belgium)] [and others

    1994-12-15

    In the present study the HLA-DRB and DPB-1 alleles as well as CD4 and CD3 polymorphisms were tested in 100 Belgian schizophrenic patients and 204 controls. Our results indicate a significant negative association of the DPB1 0101 allele with schizophrenia (relative risk (RR) = 0.27). Furthermore a significant positive and negative association could be noticed for the CD4 A4 allele and CD4 A7/A8 genotype, respectively (RR 1.79 and 0.47, respectively). These findings suggest that some contribution of HLA class II and CD4 genes to an autoimmune-like pathogenesis in schizophrenia might exist. 22 refs., 6 tabs.

  15. Human immune responses to H. pylori HLA Class II epitopes identified by immunoinformatic methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhua Zhang

    Full Text Available H. pylori persists in the human stomach over decades and promotes several adverse clinical sequelae including gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer that are linked to the induction and subsequent evasion of chronic gastric inflammation. Emerging evidence indicates that H. pylori infection may also protect against asthma and some other immune-mediated conditions through regulatory T cell effects outside the stomach. To characterize the complexity of the CD4+ T cell response generated during H. pylori infection, computational methods were previously used to generate a panel of 90 predicted epitopes conserved among H. pylori genomes that broadly cover HLA Class II diversity for maximum population coverage. Here, these sequences were tested individually for their ability to induce in vitro responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by interferon-γ ELISpot assay. The average number of spot-forming cells/million PBMCs was significantly elevated in H. pylori-infected subjects over uninfected persons. Ten of the 90 peptides stimulated IFN-γ secretion in the H. pylori-infected group only, whereas two out of the 90 peptides elicited a detectable IFN-γ response in the H. pylori-uninfected subjects but no response in the H. pylori-infected group. Cytokine ELISA measurements performed using in vitro PBMC culture supernatants demonstrated significantly higher levels of TNF-α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β1 in the H. pylori-infected subjects, whereas IL-17A expression was not related to the subjects H. pylori-infection status. Our results indicate that the human T cell responses to these 90 peptides are generally increased in actively H. pylori-infected, compared with H. pylori-naïve, subjects. This information will improve understanding of the complex immune response to H. pylori, aiding rational epitope-driven vaccine design as well as helping identify other H. pylori epitopes with potentially immunoregulatory effects.

  16. HLA class II alleles and the presence of circulating Epstein-Barr virus DNA in greek patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanikiotis, C. [424 Army General Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Daniilidis, M.; Karyotis, N.; Nikolaou, A. [AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki School of Medicine (Greece); Bakogiannis, C. [Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Economopoulos, T. [' Attikon' Univ. Hospital, Athens (Greece); Murray, S. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Papamichael, D. [Bank of Cyprus Oncology Center, Nicosia, Cyprus (Greece); Samantas, E. [' Agii Anargiri' Cancer Hospital, Athens (Greece); Skoura, L. [' Hippokration' Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Tselis, N.; Zamboglou, N. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Offenbach Hospital (Germany); Fountzilas, G. [' Papageorgiou' Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki School of Medicine (Greece)

    2008-06-15

    Background and purpose: nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) represents a seldom malignancy in most developed countries. Nevertheless, NPC receives an endemic form in concrete racial entities. The aims of this study were to detect the presence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA (EBV-DNA) in peripheral blood of NPC patients, to molecularly define human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DRB1*, DQA1* and DQB1* allele frequencies, and, finally, to determine whether the genetic predisposition of an individual to NPC depends on the liability to EBV infection. Patients and methods: a total of 101 patients of Hellenic origin and nationality, with histologically proven NPC, participated in this study. EBV-DNA detection was also applied in 66 patients with EBV-related malignancies (Hodgkin's [HL] and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [NHL]) and infectious mononucleosis (IM), as well as in 80 healthy EBV-seropositive controls. Results: 81% of the NPC patients, 77.8% with HL, 72.2% with NHL, and 66.7% with IM were EBV-DNA positive, whereas the EBV genome was detected only in 15% of the healthy controls. These differences were statistically significant in all cases. Analysis of HLA class II antigens showed decreased frequency of the DRB1*07 (p = 0.003), DQA1*0103 (p = 0.002), and DQA1*0201 (p = 0.003) alleles among NPC patients. A significant association between the HLA-DR/DQ alleles and the presence of EBV-DNA in peripheral whole blood was not established. Conclusion: circulating EBV-DNA and specific HLA class II alleles may predispose to or protect from NPC. However, the results of this study suggest that the genetic predisposition of an individual to NPC is independent of the liability to EBV infection. (orig.)

  17. Quantificação de antígenos HLA classe I solúveis pela técnica de ELISA - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v31i2.6758 Quantification of soluble HLA class I antigens by ELISA assay- DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v31i2.6758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciele Coan Boian

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available As moléculas HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigens são consideradas, principalmente, estruturas de superfície celular envolvidas em uma variedade de reações imunes associadas com transplante, infecções e doenças autoimunes. Os antígenos HLA também podem ser encontrados, em forma solúvel, no soro e em diferentes fluidos do organismo humano. Este trabalho teve como objetivo desenvolver a técnica imunoenzimática (ELISA para quantificar os níveis séricos de antígenos HLA classe I, específicos e totais, em indivíduos normais e em pacientes renais. A técnica de ELISA foi desenvolvida para demonstrar a presença, no soro, de antígenos HLA classe I totais (sHLA-I e as especificidades HLA-A2 (sHLA-A2 e HLA-B7 (sHLA-B7. Oitenta e oito amostras de soro foram envolvidas neste estudo, sendo 61 amostras provenientes de indivíduos sadios cadastrados no Hemocentro Regional de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, e 27 pacientes renais, provenientes dos centros de diálise da cidade de Maringá, Estado do Paraná. As concentrações médias de sHLA para as especificidades -A2 e -B7, detectadas somente em indivíduos sadios, foram 504.06 ng mL-1 ± 142.10 e 427.33 ng mL-1 ± 140.73, respectivamente. Resultados preliminares mostraram que sHLA-I, em indivíduos sadios, foi de 253,77 ng mL-1 e, em indivíduos renais em diálise, de 381,67 ng mL-1. A técnica de ELISA para detecção de antígenos HLA solúveis poderá ser útil em estudos comparativos, em diferentes populações saudáveis, diferentes patologias e no monitoramento das rejeições em transplantes.HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigens molecules are regarded mainly as cell surface structures involved in several immune reactions associated with transplants, infections and auto-immune diseases. HLA antigens can be also found in soluble form in serum and in different fluids of the human body. The aim of this work was to develop the immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA to quantify serum levels of specific and total

  18. Molecular genetic studies on the compatibility of HLA class II alleles in patients with unexplained recurrent miscarriage in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakuwa, Koichi; Honda, Keisuke; Yokoo, Tomokazu; Hataya, Isao; Tamura, Masaki; Tanaka, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    It is hypothesized that patients having unexplained recurrent miscarriage lack an appropriate immune reaction against their partner's antigens, which means possible compatibility of HLA antigens between the patient couples. The conclusion, however, has not yet been achieved, so the purpose was to determine whether significant compatibility of HLA class II exists between the couples. The HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 genotypes were determined using PCR-RFLP method in 91 patient couples and in 72 normal couples. The number of patient couples with zero-allele mismatch was not significantly different compared with that of control couples regarding HLA-DRB1 genotype and phenotype, as well as regarding HLA-DQB1 genotype and phenotype. While the number of patient couples with zero- and one-allele mismatch was significantly higher compared with that in control as to HLA-DR and -DQ phenotype (P=0.029 by Chi-square test). In conclusion, it is suggested that the compatibility of HLA class II antigens between couples might be involved in the genesis of unexplained recurrent miscarriage.

  19. Conformational lability in the class II MHC 310 helix and adjacent extended strand dictate HLA-DM susceptibility and peptide exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Corrie A.; Negroni, Maria P.; Kellersberger, Katherine A.; Zavala-Ruiz, Zarixia; Evans, James E.; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    HLA-DM is required for efficient peptide exchange on class II MHC molecules, but its mechanism of action is controversial. We trapped an intermediate state of class II MHC HLA-DR1 by substitution of αF54, resulting in a protein with increased HLA-DM binding affinity, weakened MHC-peptide hydrogen bonding as measured by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and increased susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Structural analysis revealed a set of concerted conformational alterations at the N-terminal end of the peptide-binding site. These results suggest that interaction with HLA-DM is driven by a conformational change of the MHC II protein in the region of the α-subunit 310 helix and adjacent extended strand region, and provide a model for the mechanism of DM-mediated peptide exchange. PMID:22084083

  20. Conformational lability in the class II MHC 310 helix and adjacent extended strand dictate HLA-DM susceptibility and peptide exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Corrie A; Negroni, Maria P; Kellersberger, Katherine A; Zavala-Ruiz, Zarixia; Evans, James E; Stern, Lawrence J

    2011-11-29

    HLA-DM is required for efficient peptide exchange on class II MHC molecules, but its mechanism of action is controversial. We trapped an intermediate state of class II MHC HLA-DR1 by substitution of αF54, resulting in a protein with increased HLA-DM binding affinity, weakened MHC-peptide hydrogen bonding as measured by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and increased susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Structural analysis revealed a set of concerted conformational alterations at the N-terminal end of the peptide-binding site. These results suggest that interaction with HLA-DM is driven by a conformational change of the MHC II protein in the region of the α-subunit 3(10) helix and adjacent extended strand region, and provide a model for the mechanism of DM-mediated peptide exchange.

  1. Soluble monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles: the three dimensions of structural complexity to use HLA-G as a clinical biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, F da Silva; König, L; Wagner, B; Giebel, B; Santos Manvailer, L F; Rebmann, V

    2016-09-01

    The HLA-G molecule belongs to the family of nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. At variance to classical HLA class I, HLA-G displays (i) a low number of nucleotide variations within the coding region, (ii) a high structural diversity, (iii) a restricted peptide repertoire, (iv) a limited tissue distribution and (v) strong immune-suppressive properties. The physiological HLA-G surface expression is restricted to the maternal-fetal interface and to immune-privileged adult tissues. Soluble forms of HLA-G (sHLA-G) are detectable in various body fluids. Cellular activation and pathological processes are associated with an aberrant or a neo-expression of HLA-G/sHLA-G. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to be key players in the induction of short- and long-term tolerance. Thus, its unique expression profile and tolerance-inducing functions render HLA-G/sHLA-G an attractive biomarker to monitor the systemic health/disease status and disease activity/progression for clinical approaches in disease management and treatments. Here, we place emphasis on (i) the current status of the tolerance-inducing functions by HLA-G/sHLA-G, (ii) the current complexity to implement this molecule as a meaningful clinical biomarker regarding the three dimensions of structural diversity (monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles) with its functional implications, and (iii) novel and future approaches to detect and quantify sHLA-G structures and functions.

  2. HLA Class I and II alleles, heterozygosity and HLA-KIR interactions are associated with rates of genital HSV shedding and lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaret, A; Dong, L; John, M; Mallal, S A; James, I; Warren, T; Gaudieri, S; Koelle, D M; Wald, A

    2016-12-01

    Variation at HLA and KIR loci is associated with the severity of viral infections. To assess associations of genital HSV-2 infection with human HLA and KIR genetic loci, we measured the frequencies of genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA detection and of genital lesions in HSV-2 seropositive persons. We followed 267 HSV-2 seropositive persons who collected daily genital swabs and recorded lesions for ⩾30 days. All persons were laboratory-documented as HIV-seronegative, and all were Caucasian by self-report. HSV detection rate and lesion frequency were compared by genotype using Poisson regression. Overall, HSV was detected on 19.1% of days and lesions on 11.6% of days. The presence of HLA-A*01 was directly associated with HSV detection frequency, whereas the presence of HLA-C*12 was inversely associated with HSV detection frequency. The presence of HLA-A*01 was directly associated with lesion rate, while HLA-A*26, -C*01 and -DQB1*0106 were associated with decreased lesions. We observed an interaction between the absence of both 2DS4del and HLA-Bw4 and higher lesion rate. Heterozygosity of HLA was also associated with reduced lesion frequency. Immune control of genital HSV infection relies on multiple interacting immunogenetic elements, including epistatic interactions between HLA and KIR.

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies new HLA class II haplotypes strongly protective against narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hor, Hyun; Kutalik, Zoltán; Dauvilliers, Yves;

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder with the strongest human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association ever reported. Since the associated HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype is common in the general population (15-25%), it has been suggested that it is almost necessary but not sufficient for developing...... narcolepsy. To further define the genetic basis of narcolepsy risk, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 562 European individuals with narcolepsy (cases) and 702 ethnically matched controls, with independent replication in 370 cases and 495 controls, all heterozygous for DRB1*1501-DQB1...... ratio = 0.02; P narcolepsy susceptibility....

  4. HLA Class II Alleles Susceptibility Markers of Type 1 Diabetes Fail to Specify Phenotypes of Ketosis-Prone Diabetes in Adult Tunisian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Laadhar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to characterize the different subgroups of ketosis-prone diabetes (KPD in a sample of Tunisian patients using the Aβ scheme based on the presence or absence of β-cell autoantibodies (A+ or A− and β-cell functional reserve (β+ or β− and we investigated whether HLA class II alleles could contribute to distinct KPD phenotypes. We enrolled 43 adult patients with a first episode of ketosis. For all patients we evaluated clinical parameters, β-cell autoimmunity, β-cell function and HLA class II alleles. Frequency distribution of the 4 subgroups was 23.3% A+β−, 23.3% A−β−, 11.6% A+β+ and 41.9% A−β+. Patients from the group A+β− were significantly younger than those from the group A−β− (P=.002. HLA susceptibility markers were significantly more frequent in patients with autoantibodies (P=.003. These patients also had resistance alleles but they were more frequent in A+β+ than A+β− patients (P=.04. Insulin requirement was not associated to the presence or the absence of HLA susceptibility markers. HLA class II alleles associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes have not allowed us to further define Tunisian KPD groups. However, high prevalence of HLA resistance alleles in our patients may reflect a particular genetic background of Tunisian KPD population.

  5. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, F. David; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castañeda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Prieto-González, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; González-Escribano, M. Francisca; Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narváez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Martínez-Berriochoa, Agustín; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Madroñero-Vuelta, Ana B.; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordóñez-Cañizares, M. Carmen; Escalante, Begoña; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Sopeña, Bernardo; Magro, César; Raya, Enrique; Grau, Elena; Román, José A.; de Miguel, Eugenio; López-Longo, F. Javier; Martínez, Lina; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Díaz-López, J. Bernardino; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Martínez-Zapico, Aleida; Monfort, Jordi; Tío, Laura; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; García-Villanueva, M. Jesús; Fernández-Contreras, M. Encarnación; Sanchez-Pernaute, Olga; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; Callejas, José L.; Fanlo-Mateo, Patricia; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor M.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schönau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Øyvind; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip array. We also imputed HLA data with a previously validated imputation method to perform a more comprehensive analysis of this genomic region. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA region, with rs477515 representing the highest peak (p = 4.05 × 10−40, OR = 1.73). A multivariate model including class II amino acids of HLA-DRβ1 and HLA-DQα1 and one class I amino acid of HLA-B explained most of the HLA association with GCA, consistent with previously reported associations of classical HLA alleles like HLA-DRB1∗04. An omnibus test on polymorphic amino acid positions highlighted DRβ1 13 (p = 4.08 × 10−43) and HLA-DQα1 47 (p = 4.02 × 10−46), 56, and 76 (both p = 1.84 × 10−45) as relevant positions for disease susceptibility. Outside the HLA region, the most significant loci included PTPN22 (rs2476601, p = 1.73 × 10−6, OR = 1.38), LRRC32 (rs10160518, p = 4.39 × 10−6, OR = 1.20), and REL (rs115674477, p = 1.10 × 10−5, OR = 1.63). Our study provides evidence of a strong contribution of HLA class I and II molecules to susceptibility to GCA. In the non-HLA region, we confirmed a key role for the functional PTPN22 rs2476601 variant and proposed other putative risk loci for GCA involved in Th1, Th17, and Treg cell function. PMID:25817017

  6. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    N-terminal binding core yet exhibit a C-terminal extension of 1-30 amino acids. Structural analysis demonstrates that binding of extended peptides opens the HLA class I F' pocket, allowing the C-terminal extension to protrude through one end of the binding groove. In summary, we demonstrate...... cells and characterize the peptide ligands using LCMS. We identify 195 T. gondii encoded ligands originating from both secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Surprisingly, T. gondii ligands are significantly longer than uninfected host ligands, and these longer pathogen derived peptides maintain a canonical...

  7. Correlation between genetic HLA class I and II polymorphisms and anthropological aspects in the Chaouya population from Morocco (Arabic speaking).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canossi, A; Piancatelli, D; Aureli, A; Oumhani, K; Ozzella, G; Del Beato, T; Liberatore, G; El Aouad, R; Adorno, D

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to provide genetic and anthropological information on the Chaouya (CH), an Arabic-speaking population living in West Morocco, Atlantic coast (Settat). In 98 unrelated healthy CH volunteers, we first investigated the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II allele polymorphisms using a sequence-based typing method and examined haplotypes and relatedness of this group to other African and Mediterranean populations. The study showed the close relatedness with Tunisian population and other North Africans, together with a strong influence of various immigrations, mainly Spaniards, French, and Portuguese, as expected. Nevertheless, analysis of class II allele frequencies (afs) showed that Oromo and Amhara Ethiopian groups cluster together with the Berbers and other North Africans, confirming the relationship between these populations (Afro-Asiatic linguistic group, Hamites). South and sub-Saharan Africans cluster separately at a great distance from CH, except the sub-Saharan Bantu population from Congo Kinshasa, which shows a relatively close genetic relationship ascribable to the effect of a diversifying selection. On the other hand, considering HLA class I afs analyses, it was noteworthy that CH grouped together with sub-Saharans, showing a close genetic distance mainly with Ugandas and Kenians Luo.

  8. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowland, J B; Andersen, V; Halberg, P

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, -DPB in 24 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in 102 healthy Danes. A highly significant increase of the frequency of the DR3...

  9. HLA class II susceptibility pattern for type 1 diabetes (T1D) in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, J; Hajilooi, M; Furst, D; Rezaei, H; Shahryari-Hesami, S; Kowsarifard, S; Zamani, A; Solgi, G

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the HLA-DRB1/HLA-DQB1 susceptibility and protection pattern for type 1 diabetes (T1D) in a population from Hamadan, north-west of Iran. A total of 133 patients with T1D were tested for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles using PCR-SSP compared to 100 ethnic-matched healthy controls. Alleles and haplotypes frequencies were compared between both groups. The most susceptible alleles for disease were HLA-DRB1*03:01, DRB1*04:02, DQB1*02:01 and DQB1*03:02, and protective alleles were HLA-DRB1*07:01, *11:01, *13:01, *14:01 and DRB1*15 and HLA-DQB1*06:01, *06:02 and *06:03. Haplotype analysis revealed that patients with T1D had higher frequencies of DRB1*03:01-DQB1*02:01 (OR = 4.86, P < 10(-7) ) and DRB1*04:02-DQB1*03:02 (OR = 9.93, P < 10(-7) ) and lower frequencies of DRB1*07:01-DQB1*02:01 (P = 0.0005), DRB1*11:01-DQB1*03:01 (P = 0.001), DRB1*13:01-DQB1*06:03 (P = 0.002) and DRB1*15-DQB1*06:01 (P = 0.001) haplotypes compared to healthy controls. Heterozygote combination of both susceptible haplotypes (DR3/DR4) confers the highest risk for T1D (RR = 18.80, P = 4 × 10(-5) ). Additionally, patients with homozygote diplotype, DR3/DR3 and DR4/DR4, showed a similar risk with less extent to heterozygote combination (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.01, respectively). Our findings not only confirm earlier reports from Iranians but also are in line with Caucasians and partly with Asians and some African patients with T1D. Remarkable differences were the identification of DRB1*04:01-DQB1*03:02, DRB1*07:01-DQB1*03:03 and DRB1*16-DQB1*05:02 as neutral and DRB1*13:01-DQB1*06:03 as the most protective haplotypes in this study.

  10. HLA Class II Defects in Burkitt Lymphoma: Bryostatin-1-Induced 17 kDa Protein Restores CD4+ T-Cell Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azim Hossain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While the defects in HLA class I-mediated Ag presentation by Burkitt lymphoma (BL have been well documented, CD4+ T-cells are also poorly stimulated by HLA class II Ag presentation, and the reasons underlying this defect(s have not yet been fully resolved. Here, we show that BL cells are deficient in their ability to optimally stimulate CD4+ T cells via the HLA class II pathway. The observed defect was not associated with low levels of BL-expressed costimulatory molecules, as addition of external co-stimulation failed to result in BL-mediated CD4+ T-cell activation. We further demonstrate that BL cells express the components of the class II pathway, and the defect was not caused by faulty Ag/class II interaction, because antigenic peptides bound with measurable affinity to BL-associated class II molecules. Treatment of BL with broystatin-1, a potent modulator of protein kinase C, led to significant improvement of functional class II Ag presentation in BL. The restoration of immune recognition appeared to be linked with an increased expression of a 17 kDa peptidylprolyl-like protein. These results demonstrate the presence of a specific defect in HLA class II-mediated Ag presentation in BL and reveal that treatment with bryostatin-1 could lead to enhanced immunogenicity.

  11. Global stability analysis on a class of cellular neural networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Yi

    2001-01-01

    [1]Chua, L. O., Yang, L., Cellular neural networks: Theory, IEEE Trans. CAS, 1988, (10): 1257.[2]Chua, L. O., Yang, L., Cellular neural networks: Applications, IEEE Trans. CAS, 1988, (10): 1273.[3]Chua, L. O., Roska, T., The CNN paradigm, IEEE Trans. CAS-I, 1993, (3): 147.[4]Matsumoto, T. Chua, L. O., Suzuki, H., CNN cloning template: Connected component detector, IEEE Trans. CAS, 1990, (8): 633.[5]Cao, L, Sun, Y, Yu, J., A CNN-based signature verification system,Proc. ICONIP′95, Beijing, 1995, 913—916.[6]Roska, T., Chua, L. O., The CNN universal machine: An analogic array computer, IEEE Trans. CAS Ⅱ, 1993, (3): 163.[7]Chua, L. O., Roska, T., Stability of a class of nonreciprocal cellular neural networks, IEEE Trans. CAS, 1990, (3): 1520.[8]Roska, T., Wu, C. W., Balsi, M. Et al., Stability and dynamics of delay type general and cellular neural networks, IEEE Trans. CAS, 1992, (6): 487.[9]Roska, T., Wu, C. W., Chua, L. O., Stability of cellular neural networks with dominant nonlinear and delaytype templates, IEEE Trans. CAS, 1993, (4): 270.[10]Civalleri, P. P., On stability of cellular neural networks with delay, IEEE Trans. CAS-I, 1993, (3): 157.[11]Gilli, G., Stability of cellular neural network and delayed cellular neural networks with nonpositive templates and nonmonotonic output functions, IEEE Trans CAS-I, 1994, (8): 518.[12]Baldi, P., Atiya, A. F., How delays affect neural dynamics and learning, IEEE Trans. On Neural Networks, 1994, (4): 612.[13]Liao, X. X., Mathematic foundation of cellular neural networks (Ⅰ), Science in China, Ser. A, 1994, 37(9): 902.[14]Liao, X. X., Mathematic foundation of cellular neural networks (Ⅱ), Science in China, Ser. A, 1994, 37(9): 1037.[15]Zhang, Y., Global exponential stability and periodic solutions of delay Hopfild neural networks, International J. Sys. Sci., 1996, (2): 227.[16]Zhang Yi, Zhong, S. M., Li, Z. L., Periodic solutions and global

  12. HLA class II diversity in seven Amerindian populations. Clues about the origins of the Aché.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneto, L T; Probst, C M; Hutz, M H; Salzano, F M; Rodriguez-Delfin, L A; Zago, M A; Hill, K; Hurtado, A M; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, A K C; Petzl-Erler, M L

    2003-12-01

    The study of the HLA variability of Native American populations revealed several alleles specific to one or more of the Latin American indigenous populations. The analysis of Amerindian groups distributed all over the continent might inform about the area of origin and the dispersal of these alleles and shed light on the evolution of this remarkable polymorphism. Moreover, HLA alleles and haplotypes are excellent markers to understand the genetic relationships between populations. For these reasons, we characterized the HLA class II polymorphism in seven South American Amerindian populations and compared the results with those previously reported for other Amerindian groups. The Guarani-Kaiowá (n = 160) and Guarani-Nandeva (n = 87) were from the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul, the Guarani-M'byá (n = 93) and Kaingang (n = 235) from Paraná state, the Aché (n = 89) from eastern Paraguay, the Quechua (n = 44) from Andean Peru. From Amazonia, a heterogeneous group was analyzed (n = 45). The most frequent alleles and haplotypes are common also in other Amerindian populations. Each HLA-DRB1 allele was typically found in combination with just one DQA1-DQB1 haplotype, most likely as a result of some form of random genetic drift and reduced gene flow from non-Amerindians. The frequency distribution differed significantly among all populations, although differences were less pronounced between the Guarani subgroups. Marker alleles allowed an estimate of European and sub-Saharan African gene flow into these populations: Quechua 23%, Guarani-Nandeva 14%, Kaingang 7%, Guarani-M'byá 4%, Guarani-Kaiowá, Amazonia, and Aché 0%. Interestingly, the DRB1*1413 allele, previously found only among the Guarani-M'byá (frequency 15%), appeared in the Aché (8%). The relationship of the Aché to other Amerindian populations is unclear, and this finding reveals a link with the Guarani. On the basis of genetic distance and the HLA allele/haplotype set, we propose that the Ach

  13. SNP mapping and candidate gene sequencing in the class I region of the HLA complex: searching for multiple sclerosis susceptibility genes in Tasmanians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burfoot, R K; Jensen, C J; Field, J; Stankovich, J; Varney, M D; Johnson, L J; Butzkueven, H; Booth, D; Bahlo, M; Tait, B D; Taylor, B V; Speed, T P; Heard, R; Stewart, G J; Foote, S J; Kilpatrick, T J; Rubio, J P

    2008-01-01

    This study is an extension to previously published work that has linked variation in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I region with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) in Australians from the Island State of Tasmania. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping was performed on an 865-kb candidate region (D6S1683-D6S265) in 166 Tasmanian MS families, and seven candidate genes [ubiquitin D (UBD), olfactory receptor 2H3 (OR2H3), gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor 1 (GABBR1), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), HLA-F, HLA complex group 4 (HCG4) and HLA-G] were resequenced. SNPs tagging the extended MS susceptibility haplotype were genotyped in an independent sample of 356 Australian MS trios and SNPs in the MOG gene were significantly over-transmitted to MS cases. We identified significant effects on MS susceptibility of HLA-A*2 (OR: 0.51; P = 0.05) and A*3 (OR: 2.85; P = 0.005), and two coding polymorphisms in the MOG gene (V145I: P = 0.01, OR: 2.2; V142L: P = 0.04, OR: 0.45) after full conditioning on HLA-DRB1. We have therefore identified plausible candidates for the causal MS susceptibility allele, and although not conclusive at this stage, our data provide suggestive evidence for multiple class I MS susceptibility genes.

  14. HLA class II polymorphism and IDDM susceptibility in the Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, I; Spyropoulou, M; Mallet, C; Loste, M N; Douay, C; Laperrière, J; Bartzokas, C; Lepage, V; Charron, D; Stavropoulos, C

    1993-06-01

    The frequencies of HLA-DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 alleles were compared between 50 Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Melitus (IDDM) patients and 49 healthy controls in the Greek population. Statistically significant difference in the frequencies of HLA-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 (P = 10(-4)), DQA1*0301-DQB1*0201 (P = 0.01) and DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001) were observed. The DRB1*0405-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0201 was the only DR, DQ combination significantly associated with the disease. The unexpected increase of DRB1*0405 observed in the Greek IDDM may suggest as reported in Chinese and Japanese IDDM a contribution of DR beta and DQ alpha in susceptibility. Moreover, in contrast to the Asians, in the Greek, the DR beta, DQ alpha are found with the usual DQ beta 57-ve.

  15. The complete primary structure of Cw*1701 reveals a highly divergent HLA class I molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, M J; Vilches, C; de Pablo, R; Puente, S; Kreisler, M

    1997-03-01

    Genotyping of the HLA-C locus by PCR-SSP has previously shown 100% association of B41 and B42 with a new allelic variant. Partial sequencing studies (exons 2-4) demonstrated that this PCR-SSP variant corresponded to the new allele Cw*1701. In this study we have characterized the whole coding region of Cw*1701 from a Bubi individual of Equatorial Guinea. Our results partially confirm the previously reported sequence and reveal that Cw*1701 has many new polymorphisms at several exons, including a 18-bp insertion in exon 5. Cw*1701 is thus a most unusual HLA-C molecule defining a third allelic lineage of this locus.

  16. HLA Class I & II Alleles in Multiple Sclerosis patients from Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, María T.; Suárez, Erick; Abbas, Muneer; Chinea, Ángel; Tosado, Rafael; Mejías, Ida A; Boukli, Nawal; Dunston, Georgia M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease where genetic and environmental factors have been implicated. The onset of symptoms occurs in individuals from twenty to fifty years of age, producing a progressive impairment of motor, sensory and cognitive functions. MS is more frequent in females than in males with a ratio of 4:1. The prevalence of the MS varies among ethnics groups such as Europeans, Africans and Caucasians. The estimated prevalence of MS in Puerto Rico is 42 for each 100,000 habitants, which is more than the prevalence reported for Central America and the Caribbean. In spite of this prevalence, the genetic component of MS has not been explored in order to know the alleles’ expression of Puerto Rican MS patients and compare it with the allele expression in other ethnic groups. Thirty-five patients and 31 control subjects were genotyped. The allele frequencies expressed in this sample were similar to those expressed for Puerto Ricans in the National Marrow Donor Program Registry (n=3,149). The most prevalent alleles for MS patients were HLA-DRB1*01 and *03. HLA-DQB1*04 was the most frequent in the control group and HLA-A*30, in MS patients. These findings are in agreement with published data. HLA-DQB1*04 was a marginal protector in this sample and this role has not been described before. The accuracy of the results is limited due to the sample size. After performing a statistical power analysis it showed that by increasing the sample the values would be significant. PMID:23767380

  17. Genetic Analysis with the Immunochip Platform in Behçet Disease. Identification of Residues Associated in the HLA Class I Region and New Susceptibility Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Cano, Marco-Antonio; García-Lozano, José-Raúl; Conde-Jaldón, Marta; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Castillo, María Jesús; Sánchez-Bursón, Juan; Juliá, María Rosa; Solans, Roser; Blanco, Ricardo; Barnosi-Marín, Ana-Celia; Gómez de la Torre, Ricardo; Fanlo, Patricia; Rodríguez-Carballeira, Mónica; Camps, Teresa; Castañeda, Santos; Alegre-Sancho, Juan-Jose; Martín, Javier; González-Escribano, María Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is an immuno-mediated vasculitis in which knowledge of its etiology and genetic basis is limited. To improve the current knowledge, a genetic analysis performed with the Immunochip platform was carried out in a population from Spain. A discovery cohort comprising 278 BD cases and 1,517 unaffected controls were genotyped using the Immunochip platform. The validation step was performed on an independent replication cohort composed of 130 BD cases and 600 additional controls. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA class I region, being HLA-B*51 the highest peak (overall P = 6.82E-32, OR = 3.82). A step-wise conditional logistic regression with classical alleles identified HLA-B*57 and HLA-A*03 as additional independent markers. The amino acid model that best explained the association, includes the position 97 of the HLA-B molecule and the position 66 of the HLA-A. Among the non-HLA loci, the most significant in the discovery analysis were: IL23R (rs10889664: P = 3.81E-12, OR = 2.00), the JRKL/CNTN5 region (rs2848479: P = 5.00E-08, OR = 1.68) and IL12A (rs1874886: P = 6.67E-08, OR = 1.72), which were confirmed in the validation phase (JRKL/CNTN5 rs2848479: P = 3.29E-10, OR = 1.66; IL12A rs1874886: P = 1.62E-08, OR = 1.61). Our results confirm HLA-B*51 as a primary-association marker in predisposition to BD and suggest additional independent signals within the class I region, specifically in the genes HLA-A and HLA-B. Regarding the non-HLA genes, in addition to IL-23R, previously reported in our population; IL12A, described in other populations, was found to be a BD susceptibility factor also in Spaniards; finally, a new associated locus was found in the JRKL/CNTN5 region. PMID:27548383

  18. Sub-classes and evolution stability of Wolfram's classesin the total-rule cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Guangwu; TIAN Feng; DONG Yinfeng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a concept of sub-classes and its evolution stability for the Wolfram's classes. Firstly, we obtain the sub-classes of the Wolfram's class IV, gene-piece of these sub-classes and their existing circumstance. Secondly, we introduce a new concept, the evolution stability, for the Wolfram's classes and sub-classes of Wolfram's class IV. Lastly, we find that Wolfram's classes I, II, and III have the evolution stability, but sub-classes of the Wolfram's class IV have not the evolution stability for the total rule cellular automata.

  19. HLA class II genes in Latvian patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumba, I; Denisova, A; Sochnev, A; Nilsson, B; Sanjeevi, C B

    1997-01-01

    PCR-based HLA genotyping was used to analyze the association of HLA-DR and -DQ genes in 127 juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients and 111 population-based controls from Latvia. The results show DQA1*03 to be positively associated in overall patients and DRB1*01-DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501 to be negatively associated with JRA in overall patients and in polyarthritis patients compared to controls. These data indicate the immunogenetic heterogeneity in the JRA patients, in the disease subgroups and in different ethnic groups. Rheumatoid factor (RF) was assayed in patients (n = 119) and controls (n = 98). RF was present in patients (7/119, 6%) compared to controls (5/98, 5%). None of the DQA1, DQB1 alleles, DQ and DR-DQ haplotypes was associated in seropositive patients compared to seropositive controls. DR1-DQ5 (DQA1*0101-B*0501) was decreased in seronegative patients (11/111, 10%) compared to seronegative controls (24/105, 23%), but the difference was not significant after correction of the p value.

  20. Sequencing of two new HLA class II alleles: DRB3*0218 and DQB1*030202.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, A; Aviles, M J; Lillo, R; Alonso-Nieto, M; Zarapuz, L; García-Villaescusa, R; García-Sánchez, F; Vicario, J L

    2004-06-01

    Two novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles for DRB3 and DQB1 genes detected in Caucasoid Spanish individuals are described: DRB3*0218 and DQB1*030202. Both alleles have been found during routine high-resolution typing by sequencing. DRB3*0218 shows a novel DRB3 gene polymorphic position, located at amino acid residue 58, alanine to glutamic acid. This residue is shared by several DRB1 alleles, including all described DRB1*11 subtypes. DQB1*030202 differs from DQB1*030201 by a point mutation at position 319 (T to C). This nucleotide change generates a new codon at amino acid position 75 that is not shared by any other DQB1 allele.

  1. Association of HLA class-I and inhibitory KIR genotypes in Gabonese patients infected by Chikungunya or Dengue type-2 viruses.

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    Caroline Petitdemange

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural killer (NK cells provide defense in the early stages of the immune response against viral infections. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR expressed on the surface of NK cells play an important role in regulating NK cell response through recognition of human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules on target cells. Previous studies have shown that specific KIR/ligand combinations are associated with the outcome of several viral infectious diseases. METHODS: We investigated the impact of inhibitory and activating KIR and their HLA-class I ligand genotype on the susceptibility to Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Dengue virus (DENV2 infections. From April to July 2010 in Gabon, a large outbreak of CHIKV and DENV2 concomitantly occurred in two provinces of Gabon (Ogooué-Lolo and Haut-Ogooué. We performed the genotypic analysis of KIR in the combination with their cognate HLA-class I ligands in 73 CHIKV and 55 DENV2 adult cases, compared with 54 healthy individuals. RESULTS: We found in CHIV-infected patients that KIR2DL1 and KIR2DS5 are significantly increased and decreased respectively, as compared to DENV2+ patients and healthy donors. The combination of KIR2DL1 and its cognate HLA-C2 ligand was significantly associated with the susceptibility to CHIKV infection. In contrast, no other inhibitory KIR-HLA pairs showed an association with the two mosquito-borne arboviruses. CONCLUSION: These observations are strongly suggestive that the NK cell repertoire shaped by the KIR2DL1:HLA-C2 interaction facilitate specific infection by CHIKV.

  2. Altered HLA Class I Profile Associated with Type A/D Nucleophosmin Mutation Points to Possible Anti-Nucleophosmin Immune Response in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

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    Kateřina Kuželová

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1 mutations are frequently found in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML and the newly generated sequences were suggested to induce immune response contributing to the relatively favorable outcome of patients in this AML subset. We hypothesized that if an efficient immune response against mutated nucleophosmin can be induced in vivo, the individuals expressing HLA alleles suitable for presenting NPM-derived peptides should be less prone to developing AML associated with NPM1 mutation. We thus compared HLA class I frequencies in a cohort of patients with mutated NPM1 (63 patients, NPMc+, a cohort of patients with wild-type NPM1 (94 patients, NPMwt and in normal individuals (large datasets available from Allele Frequency Net Database. Several HLA allelic groups were found to be depleted in NPMc+ patients, but not in NPMwt compared to the normal distribution. The decrease was statistically significant for HLA B(*07, B(*18, and B(*40. Furthermore, statistically significant advantage in the overall survival was found for patients with mutated NPM1 expressing at least one of the depleted allelic groups. The majority of the depleted alleles were predicted to bind potent NPM-derived immunopeptides and, importantly, these peptides were often located in the unmutated part of the protein. Our analysis suggests that individuals expressing specific HLA allelic groups are disposed to develop an efficient anti-AML immune response thanks to aberrant cytoplasmic localization of the mutated NPM protein.

  3. Identification by random forest method of HLA class I amino acid substitutions associated with lower survival at day 100 in unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, S R; Lin, S; Maiers, M; Haagenson, M; Spellman, S; Klein, J P; Binkowski, T A; Lee, S J; van Besien, K

    2012-02-01

    The identification of important amino acid substitutions associated with low survival in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is hampered by the large number of observed substitutions compared with the small number of patients available for analysis. Random forest analysis is designed to address these limitations. We studied 2107 HCT recipients with good or intermediate risk hematological malignancies to identify HLA class I amino acid substitutions associated with reduced survival at day 100 post transplant. Random forest analysis and traditional univariate and multivariate analyses were used. Random forest analysis identified amino acid substitutions in 33 positions that were associated with reduced 100 day survival, including HLA-A 9, 43, 62, 63, 76, 77, 95, 97, 114, 116, 152, 156, 166 and 167; HLA-B 97, 109, 116 and 156; and HLA-C 6, 9, 11, 14, 21, 66, 77, 80, 95, 97, 99, 116, 156, 163 and 173. In all 13 had been previously reported by other investigators using classical biostatistical approaches. Using the same data set, traditional multivariate logistic regression identified only five amino acid substitutions associated with lower day 100 survival. Random forest analysis is a novel statistical methodology for analysis of HLA mismatching and outcome studies, capable of identifying important amino acid substitutions missed by other methods.

  4. HLA class II DR-DQ amino acids and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: Application of the haplotype method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, A.M.; McWeeney, S.; Thomson, G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) HLA class III DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 data from four populations (Norwegian, Sardinian, Mexican American, and Taiwanese) have been analyzed to detect the amino acids involved in the disease process. The combination of sites DRB1 No. 67 and 86; DQA1 No. 47; and DQB1 No. 9, 26, 57, and 70 predicts the IDDM component in these four populations, when the results and criteria of the haplotype method for amino acids, developed in the companion paper in this issue of the journal, are used. The following sites, either individually, or in various combinations, previously have been suggested as IDDM components: DRB1 No. 57, 70, 71, and 86; DQA1 No. 52; and DQB1 No. 13, 45, and 57 (DQB1 No. 13 and 45 correlates 100% with DQB1 No. 9 and 26). We propose that DQA1 No. 47 is a better predictor of IDDM than is the previously suggested DQA1 No. 52, and we add DRB1 No. 67 and DQB1 No. 70 to the HLA DR-DQ IDDM amino acids. We do not claim to have identified all HLA DR-DQ amino acids - or highly correlated sites - involved in IDDM. The frequencies and predisposing/protective effects of the haplotypes defined by these seven sites have been compared, and the effects on IDDM are consistent across the populations. The strongest susceptible effects came from haplotypes DRB1*0301/DQA1*0501/ DQB1*0201 and DRB1*0401-5-7-8/DQA1*0301/DQB1*0302. The number of strong protective haplotypes observed was larger than the number of susceptible ones; some of the predisposing haplotypes were present in only one or two populations. Although the sites under consideration do not necessarily have a functional involvement in IDDM, they should be highly associated with such sites and should prove to be useful in risk assessment. 48 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Occurrence of Fatal and Nonfatal Adverse Outcomes after Heart Transplantation in Patients with Pretransplant Noncytotoxic HLA Antibodies

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    Luciano Potena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA antibodies (HLA ab in transplant candidates have been associated with poor outcome. However, clinical relevance of noncytotoxic antibodies after heart transplant (HT is controversial. By using a Luminex-based HLA screening, we retested pretransplant sera from HT recipients testing negative for cytotoxic HLA ab and for prospective crossmatch. Out of the 173 consecutive patients assayed (52±13y; 16% females; 47% ischemic etiology, 32 (18% showed pretransplant HLA ab, and 12 (7% tested positive against both class I and class II HLA. Recipients with any HLA ab had poorer survival than those without (65±9 versus 82±3%; P=0.02, accounting for a doubled independent mortality risk (P=0.04. In addition, HLA-ab detection was associated with increased prevalence of early graft failure (35 versus 15%; P=0.05 and late cellular rejection (29 versus 11%; P=0.03. Of the subgroup of 37 patients suspected for antibody mediated rejection (AMR, the 9 with pretransplant HLA ab were more likely to display pathological AMR grade 2 (P=0.04. By an inexpensive, luminex-based, HLA-screening assay, we were able to detect non-cytotoxic HLA ab predicting fatal and nonfatal adverse outcomes after heart transplant. Allocation strategies and desensitization protocols need to be developed and prospectively tested in these patients.

  6. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, C.; Southwood, S.; Hoof, Ilka;

    2010-01-01

    macaque potentially being a more relevant model for AIDS outcomes than the Indian rhesus macaque, the Chinese-origin rhesus macaques have not been well-characterized for their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) composition and function, reducing their greater utilization. In this study, we...... characterized a total of 50 unique Chinese rhesus macaques from several varying origins for their entire MHC class I allele composition and identified a total of 58 unique complete MHC class I sequences. Only nine of the sequences had been associated with Indian rhesus macaques, and 28/58 (48...... binding characteristics with the HLA-B7 supertype, the most frequent supertype in human populations. These studies provide the first functional characterization of an MHC class I molecule in the context of Chinese rhesus macaques and the first instance of HLA-B7 analogy for rhesus macaques....

  7. Towards understanding the origin and dispersal of Austronesians in the Solomon Sea: HLA class II polymorphism in eight distinct populations of Asia-Oceania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimdahl, H; Schiefenhövel, W; Kayser, M; Roewer, L; Nagy, M

    1999-12-01

    HLA class II nucleotide sequence polymorphisms were examined in eight ethnic groups of Asia-Oceania using DNA typing methods. Allele frequencies and characteristic DR/DQ haplotypes were determined and compared with those of other populations of Asia-Oceania. Genetic distances were measured to show the genetic relationship within the studied populations as well as between the studied populations and previously published populations. Phylogenetic trees were constructed based on HLA allele frequencies using the neighbour-joining method. The populations, mainly Trobriand Islanders, Roro, Tolai, Western Samoans and Taiwanese Aborigines, are characterized by a reduced diversity at the HLA loci examined, especially for DPB1. The high frequency of the 'Asian'-specific DPB1*0501 allele in Trobrianders and Roro, but also in Western Samoans and Taiwanese Aborigines, was the most striking result. The prevalence of DPB1*0501 and the short genetic distance from Trobriander and Roro to Taiwanese Aborigines provide evidence that the origin of the Austronesian odyssey is south-east Asia, and Taiwan could be an important part of it. The relatedness of Trobrianders to the Polynesian population from Western Samoa indicates a probable recent common ancestor. The observed lack of diversity may reflect bottleneck(s) and/or limited diversity of the founding population. Analysis of HLA class I antigens, together with mt-DNA and Y-chromosomal studies, will give us further information about the settlement of the Trobriand and other islands during the colonization of the Pacific.

  8. HLA-DRB1*11 and variants of the MHC class II locus are strong risk factors for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombrello, Michael J; Remmers, Elaine F; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Grom, Alexei; Foell, Dirk; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Özen, Seza; Prahalad, Sampath; Zeft, Andrew S; Bohnsack, John F; Mellins, Elizabeth D; Ilowite, Norman T; Russo, Ricardo; Len, Claudio; Hilario, Maria Odete E; Oliveira, Sheila; Yeung, Rae S M; Rosenberg, Alan; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Anton, Jordi; Schwarz, Tobias; Hinks, Anne; Bilginer, Yelda; Park, Jane; Cobb, Joanna; Satorius, Colleen L; Han, Buhm; Baskin, Elizabeth; Signa, Sara; Duerr, Richard H; Achkar, J P; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kottyan, Leah C; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen W; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Docampo, Elisa; Estivill, Xavier; Gül, Ahmet; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Langefeld, Carl D; Thompson, Susan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Thomson, Wendy; Kastner, Daniel L; Woo, Patricia

    2015-12-29

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an often severe, potentially life-threatening childhood inflammatory disease, the pathophysiology of which is poorly understood. To determine whether genetic variation within the MHC locus on chromosome 6 influences sJIA susceptibility, we performed an association study of 982 children with sJIA and 8,010 healthy control subjects from nine countries. Using meta-analysis of directly observed and imputed SNP genotypes and imputed classic HLA types, we identified the MHC locus as a bona fide susceptibility locus with effects on sJIA risk that transcended geographically defined strata. The strongest sJIA-associated SNP, rs151043342 [P = 2.8 × 10(-17), odds ratio (OR) 2.6 (2.1, 3.3)], was part of a cluster of 482 sJIA-associated SNPs that spanned a 400-kb region and included the class II HLA region. Conditional analysis controlling for the effect of rs151043342 found that rs12722051 independently influenced sJIA risk [P = 1.0 × 10(-5), OR 0.7 (0.6, 0.8)]. Meta-analysis of imputed classic HLA-type associations in six study populations of Western European ancestry revealed that HLA-DRB1*11 and its defining amino acid residue, glutamate 58, were strongly associated with sJIA [P = 2.7 × 10(-16), OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.8)], as was the HLA-DRB1*11-HLA-DQA1*05-HLA-DQB1*03 haplotype [6.4 × 10(-17), OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.9)]. By examining the MHC locus in the largest collection of sJIA patients assembled to date, this study solidifies the relationship between the class II HLA region and sJIA, implicating adaptive immune molecules in the pathogenesis of sJIA.

  9. Expression of HLA class Ⅰ and Ⅱ on peripheral blood lymphocytes in HBV infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chuan-xin; WANG Jin-feng; LIU Min; ZOU Xiong; YU Xiu-ping; YANG Xiao-jing; ZHENG Gui-xi

    2006-01-01

    @@ Persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the most important reason for chronic hepatitis B,hepatic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma.1 T lymphocytes, including CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, are major composition of host cellular immunity.Furthermore, CD8+ cells play a primary role in host immune reaction of anti-tumor and anti-infection.

  10. HLA Class II Antigens and Their Interactive Effect on Perinatal Mother-To-Child HIV-1 Transmission.

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    Ma Luo

    Full Text Available HLA class II antigens are central in initiating antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses to HIV-1. Specific alleles have been associated with differential responses to HIV-1 infection and disease among adults. This study aims to determine the influence of HLA class II genes and their interactive effect on mother-child perinatal transmission in a drug naïve, Mother-Child HIV transmission cohort established in Kenya, Africa in 1986. Our study showed that DRB concordance between mother and child increased risk of perinatal HIV transmission by three fold (P = 0.00035/Pc = 0.0014, OR: 3.09, 95%CI, 1.64-5.83. Whereas, DPA1, DPB1 and DQB1 concordance between mother and child had no significant influence on perinatal HIV transmission. In addition, stratified analysis showed that DRB1*15:03+ phenotype (mother or child significantly increases the risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission. Without DRB1*15:03, DRB1 discordance between mother and child provided 5 fold protection (P = 0.00008, OR: 0.186, 95%CI: 0.081-0.427. However, the protective effect of DRB discordance was diminished if either the mother or the child was DRB1*15:03+ phenotype (P = 0.49-0.98, OR: 0.7-0.99, 95%CI: 0.246-2.956. DRB3+ children were less likely to be infected perinatally (P = 0.0006, Pc = 0.014; OR:0.343, 95%CI:0.183-0.642. However, there is a 4 fold increase in risk of being infected at birth if DRB3+ children were born to DRB1*15:03+ mother compared to those with DRB1*15:03- mother. Our study showed that DRB concordance/discordance, DRB1*15:03, children's DRB3 phenotype and their interactions play an important role in perinatal HIV transmission. Identification of genetic factors associated with protection or increased risk in perinatal transmission will help develop alternative prevention and treatment methods in the event of increases in drug resistance of ARV.

  11. Structure of the Epstein-Barr virus gp42 protein bound to the MHC class II recepter HLA-DR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullen, M.; Haan, K.M.; Longnecker, R.; Jardetzky, T.

    2010-03-08

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes infectious mononucleosis, establishes long-term latent infections, and is associated with a variety of human tumors. The EBV gp42 glycoprotein binds MHC class II molecules, playing a critical role in infection of B lymphocytes. EBV gp42 belongs to the C-type lectin superfamily, with homology to NK receptors of the immune system. We report the crystal structure of gp42 bound to the human MHC class II molecule HLA-DR1. The gp42 binds HLA-DR1 using a surface site that is distinct from the canonical lectin and NK receptor ligand binding sites. At the canonical ligand binding site, gp42 forms a large hydrophobic groove, which could interact with other ligands necessary for EBV entry, providing a mechanism for coupling MHC recognition and membrane fusion.

  12. Cellular peptide composition governed by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K; Rötzschke, O; Rammensee, H G

    1990-11-15

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules present peptides derived from cellular proteins to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), which check these peptides for abnormal features. How such peptides arise in the cell is not known. Here we show that the MHC molecules themselves are substantially involved in determining which peptides occur intracellularly: normal mouse spleen cells identical at all genes but MHC class I express different patterns of peptides derived from cellular non-MHC proteins. We suggest several models to explain this influence of MHC class I molecules on cellular peptide composition.

  13. [Genetic history of Aleuts of the Komandor islands from results of analyzing variability of class II HLA genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volod'ko, N V; Derbeneva, O A; Uinuk-ool, T S; Sukernik, R I

    2003-12-01

    Variability of the HLA class II genes (alleles of the DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 loci) was investigated in a sample of Aleuts of the Commanders (n = 31), whose ancestors inhabited the Commander Islands for many thousand years. Among 19 haplotypes revealed in Aleuts of the Commanders, at most eight were inherited from the native inhabitants of the Commander Islands. Five of these haplotypes (DRB1*0401-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0301, DRB1*1401-DQA1*0101-DQB1*0503, DRB1*0802-DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402, DRB1*1101-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301, and DRB1*1201-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301) were typical of Beringian Mongoloids, i.e., Coastal Chukchi and Koryaks, as well as Siberian and Alaskan Eskimos. Genetic contribution of the immigrants to the genetic pool of proper Aleuts constituted about 52%. Phylogenetic analysis based on Transberingian distribution of the DRB1 allele frequencies favored the hypothesis on the common origin of Paleo-Aleuts, Paleo-Eskimos, and the Indians from the northwestern North America, whose direct ancestors survived in Beringian/southwestern Alaskan coastal refugia during the late Ice Age.

  14. Differences in the expressed HLA class I alleles effect the differential clustering of HIV type 1-specific T cell responses in infected Chinese and Caucasians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu,XG; Addo,MM; Perkins,BA; Wej,FL; Rathod,A; Geer,SC; Parta,M; Cohen,D; Stone,DR; Russell,CJ; Tanzi,G; Mei,S; Wureel,AG; Frahm,N; Lichterfeld,M; Heath,L; Mullins,JI; Marincola,F; Goulder,PJR; Brander,C; Allen,T; Cao,YZ; Walker,BD; Altfeld,M

    2005-01-01

    China is a region of the world with a rapidly spreading HIV-1 epidemic. Studies providing insights into HIV-1 pathogenesis in infected Chinese are urgently needed to support the design and testing of an effective HIV-1 vaccine for this population. HIV-1-specific T cell responses were characterized in 32 HIV-1-infected individuals of Chinese origin and compared to 34 infected caucasians using 410 overlapping peptides spanning the entire HIV-1 clade B consensus sequence in an IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. All HIV-1 proteins were targeted with similar frequency in both populations and all study subjects recognized at least one overlapping peptide. HIV-1-specific T cell responses clustered in seven different regions of the HIV-1 genome in the Chinese cohort and in nine different regions in the caucasian cohort. The dominant HLA class I alleles expressed in the two populations differed significantly, and differences in epitope clustering pattern were shown to be influenced by differences in class I alleles that restrict immunodominant epitopes. These studies demonstrate that the clustering of HIV-1-specific T cell responses is influenced by the genetic HLA class I background in the study populations. The design and testing of candidate vaccines to fight the rapidly growing HIV-1 epidemic must therefore take the HLA genetics of the population into account as specific regions of the virus can be expected to be differentially targeted in ethnically diverse populations.

  15. Functional analysis of frequently expressed Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules Mamu-A1*02601 and Mamu-B*08301 reveals HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 supertypic specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southwood, Scott; Solomon, Christopher; Hoof, Ilka;

    2011-01-01

    -binding characteristics with the HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 supertypes, respectively, the next most frequent human supertypes after HLA-B7. These data suggest that Chinese rhesus macaques may indeed be a more representative model of HLA gene diversity and function as compared to the species of Indian origin and therefore a better...

  16. Interaction analysis between HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles and MHC class II transactivator CIITA gene with regard to risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ronninger

    Full Text Available HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE alleles are the strongest genetic determinants for autoantibody positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA. One of the key regulators in expression of HLA class II receptors is MHC class II transactivator (CIITA. A variant of the CIITA gene has been found to associate with inflammatory diseases.We wanted to explore whether the risk variant rs3087456 in the CIITA gene interacts with the HLA-DRB1 SE alleles regarding the risk of developing RA. We tested this hypothesis in a case-control study with 11767 individuals from four European Caucasian populations (6649 RA cases and 5118 controls.We found no significant additive interaction for risk alleles among Swedish Caucasians with RA (n = 3869, attributable proportion due to interaction (AP = 0.2, 95%CI: -0.2-0.5 or when stratifying for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA presence (ACPA positive disease: n = 2945, AP = 0.3, 95%CI: -0.05-0.6, ACPA negative: n = 2268, AP = -0.2, 95%CI: -1.0-0.6. We further found no significant interaction between the main subgroups of SE alleles (DRB1*01, DRB1*04 or DRB1*10 and CIITA. Similar analysis of three independent RA cohorts from British, Dutch and Norwegian populations also indicated an absence of significant interaction between genetic variants in CIITA and SE alleles with regard to RA risk.Our data suggest that risk from the CIITA locus is independent of the major risk for RA from HLA-DRB1 SE alleles, given that no significant interaction between rs3087456 and SE alleles was observed. Since a biological link between products of these genes is evident, the genetic contribution from CIITA and class II antigens in the autoimmune process may involve additional unidentified factors.

  17. A vaccine encoding conserved promiscuous HIV CD4 epitopes induces broad T cell responses in mice transgenic to multiple common HLA class II molecules.

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    Susan Pereira Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Current HIV vaccine approaches are focused on immunogens encoding whole HIV antigenic proteins that mainly elicit cytotoxic CD8+ responses. Mounting evidence points toward a critical role for CD4+ T cells in the control of immunodeficiency virus replication, probably due to cognate help. Vaccine-induced CD4+ T cell responses might, therefore, have a protective effect in HIV replication. In addition, successful vaccines may have to elicit responses to multiple epitopes in a high proportion of vaccinees, to match the highly variable circulating strains of HIV. Using rational vaccine design, we developed a DNA vaccine encoding 18 algorithm-selected conserved, "promiscuous" (multiple HLA-DR-binding B-subtype HIV CD4 epitopes - previously found to be frequently recognized by HIV-infected patients. We assessed the ability of the vaccine to induce broad T cell responses in the context of multiple HLA class II molecules using different strains of HLA class II- transgenic mice (-DR2, -DR4, -DQ6 and -DQ8. Mice displayed CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses of significant breadth and magnitude, and 16 out of the 18 encoded epitopes were recognized. By virtue of inducing broad responses against conserved CD4+ T cell epitopes that can be recognized in the context of widely diverse, common HLA class II alleles, this vaccine concept may cope both with HIV genetic variability and increased population coverage. The vaccine may thus be a source of cognate help for HIV-specific CD8+ T cells elicited by conventional immunogens, in a wide proportion of vaccinees.

  18. Combined Linkage and Association Studies Show that HLA Class II Variants Control Levels of Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobat, Aurélie; Guergnon, Julien; Brice, Pauline; Fermé, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Pendeven, Catherine Le-; Amiel, Corinne; Taoufik, Yassine; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Theodorou, Ioannis; Besson, Caroline; Abel, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p = 5×10–5 for rs9268403). The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p = 0.02). In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL. PMID:25025336

  19. Combined linkage and association studies show that HLA class II variants control levels of antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Pedergnana

    Full Text Available Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL. Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1 IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p = 5×10(-5 for rs9268403. The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p = 0.02. In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL.

  20. HLA class I variation controlled for genetic admixture in the Gila River Indian Community of Arizona: a model for the Paleo-Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R C; McAuley, J E

    1992-01-01

    The genetic distribution of the HLA class I loci is presented for 619 "full blooded" Pima and Tohono O'odham Native Americans (Pimans) in the Gila River Indian Community. Variation in the Pimans is highly restricted. There are only three polymorphic alleles at the HLA-A locus, *A2, *A24, and *A31, and only 10 alleles with a frequency greater than 0.01 at HLA-B where *Bw48 (0.187), *B35 (0.173), and the new epitope *BN21 (0.143) have the highest frequencies. Two and three locus disequilibria values and haplotype frequencies are presented. Ten three-locus haplotypes account for more than 50% of the class I variation, with *A24 *BN21 *Cw3 (0.085) having the highest frequency. Gm allotypes demonstrate that little admixture from non-Indian populations has entered the Community since the 17th century when Europeans first came to this area. As a consequence many alleles commonly found in Europeans and European Americans are efficient markers for Caucasian admixture, while the "private" Indian alleles, *BN21 and *Bw48, can be used to measure Native American admixture in Caucasian populations. It is suggested that this distribution in "full blooded" Pimans approximates that of the Paleo-Indian migrants who first entered the Americas between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.

  1. HLA-DR4 subtype frequencies in rheumatoid arthritis indicate that DRB1 is the major susceptibility locus within the HLA class II region

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    Wordsworth, B.P.; Bell, J.I. (Univ. of Oxford (England)); Lanchbury, J.S.S.; Sakkas, L.I.; Welsh, K.I.; Panayi, G.S. (Guy' s Hospital, London (England))

    1989-12-01

    Susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be due to the presence of shared functional epitopes common the HLA-DR {beta} chains of several RA-associated haplotypes. The authors have obtained direct evidence for this hypothesis by using the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing the DRB1 and DQB1 genes from RA patients. A highly conserved epitope present on DR {beta} chains of DR4 and DR1 haplotypes was found in 83% of 149 patients with classical or definite RA but was found in only 46% of 100 control individuals. Two Dw subtypes of DR4 (Dw4 and Dw14) were associated with disease susceptibility but two other subtypes (Dw10 and Dw13) were not. Sequence differences between these subtypes implicate those residues around the putative antigen binding site of the DR {beta} molecule in the pathogenesis of RA. These data provide a basis for understanding host susceptibility to RA at a molecular level.

  2. Ambiguous allele combinations in HLA Class I and Class II sequence-based typing: when precise nucleotide sequencing leads to imprecise allele identification

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    Larsen Paula

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sequence-based typing (SBT is one of the most comprehensive methods utilized for HLA typing. However, one of the inherent problems with this typing method is the interpretation of ambiguous allele combinations which occur when two or more different allele combinations produce identical sequences. The purpose of this study is to investigate the probability of this occurrence. We performed HLA-A,-B SBT for Exons 2 and 3 on 676 donors. Samples were analyzed with a capillary sequencer. The racial distribution of the donors was as follows: 615-Caucasian, 13-Asian, 23-African American, 17-Hispanic and 8-Unknown. 672 donors were analyzed for HLA-A locus ambiguities and 666 donors were analyzed for HLA-B locus ambiguities. At the HLA-A locus a total of 548 total ambiguous allele combinations were identified (548/1344 = 41%. Most (278/548 = 51% of these ambiguities were due to the fact that Exon 4 analysis was not performed. At the HLA-B locus 322 total ambiguous allele combinations were found (322/1332 = 24%. The HLA-B*07/08/15/27/35/44 antigens, common in Caucasians, produced a large portion of the ambiguities (279/322 = 87%. A large portion of HLA-A and B ambiguous allele combinations can be addressed by utilizing a group-specific primary amplification approach to produce an unambiguous homozygous sequence. Therefore, although the prevalence of ambiguous allele combinations is high, if the resolution of these ambiguities is clinically warranted, methods exist to compensate for this problem.

  3. A statistical framework for modeling HLA-dependent T cell response data.

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    Jennifer Listgarten

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The identification of T cell epitopes and their HLA (human leukocyte antigen restrictions is important for applications such as the design of cellular vaccines for HIV. Traditional methods for such identification are costly and time-consuming. Recently, a more expeditious laboratory technique using ELISpot assays has been developed that allows for rapid screening of specific responses. However, this assay does not directly provide information concerning the HLA restriction of a response, a critical piece of information for vaccine design. Thus, we introduce, apply, and validate a statistical model for identifying HLA-restricted epitopes from ELISpot data. By looking at patterns across a broad range of donors, in conjunction with our statistical model, we can determine (probabilistically which of the HLA alleles are likely to be responsible for the observed reactivities. Additionally, we can provide a good estimate of the number of false positives generated by our analysis (i.e., the false discovery rate. This model allows us to learn about new HLA-restricted epitopes from ELISpot data in an efficient, cost-effective, and high-throughput manner. We applied our approach to data from donors infected with HIV and identified many potential new HLA restrictions. Among 134 such predictions, six were confirmed in the lab and the remainder could not be ruled as invalid. These results shed light on the extent of HLA class I promiscuity, which has significant implications for the understanding of HLA class I antigen presentation and vaccine development.

  4. Renal cell carcinoma-infiltrating natural killer cells express differential repertoires of activating and inhibitory receptors and are inhibited by specific HLA class I allotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleypen, Julia S; Von Geldern, Marion; Weiss, Elisabeth H; Kotzias, Nicole; Rohrmann, Karl; Schendel, Dolores J; Falk, Christine S; Pohla, Heike

    2003-10-10

    Among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) directly isolated from renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), we found substantial numbers of natural killer (NK) cells in most tumor tissues. They could be identified reliably in situ with an antibody directed against the activating receptor (AR) NKp46 that is exclusively expressed by all NK cells. NK-enriched TILs (NK-TILs) showed cytotoxicity against major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-negative cell lines. The ability to detect lysis of target cells was dependent on the percentage of NK cells within the TILs, and cytotoxicity was only observed after overnight activation with low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2). Infiltrating NK cells were found to express various inhibitory receptors (IRs); among these the CD94/NKG2A receptor complex was overrepresented compared to the autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) population. Other IRs were underrepresented, indicating that NK subpopulations vary in their tumor-infiltrating capacity. IRs expressed by NK-TILs are functional since receptor engagement with MHC class I ligands presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-transfected target cell lines was able to inhibit NK-mediated cytotoxicity. NK-TILs were also able to lyse autologous or allogeneic tumor cell lines in vitro. This activity correlated with low HLA class I surface expression since lysis could be inhibited by interferon (IFN)-gamma-expressing RCC transductants that displayed a higher surface density of HLA class I molecules. Therefore, NK cells infiltrating tumor tissues have an inherent ability to recognize transformed cells, but they require cytokine activation and are sensitive to inhibition by IR ligands.

  5. Association of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles with pregnancy outcome in patients with recurrent miscarriage subsequent to a firstborn boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Steffensen, Rudi; Varming, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Healthy females, pregnant with a boy, generate immune responses against male-specific minor histocompatibility (HY) antigens. The clinical importance of these responses is evident in stem cell transplantation. Birth of a boy prior to a series of miscarriages reduces the chance of a subsequent live......-restricting HLA class II alleles are associated with a decreased chance of a live birth in SRM women with firstborn boys. These findings strongly indicate an aberrant maternal immune reaction against fetal HY-antigens in SRM. The results may shed light on the as-yet unknown immunological causes of SRM and may...... help understand the successful maternal acceptance of the fetal semi-allograft....

  6. Breaking confinement: unconventional peptide presentation by major histocompatibility (MHC) class I allele HLA-A*02:01

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remesh, Soumya G.; Andreatta, Massimo; Ying, Ge

    2017-01-01

    by HLA-A*02:01. These peptides were extended at the C-terminus (PΩ) and contained charged amino acids not more than 3 residues after the anchor amino acid at PΩ, which enabled them to open the F pocket and expose their C-terminal extension into the solvent. Here, we show that the mechanism of F pocket...

  7. Antibodies against a class II HLA-peptide complex raised by active immunization of mice with antigen mimicking peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Tuxen, R; Riise, Erik Skjold

    2009-01-01

    , have been found in the peripheral blood of MS patients. These autoreactive T cells are believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of MS. In this article, antibodies against the HLA complex DR2b (DRA1*0101/DRB1*1501) in complex with the MBP-derived peptide MBP(85-99) have been generated by immunization...

  8. The tissue microlocalisation and cellular expression of CD163, VEGF, HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14 is correlated to clinical outcome in NSCLC.

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    Chandra M Ohri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously investigated the microlocalisation of M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. This study investigated the non-macrophage (NM expression of proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. METHODS: Using immunohistochemistry, CD68(+ macrophages and proteins associated with either a cytotoxic M1 phenotype (HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14, or a non-cytotoxic M2 phenotype (CD163 and VEGF were identified. NM expression of the markers was analysed in the islets and stroma of surgically resected tumours from 20 patients with extended survival (ES (median 92.7 months and 20 patients with poor survival (PS (median 7.7 months. RESULTS: The NM expression of NM-HLA-DR (p<0.001, NM-iNOS (p = 0.02 and NM-MRP 8/14 (p = 0.02 was increased in ES compared to PS patients in the tumour islets. The tumour islet expression of NM-VEGF, was decreased in ES compared to PS patients (p<0.001. There was more NM-CD163 expression (p = 0.04 but less NM-iNOS (p = 0.002 and MRP 8/14 (p = 0.01 expression in the stroma of ES patients compared with PS patients. The 5-year survival for patients with above and below median NM expression of the markers in the islets was 74.9% versus 4.7% (NM-HLA-DR p<0.001, 65.0% versus 14.6% (NM-iNOS p = 0.003, and 54.3% versus 22.2% (NM-MRP 8/14 p = 0.04, as opposed to 34.1% versus 44.4% (NM-CD163 p = 0.41 and 19.4% versus 59.0% (NM-VEGF p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Cell proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages are also expressed by other cell types in the tumour islets and stroma of patients with NSCLC. Their tissue and cellular microlocalisation is associated with important differences in clinical outcome.

  9. Prevalent HLA Class II Alleles in Mexico City Appear to Confer Resistance to the Development of Amebic Liver Abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Eric G.; Granados, Julio; Partida-Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Valenzuela, Olivia; Rascón, Edgar; Magaña, Ulises; Escamilla-Tilch, Mónica; López-Reyes, Alberto; Nieves-Ramírez, Miriam; González, Enrique; Morán, Patricia; Rojas, Liliana; Valadez, Alicia; Luna, Alexandra; Estrada, Francisco J.; Maldonado, Carmen; Ximénez, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis is an endemic disease and a public health problem throughout Mexico, although the incidence rates of amebic liver abscess (ALA) vary among the geographic regions of the country. Notably, incidence rates are high in the northwestern states (especially Sonora with a rate of 12.57/100,000 inhabitants) compared with the central region (Mexico City with a rate of 0.69/100,000 inhabitants). These data may be related to host genetic factors that are partially responsible for resistance or susceptibility. Therefore, we studied the association of the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles with resistance or susceptibility to ALA in two Mexican populations, one each from Mexico City and Sonora. Ninety ALA patients were clinically diagnosed by serology and sonography. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To establish the genetic identity of both populations, 15 short tandem repeats (STRs) were analyzed with multiplexed PCR, and the allelic frequencies of HLA were studied by PCR-SSO using LUMINEX technology. The allele frequencies obtained were compared to an ethnically matched healthy control group (146 individuals). We observed that both affected populations differed genetically from the control group. We also found interesting trends in the population from Mexico City. HLA-DQB1*02 allele frequencies were higher in ALA patients compared to the control group (0.127 vs 0.047; p= 0.01; pc= NS; OR= 2.9, 95% CI= 1.09-8.3). The less frequent alleles in ALA patients were HLA-DRB1*08 (0.118 vs 0.238 in controls; p= 0.01; pc= NS; OR= 0.42, 95% CI= 0.19-0.87) and HLA-DQB1*04 (0.109 vs 0.214; p= 0.02; pc= NS; OR= 0.40, 95% CI= 0.20-0.94). The haplotype HLA-DRB1*08/-DQB1*04 also demonstrated a protective trend against the development of this disease (0.081 vs. 0.178; p=0.02; pc=NS; OR= 0.40, 95% CI= 0.16-0.93). These trends suggest that the prevalent alleles in the population of Mexico City may be associated with protection against the development of ALA

  10. Prevalent HLA Class II Alleles in Mexico City Appear to Confer Resistance to the Development of Amebic Liver Abscess.

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    Eric G Hernández

    Full Text Available Amebiasis is an endemic disease and a public health problem throughout Mexico, although the incidence rates of amebic liver abscess (ALA vary among the geographic regions of the country. Notably, incidence rates are high in the northwestern states (especially Sonora with a rate of 12.57/100,000 inhabitants compared with the central region (Mexico City with a rate of 0.69/100,000 inhabitants. These data may be related to host genetic factors that are partially responsible for resistance or susceptibility. Therefore, we studied the association of the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles with resistance or susceptibility to ALA in two Mexican populations, one each from Mexico City and Sonora. Ninety ALA patients were clinically diagnosed by serology and sonography. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To establish the genetic identity of both populations, 15 short tandem repeats (STRs were analyzed with multiplexed PCR, and the allelic frequencies of HLA were studied by PCR-SSO using LUMINEX technology. The allele frequencies obtained were compared to an ethnically matched healthy control group (146 individuals. We observed that both affected populations differed genetically from the control group. We also found interesting trends in the population from Mexico City. HLA-DQB1*02 allele frequencies were higher in ALA patients compared to the control group (0.127 vs 0.047; p= 0.01; pc= NS; OR= 2.9, 95% CI= 1.09-8.3. The less frequent alleles in ALA patients were HLA-DRB1*08 (0.118 vs 0.238 in controls; p= 0.01; pc= NS; OR= 0.42, 95% CI= 0.19-0.87 and HLA-DQB1*04 (0.109 vs 0.214; p= 0.02; pc= NS; OR= 0.40, 95% CI= 0.20-0.94. The haplotype HLA-DRB1*08/-DQB1*04 also demonstrated a protective trend against the development of this disease (0.081 vs. 0.178; p=0.02; pc=NS; OR= 0.40, 95% CI= 0.16-0.93. These trends suggest that the prevalent alleles in the population of Mexico City may be associated with protection against the

  11. Aloimunidade contra antígenos HLA de classe I em pacientes com síndromes mielodisplásicas e anemia aplástica Aloimmunity against HLA class I antigens in patients with myelodisplastic syndrome and aplastic anemia

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    Daisy M. M. Arruda

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available As síndromes mielodisplásicas (SMD e a anemia aplástica (AA apresentam citopenias periféricas necessitando, com freqüência, de reposições transfusionais contínuas de concentrados de hemácias e/ou de concentrados de plaquetas. O objetivo do presente estudo foi verificar a ocorrência de anticorpos anti-HLA de classe I em pacientes portadores das SMD e AA atendidos no ambulatório de Hematologia do Hemoce/UFC. Foram analisados 110 pacientes, sendo 70 com SMD e 40 com AA. A pesquisa de anticorpos anti-HLA de classe I foi realizada frente a um painel (PRA, utilizando-se a técnica de microlinfocitotoxicidade dependente do complemento. Vinte (28,6% dos 70 pacientes com as SMD e 18 (45% dos 40 pacientes com AA desenvolveram anticorpos anti-HLA contra o PRA. Esses pacientes que receberam uma carga de antígenos estranhos advindos de múltiplas transfusões de vários doadores de CH e/ou CP, geralmente desenvolvem aloanticorpos contra os antígenos HLA presentes na superfície das plaquetas e dos leucócitos que contaminam esses concentrados. A produção desses anticorpos pode trazer sérias complicações para o tratamento dos pacientes com SMD e AA. As avaliações sistemáticas para detecção de anticorpos anti-HLA após a reposição transfusional podem ser valiosas para adoção de estratégias transfusionais mais adequadas para esta população de pacientes.Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS or aplastic anemia (AA present peripheral cytopenias and require continuous transfusions of red cell and/or platelet concentrates. The objective of this study is to verify the existence of anti-HLA class 1 antibodies in patients with MDS and AA treated at the hematology Out patient Clinic of Hemoce/UFC. A total of 110 patients were analyzed, 70 with MDS and 40 with AA. Anti-HLA class 1 antibody detection was achieved with an antibody reactivity panel using the complement-dependent microlymphocytotoxicity technique. A total of 20 (28.6% of

  12. On the Global Dissipativity of a Class of Cellular Neural Networks with Multipantograph Delays

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    Liqun Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time the global dissipativity of a class of cellular neural networks with multipantograph delays is studied. On the one hand, some delay-dependent sufficient conditions are obtained by directly constructing suitable Lyapunov functionals; on the other hand, firstly the transformation transforms the cellular neural networks with multipantograph delays into the cellular neural networks with constant delays and variable coefficients, and then constructing Lyapunov functionals, some delay-independent sufficient conditions are given. These new sufficient conditions can ensure global dissipativity together with their sets of attraction and can be applied to design global dissipative cellular neural networks with multipantograph delays and easily checked in practice by simple algebraic methods. An example is given to illustrate the correctness of the results.

  13. HLA-G polymorphisms and HLA-G expression in sarcoidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, TVF; Milman, N; Hylenius, S;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The MHC class Ib molecule Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G may be important in induction and maintenance of immunological tolerance, and HLA-G expression may have a role in different cancers, in certain diseases with associations to HLA, and in organ transplantation. Sarcoidosis...... is a systemic granulomatous disease with unknown etiology but at the molecular level several studies have shown HLA associations. METHODS: In the present study, HLA-G alleles/polymorphisms were studied in sarcoidosis patients (n = 47) and controls (n = 129) by PCR techniques and HLA-G protein expression...

  14. Ocular toxoplasmosis: susceptibility in respect to the genes encoding the KIR receptors and their HLA class I ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Frederico, Fábio Batista; Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara de Cássia; Previato, Mariana; Barbosa, Amanda Pires; Murata, Fernando Henrique Antunes; Silveira-Carvalho, Aparecida Perpétuo; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the genes encoding the KIR receptors and their HLA ligands in the susceptibility of ocular toxoplasmosis. A total of 297 patients serologically-diagnosed with toxoplasmosis were selected and stratified according to the presence (n = 148) or absence (n = 149) of ocular scars/lesions due to toxoplasmosis. The group of patients with scars/lesions was further subdivided into two groups according to the type of ocular manifestation observed: primary (n = 120) or recurrent (n = 28). Genotyping was performed by PCR-SSOP. Statistical analyses were conducted using the Chi-square test, and odds ratio with a 95% confidence interval was also calculated to evaluate the risk association. The activating KIR3DS1 gene was associated with increased susceptibility for ocular toxoplasmosis. The activating KIR together with their HLA ligands (KIR3DS1-Bw4-80Ile and KIR2DS1+/C2++ KIR3DS1+/Bw4-80Ile+) were associated with increased susceptibility for ocular toxoplasmosis and its clinical manifestations. KIR-HLA inhibitory pairs -KIR2DL3/2DL3-C1/C1 and KIR2DL3/2DL3-C1- were associated with decreased susceptibility for ocular toxoplasmosis and its clinical forms, while the KIR3DS1−/KIR3DL1+/Bw4-80Ile+ combination was associated as a protective factor against the development of ocular toxoplasmosis and, in particular, against recurrent manifestations. Our data demonstrate that activating and inhibitory KIR genes may influence the development of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:27827450

  15. Ocular toxoplasmosis: susceptibility in respect to the genes encoding the KIR receptors and their HLA class I ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Frederico, Fábio Batista; Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara de Cássia; Previato, Mariana; Barbosa, Amanda Pires; Murata, Fernando Henrique Antunes; Silveira-Carvalho, Aparecida Perpétuo; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2016-11-09

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the genes encoding the KIR receptors and their HLA ligands in the susceptibility of ocular toxoplasmosis. A total of 297 patients serologically-diagnosed with toxoplasmosis were selected and stratified according to the presence (n = 148) or absence (n = 149) of ocular scars/lesions due to toxoplasmosis. The group of patients with scars/lesions was further subdivided into two groups according to the type of ocular manifestation observed: primary (n = 120) or recurrent (n = 28). Genotyping was performed by PCR-SSOP. Statistical analyses were conducted using the Chi-square test, and odds ratio with a 95% confidence interval was also calculated to evaluate the risk association. The activating KIR3DS1 gene was associated with increased susceptibility for ocular toxoplasmosis. The activating KIR together with their HLA ligands (KIR3DS1-Bw4-80Ile and KIR2DS1(+)/C2(++) KIR3DS1(+)/Bw4-80Ile(+)) were associated with increased susceptibility for ocular toxoplasmosis and its clinical manifestations. KIR-HLA inhibitory pairs -KIR2DL3/2DL3-C1/C1 and KIR2DL3/2DL3-C1- were associated with decreased susceptibility for ocular toxoplasmosis and its clinical forms, while the KIR3DS1(-)/KIR3DL1(+)/Bw4-80Ile(+) combination was associated as a protective factor against the development of ocular toxoplasmosis and, in particular, against recurrent manifestations. Our data demonstrate that activating and inhibitory KIR genes may influence the development of ocular toxoplasmosis.

  16. Analysis of HLA-DRB3 alleles and supertypical genotypes in the MHC Class II region in sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojana-udomsart, Arada; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; James, Ian; Witt, Campbell; Needham, Merrilee; Day, Timothy; Kiers, Lynette; Corbett, Alastair; Martinez, Patricia; Wilton, Steve D; Mastaglia, Frank L

    2013-01-15

    We compared the carriage frequencies of HLA-DRB3 and its major alleles and of HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DRB5 in an Australian sIBM cohort and a population control group who had previously been genotyped for the HLA-DRB1*03:01 risk allele. There was a strong disease association with the carriage of the DRB3*01:01 allele which was accounted for by its linkage disequilibrium with DRB1*03:01. The carriage of HLA-DRB4 was found to be strongly protective and abrogated the risk effect of HLA-DRB1*03:01. The findings indicate that haplotypic combinations of alleles at the HLA-DRB1 and secondary HLA-DRB loci have important risk modifying effects in sIBM.

  17. Estudo de HLA classes I e II em trinta pacientes equatorianos com artrite reumatoide em comparação com alelos de indivíduos sadios e afetados com outras doenças reumáticas Study of class I and II HLA alleles in 30 ecuadorian patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with alleles from healthy and affected subjects with other rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Verónica Aguirre Arias

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A artrite reumatoide (AR é uma doença inflamatória crônica sistêmica autoimune que provém de uma desordem incapacitante. Até hoje, a etiologia da AR é desconhecida. No entanto, já se cogitou a existência de indivíduos geneticamente passíveis de tê-la. Muitos estudos já foram realizados em todo o mundo, como, por exemplo, na Polônia, Argentina, Chile, México, Brasil, Colômbia, entre outros países, com relação à influência entre os alelos HLA-DR e a doença, mas não no Equador. OBJETIVO: O principal objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a participação dos alelos de HLA classes I e II em pacientes com AR. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Esta pesquisa foi desenvolvida em 30 pacientes adultos com AR, previamente diagnosticados de acordo com os critérios de classificação do Colégio Norte-Americano de Reumatologia (ACR, 1987 e 28 controles. Para a tipificação de HLA classes I e II, adotou-se a técnica PCR-SSP, e as significâncias estatísticas foram avaliadas pelo teste de Qui-Quadrado. RESULTADOS: O HLA-DR4 está presente em 76,7% dos pacientes, com uma frequência alélica de 45%, enquanto apenas 21% dos sujeitos controle o apresentaram. O teste de Qui-Quadrado confirma que as variáveis HLA-DR4 e RA estão altamente vinculadas (X² = 11,38, P = 0,00074. CONCLUSÃO: Há frequência maior de HLA-DR4 e HLA-DR14. Os resultados encontrados são similares aos encontrados em outros estudos. Porém, seria desejável aumentar o tamanho da amostra para encontrar um maior número de perfis genéticos e de alelos envolvidos.INTRODUCTION: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease that originates from a disabling disorder. To date, the etiology of RA is unknown. However, the existence of genetically susceptible individuals was considered. Many studies have been performed worldwide, for example, in Poland, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Brazil, and Colombia, among others, regarding the influence

  18. Trivalent adenovirus type 5 HIV recombinant vaccine primes for modest cytotoxic capacity that is greatest in humans with protective HLA class I alleles.

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    Stephen A Migueles

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available If future HIV vaccine design strategies are to succeed, improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying protection from infection or immune control over HIV replication remains essential. Increased cytotoxic capacity of HIV-specific CD8+ T-cells associated with efficient elimination of HIV-infected CD4+ T-cell targets has been shown to distinguish long-term nonprogressors (LTNP, patients with durable control over HIV replication, from those experiencing progressive disease. Here, measurements of granzyme B target cell activity and HIV-1-infected CD4+ T-cell elimination were applied for the first time to identify antiviral activities in recipients of a replication incompetent adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 HIV-1 recombinant vaccine and were compared with HIV-negative individuals and chronically infected patients, including a group of LTNP. We observed readily detectable HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell recall cytotoxic responses in vaccinees at a median of 331 days following the last immunization. The magnitude of these responses was not related to the number of vaccinations, nor did it correlate with the percentages of cytokine-secreting T-cells determined by ICS assays. Although the recall cytotoxic capacity of the CD8+ T-cells of the vaccinee group was significantly less than that of LTNP and overlapped with that of progressors, we observed significantly higher cytotoxic responses in vaccine recipients carrying the HLA class I alleles B*27, B*57 or B*58, which have been associated with immune control over HIV replication in chronic infection. These findings suggest protective HLA class I alleles might lead to better outcomes in both chronic infection and following immunization due to more efficient priming of HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell cytotoxic responses.

  19. In silico calculated affinity of FVIII-derived peptides for HLA class II alleles predicts inhibitor development in haemophilia A patients with missense mutations in the F8 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashov, A D; Calvez, T; Gilardin, L; Maillère, B; Repessé, Y; Oldenburg, J; Pavlova, A; Kaveri, S V; Lacroix-Desmazes, S

    2014-03-01

    Forty per cent of haemophilia A (HA) patients have missense mutations in the F8 gene. Yet, all patients with identical mutations are not at the same risk of developing factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors. In severe HA patients, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype was identified as a risk factor for onset of FVIII inhibitors. We hypothesized that missense mutations in endogenous FVIII alter the affinity of the mutated peptides for HLA class II, thus skewing FVIII-specific T-cell tolerance and increasing the risk that the corresponding wild-type FVIII-derived peptides induce an anti-FVIII immune response during replacement therapy. Here, we investigated whether affinity for HLA class II of wild-type FVIII-derived peptides that correspond to missense mutations described in the Haemophilia A Mutation, Structure, Test and Resource database is associated with inhibitor development. We predicted the mean affinity for 10 major HLA class II alleles of wild-type FVIII-derived peptides that corresponded to 1456 reported cases of missense mutations. Linear regression analysis confirmed a significant association between the predicted mean peptide affinity and the mutation inhibitory status (P = 0.006). Significance was lost after adjustment on mutation position on FVIII domains. Although analysis of the A1-A2-A3-C1 domains yielded a positive correlation between predicted HLA-binding affinity and inhibitory status (OR = 0.29 [95% CI: 0.14-0.60] for the high affinity tertile, P = 0.002), the C2 domain-restricted analysis indicated an inverse correlation (OR = 3.56 [1.10-11.52], P = 0.03). Our data validate the importance of the affinity of FVIII peptides for HLA alleles to the immunogenicity of therapeutic FVIII in patients with missense mutations.

  20. The orthology of HLA-E and H2-Qa1 is hidden by their concerted evolution with other MHC class I molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouillon Virginie

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether MHC molecules undergo concerted evolution or not has been the subject of a long-standing debate. Results By comparing sequences of eight functional homologues of HLA-E from primates and rodents with those of MHC class Ia molecules from the same eight species, we find that different portions of MHC class I molecules undergo different patterns of evolution. By focusing our analyses sequentially on these various portions, we have obtained clear evidence for concerted evolution of MHC class I molecules, suggesting the occurrence of extensive interallelic and intergenic exchanges. Intra-species homogenisation of sequences is particularly noticeable at the level of exon 4, which codes for the α3 domain, but our results suggest that homogenisation also concerns certain residues of the α1–α2 codomain that lie outside the antigen recognition site. Conclusion A model is presented in which Darwinian selective pressures due to pathogens could, at the same time, favour diversification of MHC class Ia molecules and promote concerted evolution of separate loci by spreading advantageous motifs arising by mutations in individual MHC molecules to other alleles and to other loci of the MHC region. This would also allow MHC molecules to co-evolve with the proteins with which they interact to fulfil their functions of antigen presentation and regulation of NK cell activity. One of the raisons d'être of the MHC may therefore be to favour at the same time both diversification of MHC class Ia molecules and homogenisation of the whole pool of MHC class I molecules (Ia and Ib involved in antigen presentation. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Stephan Beck, Lutz Walter and Pierre Pontarotti.

  1. Significant HLA class I type associations with aromatic antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced SJS/TEN are different from those found for the same AED-induced DRESS in the Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Elena; Bellón, Teresa; Tong, Hoi Y; Borobia, Alberto M; de Abajo, Francisco J; Lerma, Victoria; Moreno Hidalgo, Miguel A; Castañer, José L; Cabañas, Rosario; Fiandor, Ana; González-Ramos, Jessica; Herranz, Pedro; Cachafeiro, Lucía; González-Herrada, Carlos; González, Olga; Aramburu, José A; Laosa, Olga; Hernández, Rafael; Carcas, Antonio J; Frías, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are among the drugs most frequently involved in severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). This study investigated the associations between the genetic polymorphisms of HLA class-I and AED-induced SCARs in the Spanish population. HLA class-I genotypes were determined in AED (phenytoin[PHT],lamotrigine[LTG],carbamazepine[CBZ],phenobarbital[PB])-induced SJS/TEN (n=15) or DRESS (n=12) cases included in the Spanish SCAR registry, PIELenRed. There were 3 control groups: (A)tolerant to a single AED, (B)tolerant to any AED, and (C)Spanish population controls. For SJS/TEN, concomitant HLA-A*02:01/Cw15:02 alleles were significantly associated with PHT-cases compared to control groups B and C [(B)odds ratio(OR):14.75, p=0.009;(C)OR:27.50, p<0.001], and were close to significance with respect to control group A (p=0.060). The genotype frequency of the HLA-B*38:01 was significantly associated with PHT-LTG-cases compared with the 3 groups of controls [(A)OR:12.86, p=0.012;(B)OR:13.81; p=0.002;(C)OR:14.35, p<0.001], and with LTG-cases [(A)OR:147.00, p=0.001;(B)OR:115.00, p<0.001;(C)OR:124.70, p<0.001]. We found the HLA-B*15:02 allele in a Spanish Romani patient with a CBZ-case. The HLA-A*11:01 was significantly associated with CBZ-cases [(A)OR:63.89, p=0.002;(B)OR:36.33, p=0.005;(C)OR:28.29, p=0.007]. For DRESS, the HLA-A*24:02 genotype frequency was statistically significant in the PHT-LTG-cases [(A)OR:22.56, p=0.003;(B)OR:23.50. p=0.001; (C)OR:33.25, p<0.001], and in the LTG-cases [(A),OR:49.00, p=0.015;(B)OR:27.77, p=0.005; (C)OR:34.53, p=0.002]. HLA-A*31:01 was significantly associated with the CBZ-cases [(A)OR:22.00, p=0.047;(B)OR:29.50, p=0.033;(C)OR:35.14, p=0.006]. In conclusion, we identified several significant genetic risk factors for the first time in the Spanish Caucasian population: HLA

  2. Crystallographic and Computational Studies of a Class II MHC Complex with a Nonconforming Peptide: HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Christian S.; Gorski, Jack; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2003-03-01

    The stable binding of processed foreign peptide to a class II major histocompatibility (MHC) molecule and subsequent presentation to a T cell receptor is a central event in immune recognition and regulation. Polymorphic residues on the floor of the peptide binding site form pockets that anchor peptide side chains. These and other residues in the helical wall of the groove determine the specificity of each allele and define a motif. Allele specific motifs allow the prediction of epitopes from the sequence of pathogens. There are, however, known epitopes that do not satisfy these motifs: anchor motifs are not adequate for predicting epitopes as there are apparently major and minor motifs. We present crystallographic studies into the nature of the interactions that govern the binding of these so called nonconforming peptides. We would like to understand the role of the P10 pocket and find out whether the peptides that do not obey the consensus anchor motif bind in the canonical conformation observed in in prior structures of class II MHC-peptide complexes. HLA-DRB3*0101 complexed with peptide crystallized in unit cell 92.10 x 92.10 x 248.30 (90, 90, 90), P41212, and the diffraction data is reliable to 2.2ÅWe are complementing our studies with dynamical long time simulations to answer these questions, particularly the interplay of the anchor motifs in peptide binding, the range of protein and ligand conformations, and water hydration structures.

  3. Admission Control Scheme for Multi-class Services in QoS-based Mobile Cellular Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINZhiming; XIEJianying

    2004-01-01

    Call admission control (CAC) is one of the key schemes to guarantee Quality of service (QoS) in mobile cellular networks. In this paper, we propose an optimal CAC scheme based on Semi-Markov decision processes (SMDP) theory to support multi-class services for QoS wireless networks. Linear programming formulation is used to find the optimal solution, which maximizes the channel utilization while meeting the requirements of QoS constraints. The numerical results show that the performance of our scheme outperforms DCAC scheme.

  4. HLA-DP related suppression of mixed lymphocyte reaction with alloactivated lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Hofmann, B; Jakobsen, B K

    1986-01-01

    We studied the influence of HLA class I and class II antigens on the suppression of the MLR induced by primed lymphocytes (PLs) alloactivated in vitro. The suppression of 14 different PLs of 83 MLRs was analyzed. The PLs were primed against (i) HLA-DP (SB) (ii) HLA-DR/DQ or (iii) both HLA-DP and DR...

  5. Decreased CD8+ T cell response to Epstein-Barr virus infected B cells in multiple sclerosis is not due to decreased HLA class I expression on B cells or monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csurhes Peter A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS have a decreased frequency of CD8+ T cells reactive to their own Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infected B cells. We have proposed that this might predispose to the development of MS by allowing EBV-infected autoreactive B cells to accumulate in the central nervous system. The decreased CD8+ T cell response to EBV results from a general CD8+ T cell deficiency and also a decreased proportion of EBV-specific T cells within the total CD8+ T cell population. Because decreased HLA class I expression on monocytes and B cells has been reported in MS and could influence the generation and effector function of EBV-specific CD8+ T cells, the present study was undertaken to measure the expression of HLA molecules on B cells and monocytes in patients with MS. Methods We used flow cytometry to determine the proportions of T cells, natural killer cells, B cells and monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and to quantify the expression of HLA molecules on T cells, B cells and monocytes of 59 healthy subjects and 62 patients with MS who had not received corticosteroids or immunomodulatory therapy in the previous 3 months. Results The levels of HLA class I and class II molecules expressed on T cells, B cells and monocytes were normal in patients with MS, with the exception of two patients with secondary progressive MS with very low class II expression on B cells. In confirmation of previous studies we also found that the percentage of CD8+ T cells was significantly decreased whereas the percentage of CD4+ T cells and the CD4:CD8 ratio were significantly increased in patients with MS compared to healthy subjects. Conclusions The decreased CD8+ T cell response to EBV-infected B cells in MS patients is not due to decreased HLA class I expression on monocytes or B cells. In a small proportion of patients decreased HLA class II expression on B cells might impair the CD8+ T cell response to EBV by

  6. [Polymorphism in HLA and KIR genes and the impact on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation outcomes and unrelated donor selection: Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Valérie; Brignier, Anne; Elsermans, Vincent; Gagne, Katia; Kennel, Anne; Pedron, Béatrice; Picard, Christophe; Ravinet, Aurélie; Varlet, Pauline; Cesbron, Anne; Delbos, Florent; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Loiseau, Pascale

    2016-11-01

    In an attempt to harmonize clinical practices among French hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers, the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC) held its sixth annual workshop series in September 2015 in Lille. This event brought together practitioners from across the country with the purpose of offering careful analysis of published studies on clinical practice issues that remain to be disputed. This article addresses the impact of HLA and KIR gene polymorphism on the outcome of the transplantation in order to optimize unrelated donor selection.

  7. Up-regulation of HLA class-I antigen expression and antigen-specific CTL response in cervical cancer cells by the demethylating agent hydralazine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizano-Soberón Marcela

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation are epigenetic events that contribute to the absence or downregulated expression of different components of the tumor recognition complex. These events affect the processing and presentation of antigenic peptides to CTLs by HLA class-I molecules. In this work evaluated the effect of the DNA hypomethylating agent hydralazine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid, on the expression of HLA class-I molecules and on the antigen-specific immune recognition of cervical cancer cells. Methods Cell lines C33A (HPV-, CaSki (HPV-16+ and MS751 (HPV-18+ were treated with hydralazine and valproic acid to assess the expression of HLA class-I molecules by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Promoter methylation of HLA class-I -A, -B and C, was also evaluated by Methylation-Specific PCR. Primary cervical tumors of four HLA-A*0201 allele patients were typed for HPV and their CTL's stimulated in vitro with the T2 cell line previously loaded with 50 μM of the HPV peptides. Cytotoxicity of stimulated CTL's was assayed against Caski and MS751 cells pre-treated with hydralazine and valproic acid. Results Valproic acid and hydralazine/valproic acid up-regulated the constitutive HLA class-I expression as evaluated by flow cytometry and RT-PCR despite constitutive promoter demethylation at these loci. Hydralazine and valproic acid in combination but no IFN-gamma hyperacetylated histone H4 as evaluated by ChiP assay. The antigenic immune recognition of CaSki and MS751 cells by CTLs specific to HPV-16/18 E6 and E7-derived epitopes, was increased by VA and H/VA and the combination of H/VA/IFN-gamma. Conclusion These results support the potential use of hydralazine and valproic acid as an adjuvant for immune intervention in cervical cancer patients whenever clinical protocols based on tumor antigen recognition is desirable, like in those cases where the application of E6 and E7 based therapeutic vaccines

  8. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  9. Stability Analysis of a Class of Three-Neuron Delayed Cellular Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulami D. Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this study linear stability of a class of three neuron cellular network with transmission delay had been studied. Approach: The model for the problem was first presented. The problem is then formulated analytically and numerical simulations pertaining to the model are carried out. Results: A necessary and sufficient condition for asymptotic stability of trivial steady state in the absence of delay is derived. Then a delay dependent sufficient condition for local asymptotic stability of trivial, steady state and sufficient condition for no stability switching of trivial steady for such a network are derived. Numerical simulation results of the model were presented. Conclusion/Recommendations: From numerical simulation, it appears that there may be a possibility of multiple steady states of the model. It may be possible to investigate the condition for the existence of periodic solutions of the non-linear model analytically.

  10. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 allele distribution in a large Armenian population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matevosyan, L; Chattopadhyay, S; Madelian, V; Avagyan, S; Nazaretyan, M; Hyussian, A; Vardapetyan, E; Arutunyan, R; Jordan, F

    2011-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 gene frequencies were investigated in 4279 unrelated Armenian bone marrow donors. HLA alleles were defined by using PCR amplification with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) high- and low-resolution kits. The aim of this study was to examine the HLA diversity at the high-resolution level in a large Armenian population sample, and to compare HLA allele group distribution in Armenian subpopulations. The most frequently observed alleles in the HLA class I were HLA-A*0201, A*0101, A*2402, A*0301, HLA-B*5101, HLA-B*3501, and B*4901. Among DRB1 alleles, high frequencies of DRB1*1104 and DRB1*1501 were observed, followed by DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1401. The most common three-locus haplotype found in the Armenian population was A*33-B*14-DRB1*01, followed by A*03-B*35-DRB1*01. Our results show a similar distribution of alleles in Armenian subpopulations from different countries, and from different regions of the Republics of Armenia and Karabagh. The low level of genetic distances between subpopulations indicates a high level of population homogeneity, and the genetic distances between Armenians and other populations show Armenians as a distinct ethnic group relative to others, reflecting the fact that Armenians have been an 'isolated population' throughout centuries. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of HLA-allele group distribution in a subset of Armenian populations, and the first to provide HLA-allele and haplotype frequencies at a high-resolution level. It is a valuable reference for organ transplantation and for future studies of HLA-associated diseases in Armenian populations.

  11. HLA Typing for the Next Generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema P Mayor

    Full Text Available Allele-level resolution data at primary HLA typing is the ideal for most histocompatibility testing laboratories. Many high-throughput molecular HLA typing approaches are unable to determine the phase of observed DNA sequence polymorphisms, leading to ambiguous results. The use of higher resolution methods is often restricted due to cost and time limitations. Here we report on the feasibility of using Pacific Biosciences' Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT DNA sequencing technology for high-resolution and high-throughput HLA typing. Seven DNA samples were typed for HLA-A, -B and -C. The results showed that SMRT DNA sequencing technology was able to generate sequences that spanned entire HLA Class I genes that allowed for accurate allele calling. Eight novel genomic HLA class I sequences were identified, four were novel alleles, three were confirmed as genomic sequence extensions and one corrected an existing genomic reference sequence. This method has the potential to revolutionize the field of HLA typing. The clinical impact of achieving this level of resolution HLA typing data is likely to considerable, particularly in applications such as organ and blood stem cell transplantation where matching donors and recipients for their HLA is of utmost importance.

  12. Complementarity of Binding Motifs is a General Property of HLA-A and HLA-B Molecules and Does Not Seem to Effect HLA Haplotype Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xiangyu; De Boer, Rob J; van Baarle, Debbie; Maiers, Martin; Kesmir, Can

    2013-01-01

    Different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent) are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these associations: the stronger the association with a severe (autoimmune) disease, the lower the expected HLA haplotype frequency. The peptide repertoires of the HLA molecules composing a haplotype can also influence the frequency of a haplotype. For example, it would seem advantageous to have HLA molecules with non-overlapping binding specificities within a haplotype, as individuals expressing such an haplotype would present a diverse set of peptides from viruses and pathogenic bacteria on the cell surface. To test this hypothesis, we collect the proteome data from a set of common viruses, and estimate the total ligand repertoire of HLA class I haplotypes (HLA-A-B) using in silico predictions. We compare the size of these repertoires to the HLA haplotype frequencies reported in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). We find that in most HLA-A and HLA-B pairs have fairly distinct binding motifs, and that the observed haplotypes do not contain HLA-A and -B molecules with more distinct binding motifs than random HLA-A and HLA-B pairs. In addition, the population frequency of a haplotype is not correlated to the distinctness of its HLA-A and HLA-B peptide binding motifs. These results suggest that there is a not a strong selection pressure on the haplotype level favoring haplotypes having HLA molecules with distinct binding motifs, which would result the largest possible presented peptide repertoires in the context of infectious diseases.

  13. Complementarity of binding motifs is a general property of HLA-A and HLA-B molecules and does not seem to effect HLA haplotype composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu eRao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Different HLA haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these associations: the stronger the association with a severe (autoimmune disease, the lower the expected HLA haplotype frequency. The peptide repertoires of the HLA molecules composing a haplotype can also influence the frequency of a haplotype. For example, it would seem advantageous to have HLA molecules with non-overlapping binding specificities within a haplotype, as individuals expressing such an haplotype would present a diverse set of peptides from viruses and pathogenic bacteria on the cell surface. To test this hypothesis, we collect the proteome data from a set of common viruses, and estimate the total ligand repertoire of HLA class I haplotypes (HLA-A-B using in silico predictions. We compare the size of these repertoires to the HLA haplotype frequencies reported in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP. We find that in most HLA-A and HLA-B pairs have fairly distinct binding motifs, and that the observed haplotypes do not contain HLA-A and –B molecules with more distinct binding motifs than random HLA-A and HLA-B pairs. In addition, the population frequency of a haplotype is not correlated to the distinctness of its HLA-A and HLA-B peptide binding motifs. These results suggest that there is a not a strong selection pressure on the haplotype level favouring haplotypes having HLA molecules with distinct binding motifs, which would result the largest possible presented peptide repertoires in the context of infectious diseases.

  14. Expression of HLA Class II Molecules in Humanized NOD.Rag1KO.IL2RgcKO Mice is Critical for Development and Function of Human T and B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    Visualization of human immunoglobulin classes and immuno- globulin light ( kappa and lambda ) chains was carried out using IEF kits (Helena Labs, Beaumont, TX...10.1371/journal.pone.0019826.g004 HLA Class II and Humanized Mice PLoS ONE | www.plosone.org 6 May 2011 | Volume 6 | Issue 5 | e19826 light chains in...did it allow development of functional human T and B cells [11]. The generation of mice bearing a mutation in the IL2R gamma chain (IL2Rcc) was a major

  15. HLA-DRB1 Class II antigen level alleles are associated with persistent HPV infection in Mexican women; a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for malignant lesions and cervical cancer. A widely studied element in the search for genetic factors influencing risk HPV infection diseases is allelic variation of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus. The study was designed to search for HLA susceptibility alleles contributing to the persistence of HPV infection in Mexican women. Methods A total of 172 subjects were divided into three groups...

  16. IL-27 in human secondary lymphoid organs attracts myeloid dendritic cells and impairs HLA class I-restricted antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Fabio; Di Carlo, Emma; Ferrone, Soldano; Petretto, Andrea; Pistoia, Vito; Airoldi, Irma

    2014-03-15

    Different cytokines play crucial roles in inflammation and in polarizing immune responses, including IL-27 that exerts pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. Although the activity of IL-27 is well characterized in murine immune cells, only limited information is available regarding the natural cellular sources of IL-27 in humans and its effects on human immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional APCs that in the immature state are positioned throughout peripheral tissues by acting as sentinels, sensing the presence of Ags. Activated DCs migrate into the lymph nodes and direct Ag-specific T cell responses, thus acting as key players in both adaptive and innate immunity. In this study we asked whether IL-27 is produced by human secondary lymphoid organs and what is its functional role on human DCs. To our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that 1) in lymph nodes, macrophages are the major source for IL-27; 2) immature and mature human DCs express functional IL-27R; 3) IL-27 exerts immunosuppressive activity by crippling the Ag processing machinery in immature DCs under steady-state conditions and after pulsing with a viral Ag; and 4) IL-27 is chemotactic for human DCs. Our findings highlight novel mechanisms underlying the immunosuppressive activity of IL-27, suggesting that this cytokine may function as a homeostatic cytokine in secondary lymphoid organs by limiting duration and/or intensity of ongoing adaptive immune responses. The results presented in this study pave the way to future studies aimed at investigating whether dysregulation of IL-27 expression and function may be involved in pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

  17. Investigating the Cellular and Metabolic Responses of World-Class Canoeists Training: A Sportomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Santos Coelho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: We have been using the Sportomics approach to evaluate biochemical and hematological changes in response to exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic and hematologic responses of world-class canoeists during a training session; (2 Methods: Blood samples were taken at different points and analyzed for their hematological properties, activities of selected enzymes, hormones, and metabolites; (3 Results: Muscle stress biomarkers were elevated in response to exercise which correlated with modifications in the profile of white blood cells, where a leukocyte rise was observed after the canoe session. These results were accompanied by an increase in other exercise intensity parameters such as lactatemia and ammonemia. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol increased during the exercise sessions. The acute rise in both erythrocytes and white blood profile were probably due to muscle cell damage, rather than hepatocyte integrity impairment; (4 Conclusion: The cellular and metabolic responses found here, together with effective nutrition support, are crucial to understanding the effects of exercise in order to assist in the creation of new training and recovery planning. Also we show that Sportomics is a primal tool for training management and performance improvement, as well as to the understanding of metabolic response to exercise.

  18. Peptide-independent stabilization of MHC class I molecules breaches cellular quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Zeynep; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Abualrous, Esam Tolba; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Janßen, Linda; Van Hateren, Andy; Wiek, Constanze; Hanenberg, Helmut; Momburg, Frank; Achour, Adnane; Elliott, Tim; Springer, Sebastian; Boulanger, Denise

    2014-07-01

    The intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins is directed by three quality control mechanisms that test for their structural integrity, which is correlated to the binding of high-affinity antigenic peptide ligands. To investigate which molecular features of MHC-I these quality control mechanisms detect, we have followed the hypothesis that suboptimally loaded MHC-I molecules are characterized by their conformational mobility in the F-pocket region of the peptide-binding site. We have created a novel variant of an MHC-I protein, K(b)-Y84C, in which two α-helices in this region are linked by a disulfide bond that mimics the conformational and dynamic effects of bound high-affinity peptide. K(b)-Y84C shows a remarkable increase in the binding affinity to its light chain, beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), and bypasses all three cellular quality control steps. Our data demonstrate (1) that coupling between peptide and β2m binding to the MHC-I heavy chain is mediated by conformational dynamics; (2) that the folded conformation of MHC-I, supported by β2m, plays a decisive role in passing the ER-to-cell-surface transport quality controls; and (3) that β2m association is also tested by the cell surface quality control that leads to MHC-I endocytosis.

  19. Investigating the Cellular and Metabolic Responses of World-Class Canoeists Training: A Sportomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Wagner Santos; Viveiros de Castro, Luis; Deane, Elizabeth; Magno-França, Alexandre; Bassini, Adriana; Cameron, Luiz-Claudio

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: We have been using the Sportomics approach to evaluate biochemical and hematological changes in response to exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic and hematologic responses of world-class canoeists during a training session; (2) Methods: Blood samples were taken at different points and analyzed for their hematological properties, activities of selected enzymes, hormones, and metabolites; (3) Results: Muscle stress biomarkers were elevated in response to exercise which correlated with modifications in the profile of white blood cells, where a leukocyte rise was observed after the canoe session. These results were accompanied by an increase in other exercise intensity parameters such as lactatemia and ammonemia. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol increased during the exercise sessions. The acute rise in both erythrocytes and white blood profile were probably due to muscle cell damage, rather than hepatocyte integrity impairment; (4) Conclusion: The cellular and metabolic responses found here, together with effective nutrition support, are crucial to understanding the effects of exercise in order to assist in the creation of new training and recovery planning. Also we show that Sportomics is a primal tool for training management and performance improvement, as well as to the understanding of metabolic response to exercise. PMID:27845704

  20. HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and haplotypes in two Brazilian Indian tribes: evidence of conservative evolution of HLA-DQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomaior, V S; Faucz, F R; Schafhauser, C; Janzen-Dück, M; Boldt, A B; Petzl-Erler, M L

    1998-08-01

    Nucleotide sequence polymorphism of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 class II genes was analyzed in the Kaingang and Guarani Amerindians from southern Brazil using PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide typing methods. Four different DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes were found: DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402 (associated with DRB1*0802, DRB1*08041, and DRB1*0807), DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301 (associated with DRB1*1602, DRB1*1413, and DRB1*1402), DQA1*03-DQB1*0302 (associated with DRB1*0404 and DRB1*0411), and DQA1*03-DQB1*03032 (associated with DRB1*09012). These HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and haplotypes are common in many other populations of all major ethnic groups. Alleles and haplotypes introduced into the populations by post-Columbian admixture were seen at low frequency both in the Kaingang (3.2%) and in the Guarani (3.8%). No novel HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles have thus far been identified in Amerindians. This differs from previous results for HLA-DRB1, another class II locus presenting novel alleles (i.e., alleles not found in other ethnic groups and probably generated after migration of paleo-Indians to the Americas) in the Guarani and in other South American Indian populations. The distribution of the HLA-DQ alleles and haplotypes in Amerindians indicates a weaker diversifying selective pressure on the HLA-DQ genes compared with HLA-DRB1 and HLA-B. The more conservative evolution of HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 compared with HLA-DRB1 is strong evidence of (still not well-defined) functional differences of these class II genes.

  1. Induction of CD8 T-cell responses restricted to multiple HLA class I alleles in a cancer patient by immunization with a 20-mer NY-ESO-1f (NY-ESO-1 91-110) peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikawa, Shingo; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Midori; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Luescher, Immanuel; Ohue, Yoshihiro; Ikeuchi, Kazuhiro; Uenaka, Akiko; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Udono, Heiichiro; Oka, Mikio; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2013-01-15

    Immunogenicity of a long 20-mer NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine was evaluated in a lung cancer patient TK-f01, immunized with the peptide with Picibanil OK-432 and Montanide ISA-51. We showed that internalization of the peptide was necessary to present CD8 T-cell epitopes on APC, contrasting with the direct presentation of the short epitope. CD8 T-cell responses restricted to all five HLA class I alleles were induced in the patient after the peptide vaccination. Clonal analysis showed that B*35:01 and B*52:01-restricted CD8 T-cell responses were the two dominant responses. The minimal epitopes recognized by A*24:02, B*35:01, B*52:01 and C*12:02-restricted CD8 T-cell clones were defined and peptide/HLA tetramers were produced. NY-ESO-1 91-101 on A*24:02, NY-ESO-1 92-102 on B*35:01, NY-ESO-1 96-104 on B*52:01 and NY-ESO-1 96-104 on C*12:02 were new epitopes first defined in this study. Identification of the A*24:02 epitope is highly relevant for studying the Japanese population because of its high expression frequency (60%). High affinity CD8 T-cells recognizing tumor cells naturally expressing the epitopes and matched HLA were induced at a significant level. The findings suggest the usefulness of a long 20-mer NY-ESO-1f peptide harboring multiple CD8 T-cell epitopes as an NY-ESO-1 vaccine. Characterization of CD8 T-cell responses in immunomonitoring using peptide/HLA tetramers revealed that multiple CD8 T-cell responses comprised the dominant response.

  2. Association between Alu insertion polymorphisms and HLA class T alleles in Chinese Lisu and Nu ethnic populations%中国傈僳族和怒族群体人类白细胞抗原Ⅰ类基因区Alu插入多态性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董兆梅; 姚宇峰; 史磊; 陶玉芬; 林克勤; 黄小琴; 杨昭庆; 褚嘉祐; 史荔

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the frequencies of HLA-Alu repeat polymorphisms (AluMICB,AluTF,AluHJ,AluHG and AluHF) in Chinese Lisu and Nu ethnic populations.Methods The frequencies of HLA-Alu repeat polymorphisms in above populations were determined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR).The associations between HLA-Alu repeat polymorphisms and HLA-A,HLA-B and HLA-C alleles were also analyzed.Phylogenetic trees were constructed with genetic distance calculated from the frequencies of HLA-Alu repeat polymorphisms.Results Frequencies of AluTF * 2 and AluHF * 2 were different between the two populations (P<0.05),while those of other three insertions were similar.The strength of association between HLA-Alus and HLA alleles were different (P<0.05) in the two populations.Although AluMICB * 2 were associated with HLA-B* 56:01 in both populations,the association was stronger in Lisu population (74.0%) but moderate in Nu population (30.7%).HLA-Alus were associated with particular HLA subtypes,e.g.,AluHG * 2 with certain HLA-A * 02 subtypes.By phylogenetic analysis,Lisu and Nu were clustered together with southern Chinese and Thai populations.Conclusion The distribution of HLA-Alus and the strength of associations between HLA-Alus and HLA class I alleles have varied between the two populations.Study of this association may facilitate identification of origins,evolution,progenitor haplotypes and recombination within the HLA class I region.%目的 研究中国两个隔离群体(傈僳族和怒族)人类白细胞抗原(human leukocyte antigen,HLA)Ⅰ类基因区域内5个HLA-Alu插入多态性(AluMICB、AluTF、AluHJ、AluHG和AluHF)的分布特征.方法 应用聚合酶链反应技术对中国两个隔离群体傈僳族(107人)和怒族(104人)进行HLA-Alu多态性分型.结合HLA基因分型数据,分析这两个群体中HLA-Alu插入与HLA-A、HLA-B和HLA-C基因的关系.根据HLA-Alu频率计算各群体间遗传距离,构建系统进化树.结果 AluTF和AluHF插入

  3. Uncovering the Peptide-Binding Specificities of HLA-C: A General Strategy To Determine the Specificity of Any MHC Class I Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette;

    2014-01-01

    representing their peptide-binding motifs. The motifs prominently shared a conserved C-terminal primary anchor with hydrophobic amino acid residues, as well as one or more diverse primary and auxiliary anchors at P1, P2, P3, and/or P7. Matrices were used to generate a large panel of HLA-C-specific peptide...

  4. HLA-class II-associated control of antigen recognition by T cells in leprosy: A prominent role for the 30/31-kDa antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thole, J.E.R.; Janson, A.A.M.; Cornelisse, Y.; Schreuder, G.M.T.; Wieles, B.; Naafs, B.; Vries, R.R.P. de; Ottenhoff, T.H.M.

    1999-01-01

    The recognition of 16 mycobacterial Ags by a panel of T cell lines from leprosy patients and healthy exposed individuals from an endemic population was examined within the context of expressed HLA-DR molecules. Although overall no significant differences were found between the frequencies of Ag reco

  5. Development of a high-resolution NGS-based HLA-typing and analysis pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Michael; Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Kässens, Jan C; Koch, Simon; Forster, Michael; Ellinghaus, Eva; Hov, Johannes R; Sauer, Sascha; Schimmler, Manfred; Ziemann, Malte; Görg, Siegfried; Jacob, Frank; Karlsen, Tom H; Franke, Andre

    2015-06-23

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex contains the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. The classical HLA class I and II genes define the specificity of adaptive immune responses. Genetic variation at the HLA genes is associated with susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases and plays a major role in transplantation medicine and immunology. Currently, the HLA genes are characterized using Sanger- or next-generation sequencing (NGS) of a limited amplicon repertoire or labeled oligonucleotides for allele-specific sequences. High-quality NGS-based methods are in proprietary use and not publicly available. Here, we introduce the first highly automated open-kit/open-source HLA-typing method for NGS. The method employs in-solution targeted capturing of the classical class I (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C) and class II HLA genes (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1). The calling algorithm allows for highly confident allele-calling to three-field resolution (cDNA nucleotide variants). The method was validated on 357 commercially available DNA samples with known HLA alleles obtained by classical typing. Our results showed on average an accurate allele call rate of 0.99 in a fully automated manner, identifying also errors in the reference data. Finally, our method provides the flexibility to add further enrichment target regions.

  6. Low-cost, simultaneous, single-sequence genotyping of the HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, W G H; Tukuitonga, C F; Ofanoa, M; Munn, S R; Gane, E J

    2006-07-01

    New automated DNA sequencing technology has enabled the development of an assay for genotyping the three major HLA class 1 loci from a single sequence of each gene containing exon 3, intron 2 and exon 2. The assay allows 31 subjects (with 3 negative controls) to be genotyped at all three loci simultaneously, using a 96-well plate format. Genotypes were assigned by comparing each sequence to a database of 307 HLA-A, 563 HLA-B and 166 HLA-C alleles. Unequivocal, 4-digit allele assignments were made for 40 of 130 HLA-A genes, 82 of 130 HLA-B genes and 97 of 130 HLA-C genes from 21 European, 20 Tongan and 24 Niuean subjects. Ambiguity in interpretation of the sequence contributed to 66 of the 170 equivocal allele assignments, and 105 equivocal assignments were due to polymorphisms outside exons 2 and 3. All known alternative interpretations of ambiguous genotypes were identified, and seven HLA-B and two HLA-C ambiguities were resolved by reading the out-of-phase exon 2 sequence that followed an indel in intron 2. The genotypes of a subgroup of 27 heterozygous subjects, whose genotypes contained all of the alleles identified in this study, were confirmed with commercial, generic PCR-SSP typing. In European subjects, the repertoire of HLA-B/HLA-C haplotypes was almost identical to previously published data. We identified five new HLA-B/HLA-C haplotypes in the Polynesian subjects, and the remaining haplotypes were of Asian origin. In summary, we are describing a low-cost, sequencing assay for the three major HLA class I loci that provides a level of resolution that is comparable with a commercial PCR-SSP assay.

  7. Human cytomegalovirus alters localization of MHC class II and dendrite morphology in mature Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew W; Hertel, Laura; Louie, Ryan K; Burster, Timo; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Abate, Davide A; Mocarski, Edward S; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2006-09-15

    Hemopoietic stem cell-derived mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (LC) are susceptible to productive infection by human CMV (HCMV). To investigate the impact of infection on this cell type, we examined HLA-DR biosynthesis and trafficking in mature LC cultures exposed to HCMV. We found decreased surface HLA-DR levels in viral Ag-positive as well as in Ag-negative mature LC. Inhibition of HLA-DR was independent of expression of unique short US2-US11 region gene products by HCMV. Indeed, exposure to UV-inactivated virus, but not to conditioned medium from infected cells, was sufficient to reduce HLA-DR on mature LC, implicating particle binding/penetration in this effect. Reduced surface levels reflected an altered distribution of HLA-DR because total cellular HLA-DR was not diminished. Accumulation of HLA-DR was not explained by altered cathepsin S activity. Mature, peptide-loaded HLA-DR molecules were retained within cells, as assessed by the proportion of SDS-stable HLA-DR dimers. A block in egress was implicated, as endocytosis of surface HLA-DR was not increased. Immunofluorescence microscopy corroborated the intracellular retention of HLA-DR and revealed markedly fewer HLA-DR-positive dendritic projections in infected mature LC. Unexpectedly, light microscopic analyses showed a dramatic loss of the dendrites themselves and immunofluorescence revealed that cytoskeletal elements crucial for the formation and maintenance of dendrites are disrupted in viral Ag-positive cells. Consistent with these dendrite effects, HCMV-infected mature LC exhibit markedly reduced chemotaxis in response to lymphoid chemokines. Thus, HCMV impedes MHC class II molecule trafficking, dendritic projections, and migration of mature LC. These changes likely contribute to the reduced activation of CD4+ T cells by HCMV-infected mature LC.

  8. Molecular analysis of polimorphisms in HLA-CLASS II DRB1* and IL7Rα possibly associated with multiple sclerosis susceptibility in a population sample of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis dos Santos Figueiredo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory and degenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS that affects mainly young adults. MS seems to be a polygenic and multifactorial disease, and genetic susceptibility has been associated mainly with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, which in humans is the human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Among non-HLA genes is the alpha chain of interleukin 7 receptor gene (IL7Rα at the 5p12-14 locus, also known as CD127. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between polymorphism in the IL7Rα (rs6897932C gene, HLA-class II DRB1* haplotypes and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis in patients with Recurrent Remitting form (RRMS. METHOD: In this study, peripheral blood samples were taken from 50 patients diagnosed using the diagnostic criteria for MS according to Polman (MacDonald et al (2011. The patients were monitored at the Clinic of Neurology, Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, along with 100 healthy control subjects matched for ancestry, sex and age. After DNA extraction by organic method, polymorphism +244 *C (rs6897932 was assessed by PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis on the ABI PRISM® 3500 Genetic Analyzer (Applied Biosystems, USA platform. RESULTS: The results indicated a significant association between the CC haplotype and RRMS (p=0.02 , OR=2.14, as well as an association between the *C allele (CC and CT and RRMS (p=0.042, OR=2.15. The same C allele was more frequent in the sample, both in patients (0.82, and in the control group (0.71. The sample, control group and patients included, was in Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium. The correlation between the presence of the CC genotype and HLA-DRB1* 15:01 was significant (OR=3.6, p=0.034. CONCLUSION: These results reinforce the polygenic/multifactorial characteristic or genetic heterogeneity of MS, indicating a relationship between putative polymorphism +244*C (CC genotype in the IL7Rα gene and susceptibility to MS

  9. Cellular Phone Use in Class: Implications for Teaching and Learning a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Shari M.; Lohenry, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Students equipped with the cell phones enter college classrooms daily. Realizing the impact of technology on fellow learners and faculty represents an area of concern. A pilot study was conducted to determine student and faculty perception regarding cellular phone use in the classroom. A quantitative descriptive study examined the perception of…

  10. The Presence of Anti-HLA Antibodies before and after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplantation from HLA-Mismatched Unrelated Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Koclega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies (anti-HLA Abs are important factors responsible for graft rejection in solid organ transplantation and play a role in post-transfusion complications, their role in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT has not been finally defined. Enormous polymorphism of HLA-genes, their immunogenicity and heterogeneity of antibodies, as well as the growing number of allo-HSCTs from partially HLA-mismatched donors, increase the probability that anti-HLA antibodies could be important factors responsible for the treatment outcomes. We have examined the incidence of anti-HLA antibodies in a group of 30 allo-HSCT recipients from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. Anti-HLA Abs were identified in sera collected before and after allo-HSCT. We have used automated DynaChip assay utilizing microchips bearing purified class I and II HLA antigens for detection of anti-HLA Abs. We have detected anit-HLA antibodies against HLA-A, B, C, DR, DQ and DP, but no donor or recipient-specific anti-HLA Abs were detected in the studied group. The preliminary results indicate that anti-HLA antibodies are present before and after allo-HSCT in HLA-mismatched recipients.

  11. HLA-E polymorphism and soluble HLA-E plasma levels in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidi, I; Laaribi, A B; Bortolotti, D; Belhadj, M; Mehri, A; Yahia, H B; Babay, W; Chaouch, H; Zidi, N; Letaief, A; Yacoub, S; Boukadida, J; Di Luca, D; Hannachi, N; Rizzo, R

    2016-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occurs in association to a deregulation of immune system. Human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) is an immune-tolerant nonclassical HLA class I molecule that could be involved in HBV progression. To measure soluble (s) HLA-E in patients with chronic HBV hepatitis (CHB). We tested the potential association of HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G gene polymorphism to CHB. Our cohort consisted of 93 Tunisian CHB patients (stratified in CHB with high HBV DNA levels and CHB with low HBV DNA levels) and 245 healthy donors. Plasma sHLA-E was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer. No association between HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G polymorphism and HBV DNA levels in CHB patients was found. G/G genotype is less frequent in CHB patients without significance. sHLA-E is significantly enhanced in CHB patients compared with healthy controls (P = 0.0017). Stratification according to HBV DNA levels showed that CHB patients with low HBV DNA levels have higher sHLA-E levels compared with CHB patients with high HBV DNA levels. CHB patients with G/G genotype have enhanced sHLA-E levels compared with other genotypes (P = 0.037). This significant difference is maintained only for CHB women concerning G/G genotypes (P = 0.042). Finally, we reported enhanced sHLA-E in CHB patients with advanced stages of fibrosis (P = 0.032). We demonstrate, for the first time, the association of sHLA-E to CHB. Owing to the positive correlation of HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G polymorphism and the association of sHLA-E to advanced fibrosis stages, HLA-E could be a powerful predictor for CHB progression. Further investigations will be required to substantiate HLA-E role as a putative clinical biomarker of CHB.

  12. Association between HLA-C*04 and American cutaneous leishmaniasis in endemic region of southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Silva, R C; Ribas, A D; Ferreira, E C; Silveira, T G V; Borelli, S D

    2015-11-23

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infectious disease with global repercussions. American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is endemic in southern Brazil and its pathogenesis varies according to parasite species, immune response, and host genetics. In terms of immunogenetics, many host genes, including HLA (human leukocyte antigen), could be involved in susceptibility to and protection against ACL. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between HLA class I genes (HLA-A, -B, and -C) and ACL in an endemic region of southern Brazil. The allele frequencies of 186 patients diagnosed with ACL and 278 healthy individuals were compared. HLA class I (HLA-A, -B, and -C) typing was carried out by PCR-SSO using Luminex technology. The results revealed an association between the HLA-C*04 allele and the patient study group, in which it appeared more frequently than in the control group [21.5 vs 13.49% (P = 0.0016 and Pc = 0.0258; OR = 1.7560; 95%CI = 1.2227-2.5240)], thereby suggesting an increased susceptibility to ACL. Additional allelic groups such as HLA-A*02, HLA-B*35, HLA-B*45, HLA-C*01, and HLA-C*15 were also implicated; however, further investigation is necessary to confirm their association with ACL. Therefore, the results obtained in this study demonstrate the involvement of HLA class I genes in the susceptibility or resistance to ACL, with significant association between HLA-C*04 and ACL susceptibility.

  13. Evaluation of Association Between HLA Class II DR4–DQ8 Haplotype and Type I Diabetes Mellitus in Children of East Azerbaijan State of Iran

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    Nasrin Sohrabi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Association between HLA-DR4–DQ8 haplotype and type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-1A was investigated in children of East Azerbaijan state of Iran because such an association has not been previously studied in this population. Methods: HLA-typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific priming. For haplotype analysis, the logistic regression model was performed. Results: Of the three investigated alleles, the frequency of DRB1*0401 was significantly higher among patients compared with that in healthy subjects (76.74% vs. 23.26%. Conclusion: The findings of the current study are consistent with those of previous studies and show that DRB1*0401 is associated with DM-1A; the frequencies of the two other alleles were also higher among patients, although the differences were not statistically significant. Two haplotypes associated with these alleles were also surveyed, and DRB1*0401−-DQA1*0301−, and DRB1*0401−-DQA1*0301−-DQB1*0302− were the most frequent haplotypes among the patient group.

  14. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G during pregnancy part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Klitkou, Louise; Christiansen, Ole B;

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a class Ib molecule with restricted tissue distribution expressed on the extra-villous trophoblast and seems to have immunomodulatory functions during pregnancy. Studies have linked HLA-G polymorphisms to pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and recurren...

  15. HLA-A*68:02-restricted Gag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses can drive selection pressure on HIV but are subdominant and ineffective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; Buus, Anette Stryhn; Harndahl, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    Human leukocyte allele (HLA) class I polymorphism has the greatest impact of human genetic variation on viral load set point. A substantial part of this effect is due to the action of HLA-B and HLA-C alleles. With few exceptions the role of HLA-A molecules in immune control of HIV is unclear....

  16. Anthrax lethal factor as an immune target in humans and transgenic mice and the impact of HLA polymorphism on CD4+ T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascough, Stephanie; Ingram, Rebecca J; Chu, Karen K; Reynolds, Catherine J; Musson, Julie A; Doganay, Mehmet; Metan, Gökhan; Ozkul, Yusuf; Baillie, Les; Sriskandan, Shiranee; Moore, Stephen J; Gallagher, Theresa B; Dyson, Hugh; Williamson, E Diane; Robinson, John H; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M

    2014-05-01

    Bacillus anthracis produces a binary toxin composed of protective antigen (PA) and one of two subunits, lethal factor (LF) or edema factor (EF). Most studies have concentrated on induction of toxin-specific antibodies as the correlate of protective immunity, in contrast to which understanding of cellular immunity to these toxins and its impact on infection is limited. We characterized CD4+ T cell immunity to LF in a panel of humanized HLA-DR and DQ transgenic mice and in naturally exposed patients. As the variation in antigen presentation governed by HLA polymorphism has a major impact on protective immunity to specific epitopes, we examined relative binding affinities of LF peptides to purified HLA class II molecules, identifying those regions likely to be of broad applicability to human immune studies through their ability to bind multiple alleles. Transgenics differing only in their expression of human HLA class II alleles showed a marked hierarchy of immunity to LF. Immunogenicity in HLA transgenics was primarily restricted to epitopes from domains II and IV of LF and promiscuous, dominant epitopes, common to all HLA types, were identified in domain II. The relevance of this model was further demonstrated by the fact that a number of the immunodominant epitopes identified in mice were recognized by T cells from humans previously infected with cutaneous anthrax and from vaccinated individuals. The ability of the identified epitopes to confer protective immunity was demonstrated by lethal anthrax challenge of HLA transgenic mice immunized with a peptide subunit vaccine comprising the immunodominant epitopes that we identified.

  17. Anthrax lethal factor as an immune target in humans and transgenic mice and the impact of HLA polymorphism on CD4+ T cell immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ascough

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis produces a binary toxin composed of protective antigen (PA and one of two subunits, lethal factor (LF or edema factor (EF. Most studies have concentrated on induction of toxin-specific antibodies as the correlate of protective immunity, in contrast to which understanding of cellular immunity to these toxins and its impact on infection is limited. We characterized CD4+ T cell immunity to LF in a panel of humanized HLA-DR and DQ transgenic mice and in naturally exposed patients. As the variation in antigen presentation governed by HLA polymorphism has a major impact on protective immunity to specific epitopes, we examined relative binding affinities of LF peptides to purified HLA class II molecules, identifying those regions likely to be of broad applicability to human immune studies through their ability to bind multiple alleles. Transgenics differing only in their expression of human HLA class II alleles showed a marked hierarchy of immunity to LF. Immunogenicity in HLA transgenics was primarily restricted to epitopes from domains II and IV of LF and promiscuous, dominant epitopes, common to all HLA types, were identified in domain II. The relevance of this model was further demonstrated by the fact that a number of the immunodominant epitopes identified in mice were recognized by T cells from humans previously infected with cutaneous anthrax and from vaccinated individuals. The ability of the identified epitopes to confer protective immunity was demonstrated by lethal anthrax challenge of HLA transgenic mice immunized with a peptide subunit vaccine comprising the immunodominant epitopes that we identified.

  18. IgE production after antigen-specific and cognate activation of HLA-DPw4-restricted T-cell clones, by 78% of randomly selected B-cell donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baselmans, PJ; Pollabauer, EM; van Reijsen, FC; Heystek, HC; Hren, A; Stumptner, P; Tilanus, MGJ; Vooijs, WC; Mudde, GC

    2000-01-01

    The frequency of expression of the MHC class II antigen, HLA-DPw4, in the caucasoid population is approximately 78%, and is unmatched by phenotypic frequencies of other HLA class II molecules. Here we describe three human Der-P1-specific T-cell clones (TCC), restricted by the HLA-DPw4-variant HLA-DP

  19. Haplotypes of the HLA-G 3’ Untranslated Region Respond to Endogenous Factors of HLA-G+ and HLA-G- Cell Lines Differentially

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnin, Natalia F.; Sgorla de Almeida, Bibiana; Castelli, Erick C.; Carosella, Edgardo D.; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Moreau, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The immune checkpoint HLA-G prevents maternal rejection of the fetus and contributes in cancer invasion and acceptance of allografts. The 5’ and 3’ regulatory regions of the HLA-G gene are polymorphic and balancing selection probably maintains this variability. It is proposed that nucleotide variations may affect the level of HLA-G expression. To investigate this issue we aimed to analyze how haplotypes of the 3’ untranslated region (3’UTR) with highest worldwide frequencies, namely UTR-1, UTR-2, UTR-3, UTR-4, UTR-5, UTR-18 and UTR-7, impact the expression of a luciferase reporter gene in vitro. Experiments performed with the HLA-G positive cell lines JEG-3 (choricarcinoma) and FON (melanoma), and with the HLA-G negative cell lines M8 (melanoma) and U251MG (glioblastoma) showed that the HLA-G 3’UTR polymorphism influences the response to endogenous cellular factors and may vary according to the cell type. UTR-5 and UTR-7 impact the activity of luciferase the most whereas UTR-2, UTR-3, UTR-4, and UTR-18 have intermediate impact, and UTR-1 has the lowest impact. These results corroborate the previous associations between amounts of plasma sHLA-G levels and 3’UTR haplotypes in healthy individuals and reinforce that 3’UTR typing may be a predictor of the genetic predisposition of an individual to express different levels of HLA-G. PMID:28045999

  20. The structure of HLA-DR52c: Comparison to other HLA-DRB3 alleles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shaodong; Crawford, Frances; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W. (HHMI)

    2008-09-05

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) molecules present antigens to CD4{sup +} T cells. In addition to the most commonly studied human MHCII isotype, HLA-DR, whose {beta} chain is encoded by the HLA-DRB1 locus, several other isotypes that use the same {alpha} chain but have {beta} chains encoded by other genes. These other DR molecules also are expressed in antigen-presenting cells and are known to participate in peptide presentation to T cells and to be recognized as alloantigens by other T cells. Like some of the HLA-DRB1 alleles, several of these alternate DR molecules have been associated with specific autoimmune diseases and T cell hypersensitivity. Here we present the structure of an HLA-DR molecule (DR52c) containing one of these alternate {beta} chains (HLA-DRB3*0301) bound to a self-peptide derived from the Tu elongation factor. The molecule shares structurally conserved elements with other MHC class II molecules but has some unique features in the peptide-binding groove. Comparison of the three major HLA-DBR3 alleles (DR52a, b, and c) suggests that they were derived from one another by recombination events that scrambled the four major peptide-binding pockets at peptide positions 1, 4, 6, and 9 but left virtually no polymorphisms elsewhere in the molecules.

  1. A novel method to measure HLA-DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules based on peptide binding competition assay and differential IC(50) determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-04-01

    HLA-DM (DM) functions as a peptide editor that mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules by accelerating peptide dissociation and association kinetics. The relative DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHCII molecules correlates with antigen presentation and immunodominance hierarchy, and measurement of DM-susceptibility has been a key effort in this field. Current assays of DM-susceptibility, based on differential peptide dissociation rates measured for individually labeled peptides over a long time base, are difficult and cumbersome. Here, we present a novel method to measure DM-susceptibility based on peptide binding competition assays performed in the presence and absence of DM, reported as a delta-IC(50) (change in 50% inhibition concentration) value. We simulated binding competition reactions of peptides with various intrinsic and DM-catalyzed kinetic parameters and found that under a wide range of conditions the delta-IC(50) value is highly correlated with DM-susceptibility as measured in off-rate assay. We confirmed experimentally that DM-susceptibility measured by delta-IC(50) is comparable to that measured by traditional off-rate assay for peptides with known DM-susceptibility hierarchy. The major advantage of this method is that it allows simple, fast and high throughput measurement of DM-susceptibility for a large set of unlabeled peptides in studies of the mechanism of DM action and for identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes.

  2. The role of HLA-E polymorphism in immunological response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Iwaszko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-E protein is one of the most extensively studied MHC class Ib antigens and the least polymorphic one compared to other MHC class I molecules. In the human population there have been reported just ten alleles encoding three different peptides. Only two of these alleles, namely HLA-E*0101 and HLA-E*0103, are widely distributed (around 50�0each. The proteins encoded by these alleles differ from each other in one amino acid at position 107. In HLA-E*0101 it is arginine and in HLA-E*0103 it is glycine. The difference between these proteins manifests itself in surface expression levels, affinities to leader peptides and thermal stabilities of their complexes.The HLA-E molecule is a ligand for CD94/NKG2 receptors on NK cells and TCR receptors on NK-CTL (NK-cytotoxic T lymphocyte cells, so it plays a double role in both innate and adaptive immunity. This paper reviews the knowledge on the role of the HLA-E molecule in the immunological response. Aspects related to polymorphism of the HLA-E gene and the course of several diseases including type I diabetes, ankylosing spondylitis, HCV and HIV infections, nasopharyngeal cancer and recurrent spontaneous abortions, as well as the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are presented and discussed in more detail.

  3. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Amari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional (3D structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  4. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Shinji; Kataoka, Ryoichi; Ikegami, Takashi; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  5. Maternal homozygocity for a 14 basepair insertion in exon 8 of the HLA-G gene and carriage of HLA class II alleles restricting HY immunity predispose to unexplained secondary recurrent miscarriage and low birth weight in children born to these patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ole B; Kolte, Astrid Marie; Dahl, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    Homozygous carriage of a 14 base pair (bp) insertion in exon 8 of the HLA-G gene may be associated with low levels of soluble HLA-G and recurrent miscarriage (RM). We investigated the G14bp insertion(ins)/deletion(del) polymorphism in 339 women with unexplained RM and 125 control women. In all...

  6. Understanding of HLA-conferred susceptibility to chronic hepatitis B infection requires HLA genotyping-based association analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Nao; Ohashi, Jun; Khor, Seik-Soon; Sugiyama, Masaya; Tsuchiura, Takayo; Sawai, Hiromi; Hino, Keisuke; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Koike, Kazuhiko; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Izumi, Namiki; Korenaga, Masaaki; Kang, Jong-Hon; Tanaka, Eiji; Taketomi, Akinobu; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Tamori, Akihiro; Sakaida, Isao; Hige, Shuhei; Itoh, Yoshito; Mochida, Satoshi; Mita, Eiji; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Ide, Tatsuya; Hiasa, Yoichi; Kojima, Hiroto; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakamura, Minoru; Saji, Hiroh; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Kanto, Tatsuya; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Mizokami, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Associations of variants located in the HLA class II region with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection have been identified in Asian populations. Here, HLA imputation method was applied to determine HLA alleles using genome-wide SNP typing data of 1,975 Japanese individuals (1,033 HBV patients and 942 healthy controls). Together with data of an additional 1,481 Japanese healthy controls, association tests of six HLA loci including HLA-A, C, B, DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1, were performed. Although the strongest association was detected at a SNP located in the HLA-DP locus in a SNP-based GWAS using data from the 1,975 Japanese individuals, HLA genotyping-based analysis identified DQB1*06:01 as having the strongest association, showing a greater association with CHB susceptibility (OR = 1.76, P = 6.57 × 10−18) than any one of five HLA-DPB1 alleles that were previously reported as CHB susceptibility alleles. Moreover, HLA haplotype analysis showed that, among the five previously reported HLA-DPB1 susceptibility and protective alleles, the association of two DPB1 alleles (DPB1*09:01, and *04:01) had come from linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DR-DQ haplotypes, DRB1*15:02-DQB1*06:01 and DRB1*13:02-DQB1*06:04, respectively. The present study showed an example that SNP-based GWAS does not necessarily detect the primary susceptibility locus in the HLA region. PMID:27091392

  7. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  8. HLA B27 as Predisposition Factor to Suffer Age Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Enrique Villegas; Fernández, Rafael González; Torres, Luis Pérula; Lacomba, Manuel Santos; Galera, José María Gallardo

    2009-01-01

    To research whether specific alleles HLA class I (HLA-A and HLA-B) and class II (HLA-DR) are risk factors for the development of exudative type of Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD), HLA antigens are expressed both in normal and affected eyes with ARMD. We designed a prospective case-controlled study. We recruited 75 patients with choroidal neovascularization predominantly classic or occult, secondary to ARMD, and treated with photodynamic therapy. Two hundred and fifty patients over 55 years old, without ophthalmologic pathology who went to hospital for an analytical routine check were used as control. The analysis of the data shows a significant difference between two groups. Allele HLA-B27 correlated positively with ARMD (p < 0.0113). However, we didn't find alleles negatively associated. Thus HLA-B27 is an allele predisposed to suffer ARMD. PMID:19728932

  9. 喉鳞状细胞癌组织中人白细胞I类分子和抗原加工递呈分子的表达%Association of antigen processing machinery and HLA class Ⅰ defects with clinicopathological outcome in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾泉; 王晓雷; 徐震纲; 吕宁; 郑闪; 赵清正; 唐平章

    2012-01-01

    、LMP-7阴性表达与表达下调不利于肿瘤抗原的递呈及细胞毒性T淋巴细胞向肿瘤实质浸润与杀伤.HLA-Ⅰ类分子、TAP-1、LMP-7阴性表达与表达下调可能促进了癌细胞的发生、侵袭及发展,可能是肿瘤逃避机体免疫监视的方式之一.%Objective To investigate the role of antigen-processing machinery (APM) component defects in HLA class Ⅰ antigen down-regulation in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and to assess the clinical significance of these defects. Methods Fifty-one formalin-fixed,paraffin-embedded SCC specimens were examined for the expressions of APM component transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1) and low molecular weight polypeptide (LMP-7) and HLA class Ⅰ antigen by immunohistochemistry.Results HLA class Ⅰ antigens,TAP-1 and LMP-7 expressions were downregulated in 56.9% (29/51),39.2 % (20/51) and 45.1% (23/51) of the tested specimens respectively,whereas HLA class Ⅰ antigens,TAP-1 and LMP-7 expressions lost in 21.6 % ( 11/51 ),33.3% ( 17/51 )and 27.5 % ( 14/51 ) of the tested specimens respectively.TAP-1 and LMP-7 expressions were significantly correlated with HLA class Ⅰ antigen expression (r =0.460,P < 0.05 and r =0.685,P < 0.05,respectively).HLA class Ⅰ antigens down-regulation was significantly correlated with T stage( x2 =8.61,P < 0.05).Both TAP-1 and LMP-7 down-regulations were significantly correlated with T stage ( x2 valueswere 9.72 and 8.97 respectively,P < 0.05 ) and TNM stage( x2 values were 9.18 and 7.70 respectively,P <0.05 ).TAP-1,LMP-7 and HLA class Ⅰ antigen down-regulations were significantly associated with reduced patients' overall survival ( P < 0.05 ) and disease-free survival ( P < 0.05 ).Multivariate analysis showed lymph node metastasis,recurrence and HLA class I antigen down-regulation were unfavorable prognostic factors(P < 0.05).Conclusions Down-regulated expressions of HLA class Ⅰ antigen and APM component TAP-1

  10. High expression of HLA-E in colorectal carcinoma is associated with a favorable prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Elisa Lo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-E is a non-classical class I HLA molecule that can be stabilized by ligands donated by other classical (HLA-A, -B, -C and non-classical (HLA-G family members. HLA-E engages a variety of immune receptors expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, Natural killer (NK cells and NK-CTLs. In view of the opposing outcomes (activation or inhibition of the different HLA-E receptors, the preferred role (if any of HLA-E expressed in vivo on tumor cells remains to be established. Methods Taking advantage of MEM-E/02, a recently characterized antibody to denatured HLA-E molecules, HLA-E expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry on an archival collection (formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded of 149 colorectal primary carcinoma lesions paired with their morphologically normal mucosae. Lymphoid infiltrates were assessed for the expression of the HLA-E-specific, inhibitory, non-rearranging receptor NKG2A. Results High HLA-E expression did not significantly correlate with the expression of classical HLA-B and HLA-C molecules, but it did correlate with high expression of its preferential ligand donor HLA-A. In addition, it correlated with lymphoid cell infiltrates expressing the inhibitory NKG2A receptor, and was an independent predictor of good prognosis, particularly in a subset of patients whose tumors express HLA-A levels resembling those of their paired normal counterparts (HLA-A. Thus, combination phenotypes (HLA-Elo-int/HLA-AE and HLA-Ehi/HLA-AE of classical and non-classical class I HLA molecules mark two graded levels of good prognosis. Conclusions These results suggest that HLA-E favors activating immune responses to colorectal carcinoma. They also provide evidence in humans that tumor cells entertain extensive negotiation with the immune system until a compromise between recognition and escape is reached. It is implied that this process occurs stepwise, as predicted by the widely accepted

  11. Preformed donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies mediate acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection following renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, E C; Key, T; Rasheed, H; Morgan, H; Butler, A; Pritchard, N; Taylor, C J; Clatworthy, M R

    2012-10-01

    Donor-specific HLA alloantibodies may cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and significantly compromise allograft survival. The clinical relevance of antibodies directed against some HLA class II antigens, particularly HLA-DP, is less clear with conflicting reports on their pathogenicity. We report two patients with high levels of pretransplant donor-specific HLA-DP antibodies who subsequently developed recurrent acute AMR and graft failure. In both cases, there were no other donor-specific HLA alloantibodies, suggesting that the HLA-DP-specific antibodies may be directly pathogenic.

  12. Molecular genetics (HLA) of Behçet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuki, N; Inoko, H; Ohno, S

    1997-12-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) has been known to be strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B51. This B51 association has been confirmed in many different ethnic groups between the Middle East and Japan, and it has been proposed that BD is prevalent in those ethnic groups along the old Silk Route. The hypothesis could be made that B51 molecules are primarily involved in BD development through specific antigen presentation. However, polymorphic analyses of the TNFB gene and Tau-a microsatellite between the HLA-B and TNF genes indicate that the pathogenic gene of BD is not the HLA-B51 gene itself but another gene located around the HLA-B gene. HLA-C genotyping by the PCR-SSP method also suggests that the BD pathogenic gene is not the HLA-C gene itself but other gene located near the HLA-B gene. Recently we sequenced a single contig of 236,822 bp from the MICA gene (58.2 kb centromeric of HLA-B) to 90.8 kb telomeric of HLA-C and identified 8 novel genes designated NOB1-8 (NOB: new organization associated with HLA-B). During the course of the genomic sequence analysis we clarified the genetic structure of the MICA (MHC class I chain-related gene A) gene and found a triplet repeat microsatellite polymorphism of (GCT/AGC)n in the transmebrane (TM) region. Furthermore, the microsatellite allele consisting of 6 repetitions of GCT/AGC (MICA A6 allele) was present at a significantly higher frequency in the BD patient group than in the control group and a significant fraction of B51-negative patients were positive for this MICA A6 allele. These results suggest the possibility of a primary association of BD with MICA rather than HLA-B.

  13. Association study between HLA-DRB, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and breast cancer in Iranian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirzargar AA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Based on the reports, high frequency of special alleles of HLA class II genes might be associated with susceptibility to or protective from a particular cancer. These alleles might vary depending on the geographical region. Here we investigate the association between alleles of HLA class II genes and breast cancer in Iranian women."n"nMethods: 100 patients with pathologically proved breast cancer who referred to Cancer Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran, were divided to two groups based on ages (40 years old and less/ or more than 40 years old and were randomly selected and compared with a group of 80 healthy blood donor subjects. HLA class II alleles were determined by amplification of DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR method followed by HLA-typing using sequence-specific primer (SSP for each allele."n"nResults: The most frequent alleles in the DR and DQ regions in group 1 (40 years old and less in comparison with control group were HLA-DQA1*0301 (p=0.002 and HLA-DQB1*0302 (p>0.05. In contrast HLA-DQA1*0505 (p=0.004 had significantly lower frequency in this group compared with control group. Patients of group two (more than 40 years old had a higher frequencies of HLA

  14. Identification by sequencing based typing and complete coding region analysis of three new HLA class II alleles: DRB3*0210, DRB3*0211 and DQB1*0310.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, A; Santos, S; Aviles, M J; Garcia-Sanchez, F; Lillo, R; Vicario, J L

    2000-10-01

    The study of HLA class II polymorphism by direct exon 2 DNA sequencing analysis has been established to be a reliable and accurate high-resolution typing procedure. This approach shows some advantages in relation to previous methods, polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific oligonucleotides (PCR-SSO) and sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP), basically due to the capability of analysis for the complete sequenced genomic region, including non-polymorphic motifs. DRB3 and DQB1 sequencing based typing (SBT) in unrelated bone marrow donor searching allowed us to detect three new alleles. The complete coding region sequences were characterised from cDNA. Two new DRB3 alleles, DRB3*0210 and DRB3*0211, were described in two Caucasian bone marrow donors. Both sequences showed single point mutations regarding DRB3*0202, producing amino acid replacements at positions 51 (Asp to Thr) and 67 (Leu to Ile), respectively. These two point mutations can be found in other DRB alleles, and suggest that gene conversion would be involved in the origin of both alleles. A new DQB1 sequence was found in a Spanish patient that showed two nucleotide differences, positions 134 and 141, with regard to its close similar DQB1*03011 allele. Only substitution at position 134 provoked amino acid replacement at residue 45, Glu to Gly. This single amino acid change would be involved in the lack of serologic recognition of this new molecule by DQ7-specific reagents.

  15. New Developments in HLA-G in Cardiac Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarte, Julieta; Tumiati, Laura C; Rao, Vivek; Delgado, Diego H

    2016-09-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class 1b protein, whose gene is located on chromosome 6 (6p21.31). HLA-G inhibits the immune cells' cytotoxic activity by interacting with specific receptors on their membranes. Since it is a naturally occurring immune modulator, HLA-G has been investigated in transplantation. Indeed, a number of investigations reveal that HLA-G expression is influenced by genetic polymorphisms and in turn, those polymorphisms are associated with detrimental or beneficial outcomes in various pathological situations. The present review introduces the HLA-G molecule, the gene and its polymorphisms. It focuses on the expression of HLA-G and the role of polymorphisms primarily in heart transplant outcomes, secondarily in other transplant organs, as well as the role of the allograft and effect of medical therapy. We discuss the limitations in HLA-G transplant investigations and future directions. The immune inhibiting activity of HLA-G has a great deal of potential for its utilization in enhancing diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies against rejection in the setting of transplantation.

  16. Preformed Donor HLA-DP-Specific Antibodies Mediate Acute and Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection Following Renal Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Jolly, E. C.; Key, T; H. Rasheed; Morgan, H; Butler, A; Pritchard, N.; Taylor, C J; Clatworthy, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Donor-specific HLA alloantibodies may cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and significantly compromise allograft survival. The clinical relevance of antibodies directed against some HLA class II antigens, particularly HLA-DP, is less clear with conflicting reports on their pathogenicity. We report two patients with high levels of pretransplant donor-specific HLA-DP antibodies who subsequently developed recurrent acute AMR and graft failure. In both cases, there were no o...

  17. The HLA-G*0105N null allele induces cell surface expression of HLA-E molecule and promotes CD94/NKG2A-mediated recognition in JAR choriocarcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Frédéric G; Del Moral, Pierre-Marie; Pizzato, Nathalie; Legrand-Abravanel, Florence; Le Bouteiller, Philippe; Lenfant, Françoise

    2004-12-01

    HLA-G is a non-classical HLA class Ib molecule primarily expressed in trophoblast cells, and is thought to play a key role in the induction of materno-fetal tolerance during pregnancy. In addition, the HLA-G gene provides a suitable leader sequence peptide capable of binding to HLA-E. However, the existence of placentas homozygous for the HLA-G*0105N null allele suggests that HLA-G1 might not be essential for fetal survival. To investigate whether expression of the HLA-G*0105N allele supports HLA-E cell surface expression, we transfected the HLA-G*0105N gene into JAR trophoblast cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed that HLA-G*0105N-transfected cells express surface HLA-E to a similar extent as the unmutated HLA-G gene, whereas HLA-G1 cell surface expression was undetectable. Using the NKL cell line in a standard (51)Cr release assay, the HLA-E molecules were found to inhibit natural killer lysis, through a mechanism partially dependent on CD94/NKG2A-mediated recognition.

  18. Identification of immunogenic HLA-B7 "Achilles' heel" epitopes within highly conserved regions of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Groot, Anne S; Rivera, Daniel S; McMurry, Julie A;

    2008-01-01

    previously described as restricted by B7. The HLA-B7 restricted epitopes discovered using this in silico screening approach are highly conserved across strains and clades of HIV as well as conserved in the HIV genome over the 20 years since HIV-1 isolates were first sequenced. This study demonstrates......Genetic polymorphisms in class I human leukocyte antigen molecules (HLA) have been shown to determine susceptibility to HIV infection as well as the rate of progression to AIDS. In particular, the HLA-B7 supertype has been shown to be associated with high viral loads and rapid progression...... to disease. Using a multiplatform in silico/in vitro approach, we have prospectively identified 45 highly conserved, putative HLA-B7 restricted HIV CTL epitopes and evaluated them in HLA binding and ELISpot assays. All 45 epitopes (100%) bound to HLA-B7 in cell-based HLA binding assays: 28 (62%) bound...

  19. Genetically engineered blood pharming: generation of HLA-universal platelets derived from CD34+ progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Constança; Blaszczyk, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Blood pharming is a recently designed concept to enable in vitro production of blood cells that are safe, effective and readily available. This approach represents an alternative to blood donation and may contribute to overcome the shortage of blood products. However, the high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci remains a major hurdle to the application of off-the-shelf blood products. Refractoriness to platelet (PLT) transfusion caused by alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens constitutes a relevant clinical problem. Thus, it would be desirable to generate PLT units devoid of HLA antigens. To reduce the immunogenicity of cell-based therapeutics, we have permanently reduced HLA class I expression using an RNA interference strategy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the generation of HLA class I-silenced (HLA-universal) PLTs from CD34+ progenitor cells using an shRNA targeting β2-microglobulin transcripts is feasible. CD34+ progenitor cells derived from G-CSF mobilised donors were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding for the β2-microglobulin-specific shRNA and differentiated into PLTs using a liquid culture system. The functionality of HLA-silenced PLTs and their ability to escape HLA antibody-mediated cytotoxicity were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Platelet activation in response to ADP and thrombin were assessed in vitro. The immune-evasion capability of HLA-universal megakaryocytes (MKs) and PLTs was tested in lymphocytotoxicity assays using anti-HLA antibodies. To assess the functionality of HLA-universal PLTs in vivo, HLA-silenced MKs were infused into NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) mice with or without anti-HLA antibodies. PLT generation was evaluated by flow cytometry using anti-CD42a and CD61 antibodies. HLA-universal PLTs demonstrated to be functionally similar to blood-derived PLTs. Lymphocytotoxicity assays showed that HLA-silencing efficiently protects MKs against HLA antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. 80

  20. ENDOGENOUS EXPRESSION AND HLA STABILIZATION ASSAY OF PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM CTL EPITOPE MINIGENE IN HUMAN HLA-A2.1 AND HLA-B51 CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐玉阳; 王恒

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the Plasmodium falciparum CTL epitope vaccines in HLA class I allele specific human cell lines that have high frequency among Chinese population. Methods. Synthesized oligonucleotides encoding for P.f. CTL epitope genes, constructed eukaryotic expression plasmids, transfected the minigenes into HLA class I allele specific human cell lines and identified endogenous expressing of the minigenes by RT-PCR and HLA stabilization assay. Results. Two mini-genes encoding Plasmodium falciparum CTL epitopes were designed and cloned, respectively, into an eukaryotic expressing vector to form TR26 which was restricted to HLA-B51, SH6 which was restricted to HLA-A2.1, and TS, which had the two aforementioned mini-genes fused in tandem. All of these CTL epitope genes were transfected and endogenously expressed in respective cell lines containing appropriate HLA molecules. The obviously increased expressions of HLA class I molecules were detected in the transfected cell lines. It was demonstrated that the two discrete Plasmodium falciparum epitope genes were effectively processed and presented, and the close proximity of the two epitope genes in one chain as in mini-gene TS did not interfere with the processing and presenting of each epitope gene in corresponding cell line. Conclusion. A successful expression and presentation of multiple CTL epitope mini-gene in MHC class I allele specific human cell lines were demonstrated by an in vitro assay, which could be corresponding to the vaccination of CTL vaccines in people with different MHC I molecules. This work also suggested the possibility of constructing a multiple CTL epitope plasmodium falciparum DNA vaccine that could cover most of Chinese population.

  1. The diversity of the HLA-E-restricted peptide repertoire explains the immunological impact of the Arg107Gly mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Alexander A; Kraemer, Thomas; Huyton, Trevor; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Döding, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E molecules are potent inhibitors of NK cell-mediated killing. Low in polymorphisms, two alleles are widely expressed among diverse populations: HLA-E*01:01 and HLA-E*01:03. Both alleles are distinguished by one SNP resulting in the substitution Arg107Gly. Both alleles present a limited set of peptides derived from class I leader sequences physiologically; however, HLA-E*01:01 presents non-canonical peptides in the absence of HLA class I molecules. To further assess the functional differences between both alleles, we analyzed the peptide repertoire of HLA-E*01:03 by applying soluble HLA technology followed by mass-spectrometric peptide sequencing. HLA-E*01:03 restricted peptides showed a length of 9-17 amino acids and differed in their biophysical properties, no overlap in the peptide repertoire of both allelic variants could be observed; however, both alleles shared marginal peptides from the same proteomic content. Artificial APCs expressing empty HLA-E*01:01 or E*01:03 molecules were generated and stabilized using cognate HLA class I-derived peptide ligands to analyze the impact of residue 107 within the HLA-E heavy chain on the NKG2/CD94 receptor engagement. Differences in peptide stabilization could be translated to the density and half-life time of peptide-HLA-E molecules on the cell surface that subsequently impacted NK cell inhibition as verified by cytotoxicity assays. Taken together, these data illustrate functional differences of HLA-E allelic variants induced by a single amino acid. Furthermore, the function of HLA-E in pathophysiologic situations when the HLA processing machinery is interrupted seems to be more emphasized than previously described, implying a crucial role for HLA-E in tumor or viral immune episodes.

  2. Rheumatoid Rescue of Misfolded Cellular Proteins by MHC Class II Molecules: A New Hypothesis for Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arase, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins localized in the endoplasmic reticulum are degraded promptly and thus are not transported outside cells. However, misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum are rescued from protein degradation upon association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and are transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules without being processed to peptides. Studies on the misfolded proteins rescued by MHC class II molecules have revealed that misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules are specific targets for autoantibodies produced in autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, a strong correlation has been observed between autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules and the autoimmune disease susceptibility conferred by each MHC class II allele. These new insights into MHC class II molecules suggest that misfolded proteins rescued from protein degradation by MHC class II molecules are recognized as "neo-self" antigens by immune system and are involved in autoimmune diseases as autoantibody targets.

  3. Distribution of HLA-G extended haplotypes and one HLA-E polymorphism in a large-scale study of mother-child dyads with and without severe preeclampsia and eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, L. L.; Djurisic, S.; Andersen, A.-M. N.;

    2016-01-01

    The etiological pathways and pathogenesis of preeclampsia have rendered difficult to disentangle. Accumulating evidence points toward a maladapted maternal immune system, which may involve aberrant placental expression of immunomodulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib molecules during...... pregnancy. Several studies have shown aberrant or reduced expression of HLA-G in the placenta and in maternal blood in cases of preeclampsia compared with controls. Unlike classical HLA class Ia loci, the nonclassical HLA-G has limited polymorphic variants. Most nucleotide variations are clustered in the 5...... comprehensive performed, investigated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del (rs66554220) and HLA-E polymorphisms in mother and newborn dyads from pregnancies complicated by severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and from uncomplicated pregnancies. Furthermore, results from extended HLA-G haplotyping...

  4. Association of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 Alleles in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy in the Han Ethnicity of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Jun Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA gene system is one of the most polymorphic regions of the human genome. The association of HLA class II genes in T1DM pathogenesis has been reported for several ethnicities. Associations of HLA class II genes with T2DM have revealed inconsistent results. Moreover, correlations between DN and HLA alleles remain unclear. We carried out DNA typing chip by specific medium resolution typing probes in 310 T2DM subjects (including 210 patients with DN and 100 patients without DN in addition to 100 healthy controls. Differences were found between patients with T2DM and the control group in the frequencies of the HLA-DQA1*0301 (15.5% versus 8.0%, P<0.01 and the HLA-DQA1*0501 alleles (16.6% versus 8.5%, P<0.01. Differences were found between patients with DN and without DN in the frequencies of the HLA-DQA1*0302 (6.9% versus 13.5%, P<0.01 and HLA-DQB1*0501 alleles (5.8% versus 14.5%, P<0.01. Diabetes duration and systolic blood pressure were independent risk factors associated with DN (OR=2.277 and 1.366, resp., P<0.05, whereas the HLA-DQB1*0501 llele had a protective effect on DN (OR=0.53, P<0.05. These data suggest the HLA-DQA1*0301 and HLA-DQA1*0501 alleles are markers of susceptibility for T2DM, and the HLA-DQB1*0501 allele is associated with a protective effect on DN in Han ethnicity of China.

  5. Cellular misfolded proteins rescued from degradation by MHC class II molecules are possible targets for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arase, Noriko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-11-01

    The major function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is the presentation of peptide antigens to helper T cells. However, when misfolded proteins are associated with MHC class II molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum, they are transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules without processing to peptides. Of note, misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules are specifically recognized by autoantibodies produced in patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and antiphospholipid syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules is associated with the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases conferred by each MHC class II allele. Therefore, misfolded proteins rescued from degradation by MHC class II molecules may be recognized as 'neo-self' antigens by the immune system and be involved in the pathogenicity of autoimmune diseases.

  6. MULTIPRED2: A computational system for large-scale identification of peptides predicted to bind to HLA supertypes and alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; DeLuca, David S.; Keskin, Derin B.;

    2011-01-01

    MULTIPRED2 is a computational system for facile prediction of peptide binding to multiple alleles belonging to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II DR molecules. It enables prediction of peptide binding to products of individual HLA alleles, combination of alleles, or HLA supertypes...... groups in North America. MULTIPRED2 is an important tool to complement wet-lab experimental methods for identification of T-cell epitopes. It is available at http://cvc.dfci.harvard.edu/multipred2/....

  7. Differential clade-specific HLA-B*3501 association with HIV-1 disease outcome is linked to immunogenicity of a single Gag epitope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Philippa C; Koyanagi, Madoka; Kløverpris, Henrik N;

    2012-01-01

    The strongest genetic influence on immune control in HIV-1 infection is the HLA class I genotype. Rapid disease progression in B-clade infection has been linked to HLA-B*35 expression, in particular to the less common HLA-B*3502 and HLA-B*3503 subtypes but also to the most prevalent subtype, HLA-...... be of overriding importance in achieving immune control of HIV infection. This distinction is of direct relevance to development of vaccines designed to optimize the anti-HIV CD8(+) T-cell response in all individuals, irrespective of HLA type....

  8. HLA-II 类抗原基因分型PCR-SSP方法在ALLo-HSCT中的应用%The Application of HLA Class II Genotyping by Polymerase Chain Reaction Amplification with Sequence-specific Primers Method in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Trasplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏彩霞; 杨绵本; 李玛琳; 景强; 黎承萍; 杨弘; 肖敏

    2002-01-01

    准确的HLA 配型是异基因造血干细胞移植( Allo-HSCT) 成功的关键之一, 经典的血清学方法用于HLA-II 类抗原的配型因存在诸多不足可导致漏配或错配,为了克服血清学方法的种种不足,我们建立了HLA-II类聚合酶链反应-序列特异性引物(PCR-SSP)基因配型方法.此方法可避开血清学方法的种种干扰,直接从基因水平检测HLA的个体遗传学差异.结果表明:PCR-SSP方法具有重复性好、特异性强、灵敏度高、实验结果易于判断等特点,对于Allo-HSCT选择理想供者,减少或减轻Allo-HSCT时GVHD 的发生,有着至关重要的意义.可满足Allo-HSCT对HLA 配型准确性高的要求,为在同胞兄弟姐妹间和无血缘关系供-受者之间选择理想供者提供了重要保证.

  9. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN DE NOVO DONOR SPECIFIC HLA ANTIBODY, C4D STAINING IN RENAL GRAFT BIOPSY AND GRAFT OUTCOME: A SINGLE CENTER EXPERIENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciarelli, James; Cho, Yong W; Koss, Michael; Helstab-Houston, Kathryn; Mendez, Robert; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Hutchinson, Ian V; Shah, Tariq

    2009-01-01

    In 69 renal transplant recipients (RTR), all had a functioning graft (SCr HLA antibodies and 41 (59%) had DSA. The proportion of C4d positivity was significantly higher in patients with DSA (HLA Class I only, II only, and I & II) in comparison to patients without post-transplant HLA antibodies. The incidence of graft failure (including current SCr > 4.0) in RTR with HLA Class II antibodies (Class II only or I & II) was significantly higher than in RTR without post-transplant HLA antibodies (P=0.03).Even after amelioration of rejection, the RTR with Class II DSA group continued to fail beyond 2 years after transplantation when compared with the other 2 groups (None/NDSA or HLA Class I only), however, the difference in graft survival between HLA Class II and None/NDSA groups did not reach statistical significance (log-rank P=0.32). Significant association between C4d staining, post-transplant HLA Class II antibodies and graft failure strongly suggests the importance of post-transplant HLA antibodies. HLA Class II DSAs may be an indicator of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) proceeding to graft loss. We propose that amelioration of CAN graft loss may be affected by monitoring and identification of DSA with appropriate immunosuppression of these antibodies.

  10. Distribution of HLA-G extended haplotypes and one HLA-E polymorphism in a large-scale study of mother-child dyads with and without severe preeclampsia and eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, L L; Djurisic, S; Andersen, A-M N; Melbye, M; Bjerre, D; Ferrero-Miliani, L; Hackmon, R; Geraghty, D E; Hviid, T V F

    2016-10-01

    The etiological pathways and pathogenesis of preeclampsia have rendered difficult to disentangle. Accumulating evidence points toward a maladapted maternal immune system, which may involve aberrant placental expression of immunomodulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib molecules during pregnancy. Several studies have shown aberrant or reduced expression of HLA-G in the placenta and in maternal blood in cases of preeclampsia compared with controls. Unlike classical HLA class Ia loci, the nonclassical HLA-G has limited polymorphic variants. Most nucleotide variations are clustered in the 5'-upstream regulatory region (5'URR) and 3'-untranslated regulatory region (3'UTR) of HLA-G and reflect a stringent expressional control. Based on genotyping and full gene sequencing of HLA-G in a large number of cases and controls (n > 900), the present study, which to our knowledge is the largest and most comprehensive performed, investigated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del (rs66554220) and HLA-E polymorphisms in mother and newborn dyads from pregnancies complicated by severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and from uncomplicated pregnancies. Furthermore, results from extended HLA-G haplotyping in the newborns are presented in order to assess whether a combined contribution of nucleotide variations spanning the 5'URR, coding region, and 3'UTR of HLA-G describes the genetic association with severe preeclampsia more closely. In contrast to earlier findings, the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism was not associated with severe preeclampsia. Furthermore, the polymorphism (rs1264457) defining the two nonsynonymous HLA-E alleles, HLA-E*01:01:xx:xx and HLA-E*01:03:xx:xx, were not associated with severe preeclampsia. Finally, no specific HLA-G haplotypes were significantly associated with increased risk of developing severe preeclampsia/eclampsia.

  11. Quantitative predictions of peptide binding to any HLA-DR molecule of known sequence: NetMHCIIpan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Blicher, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    class II molecules is therefore of pivotal importance for rational discovery of immune epitopes. HLA-DR is a prominent example of a human MHC class II. Here, we present a method, NetMHCIIpan, that allows for pan-specific predictions of peptide binding to any HLA-DR molecule of known sequence. The method...

  12. Assessing high affinity binding to HLA-DQ2.5 by a novel peptide library based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jüse, Ulrike; Arntzen, Magnus; Højrup, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on a novel peptide library based method for HLA class II binding motif identification. The approach is based on water soluble HLA class II molecules and soluble dedicated peptide libraries. A high number of different synthetic peptides are competing to interact with a limited amoun...

  13. Association of HLA-DRB1*1602 and DRB1*1001 with Takayasu arteritis in Colombian mestizos as markers of Amerindian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, M; Varela, A; Ramirez, L A; Uribe, O; Vasquez, G; Egea, E; Yunis, E J; Iglesias-Gamarra, A

    2000-08-31

    We performed HLA Class I and Class II typing in 16 patients (15 women, one man) with a confirmed diagnosis of Takayasu arteritis. We did not find any of the previously described associations with HLA-B52, and/or HLA-DRB1*1301 alleles. However, in our patients, HLA-DRB1*1602 and HLA-DRB1*1001 were significantly increased. The association of Takayasu arteritis with Amerindian and Asian HLA-DRB1 alleles (DRB1*1602 and DRB1*1001) in the Colombian mestizo patients reported here, and with HLA-B*3906 previously reported in Mexicans, suggest the possibility that some HLA and disease associations are markers for ethnicity of a population carrying a disease gene which is present in an admixed population with the disease.

  14. MiRNA-mediated control of HLA-G expression and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Manaster

    Full Text Available HLA-G is a non-classical HLA class-Ib molecule expressed mainly by the extravillous cytotrophoblasts (EVT of the placenta. The expression of HLA-G on these fetal cells protects the EVT cells from immune rejection and is therefore important for a healthy pregnancy. The mechanisms controlling HLA-G expression are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that miR-148a and miR-152 down-regulate HLA-G expression by binding its 3'UTR and that this down-regulation of HLA-G affects LILRB1 recognition and consequently, abolishes the LILRB1-mediated inhibition of NK cell killing. We further demonstrate that the C/G polymorphism at position +3142 of HLA-G 3'UTR has no effect on the miRNA targeting of HLA-G. We show that in the placenta both miR-148a and miR-152 miRNAs are expressed at relatively low levels, compared to other healthy tissues, and that the mRNA levels of HLA-G are particularly high and we therefore suggest that this might enable the tissue specific expression of HLA-G.

  15. HLA-G Expression and Role in Advanced-Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caocci, G.; Greco, M.; Fanni, D.; Senes, G.; Littera, R.; Lai, S.; Risso, P.; Carcassi, C.; Faa, G.; La Nasa, G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  16. AMBIGUITY OF LOCI DURING HLA-TYPING ON SSO TECHNOLOGY AND ATTEMPT TO RESOLVE THEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Loginova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequence specific oligonucleotides typing was used to identify human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A, B, DRB1 alleles from 705 recruited volunteers with Volga Federal District for unrelated hematopoietic stem cell registry and 155 of their number at locus HLA-C. 48 samples cannot be entered into the database because of ambiguities in the identification of allelic loci on HLA-class I – HLA-A, HLA-B. To resolution of ambiguity use reagents kits AlleleSEQR HLA Sequencing, which allowed to reveal the ambiguity of the locus HLA-A, 44% of cases, the loci HLA-B and HLA-C – 40% of cases. Application software HARPs Finder showed the possibility of resolution of all identified allelic ambiguities (with the exception of types of ambiguity – A*03/A*32 or A*74:13/A*32:04 and A*01/A*11 or A*36:04/A*11 with the addition of basic kits AlleleSEQR HLA Sequencing reagents kit Al- leleSEQR HARPs. 

  17. Study of Soluble HLA-G in Congenital Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Liliana; Bortolotti, Daria; Gentili, Valentina; Piccirilli, Giulia; Chiereghin, Angela; Pavia, Claudia; Bolzani, Silvia; Guerra, Brunella; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Cervi, Francesca; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Luca, Dario Di; Landini, Maria Paola; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I antigen that is expressed during pregnancy contributing to maternal-fetal tolerance. HLA-G can be expressed as membrane-bound and soluble forms. HLA-G expression increases strongly during viral infections such as congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, with functional consequences in immunoregulation. In this work we investigated the expression of soluble (s)HLA-G and beta-2 microglobulin (component of HLA) molecules in correlation with the risk of transmission and severity of congenital HCMV infection. We analyzed 182 blood samples from 130 pregnant women and 52 nonpregnant women and 56 amniotic fluid samples from women experiencing primary HCMV infection. The median levels of sHLA-G in maternal serum of women with primary HCMV infection were higher in comparison with nonprimary and uninfected pregnant women (p < 0.001). AF from HCMV symptomatic fetuses presented higher sHLA-G levels in comparison with infected asymptomatic fetuses (p < 0.001), presence of HLA-G free-heavy chain, and a concentration gradient from amniotic fluid to maternal blood. No significant statistical difference of beta-2 microglobulin median levels was observed between all different groups. Our results suggest the determination of sHLA-G molecules in both maternal blood and amniotic fluid as a promising biomarker of diagnosis of maternal HCMV primary infection and fetal HCMV disease. PMID:27699182

  18. Role of HLA adaptation in HIV evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Leslie, Alasdair; Goulder, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Killing of HIV-infected cells by CD8+ T-cells imposes strong selection pressure on the virus toward escape. The HLA class I molecules that are successful in mediating some degree of control over the virus are those that tend to present epitopes in conserved regions of the proteome, such as in p24...... Gag, in which escape also comes at a significant cost to viral replicative capacity (VRC). In some instances, compensatory mutations can fully correct for the fitness cost of such an escape variant; in others, correction is only partial. The consequences of these events within the HIV-infected host......, and at the population level following transmission of escape variants, are discussed. The accumulation of escape mutants in populations over the course of the epidemic already shows instances of protective HLA molecules losing their impact, and in certain cases, a modest decline in HIV virulence in association...

  19. HLA antibody detection with solid phase assays: great expectations or expectations too great?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, H M; Bray, R A

    2014-09-01

    Alloantibodies directed against HLA antigens, are a barrier to long-term solid organ allograft survival. The clinical impact of preformed, donor-directed HLA alloantibodies range from acceptable risk to unequivocal contraindication for organ transplantation. HLA antibodies are key factors that limit patient access to donor organs. Serological methods were once the only approach to identify HLA antigens and antibodies. Limitations in these technologies led to the development of solid phase approaches. In the early 1990s, the development of the polymerase chain reaction enabled DNA-based HLA antigen testing to be performed. By the mid-1990s, microparticle-based technology that utilized flow cytometry for analysis was developed to detect both classes I and II HLA antibodies. These methodologies revolutionized clinical histocompatibility testing. The strengths and weaknesses of these assays are described in detail in this review.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) generates soluble HLA-G1 by cell surface proteolytic shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Trentini, Alessandro; Bortolotti, Daria; Manfrinato, Maria C; Rotola, Antonella; Castellazzi, Massimiliano; Melchiorri, Loredana; Di Luca, Dario; Dallocchio, Franco; Fainardi, Enrico; Bellini, Tiziana

    2013-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules are non-classical HLA class I antigens with an important role in pregnancy immune regulation and inflammation control. Soluble HLA-G proteins can be generated through two mechanisms: alternative splicing and proteolytic release, which is known to be metalloprotease mediated. Among this class of enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) might be involved in the HLA-G1 membrane cleavage. Of particular interest are MMP-2 and MMP-9, which regulate the inflammatory process by cytokine and chemokine modulation. We evaluated the effect of MMP-9 and MMP-2 on HLA-G1 membrane shedding. In particular, we analyzed the in vitro effect of these two gelatinases on the secretion of HLA-G1 via proteolytic cleavage in 221-G1-transfected cell line, in JEG3 cell line, and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results obtained by both cell lines showed the role of MMP-2 in HLA-G1 shedding. On the contrary, MMP-9 was not involved in this process. In addition, we identified three possible highly specific cleavage sites for MMP-2, whereas none were detected for MMP-9. This study suggests an effective link between MMP-2 and HLA-G1 shedding, increasing our knowledge on the regulatory machinery beyond HLA-G regulation in physiological and pathological conditions.

  1. Expression of HLA-G in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Schmitt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of HLA-G was reported in certain malignancies and its role in escaping from immunosurveillance in cancers was proposed since HLA-G is a nonconventional HLA class I molecule that protects fetus from immunorecognition during pregnancy. Recent studies proposed HLA-G as novel prognostic marker for patients with B-CLL. HLA-G was showed to bear even better prognostic information compared to Zeta-chain associated protein of 70kDa (ZAP-70 and CD38 although some other authors did not find HLA-G expression in CLL. Therefore in this study we characterized the expression of HLA-G on both RNA and protein level. In most of 20 B-CLL patients we were able to detect signal from HLA-G using flow cytometry analysis. The expression of HLA-G was confirmed on messenger level by real-time RT-PCR experiments. No correlation between HLA-G expression and expression of well established prognostic factors such as ZAP-70 and CD38 was detected. These results confirm that HLA-G is expressed on CLL leukemic cells. Furthermore the expression of HLA-G on CLL cells suggests that this molecule might be involved in escaping of CLL cells from immunosurveillance.

  2. HLA polymorphism in Sudanese renal donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer M Dafalla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to provide a database for renal transplantation in Sudan and to determine the HLA antigens and haplotype frequencies (HFs in the study subjects. HLA typing was performed using the complement-dependant lymphocytotoxicity test in 250 unrelated healthy individuals selected as donors in the Sudanese Renal Transplantation Program. Considerable polymorphism was observed at each locus; A2 (0.28, A30 (0.12, A3 (0.09, A24 (0.09, A1 (0.09, and A68 (0.06 were the most frequent antigens in the A locus, while B51 (0.092, B41 (0.081, B39 (0.078, B57 (0.060, B35 (0.068, B 50 (0.053 and B 52 (0.051 were the most common B locus antigens. DR13 (0.444 and DR15 (0.160 showed the highest antigen frequencies (AFs in the DR locus. In the DQ locus, DQ1 showed the highest gene frequency (0.498, while DQ2 and DQ3 AFs were (0.185 and (0.238, respectively. The most common HLA-A and -B haplotypes in positive linkage disequilibrium were A24, B38; A1, B7; and A3, B52. The common HLA-A and -B HFs in positive linkage disequilibrium in the main three tribe-stocks of the study subjects (Gaalia, Nile Nubian and Johyna were A24, B38 for Gaalia; A24, B38 and A2, B7 for Johyna; and A2, B64 and A3, B53 for Nile Nubian. These results suggest that both class I and class II polymorphisms of the study subjects depict considerable heterogeneity, which reflects recent admixture of this group with neighboring Arabs and African populations.

  3. Enhanced expression in vivo of HLA-ABC antigens and beta 2-microglobulin on human lymphoid cells induced by human interferon-alpha in patients with lung cancer. Enhanced expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens prior to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Plesner, T; Larsen, J K;

    1985-01-01

    The effect of cloned human interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) on the expression of HLA-ABC antigens (HLA-ABC) and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) on human peripheral lymphoid cells in vivo was studied by cytofluorometry using monoclonal antibodies and fluorescein-labelled rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin....... A significant increase in the mean fluorescence intensity of HLA-ABC (median 59%, P less than 0.001) and beta 2m (median 57%, P less than 0.001) on small lymphoid cells was observed 24 h after initiation of IFN-alpha treatment (50 X 10(6) units IFN-alpha/m2 three times a week). The enhanced expression...... of these antigens in vivo was found in 11 of 12 examined patients with primary bronchial carcinoma. A concomitant increase in serum beta 2m (median 90%, P less than 0.001) was found in all patients. In contrast the amount of cell-associated HLA-ABC and beta 2m remained unchanged (P greater than 0.1 and P greater...

  4. Residues Met76 and Gln79 in HLA-G α1 domain involved in KIR2DL4 recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hua YAN; Li An FAN

    2005-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) has long been speculated as a beneficial factor for a successful pregnancy for its restricted expression on fetal-maternal extravillous cytotrophoblasts and its capability of modulating uterine natural killer cell (uNK) function such as cytotoxicity and cytokine production through NK cell receptors. HLA class I α1domain is an important killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) recognition site and the Met76 and Gln79 are unique to HLA-G in this region. NK cell receptor KIR2DL4 is a specific receptor for HLA-G, yet the recognition site on HLA-G remains unknown. In this study, retroviral transduction was applied to express the wild type HLA-G (HLA-wtG), mutant HLA-G (HLA-mG) on the chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 cells and KIR2DL4 molecule on NK-92 cells,respectively. KIR2DL4-IgG Fc fusion protein was generated to determine the binding specificity between KIR2DL4and HLA-G. Our results showed that residue Met76, Gln79 mutated to Ala76,79 in the α1 domain of HLA-G protein could affect the binding affinity between KIR2DL4 and HLA-G, meanwhile, the KIR2DL4 transfected NK-92 cells (NK-92-2DL4) showed a considerably different cytolysis ability against the HLA-wtG and HLA-mG transfected K562 targets.Taken together, our data indicated that residue Met76 and Gln79 in HLA-G α1 domain plays a critical role in the recognition of KIR2DL4, which could be an explanation for the isoforms of HLA-G, all containing the α1 domain, with the potential to regulate NK functions.

  5. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis phagosome is a HLA-I processing competent organelle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff E Grotzke

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb resides in a long-lived phagosomal compartment that resists maturation. The manner by which Mtb antigens are processed and presented on MHC Class I molecules is poorly understood. Using human dendritic cells and IFN-gamma release by CD8(+ T cell clones, we examined the processing and presentation pathway for two Mtb-derived antigens, each presented by a distinct HLA-I allele (HLA-Ia versus HLA-Ib. Presentation of both antigens is blocked by the retrotranslocation inhibitor exotoxin A. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that, after reaching the cytosol, both antigens require proteasomal degradation and TAP transport, but differ in the requirement for ER-golgi egress and new protein synthesis. Specifically, presentation by HLA-B8 but not HLA-E requires newly synthesized HLA-I and transport through the ER-golgi. Phenotypic analysis of the Mtb phagosome by flow organellometry revealed the presence of Class I and loading accessory molecules, including TAP and PDI. Furthermore, loaded HLA-I:peptide complexes are present within the Mtb phagosome, with a pronounced bias towards HLA-E:peptide complexes. In addition, protein analysis also reveals that HLA-E is enriched within the Mtb phagosome compared to HLA-A2. Together, these data suggest that the phagosome, through acquisition of ER-localized machinery and as a site of HLA-I loading, plays a vital role in the presentation of Mtb-derived antigens, similar to that described for presentation of latex bead-associated antigens. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of this presentation pathway for an intracellular pathogen. Moreover, these data suggest that HLA-E may play a unique role in the presentation of phagosomal antigens.

  6. Low Constitutive Cell Surface Expression of HLA-B Is Caused by a Posttranslational Mechanism Involving Glu180 and Arg239

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Ekwelum, Vanessa A. C.; Ormhøj, Maria

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I cell surface expression is crucial for normal immune responses, and variability in HLA expression may influence the course of infections. We have previously shown that classical HLA class I expression on many human cell types is biased with greatly reduced expression of HLA-B compared...... with HLA-A in the absence of inflammatory signals. In the search for the mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy, we have recently reported that the regulation is mainly posttranslational and that the C-terminal part of the α2 domain and the α3 domain contain the molecular determinants that explain...

  7. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: new B39 and B15 alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, T L; Butler, L M; Trachtenberg, E A; Erlich, H A; Rickards, O; De Stefano, G; Watkins, D I

    1995-01-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles.

  9. HLA-E coding and 3' untranslated region variability determined by next-generation sequencing in two West-African population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Erick C; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Sabbagh, Audrey; Porto, Iane O P; Garcia, André; Ramalho, Jaqueline; Lima, Thálitta H A; Massaro, Juliana D; Dias, Fabrício C; Collares, Cristhianna V A; Jamonneau, Vincent; Bucheton, Bruno; Camara, Mamadou; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-12-01

    HLA-E is a non-classical Human Leucocyte Antigen class I gene with immunomodulatory properties. Whereas HLA-E expression usually occurs at low levels, it is widely distributed amongst human tissues, has the ability to bind self and non-self antigens and to interact with NK cells and T lymphocytes, being important for immunosurveillance and also for fighting against infections. HLA-E is usually the most conserved locus among all class I genes. However, most of the previous studies evaluating HLA-E variability sequenced only a few exons or genotyped known polymorphisms. Here we report a strategy to evaluate HLA-E variability by next-generation sequencing (NGS) that might be used to other HLA loci and present the HLA-E haplotype diversity considering the segment encoding the entire HLA-E mRNA (including 5'UTR, introns and the 3'UTR) in two African population samples, Susu from Guinea-Conakry and Lobi from Burkina Faso. Our results indicate that (a) the HLA-E gene is indeed conserved, encoding mainly two different protein molecules; (b) Africans do present several unknown HLA-E alleles presenting synonymous mutations; (c) the HLA-E 3'UTR is quite polymorphic and (d) haplotypes in the HLA-E 3'UTR are in close association with HLA-E coding alleles. NGS has proved to be an important tool on data generation for future studies evaluating variability in non-classical MHC genes.

  10. Korean BAC library construction and characterization of HLA-DRA, HLA-DRB3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Hye-Ja; Bok, Jeong; Kim, Cheol-Hwan; Hong, Seong-Tshool; Park, Chan; Kimm, KuChan; Oh, Bermseok; Lee, Jong-Young

    2006-07-31

    A human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed with high molecular weight DNA extracted from the blood of a male Korean. This Korean BAC library contains 100,224 clones of insert size ranging from 70 to 150 kb, with an average size of 86 kb, corresponding to a 2.9-fold redundancy of the genome. The average insert size was determined from 288 randomly selected BAC clones that were well distributed among all the chromosomes. We developed a pooling system and three-step PCR screen for the Korean BAC library to isolate desired BAC clones, and we confirmed its utility using primer pairs designed for one of the clones. The Korean BAC library and screening pools will allow PCR-based screening of the Korean genome for any gene of interest. We also determined the allele types of HLA-DRA and HLA-DRB3 of clone KB55453, located in the HLA class II region on chromosome 6p21.3. The HLA-DRA and DRB3 genes in this clone were identified as the DRA*010202 and DRB3*01010201 types, respectively. The haplotype found in this library will provide useful information in future human disease studies.

  11. Polymorphism of HLA-A and HLA-B in pre-eclampsia%HLA-A和HLA-B的多态性与先兆子痫

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张展; 贾莉婷; 张琳琳

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between the polymorphism of HLA-A, HLA-B genes and pre-eclampsia. Methods: HLA-A, HLA-B genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) in 119 preeclampsia patients, 117 normal pregnant women and their neonates. Results: The study showed that 16 HLA-A and 39 HLA-B alleles were obtained in pre-eclamptic patients and normal pregnant women. 15 HLA-A and 37 HLA-B alleles were obtained in their neonates. No significant difference was found in maternal or neonatal HLA-A, HLA-B alleles be-tween pre-eclampsia group and control group (Pc>0. 05). The frequencies of HLA-A11, HLA-A24,HLA-B13, HLA-B14, HLA-B15, HLA-B52 maternal/fetus genetic assoications were significantly different between pre-eclampsia group and control group (P<0. 05). Conclusion: Some HLA-A, HLA-B maternal/fetus special bindings may be associated with the susceptibility or protective of pre-eclampsia.

  12. HLA-KIR Interactions and Immunity to Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Sabouri Ghannad

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Host genetic factors play a central role in determining the clinical phenotype of human diseases. Association between two polymorphic loci in human genome, human leukocyte antigen (HLA and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, and genetically complex infectious disease, particularly those of viral etiology, have been historically elusive. Hence, defining the influence of genetic diversity in HLA and KIRs on the outcome of viral infections has been extensively started in clinically well-defined cohort studies. HLA genes encode molecules which present antigenic peptide fragments to T lymphocytes as central players in adaptive immunity against infectious diseases. KIRs are expressed on natural killer cells which perform a crucial role in innate immunity to pathogen infection. The effector functions of NK cells such as direct killing of infected cells, cytokine production, and cross-talk with adaptive immune system depend on activation of NK cells, which is determined by their surface receptors. Among these receptors, KIRs, which interact with HLA class I, are mainly inhibitory and exhibit substantial genetic diversity. An extensive body of association studies indicates a role for HLA–KIRs interactions in infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, cancer, transplantation, and reproduction. Various compound HLA-KIR genotypes appear to affect outcome of viral infections that suggests a role for HLA class I diversity in innate immunity as well as adaptive immune responses. The aim of this review is focusing on the impact of HLA and KIR alleles and different combinations of these alleles on clinical outcome of viral diseases to validate this proof-of-concept with respect to the therapeutic interventions.

  13. Impaired cell surface expression of HLA-B antigens on mesenchymal stem cells and muscle cell progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Nehlin, Jan; Sabir, Hardee Jawad;

    2010-01-01

    HLA class-I expression is weak in embryonic stem cells but increases rapidly during lineage progression. It is unknown whether all three classical HLA class-I antigens follow the same developmental program. In the present study, we investigated allele-specific expression of HLA-A, -B, and -C...... at the mRNA and protein levels on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue as well as striated muscle satellite cells and lymphocytes. Using multicolour flow cytometry, we found high cell surface expression of HLA-A on all stem cells and PBMC examined. Surprisingly, HLA-B was either...... undetectable or very weakly expressed on all stem cells protecting them from complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) using relevant human anti-B and anti-Cw sera. IFNgamma stimulation for 48-72 h was required to induce full HLA-B protein expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that IFNgamma induced...

  14. Analyzing the effect of peptide-HLA-binding ability on the immunogenicity of potential CD8+ and CD4+ T cell epitopes in a large dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shufeng; Li, Jintao; Chen, Xiaoling; Wang, Li; Liu, Wei; Wu, Yuzhang

    2016-08-01

    Immunogenicity is a key factor that influences whether a peptide presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) can be a T cell epitope. However, peptide immunization experiments have shown that approximately half of MHC class I-binding peptides cannot elicit a T cell response, indicating the importance of analyzing the variables affecting the immunogenicity of MHC-binding peptides. In this study, we hierarchically investigated the contribution of the binding stability and affinity of peptide-MHC complexes to immunogenicity based on the available quantitative data. We found that the immunogenicity of peptides presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules was still predictable using the experimental binding affinity, although approximately one-third of the peptides with a binding affinity stronger than 500 nM were non-immunogenic, whereas the immunogenicity of HLA-II-presented peptides was predicted well using the experimental affinity and even the predicted affinity. The positive correlation between the binding affinity and stability was only observed in peptide-HLA-I complexes with a binding affinity stronger than 500 nM, which suggested that the stability alone could not be used for the prediction of immunogenicity. A characterization and comparison of the 'holes' in the CD8+ and CD4+ T cell repertoire provided an explanation for the observed differences between the immunogenicity of peptides presented by HLA class I and II molecules. We also provided the optimal affinity threshold for the potential CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes. Our results provide important insights into the cellular immune response and the accurate prediction of T cell epitopes.

  15. HLA-G expression in melanoma: A way for tumor cells to escape from immunosurveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Pascale; Rouas-Freiss, Nathalie; Khalil-Daher, Iman; Moreau, Philippe; Riteau, Beatrice; Le Gal, Frederique Anne; Avril, Marie Francoise; Dausset, Jean; Guillet, Jean Gerard; Carosella, Edgardo D.

    1998-01-01

    Considering the well established role of nonclassical HLA-G class I molecules in inhibiting natural killer (NK) cell function, the consequence of abnormal HLA-G expression in malignant cells should be the escape of tumors from immunosurveillance. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed HLA-G expression and NK sensitivity in human malignant melanoma cells. Our analysis of three melanoma cell lines and ex vivo biopsy demonstrated that (i) IGR and M74 human melanoma cell lines exhibit a high level of HLA-G transcription with differential HLA-G isoform transcription and protein expression patterns, (ii) a higher level of HLA-G transcription ex vivo is detected in a skin melanoma metastasis biopsy compared with a healthy skin fragment from the same individual, and (iii) HLA-G protein isoforms other than membrane-bound HLA-G1 protect IGR from NK lysis. It thus appears of critical importance to consider the specific role of HLA-G expression in tumors in the design of future cancer immunotherapies. PMID:9539768

  16. Identification of the core regulators of the HLA I-peptide binding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Hang; Xing, Zhihao; Liu, Chenglin; Wang, ShaoPeng; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong; Kong, Xiangyin

    2017-01-01

    During the display of peptide/human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -I complex for further immune recognition, the cleaved and transported antigenic peptides have to bind to HLA-I protein and the binding affinity between peptide epitopes and HLA proteins directly influences the immune recognition ability in human beings. Key factors affecting the binding affinity during the generation, selection and presentation processes of HLA-I complex have not yet been fully discovered. In this study, a new method describing the HLA class I-peptide interactions was proposed. Three hundred and forty features of HLA I proteins and peptide sequences were utilized for analysis by four candidate algorithms, screening the optimal classifier. Features derived from the optimal classifier were further selected and systematically analyzed, revealing the core regulators. The results validated the hypothesis that features of HLA I proteins and related peptides simultaneously affect the binding process, though with discrepant redundancy. Besides, the high relative ratio (16/20) of the amino acid composition features suggests the unique role of sequence signatures for the binding processes. Integrating biological, evolutionary and chemical features of both HLA I molecules and peptides, this study may provide a new perspective of the underlying mechanisms of HLA I-mediated immune reactions. PMID:28211542

  17. HLA-F coding and regulatory segments variability determined by massively parallel sequencing procedures in a Brazilian population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Thálitta Hetamaro Ayala; Buttura, Renato Vidal; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana Caricati; Mendes-Junior, Celso Teixeira; Castelli, Erick C

    2016-10-01

    Human Leucocyte Antigen F (HLA-F) is a non-classical HLA class I gene distinguished from its classical counterparts by low allelic polymorphism and distinctive expression patterns. Its exact function remains unknown. It is believed that HLA-F has tolerogenic and immune modulatory properties. Currently, there is little information regarding the HLA-F allelic variation among human populations and the available studies have evaluated only a fraction of the HLA-F gene segment and/or have searched for known alleles only. Here we present a strategy to evaluate the complete HLA-F variability including its 5' upstream, coding and 3' downstream segments by using massively parallel sequencing procedures. HLA-F variability was surveyed on 196 individuals from the Brazilian Southeast. The results indicate that the HLA-F gene is indeed conserved at the protein level, where thirty coding haplotypes or coding alleles were detected, encoding only four different HLA-F full-length protein molecules. Moreover, a same protein molecule is encoded by 82.45% of all coding alleles detected in this Brazilian population sample. However, the HLA-F nucleotide and haplotype variability is much higher than our current knowledge both in Brazilians and considering the 1000 Genomes Project data. This protein conservation is probably a consequence of the key role of HLA-F in the immune system physiology.

  18. Association of HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 with pulmonary tuberculosis in western Javanese Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliwulandari, Rika; Sachrowardi, Qomariyah; Nakajima, Humiaki; Kashiwase, Koichi; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mabuchi, Akihiko; Sofro, Abdul Salam Mudzakir; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2010-07-01

    Genetic studies of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), including those of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, have been reported in several populations. Some studies also have reported these genes to have a stronger role in severe tuberculosis. We investigated HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes to ascertain their role in susceptibility and resistance to new and recurrent PTB in 257 PTB patients (216 new and 41 recurrent PTB patients) and 236 healthy controls in Western Javanese (Indonesia). HLA-B*4006 was associated with new PTB (p = 0.044, p(adj) = ns), whereas HLA-B*1802, HLA-B*4001 and HLA-DRB1*1101 were associated with recurrent PTB (p = 0.013, p(adj) = 0.016; p = 0.015, p(adj) = 0.028; and p = 0.008, p(adj) = 0.027 for new PTB vs recurrent PTB, respectively). Except for HLA-B*4006, those associations remained significant after adjustment for age and gender by logistic regression analysis, although they disappeared after correction for multiple testing. Haplotype HLA-B*1802-DRB1*1202 was associated with susceptibility to recurrent PTB (p = 0.014, odds ratio = 3.8, 95% confidence interval = 1.18-12.27). In contrast, HLA-DRB1*1202 in the absence of HLA-B*1802 showed a significant association with resistance to recurrent PTB (p = 8.2 x 10(-4), odds ratio = 0.32, 95% confidence interval = 0.16-0.64), suggesting that stronger susceptibility effect of HLA-B*1802 masked the protective effect of HLA-DRB1*1202. Further studies using larger number of patients with recurrent PTB will be needed to confirm our findings.

  19. HLA-G expression levels influence the tolerogenic activity of human DC-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodio, Giada; Comi, Michela; Tomasoni, Daniela; Gianolini, Monica Emma; Rizzo, Roberta; LeMaoult, Joël; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Gregori, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a non-classical HLA class I molecule with known immune-modulatory functions. Our group identified a subset of human dendritic cells, named DC-10, that induce adaptive interleukin-10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells via the interleukin-10-dependent HLA-G/ILT4 pathway. In this study we aimed at defining the role of HLA-G in DC-10-mediated Tr1 cell differentiation. We analyzed phenotype, functions, and genetic variations in the 3′ untranslated region of the HLA-G locus of in vitro-differentiated DC-10 from 67 healthy donors. We showed that HLA-G expression on DC-10 is donor-dependent. Functional studies demonstrated that DC-10, independently of HLA-G expression, secrete interleukin-10 and negligible levels of interleukin-12. Interestingly, DC-10 with high HLA-G promote allo-specific anergic T cells that contain a significantly higher frequency of Tr1 cells, defined as interleukin-10-producing (P=0.0121) or CD49b+LAG-3+ (P=0.0031) T cells, compared to DC-10 with low HLA-G. We found that the HLA-G expression on DC-10 is genetically imprinted, being associated with specific variations in the 3′ untranslated region of the gene, and it may be finely tuned by microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. These data highlight the important role of HLA-G in boosting DC-10 tolerogenic activity and confirm that interleukin-10 production by DC-10 is necessary but not sufficient to promote Tr1 cells at high frequency. These new insights into the role of HLA-G in DC-10-mediated induction of Tr1 cells provide additional information for clinical use in Tr1- or DC-10-based cell therapy approaches. PMID:25661445

  20. HLA-G expression and role in advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Caocci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL, in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp deletion-insertion (del-ins polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.

  1. Structure of HLA-A*0301 in complex with a peptide of proteolipid protein: insights into the role of HLA-A alleles in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Róisín M. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Friis, Lone [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Siebold, Christian [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Friese, Manuel A. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Falkenried 94, 20251 Hamburg (Germany); Fugger, Lars, E-mail: lars.fugger@imm.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby Sygehus, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 N Aarhus (Denmark); Jones, E. Yvonne, E-mail: lars.fugger@imm.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-01

    The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. HLA-A3 is a predisposing allele for multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The KLIETYFSK peptide is a naturally processed epitope of proteolipid protein, a myelin protein and candidate target for immune-mediated myelin destruction in MS. Comparison of the structure of HLA-A3 with that of HLA-A2, an MHC class I molecule which is protective against MS, indicates that both MHC class I molecules present very similar faces for T-cell receptor recognition whilst differing in the specificity of their peptide-binding grooves. These characteristics may underlie the opposing (predisposing versus protective) associations that they exhibit both in humans and in mouse models of MS-like disease. Furthermore, subtle alterations within the peptide-binding groove of HLA-A3 and other A3-like MHC class I molecules, members of the so-called A3 superfamily, may be sufficient to alter their presentation of autoantigen peptides such as KLIETYFSK. This in turn may modulate their contribution to the associated risk of autoimmune disease.

  2. Generation of functional HLA-DR*1101 tetramers receptive for loading with pathogen or tumour derived synthetic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protti Maria

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC class I-peptide tetramers are currently utilised to characterize CD8+ T cell responses at single cell level. The generation and use of MHC class II tetramers to study antigen-specific CD4+ T cells appears less straightforward. Most MHC class II tetramers are produced with a homogeneously built-in peptide, reducing greatly their flexibility of use. We attempted the generation of "empty" functional HLA-DR*1101 tetramers, receptive for loading with synthetic peptides by incubation. No such reagent is in fact available for this HLA-DR allele, one of the most frequent in the Caucasian population. Results We compared soluble MHC class II-immunoglobulin fusion proteins (HLA-DR*1101-Ig with soluble MHC class II protein fused with an optimised Bir site for enzymatic biotynilation (HLA-DR*1101-Bir, both produced in insect cells. The molecules were multimerised by binding fluorochrome-protein A or fluorochrome-streptavidin, respectively. We find that HLA-DR*1101-Bir molecules are superior to the HLA-DR*1101-Ig ones both in biochemical and functional terms. HLA-DR*1101-Bir molecules can be pulsed with at least three different promiscuous peptide epitopes, derived from Tetanus Toxoid, influenza HA and the tumour associated antigen MAGE-3 respectively, to stain specific CD4+ T cells. Both staining temperature and activation state of CD4+ T cells are critical for the binding of peptide-pulsed HLA-DR*1101-Bir to the cognate TCR. Conclusion It is therefore possible to generate a soluble recombinant HLA-DR*1101 backbone that is receptive for loading with different peptides to stain specific CD4+ T cells. As shown for other HLA-DR alleles, we confirm that not all the strategies to produce soluble HLA-DR*1101 multimers are equivalent.

  3. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the HLA-DP subregion and correlations to HLA-DP phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Morling, Niels; Ødum, Niels;

    1987-01-01

    The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the class II HLA-DP subregion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of humans has been unraveled by Southern blotting using DP alpha and DP beta probes in a study of 46 unrelated individuals with known HLA-DP types. Contrary to earlier...... preliminary findings with a limited number of enzymes, the RFLP appears to be quite extensive both with the DP beta (14 different DNA markers defined by individual fragments or clusters thereof) and the DP alpha (8 markers) probes, especially when enzymes recognizing only four base pairs were used. A few...

  4. Characterization of a Proteasome and TAP-independent Presentation of Intracellular Epitopes by HLA-B27 Molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Magnacca, A.

    2012-07-17

    Nascent HLA-class I molecules are stabilized by proteasome-derived peptides in the ER and the new complexes proceed to the cell surface through the post-ER vesicles. It has been shown, however, that less stable complexes can exchange peptides in the Trans Golgi Network (TGN). HLA-B27 are the most studied HLA-class I molecules due to their association with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). Chimeric proteins driven by TAT of HIV have been exploited by us to deliver viral epitopes, whose cross-presentation by the HLA-B27 molecules was proteasome and TAP-independent and not restricted to Antigen-Presenting Cells (APC). Here, using these chimeric proteins as epitope suppliers, we compared with each other and with the HLA-A2 molecules, the two HLA-B*2705 and B*2709 alleles differing at residue 116 (D116H) and differentially associated with AS. We found that the antigen presentation by the two HLA-B27 molecules was proteasome-, TAP-, and APC-independent whereas the presentation by the HLA-A2 molecules required proteasome, TAP and professional APC. Assuming that such difference could be due to the unpaired, highly reactive Cys-67 distinguishing the HLA-B27 molecules, C67S mutants in HLA-B*2705 and B*2709 and V67C mutant in HLA-A*0201 were also analyzed. The results showed that this mutation did not influence the HLA-A2-restricted antigen presentation while it drastically affected the HLA-B27-restricted presentation with, however, remarkable differences between B*2705 and B*2709. The data, together with the occurrence on the cell surface of unfolded molecules in the case of C67S-B*2705 mutant but not in that of C67S-B*2709 mutant, indicates that Cys-67 has a more critical role in stabilizing the B*2705 rather than the B*2709 complexes.

  5. Implication of HLA-DMA Alleles in Corsican IDDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cucchi-Mouillot

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-DM molecule catalyses the CLIP/antigen peptide exchange in the classical class II peptide-binding groove. As such, DM is an antigen presentation regulator and may be linked to autoimmune diseases. Using PCR derived methods, a relationship was revealed between DM gene polymorphism and IDDM, in a Corsican population. The DMA*0101 allele was observed to confer a significant predisposition to this autoimmune disease while the DMA*0102 allele protected significantly. Experiments examining polymorphism of the HLA-DRB1 gene established that these relationships are not a consequence of linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1 alleles implicated in this pathology. The study of the DMA gene could therefore be an additional tool for early IDDM diagnosis in the Corsican population.

  6. El complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad humano: sistema HLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando García

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available

    class="MsoNormal">El complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad humano, o sistema HLA, está localizado en el brazo corto del cromosoma 6. Sus genes codifican tres tipos de moléculas. Los antígenos clase I (HLA-A, B, C y E están formados por una cadena pesada unida no covalentemente a la β2-microglobulina y se expresan en la superficie de la mayoría de las células nucleadas del organismo. Estos antígenos actúan como elementos de restricción en la activación de los linfocitos T CD8+. Los antígenos clase II son dímeros compuestos por cadenas α y β y su distribución tisular está limitada sólo a algunos tipos de células. Estas moléculas actúan restringiendo la presentación de antígenos a los linfocitos CD4+. Los antígenos de clase III son proteínas plasmáticas del sistema del complemento. Los diferentes loci del sistema HLA son muy polimórficos y sus productos se heredan en bloques conocidos como haplotipos. Debido a que los diferentes grupos étnicos presentan variaciones en la frecuencia de ale ios y haplotipos, el HLA ha sido muy útil en los estudios antropogenéticos. Algunos antígenos HLA están presentes en pacientes con determinadas enfermedades con una frecuencia significativamente diferente a la encontrada en la población general. Estos hallazgos han sido de gran importancia para comprender la patogénesis y los mecanismos genéticos de resistencia o susceptibilidad a dichas enfermedades. En el campo de los transplantes de órganos, la compatibilidad HLA donante-receptor correlaciona con la sobrevida del injerto. El sistema HLA también parece tener mucha importancia en los fenómenos inmunológicos que ocurren durante el

  7. Identification of the murine H-2D(b) and human HLA-A*0201 MHC class I-restricted HPV6 E7-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shiwen; Mattox, Austin; Best, Simon R; Barbu, Anca M; Burns, James A; Akpeng, Belinda; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Benjamin; Ishida, Eiichi; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Pai, Sara I

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, most commonly types 6 (HPV-6) and 11 (HPV-11). Due to failed host immune responses, HPV is unable to be cleared from the host, resulting in recurrent growth of HPV-related lesions that can obstruct the lumen of the airway within the upper aerodigestive tract. In our murine model, the HPV-6b and HPV-11 E7 antigens are not innately immunogenic. In order to enhance the host immune responses against the HPV E7 antigen, we linked calreticulin (CRT) to HPV-6b E7 and found that vaccinating C57BL/6 mice with the HPV-6b CRT/E7 DNA vaccine is able to induce a CD8+ T cell response that recognizes an H-2D(b)-restricted E7aa21-29 epitope. Additionally, vaccination of HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice with HPV-6b CRT/E7 DNA generated a CD8+ T cell response against the E7aa82-90 epitope that was not observed in the wild-type C57BL/6 mice, indicating this T cell response is restricted to HLA-A*0201. In vivo cytotoxic T cell killing assays demonstrated that the vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells are able to efficiently kill target cells. Interestingly, the H-2D(b)-restricted E7aa21-29 sequence and the HLA-A*0201-restricted E7aa82-90 sequence are conserved between HPV-6b and HPV-11 and may represent shared immunogenic epitopes. The identification of the HPV-6b/HPV-11 CD8+ T cell epitopes facilitates the evaluation of various immunomodulatory strategies in preclinical models. More importantly, the identified HLA-A*0201-restricted T cell epitope may serve as a peptide vaccination strategy, as well as facilitate the monitoring of vaccine-induced HPV-specific immunologic responses in future human clinical trials.

  8. Correlation between HLA-G and tumor immunity and its advances%HLA-G与肿瘤免疫的相关进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈黎; 董延生; 李敏; 张雯珂; 姚元庆

    2016-01-01

    HLA-G belongs to non-classical HLA-class Ⅰ genes.It is expressed in the fetal-maternal interface on the extravillous cytotrophoblast and in such immune privilege tissues as the cornea and pancreas.However, under pathological conditions, such as tumor, inflammatory diseases and post transplantation, HLA-G is expressed abnormally.HLA-G can interact with its acceptors or immune cells and suppress the function of immune cells, which facilitates the escape of the surveillance of the human immune system and the consequent damage.In clinical studies,HLA-G is related to some clinical parameters.This review will focus on the expression, function and regulatory mechanisms of HLA-G in cancer immunology.%HLA-G是非经典人类白细胞抗原Ⅰ类基因的一种,在绒毛外细胞滋养层的母-胎界面,以及角膜、胰腺等免疫豁免组织中表达,病理状态如肿瘤、炎症、移植后等也出现不同程度的表达。肿瘤细胞表达HLA-G后通过作用于相应受体或免疫细胞,抑制免疫细胞的功能,从而躲避人体免疫系统的监视和杀伤,且HLA-G的表达情况与肿瘤临床参数具有相关性。该文对HLA-G在肿瘤免疫中的表达、功能、调节机制等的新进展进行综述。

  9. Association of HLA-G 3' untranslated region variants with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque, Rafael S; Mendes-Junior, Celso Teixeira; Lucena-Silva, Norma; da Silva, Camila Leal Lopes; Rassi, Diane Meire; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C; Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Foss, Milton César; Deghaide, Neifi Hassan Saloum; Moreau, Philippe; Gregori, Silvia; Castelli, Erick C; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio

    2016-04-01

    Besides the well recognized association of HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), linkage studies have identified a gene region close to the non-classical class I HLA-G gene as an independent susceptibility marker. HLA-G is constitutively expressed in the endocrine compartment of the human pancreas and may play a role in controlling autoimmune responses. We evaluated the genetic diversity of the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of HLA-G, which have been associated with HLA-G mRNA post-transcriptional regulation, in 120 Brazilian T1D patients and in 120 healthy controls. We found the +3001 T allele was observed only in T1D patients. Notably, the +3001 T allele was in linkage disequilibrium with polymorphic sites associated with low production of HLA-G mRNA or soluble HLA-G levels. Moreover, T1D patients showed a low frequency of the HLA-G 3'UTR-17 (14bpINS/+3001T/+3003T/+3010C/+3027C/+3035T/+3142G/+3187A/+3196C). The +3010 CC genotype and the UTR-3 haplotype (14bpDEL/+3001C/+3003T/+3010C/+3027C/+3035C/+3142G/+3187A/+3196C), associated with low and moderate soluble HLA-G expression, respectively, were underrepresented in patients. The decreased expression of HLA-G at the pancreas level should be detrimental in individuals genetically prone to produce less HLA-G.

  10. Propiedades moleculares e inmunológicas de HLA-B14 y su papel en la espondilitis anquilosante

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The association of HLA-B27 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is the strongest one between an HLA class I molecule and any disease. HLA-B*1403 was strongly associated to AS in the Togolese population, where both this disease and HLA-B27 are unfrequent. B*1402, which differs from B*1403 only at residue 156 (L156R), was found only in the healthy controls. Thus, the availability of two closely related HLAB14 molecules differentially associated with AS, allowed us for the first time ...

  11. A polymorphism in the HLA-DPB1 gene is associated with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Field

    Full Text Available We conducted an association study across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA complex to identify loci associated with multiple sclerosis (MS. Comparing 1927 SNPs in 1618 MS cases and 3413 controls of European ancestry, we identified seven SNPs that were independently associated with MS conditional on the others (each P ≤ 4 x 10(-6. All associations were significant in an independent replication cohort of 2212 cases and 2251 controls (P ≤ 0.001 and were highly significant in the combined dataset (P ≤ 6 x 10(-8. The associated SNPs included proxies for HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DRB1*03:01, and SNPs in moderate linkage disequilibrium (LD with HLA-A*02:01, HLA-DRB1*04:01 and HLA-DRB1*13:03. We also found a strong association with rs9277535 in the class II gene HLA-DPB1 (discovery set P = 9 x 10(-9, replication set P = 7 x 10(-4, combined P = 2 x 10(-10. HLA-DPB1 is located centromeric of the more commonly typed class II genes HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1. It is separated from these genes by a recombination hotspot, and the association is not affected by conditioning on genotypes at DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1. Hence rs9277535 represents an independent MS-susceptibility locus of genome-wide significance. It is correlated with the HLA-DPB1*03:01 allele, which has been implicated previously in MS in smaller studies. Further genotyping in large datasets is required to confirm and resolve this association.

  12. High-density mapping of the MHC identifies a shared role for HLA-DRB1*01:03 in inflammatory bowel diseases and heterozygous advantage in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goyette, Philippe; Boucher, Gabrielle; Mallon, Dermot;

    2015-01-01

    high-density SNP typing of the MHC in >32,000 individuals with IBD, implicating multiple HLA alleles, with a primary role for HLA-DRB1*01:03 in both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Noteworthy differences were observed between these diseases, including a predominant role for class II HLA...

  13. Pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies negatively impact survival of pediatric aplastic anemia patients undergoing HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hua; He, Jun; Cai, Junchao; Yuan, Xiaoni; Jiang, Hua; Luo, Changying; Wang, Jianmin; Luo, Chengjuan; Pan, Zhijuan; Terasaki, Paul I; Ding, Lixia; Chen, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Graft failure and survival are the major problems for patients with aplastic anemia undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Previous studies showed that anti-HLA antibodies negatively impact engraftment in HSCT. This retrospective study of 51 pediatric patients with acquired aplastic anemia who underwent allogeneic HSCT at a single institution between 2006 and 2012 investigated the influence of anti-HLA antibodies on the outcome of HSCT. Serum samples collected before HSCT were tested for the presence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies were detected in 54.9% (28/51) of patients, among whom 39.2% (20/51) had anti-HLA class I antibodies. Anti-HLA antibodies were associated with worse five-yr survival (78.6% vs. 100%, p = 0.021) and higher treatment-related mortality (21.4% vs. 0%, p = 0.028) compared with antibody-negative patients. Anti-HLA class I antibody-positive patients had poorer five-yr survival (75.0%) than anti-HLA class I&II antibody-positive and antibody-negative patients (87.5% and 100.0%, respectively, p = 0.039). Presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies (p = 0.024) and older age (10 yr or more; p = 0.027) significantly increased the risk of post-HSCT mortality. Pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies negatively affect the outcome of HSCT in pediatric patients with aplastic anemia. Routine testing for anti-HLA antibodies concurrent with efficient treatment should be conducted prior to HSCT.

  14. The influence of HLA on HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment in Anhui, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel D Schrier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HLA-DR*04 was identified as a predictor of HIV-Associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND, low CD4 T-cell responses to HIV, and low plasma HIV RNA levels in a U.S. cohort. We hypothesized that low CD4 T-cell activation leads to poor immune control of HIV in the CNS, predisposing to HAND, but also provided fewer target (activated CD4 T-cells for HIV replication. To assess the consistency of these HLA Class II associations in a new cohort and extend analysis to HLA Class I, HLA types, neurocognitive, and virologic status were examined in a cohort of former plasma donors in China. METHODS: 178 HIV infected individuals in Anhui China, were HLA typed and underwent neurocognitive evaluations (using locally standardized norms, neuromedical, treatment and virologic assessments at baseline and at 12 months. RESULTS: HLA DR*04 was associated with a higher rate of baseline neurocognitive impairment (p = 0.04, neurocognitive decline (p = 0.04, and lower levels of HIV RNA in plasma (p = 0.05. HLA Class I alleles (B*27,57,58,A*03,33 that specify a CD8 T-cell response to conserved HIV sequences were neuroprotective, associated with less impairment at baseline (p = 0.037, at month 012 (p = 0.013 and less neurocognitive decline (p = 0.023 in the interval. Consistent with the theory that effective CD8 T-cell responses require CD4 T-cell support, the HLA DR*04 allele reduced the neuroprotective effect of the Class I alleles. The presence of HLA-DR*04 and the Alzheimer associated allele ApoE4 in the same individual had a synergistic negative effect on cognition (p = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: Despite major background differences between U.S. and Anhui China cohorts, HLA DR*04 predicted neurocognitive impairment and lower plasma HIV RNA levels in both populations. HLA Class I alleles associated with CD8 T-cell control of HIV were associated with protection from HAND, but protection was reduced in the presence of HLA-DR*04.

  15. HLA analysis in patients with degenerative diseases of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learreta, Jorge A; Bono, Andrea E; Durst, Andreas C

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of HLA alleles, specifically HLA-DR alleles, and to correlate them with clinical and radiological features of patients with degenerative processes (DP) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The final goal was to determine which allele can be used to identify patients having more aggressive forms of the articular pathologies. Thirty-two (32) Caucasian patients with DP of the TMJ were included in the study. The SSOP (Luminex Corp., Austin, TX) method was used to determine class II HLA alleles. The presence of HLA-II DR in patients with DP of the TMJ was 98%. The presence of HLA was significantly higher in patients with DP of the TMJ than in healthy subjects (66%) (p=0.003). HLA DR52 was significantly more frequent in patients than in healthy individuals (40.62% vs. 13.79%, p = 0.041). While the percentage of DR11 positive individuals was also higher among patients than among healthy control subjects, the association with DP of the TMJ was not significant (p=0.220). Patients having the DR52 allele had higher deformation or DP. It was concluded that HLA-DR54 and DR11 alleles are associated with a higher susceptibility to DP of the TMJ, and HLA-DR54 and DR52 are associated with a higher severity of DP.

  16. Stimulation of HIV-specific T cell clonotypes using allogeneic HLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Coral-Ann; van Miert, Paula; O'Driscoll, Kane; Zoet, Yvonne M; Chopra, Abha; Watson, Mark; de Santis, Dianne; Witt, Campbell; John, Mina; Claas, Frans H J; D'Orsogna, Lloyd J

    2017-03-28

    We hypothesized that HIV-specific CD8 T cell clonotypes can be stimulated by allogeneic HLA molecules. Multiple HIV-specific CD8 T cell clones were derived from 12 individuals with chronic HIV infection, specific for 13 different HIV Gag antigens and restricted to 7 different HLA molecules. The generated T cell clones were assayed for alloreactivity against a panel of single HLA class I expressing cell lines (SALs). HIV-specific T cells recognising at least one allogeneic HLA molecule could be identified from 7 of 12 patients tested. Allorecognition was associated with IFNγ cytokine production, CD137 upregulation and cytotoxicity, suggesting high avidity allo-stimulation. Allo-HLA recognition by HIV-specific T cells was specific to the HIV target peptide/HLA restriction and TCR TRBV usage of the T cells. HIV-specific T cells do crossreact against allogeneic HLA molecules in an epitope and TRBV specific manner. Therefore allo-HLA stimulation could be exploited to induce or augment HIV-specific T cell responses.

  17. The impact of HLA-G 3' UTR variants and sHLA-G on risk and clinical correlates of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Ashwini; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Kalmady, Sunil V; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Subbana, Manjula; Venugopal, Deepthi; Amaresha, Anekal C; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Berk, Michael; Debnath, Monojit

    2016-12-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC)/Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) is known to influence the pathogenesis of several complex human diseases resulting from gene-environmental interactions. Recently, it has emerged as one of the risk determinants of schizophrenia. The HLA-G protein (a non-classical MHC class I molecule), encoded by the HLA-G gene, is shown to play important role in embryonic development. Importantly, its genetic variations and aberrant expression have been implicated in pregnancy complications like preeclampsia, inflammation, and autoimmunity. Converging evidence implicates these phenomena as risk mechanisms of schizophrenia. However, the functional implications of HLA-G in schizophrenia are yet to be empirically examined. The impact of two functional polymorphisms [14bp Insertion/Deletion (INDEL) and +3187 A>G] and soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels on schizophrenia risk was evaluated. In this exploratory study, the Ins/Ins genotype of 14bp INDEL was found to confer a strong risk for schizophrenia. Further, low levels of sHLA-G were shown to have a significant impact on Clinical Global Impression (CGI) severity in people with schizophrenia.

  18. Modulation of HLA Expression in Human Cytomegalovirus Immune Evasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aifen Lin; Huihui Xu; Weihua Yan

    2007-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) has evolved multiple mechanisms to escape the host immune recognition and innate or adaptive immune responses. Among them, hCMV has developed strategies to modulate the expression and/or function of human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), including by encoding series of infection stage-dependent hCMV proteins to detain and destroy the expression of HLA molecules on the surface of infected cells. This disturbs the antigen presentation and processing, by encoding MHC class Ⅰ homologues or selective up-regulation of particular HLA class Ⅰ molecules binding to NK cell inhibitory receptors, and by encoding specific ligand antagonists to interfere with NK cell activating receptors. Here we discussed the molecular mechanisms utilized by the hCMV to alter the formation, transportation and expression of HLA antigens on the infected cell surface. The knowledge about hCMV modulating HLA expression could benefit us to further understand the pathogenesis of viral diseases and may eventually develop novel effective immunotherapies to counteract viral infections and viral associated diseases.

  19. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christian M.; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Glazer, Andrew M.; Steiner, Heidi E.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Roden, Dan M.

    2017-01-01

    Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations. PMID:28207879

  20. Identification of HLA-DRPheβ47 as the susceptibility marker of hypersensitivity to beryllium in individuals lacking the berylliosis-associated supratypic marker HLA-DPGluβ69

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogliani Paola

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Susceptibility to beryllium (Be-hypersensitivity (BH has been associated with HLA-DP alleles carrying a glutamate at position 69 of the HLA-DP β-chain (HLA-DPGlu69 and with several HLA-DP, -DQ and -DR alleles and polymorphisms. However, no genetic associations have been found between BH affected subjects not carrying the HLA-DPGlu69 susceptibility marker. Methods In this report, we re-evaluated an already described patient populations after 7 years of follow-up including new 29 identified BH subjects. An overall population 36 berylliosis patients and 38 Be-sensitization without lung granulomas and 86 Be-exposed controls was analysed to assess the role of the individual HLA-class II polymorphisms associated with BH-susceptibility in HLA-DPGlu69 negative subjects by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results As previously observed in this population the HLA-DPGlu69 markers was present in higher frequency in berylliosis patients (31 out of 36, 86% than in Be-sensitized (21 out of 38, 55%, p = 0.008 vs berylliosis and 41 out of 86 (48%, p However, 22 subjects presenting BH did not carry the HLA-DPGlu69 marker. We thus evaluated the contribution of all the HLA-DR, -DP and -DQ polymorphisms in determining BH susceptibility in this subgroup of HLA-Glu69 subjects. In HLA-DPGlu69-negatives a significant association with BH was found for the HLA-DQLeu26, for the HLA-DRB1 locus residues Ser13, Tyr26, His32, Asn37, Phe47 and Arg74 and for the HLA-DRB3 locus clusterized residues Arg11, Tyr26, Asp28, Leu38, Ser60 and Arg74. HLA-DRPhe47 (OR 2.956, p Conclusion We conclude that HLA-DPGlu69 is the primary marker of Be-hypersensitivity and HLA-DRPhe47 is associated with BH in Glu69-negative subjects, likely playing a role in Be-presentation and sensitization.

  1. Genome-wide association study of HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative essential hypersomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Khor, Seik-Soon; Miyagawa, Taku; TOYODA, HIROMI; Yamasaki, Maria; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Tanii, Hisashi; Okazaki, Yuji; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Lin, Ling; Faraco, Juliette; Rico, Tom; Honda, Yutaka; Honda, Makoto; Mignot, Emmanuel; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2013-01-01

    Essential hypersomnia (EHS), a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, can be divided into two broad classes based on the presence or absence of the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele. HLA-DQB1*06:02-positive EHS and narcolepsy with cataplexy are associated with the same susceptibility genes. In contrast, there are fewer studies of HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative EHS which, we hypothesized, involves a different pathophysiological pathway than does narcolepsy with cataplexy. In order to ident...

  2. Associação entre HLA e leucemia em uma população brasileira de etnia mista Association between HLA and leukemia in a mixed Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Aparecida Barion

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a freqüência de antígenos HLA Classe I e de alelos HLA Classe II em 164 pacientes com vários tipos de leucemias: 35 pacientes com LLA (leucemia linfóide aguda, 50 com LMA (leucemia mielóide aguda e 78 com LMC (leucemia mielóide crônica. MÉTODOS: A tipagem HLA Classe I foi realizada por microlinfocitotoxicidade e a de Classe II por PCR-SSP (polymerase chain reaction - sequence specific of primers, ambas da One Lambda (Canoga Park, CA, US. RESULTADOS: Em pacientes com LLA, as freqüências das variantes HLA-B45 e HLA-B56 foram maiores (P = 0,02; OR = 3,13; 95%IC = 0,94-10,44; P = 0,03; OR = 3,61; 95%IC = 0,47-27,64, respectivamente, quando comparadas com controles. Nos pacientes com LMA, a freqüência de HLA-B7 (P = 0,01; OR = 2,41; 95%IC = 1,25-4,67 foi maior que em controles. A presença de HLA-B45 (P= 0,01; OR = 3,29; 95%IC = 1,46-7,40 e de HLA-DRB1*04 (P = 0,002; OR = 2,17; 95%IC = 1,36-3,46 e HLA-DRB1*08 (P = 0,004; OR = 2,36; 95%IC = 1,34-4,16 foi associada ao maior risco de desenvolver LMC. CONCLUSÃO: Nossos resultados sugerem que variantes HLA conferem susceptibilidade a algumas formas de leucemia e podem prover novas ferramentas para a investigação da genética e etiologia desta doença.OBJECTIVE: The main purpose of this study was to investigate the class I HLA antigens and class II HLA allele frequencies in 164 patients with leukemia: 35 patients with ALL (acute lymphoid leukemia, 50 with AML (acute myeloid leukemia and 78 with CML (chronic myeloid leukemia. METHODS: The genotyping of class I HLA was performed by microlymphocytotoxicity and of class II by PCR-SSP (polymerase chain reaction - sequence specific of primers (One Lambda, Canoga Park, CA, USA. RESULTS: In patients with LLA, frequencies of HLA-B45 and HLA-B56 were higher (P = 0.02; OR = 3.13; 95%IC = 0.94-10.44; P = 0.03; OR = 3.61; 95%IC = 0.47-27.64, respectively, than in controls. In patients with AML, the

  3. Associations of HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C Alleles Frequency with Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections and Diseases Across Global Populations: Implication for the Development of an Universal CD8+ T-Cell Epitope-Based Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samandary, Sarah; Kridane-Miledi, Hédia; Sandoval, Jacqueline S.; Choudhury, Zareen; Langa-Vives, Francina; Spencer, Doran; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; Lemonnier, François A.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of the world’s population is infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 and/or type 2 (HSV-1 and/or HSV-2), that cause a wide range of diseases including genital herpes, oro-facial herpes, and the potentially blinding ocular herpes. While the global prevalence and distribution of HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections cannot be exactly established, the general trends indicate that: (i) HSV-1 infections are much more prevalent globally than HSV-2; (ii) Over half billion people worldwide are infected with HSV-2; (iii) the sub-Saharan African populations account for a disproportionate burden of genital herpes infections and diseases; (iv) the dramatic differences in the prevalence of herpes infections between regions of the world appear to be associated with differences in the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. The present report: (i) analyzes the prevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections across various regions of the world; (ii) analyzes potential associations of common HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C alleles with the prevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in the Caucasoid, Oriental, Hispanic and Black major populations; and (iii) discusses how our recently developed HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C transgenic/H-2 class I null mice will help validate HLA/herpes prevalence associations. Overall, high prevalence of herpes infection and disease appears to be associated with high frequency of HLA-A*24, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*53 and HLA-B*58 alleles. In contrast, low prevalence of herpes infection and disease appears to be associated with high frequency of HLA-B*44 allele. The finding will aid in developing a T-cell epitope-based universal herpes vaccine and immunotherapy. PMID:24798939

  4. Analyse des HLA de classe II dans la polyarthrite rhumatoïde (PR): rôles dans la susceptibilité et la sévérité de la maladie

    OpenAIRE

    Stingelin, Sibylle; Guerne, Pierre-André

    2005-01-01

    Le diagnostic de polyarthrite rhumatoïde débutante, mais surtout la prédiction de son évolution, restent un défi pour le clinicien. Les patients qui vont développer une forme sévère de la maladie devraient bénéficier d'une prise en charge agressive et la difficulté consiste à les dépister précocement. Il manque en effet de bons facteurs pronostiques. Nous avons analysé la distribution de l'épitope et du DERAA chez des patients PR et des témoins ainsi que le polymorphisme de HLA-DQ *0301 et *0...

  5. Analyse des HLA de classe II dans la polyarthrite rhumatoïde (PR) : rôles dans la susceptibilité et la sévérité de la maladie

    OpenAIRE

    Stingelin, Sibylle

    2003-01-01

    Le diagnostic de polyarthrite rhumatoïde débutante, mais surtout la prédiction de son évolution, restent un défi pour le clinicien. Les patients qui vont développer une forme sévère de la maladie devraient bénéficier d'une prise en charge agressive et la difficulté consiste à les dépister précocement. Il manque en effet de bons facteurs pronostiques. Nous avons analysé la distribution de l'épitope et du DERAA chez des patients PR et des témoins ainsi que le polymorphisme de HLA-DQ *0301 et *0...

  6. The Ying and Yang of HLA and KIR in Human Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Smita; Martin, Maureen P.; Carrington, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and subsets of T cells. The KIR genes are polymorphic and the KIR gene complex is polygenic with varying numbers of inhibitory and activating receptors. HLA class I molecules serve as ligands for the KIR. Interactions of the independently segregating KIR and HLA loci are important for recognition of targets by NK cells as well as NK cell ‘licensing’. Several disease association studies indicate a role f...

  7. Extended LTA, TNF, LST1 and HLA gene haplotypes and their association with rubella vaccine-induced immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna G Ovsyannikova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have suggested the importance of HLA genes in determining immune responses following rubella vaccine. The telomeric class III region of the HLA complex harbors several genes, including lymphotoxin alpha (LTA, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and leukocyte specific transcript -1 (LST1 genes, located between the class I B and class II DRB1 loci. Apart from HLA, little is known about the effect of this extended genetic region on HLA haplotypic backgrounds as applied to immune responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the association between immune responses and extended class I-class II-class III haplotypes among 714 healthy children after two doses of rubella vaccination. These extended haplotypes were then compared to the HLA-only haplotypes. The most significant association was observed between haplotypes extending across the HLA class I region, ten-SNP haplotypes, and the HLA class II region (i.e. A-C-B-LTA-TNF-LST1-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1-DPA1-DPB1 and rubella-specific antibodies (global p-value of 0.03. Associations were found between both extended A*02-C*03-B*15-AAAACGGGGC-DRB1*04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03-DPA1*01-DPB1*04 (p = 0.002 and HLA-only A*02-C*03-B*15-DRB1*04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03-DPA1*01-DPB1*04 haplotypes (p = 0.009 and higher levels of rubella antibodies. The class II HLA-only haplotype DRB1*13-DQA1*01-DQB1*06-DPA1*01-DPB1*04 (p = 0.04 lacking LTA-TNF-LST1 SNPs was associated with lower rubella antibody responses. Similarly, the class I-class II HLA-only A*01-C*07-B*08-DRB1*03-DQA1*05-DQB1*02-DPA1*01-DPB1*04 haplotype was associated with increased TNF-alpha secretion levels (p = 0.009. In contrast, the extended AAAACGGGGC-DRB1*01-DQA1*01-DQB1*05-DPA1*01-DPB1*04 (p = 0.01 haplotype was found to trend with decreased rubella-specific IL-6 secretion levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest the importance of examining both HLA genes and genes in the class III region as part of the extended haplotypes useful in

  8. High-Accuracy HLA Type Inference from Whole-Genome Sequencing Data Using Population Reference Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilthey, Alexander T; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Mentzer, Alexander J; Cereb, Nezih; Iqbal, Zamin; McVean, Gil

    2016-10-01

    Genetic variation at the Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) genes is associated with many autoimmune and infectious disease phenotypes, is an important element of the immunological distinction between self and non-self, and shapes immune epitope repertoires. Determining the allelic state of the HLA genes (HLA typing) as a by-product of standard whole-genome sequencing data would therefore be highly desirable and enable the immunogenetic characterization of samples in currently ongoing population sequencing projects. Extensive hyperpolymorphism and sequence similarity between the HLA genes, however, pose problems for accurate read mapping and make HLA type inference from whole-genome sequencing data a challenging problem. We describe how to address these challenges in a Population Reference Graph (PRG) framework. First, we construct a PRG for 46 (mostly HLA) genes and pseudogenes, their genomic context and their characterized sequence variants, integrating a database of over 10,000 known allele sequences. Second, we present a sequence-to-PRG paired-end read mapping algorithm that enables accurate read mapping for the HLA genes. Third, we infer the most likely pair of underlying alleles at G group resolution from the IMGT/HLA database at each locus, employing a simple likelihood framework. We show that HLA*PRG, our algorithm, outperforms existing methods by a wide margin. We evaluate HLA*PRG on six classical class I and class II HLA genes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DQA1, -DQB1, -DRB1) and on a set of 14 samples (3 samples with 2 x 100bp, 11 samples with 2 x 250bp Illumina HiSeq data). Of 158 alleles tested, we correctly infer 157 alleles (99.4%). We also identify and re-type two erroneous alleles in the original validation data. We conclude that HLA*PRG for the first time achieves accuracies comparable to gold-standard reference methods from standard whole-genome sequencing data, though high computational demands (currently ~30-250 CPU hours per sample) remain a significant

  9. HLA-DRB GENES POLYMORPHISM IN CHINESE NORTHERN PATIENTS WITH ATOPIC ASTHMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高金明; 林耀广; 邱长春; 马毅

    1998-01-01

    Objective. Atopie asthma provides a usetul model for evaluating the genetic tactors that control human immune responsiveness. HLA class Ⅱ gene products are involved in the control of immune response. As HLA-DRB gene is the most polymorphic HLA class Ⅱ gene, we investigated whether susceptibility or resistance to the disease is associated with HLA-DRB. Methods. Blood samples were obtained from two groups of unrelated Chinese northern adults: (1) 50 atopic asthma (7 of them with familial aggregation) ; (2) 80 healthy controls without asthma or atopy and other HLA-associated diseases. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral venous blood leucocytes. The polymorphie second exon of HLA-DRB gene was amplified by sequence-specific primer polymerase chain reaction (SSP/PCR) methods. All patients had their serum IgE(total and spscifie) antibody levels by RAST, bronchial reactivity assessed by methaeholine brocho-provocation test and/or hronchodilation test. Results.There was an increased gene frequency of DR52 and DR52 in asthmatic subjects compared with healthy subjects(17% vs 4.3%, P<0. 01% 50% vs 17.5%, P<0. 01), and the decreased frequency of DR2(15) and DR52 in asthmatic patients(7% vs 18%, P<0. 05; 2% vs 33%, P<0. 01). We found the positive association between DR5(13)-DR52 and sIgE antibody responsiveness to d1 (from house dust mite allergen ); negative association between HLA-DRB alleles and TIgE or BHR ( bronchial hyperresponsiveness). Conclusion. The results suggested that HLA haplotype DR6(13)-DR52 was significantly implicated in suseeptibility to house dust mite induced-asthma, at least it would he more closely assocaated with atopic asthms. Conversely, alleles DR2(15) and DR51 might corder protection against the disease. HLA-DRB genes were particularly involved in regulating human atopie immune response in asthma.

  10. Definition of supertypes for HLA molecules using clustering of specificity matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Kesmir, Can;

    2004-01-01

    a novel method for clustering sequence motifs. We construct hidden Markov models for HLA class I molecules using a Gibbs sampling procedure and use the similarities among these to define clusters of specificities. These clusters are extensions of the previously suggested ones. We suggest splitting some...... report that the previously observed specificities of these class II molecules can be clustered into nine classes, which only partly correspond to the serological classification. We show that classification of HLA molecules may be done in a uniform and automated way. The definition of clusters allows......Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins are encoded by extremely polymorphic genes and play a crucial role in immunity. However, not all genetically different MHC molecules are functionally different. Sette and Sidney (1999) have defined nine HLA class I supertypes and showed that with only...

  11. Establishment of HLA-DR4 transgenic mice for the identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes of tumor-associated antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Yatsuda

    Full Text Available Reports have shown that activation of tumor-specific CD4(+ helper T (Th cells is crucial for effective anti-tumor immunity and identification of Th-cell epitopes is critical for peptide vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy. Although computer algorithms are available to predict peptides with high binding affinity to a specific HLA class II molecule, the ability of those peptides to induce Th-cell responses must be evaluated. We have established HLA-DR4 (HLA-DRA*01:01/HLA-DRB1*04:05 transgenic mice (Tgm, since this HLA-DR allele is most frequent (13.6% in Japanese population, to evaluate HLA-DR4-restricted Th-cell responses to tumor-associated antigen (TAA-derived peptides predicted to bind to HLA-DR4. To avoid weak binding between mouse CD4 and HLA-DR4, Tgm were designed to express chimeric HLA-DR4/I-E(d, where I-E(d α1 and β1 domains were replaced with those from HLA-DR4. Th cells isolated from Tgm immunized with adjuvant and HLA-DR4-binding cytomegalovirus-derived peptide proliferated when stimulated with peptide-pulsed HLA-DR4-transduced mouse L cells, indicating chimeric HLA-DR4/I-E(d has equivalent antigen presenting capacity to HLA-DR4. Immunization with CDCA155-78 peptide, a computer algorithm-predicted HLA-DR4-binding peptide derived from TAA CDCA1, successfully induced Th-cell responses in Tgm, while immunization of HLA-DR4-binding Wilms' tumor 1 antigen-derived peptide with identical amino acid sequence to mouse ortholog failed. This was overcome by using peptide-pulsed syngeneic bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DC followed by immunization with peptide/CFA booster. BM-DC-based immunization of KIF20A494-517 peptide from another TAA KIF20A, with an almost identical HLA-binding core amino acid sequence to mouse ortholog, successfully induced Th-cell responses in Tgm. Notably, both CDCA155-78 and KIF20A494-517 peptides induced human Th-cell responses in PBMCs from HLA-DR4-positive donors. Finally, an HLA-DR4 binding DEPDC1191

  12. Anti-HLA antibody profile of Turkish patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, G E; Seyhun, Y; Oguz, F; Kekik, C; Onal, E; Caliskan, Y; Bakkaloglu, H; Yazici, H; Turkmen, A; Aydin, A E; Sever, M S; Eldegez, U; Carin, M N

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) via blood transfusions, pregnancies, and previous transplantations can result in anti-HLA antibody production. The presence of anti-HLA antibodies in recipient sera before transplantation is an important risk factor. To demonstrate the anti-HLA antibody status of Turkish end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, 674 patients (mean age, 40.35 +/- 13.15 years; female/male, 328/346) were enrolled into the study. Anti-HLA antibody screening and identification tests were performed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The panel-reactive antibody (PRA)-negative group consisted of 564 (83.6%) and the PRA-positive group consisted of 110 (17.3%) patients. Of the 110 (17.3%) PRA-positive patients, 43 (6.4%) were class I (+) and class II (-); 19 (2.8%) were class I (-) and class II (+); 48 (7.1%) were both class I and II (+). The most frequent antibodies were directed against the A2 crossreactive group (CREG) and the A10 CREG with less frequent reactions against the B7 CREG, indicating antibodies to both frequent (members of A2 CREG) and relatively rare (members of A10 CREG and B7 CREG antigens). These data also suggested that some antibodies occur at greater than expected frequency because of shared epitopes. Our findings confirmed the significant correlation between female gender, pregnancy, failed graft history, long dialysis duration, and blood transfusions with PRA positivity (P < .05).

  13. Research about the disassociated cases between HLA-DRB1、HLA-DRB3、 HLA-DRB4、HLA-DRB5 locus and HLA-DQ locus%HLA-DRB1、HLA-DRB3、HLA-DRB4、HLA-DRB5与HLA-DQ位点不关联病例的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹丹; 孙敬芬; 朱海燕; 韩晓苹; 金荔; 刘楠; 奚永志; 高春纪; 于力

    2008-01-01

    目的:完善目前已知的HLA-DR与HLA-DQ关联表.方法:从2000~2006年间到我们实验室配型的供患者中选出与关联表不相符的16例标本并对这些标本进行高分辨鉴定.结果:发现在中国汉族人中的五条HLA-DR与HLA-DQ位点连锁遗传的单倍体.结论:为目前所用的HLA-DR与HLA-DQ位点关联表在中国人群中增加五个新的单倍体,使关联表更适合于中国人群.

  14. Template Driven Code Generator for HLA Middleware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.E.J.; Prins, L.M.; Huiskamp, W.

    2007-01-01

    HLA is the accepted standard for simulation interoperability. However, the HLA services and the API that is provided for these services are relatively complex from the user point of view. Since the early days of HLA, federate developers have attempted to simplify their task by using middleware that

  15. Effect of HLA on hepatitis C virus clearance and persistence in anti-HCV-positive end-stage renal disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Ocal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The efficacy of immune response against hepatitis C virus (HCV is determined by human leukocyte antigen (HLA molecules of the host which present HCV antigens to CD4 + and CD8 + T lymphocytes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible relationship between the frequencies of certain HLA class I-II alleles and the natural history of HCV in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Settings and Design: This is a retrospective cohort study conducted in a university hospital. Patients and Methods: The present study comprised 189 ESRD patients (candidates for renal transplantation who had positive anti-HCV antibody test. The results concerning HCV and HLA status were gathered from patients′ files. The viral persistence was compared between the groups that were determined by HLA sub-typing. Statistical Analysis: Statistical evaluation was performed using Mann-Whitney U-test, Chi-square test, and Fisher′s exact test. Level of error was set at 0.05 for all statistical evaluations, and P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: We found possible association between the course of HCV infection and specific HLA alleles. HLA class I CwFNx016 and HLA class II DRBFNx0110 alleles were observed more frequently in the viral clearance group (P < 0.05. The HLA class I BFNx0138 allele group was more prone to develop chronic hepatitis C (P < 0.01. Conclusions: These findings suggest that HLA class I CwFNx016 and HLA class II DRBFNx0110 alleles may be associated with immunological elimination of HCV in Turkish patients on hemodialysis. HLA sub-typing could help predict the prognosis of HCV infection.

  16. A cis-eQTL of HLA-DRB1 and a frameshift mutation of MICA contribute to the pattern of association of HLA alleles with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2014-04-01

    The association of classic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles with risk of cervical cancer has been extensively studied, and a protective effect has consistently been found for DRB1*1301, DQA1*0103, and/or DQB1*0603 (these three alleles are in perfect linkage disequilibrium [LD] and often occur on the same haplotype in Europeans), while reports have differed widely with respect to the effect of HLA-B*07, DRB1*1501, and/or DQB1*0602 (the last two alleles are also in perfect LD in Europeans). It is not clear whether the reported HLA alleles are responsible for the differences in cervical cancer susceptibility, or if functional variants at other locations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region may explain the effect. In order to assess the relative contribution of both classic HLA alleles and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC region to cervical cancer susceptibility, we have imputed classic HLA alleles in 1034 cervical cancer patients and 3948 controls in a Swedish population for an integrated analysis. We found that the protective haplotype DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 has a direct effect on cervical cancer and always occurs together with the C allele of a HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143), which increases the expression of HLA-DRB1. The haplotype rs9272143C-DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 conferred the strongest protection against cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.32-0.52, P = 6.2 × 10(-13)). On the other hand, the associations with HLA-B*0702 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 are attributable to the joint effects of both the HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143) and a frameshift mutation (G inserion of rs67841474, also known as A5.1) of the MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA). Variation in LD between the classic HLA loci, rs9272143 and rs67841474 between populations may explain the different associations of HLA-B*07 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 with cervical cancer between studies. The

  17. Discrete mathematics and physics on the Planck-scale exemplified by means of a class of "cellular network models" and their dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Requardt, M

    1996-01-01

    Starting from the hypothesis that both physics, in particular space-time and the physical vacuum, and the corresponding mathematics are discrete on the Planck scale we develop a certain framework in form of a class of '{\\it cellular networks}' consisting of cells (nodes) interacting with each other via bonds according to a certain {\\it 'local law'} which governs their evolution. Both the internal states of the cells and the strength/orientation of the bonds are assumed to be dynamical variables. We introduce a couple of candidates of such local laws which, we think, are capable of catalyzing the unfolding of the network towards increasing complexity and pattern formation. In section 3 the basis is laid for a version of '{\\it discrete analysis}' and {\\it 'discrete topology/geometry'} which, starting from different, perhaps more physically oriented principles, manages to make contact with the much more abstract machinery of Connes et al. and may complement the latter approach. In section 4 a, as far as we can s...

  18. MHC class I and class II phenotype, gene, and haplotype frequencies in Greeks using molecular typing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassavas, E C; Spyropoulou-Vlachou, M; Papassavas, A C; Schipper, R F; Doxiadis, I N; Stavropoulos-Giokas, C

    2000-06-01

    In the present study, DNA typing for HLA-A, C, B, DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 was performed for 246 healthy, unrelated Greek volunteers of 20-59 years of age. Phenotype, genotype frequencies, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium fit, and 3-locus haplotype frequencies for HLA-A, C, B, HLA-A, B, DRB1, HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and HLA-DRB1, DQB1, DPB1 were calculated. Furthermore, linkage disequilibrium, deltas, relative deltas and p-values for significance of the deltas were defined. The population studied is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and many MHC haplotypes are in linkage disequilibrium. The most frequent specificities were HLA-A*02 (phenotype frequency = 44.3%) followed by HLA-A*24 (27.2%), HLA-B*51 (28.5%), HLA-B*18 (26.8%) and HLA-B*35 (26.4%) and HLA-Cw*04 (30.1%) and HLA-Cw*12 (26.8%). The most frequent MHC class II alleles were HLA-DRB1*1104 (34.1%), HLA-DQB1*0301 (54.5%) and HLA-DPB1*0401 with a phenotype frequency of 59.8%. The most prominent HLA-A, C, B haplotypes were HLA-A*24, Cw*04, B*35, and HLA-A*02, Cw*04, B*35, each of them observed in 21/246 individuals. The most frequent HLA-A, B, DRB1 haplotype was HLA-A*02, B*18, DRB1*1104 seen in 20/246 individuals, while the haplotype HLA-DRB1*1104, DQB1*0301, DPB1*0401 was found in 49/246 individuals. Finally, the haplotype DRB1*1104, DQA1*0501, DQB1*0301 was observed in 83/246 individuals. These results can be used for the estimation of the probability of finding a suitable haplotypically identical related or unrelated stem cell donor for patients of Greek ancestry. In addition, they can be used for HLA and disease association studies, genetic distance studies in the Balkan and Mediterranean area, paternity cases, and matching probability calculations for the optimal allocation of kidneys in Greece.

  19. CTL epitopes for influenza A including the H5N1 bird flu; genome-, pathogen-, and HLA-wide screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjun; Lamberth, Kasper; Harndahl, Mikkel; Røder, Gustav; Stryhn, Anette; Larsen, Mette V; Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Tang, Sheila T; Dziegiel, Morten H; Rosenkvist, Jørgen; Pedersen, Anders E; Buus, Søren; Claesson, Mogens H; Lund, Ole

    2007-04-12

    The purpose of the present study is to perform a global screening for new immunogenic HLA class I (HLA-I) restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes of potential utility as candidates of influenza A-virus diagnostics and vaccines. We used predictions of antigen processing and presentation, the latter encompassing 12 different HLA class I supertypes with >99% population coverage, and searched for conserved epitopes from available influenza A viral protein sequences. Peptides corresponding to 167 predicted peptide-HLA-I interactions were synthesized, tested for peptide-HLA-I interactions in a biochemical assay and for influenza-specific, HLA-I-restricted CTL responses in an IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. Eighty-nine peptides could be confirmed as HLA-I binders, and 13 could be confirmed as CTL targets. The 13 epitopes, are highly conserved among human influenza A pathogens, and all of these epitopes are present in the emerging bird flu isolates. Our study demonstrates that present technology enables a fast global screening for T cell immune epitopes of potential diagnostics and vaccine interest. This technology includes immuno-bioinformatics predictors with the capacity to perform fast genome-, pathogen-, and HLA-wide searches for immune targets. To exploit this new potential, a coordinated international effort to analyze the precious source of information represented by rare patients, such as the current victims of bird flu, would be essential.

  20. HLA-G profile of infertile couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Nardi, Fabiola Silva; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; da Graça Bicalho, Maria

    2016-12-01

    HLA-G codes for a non-classical class I (Ib) protein which is mainly expressed in trophoblast cells. Many pieces of evidence pointed out its essential role conferring immunological tolerance to the fetus. Some HLA-G alleles have been linked to enhanced or reduced HLA-G protein levels expression, which have been associated with reproductive failure. In this study 33 couples undergoing ART (assisted reproduction treatment; n=66) and 120 couples who conceived naturally (controls; n=240) were enrolled in the study. Genotyping was performed by SBT and tagged an 1837bp at 5'URR as well as exons 2, 3 and4 of HLA-G. Alleles, genotypes and haplotypes were compared between infertile and control groups using Fisher Exact Test. The haplotype HLA-G(∗)010101b/HLA-G(∗)01:01:01 showed statistically significant higher frequency in control groups. The immunogenetics of infertility is complex and might be dependent on different genes involved in the establishment of a successful pregnancy. A better understanding of HLA-G alleles and haplotypes structure and how the genetic diversity at their regulatory sites could impact on their level of expression and build up the susceptibility or protection conditions may shed light on the comprehension of immunogenetics mechanisms acting at the fetus-maternal interface.

  1. HLA Immune Function Genes in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Torres

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes on chromosome 6 are instrumental in many innate and adaptive immune responses. The HLA genes/haplotypes can also be involved in immune dysfunction and autoimmune diseases. It is now becoming apparent that many of the non-antigen-presenting HLA genes make significant contributions to autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, it has been reported that autism subjects often have associations with HLA genes/haplotypes, suggesting an underlying dysregulation of the immune system mediated by HLA genes. Genetic studies have only succeeded in identifying autism-causing genes in a small number of subjects suggesting that the genome has not been adequately interrogated. Close examination of the HLA region in autism has been relatively ignored, largely due to extraordinary genetic complexity. It is our proposition that genetic polymorphisms in the HLA region, especially in the non-antigen-presenting regions, may be important in the etiology of autism in certain subjects.

  2. HIV control through a single nucleotide on the HLA-B locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; Harndahl, Mikkel; Leslie, Alasdair J;

    2012-01-01

    :02, which differ by only a single amino acid. Crucially, they occur primarily on identical HLA class I haplotypes and, as Bw6 alleles, do not act as NK cell ligands and are therefore largely unconfounded by other genetic factors. We show that in an outbred cohort (n = 2,093) of HIV C......Genetic variation within the HLA-B locus has the strongest impact on HIV disease progression of any polymorphisms within the human genome. However, identifying the exact mechanism involved is complicated by several factors. HLA-Bw4 alleles provide ligands for NK cells and for CD8 T cells......-clade-infected individuals, a single amino acid change at position 9 of the HLA-B molecule critically affects peptide binding and significantly alters the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes targeted, measured directly ex vivo by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay (P = 2 × 10...

  3. HLA-G Orchestrates the Early Interaction of Human Trophoblasts with the Maternal Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Silvia; Amodio, Giada; Quattrone, Federica; Panina-Bordignon, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Extravillous trophoblasts (EVTs) play a central role in educating maternal leukocytes, endometrial stromal and endothelial cells to generate a receptive decidual microenvironment tailored to accept the semi-allogeneic fetus. HLA-G, a non-classical HLA class I molecule endowed with immune-regulatory functions, is primarily expressed on EVTs lining the placenta and on the naturally occurring tolerogenic dendritic cells, named DC-10, which are enriched in the human first trimester decidua. Decidual DC-10 are involved in HLA-G-mediated tolerance at the maternal–fetal interface. EVTs not only establish a tolerogenic microenvironment through the interaction with maternal innate and adaptive cells but also orchestrate placenta vascular and tissue remodeling, leading to a successful pregnancy. Here, we discuss the potential implications of the HLA-G-mediated cross-talk among the cells present at the maternal–fetal interface, and its role in maintaining a positive relationship between the mother and the fetus. PMID:25870595

  4. Genome-wide association study of HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative essential hypersomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Seik-Soon; Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Maria; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Tanii, Hisashi; Okazaki, Yuji; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Lin, Ling; Faraco, Juliette; Rico, Tom; Honda, Yutaka; Honda, Makoto; Mignot, Emmanuel; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2013-01-01

    Essential hypersomnia (EHS), a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, can be divided into two broad classes based on the presence or absence of the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele. HLA-DQB1*06:02-positive EHS and narcolepsy with cataplexy are associated with the same susceptibility genes. In contrast, there are fewer studies of HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative EHS which, we hypothesized, involves a different pathophysiological pathway than does narcolepsy with cataplexy. In order to identify susceptibility genes associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative EHS, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 125 unrelated Japanese EHS patients lacking the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele and 562 Japanese healthy controls. A comparative study was also performed on 268 HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative Caucasian hypersomnia patients and 1761 HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative Caucasian healthy controls. We identified three SNPs that each represented a unique locus- rs16826005 (P = 1.02E-07; NCKAP5), rs11854769 (P = 6.69E-07; SPRED1), and rs10988217 (P = 3.43E-06; CRAT) that were associated with an increased risk of EHS in this Japanese population. Interestingly, rs10988217 showed a similar tendency in its association with both HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative EHS and narcolepsy with cataplexy in both Japanese and Caucasian populations. This is the first GWAS of HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative EHS, and the identification of these three new susceptibility loci should provide additional insights to the pathophysiological pathway of this condition.

  5. HLA dosage effect in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, Astrid; Verduijn, Willem; Haasnoot, Geert W; Drabbels, Jos J M; Lammers, Gert J; Claas, Frans H J

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. It is tightly associated with a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-allele: HLA-DQB1*06:02. Based on this, an autoimmune process has been hypothesized. A functional HLA-DQ molecule consists of a DQα and a DQβ chain. HLA-DQB1*06:02 (DQβ) has a strong preference for binding to HLA-DQA1*01:02 (DQα), and together they form the functional DQ0602 dimer. A dosage effect would be expected if the HLA-DQ0602 dimer itself is directly involved in the aetiology. An increased expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer is expected in individuals homozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02, but is also hypothesized in individuals heterozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02 and homozygous for HLA-DQA1*01:02. To study the impact of the expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer on narcolepsy susceptibility, 248 Dutch narcolepsy patients and 1272 Dutch control subjects, all of them positive for DQB1*06:02 (heterozygous and homozygous), were HLA-genotyped with attention not only to DQB1 but also to DQA1*01:02. DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02 homozygosity was significantly more often seen in patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.29) confirming previous observations. More importantly, a significantly higher prevalence of homozygosity for DQA1*01:02 was found in HLA-DQB1*06:02 heterozygous patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.37, p < 0.001). The latter finding clearly supports a direct role of the HLA-DQ molecule in the development of disease.

  6. Different Impact of Pretransplant Anti-HLA Antibodies Detected by Luminex in Highly Sensitized Renal Transplanted Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Pérez-Flores; Jose Luis Santiago; Natividad Calvo-Romero; Alberto Barrientos-Guzmán; Ana Isabel Sánchez-Fructuoso

    2013-01-01

    It is well know that anti-HLA antibodies are an important obstacle in kidney transplantation. Our aim was to study the clinical impact of pretransplant donor specific anti-HLA antibodies (HLA-DSA), in highly sensitized (HS) patients. We analyzed retrospectively the day-of-transplant sera by Luminex Single Antigen Assay (LSA) in HS patients, and the results were correlated with episodes of humoral and cellular rejection as well as with graft and patient survival. All HS subjects received the s...

  7. HLA-C incompatibilities in allogeneic unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie eTIERCY

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An increasingly larger fraction of patients with hematological diseases are treated by hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (HSCT from HLA matched unrelated donors. Polymorphism of HLA genes represent a major barrier to HSCT because HLA-A,B,C and DRB1 incompatibilities confer a higher risk of aGVHD and mortality. Although >22 million volunteer HLA-typed donors are available worldwide, still a significant number of patients do not find a highly matched HSC donor. Because of the large haplotypic diversity in HLA-B-C associations, incompatibilities occur most frequently at HLA-C, so that unrelated donors with a single HLA-C mismatch often represent the only possible choice. The ratio of HLA-C-mismatched HSCT over the total number of transplants varies from 15-30%, as determined in 12 multicenter studies. Six multicenter studies involving >1800 patients have reported a 21-43% increase in mortality risk. By using in vitro cellular assays a large heterogeneity in T-cell allorecognition has been observed. Yet the permissiveness of individual HLA-C mismatches remains poorly defined. It could be linked to the position and nature of the mismatched residues on HLA-C molecules, but also to variability in the expression levels of the mismatched alleles. The permissive C*03:03-03:04 mismatch is caracterized by full compatibility at residues 9, 97, 99, 116, 152, 156 and 163 reported to be key positions influencing T-cell allorecognition. With a single difference in these key residues the C*07:01-07:02 mismatch might also be considered by analogy as permissive. High variability of HLA-C expression as determined by quantitative RT-PCR has been observed within individual allotypes and shows some correlation with A-B-C-DRB1 haplotypes. Thus in addition to the position of mismatched amino acid residues, expression level of patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype might influence T-cell allorecognition, with patient's low expression-C alleles representing possible

  8. Gamma ray-induced mutants as a tool for the production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against HLA-alloantigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, B.; Pawelec, G.; Ziegler, A.

    1986-01-01

    To simplify the screening procedure for murine monoclonal antibodies specific for polymorphic HLA determinants, spleen cells from a mouse immunized with the human cell line BJAB-B95.8.6 were fused with NS1 mouse myeloma cells, and hybridoma supernatants were screened for their reactivity on BJAB-B95.8.6 and two gamma ray-induced HLA-loss mutants of this line. The use of these HLA-loss mutants allowed the rapid identification of two new allospecific MOABs designated TU160 and TU161. Serological as well as biochemical studies revealed TU160 to be specific for HLA=A2, and TU161 for HLA-B13 molecules, respectively. Both MOABs were determined to be antibodies of the IgG class and were able to precipitate their antigens from lysates of radioactively labeled cells.

  9. HLA-DRB genotype and specific IgE responses in patients with allergies to penicillins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Because of the pivotal role of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules in regulating the immune response and their extensive polymorphism, it is not surprising that particular HLA class II alleles have been implicated in susceptibility to allergic diseases and in restriction of the IgE responses to a variety of allergens. We investigated the relationship between HLA-DRB genotype and allergies to various penicillins and explored HLA-DRB restriction of IgE responses to these derivatives of penicillin.Methods Radioallergosorbent test was used to examine 8 kinds of specific IgE antibodies (4 major and 4 minor antigenic determinants) in the sera of 248 patients with an allergy to penicillins and 101 healthy subjects without any allergic reaction. Some (113 patients and 87 healthy control subjects) were chosen from all subjects to type for HLA-DRB alleles by sequence specific primer-polymerase chain reaction.Results Compared with control subjects, a significantly increased frequency of DR9 was present in 77 patients with allergic reactions, with immediate hypersensitive reaction and with urticaria (P = 0.011; P = 0.019; P = 0.005 respectively). Conversely, a significantly decreased frequency of DR14.1 was found in 80 patients with positive IgE antibodies, with immediate reaction and with urticaria compared with control group (P = 0.024; P = 0.038; P = 0.038). A possible excess of HLA-DR17 was found in subjects who were responsive to benzylpenicilloyl compared with those were not (χ2 = 5.134, P = 0.023), and of HLA-DR4 was found in subjects responsive to phenoxomethylpenicillanyl (PVA, χ2 = 4.057, P = 0.044).Conclusion HLA-DRB gene may be involved in allergy to penicillins through modulating specific serum IgE to penicillins.

  10. Analysis of Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genes and Their HLA Ligands in Iranian Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Mehdi; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Karami, Jafar; Mohseni, Alireza; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Farhadi, Elham; Ahmadzadeh, Nooshin; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-02-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is a chronic rheumatic disease which mainly involves the axial skeleton. It seems that non-HLA genes, as well as HLA-B27 gene, are linked to the etiology of the disease. Recently, it has been documented that KIRs and their HLA ligands are contributed to the Ankylosing Spondylitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the KIR genes and their HLA ligands in Iranian AS patients and healthy individuals. The present study includes 200 AS patient samples and 200 healthy control samples. KIR genotyping was performed using the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) method to type the presence or absence of the 16 KIR genes, 6 known specific HLA class I ligands and also, two pseudogenes. Two KIR genes (KIR-2DL3 and KIR2DL5), and among the HLA ligands, two HLA ligands (HLA-C2Lys80 and HLA-B27) genes were significantly different between case and control groups. In addition, we found some interesting KIR/HLA compound genotypes, which were associated with AS susceptibility. Our results suggest that the AS patients present more activating and less inhibitory KIR genes with combination of their HLA ligands than healthy controls. Once the balance of signal transduction between activating and inhibitory receptors is disturbed, the ability of NK cells to identify and lyse the targets in immune responses will be compromised. Accordingly, imbalance of activating and inhibitory KIR genes by up-regulating the activation and losing the inhibition of KIRs signaling or combination of both might be one of the important factors which underlying the pathogenesis of AS.

  11. Identification of Melanoma-specific Peptide Epitopes by HLA-A2.1-restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Liang GE; Ying WANG; Shu-Jun WANG; Yong ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    HLA-A2.1-associated peptides, extracted from human melanoma cells, were used to study epitopes for melanoma-specific HLA-A2.1-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by epitope reconstitution, active peptide sequence characterization and synthetic peptide verification. CTL were generated from tumor-involved nodes by in vitro stimulation, initially with autologous melanoma cells and subsequently with allogeneic HLA-A2.1 positive melanoma cells. The CTLs could lyse autologous and allogeneic HLA-A2.1 positive melanomas, but not HLA-A2.1 negative melanomas or HLA-A2.1 positive non-melanomas. The lysis of melanomas could be inhibited by anti-CD3, anti-HLA class Ⅰ and anti-HLA-A2.1 monoclonal antibodies.HLA-A2.1 molecules were purified from detergent-solubilized human melanoma cells by immunoaffinity column chromatography and further fractionated by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography.The fractions were assessed for their ability to reconstitute melanoma-specific epitopes with HLA-A2.1 positive antigen-processing mutant T2 cells. Three reconstitution peaks were observed in lactate dehydrogenase release assay. Mass spectrometry and ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography analysis were used to identify peptide epitopes. Peptides with a mass-to-charge ratio of 948 usually consist of nine amino acid residues. The data from reconstitution experiments confirmed that the synthetic peptides contained epitopes and that the peptides associated with HLA-A2.1 and recognized by melanoma-specific CTL were present in these different melanoma cells. These peptides could be potentially exploited in novel peptide-based antitumor vaccines in immunotherapy for CTL.

  12. DNA methylation and mRNA expression of HLA-DQA1 alleles in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepek, Pavel; Zajacova, Marta; Kotrbova-Kozak, Anna; Silhova, Elena; Cerna, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) belongs among polygenic multifactorial autoimmune diseases. The highest risk is associated with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, including HLA-DQA1 gene. Our aim was to investigate DNA methylation of HLA-DQA1 promoter alleles (QAP) and correlate methylation status with individual HLA-DQA1 allele expression of patients with T1D and healthy controls. DNA methylation is one of the epigenetic modifications that regulate gene expression and is known to be shaped by the environment.Sixty one patients with T1D and 39 healthy controls were involved in this study. Isolated DNA was treated with sodium bisulphite and HLA-DQA1 promoter sequence was amplified using nested PCR. After sequencing, DNA methylation of HLA-DQA1 promoter alleles was analysed. Individual mRNA HLA-DQA1 relative allele expression was assessed using two different endogenous controls (PPIA, DRA). We have found statistically significant differences in HLA-DQA1 allele 02:01 expression (PPIA normalization, Pcorr = 0·041; DRA normalization, Pcorr = 0·052) between healthy controls and patients with T1D. The complete methylation profile of the HLA-DQA1 promoter was gained with the most methylated allele DQA1*02:01 and the least methylated DQA1*05:01 in both studied groups. Methylation profile observed in patients with T1D and healthy controls was similar, and no correlation between HLA-DQA1 allele expression and DNA methylation was found. Although we have not proved significant methylation differences between the two groups, detailed DNA methylation status and its correlation with expression of each HLA-DQA1 allele in patients with T1D have been described for the first time.

  13. Detection of Primary T Cell Responses to Drugs and Chemicals in HLA-Typed Volunteers: Implications for the Prediction of Drug Immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Lee; Gibson, Andrew; Sullivan, Andrew; Tailor, Arun; Usui, Toru; Alfirevic, Ana; Pirmohamed, Munir; Naisbitt, Dean J; Kevin Park, B

    2016-12-01

    A number of serious adverse drug reactions are caused by T cells. An association with HLA alleles has been identified with certain reactions, which makes it difficult to develop standardized preclinical tests to predict chemical liability. We have recently developed a T cell priming assay using the drug metabolite nitroso sulfamethoxazole (SMX-NO). We now report on reproducibility of the assay, establishment of a biobank of PBMC from 1000 HLA-typed volunteers, and generation of antigen-specific responses to a panel of compounds. Forty T cell priming assays were performed with SMX-NO; 5 gave weak responses (1.5-1.9) and 34 showed good (SI 2.0-3.9) or strong responses (SI  > 4.0) using readouts for proliferation and cytokine release. Thus, SMX-NO can be used as a model reagent for in vitro T cell activation. Good to strong responses were also generated to haptenic compounds (amoxicillin, piperacillin and Bandrowski's base) that are not associated with an HLA risk allele. Furthermore, responses were detected to carbamazepine (in HLA-B*15:02 donors), flucloxacillin (in 1 HLA-B*57:01 donor) and oxypurinol (in HLA-B*58:01 donors), which are associated with HLA-class I-restricted forms of hypersensitivity. In contrast, naïve T cell priming to ximelagatran, lumiracoxib, and lapatinib (HLA-class II-restricted forms of hypersensitivity) yielded negative results. Abacavir, which activates memory T cells in patients, did not activate naïve T cells from HLA-B*57:01 donors. This work shows that the priming assay can be used to assess primary T cell responses to drugs and to study mechanisms T cell priming for drugs that display HLA class I restriction. Additional studies are required to investigate HLA-class II-restricted reactions.

  14. Multi-population classical HLA type imputation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Dilthey

    Full Text Available Statistical imputation of classical HLA alleles in case-control studies has become established as a valuable tool for identifying and fine-mapping signals of disease association in the MHC. Imputation into diverse populations has, however, remained challenging, mainly because of the additional haplotypic heterogeneity introduced by combining reference panels of different sources. We present an HLA type imputation model, HLA*IMP:02, designed to operate on a multi-population reference panel. HLA*IMP:02 is based on a graphical representation of haplotype structure. We present a probabilistic algorithm to build such models for the HLA region, accommodating genotyping error, haplotypic heterogeneity and the need for maximum accuracy at the HLA loci, generalizing the work of Browning and Browning (2007 and Ron et al. (1998. HLA*IMP:02 achieves an average 4-digit imputation accuracy on diverse European panels of 97% (call rate 97%. On non-European samples, 2-digit performance is over 90% for most loci and ethnicities where data available. HLA*IMP:02 supports imputation of HLA-DPB1 and HLA-DRB3-5, is highly tolerant of missing data in the imputation panel and works on standard genotype data from popular genotyping chips. It is publicly available in source code and as a user-friendly web service framework.

  15. Correlation Between HLA-A, B and DRB1 Alleles and Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-mei; Jiang, Xiao-lin; Pang, Bo; Song, Yong-hong; Wang, Jian-xing; Pei, Yao-wen; Zhu, Chuan-fu; Wang, Xian-jun; Yu, Xue-jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging hemorrhagic fever caused by a tick-borne bunyavirus (SFTSV) in East Asian countries. The role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in resistance and susceptibility to SFTSV is not known. We investigated the correlation of HLA locus A, B and DRB1 alleles with the occurrence of SFTS. Methods A total of 84 confirmed SFTS patients (patient group) and 501 unrelated non-SFTS patients (healthy individuals as control group) from Shandong Province were genotyped by PCR-sequence specific oligonucleotide probe (PCR-SSOP) for HLA-A, B and DRB1 loci.Allele frequency was calculated and compared using χ2 test or the Fisher's exact test. A corrected P value was calculated with a bonferronis correction. Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by Woolf’s method. Results A total of 11 HLA-A, 23 HLA-B and 12 HLA-DRB1 alleles were identified in the patient group, whereas 15 HLA-A, 30 HLA-B and 13 HLA-DRB1 alleles were detected in the control group. The frequencies of A*30 and B*13 in the SFTS patient group were lower than that in the control group (P = 0.0341 and 0.0085, Pc = 0.5115 and 0.252). The ORs of A*30 and B*13 in the SFTS patient group were 0.54 and 0.49, respectively. The frequency of two-locus haplotype A*30-B*13 was lower in the patient group than in the control group(5.59% versus 12.27%, P = 0.037,OR = 0.41, 95%CI = 0.18–0.96) without significance(Pc>0.05). A*30-B*13-DRB1*07 and A*02-B*15-DRB1*04 had strong associations with SFTS resistance and susceptibility respectively (Pc = 0.0412 and 0.0001,OR = 0.43 and 5.07). Conclusion The host HLA class I polymorphism might play an important role with the occurrence of SFTS. Negative associations were observed with HLA-A*30, HLA-B*13 and Haplotype A*30-B*13, although the associations were not statistically significant. A*30-B*13-DRB1*07 had negative correlation with the occurrence of SFTS; in contrast, haplotype A*02-B*15-DRB1

  16. HLA-E polymorphism in Amerindians from Mexico (Mazatecans), Colombia (Wayu) and Chile (Mapuches): evolution of MHC-E gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Vargas-Alarcon, G; Serrano-Vela, J I; Reguera, R; Martinez-Laso, J; Silvera-Redondo, C; Granados, J; Moscoso, J

    2007-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E is a nonclassical class I (Ib) gene with a restricted polymorphism. Only eight DNA alleles and three proteins of this gene have been described and their frequencies analyzed in Caucasian, Oriental, Asian Indian, and Negroid populations. In the present study, HLA-E polymorphism has been analyzed in six Amerindian and Mestizo populations from North and South America and compared with previously described populations. HLA-E*0101 is the most frequent allele found in all populations except in Afrocolombian and Wayu Amerindians, in which blood group analyses show a high admixture with Caucasian and African populations. Mazatecan and Mapuche (two Amerindian groups from North and South America, respectively) presented similar HLA-E frequencies, whereas Wayu Indians are more similar to the Afrocolombian population. The Mexican and Colombian Mestizo show similar allele frequencies to Amerindians with high frequencies of HLA-E*0101 and HLA-E*010302 alleles. Also, frequencies in Negroids and Asian Indians present a similar distribution of HLA-E alleles. These data are in agreement with worldwide restricted polymorphism of HLA-E because no new allele was detected in the six populations studied. The allelic frequencies show differences among Caucasian, Oriental, Mestizo and Indian populations. Ape major histocompatibility complex-E allelism is also very restricted: common chimpanzee (one allele); bonobo (two alleles); gorilla (two alleles); orangutan (one allele); rhesus monkey (eight alleles); cynomolgus monkey (two alleles); and green monkey (two alleles).

  17. Anti-HLA and Anti-MICA Antibodies in Liver Transplant Recipients: Effect on Long-Term Graft Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Ciszek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Presence of anti-HLA antibodies has a well-known impact on kidney grafts survival; however their role in liver transplantation has not been fully elucidated. We conducted a 7-year prospective study to show correlation between presence of anti-HLA and anti-MICA antibodies and liver graft survival. Methods. Blood samples from 123 liver transplant recipients were collected during patients routine visits. Time from transplantation to blood sample collection was different for each patient. Blood samples were tested for anti-HLA (separately class I and II and MICA antibodies using Luminex assays. Results. There were 32 (26% patients with positive anti-HLA and 37 (30% with positive anti-MICA antibodies. Graft loss occurred in 7 cases (23% in anti-HLA positive group compared to 20 (22% in anti-HLA negative group ( and in 8 cases (22% in anti-MICA positive group but 19 (23% in anti-MICA negative group (. No correlations were detected between presence of antibodies and acute graft rejection (AGR. Presence of any antibodies (anti-HLA or anti-MICA antibodies correlated with late graft rejection (. Conclusion. Presence of anti-HLA or anti-MICA had no impact on long-term liver graft survival; however, detection of any antibodies was correlated with episodes of late graft rejection.

  18. DIFFERENTIAL IMPACT OF HLA-A, HLA-B AND HLA-DR COMPATIBILITY ON THE RENAL ALLOGRAFT SURVIVAL

    OpenAIRE

    V. Y. Abramov; Y. G. Moysyuk; N. N. Kaluzhina; N. B. Bogdanova; V. V. Morozova; N. V. Apanasenko

    2012-01-01

    We studied the long-term results of 532 deceased donor kidney transplantations to investigate the impact of HLA match on the survival of renal allograft. All transplants were performed in our center in 1996–2009 and moni- tored prospectively for 1–14 years. We found, the survival of 58 kidneys grafted with 0–2 mismatch for HLA- ABDR to be significantly better (Plogrank = 0,016) than the survival of the kidneys grafted with 3–6 HLA-ABDR mismatch. The full compatibility for HLA-A (n = 75) did n...

  19. Cell surface expression level variation between two common Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles, HLA-A2 and HLA-B8, is dependent on the structure of the C terminal part of the alpha 2 and the alpha 3 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Nehlin, Jan O; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive cell surface expression of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I antigens vary extremely from tissue to tissue and individual antigens may differ widely in expression levels. Down-regulation of class I expression is a known immune evasive mechanism used by cancer cells and viruses....... Moreover, recent observations suggest that even minor differences in expression levels may influence the course of viral infections and the frequency of complications to stem cell transplantation. We have shown that some human multipotent stem cells have high expression of HLA-A while HLA-B is only weakly...... expressed, and demonstrate here that this is also the case for the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T. Using quantitative flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction we found expression levels of endogenous HLA-A3 (median 71,204 molecules per cell) 9.2-fold higher than the expression of...

  20. Recognition of HLA-A3 and HLA-A11 by KIR3DL2 is peptide-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansasuta, Pokrath; Dong, Tao; Thananchai, Hathairat; Weekes, Michael; Willberg, Christian; Aldemir, Hatice; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Braud, Veronique M

    2004-06-01

    The recognition of MHC class I molecules by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) is central to the control of NK cell function and can also modulate the CTL activation threshold. Among KIR receptors, KIR3DL2 is thought to interact with HLA-A3 and -A11, although direct evidence has been lacking. In this study, we show that HLA-A3 and -A11 tetramers specifically bind to KIR3DL2*001 transfectants and that this recognition is peptide-specific. Single amino acid substitutions in the nonamer peptide underline a critical role for residue 8 in recognition of KIR3DL2. However, the role of this interaction in vivo still remains to be established.

  1. Genetic analysis of dilated cardiomyopathy--HLA and immunoglobulin genes may confer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, H; Kimura, A; Fukuta, S; Kusukawa, R; Kawamura, K; Nimura, Y; Nagano, M; Yasuda, H; Kawai, C; Sugimoto, T

    1992-10-01

    To identify genetic factors in the immune system which control the susceptibility to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), HLA class II DNA typing was performed in 61 Japanese patients, using PCR/SSO probe analyses. The frequencies of HLA-DQB1*0503 (15% vs 5%; RR = 3.06, chi 2 = 7.19) and DQB1*0604 (21% vs 10%; RR = 2.41, chi 2 = 6.20) were significantly increased and that of HLA-DQB1*0502 (RR = 1.74) was slightly increased in the DCM patients. The frequency of DQB1*0303 (16% vs 31%; RR = 0.44, chi 2 = 5.16) was significantly decreased in the patients. The increased HLA-DQB1 alleles have a histidine residue in common at the 30th codon for the HLA-DQ beta chain. Among the genetic markers studied by Southern blot analyses, IGLV (immunoglobulin lambda light chain, pV3.3) showed a strong association with DCM, i.e. A2/A2 genotype was found in 37.7% of patients whereas it was observed in only 18.9% of the control subjects (RR = 2.6, chi 2 = 7.77). The frequency of this genotype was higher in patients under age 45 years at the time of diagnosis (45.5%, RR = 3.6, chi 2 = 10.02). These results suggest that HLA and immunoglobulin genes are closely linked to susceptibility to DCM.

  2. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genes on susceptibility to and protection from allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Manuel; Mondejar-López, Pedro; Moya-Quiles, María Rosa; Salgado, Gema; Pastor-Vivero, María Dolores; Lopez-Hernandez, Ruth; Boix, Francisco; Campillo, José Antonio; Minguela, Alfredo; Garcia-Alonso, Ana; Sánchez-Solís, Manuel; Álvarez-López, María Rocío

    2013-03-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a hypersensitivity pulmonary disease that affects both patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and those with asthma. HLA-DRB1 alleles have previously been associated with ABPA-CF susceptibility; however, HLA-DQB1 allele associations have not been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to investigate HLA class II associations in patients with ABPA-CF and determine their roles in susceptibility or protection. Patients with ABPA-CF, patients with CF without ABPA, patients with asthma without ABPA (AST), and healthy controls were included in this study. DNA was extracted by automatic extractor. HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 genotyping was performed by the Luminex PCR-SSOP method (One Lambda, Canoga Park, CA, USA). Allele specific PCR-SSP was also performed by high-resolution analysis (One Lambda). Statistical analysis was performed with SSPS and Arlequin software. Both HLA-DRB1*5:01 and -DRB1*11:04 alleles occurred with greater frequency in patients with ABPA-CF than in those with AST and CF and control subjects, corroborating previously published data. On the other hand, analysis of haplotypes revealed that almost all patients with ABPA-CF lacking DRB1*15:01 or DRB1*11:04 carry either DRB1*04, DRB1*11:01, or DRB1*07:01 alleles. In the HLA-DQB1 region, the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele occurred more frequently in patients with ABPA-CF than in those with AST and CF and healthy controls, whereas HLA-DQB1*02:01 occurred less frequently in patients with ABPA-CF. These data confirm that there is a correlation between HLA-DRB1*15:01, -DRB1*11:04, DRB1*11:01, -DRB1*04 and -DRB1*07:01 alleles and ABPA-CF susceptibility and suggest that HLA-DQB1*02:01 is an ABPA-CF resistance allele.

  3. [The HLA system and habitual abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek-Rosenmayr, A

    1990-01-01

    HLA-antigens are extremely polymorphic. A calculation of the polymorphism shows a number of 398.476.343 possible HLA-phenotypes, if HLA-A, -B, -C and -DR antigens are taken into account. The compatibility of HLA-antigens of recipient and donor plays a crucial role in transplantation: HLA-antigens are the traits, which are recognized by the immune system of the recipient in the frame of a rejection of the transplant or by the donor in the frame of a graft-versus-host reaction. Large international statistics show that HLA-incompatibility between recipient and donor leads to short transplant function periods, while compatibility brings about good transplant function. Therefore, matching of HLA-antigens plays an important role in transplantation of solid organs, mainly kidneys (3, 4, 5), and is completely necessary in bone marrow transplantation. Also in pregnancy, HLA-antigens are important: If HLA compatibility between mother and child is high, the risk for habitual abortion is higher than in normal pregnancies (6, 7).

  4. Association between protective and deleterious HLA alleles with multiple sclerosis in Central East Sardinia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Pastorino

    Full Text Available The human leukocyte antigen (HLA complex on chromosome 6p21 has been unambiguously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS. The complex features of the HLA region, especially its high genic content, extreme polymorphism, and extensive linkage disequilibrium, has prevented to resolve the nature of HLA association in MS. We performed a family based association study on the isolated population of the Nuoro province (Sardinia to clarify the role of HLA genes in MS. The main stage of our study involved an analysis of the ancestral haplotypes A2Cw7B58DR2DQ1 and A30Cw5B18DR3DQ2. On the basis of a multiplicative model, the effect of the first haplotype is protective with an odds ratio (OR = 0.27 (95% confidence interval CI 0.13-0.57, while that of the second is deleterious, OR 1.78 (95% CI 1.26-2.50. We found both class I (A, Cw, B and class II (DR, DQ loci to have an effect on MS susceptibility, but we saw that they act independently from each other. We also performed an exploratory analysis on a set of 796 SNPs in the same HLA region. Our study supports the claim that Class I and Class II loci act independently on MS susceptibility and this has a biological explanation. Also, the analysis of SNPs suggests that there are other HLA genes involved in MS, but replication is needed. This opens up new perspective on the study of MS.

  5. HLA-G allelic variants are associated with differences in the HLA-G mRNA isoform profile and HLA-G mRNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Hylenius, Sine; Rørbye, Christina;

    2003-01-01

    between mother and fetus in several ways. Finally, the expression of membrane-bound HLA-G and soluble HLA-G has been proposed to influence the outcome of pregnancy, and an aberrant HLA-G expression in pre-eclamptic placentas and spontaneous abortions has been reported. Here, an association between certain...... HLA-G polymorphisms and the mRNA levels of the different alternatively spliced HLA-G isoforms in first trimester trophoblast cell populations is reported. Several alternatively spliced HLA-G mRNA isoforms, including a 14-bp polymorphism in the 3'UTR end (exon 8) of the HLA-G gene, are expressed...

  6. Amino acid residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 specify an antigenic determinant shared by HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ways, J P; Rothbard, J B; Parham, P

    1986-07-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody MA2.1 was previously used to define an epitope shared by native HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 molecules and amino acid sequence comparison of nine HLA-A,B,C molecules identified residues 62 to 65 as the region most likely to form this epitope. An unabsorbed rabbit antiserum raised against a peptide corresponding to residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 gives highly specific reactions with HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 heavy chains in Western blots. No interactions with native HLA-A2 and B17 molecules were detected in a variety of assays. Although the topographic relationship between the epitopes recognized by the rabbit antiserum and the monoclonal antibody could not be determined, the results show that residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 can form epitopes with specificity for HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

  7. DIFFERENTIAL IMPACT OF HLA-A, HLA-B AND HLA-DR COMPATIBILITY ON THE RENAL ALLOGRAFT SURVIVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Abramov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the long-term results of 532 deceased donor kidney transplantations to investigate the impact of HLA match on the survival of renal allograft. All transplants were performed in our center in 1996–2009 and moni- tored prospectively for 1–14 years. We found, the survival of 58 kidneys grafted with 0–2 mismatch for HLA- ABDR to be significantly better (Plogrank = 0,016 than the survival of the kidneys grafted with 3–6 HLA-ABDR mismatch. The full compatibility for HLA-A (n = 75 did not influence the long-term survival (Plogrank = 0,48. The absence of HLA-DR mismatch had a beneficial effect for survival of 68 kidneys (Plogrank = 0,07. Eighteen cases with the full HLA-B compatibility between graft and recipient demonstrated excellent long-term survival (Plogrank = 0,007. HLA-B compatibility influenced significantly (P = 0,042 the survival of transplanted kidney in the Cox regression model adjusted for donor and recipient age, panel-reactive antibody level, re-transplant, and immunosuppression protocol. The data obtained support the conclusion, that HLA compatibility should be one of the criteria of deceased donor kidney allocation. 

  8. Polymorphic Alu insertions and their associations with HLA Ⅰ alleles in Yugu and Zhuang ethnic populations%中国壮族和裕固族群体HLAⅠ类区域Alu插入多态性及其与HLA-A位点的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史磊; 杨昭庆; 褚嘉祐; 姚宇峰; 史荔; 陶玉芬; 于亮; 黄小琴; 林克勤; 易文; 孙浩

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have show that the structurally polymorphic Alu insertion within HLA class I region are useful tools for investigating the origin, evolmion and recombination of HLA class Ⅰ progenitor haplotypes and gene diversity in different ethnic populations.In the present study, we determined the frequencies of HLA-Alus (i.e., AluMICB, AluTF,AluHJ, AluHG, and AluHF) in Zhuang and Yugu ethnic populations at first.Then combined with HLA genotyping data.we studied associations between HLA-Alus and HLA-A alleles in Zhuang, Yugu Bulang, Dai, and Hani ethnic populations.Our results showed that (l) the frequencies of five HLA-Alus were 1.5%~ 35.8% and 9.2%~34.8% in Zhuang and Yugu, respectively: and (2) the results of association between HLA-A alleles and HLA-Alu showed strong association between AluHG insalion and HLA-A *02 subtypes in all populations, association between AluHJ insertion and HLA-A *2402 in all populations, and association between AluHJ inseflion and HLA-A V/O/, -A *2407 in Bulang.The present study suggested that the distribution of HLA-Alus as well as the associations between HLA-Alus and HLA class I alleles are variable in different ethnic populations.HLA Alus alone or together with the HLA classⅠ alieles are informative genetic markers for the identification of HLA class I allele and variation of haplotype lineages in different populations.%近年来研究发现:位于HLAⅠ类基因区域的Alu插入是研究不同群体HLAⅠ类基因区域祖先单倍型和HLAⅠ类基因多样性产生、进化和重组的理想工具.文章对中国壮族和裕固族群体HLAⅠ类基因区域5个Alu插入多态性(AluMICB、AluTF、AluHJ、AluHG和AluHF)进行研究,结合HLA基因分型数据,分析壮族、裕固族、哈尼族、布朗族和傣族5个民族群体中Alu插入与HLA-A等位基因的关系.研究结果显示:(1)壮族和裕固族人群中5个Alu插入频率范围分别为1.5%~35.8%和9.2~34.8%,AluMICB、AluTF和Alu,HF插入

  9. NetMHCpan, a method for MHC class I binding prediction beyond humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Peters, B; Sidney, J;

    2009-01-01

    .0, a method that generates quantitative predictions of the affinity of any peptide-MHC class I interaction. NetMHCpan-2.0 has been trained on the hitherto largest set of quantitative MHC binding data available, covering HLA-A and HLA-B, as well as chimpanzee, rhesus macaque, gorilla, and mouse MHC class I...

  10. HLA-DP and bonemarrow transplantation: DP-incompatibility and severe acute graft versus host disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Platz, P; Jakobsen, B K

    1987-01-01

    of the various HLA class II antigens was observed between the groups. Similarly, no significant differences in stimulatory capability in secondary mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) were seen. The distribution of T helper/inducer (CD4+), T suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8+), and NK cells was similar in active JCA, JCA...

  11. HLA Preferences for Conserved Epitopes: A Potential Mechanism for Hepatitis C Clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, X.; Hoof, I.; Baarle, D. van; Kesmir, C.; Textor, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections affect more than 170 million people worldwide. Most of these individuals are chronically infected, but some clear the infection rapidly. Host factors seem to play a key role in HCV clearance, among them are the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules. Certa

  12. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Torres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The common variant - common disease hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased versus matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the common variant—common disease hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics.Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14bp-indel frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table2. The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2. Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1 and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15%, 22% and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR

  13. Detection of anti-HLA antibodies with flow cytometry in needle core biopsies of renal transplants recipients with chronic allograft nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laurent; Guignier, Fredy; Bocrie, Olivier; D'Athis, Philippe; Rageot, David; Rifle, Gérard; Justrabo, Eve; Mousson, Christiane

    2005-05-27

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of detecting anti-HLA antibodies in eluates from needle core biopsies of renal transplants with chronic allograft nephropathy. Two methods of screening, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry (FlowPRA) were compared. Twenty renal transplants with CAN were removed after irreversible graft failure. To assess the feasibility of detecting anti-HLA antibodies in small samples, needle core biopsies were sampled at the same place as surgical samples and at a second cortical area. Antibodies were eluted with an acid elution kit and anti-class I and class II IgG HLA antibodies detected using ELISA and flow cytometry. Flow cytometry was found to be more sensitive than ELISA for detecting anti-HLA antibodies in eluates from renal transplants with CAN (95% vs. 75% of positive cases). Detection of anti-HLA antibodies showed good agreement between surgical samples and needle core biopsies performed at the same place for anti-class I (80% vs. 65%, r=0.724 PHLA antibodies (70% vs. 55%, r=0.827 PHLA antibodies in needle core biopsies sampled at different sites suggests that immunization to class I donor antigen could be underestimated in needle core biopsy samples. These data indicate that anti-HLA antibodies can be detected in needle core biopsies from renal transplants. Provided further evaluation is done, elution might be a complementary method to detect anti-HLA antibodies when they are bound to the transplant.

  14. HLA typing in acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, J L; Madsen, H O; Ryder, L P;

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients with ON refe......OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients......: The frequency of HLA-DR15 was significantly increased in patients with ON + CDMS (52%) and ON (47%) compared with control subjects (31%). The frequency of HLA-DR17 was almost equal in the ON + CDMS (18%), ON (23%), and control (23%) groups. The frequencies of HLA-DQA-1B (55% in ON + CDMS, 58% in ON) and HLA......-DQB-1B (49% in ON + CDMS, 59% in ON) were significantly increased compared with control subjects (41%, HLA-DQA-1B; 37%, HLA-DQB-1B). Brain MRI was abnormal in 48 of 56 examined patients with ON + CDMS and in 64 of 120 examined patients with ON (P

  15. Monocytic HLA DR antigens in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Daniela; Wagner, Jenny; Matz, Judith; Weidinger, Elif; Obermeier, Michael; Riedel, Michael; Gruber, Rudolf; Schwarz, Markus; Mueller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    A genetic association of specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DR genes and schizophrenia has recently been shown. These HLA play a fundamental role in the control of immune responses. Furthermore infectious agents have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In this study we investigated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes in schizophrenic patients compared to controls with a special focus on the adaption to in vitro stimulation with toll-like receptor ligands. Patients with schizophrenia and matched controls were included. For each individual, we evaluated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes (either incubated at 37 °C or after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C). We found a significantly higher percentage of schizophrenic patients with elevated HLA DR positive cells (p=0.045) as compared to controls. The adjustment rate from baseline levels of monocytic HLA DR positive cells to stimulation with Poly I:C was significantly lower in schizophrenic patients (p=0.038). The increased monocytic HLA DR in schizophrenic patients and the maladjustment of their monocytic HLA DR levels to an infectious stimulus might be a sign for a disturbed monocytic immune balance in schizophrenic individuals.

  16. Soluble HLA-G expression and renal graft acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, J; Terasaki, P I; Miller, J; Mizutani, K; Cai, J; Carosella, E D

    2006-09-01

    HLA-G is a potentially interesting molecule associated with immunosuppressive function. We survey here the presence of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in serial serum samples of renal transplants. A total of 330 sera of from 65 patients were tested for sHLA-G with ELISA. IgG/IgM antibodies to HLA, and MICA antibodies were also previously tested. After serial analysis of the 65 patients' 330 sera, 50% of 26 patients in functioning group had consistent sHLA-G expression or became positive, in comparison to 20.5% among 39 patients who rejected their transplants (p=0.013). Thus sHLA-G was associated with functioning transplants. Eighty percent (77 of 96) of the HLA IgG positive sera had no sHLA-G expression, while 81.4% (83 of 102) of the HLA-G(+) sera had no HLA IgG (p=0.005), which showed a negative association between sHLA-G and the presence of HLA IgG antibodies (which was previously been shown to be associated with failure). In this preliminary survey, sHLA-G was found in the serum of about 30% of renal transplant patients. sHLA-G had a negative association with allograft failure from chronic rejection, and a negative relationship with the production of HLA IgG antibodies. The significance of sHLA-G in renal transplants remains to be determined.

  17. Allele frequency net 2015 update: new features for HLA epitopes, KIR and disease and HLA adverse drug reaction associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Galarza, Faviel F; Takeshita, Louise Y C; Santos, Eduardo J M; Kempson, Felicity; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; da Silva, Andrea Luciana Soares; Teles e Silva, André Luiz; Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S; Alfirevic, Ana; Jones, Andrew R; Middleton, Derek

    2015-01-01

    It has been 12 years since the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND; http://www.allelefrequencies.net) was first launched, providing the scientific community with an online repository for the storage of immune gene frequencies in different populations across the world. There have been a significant number of improvements from the first version, making AFND a primary resource for many clinical and scientific areas including histocompatibility, immunogenetics, pharmacogenetics and anthropology studies, among many others. The most widely used part of AFND stores population frequency data (alleles, genes or haplotypes) related to human leukocyte antigens (HLA), killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes (MIC) and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. AFND now contains >1400 populations from more than 10 million healthy individuals. Here, we report how the main features of AFND have been updated to include a new section on 'HLA epitope' frequencies in populations, a new section capturing the results of studies identifying HLA associations with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and one for the examination of infectious and autoimmune diseases associated with KIR polymorphisms-thus extending AFND to serve a new user base in these growing areas of research. New criteria on data quality have also been included.

  18. Autoimmune vitiligo is associated with gain-of-function by a transcriptional regulator that elevates expression of HLA-A*02:01 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masahiro; Jin, Ying; Yorgov, Daniel; Santorico, Stephanie A; Hagman, James; Ferrara, Tracey M; Jones, Kenneth L; Cavalli, Giulio; Dinarello, Charles A; Spritz, Richard A

    2016-02-02

    HLA-A is a class I major histocompatibility complex receptor that presents peptide antigens on the surface of most cells. Vitiligo, an autoimmune disease in which skin melanocytes are destroyed by cognate T cells, is associated with variation in the HLA-A gene; specifically HLA-A*02:01, which presents multiple vitiligo melanocyte autoantigens. Refined genetic mapping localizes vitiligo risk in the HLA-A region to an SNP haplotype ∼20-kb downstream, spanning an ENCODE element with many characteristics of a transcriptional enhancer. Convergent CTCF insulator sites flanking the HLA-A gene promoter and the predicted transcriptional regulator, with apparent interaction between these sites, suggests this element regulates the HLA-A promoter. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy subjects homozygous for the high-risk haplotype expressed 39% more HLA-A RNA than cells from subjects carrying nonhigh-risk haplotypes (P = 0.0048). Similarly, RNAseq analysis of 1,000 Genomes Project data showed more HLA-A mRNA expressed in subjects homozygous for the high-risk allele of lead SNP rs60131261 than subjects homozygous for the low-risk allele (P = 0.006). Reporter plasmid transfection and genomic run-on sequence analyses confirm that the HLA-A transcriptional regulator contains multiple bidirectional promoters, with greatest activity on the high-risk haplotype, although it does not behave as a classic enhancer. Vitiligo risk associated with the MHC class I region thus derives from combined quantitative and qualitative phenomena: a SNP haplotype in a transcriptional regulator that induces gain-of-function, elevating expression of HLA-A RNA in vivo, in strong linkage disequilibrium with an HLA-A allele that confers *02:01 specificity.

  19. Technological advances in the study of HLA-DRA promoter regulation: Extending the functions of CIITA, Oct-1, Rb, and RFX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Melissa I.Niesen; Aaron R.Osborne; William R.Lagor; Harry Zhang; Kristy Kazemfar; Gene C.Ness; George Blanck

    2009-01-01

    Several advances were established in examining the interaction of transcriptional factors with the HLA-DRA promoter. First, hydrodynamic injection was used to demonstrate the activation of the promoter by class II transactivator in a live mouse. Second, the Oct-1 DNA-binding site in the HLA-DRA promoter is a negative element in many cells, but here we show that Oct-1 activates the promoter independently of the Oct-1-binding site. Third, the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein is required for the induction of the endogenous HLA-DRA gene, due to a poorly understood, pleiotropic effect on the Oct-1 and YY1 repressive functions at the HLA-DRA promoter. There has never been an indication that direct promoter activation, by Rb, is possible. Here, we report that the first HLA-DRA intron has an Rb-responsive element, as indicated by a transient transfection/promoter reporter assay. Finally, RFX activates a methylated version of an HLA-DRA promoter reporter construct, consistent with the role of RFX in rescuing the expression of the methylated, endogenous HLA-DRA gene. Here, we report that this RFX function is not limited to a specific RFX-binding sequence or to the HLA-DRA promoter. These advances provide bases for novel investigations into the function of the major histocompatibility class II promoter.

  20. Molecular characterization of major histocompatibility complex class 1 (MHC-I) from squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascalis, Hervé; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Fendel, Rolf; Lavergne, Anne; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2003-12-01

    Little is known about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class 1 in squirrel monkeys ( Saimiri sciureus). We cloned, sequenced and characterized two alleles and the cDNA of the coding region of MHC class 1 in these New World monkeys. Phylogenetic analyses showed that these sequences are related to HLA class 1 genes ( HLA-A and HLA-G). The structure and organization of one of the two identified clones was similar to that of a class 1 MHC gene ( HLA-A2). All the exon/intron splice acceptor/donor sites are conserved and their locations correspond to the HLA-A2 gene. The sequences of the newly described cDNAs reveal that they code for the characteristic class 1 MHC proteins, with all the features thought necessary for cell surface expression. Typical sequences for the leader peptide, alpha(1), alpha(2), alpha(3), transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains were found.

  1. HLA-B*44 Is Associated with Dengue Severity Caused by DENV-3 in a Brazilian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liciana Xavier Eurico de Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles have been correlated with susceptibility or resistance to severe dengue; however, few immunogenetic studies have been performed in Latin American (LA populations. We have conducted immunogenetic studies of HLA class I and II alleles in a cohort of 187 patients with DENV-3 infection and confirmed clinical diagnosis of either severe dengue, known as dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, or the less severe form, dengue fever (DF, in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. An association analysis was performed using Fisher’s association test, with odds ratios (ORs calculated using conditional maximum likelihood estimates. HLA-B*44 (P=0.047, OR = 2.025, 95% CI = 0.97–4.24 was found to be associated with increased susceptibility to DHF in response to DENV-3 infection. In addition, HLA-B*07 (P=0.048, OR = 0.501, one-sided 95% CI = 0–0.99 and HLA-DR*13 (P=0.028, OR = 0.511, one-sided 95% CI = 0–0.91 were found to be associated with resistance to secondary dengue infection by DENV-3. These results suggest that HLA-B*44 supertype alleles and their respective T-cell responses might be involved in susceptibility to severe dengue infections, whereas the HLA-B*07 supertype alleles and DR*13 might be involved in cross-dengue serotype immunity.

  2. Association of HLA-DRB1 Alleles with Ulcerative Colitis in the City of Kerman, South Eastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Mohammadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The association of HLA class II genes with ulcerative colitis (UC as an autoimmune disease has been investigated for several years. However, factors responsible for genetic predisposition of this disease have so far not been clearly understood. In this study, for the first time, we aimed to investigate the association between HLA-DRB1 types and UC in the population of Kerman, a city southeast Iran.HLA typing was performed among 85 UC patients and 95 healthy controls using PCRamplification, employing sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP. The DRB1 frequencies were determined in the patients and controls.HLA-DRB1*04 was negatively associated with UC. Furthermore, HLA-DRB1*13 was significantly associated with severity of the disease (p=0.01 among UC patients.This is the novel result that describes an association of HLA-DRB1*13 with UC and also shows the protective role of HLA-DRB1*04 against the disease in people of Kerman.

  3. Characterisation and functional implications of the two new HLA-G alleles found in Amerindian and Caribbean populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio; Enriquez-de-Salamanca, Mercedes; Palacio-Grüber, Jose; Campos, Cristina; Camacho, Alejandro; Martin-Villa, Jose Manuel; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa; Gomez-Casado, Eduardo; Muñiz, Ester

    2016-09-01

    HLA-G polymorphism has been found to be relatively low in all world populations. In the present paper two new HLA-G molecules are described in ancient American natives. A new HLA-G molecule from a Ecuador Amerindian individual (male) showed four codon changes with respect to HLA-G*01:01:01. Silent changes at α1 domain (residue 57, Pro, CCG→CCA) and α2 domain (residue 93, His, CAC→CAT and residue 100, Gly, GGC→GGT) and one productive change in α3 domain (residue 219 changed from Arg to Trp). This α3 change may dramatically alter HLA-G interactions with beta-2 microglobulin, CD8, ILT-2 and ILT-4 ligands present in subsets of T, B, NK, monocytes, macrophages and dentritic cells. Another HLA-G new molecule was found in a woman from Hispaniola Island, Dominican Republic (Sto Domingo): it presented a silent change at α2 domain residue 107, Gly, GGA→GGT and non-silent change at residue 178, Met→Thr (with respect to HLA-G*01:01:01) which is close to class I molecule/clonotypic T cell receptor interaction sites. Functional implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. HLA-G in human early pregnancy: Control of uterine immune cell activation and likely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Le Bouteiller

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite a number of controversies, the functional importance of human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G in early human pregnancy is now sustained by a large amount of sound data. Membrane-bound and soluble HLA-G isoforms, either as β2-microglobulin-free or -associated as monomers or dimers, are expressed by different trophoblast subpopulations, the only fetal-derived cells that are directly in contact with maternal cells (maternal-fetal interfaces. Trophoblast HLA-G is the specific ligand of multiple cellular receptors present in maternal immune and non-immune cells, including CD8, leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LILR B1, LILRB2, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR 2DL4, and possibly CD160. Trophoblast HLA-G specific engagement of these cellular receptors triggers either inhibitory or activating signals in decidual CD8 + T cells, CD4 + T cells, natural killer (NK cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, or endothelial cells. Such HLA-G-receptor specific interactions first contribute to limit potentially harmful maternal anti-paternal immune response by impairment of decidual NK cell cytotoxicity, inhibition of CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell and B-cell proliferation, and induction of apoptosis of activated CD8 + T cells. Second, these HLA-G specific interactions contribute to stimulate placental development through secretion of angiogenic factors by decidual NK cells and macrophages, and to provide a protective effect for the outcome of pregnancy by the secretion of interleukin (IL-4 by decidual trophoblast antigen-specific CD4 + T cells.

  5. Donor killer immunoglobulin-like receptor genes and reactivation of cytomegalovirus after HLA-matched hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation: HLA-C allotype is an essential cofactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn E. Behrendt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells whose killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR recognize human leukocyte antigen (HLA ligand are licensed for activity. In contrast, non-licensed NK cells display KIRs for which ligand is absent from the self genotype and are usually hyporesponsive. Surprisingly, non-licensed cells are active in tumor control after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT and dominate NK response to murine cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. From those reports, we hypothesized that control of human CMV early after HSCT is influenced by donor KIR genes whose HLA ligand is absent-from-genotype of HLA-matched donor and recipient. To investigate, we studied CMV reactivation through Day 100 after grafts involving CMV-seropositive donor and/or recipient. A multivariate proportional rates model controlled for variability in surveillance and established covariates including acute graft-versus-host disease; statistical significance was adjusted for testing of multiple KIRs with identified HLA class I ligand (2DL1, 2DL2/3, 2DS1, 2DS2, full-length 2DS4, 3DL1/3DS1, 3DL2. Among HSCT recipients (n=286, CMV reactivation-free survival time varied with individual donor KIR genes evolutionarily-specific for HLA-C: when ligand was absent from the donor/recipient genotype, inhibitory KIRs 2DL2 (P<0.0001 and 2DL1 (P=0.015 each predicted inferior outcome, and activating KIRs 2DS2 (P<0.0001, 2DS1 (P=0.016, and 2DS4 (P=0.016 each predicted superior outcome. Otherwise, with ligand present-in-genotype, donor KIR genes had no effect. In conclusion, early after HLA-matched HSCT, individual inhibitory and activating KIR genes have qualitatively different effects on risk of CMV reactivation; unexpectedly, absence of HLA-C ligand from the donor/recipient genotype constitutes an essential cofactor in these associations. Being KIR and HLA-C specific, these findings are independent of licensing via alternate NK cell receptors (NKG2A, NKG2C that recognize HLA-E.

  6. Association of IL-4RA single nucleotide polymorphisms, HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in children with Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Luis A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma afflicts 6% to 8% of the United States population, and severe asthma represents approximately 10% of asthmatic patients. Several epidemiologic studies in the United States and Europe have linked Alternaria sensitivity to both persistence and severity of asthma. In order to begin to understand genetic risk factors underlying Alternaria sensitivity and asthma, in these studies we examined T cell responses to Alternaria antigens, HLA Class II restriction and HLA-DQ protection in children with severe asthma. Methods Sixty children with Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma were compared to 49 children with Alternaria-sensitive mild asthma. We examined HLA-DR and HLA-DQ frequencies in Alternaria-sensitive asthmatic by HLA typing. To determine ratios of Th1/Th2 Alternaria-specific T-cells, cultures were stimulated in media alone, Alternaria alternata extract and Alt a1. Sensitivity to IL-4 stimulation was measured by up-regulation of CD23 on B cells. Results Children with Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma trended to have increased sensitivities to Cladosporium (46% versus 35%, to Aspergillus (43% versus 28%, and significantly increased sensitivities to trees (78% versus 57% and to weeds (68% versus 48%. The IL-4RA ile75val polymorphism was significantly increased in Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthmatics, 83% (0.627 allele frequency compared to Alternaria-sensitive mild asthmatics, 57% (0.388 allele frequency. This was associated with increased sensitivity to IL-4 stimulation measured by significantly increased IL-4 stimulated CD23 expression on CD19+ and CD86+CD19+ B cells of Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthmatics. IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis was significantly increased in Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthmatics compared to mild asthmatics to Alternaria extract and Alt a1 stimulation. The frequency of HLA-DQB1*03 allele was significantly decreased in Alternaria-sensitive moderate

  7. KIR/HLA Interactions and Pathogen Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaleel M. Jamil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is the first line of defence in response to pathogen infection. Natural killer (NK cells perform a vital role in this response with the ability to directly kill infected cells, produce cytokines, and cross-talk with the adaptive immune system. These effector functions are dependent on activation of NK cells which is determined by surface receptor interactions with ligands on target cells. Of these receptors, the polymorphic killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which interact with MHC class 1 (also highly polymorphic, are largely inhibitory, and exhibit substantial genetic diversity. The result is a significant variation of NK cell repertoire between individuals and also between populations, with a multitude of possible KIR:HLA combinations. As each KIR:ligand interaction may have differential effects on NK cell activation and inhibition, this diversity has important potential influences on the host response to infections. Genetic studies have demonstrated associations between specific KIR:ligand combinations and the outcome of viral (and other infections, in particular hepatitis C and HIV infection. Detailed functional studies are not required to define the mechanisms underpinning these disease associations.

  8. ANALYZING HLA HAPLOTYPE OF THE LOCI HLA-A,-B, AND-DRB1 IN MONGOLIA ETHNIC GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪波; 李生斌

    2006-01-01

    Mongolian is a main ethnic group in China.The Mongol people have a well-established andglorious culture.Their clai mto the reputation of"horseback people"rests ontheir special affection forthe grasslands and horses,which is derived fromtheir thousands of years nomadic history[1-2].Thehuman leukocyte antigen(HLA)are located on theshort ar m of human chromosome6encoding t wodistinct classes of highly polymorphic cell surfacemolecules that bind and present processed antigens inthe for mof peptides to Tlymphocy...

  9. [HL-A antigens in dust allergy in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seignalet, J; Levallois, C; Lapinski, H; Jean, R

    1976-12-01

    The distribution of 29 HLA antigens has been compared in 60 unrelated children presenting a dust allergy and in 300 healthy controls. We observed an increased frequency for HLA-Aw19 and HLA-B5 in patients. Yet, the differences are not very significant and there is probably no association between one HLA gene and the dust allergy.

  10. Modeling HLA associations with EBV-positive and -negative Hodgkin lymphoma suggests distinct mechanisms in disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul C D; McAulay, Karen A; Montgomery, Dorothy; Lake, Annette; Shield, Lesley; Gallagher, Alice; Little, Ann-Margaret; Shah, Anila; Marsh, Steven G E; Taylor, G Malcolm; Jarrett, Ruth F

    2015-09-01

    HLA genotyping and genome wide association studies provide strong evidence for associations between Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) alleles and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Analysis of these associations is complicated by the extensive linkage disequilibrium within the major histocompatibility region and recent data suggesting that associations with EBV-positive and EBV-negative cHL are largely distinct. To distinguish independent and therefore potentially causal associations from associations confounded by linkage disequilibrium, we applied a variable selection regression modeling procedure to directly typed HLA class I and II genes and selected SNPs from EBV-stratified patient subgroups. In final models, HLA-A*01:01 and B*37:01 were associated with an increased risk of EBV-positive cHL whereas DRB1*15:01 and DPB1*01:01 were associated with decreased risk. Effects were independent of a prior history of infectious mononucleosis. For EBV-negative cHL the class II SNP rs6903608 remained the strongest predictor of disease risk after adjusting for the effects of common HLA alleles. Associations with "all cHL" and differences by case EBV status reflected the subgroup analysis. In conclusion, this study extends previous findings by identifying novel HLA associations with EBV-stratified subgroups of cHL, highlighting those alleles likely to be biologically relevant and strengthening evidence implicating genetic variation associated with the SNP rs6903608.

  11. Induction of HLA-G expression in a melanoma cell line OCM-1A following the treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hua YAN; Ai Fen LIN; Chien Chung CHANG; Soldano FERRONE

    2005-01-01

    The non-classical HLA class I antigen HLA-G is an immune modulator which inhibits the functions of T cells,NK cells,and the Dendritic cells (DC).As a result,HLA-G expression in malignant cells may provide them with a mechanism to escape the immune surveillance.In melanoma,HLA-G antigen expression has been found in 30% of surgically removed lesions but in less than 1% of established cell lines.One possible mechanism underlying the differential HLAG expression in vivo and in vitro is that the HLA-G gene is epigenetically repressed in melanoma cells in vitro.To test this hypothesis,we treated the HLA-G negative melanoma cell line OCM-1A with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AC) and analyzed whether HLA-G expression can be restored.Our data strongly suggest that HLA-G is silenced as a result of CpG hypermethylation within a 5' regulatory region encompassing 220 bp upstream of the start codon.After treatment,HLA-G mRNA expression was dramatically increased.Western blot and flow cytometry showed that HLA-G protein was induced.Interestingly,HLA-G cell surface expression on the 5-AC treated OCM-1A cells is much less than that on the HLA-G positive JEG-3 cells while a similar amount of total HLA-G was observed.Possible mechanisms for the difference were analyzed in the study such as cell cold-treatment,peptide loading and antigen processing machinery components (APM) as well as β2 microglobulin (β2-m) expression.Data revealed that the APM component calreticulin might be involved in the lower HLA-G surface expression on OCM-1A cells.Taken together,our results indicated that DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism by which HLA-G antigen expression is modulated in melanoma cells in vitro. Furthermore,to the first time, we hypothesized that the deficiency of calreticulin might be involved in the low HLA-G surface expression on the 5-AC treated OCM-lA cells.

  12. The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-B27 Peptidome in Vivo, in Spondyloarthritis-susceptible HLA-B27 Transgenic Rats and the Effect of Erap1 Deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, Eilon; Melamed Kadosh, Dganit; Haimovich, Yael; Satumtira, Nimman; Dorris, Martha L; Nguyen, Mylinh T; Hammer, Robert E; Tran, Tri M; Colbert, Robert A; Taurog, Joel D; Admon, Arie

    2017-04-01

    HLA-B27 is a class I major histocompatibility (MHC-I) allele that confers susceptibility to the rheumatic disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS) by an unknown mechanism. ERAP1 is an aminopeptidase that trims peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum for binding to MHC-I molecules. ERAP1 shows genetic epistasis with HLA-B27 in conferring susceptibility to AS. Male HLA-B27 transgenic rats develop arthritis and serve as an animal model of AS, whereas female B27 transgenic rats remain healthy. We used large scale quantitative mass spectrometry to identify over 15,000 unique HLA-B27 peptide ligands, isolated after immunoaffinity purification of the B27 molecules from the spleens of HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Heterozygous deletion of Erap1, which reduced the Erap1 level to less than half, had no qualitative or quantitative effects on the B27 peptidome. Homozygous deletion of Erap1 affected approximately one-third of the B27 peptidome but left most of the B27 peptidome unchanged, suggesting the possibility that some of the HLA-B27 immunopeptidome is not processed in the presence of Erap1. Deletion of Erap1 was permissive for the AS-like phenotype, increased mean peptide length and increased the frequency of C-terminal hydrophobic residues and of N-terminal Ala, Ser, or Lys. The presence of Erap1 increased the frequency of C-terminal Lys and Arg, of Glu and Asp at intermediate residues, and of N-terminal Gly. Several peptides of potential interest in AS pathogenesis, previously identified in human cell lines, were isolated. However, rats susceptible to arthritis had B27 peptidomes similar to those of non-susceptible rats, and no peptides were found to be uniquely associated with arthritis. Whether specific B27-bound peptides are required for AS pathogenesis remains to be determined. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005502.

  13. HLA-A*7401-mediated control of HIV viremia is independent of its linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B*5703

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Philippa C; Adland, Emily; Listgarten, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    disease, highlighting improved viremic control in subjects with HLA-A*7401 combined with HLA-B*57. In common with HLA-B alleles that are associated with effective control of viremia, HLA-A*7401 presents highly targeted epitopes in several proteins, including Gag, Pol, Rev, and Nef, of which the Gag...

  14. Increased Frequency of HLA B 17 Antigen in Girls with Turner Syndrome and their Fathers

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    C. Dacou-Voutetakis

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA-A, -B and -DR antigen distribution was studied in 49 girls with Turner Syndrome (TS, in 43 of their parents, as well as in 433 controls. No increased frequency of DR3, DR4 was found in our group. However, an increased frequency of HLA B 17 antigen was disclosed (18.3% in TS versus 6.4% in the controls, p<0.001 and Pc<0.01. Furthermore, the HLA B 17 antigen was of paternal origin in 77.7% of the cases . The interpretation of the present findings is quite difficult. Most likely, the findings are related to the chromosomal abnormality rather than to autoimmunity. It is quite possible that genes within the region of class I genes create unfavorable circumstances leading to the loss of the sex chromosome or, alternatively, genes in this region confer protection and prevent miscarriage of the affected fetus.

  15. The Yin and Yang of HLA and KIR in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Smita; Martin, Maureen P; Carrington, Mary

    2008-12-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and subsets of T cells. The KIR genes are polymorphic and the KIR gene complex is polygenic with varying numbers of inhibitory and activating receptors. HLA class I molecules serve as ligands for the KIR. Interactions of the independently segregating KIR and HLA loci are important for recognition of targets by NK cells as well as NK cell 'licensing'. Several disease association studies indicate a role for interactions between these loci in infectious diseases, autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, cancer and reproduction. Emerging functional data supports a mechanism based on a continuum of inhibition to activation through various compound KIR-HLA genotypes in diseases.

  16. The radiographic features of rheumatoid arthritis in HLA-B27-positive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundback, J.H. (Dept. of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)); Rosenberg, Z.S. (Dept. of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, Orthopaedic Inst., New York, NY (United States)); Solomon, G. (Dept. of Rheumatology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, Orthopaedic Institute, New York, NY (United States))

    1993-05-01

    Radiographs were reviewed in a group of nine patients with classical seropositive rheumatoid arthritis who on tissue typing were found to express the class I HLA-B27 allele. Radiographs were analyzed with regard to whether or not they demonstrated radiographic features of (1) classical rheumatoid arthritis, (2) seronegative arthritis, or (3) mixed features of rheumatoid and seronegative arthritis. Five patients (55%) displayed radiographic features consistent with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, two patients (22%) showed radiographic features of seronegative disorder (periostitis and sacroiliitis), and two patients (22%) showed a mixed picture with evidence of both rheumatoid arthritis and a seronegative disorder. Thus, the HLA-B27 allele contributed to the radiographic features in 44% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and associated HLA-B27. Thus, the wide range of findings in our population indicates that the radiographic attributes are not specific enough to constitute a unique subpopulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  17. Frequency of null allele of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) locus in subjects to recurrent miscarriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Nazila; Mosaferi, Elnaz; Farzadi, Laya; Majidi, Jafar; Monfaredan, Amir; Yousefi, Bahman; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class I molecule highly expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblast cells. Due to a single base pair deletion, its function can be compensated by other isoforms. Investigating the frequency of null allele in Recurrent Miscarriage (RM) subjects could be useful in understanding the relationship between frequency of this allele and RM in a given population. Objective: This study aimed to determine the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele and its potential association with down-regulation of HLA-G in subjects with RM. Materials and Methods: Western blotting was used to assess the level of HLA-G protein expression. For investigating the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele in RM subjects, PCR-RFLP method was used. Exon 3 of HLA-G gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, PpuM-1 enzyme was employed to digest the PCR products and fragments were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Results: Digestion using restriction enzyme showed the presence of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele in 10% of the test population. Western blotting results confirmed the decrease in expression of HLA-G in the placental tissue of subjects with RM compared to subjects who could give normal birth. Conclusion: The frequency of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele was high to some extent in subjects with RM. The mutation rate in subjects suggested that there is a significant association between RM and frequency of mutations in this allele. PMID:27525330

  18. HLA diversity in the 1000 genomes dataset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Antoine Gourraud

    Full Text Available The 1000 Genomes Project aims to provide a deep characterization of human genome sequence variation by sequencing at a level that should allow the genome-wide detection of most variants with frequencies as low as 1%. However, in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, only the top 10 most frequent haplotypes are in the 1% frequency range whereas thousands of haplotypes are present at lower frequencies. Given the limitation of both the coverage and the read length of the sequences generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, the highly variable positions that define HLA alleles may be difficult to identify. We used classical Sanger sequencing techniques to type the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genes in the available 1000 Genomes samples and combined the results with the 103,310 variants in the MHC region genotyped by the 1000 Genomes Project. Using pairwise identity-by-descent distances between individuals and principal component analysis, we established the relationship between ancestry and genetic diversity in the MHC region. As expected, both the MHC variants and the HLA phenotype can identify the major ancestry lineage, informed mainly by the most frequent HLA haplotypes. To some extent, regions of the genome with similar genetic or similar recombination rate have similar properties. An MHC-centric analysis underlines departures between the ancestral background of the MHC and the genome-wide picture. Our analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD decay in these samples suggests that overestimation of pairwise LD occurs due to a limited sampling of the MHC diversity. This collection of HLA-specific MHC variants, available on the dbMHC portal, is a valuable resource for future analyses of the role of MHC in population and disease studies.

  19. Skin Cancer Risk Is Modified by KIR/HLA Interactions That Influence the Activation of Natural Killer Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vineretsky, Karin A; Karagas, Margaret R; Christensen, Brock C; Kuriger-Laber, Jacquelyn K; Perry, Ann E; Storm, Craig A; Nelson, Heather H

    2016-01-15

    Natural killer (NK)-cell phenotype is partially mediated through binding of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) with HLA class I ligands. The KIR gene family is highly polymorphic and not well captured by standard genome-wide association study approaches. Here, we tested the hypothesis that variations in KIR gene content combined with HLA class I ligand status is associated with keratinocyte skin cancers using a population-based study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We conducted an interaction analysis of KIR gene content variation and HLA-B (Bw4 vs. Bw6) and HLA-C (C1 vs. C2). KIR centromeric B haplotype was associated with significant risk of multiple BCC tumors (OR, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-5.21), and there was a significant interaction between HLA-C and the activating gene KIR2DS3 for BCC (Pinteraction = 0.005). Furthermore, there was significant interaction between HLA-B and telomeric KIR B haplotype (containing the activating genes KIR3DS1 and KIR2DS1) as well as HLA-B and the activating KIR gene KIR2DS5 (Pinteraction 0.001 and 0.012, respectively). Similar but greatly attenuated associations were observed for SCC. Moreover, previous in vitro models demonstrated that p53 is required for upregulation of NK ligands, and accordingly, we observed there was a strong association between the KIR B haplotype and p53 alteration in BCC tumors, with a higher likelihood that KIR B carriers harbor abnormal p53 (P KIR and HLA modify risks of BCC and SCC and that KIR encoded by the B genes provides selective pressure for altered p53 in BCC tumors.

  20. HLA-A, -B, -C expression in colon carcinoma mimics that of the normal colonic mucosa and is prognostically relevant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, Maria; Mottolese, Marcella; Piperno, Giulia; Sperduti, Isabella; Cione, Antonio; Sibilio, Leonardo; Martayan, Aline; Donnorso, Raffaele Perrone; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2007-01-01

    Whether human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, -C expression has any predictive value on the prognosis of human malignancies remains controversial. Herein, monoclonal antibodies with preferential reactivity for HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C (HCA2, HC10, and L31) were used to stain an archival collection of 291 formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded tissues, comprising neoplastic lesions from stages II and III colon carcinoma patients (n=165), and the uninvolved, morphologically normal mucosae from a subset (n=126) of these patients. Marked staining variability was detected not only in the tumors as in previous studies, but also in the normal paired mucosae. HLA-A, -B, -C expression was similar in approximately two thirds of the available 126 normal/neoplastic pairs, confirming in vivo our previous observation that most tumor cells mimic the HLA phenotypes of their normal counterparts. Both up and down-regulation occurred in the remaining third of the pairs, but did not coincide with high and low expression, respectively, conventionally evaluated on the tumor lesion only. Remarkably, a "paired" evaluation, but not high or low expression in the tumor, was predictive of the clinical outcome. Deviations from the expression in the normal paired mucosa (both increases and decreases) of HCA2-reactive class I molecules (possibly HLA-A), and down-regulation of L31-reactive class I molecules (possibly HLA-C), particularly in tumors from stage II patients, correlated with poor 5-year overall and disease-free survival, hazard risk ranging from 2 to 6, approximately. Thus, a paired immunohistochemical comparison reveals a novel immune evasion strategy that may impact on the prognosis of colon carcinoma.

  1. [Detection of common determinants of HLA antigens A2 and B17 by absorption using human HLA serum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májský, A; Korínková, P

    1983-01-01

    Attempts of cross absorption where sera of anti-HLA A2 + B17, anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 with thrombocytes were absorbed from donors of HLA A2 positive, B17 negative and HLA A2 negative, B17 positive, revealed that anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 could be eliminated from the sera of both HLA types on the platelets. Thus, the findings allow the existence of a common determinant of HLA A2 and B17-antigens to be assumed. This is the first case where the evidence of a cross reaction between antigens of two different HLA loci with human sera could be established.

  2. HLA-B8 association with late-stage melanoma – an immunological lesson?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Mads

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in HLA allele frequencies between the diseased and healthy populations may signify efficient immune responses, a notion that has been successfully tested for infectious diseases or for association with genetic elements involved in a distinct type of immunity. This retrospective study is intended to detect differences in MHC class I carrier frequencies of advanced melanoma patients compared to healthy bone marrow donors. Methods The HLA-A and -B carrier frequencies of 748 stage IV melanoma patients retrieved from serotyping at 6 different centers in Germany were compared using a chi-square test to 13,386 fully HLA typed bone marrow donors registered in the German national bone marrow donor registry. Results The comparison of HLA carrier frequencies in advanced cancer patients with healthy bone marrow donors revealed a significant decrease in HLA-B8 carrier frequencies, which was also apparent in patients with advanced disease compared to patients with loco-regional disease. Conclusion The data suggest that protective immune responses restricted to distinct MHC class I molecules may be operational in a subset of melanoma patients, which is the prerequisite for a large scale screen for the corresponding epitopes. Alternatively, the known association of the ancestral haplotype HLA-A1, -B8 and -DR3 with genetic elements such as distinct TNF-α alleles might have a protective effect on disease progression. In any case, identification of the cause of protection within this patient subset might lead to a significant improvement in the efficacy of current immunotherapeutic approaches.

  3. Association between HLA-DQA1, -DQB1 gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to asthma in northern Chinese subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高金明; 林耀广; 邱长春; 刘怡雯; 马毅; 刘英

    2003-01-01

    Objective Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ⅱ genes, especially HLA-DQ genes, which are highly polymorphic, have been thought to be candidate loci for the etiology of asthma, and shown to be involved in antigenic presentation. This study was conducted to investigate whether susceptibility or resistance to asthma is associated with HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 genes polymorphism.Methods Venous blood samples were collected from northern Chinese population with Han ethnic. (1) One hundred and twenty-five unrelated asthmatic individuals and 52 subjects from 12 asthmatic pedigrees. (2) Ninety-six healthy controls without asthma and atopy with the same ethnic. Genomic DNA was extracted using standard phenol-chloroform method. The second exon of HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 genes were amplified by sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) method. All asthmatics had their serum IgE (total and specific) antibody or skin-prick test measured, bronchial reactivity to methacholine (Mch) and bronchial reversibility by β2-agonist evaluated.Results HLA-DQA1*0104 allele and HLA-DQB1*0201 allele were significantly higher in asthmatics than those in healthy controls (0.408 vs 0.177, P<0.01; 0.568 vs 0.198, P<0.01). Odds ratios (ORs) were 3.203 (95% CI 1.699-6.037), 5.328 (95% CI 2.883-9.849) respectively. Conversely, HLA-DQA1*0301 allele and HLA-DQB1*0301 were significantly decreased in asthmatics compared to healthy controls (0.296 vs 0.50, P<0.01; 0.4 vs 0.563, P<0.05); Logistic regression analysis showed that HLA-DQA1*0104 allele was associated independently with asthma etiology, OR [represented by Exp(B)] was 5.0942 with 95% CI 2.2520-21.1813; Spearman's analysis showed that HLA-DQA1*0104 allele and HLA-DQB1*0201 allele were positively associated with atopy, the correlation coefficient were 0.183 and 0.289 respectively, P<0.01. By contrast, HLA-DQA1*0301 allele was negatively related to atopy, the correlation coefficient was -0.168, P<0.05; linkage analysis did not support the

  4. Origins and relatedness of human leukocyte antigen class I allele supertypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugler, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles can be classified into supertypes based on the epitope specificity of their peptide binding grooves. The evolutionary origin of these supertypes has been the topic of prior research and remains an important question because of the increasing interest in HLA supertypes in the contexts of infection and cancer epidemiology and vaccine development. Here I re-examine the origins of HLA class I supertypes using the nucleotide sequences of 88 HLA-A alleles and 117 HLA-B alleles. Phylogenetic trees with ancestral character state reconstruction show that the HLA-A02, A03, and A24 supertypes largely form clades with a single ancestral origin while HLA-A01 shows multiple independent origins all from HLA-A03 ancestors. HLA-B supertypes show multiple origins for the B07, B08, and B27 supertypes, while the B44, B58, and B62 supertypes largely form clades with a single ancestor. Supertypes arising multiple times show different amino acid substitutions in each clade. These findings suggest that convergent evolution has occurred in only a few HLA allele supertypes and may indicate different evolutionary pressures shaping certain supertypes.

  5. Quantitative Trait Locus and Brain Expression of HLA-DPA1 Offers Evidence of Shared Immune Alterations in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Z. Morgan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies of schizophrenia encompassing the major histocompatibility locus (MHC were highly significant following genome-wide correction. This broad region implicates many genes including the MHC complex class II. Within this interval we examined the expression of two MHC II genes (HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DRB1 in brain from individual subjects with schizophrenia (SZ, bipolar disorder (BD, major depressive disorder (MDD, and controls by differential gene expression methods. A third MHC II mRNA, CD74, was studied outside of the MHC II locus, as it interacts within the same immune complex. Exon microarrays were performed in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC in BD compared to controls, and both HLA-DPA1 and CD74 were decreased in expression in BD. The expression of HLA-DPA1 and CD74 were both reduced in hippocampus, amygdala, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex regions in SZ and BD compared to controls by specific qPCR assay. We found several novel HLA-DPA1 mRNA variants spanning HLA-DPA1 exons 2-3-4 as suggested by exon microarrays. The intronic rs9277341 SNP was a significant cis expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL that was associated with the total expression of HLA-DPA1 in five brain regions. A biomarker study of MHC II mRNAs was conducted in SZ, BD, MDD, and control lymphoblastic cell lines (LCL by qPCR assay of 87 subjects. There was significantly decreased expression of HLA-DPA1 and CD74 in BD, and trends for reductions in SZ in LCLs. The discovery of multiple splicing variants in brain for HLA-DPA1 is important as the HLA-DPA1 gene is highly conserved, there are no reported splicing variants, and the functions in brain are unknown. Future work on the function and localization of MHC Class II proteins in brain will help to understand the role of alterations in neuropsychiatric disorders. The HLA-DPA1 eQTL is located within a large linkage disequilibrium block that has an irrefutable association with schizophrenia. Future

  6. HLA-B5/51 GENOTYPE: AN ASSOCIATION WITH THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF BEHCET’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. S. Alekberova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the contribution of HLA-B5/51 genotype to the clinical manifestations and risk of Behcet’s disease (BD in two ethnic groups.Subjects and methods. 146 BD patients fulfilling the International Criteria for BD (ICBD were divided into two ethnic groups: 1 86 patients from Dagestan (representatives of 8 ethnic nationalities in this region with mean age 30.7±9.6 years; disease duration – 8.8±10.1 years; 2 60 ethnic Russian patients, nonresidents of Dagestan with mean age 32.9±11.1 years; disease duration – 11.2±10.1 years. All patients were examined at the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology in 1990 to 2014. HLA class I antigens were typed by a microlymphocytotoxic technique using a Gisans anti-leukocyte sera kit (Saint Petersburg.Results. HLA-B5/51 was detected in 87 (59.6% patients, much more often in men than in women (70 and 38%, respectively; p<0.01. Genital ulcers and erythema nodosum were significantly more common in HLA-B5/51-positive Dagestani (87.3 and 57% than in HLA-B5/51-negative ones (56.5 and 26%; p=0.0019 and р=0.01; respectively. There were no significant differences in these signs in the Russian group of patients with BD depending on the presence of this allele. In HLA-B5/51-positive male Dagestani patients with BD, the risk of erythema nodosum was twice as high as that in HLA-B5/51-negative patients (p=0.054. In HLA-B5/51 female Dagestani carriers, the risk of genital ulcers and generalized uveitis proved to be 3.5 (p=0.057 and 2.7 times higher than that in HLA-B5/51 noncarriers. Frequency of HLA-B5/51 was 73.2% among the Dagestanis and 40% among the Russians. Furthermore, this investigation revealed HLA-B5/51 carriage mainly in the male BD patients. Therefore, in addition to ethnicity, gender should be borne in mind when analyzing the clinical associations with HLA-B5/51.

  7. Combination of KIR 2DL2 and HLA-C1 (Asn 80) confers susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in Latvians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, A; Sedimbi, S K; Rajalingam, R; Nikitina-Zake, L; Rumba, I; Wigzell, H; Sanjeevi, C B

    2008-12-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are known to modulate natural killer (NK) and NK T-cell function by interacting with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands on target cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of KIR2D genes with their HLA-C ligands in susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. A total of 98 type 1 diabetes patients and 70 healthy subjects from Latvia were typed for KIR genes and HLA-C ligands using polymerase chain reaction-based genotyping. The HLA C1+/C2+ combination was positively, and C1-/C2+ combination was negatively, associated with type 1 diabetes. Stratification analysis of KIR/HLA-C ligand combinations showed 2DL2+/C1+, 2DL3+/C1+, and 2DS2+ /C1+ to be positively, and 2DL2-/C1- and 2DS2-/ C1- to be negatively, associated. The presence of 2DL2-HLA-C1 in the absence of 2DS1, 2DS2 confers maximum susceptibility. Absence of 2DL2 and HLA-C1 along with absence of 2DS1 and 2DS2 confer maximum protection. A hypothetical model of KIR/ligand combinations on immune responses and type 1 diabetes susceptibility is proposed. Our results suggest that a combination KIR2DL2- HLA-C1 plays a critical role in susceptibility or protection in Latvians against type 1 diabetes.

  8. Donor-specific HLA antibodies in chronic renal allograft rejection: a prospective trial with a four-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Nils; Terasaki, Paul I; Schönemann, Constanze

    2006-01-01

    A total of 1,043 serum samples of kidney allograft recipients with functioning grafts at a mean of 6 years after transplantation were tested once for HLA abs and monitored for graft and patient survival for 4 years after testing. All grafts were transplanted between 1984 and 2004 at the Charité hospital (Berlin, Germany). 1. To our knowledge this is the first study with more than 1,000 patients designed to elucidate the impact of DSA and NDSA on late renal graft outcome. True donor specificity of HLA abs in 30% of antibody positive patients was determined by using a single HLA antigen coated bead assay. 2. The long-term graft survival was adversely impacted by the presence of HLA abs directed against mismatched HLA antigens and to a lesser extent also by NDSA. This difference was shown to be leveled at late stages of graft damage, suggesting NDSA as a predictor of adsorbed DSA killing the graft. 3. The deleterious effect of preexisting and de novo formed HLA abs on long-term graft function was shown to be equal. Despite a negative crossmatch at the time of transplantation sensitized recipients and those who produced HLA abs de novo posttransplant showed the same increased risk of late graft failure. 4. Among patients with DSA and additional NDSA the majority of 74% of assigned potential HLA class I epitopes were shared among DSA and NDSA suggesting mismatched donor antigens as the cause of detected NDSA.

  9. Statistical resolution of ambiguous HLA typing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Listgarten

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution HLA typing plays a central role in many areas of immunology, such as in identifying immunogenetic risk factors for disease, in studying how the genomes of pathogens evolve in response to immune selection pressures, and also in vaccine design, where identification of HLA-restricted epitopes may be used to guide the selection of vaccine immunogens. Perhaps one of the most immediate applications is in direct medical decisions concerning the matching of stem cell transplant donors to unrelated recipients. However, high-resolution HLA typing is frequently unavailable due to its high cost or the inability to re-type historical data. In this paper, we introduce and evaluate a method for statistical, in silico refinement of ambiguous and/or low-resolution HLA data. Our method, which requires an independent, high-resolution training data set drawn from the same population as the data to be refined, uses linkage disequilibrium in HLA haplotypes as well as four-digit allele frequency data to probabilistically refine HLA typings. Central to our approach is the use of haplotype inference. We introduce new methodology to this area, improving upon the Expectation-Maximization (EM-based approaches currently used within the HLA community. Our improvements are achieved by using a parsimonious parameterization for haplotype distributions and by smoothing the maximum likelihood (ML solution. These improvements make it possible to scale the refinement to a larger number of alleles and loci in a more computationally efficient and stable manner. We also show how to augment our method in order to incorporate ethnicity information (as HLA allele distributions vary widely according to race/ethnicity as well as geographic area, and demonstrate the potential utility of this experimentally. A tool based on our approach is freely available for research purposes at http://microsoft.com/science.

  10. Characterization of human antiviral adaptive immune responses during hepatotropic virus infection in HLA-transgenic human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billerbeck, Eva; Horwitz, Joshua A; Labitt, Rachael N; Donovan, Bridget M; Vega, Kevin; Budell, William C; Koo, Gloria C; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2013-08-15

    Humanized mice have emerged as a promising model to study human immunity in vivo. Although they are susceptible to many pathogens exhibiting an almost exclusive human tropism, human immune responses to infection remain functionally impaired. It has recently been demonstrated that the expression of HLA molecules improves human immunity to lymphotropic virus infections in humanized mice. However, little is known about the extent of functional human immune responses in nonlymphoid tissues, such as in the liver, and the role of HLA expression in this context. Therefore, we analyzed human antiviral immunity in humanized mice during a hepatotropic adenovirus infection. We compared immune responses of conventional humanized NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient (NSG) mice to those of a novel NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient strain transgenic for both HLA-A*0201 and a chimeric HLA-DR*0101 molecule. Using a firefly luciferase-expressing adenovirus and in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we demonstrate a human T cell-dependent partial clearance of adenovirus-infected cells from the liver of HLA-transgenic humanized mice. This correlated with liver infiltration and activation of T cells, as well as the detection of Ag-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. When infected with a hepatitis C virus NS3-expressing adenovirus, HLA-transgenic humanized mice mounted an HLA-A*0201-restricted hepatitis C virus NS3-specific CD8(+) T cell response. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the generation of partial functional antiviral immune responses against a hepatotropic pathogen in humanized HLA-transgenic mice. The adenovirus reporter system used in our study may serve as simple in vivo method to evaluate future strategies for improving human intrahepatic immune responses in humanized mice.

  11. Complementarity of Binding Motifs is a General Property of HLA-A and HLA-B Molecules and Does Not Seem to Effect HLA Haplotype Composition

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent) are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these assoc...

  12. [Polymorphism of human HLA-DRB1 leukocyte antigen alleles and its association to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in a sample of Colombian mestizo children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavito, Gloria; Malagón, Clara; Ramírez, Luis A; De La Cruz, Oscar F; Uribe, Oscar; Navarro, Edgar; Iglesias, Antonio; Martínez, Paz; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Egea, Eduardo

    2003-09-01

    Oligotypes of the human leukocyte antigen HLA Class II, DRB1 alleles were characterized at the molecular level in a group of Colombian children suffering juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). The distribution of these alleles was examined in a group of Colombian mestizo children (genetic admixture of Amerindians, Europeans and Africans) suffering from clinically distinct JRA subsets in order to detect HLA allele frequency differences in patients with different JRA subsets. A group of 65 patients with JRA and 65 controls were characterized for the subtypes of the HLA-DRB1 alleles using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP). The oligotyping protocol recommended by the 12th International Histocompatibility Workshop held in St. Malo, Paris, in 1996, was used. Subtype HLA-DRB1*1104 was the allele most strongly associated with susceptibility to JRA (Fisher's p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR) = 16.79, etiologic fraction (EF) = 0.93). HLA-DRB1*1602 was also associated with susceptibility to a lesser degree (Fisher's p = 0.016, OR = 8.98, EF = 0.88). HLA-DRB1 alleles participating in JRA protection were HLA-DRB1*1501 (preventive fraction (PF) = 0.466, p = 0.005) and HLA DRB1*1402 (PF = 0.49, p = 0.009). The relationship between some HLA-DRB1 alleles and clinical features was also compared. The presence of rheumatic factor was associated with the alleles HLA-DRB1*0407 (p = 0.05, OR = 11.2, EF = 0.45) and HLA-DRB1*1302 (p = 0.02, OR = 22.8, EF = 0.63). There was also an association between HLA-DRB1*0701 (p = 0.001, OR = 58, EF = 0.73) with expressing ANA +. We found that in the oligoarticular subset, the allele HLA-DRB1*1104 (p = 0.0034, OR = 41.53, EF = 0.97) was the one expressed most commonly. In the poliarticular group, the alleles most frequently expressed were HLA-DRB1*0404 (Fisher's p = 0.012, OR = 8.75, EF = 0.88). In patients with systemic JRA, the HLA-DRB1*1602 allele (p = 0.005, OR = 21.33, EF = 0.95) was most frequent. These

  13. HLA-B27 subtypes among the Chukotka native groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krylov, M.Y.; Alexeeva, L.I.; Erdesz, S.; Benevolenskaya, L.I. [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Revmatizma; Reveille, J.D.; Arnett, F.C. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Health Science Center

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of the known HLA-B27 subtypes in HLA-B27 positive Chukotka natives, which have higher frequencies of HLA-B27 (to 40%) and spondylarthropathies (to 2%) than the Russian Caucasian population. Using oligotyping of the polymerase-chain reaction amplified second and third exons of the HLA-B27 gene in 86 DNA samples from HLA-B27 positive individuals were successfully typed. All had HLA-B*2705, including 4 patients with Reiter`s syndrome and 5 with ankylosing spondyloarthritis, except one Eskimo who had HLA-B*2702. None had HLA-B*2704, a frequent subtype in Orientals. With respect to HLA-B27 subtypes the indigenous populations from the eastern part of the Chukotka Peninsula are genetically more closely related to Caucasians than to Orientals. (author). 18 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. HLA antigens and asthma in Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, J; Toumbis, M; Konstantopoulos, K; Kamaroulias, D; Anagnostakis, J; Georgoulias, V; Fessas, P; Zervas, J

    1996-04-01

    HLA-A and -B antigens were determined in a group of 76 Greek asthmatic patients: 35 children (1.5-15 years) and 41 adults (18-73 years). The results were compared to those of 400 healthy unrelated controls from the same population. The standard NIH lymphocytotoxicity test was applied. When all 76 patients were compared to the controls, a statistically significant lower frequency of HLA-B5 and -B35 antigens was noted. When adults were analysed alone, an increased frequency of HLA-B8 was found. On the other hand, in the asthmatic children sub-group, the HLA-A10 antigen was significantly higher and the HLA-B5 was significantly lower than in the controls. These data imply that different HLA antigens may be involved in the pathogenesis of several clinical forms of asthma and that, in order to study the role of immunogenetic factor(s) in the pathogenesis of this disease, more adequate grouping criteria are needed.

  15. HLA-E expression in cervical adenocarcinomas: association with improved long-term survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaans Vivian M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide. The most common histopathological subtype is cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, 75-80%, followed by adenocarcinoma (AC and adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC; together 15-20%. Rising incidence rates of AC have been observed relative and absolute to SCC and evidence is accumulating that cervical AC is a distinct clinical entity. Cervical SCC, ASC, and AC are caused by a persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV and failed control of the immune system plays a pivotal role in the carcinogenesis of all three histopathological subtypes. Human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E, a non-classical HLA class Ib molecule, plays an important role in immune surveillance and immune escape of virally infected cells. In this study we investigated HLA-E expression in three well-defined cohorts of cervical AC, ASC, and SCC patients, and determined whether HLA-E expression was associated with histopathological parameters and patient survival. Methods and results HLA-E expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 79 SCC, 38 ASC, and 75 AC patients. All patients included were International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics stage I-II and underwent radical hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy as primary treatment. Significant differences between the histopathological subgroups were detected for age distribution, HPV positivity, HPV type distribution, tumour size, tumour infiltration depth, lymph-vascular space invasion, and adjuvant radiotherapy. High expression of HLA-E was found in 107/192 (56% cervical carcinomas, with significantly more overexpression in cervical AC compared to SCC and ASC (37/79 SCC, 18/38 ASC, and 52/75 AC; P = 0.010. High HLA-E expression in cervical AC was associated with favourable long term disease-specific and recurrence-free survival (P = 0.005 and P = 0

  16. A comparative review of HLA associations with hepatitis B and C viral infections across global populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rashmi Singh; Rashmi Kaul; Anil Kaul; Khalid Khan

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viral infection or co-infection leads to risk of development of chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immigration and globalization have added to the challenges of public health concerns regarding chronic HBV and HCV infections worldwide. The aim of this study is to review existing global literature across ethnic populations on HBV and HCV related human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations in relation to susceptibility, viral persistence and treatment. Extensive literature search was conducted to explore the HLA associations in HBV and HCV infections reported across global populations over the past decade to understand the knowledge status, weaknesses and strengths of this information in different ethnic populations. HLA DR13 is consistently associated with HBV clearance globally. HLADRB1*11/*12 alleles and DQB1*0301 are associated with HBV persistence but with HCV clearance worldwide. Consistent association of DRB1*03 and *07 is observed with HCV susceptibility and non-responsiveness to HBV vaccination across the population. HLA DR13 is protective for vertical HBV and HCV transmission in Chinese and Italian neonates, but different alleles are associated with their susceptibility in these populations. HLA class I molecule interactions with Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptors (KIR) of natural killer (NK) cells modulate HCV infection outcome via regulating immune regulatory cells and molecules. HLA associations with HBV vaccination, interferon therapy in HBV and HCV, and with extra hepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis are also discussed. Systematic studies in compliance with global regulatory standards are required to identify the HLA specific viral epitope, stage specific T cell populations interacting with different HLA alleles during disease progression and viral clearance ofchronic HBV or HCV infections among different ethnic populations. These studies would facilitate stage specific

  17. Inhibitory NK receptor recognition of HLA-G: regulation by contact residues and by cell specific expression at the fetal-maternal interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsufit Gonen-Gross

    Full Text Available The non-classical HLA-G protein is distinguished from the classical MHC class I molecules by its expression pattern, low polymorphism and its ability to form complexes on the cell surface. The special role of HLA-G in the maternal-fetal interface has been attributed to its ability to interact with specific receptors found on maternal immune cells. However this interaction is restricted to a limited number of receptors. In this study we elucidate the reason for this phenomenon by comparing the specific contact residues responsible for MHC-KIR interactions. This alignment revealed a marked difference between the HLA-G molecule and other MHC class I molecules. By mutating these residues to the equivalent classical MHC residues, the HLA-G molecule regained an ability of interacting with KIR inhibitory receptors found on NK cells derived either from peripheral blood or from the decidua. Functional NK killing assays further substantiated the binding results. Furthermore, double immunofluorescent staining of placental sections revealed that while the conformed form of HLA-G was expressed in all extravillous trophoblasts, the free heavy chain form of HLA-G was expressed in more distal cells of the column, the invasion front. Overall we suggest that HLA-G protein evolved to interact with only some of the NK inhibitory receptors thus allowing a control of inhibition, while permitting appropriate NK cell cytokine and growth factor production necessary for a viable maternal fetal interface.

  18. Persistence of hepatitis C virus in a white population: associations with human leukocyte antigen class 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, Liam J

    2012-02-03

    The aim of this study was to define novel associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class 1 alleles and persistence or clearance of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a white population. All individuals in the study were seropositive for anti-HCV antibodies. Viral status was determined by the Roche HCV Amplicor test. HLA-A, -B, -C allelic group profile was molecularly defined by reverse line probe hybridization. The strongest individual allelic group associations with persistent HCV infection were HLA A*11 (p = 0.044) and Cw*04 (p = 0.006). However, only the HLA C*04 association survived correction for multiple comparisons. Further analysis of alleles in linkage with HLA Cw*04 revealed that the haplotype HLA A*11, Cw*04 was present in 11 individuals, 10 of whom were viremic (p = 0.05). No gene dosage effect was observed. No association between HLA class 1 allelic groups and aviremia and virus load was evident in this white population. HLA B*44 is associated with low virus load in human immunodeficiency virus disease, but this association was not evident in this HCV-infected population. Novel HLA class 1 alleles associated with persistence of HCV have been identified.

  19. Circulating preproinsulin signal peptide-specific CD8 T cells restricted by the susceptibility molecule HLA-A24 are expanded at onset of type 1 diabetes and kill β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Deborah; Knight, Robin R; Estorninho, Megan; Ellis, Richard J; Kester, Michel G; de Ru, Arnoud; Eichmann, Martin; Huang, Guo C; Powrie, Jake; Dayan, Colin M; Skowera, Ania; van Veelen, Peter A; Peakman, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from T cell-mediated β-cell destruction. The HLA-A*24 class I gene confers significant risk of disease and early onset. We tested the hypothesis that HLA-A24 molecules on islet cells present preproinsulin (PPI) peptide epitopes to CD8 cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Surrogate β-cell lines secreting proinsulin and expressing HLA-A24 were generated and their peptide ligandome examined by mass spectrometry to discover naturally processed and HLA-A24-presented PPI epitopes. A novel PPI epitope was identified and used to generate HLA-A24 tetramers and examine the frequency of PPI-specific T cells in new-onset HLA-A*24(+) patients and control subjects. We identified a novel naturally processed and HLA-A24-presented PPI signal peptide epitope (PPI(3-11); LWMRLLPLL). HLA-A24 tetramer analysis reveals a significant expansion of PPI(3-11)-specific CD8 T cells in the blood of HLA-A*24(+) recent-onset patients compared with HLA-matched control subjects. Moreover, a patient-derived PPI(3-11)-specific CD8 T-cell clone shows a proinflammatory phenotype and kills surrogate β-cells and human HLA-A*24(+) islet cells in vitro. These results indicate that the type 1 diabetes susceptibility molecule HLA-A24 presents a naturally processed PPI signal peptide epitope. PPI-specific, HLA-A24-restricted CD8 T cells are expanded in patients with recent-onset disease. Human islet cells process and present PPI(3-11), rendering themselves targets for CTL-mediated killing.

  20. Analysis of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in colombian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamín Rocío Arias-Murillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The high polymorphism of the HLA system allows its typification to be used as valuable tool in establishing association to various illnesses, immune and genetic profiles; it also provides a guide to identifying compatibility among donors and receptors of organs transplants. Objective: To establish HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA.DRB1 allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies among patients treated at Clinica Colsanitas SA. Methods: 561 patients coming from different regions in Colombia, who were attended in 8 centers of the clinical laboratory of the Clinica Colsanitas in different cities of the country from January 2004 to August 2008, were included in this study. All were HLA-A,-B, and -DRB1 typified via SSP PCR. Allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies were estimated with STATA Software Version 9.0 and the GENEPOP genetic analysis package. Results: 19, 28, and 15 different alleles were identified for loci HLA-A,-B and -DRB1, respectively. Alleles found most frequently were A*24 (26.2%, A*02 (26%, B*35(22.7%, and DRB1*04 (24%. The most frequent genotypes were A*02,24 (14.2%, B*07,35 (5.5%, DRB1*01,04, and DRB1*04,04 (6.9%; while most the frequent haplotypes were HLA A*24, B*35 (9.2%, A*24, DRB1*04 (8.1%; B*35, DRB1*04 (7.8%, A*2 DRB1*04 (7.4%. Conclusion: The results obtained provide a useful reference framework for the population studied, allowing compatibility probability calculations to be performed for organ transplants.

  1. Analysis of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in colombian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmin Rocío Árias-Murillo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The high polymorphism of the HLA system allows its typification to be used as valuable tool in establishing association to various illnesses, immune and genetic profiles; it also provides a guide to identifying compatibility among donors and receptors of organs transplants.Objective: To establish HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA.DRB1 allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies among patients treated at Clinica Colsanitas SA.Methods: 561 patients coming from different regions in Colombia, who were attended in 8 centers of the clinical laboratory of the Clinica Colsanitas in different cities of the country from January 2004 to August 2008, were included in this study. All were HLA-A,-B, and -DRB1 typified via SSP PCR. Allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies were estimated with STATA Software Version 9.0 and the GENEPOP genetic analysis package.Results: 19, 28, and 15 different alleles were identified for loci HLA-A,-B and -DRB1, respectively. Alleles found most frequently were A*24 (26.2%, A*02 (26%, B*35(22.7%, and DRB1*04 (24%. The most frequent genotypes were A*02,24 (14.2%, B*07,35 (5.5%, DRB1*01,04, and DRB1*04,04 (6.9%; while most the frequent haplotypes were HLA A*24, B*35 (9.2%, A*24, DRB1*04 (8.1%; B*35, DRB1*04 (7.8%, A*2 DRB1*04 (7.4%.Conclusion: The results obtained provide a useful reference framework for the population studied, allowing compatibility probability calculations to be performed for organ transplants.

  2. HLA polymorphisms as incidence factor in the progression to end-stage renal disease in Brazilian patients awaiting kidney transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispim, J C; Mendes-Júnior, C T; Wastowski, I J; Palomino, G Martelli; Saber, L T; Rassi, D M; Donadi, E A

    2008-06-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) leads in the majority of instances to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy. Age, gender, genetics, race, hypertension, and smoking among others are factors associated with ESRD. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of class I and II HLA antigens with ESRD renal disease independent of other factors, among patients with CRF, having various diagnoses in the Brazilian population of the São Paulo state. So 21 HLA-A, 31 HLA-B, and 13 HLA-DR were detected in 105 patients who were compared with 160 healthy controls of both sexes who were not related to the patients evaluated until 2005. We calculated allelic frequencies, haplotypes frequencies, etiological fractions (EF), preventive fractions, and relative risks (RR). We compared demographic data of patients and controls. The antigens positively associated with ESRD were: HLA-A78 (RR = 30.31 and EF = 0.96) and HLA-DR11 (RR = 18.87 and EF = 0.65). The antigens HLAB14 (RR = 29.90 and EF = 0.75) was present at a significantly lower frequency among patients compared with controls. In contrast, no haplotype frequency showed statically significant associations. Further molecular studies may clarify types and subtypes of alleles involved with ESRD progression.

  3. Association between HLA-G genotype and risk of pre-eclampsia: a case-control study using family triads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hylenius, Sine; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Melbye, Mads;

    2004-01-01

    that it is caused by immune- maladaptation. The MHC class Ib gene, HLA-G, is expressed in the placenta and seems to have immunomodulatory functions. Aberrant HLA-G mRNA and protein expression in pre-eclamptic placentas have been reported. Here, we have investigated detailed HLA-G genotypes in a case-control study...... of 155 family triads of mother, father and newborn. Among primiparas, an overrepresentation of a homozygous HLA-G genotype was detected in the 40 pre-eclamptic offspring compared to the 70 controls [P = 0.002, Fisher's exact test; odds ratio 5.57 (95% CI 1.79-17.31)]. Further analyses suggested...... that the differences between pre-eclamptic cases and controls primarily were accomplished by a different transmission from the father of a 14 bp deletion/insertion polymorphism in exon 8 (P = 0.006, Fisher's exact test), which previously has been linked to differences in the levels of HLA-G expression and in HLA-G m...

  4. Identification of MHC class II restricted T-cell-mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila T; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune; Larsen, Mette V; Dziegiel, Morten H; Lewinsohn, David M; Buus, Søren; Lund, Ole; Claesson, Mogens H

    2011-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide-based vaccines. In the present work, bioinformatics technology was employed to predict binding motifs of 9mer peptides derived from M. tuberculosis for the 12 HLA-I supertypes. Subsequently, the predicted peptides were synthesized and assayed for binding to HLA-I molecules in a biochemically based system. The antigenicity of a total of 157 peptides with measured affinity for HLA-I molecules of K(D) ≤ 500 nM were evaluated using peripheral blood T cells from strongly purified protein derivative reactive healthy donors. Of the 157 peptides, eight peptides (5%) were found to induce T-cell responses. As judged from blocking with HLA class I and II subtype antibodies in the ELISPOT assay culture, none of the eight antigenic peptides induced HLA class I restricted CD8(+) T-cell responses. Instead all responses were blocked by pan-HLA class II and anti-HLA-DR antibodies. In addition, CD4(+) T-cell depletion before the 10 days of expansion, resulted in total loss of reactivity in the ELISPOT culture for most peptide specificities. FACS analyses with intracellular interferon-γ staining of T cells expanded in the presence of M. tuberculosis peptides confirmed that the responsive cells were indeed CD4(+). In conclusion, T-cell immunity against HLA-I binding 9mer M. tuberculosis-derived peptides might in many cases turn out to be mediated by CD4(+) T cells and restricted by HLA-II molecules. The use of 9mer peptides recognized by both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells might be of importance for the development of future M. tuberculosis peptide-based vaccines.

  5. Peptide-binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John

    2013-01-01

    that they may be a better model for HIV. Nevertheless, the specific mechanism(s) accounting for these kinetics remains unclear. The study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, including their MHC/peptide-binding motifs, provides valuable information for measuring cellular immune responses...... in humans. All six alleles characterized in the present study were found to have specificities analogous to HLA supertype alleles. These data contribute to the concept that Chinese rhesus macaque MHC immunogenetics is more similar to HLA than their Indian rhesus macaque counterparts and thereby warrants...

  6. Chronic Beryllium Disease: revealing the role of beryllium ion and small peptides binding to HLA-DP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukh, Marharyta; Wu, Bohua; Stefl, Shannon; Smith, Nick; Hyde-Volpe, David; Wang, Li; Alexov, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Beryllium (Be) Disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder that predominantly affects the lung. The CBD is caused by Be exposure of individuals carrying the HLA-DP2 protein of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII). While the involvement of Be in the development of CBD is obvious and the binding site and the sequence of Be and peptide binding were recently experimentally revealed [1], the interplay between induced conformational changes and the changes of the peptide binding affinity in presence of Be were not investigated. Here we carry out in silico modeling and predict the Be binding to be within the acidic pocket (Glu26, Glu68 and Glu69) present on the HLA-DP2 protein in accordance with the experimental work [1]. In addition, the modeling indicates that the Be ion binds to the HLA-DP2 before the corresponding peptide is able to bind to it. Further analysis of the MD generated trajectories reveals that in the presence of the Be ion in the binding pocket of HLA-DP2, all the different types of peptides induce very similar conformational changes, but their binding affinities are quite different. Since these conformational changes are distinctly different from the changes caused by peptides normally found in the cell in the absence of Be, it can be speculated that CBD can be caused by any peptide in presence of Be ion. However, the affinities of peptides for Be loaded HLA-DP2 were found to depend of their amino acid composition and the peptides carrying acidic group at positions 4 and 7 are among the strongest binders. Thus, it is proposed that CBD is caused by the exposure of Be of an individual carrying the HLA-DP2*0201 allele and that the binding of Be to HLA-DP2 protein alters the conformational and ionization properties of HLA-DP2 such that the binding of a peptide triggers a wrong signaling cascade.

  7. KIR : HLA association with clinical manifestations of HBV infection in Madurai, south India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narayanan Kalyanaraman; Lakshmikanthan Thayumanavan; Mariakuttikan Jayalakshmi

    2016-03-01

    The antiviral action of natural killer (NK) cells is regulated by a wide repertoire of germ-line encoded membrane receptors which recognize the expression of certain self-molecules on target cells. Among the receptors, killer cell immunoglobulinlikereceptor (KIR) which recognizes the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I has a predominant role in regulating the effector functions of NK cells, particularly in viral infections. We studied a total of 128 hepatitis B virus (HBV)patients (15 acute, 43 asymptomatic, 27 chronic and 43 with other liver diseases) while attending the Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, India, and 128 ethnic matched control to find the association between the KIR : HLA genes and differential manifestations of HBV. KIR and its ligand HLA polymorphism were identified by DNAPCR methods. The activatory receptor KIR-2DS1 was significantly elevated in various disease categories, namely asymptomatic, chronic and other HBV, except acute HBV infection. Whereas, KIR 2DS3 in acute and chronic patients and KIR 2DS5 and 3DS1 in asymptomatic individuals. Among various KIR–HLA combinations, homozygous 2DS2:C1 and individuals with 3DSI:BW4 (OR = 3.23, CI = 1.55–6.7, Pc = 0.02) are associated with HBV asymptomatism, while most of the two domain inhibitory receptors with their ligands showed significant risk in other liver diseases. Further, KIR3DL1 : HLA Bw4Iso80 (OR = 3.89, 95% CI = 1.58–9.55, Pc = 0.004) is related with higher risk for asymptomatic infection when compared with chronic HBV. Thus, the select KIR : HLA alleles and combinations seem to direct the NK cell activities and immune response in different directions resulting in varied symptoms and manifestations in the subgroups of HBV-infected patientsstudied.

  8. Epistatic interaction of ERAP1 and HLA-B in Behcet disease: a replication study in the Spanish population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Conde-Jaldón

    Full Text Available Behçet's disease (BD is a multifactorial disorder associated with the HLA region. Recently, the ERAP1 gene has been proposed as a susceptibility locus with a recessive model and with epistatic interaction with HLA-B51. ERAP1 trims peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum to optimize their length for MHC-I binding. Polymorphisms in this gene have been related with the susceptibility to other immune-mediated diseases associated to HLA class I. Our aim was, the replication in the Spanish population of the association described in the Turkish population between ERAP1 (rs17482078 and BD. Additionally, in order to improve the understanding of this association we analyzed four additional SNPs (rs27044, rs10050860, rs30187 and rs2287987 associated with other diseases related to HLA class I and the haplotype blocks in this gene region. According to our results, frequencies of the homozygous genotypes for the minor alleles of all the SNPs were increased among patients and the OR values were higher in the subgroup of patients with the HLA-B risk factors, although differences were not statistically significant. Moreover, the presence of the same mutation in both chromosomes increased the OR values from 4.51 to 10.72 in individuals carrying the HLA-B risk factors. Therefore, although they were not statistically significant, our data were consistent with an association between ERAP1 and BD as well as with an epistatic interaction between ERAP1 and HLA-B in the Spanish population.

  9. Differential Clade-Specific HLA-B*3501 Association with HIV-1 Disease Outcome Is Linked to Immunogenicity of a Single Gag Epitope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Philippa C.; Koyanagi, Madoka; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Juarez Molina, Claudia; Valenzuela Ponce, Humberto; Avila Rios, Santiago; Cole, David; Carlson, Jonathan; Payne, Rebecca P.; Ogwu, Anthony; Bere, Alfred; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Gounder, Kamini; Chen, Fabian; Riddell, Lynn; Luzzi, Graz; Shapiro, Roger; Brander, Christian; Walker, Bruce; Sewell, Andrew K.; Reyes Teran, Gustavo; Heckerman, David; Hunter, Eric; Buus, Søren; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Goulder, Philip J. R.

    2012-01-01

    The strongest genetic influence on immune control in HIV-1 infection is the HLA class I genotype. Rapid disease progression in B-clade infection has been linked to HLA-B*35 expression, in particular to the less common HLA-B*3502 and HLA-B*3503 subtypes but also to the most prevalent subtype, HLA-B*3501. In these studies we first demonstrated that whereas HLA-B*3501 is associated with a high viral set point in two further B-clade-infected cohorts, in Japan and Mexico, this association does not hold in two large C-clade-infected African cohorts. We tested the hypothesis that clade-specific differences in HLA associations with disease outcomes may be related to distinct targeting of critical CD8+ T-cell epitopes. We observed that only one epitope was significantly targeted differentially, namely, the Gag-specific epitope NPPIPVGDIY (NY10, Gag positions 253 to 262) (P = 2 × 10−5). In common with two other HLA-B*3501-restricted epitopes, in Gag and Nef, that were not targeted differentially, a response toward NY10 was associated with a significantly lower viral set point. Nonimmunogenicity of NY10 in B-clade-infected subjects derives from the Gag-D260E polymorphism present in ∼90% of B-clade sequences, which critically reduces recognition of the Gag NY10 epitope. These data suggest that in spite of any inherent HLA-linked T-cell receptor repertoire differences that may exist, maximizing the breadth of the Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell response, by the addition of even a single epitope, may be of overriding importance in achieving immune control of HIV infection. This distinction is of direct relevance to development of vaccines designed to optimize the anti-HIV CD8+ T-cell response in all individuals, irrespective of HLA type. PMID:22973023

  10. Human leucocyte antigen class Ib molecules in pregnancy success and early pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2013-01-01

    AND CONCLUSIONS The HLA class Ib molecules seem to induce suppression of the maternal immune system, but are not necessarily fundamental factors for pregnancy success. However, evidence points towards low expression of these proteins, especially HLA-G, being associated with reduced fertility. To clarify...

  11. Identifying coevolutionary patterns in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaowei; Fares, Mario A

    2010-05-01

    The antigenic peptide, major histocompatibility complex molecule (MHC; also called human leukocyte antigen, HLA), coreceptor CD8, or CD4 and T-cell receptor (TCR) function as a complex to initiate effectors' mechanisms of the immune system. The tight functional and physical interaction among these molecules may have involved strong coevolution links among domains within and between proteins. Despite the importance of unraveling such dependencies to understand the arms race of host-pathogen interaction, no previous studies have aimed at achieving such an objective. Here, we perform an exhaustive coevolution analysis and show that indeed such dependencies are strongly shaping the evolution and probably the function of these molecules. We identify intramolecular coevolution in HLA class I and II at domains important for their immune activity. Most of the amino acid sites identified to be coevolving in HLAI have been also detected to undergo positive Darwinian selection highlighting therefore their adaptive value. We also identify coevolution among antigen-binding pockets (P1-P9) and among these and TCR-binding sites. Conversely to HLAI, coevolution is weaker in HLAII. Our results support that such coevolutionary patterns are due to selective pressures of host-pathogen coevolution and cooperative binding of TCRs, antigenic peptides, and CD8/CD4 to HLAI and HLAII.

  12. Association of defective HLA-Ⅰ expression with antigen processing machinery and their association with clinicopathological characteristics in Kazak patients with esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayshamgul Hasim; MA Hong; Ilyar Sheyhidin; ZHANG Li-wei; Abulizi Abudula

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been confirmed that defective expression of human leukocyte antigen class Ⅰ (HLA-Ⅰ) molecules can contribute to the immune evasion of cancer cells in some types of cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of HLA class Ⅰ antigen and the antigen-processing machinery (APM) components in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and their role in high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and to analyze their association with histopathological characteristics in the Kazak ethnic group.Methods A total of 50 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded ESCC lesions were collected from the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, China. The expression levels of HLA-Ⅰ antigen and APM components were determined by immunohistochemistry; the HPV DNA were detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Results A high frequency of down-regulation or loss of expression of HLA and APM components were found in esophageal cancer in Kazak people. HLA-Ⅰ, TAP1, CNX, LMP7, Erp57, Tapasin and ERAP1 were down-regulated in 68%,44%, 48%, 40%, 52%, 32% and 20% of ESCC lesions then, respectively. The loss of expression of HLA-Ⅰ antigen was significantly correlated with part of the APM components and positively correlated with high risk HPV16 infection. TAP1,CNX, LMP7, Erp57 and Tapasin loss were significantly associated with tumor grading, lymph node metastasis and depth of invasion (P<0.05).Conclusion Our results suggest that APM component defects are a mechanism underlying HLA-Ⅰ antigen down-regulation in ESCC lesions, and indicate that the loss expression of HLA-Ⅰ and APM components will become an important marker of ESCC and analysis of HLA-Ⅰ and APM component expression can provide useful prognostic information for patients with ESCC from the Kazak ethnic group.

  13. A human homologue to the yeast omnipotent suppressor 45 maps 100 kb centromeric to HLA-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvel, B.; Dorval, I.; Fergelot, P. [CNRS, Faculte de Medecine, Rennes (France)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Idipathic hemochromatosis is a common autosomal recessive inherited disorder of iron metabolism. The molecular defect is unknown. However, the gene responsible for the disease (HFE) has been localized on the short arm of chromosome 6. It is closely linked to the HLA class I genes and possibly within a 350 kilobase (kb) region around the HLA-A locus. In order to identify candidate genes for hemochromatosis, we applied a cDNA selection technique to isolate transcribed sequences encoded on yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC). At first, we screened a cDNA library derived from normal human duodenal mucosa with the YAC B30 H3. This YAC contains a 320 kb DNA insert including the HLA-A gene and spanning 150 kb of the 350 kb zone where the hemochromatosis gene is in linkage disequilibrium with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. Preparation of the cDNA library of duodenal mucosa in Lambda Zap II phage and library screening with YAC B30 were carried out as previously described. In this way, we isolated seven non-HLA-A cDNAs corresponding to seven new genomic sequences. These potential genes were named hemochromatosis candidate gene (HCG) and numbered I to VII. The survey of all these cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences is in progress. In this work, we are especially interested in one of the seven non-HLA class I cDNA clones, named clone 58. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Impact of HLA on the underlying primary diseases in Turkish patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Gonca Emel; Seyhun, Yalcin; Oguz, Fatma Savran; Kekik, Cigdem; Onal, Ayse Emel; Yazici, Halil; Turkmen, Aydin; Aydin, Ali Emin; Sever, Mehmet Sukru; Eldegez, Ulug; Carin, Mahmut Nezih

    2009-01-01

    The number of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing faster than the number of renal transplantations performed per year worldwide. Of the primary diseases leading to ESRD, diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the association of HLA with the primary diseases leading to ESRD in Turkish patients. A total of 3230 individuals comprising 587 ESRD patients and 2643 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. Class I HLA-A, -B typing was performed by CDC method, while class II HLA-DRB1 typing was performed by low resolution PCR-SSP. We found a significant negative association between almost all A locus antigens and primary disease groups classified as chronic glomerulonephritis and hypertensive nephrosclerosis (p HLA-B58 and HLA-DRB1*03 significantly correlated with amyloidosis and diabetic nephropathy, respectively. Determination of HLAs as risk factors for primary diseases leading to ESRD might be beneficial in preventing progression to ESRD and recurrence of the primary disease post-transplantation.

  15. Exponential Stability of a Class of Cellular Neural Networks with Multi-Pantograph Delays%一类具多比例延时的细胞神经网络的指数稳定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张迎迎; 周立群

    2012-01-01

    The exponential stability of a class of cellular neural networks with multi-pantograph delays is studied. In view of nonlinear measure,a sufficient condition is derived for the existence,uniqueness and exponential stability of the equilibrium point. And the method gains the exponential convergent velocity of the solutions. Finally,an example is provided to illustrate effectiveness of the method.%讨论了一类具多比例延时的细胞神经网络的指数稳定性.利用非线性测度得到了一个保证平衡点存在唯一且指数稳定的充分条件,并给出了解的指数收敛速度.最后验证了结论的正确性并进行了模拟仿真.

  16. Association of human leukocyte antigen class I antigens in Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Hossein; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Esmaili, Nafiseh; Toofan, Hesam; Ehsani, Amir Hooshang; Hosseini, Seyed Hamed; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-04-01

    There are a limited number of reports indicating the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles in pemphigus vulgaris. This study was designed to highlight the association of HLA class I alleles with pemphigus vulgaris in Iran. Fifty patients with pemphigus vulgaris, diagnosed based on clinical, histological and direct immunofluorescence findings were enrolled into this study. The control group consisted of 50 healthy, age- and sex-matched individuals. HLA typing of class I (A, B and C alleles) was carried out using polymerase chain reaction based on the sequence-specific primer method. This study showed the higher frequency of HLA-B*44:02 (P = 0.007), -C*04:01 (P pemphigus vulgaris was significantly lower than the controls. Regarding the linkage disequilibrium between HLA class I alleles, the HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype (4% vs 0%, P = 0.04) is suggested to be a predisposing factor, whereas HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype (0% vs 6%, P = 0.01) is suggested to be a protective factor. In conclusion, it is suggested that HLA-B*44:02, -C*04:01, -C*15:02 alleles and HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype are susceptibility factors for development of pemphigus vulgaris in the Iranian population, while HLA-C*06:02, -C*18:01 alleles and HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype may be considered as protective alleles.

  17. HLA DQB1*06:02 negative narcolepsy with hypocretin/orexin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Fang; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara;

    2014-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To identify rare allelic variants and HLA alleles in narcolepsy patients with hypocretin (orexin, HCRT) deficiency but lacking DQB1*06:02. SETTINGS: China (Peking University People's Hospital), Czech Republic (Charles University), Denmark (Golstrup Hospital), Italy (University...... of Bologna), Korea (Catholic University), and USA (Stanford University). DESIGN: CSF hypocretin-1, DQB1*06:02, clinical and polysomnographic data were collected in narcolepsy patients (552 with and 144 without cataplexy) from 6 sites. Numbers of cases with and without DQB1*06:02 and low CSF hypocretin-1 were...... compiled. HLA class I (A, B, C), class II (DRBs, DQA1, DQB1, DPA1, and DPB1), and whole exome sequencing were conducted in 9 DQB1*06:02 negative cases with low CSF hypocretin-1. Sanger sequencing of selected exons in DNMT1, HCRT, and MOG was performed to exclude mutations in known narcolepsy...

  18. A novel class of anti-HIV agents with multiple copies of enfuvirtide enhances inhibition of viral replication and cellular transmission in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsing Chang

    Full Text Available We constructed novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitors that may overcome the current limitations of enfuvirtide, the first such therapeutic in this class. The three prototypes generated by the Dock-and-Lock (DNL technology to comprise four copies of enfuvirtide tethered site-specifically to the Fc end of different humanized monoclonal antibodies potently neutralize primary isolates (both R5-tropic and X4-tropic, as well as T-cell-adapted strains of HIV-1 in vitro. All three prototypes show EC(50 values in the subnanomolar range, which are 10- to 100-fold lower than enfuvirtide and attainable whether or not the constitutive antibody targets HIV-1. The potential of such conjugates to purge latently infected cells was also demonstrated in a cell-to-cell viral inhibition assay by measuring their efficacy to inhibit the spread of HIV-1(LAI from infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to Jurkat T cells over a period of 30 days following viral activation with 100 nM SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. The IgG-like half-life was not significantly different from that of the parental antibody, as shown by the mean serum concentration of one prototype in mice at 72 h. These encouraging results provide a rationale to develop further novel anti-HIV agents by coupling additional antibodies of interest with alternative HIV-inhibitors via recombinantly-produced, self-assembling, modules.

  19. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  20. Identification of a new HLA-DPB1 allele (DPB1*5101) by oligotyping and nucleotide sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyris, E.G.; Cizman, B.; Kamoun, M.; Zmijewski, C.M.; Monos, D.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gibson, C.G.; Williams, T.M. [Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    DNA sequence analysis of DPB1 second exons shows great variability with over 50 alleles. This report describes a new HLA-DPB1 allele present in a Caucasoid donor bearing the class II alleles DRB1*0901/1301, DRB3*0101, DRB4*0101, DQB1*0603/0303, and DPB1*1101. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Lysis of pig endothelium by IL-2 activated human natural killer cells is inhibited by swine and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itescu, S; Artrip, J H; Kwiatkowski, P A; Wang, S F; Minanov, O P; Morgenthau, A S; Michler, R E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a form of xenograft rejection, mediated by natural killer (NK) cells, occurring in pig-to-primate organ transplants beyond the period of antibody-mediated hyperacute rejection. In this study, two distinct NK activation pathways were identified as mechanisms of pig aortic endotheliual cell (PAEC) lysis by human NK cells. Using an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, a progressive increase in human NK lysis of PAEC was observed following incubation with human IgG at increasing serum titer. In the absence of IgG, a second mechanism of PAEC lysis by human NK cells was observed following activation with IL-2. IL-2 activation of human NK cells increased lysis of PAEC by over 3-fold compared with ADCC. These results indicate that IL-2 activation of human NK cells induces significantly higher levels of lytic activity than does conventional ADCC involving IgG and FcRIII. We next investigated the role of MHC class I molecules in the regulation of NK lysis following IL-2 activation. PAEC expression of SLA class I molecules was increased by up to 75% by treatment with human TNFa. Following treatment with TNFa at 1 u/ml, IL-2 activated human NK lysis of PAEC was inhibited at every effector:target (E:T) ratio tested. Maximal effect occurred at an E:T ratio of 10:1, with TNFa inhibiting specific lysis by 59% (p < 0.01). Incubation with an anti-SLA class I Mab, but not IgG isotype control, abrogated the protective effects of TNFa on NK lysis of PAEC, suggesting direct inhibitory effects of SLA class I molecules on human NK function. To investigate whether human MHC class I molecules might have similar effects on human NK lysis of PAEC, further experiments were performed using a soluble peptide derived from the alpha-helical region of HLA-B7. Incubation with the HLA-B7 derived peptide significantly reduced the IL-2 activated NK lytic activity against PAEC in a dose-dependent fashion. Maximal effect occurred at a concentration of 10 mg

  2. TEPITOPEpan: extending TEPITOPE for peptide binding prediction covering over 700 HLA-DR molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianming Zhang

    Full Text Available MOTIVATION: Accurate identification of peptides binding to specific Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II (MHC-II molecules is of great importance for elucidating the underlying mechanism of immune recognition, as well as for developing effective epitope-based vaccines and promising immunotherapies for many severe diseases. Due to extreme polymorphism of MHC-II alleles and the high cost of biochemical experiments, the development of computational methods for accurate prediction of binding peptides of MHC-II molecules, particularly for the ones with few or no experimental data, has