WorldWideScience

Sample records for cellular electron microscopy

  1. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy of the internal cellular organization of fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, W.H.; Aelst, van A.C.; Humbel, B.M.; Krift, van der T.P.; Boekhout, T.

    2000-01-01

    Internal viewing of the cellular organization of hyphae by scanning electron microscopy is an alternative to observing sectioned fungal material with a transmission electron microscope. To study cytoplasmic organelles in the hyphal cells of fungi by SEM, colonies were chemically fixed with glutarald

  2. Quantifying the cellular uptake of semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles by analytical electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondow, Nicole; Brown, M Rowan; Starborg, Tobias; Monteith, Alexander G; Brydson, Rik; Summers, Huw D; Rees, Paul; Brown, Andy

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles are in demand as optical biomarkers yet the cellular uptake process is not fully understood; quantification of numbers and the fate of internalized particles are still to be achieved. We have focussed on the characterization of cellular uptake of quantum dots using a combination of analytical electron microscopies because of the spatial resolution available to examine uptake at the nanoparticle level, using both imaging to locate particles and spectroscopy to confirm identity. In this study, commercially available quantum dots, CdSe/ZnS core/shell particles coated in peptides to target cellular uptake by endocytosis, have been investigated in terms of the agglomeration state in typical cell culture media, the traverse of particle agglomerates across U-2 OS cell membranes during endocytosis, the merging of endosomal vesicles during incubation of cells and in the correlation of imaging flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy to measure the final nanoparticle dose internalized by the U-2 OS cells. We show that a combination of analytical transmission electron microscopy and serial block face scanning electron microscopy can provide a comprehensive description of the internalization of an initial exposure dose of nanoparticles by an endocytically active cell population and how the internalized, membrane bound nanoparticle load is processed by the cells. We present a stochastic model of an endosome merging process and show that this provides a data-driven modelling framework for the prediction of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles in general. PMID:25762522

  3. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ~150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level.Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of

  4. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations by electron microscopy: probing cellular alterations in early carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most cancers are curable if they are diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Recent studies suggest that nanoarchitectural changes occur within cells during early carcinogenesis and that such changes precede microscopically evident tissue alterations. It follows that the ability to comprehensively interrogate cell nanoarchitecture (e.g., macromolecular complexes, DNA, RNA, proteins and lipid membranes) could be critical to the diagnosis of early carcinogenesis. We present a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of biological tissues by quantifying their degree of disorder at the nanoscale. Transmission electron microscopy images of human tissues are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. The properties of nanoscale disorder are then studied by statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the spatially localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. Our results show an increase in the disorder of human colonic epithelial cells in subjects harboring early stages of colon neoplasia. Furthermore, our findings strongly suggest that increased nanoscale disorder correlates with the degree of tumorigenicity. Therefore, the IPR technique provides a practicable tool for the detection of nanoarchitectural alterations in the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. Potential applications of the technique for early cancer screening and detection are also discussed

  5. Measuring in vitro cellular uptake of nanoparticles by transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.; Hondow, N. S.

    2014-06-01

    Biomedical application of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) is a growing area of research and development. Uncertainty remains as to the mode of action of many NP types and TEM is a tool capable of addressing this if used in conjunction with standard cellular response assays. We will demonstrate imaging of thin sections of fixed, plastic embedded cells by analytical TEM to identify: superparamagnetic iron oxide NP translocation into cell compartments such as endosomes; amorphous silica NP penetration through a cell membrane without membrane encapsulation and zinc oxide NP degradation in cell compartments. We will then discuss how the in vitro cellular responses to a dose of NPs exposed to cell lines can be correlated to the internalized dose per cell section noting however that quantification of the latter requires random sampling procedures or correlation to higher throughout techniques to measure a population of whole cells. Similarly, analytical TEM measures of NP degradation within intracellular compartments will require a more appropriate sample preparation such as cryo-fixation.

  6. Tissue and cellular localization of tannins in Tunisian dates (Phoenix dactylifera L.) by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammouda, Hédi; Alvarado, Camille; Bouchet, Brigitte; Kalthoum-Chérif, Jamila; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika; Guyot, Sylvain

    2014-07-16

    A histological approach including light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to provide accurate information on the localization of condensed tannins in the edible tissues and in the stone of date fruits (Phoenix dactylifera L.). Light microscopy was carried out on fresh tissues after staining by 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) for a specific detection of condensed tannins. Thus, whether under light microscopy or transmission electron microscopy (TEM), results showed that tannins are not located in the epidermis but more deeply in the mesocarp in the vacuole of very large cells. Regarding the stones, tannins are found in a specific cell layer located at 50 μm from the sclereid cells of the testa. PMID:24987926

  7. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  8. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for whic...

  9. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Doory; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and ima...

  10. Correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy and electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doory Kim

    Full Text Available Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets.

  11. Electron microscopy and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a description of research activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Department, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  12. Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy (CLEM) as a Tool to Visualize Microinjected Molecules and their Eukaryotic Sub-cellular Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Reddick, L. Evan; Alto, Neal M.

    2012-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell relies on complex, highly regulated, and functionally distinct membrane bound compartments that preserve a biochemical polarity necessary for proper cellular function. Understanding how the enzymes, proteins, and cytoskeletal components govern and maintain this biochemical segregation is therefore of paramount importance. The use of fluorescently tagged molecules to localize to and/or perturb subcellular compartments has yielded a wealth of knowledge and advanced our under...

  13. Cellular uptake of PLA nanoparticles studied by light and electron microscopy: synthesis, characterization and biocompatibility studies using an iridium(iii) complex as correlative label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifarth, Martin; Pretzel, David; Schubert, Stephanie; Weber, Christine; Heintzmann, Rainer; Hoeppener, Stephanie; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-03-10

    We present the synthesis of polylactide by ring-opening polymerization using a luminescent iridium(iii) complex acting as initiator. The polymer was formulated into nanoparticles, which were taken up by HEK-293 cells. We could show that the particles provided an appropriate contrast in both superresolution fluorescence and electron microscopy, and, moreover, are non-toxic, in contrast to the free iridium complex. PMID:26923139

  14. Holography and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principles and methods of off-axis electron holography are presented and illustrated by means of three examples related to its application in high resolution electron microscopy and the investigation of electric and magnetic fields in thin specimens. (orig.)

  15. Electron microscopy and analysis, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is the proceedings of the Institute of Physics Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group conference, held at UMIST (United Kingdom), 1987. The programme contained a theme of 'advances in Imaging and Analysis with electrons and other focused probes', as well as the underlying theory and technique development. Eighty four papers were presented at the conference on eleven different topics, which included: auger spectroscopy, metal oxides-corrosion and catalysts, secondary ion mass spectrometry, instrumentation, diffraction techniques, beam-induced modifications, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution electron microscopy, semiconductors and superconductors, alternative imaging techniques, and x-ray microanalysis. Of these 84 papers, 9 were selected for INIS and indexed separately. (U.K.)

  16. Scanning electron microscopy of biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    McKinlay, K.J.; Scotchford, C A; Grant, D M; Oliver, J M; King, John R.; Brown, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    A comparison of conventional high vacuum scanning electron microscopy (HVSEM), environmental SEM (ESEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in the assessment of cell-material interactions is made. The processing of cells cultured for conventional HVSEM leads to the loss of morphological features that are retained when using ESEM. The use of ESEM in conjunction with CLSM of the labeled cytoskeleton gives an indication of changes to the cell morphology as a consequence of incubation t...

  17. High-resolution electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, John C H

    2013-01-01

    This new fourth edition of the standard text on atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) retains previous material on the fundamentals of electron optics and aberration correction, linear imaging theory (including wave aberrations to fifth order) with partial coherence, and multiple-scattering theory. Also preserved are updated earlier sections on practical methods, with detailed step-by-step accounts of the procedures needed to obtain the highest quality images of atoms and molecules using a modern TEM or STEM electron microscope. Applications sections have been updated - these include the semiconductor industry, superconductor research, solid state chemistry and nanoscience, and metallurgy, mineralogy, condensed matter physics, materials science and material on cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology. New or expanded sections have been added on electron holography, aberration correction, field-emission guns, imaging filters, super-resolution methods, Ptychography, Ronchigrams, tomogr...

  18. Illuminating Electron Microscopy of Photocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo

    the surface of the planet with a device that converts solar energy into a useable form at 10% efficiency would give more than the present worldwide consumption of fossil energy. Photocatalysts are of fundamental interest for sustainable energy research because they provide a viable route for...... converting solar energy into chemical bonds. By means of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) it is possible to gain insight in the fundamentals of their reaction mechanisms, chemical behaviour, structure and morphology before, during and after reaction using in situ investigations. In particular, the...... platform inside the microscope that allows electron microscopy under nonconventional TEM conditions and new kinds of in situ spectroscopy....

  19. Electron microscopy at molecular dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumeister, W.; Vogell, W.

    1980-01-01

    This book gives a survey of recent trends and activities in molcular microscopy . This branch of electron microscopy which is aimed at determining the structure of biological macromolecules and supramolecular assemblies has made significant progress during the past few years and promises to play a major role in the future of molecular biology. The thirty nine chapters fall into two general groups: The first group discusses the state-of-the-art illustrated by a wide range of molecular specimens containing new material. The second group reviews recent developments in image recording, low dose microscopy and image processing which are of potential interest to those seeking to overcome present limitations in obtaining more detailed structural information. The final five chapters deal with a subject which will surely emerge as a major area of practical interest in molecular microscopy: the artifical assembly of ordered molecular arrays.

  20. Electron Microscopy at Ultralow Energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk

    Kerala : IUMSE, 2015. s. 36. [WCM 2015. World Congress on Microscopy: Instrumentation , Techniques and Applications in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences. 09.10.2015-11.10.2015, Kerala] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : SEM * STEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  1. Simultaneous Correlative Scanning Electron and High-NA Fluorescence Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liv, N.; Zonnevylle, A.C.; Narvaez, A.C.; Effting, A.P.J.; Voorneveld, P W; Lucas, M. S.; Hardwick, J. C.; Wepf, R.A.; Kruit, P.; Hoogenboom, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a nov...

  2. Automated cellular pathology in noninvasive confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Monica; Krueger, James; Gareau, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    A computer algorithm was developed to automatically identify and count melanocytes and keratinocytes in 3D reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) images of the skin. Computerized pathology increases our understanding and enables prevention of superficial spreading melanoma (SSM). Machine learning involved looking at the images to measure the size of cells through a 2-D Fourier transform and developing an appropriate mask with the erf() function to model the cells. Implementation involved processing the images to identify cells whose image segments provided the least difference when subtracted from the mask. With further simplification of the algorithm, the program may be directly implemented on the RCM images to indicate the presence of keratinocytes in seconds and to quantify the keratinocytes size in the en face plane as a function of depth. Using this system, the algorithm can identify any irregularities in maturation and differentiation of keratinocytes, thereby signaling the possible presence of cancer.

  3. Silicon Nitride Windows for Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ring, E. A.; Peckys, D. B.; Dukes, M. J.; Baudoin, J. P.; de Jonge, N.

    2011-01-01

    Silicon microchips with thin electron transparent silicon nitride windows provide a sample support that accommodates both light-, and electron microscopy of whole eukaryotic cells in vacuum or liquid, with minimum sample preparation steps. The windows are robust enough that cellular samples can be cultured directly onto them, with no addition of a supporting film, and no need to embed or section the sample, as is typically required in electron microscopy. By combining two microchips, a microf...

  4. Correlative Fluorescence Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Quantum Dot Labeled Proteins in Whole Cells in Liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Dukes, Madeline J.; Peckys, Diana B.; de Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a state-of-the-art microscopy methodology to study cellular function, combining the functionality of light microscopy with the high resolution of electron microscopy. However, this technique involves complex sample preparation procedures due to its need for either thin sections or frozen samples for TEM imaging. Here, we introduce a novel correlative approach capable of imaging whole eukaryotic cells in liquid w...

  5. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  6. Electron microscopy of pharmaceutical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, Victoria; Valenta, Claudia; Matsko, Nadejda B

    2013-01-01

    During the last decades, the focus of research in pharmaceutical technology has steadily shifted towards the development and optimisation of nano-scale drug delivery systems. As a result, electron microscopic methods are increasingly employed for the characterisation of pharmaceutical systems such as nanoparticles and microparticles, nanoemulsions, microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, different types of vesicles, nanofibres and many more. Knowledge of the basic properties of these systems is essential for an adequate microscopic analysis. Classical transmission and scanning electron microscopic techniques frequently have to be adapted for an accurate analysis of formulation morphology, especially in case of hydrated colloidal systems. Specific techniques such as environmental scanning microscopy or cryo preparation are required for their investigation. Analytical electron microscopic techniques such as electron energy-loss spectroscopy or energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are additional assets to determine the elemental composition of the systems, but are not yet standard tools in pharmaceutical research. This review provides an overview of pharmaceutical systems of interest in current research and strategies for their successful electron microscopic analysis. Advantages and limitations of the different methodological approaches are discussed and recent findings of interest are presented. PMID:22921788

  7. Immunophotoelectron microscopy: The electron optical analog of immunofluorescence microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    The electron optical analog of immunofluorescence microscopy combines three developments: (i) photo-electron microscopy to produce a high-resolution image of exposed components of the cell, (ii) site-specific antibodies, and (iii) photoemissive markers coupled to the antibodies to make the distribution of sites visible. This approach, in theory, provides a way to extend the useful immunofluorescence microscopy technique to problems requiring much higher resolution. The resolution limit of flu...

  8. Electron microscopy and forensic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrlý, Marek; Turková, Ivana

    2013-05-01

    Electron microanalysis in forensic practice ranks among basic applications used in investigation of traces (latents, stains, etc.) from crime scenes. Applying electron microscope allows for rapid screening and receiving initial information for a wide range of traces. SEM with EDS/WDS makes it possible to observe topography surface and morphology samples and examination of chemical components. Physical laboratory of the Institute of Criminalistics Prague use SEM especially for examination of inorganic samples, rarely for biology and other material. Recently, possibilities of electron microscopy have been extended considerably using dual systems with focused ion beam. These systems are applied mainly in study of inner micro and nanoparticles , thin layers (intersecting lines in graphical forensic examinations, analysis of layers of functional glass, etc.), study of alloys microdefects, creating 3D particles and aggregates models, etc. Automated mineralogical analyses are a great asset to analysis of mineral phases, particularly soils, similarly it holds for cathode luminescence, predominantly colour one and precise quantitative measurement of their spectral characteristics. Among latest innovations that are becoming to appear also at ordinary laboratories are TOF - SIMS systems and micro Raman spectroscopy with a resolution comparable to EDS/WDS analysis (capable of achieving similar level as through EDS/WDS analysis).

  9. Low-Cost Cryo-Light Microscopy Stage Fabrication for Correlated Light/Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, David B.; Evans, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The coupling of cryo-light microscopy (cryo-LM) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) poses a number of advantages for understanding cellular dynamics and ultrastructure. First, cells can be imaged in a near native environment for both techniques. Second, due to the vitrification process, samples are preserved by rapid physical immobilization rather than slow chemical fixation. Third, imaging the same sample with both cryo-LM and cryo-EM provides correlation of data from a single cell, rathe...

  10. Nano, Queensland and cryo-electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    electron microscopy of cellular structures and macromolecules. Cooperative funding mechanisms from UQ, IMB, together with the ARC-SRC for Functional and Applied Genomics, Queensland Government and Federal Major National Research Facility grant to NANO will support infrastructure, staff and network access to the facility. As we experience the workshops and the invited talks from this ACEM 17 the homegrown interest in Cryo-EM continues to be strong there is no doubt the current support is welcome will be a benefit to all microscopists in the region. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  11. Proximity Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy/Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Here a new microscopic method is proposed to image and characterize very thin samples like few-layer materials, organic molecules, and nanostructures with nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution using electron beams of energies lower than 20 eV. The microscopic technique achieves high resolution through the proximity (or near-field) effect, as in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), while it also allows detection of transmitted electrons for imaging and spectroscopy, as in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). This proximity transmission electron microscopy (PSTEM) does not require any lens to focus the electron beam. It also allows detailed characterization of the interaction of low-energy electron with materials. PSTEM can operate in a way very similar to scanning tunneling microscopy, which provides high-resolution imaging of geometric and electronic structures of the sample surface. In addition, it allows imaging and characterization of the interior structures of the sample based on the detected...

  12. Ultrafast Science Opportunities with Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURR, HERMANN; Wang, X.J., ed.

    2016-04-28

    X-rays and electrons are two of the most fundamental probes of matter. When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first x-ray free electron laser, began operation in 2009, it transformed ultrafast science with the ability to generate laser-like x-ray pulses from the manipulation of relativistic electron beams. This document describes a similar future transformation. In Transmission Electron Microscopy, ultrafast relativistic (MeV energy) electron pulses can achieve unsurpassed spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast temporal resolution will be the next frontier in electron microscopy and can ideally complement ultrafast x-ray science done with free electron lasers. This document describes the Grand Challenge science opportunities in chemistry, material science, physics and biology that arise from an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction & microscopy facility, especially when coupled with linac-based intense THz and X-ray pump capabilities.

  13. Microscopy of electronic wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work of thesis aims to visualize, on a position sensitive detector, the spatial oscillations of slow electrons (∼ meV) emitted by a threshold photoionization in the presence of an external electric field. The interference figure obtained represents the square magnitude of electronic wavefunction. This fundamental work allows us to have access to the electronic dynamics and thus to highlight several quantum mechanisms that occur at the atomic scale (field Coulomb, electron/electron interaction..). Despite the presence an electronic core in Li atom, we have succeeded, experimentally and for the first time, in visualizing the wave function associated with the quasi-discrete Stark states coupled to the ionization continuum. Besides, using simulations of wave packet propagation, based on the 'Split-operator' method, we have conducted a comprehensive study of the H, Li and Cs atoms while revealing the significant effects of the Stark resonances. A very good agreement, on and off resonances, was obtained between simulated and experimental results. In addition, we have developed a generalized analytical model to understand deeply the function of VMI (Velocity-Map Imaging) spectrometer. This model is based on the paraxial approximation; it is based on matrix optics calculation by making an analogy between the electronic trajectory and the light beam. An excellent agreement was obtained between the model predictions and the experimental results. (author)

  14. Electron microscopy of nuclear zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission electron microscopy observations of the microstructure of zirconium alloys used in fuel sheaths of nuclear power reactors are reported. Specimens were observed after different thermal and mechanical treatment, similar to those actually used during fabrication of the sheaths. Electron micrographs and electron diffraction patterns of second phase particles present in zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 were also obtained, as well as some characteristic parameters. Images of oxides and hydrides most commonly present in zirconium alloys are also shown. Finally, the structure of a Zr-2,5Nb alloy used in CANDU reactors pressure tubes, is observed by electron microscopy. (Author)

  15. Scanning Very Low Energy Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Mikmeková, Šárka; Pokorná, Zuzana; Mikmeková, Eliška; Frank, Luděk

    Ostrava : Tanger spol. s r. o, 2011, s. 238-243. ISBN 978-80-87294-27-7. [NANOCON 2011. International Conference /3./. Brno (CZ), 21.09.2011-23.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/11/2270; GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * low energy electrons * grain contrast * transmitted electrons * dopant contrast * thin films Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  16. Effect of Apple, Baobab, Red-Chicory, and Pear Extracts on Cellular Energy Expenditure and Morphology of Caco-2 Cells using Transepithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigated the effects of four food extracts on the Caco-2 intestinal cell line using a new transepithelial electrical resistance method (TEER) concurrent with electron microscopy (SEM). Caco-2 cells are widely used in transepithelial studies because they can be cultured to creat...

  17. Correlative Cryo-electron Tomography and Optical Microscopy of Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Peijun

    2013-01-01

    The biological processes occurring in a cell are complex and dynamic, and to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, both temporal and spatial information is required. While cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) provides three-dimensional (3D) still pictures of near-native state cells and organelles at molecular resolution, fluorescence light microscopy (fLM) offers movies of dynamic cellular processes in living cells. Combining and integratin...

  18. Illuminating Electron Microscopy of Photocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo

    . The holder is implemented with a laser diode and an optical system that guides the light onto the sample surface with maximum power transmission. The source can be changed and tuned according to the needs, in principle spanning the whole visible and UV light spectrum. It is possible to use the device....... Analysis can be performed on a variety of photoreactive materials and structures, including photocatalysts, photonic devices and solar cells. Furthermore, light can be exploited to reduce or completely compensate charging effects in samples under electron beam exposure [3]. We expect to observe structural...

  19. Monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has developed into an established technique for chemical and structural analysis of thin specimens in the (scanning) transmission electron microscope (S)TEM. The energy resolution in EELS is largely limited by the stability of the high voltage supply, by the resolution of the spectrometer and by the energy spread of the source. To overcome this limitation a Wien filter monochromator was recently introduced with commercially available STEMs, offering the advantage to better resolve EELS fine structures, which contain valuable bonding information. The method of atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging within an STEM, utilizing a high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) detector can perfectly complement the excellent energy resolution, since EELS spectra can be collected simultaneously. In combination with a monochromator microscope not only high spatial resolution images can be recorded but also high energy resolution EELS spectra are attainable. In this work we investigated the STEM performance of a 200 kV monochromated Tecnai F20 with a high resolution Gatan Imaging Filter (HR-GIF). (author)

  20. National Center for Electron Microscopy users' guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) in the Materials and Molecular Research Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is a high voltage electron microscope facility for ultra-high resolution or dynamic in-situ studies. This guide describes the instruments and their specifications, support instrumentation, and user policies. Advice as to travel and accommodations is provided in the guide. (FI)

  1. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Radlička, Tomáš; Konvalina, Ivo; Müllerová, Ilona

    Singapore: National University of Singapore, 2010. s. 98-99. [CPO /8./ International Conference on Charged Particle Optics. 12.07.2010-16.07.2010, Singapore] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : very low energy scanning electron microscopy * cathode lens * BSE detector Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  2. Scanning Electron Microscopy with biased samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Konvalina, Ivo; Mikmeková, Šárka

    Kraków : Wydawnictwo Naukove Akapit, 2014, s. 76-77. ISBN 978-83-63663-48-3. [EM 2014. International Conference on Electron Microscopy /15./. Kraków (PL), 15.09.2014-18.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : SEM * STEM * low energy electrons * graphene Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  3. Simultaneous correlative scanning electron and high-NA fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Liv

    Full Text Available Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown.

  4. Movies of cellular and sub-cellular motion by digital holographic microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lingfeng

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological specimens, such as living cells and their intracellular components, often exhibit very little amplitude contrast, making it difficult for conventional bright field microscopes to distinguish them from their surroundings. To overcome this problem phase contrast techniques such as Zernike, Normarsky and dark-field microscopies have been developed to improve specimen visibility without chemically or physically altering them by the process of staining. These techniques have proven to be invaluable tools for studying living cells and furthering scientific understanding of fundamental cellular processes such as mitosis. However a drawback of these techniques is that direct quantitative phase imaging is not possible. Quantitative phase imaging is important because it enables determination of either the refractive index or optical thickness variations from the measured optical path length with sub-wavelength accuracy. Digital holography is an emergent phase contrast technique that offers an excellent approach in obtaining both qualitative and quantitative phase information from the hologram. A CCD camera is used to record a hologram onto a computer and numerical methods are subsequently applied to reconstruct the hologram to enable direct access to both phase and amplitude information. Another attractive feature of digital holography is the ability to focus on multiple focal planes from a single hologram, emulating the focusing control of a conventional microscope. Methods A modified Mach-Zender off-axis setup in transmission is used to record and reconstruct a number of holographic amplitude and phase images of cellular and sub-cellular features. Results Both cellular and sub-cellular features are imaged with sub-micron, diffraction-limited resolution. Movies of holographic amplitude and phase images of living microbes and cells are created from a series of holograms and reconstructed with numerically adjustable

  5. Active Pixel Sensors for electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, P.; Bussat, J.-M.; Lee, Z.; Radmillovic, V.

    2007-09-01

    The technology used for monolithic CMOS imagers, popular for cell phone cameras and other photographic applications, has been explored for charged particle tracking by the high-energy physics community for several years. This technology also lends itself to certain imaging detector applications in electron microscopy. We have been developing such detectors for several years at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and we and others have shown that this technology can offer excellent point-spread function, direct detection and high readout speed. In this paper, we describe some of the design constraints peculiar to electron microscopy and summarize where such detectors could play a useful role.

  6. Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale. - Highlights: • Demonstration of nanometre scale resolution in magnetic field free environment using aberration correction in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). • Implementation of differential phase contrast mode of Lorentz microscopy in aberration corrected STEM with improved sensitivity. • Quantitative imaging of magnetic induction of nanostructures in amorphous and cross-section samples

  7. The future of high resolution electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D Van Dyck

    2000-01-01

    The state of the art and the future in quantitative high resolution electron microscopy are discussed in the framework of parameter estimation. Reconstruction methods are then to be considered as direct methods to yield a starting structure for further refinement. With the increasing flexibility of the instruments, computer aided experimental strategy will become important.

  8. Phosphogypsum surface characterisation using scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of application of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to examinations of the samples of natural gypsum and phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has a well developed crystalline structure, and appear in two polymorphous forms, of rombic and hexagonal shape crystals. Natural gypsum has a poorly crystalline structure. The differences in crystalline structure influence the chemical behavior of these row materials.

  9. The rapidly changing face of electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John Meurig; Leary, Rowan K.; Eggeman, Alexander S.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2015-07-01

    This short but wide-ranging review is intended to convey to chemical physicists and others engaged in the interfaces between solid-state chemistry and solid-state physics the growing power and extensive applicability of multiple facets of the technique of electron microscopy.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Third volume of a 40volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  11. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saibil, Helen R., E-mail: h.saibil@mail.cryst.bbk.ac.uk [Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Grünewald, Kay [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  12. Studying kinetochore-fiber ultrastructure using correlative light-electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Daniel G.; Cheeseman, Liam P.; Prior, Ian A.; Royle, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) has dominated high-resolution cellular imaging for over 50 years thanks to its ability to resolve on a nanometer-scale intracellular structures such as the microtubules of the mitotic spindle. It is advantageous to view the cell of interest prior to processing the sample for EM. Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) is a technique that allows one to visualize cells of interest by light microscopy (LM) before being transferred to EM for ultra-structural examinat...

  13. EOD (Electron Optical Design) Program For Computations For Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lencová, Bohumila; Zlámal, J.

    Villigen: Paul Scherrer Institute, 2005, s. 8. ISBN N. ISSN 1019-6447. [Dreiländertagung Microscopy Conference (MC 2005). Davos (CH), 28.08.2005-02.09.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : computer aided design * electron optics * finite element method Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. Cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: For the last two decades, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-em) of thin layers of vitrified biological suspensions has considerably extended applications in electron microscopy. Biomacromolecules or their assemblies can be observed in their fully hydrated native state, without any or few microscopy related preparation artefacts. Only electron beam damage still limits resolution, thus leaving room for specialists of image processing, capable of extracting the very last bit of information created by a limited number of electrons. They're skills and programs have been very good when applied to thin specimens but this method does not apply readily to bulk specimens. However over the last 20 years, cryo-em of vitreous bulk material and sections has also been under development. In principle, it is the dream method of structural cell biology. It consists in vitrifying a sample of tissue by rapid cooling, cutting into ultra-thin sections and cryo-em observation with all details perfectly preserved. Practically the technical problems are considerable. First of all, vitrification, which is relatively easy for sub-micron sample, must be extended to macroscopic dimensions. For this purpose, freezing under high pressure has proved very effective. Cutting a piece of vitreous material into under the knife. A compromise must be found between fracturing the brittle material or plastic deformation when it is more viscous. Here the recent development of an oscillating knife is promising. Finally, to become fluent with the various manipulations and adjustments leading to optimal observations requires time and experience. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    OpenAIRE

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis.

  16. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques E; Castro, Luis Antonio Suita de

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  17. Application of scanning electron microscopy in catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lomić Gizela A.; Kiš Erne E.; Bošković Goran C.; Marinković-Nedučin Radmila P.

    2004-01-01

    A short survey of various information obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in the investigation of heterogeneous catalysts and nano-structured materials have been presented. The capabilities of SEM analysis and its application in testing catalysts in different fields of heterogeneous catalysis are illustrated. The results encompass the proper way of catalyst preparation, the mechanism of catalyst active sites formation catalysts changes and catalyst degradation during their applicat...

  18. Connecting μ-fluidics to electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kemmerling, Simon; Ziegler, Jörg; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Arnold, Stefan A; Giss, Dominic; Müller, Shirley A; Ringler, Philippe; Goldie, Kenneth N.; Goedecke, Nils; Hierlemann, Andreas; Stahlberg, Henning; Engel, Andreas; Braun, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A versatile methodology for electron microscopy (EM) grid preparation enabling total content sample analysis is presented. A microfluidic-­dialysis conditioning module to desalt or mix samples with negative stain solution is used, combined with a robotic writing table to micro-­pattern the EM grids. The method allows heterogeneous samples of minute volumes to be processed at physiological pH for structure and mass analysis, and allows the preparation characteristics to be finely tuned.

  19. Connecting μ-fluidics to electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerling, Simon; Ziegler, Jörg; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Arnold, Stefan A; Giss, Dominic; Müller, Shirley A; Ringler, Philippe; Goldie, Kenneth N; Goedecke, Nils; Hierlemann, Andreas; Stahlberg, Henning; Engel, Andreas; Braun, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A versatile methodology for electron microscopy (EM) grid preparation enabling total content sample analysis is presented. A microfluidic-dialysis conditioning module to desalt or mix samples with negative stain solution is used, combined with a robotic writing table to micro-pattern the EM grids. The method allows heterogeneous samples of minute volumes to be processed at physiological pH for structure and mass analysis, and allows the preparation characteristics to be finely tuned. PMID:22094535

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of primary bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critical-point-drying of tumor tissue fixed in a glutaraldehyde-paraformaldehyde solution and viewed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provides a 3-dimensional view of tumor cells and their matrices. This report describes the SEM appearance of three primary bone tumors: a canine osteosarcoma of the distal radius, a feline chondrosarcoma of the proximal tibia and a canine fibrosarcoma of the proximal humerus. The ultrastructural morphology is compared with the histologic appearance of each tumor

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  2. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to gener...

  3. Transmission electron microscopy in micro-nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Claverie, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Today, the availability of bright and highly coherent electron sources and sensitive detectors has radically changed the type and quality of the information which can be obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEMs are now present in large numbers not only in academia, but also in industrial research centers and fabs.This book presents in a simple and practical way the new quantitative techniques based on TEM which have recently been invented or developed to address most of the main challenging issues scientists and process engineers have to face to develop or optimize sem

  4. Electron Microscopy Study of Tin Whisker Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, Murray G.(Washington State University); Lebret, Joel (8392)

    2003-03-30

    The growth of tin whiskers formed on sputtered tin layers deposited on brass was studied using electron microscopy. The occurrence of whiskers appeared to be largely independent of the macroscopic stress state in the film; rather it was microscopic compressive stresses arising from the formation of an intermetallic phase that appeared to be the necessary precursor. Whisker morphology was a result of whether nucleation had occurred on single grains or on multiple grains. In the latter case, the whiskers had a fluted or striated surface. The formation of whiskers on electron transparent samples was demonstrated. These samples showed the whiskers were monocrystalline and defect free, and that the growth direction could be determined.

  5. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Diffractometry of Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fultz, Brent

    2013-01-01

    This book explains concepts of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) that are important for the characterization of materials. The fourth edition adds important new techniques of TEM such as electron tomography, nanobeam diffraction, and geometric phase analysis. A new chapter on neutron scattering completes the trio of x-ray, electron and neutron diffraction. All chapters were updated and revised for clarity. The book explains the fundamentals of how waves and wavefunctions interact with atoms in solids, and the similarities and differences of using x-rays, electrons, or neutrons for diffraction measurements. Diffraction effects of crystalline order, defects, and disorder in materials are explained in detail. Both practical and theoretical issues are covered. The book can be used in an introductory-level or advanced-level course, since sections are identified by difficulty. Each chapter includes a set of problems to illustrate principles, and the extensive Appendix includes la...

  6. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  7. Integrative approaches for cellular cryo-electron tomography: correlative imaging and focused ion beam micromachining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigort, Alexander; Villa, Elizabeth; Bäuerlein, Felix J B; Engel, Benjamin D; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2012-01-01

    The application of cryo-electron tomography to cells and tissues is commonly referred to as "cellular tomography," and enables visualization of the supramolecular architecture of cells in a near-native state. However, in order to access structural features hidden deep inside cellular volumes, it is necessary to use hybrid techniques to identify and localize features of interest and prepare such regions for subsequent analysis by transmission electron microscopy. We present a workflow that integrates different approaches: (1) correlative cryo-fluorescence microscopy to localize features within frozen-hydrated cells, (2) focused ion beam milling to thin these specimens in a targeted manner, and (3) cryo-electron tomography to provide detailed information about the cellular ultrastructure of thinned samples. We describe the combined use of these techniques and the instrumentation required to enable cryo-electron tomography for a vast range of cellular samples. PMID:22857933

  8. Scanning Electron Microscopy with a Retarded Primary Beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk

    Rijeka: InTech, 2016 - (Janeček, M.; Král, R.), s. 49-78 ISBN 978-953-51-2252-4 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * scanning transmission electron microscopy * slow electrons * electron microscopy of materials * biomedical eletron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  9. Femtosecond electron microscopy using photocathode RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The revealing and understanding of ultrafast structural-change induced dynamics are essential not only in physics, chemistry and biology, but also are indispensable for the development of new materials, new devices and applications. Both new RF gun based ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction and microscopy (UED and UEM) have being developed in Osaka University to probe directly structural changes at the atomic scale with sub-100 fs temporal resolution in materials. The first prototype of relativistic-energy UEM using a femtosecond photocathode RF gun has been developed. Both ultrafast diffraction and image measurements have been succeeded using a femtosecond electron beam. In this paper, the development of the UEM prototype and the first experiments of relativistic-energy electron imaging will be reported. (author)

  10. Experiments in electron microscopy: from metals to nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Nigel

    2015-04-01

    Electron microscopy has advanced remarkably as a tool for biological structure research since the development of methods to examine radiation-sensitive unstained specimens and the introduction of cryo-techniques. Structures of biological molecules at near-atomic resolution can now be obtained from images of single particles as well as crystalline arrays. It has also become possible to analyze structures of molecules in their functional context, i.e. in their natural membrane or cellular setting, and in an ionic environment like that in living tissue. Electron microscopy is thus opening ways to answer definitively questions about physiological mechanisms. Here I recall a number of experiments contributing to, and benefiting from the technical advances that have taken place. I begin—in the spirit of this crystallography series—with some biographical background, and then sketch the path to an analysis by time-resolved microscopy of the opening mechanism of an ion channel (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor). This analysis illustrates how electron imaging can be combined with freeze-trapping to illuminate a transient biological event: in our case, chemical-to-electrical transduction at the nerve-muscle synapse.

  11. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Viktoria Liss; Britta Barlag; Monika Nietschke; Michael Hensel

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded m...

  12. Electron scattering cross sections pertinent to electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some elements of the physics that determine cross sections are discussed, and various sources of data are indicated that should be useful for analytical microscopy. Atoms, molecules, and to some extent, solids are considered. Inelastic and elastic scattering of electrons and some solid-state effects are treated. 30 references

  13. Simultaneous Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy of Samples in Liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Liv, N.

    2014-01-01

    A combined use of fluorescence and light microscopy is a powerful approach to further increase our understanding in biological systems of structure-function relations at cellular and sub-cellular levels. The power of fluorescence microscopy (FM) is to spectrally resolve and visualize individual proteins with endogenous or immuno- fluorescent labeling. Additionally, super-resolution microscopy techniques have beaten the diffraction limit and improved the achievable resolution in FM down to sub...

  14. Real-time observations with electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Stach

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic transmission electron microscopy allows observation of changes in both the structure and properties of materials at resolutions from the nanometer to the Ångström. Here I review four significant developments in instrumentation and technique that are pushing the boundaries of these experiments, including new optics, new experimental geometries, new ways of imaging solids in liquid and gaseous environments, and developments in ultrafast imaging. These advances will significantly improve our understanding in many areas of materials science, nanoscience, and biological function.

  15. Electron microscopy - principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 8 minute programme explains the nature of the possible radiation hazard in Electron Microscopy and outlines the ways in which modern equipment is designed and made so that in normal use the worker is not exposed to radiation. The interlock principle is explained and illustrated by an example from the field of X-ray crystallography. By filming machines while they were dismantled for servicing, details of several internal safety devices have been included. In this way workers who normally use the equipment as a 'black box' get some insight into the principles and practice of radiation protection in the field. (author)

  16. Electron microscopy in an oncologic institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective survey of all electron microscopic (EM) examinations of surgical pathology specimens obtained at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan over a 5-year period (1981-1985) was carried out. During this time a total of 259 cases were examined: for 97 (38%) electron microscopy provided a substantial diagnostic contribution, whereas in 151 (58%) it confirmed the prefious light microscopic diagnosis. In our experience, EM was most useful for diagnosing selected cases of cutaneous malignant melanoma predominantly metastatic, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma and poorly differentiated neuroepithelial tumors and less helpfull in the further analysis of cases of malignant mesothelioma, Ewing's sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and fibrohistiocytic malignancies. In cases of well-differentiated neuroepithelial tumors, such as carcinoids, EM data was essentially confirmatory of (immuno)-histochemical findings

  17. Emission sources in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the beginning of the commercial scanning electron microscopy, there are two kinds of emission sources generally used for generation of the electron beam. The first group covers the cathodes heated directly and indirectly (tungsten hair-needle cathodes and lanthanum hexaboride single crystals, LaB6 cathode). The other group is the field emission cathodes. The advantages of the thermal sources are their low vacuum requirement and their high beam current which is necessary for the application of microanalysis units. Disadvantages are the short life and the low resolution. Advantages of the field emission cathode unambiguously are the possibilities of the very high resolution, especially in the case of low acceleration voltages. Disadvantages are the necessary ultra-high vacuum and the low beam current. An alternative source is the thermally induced ZrO/W field emission cathode which works stably as compared to the cold field emission and does not need periodic flashing for emitter tip cleaning. (orig.)

  18. Z-contrast transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Z-contrast electron microscopy provides a new view of materials on the atomic scale, a direct image of atomic structure composition. Unexpected atomic arrangement generally arise as a result of previously unknown growth mechanisms, and they can often be deduced from the form of the image. Z-contrast electron microscopy at atomic resolution combines incoherent characteristics with a contrast that is highly sensitive to composition. In an incoherent image, the object and its image are related in a simple, direct manner, so that given one, it is relatively straightforward to predict the other, at least to first order. An atomically smooth and abrupt interface, for example, will easily be recognized as such, but equally, the formation of new interfacial phases, transition zones, interface defects, or interfacial ordering would also be immediately apparent from the image. In this paper the imaging process is outlined briefly, followed by examples of the insights obtained into the growth mechanisms and properties of semiconducting and superconducting materials. It is seen that the high Tc materials, with their complex unit cells, have a relatively simple growth behavior, whereas the elemental semiconductors, Ge and Si, show a growth behavior that is remarkably complex. In particular, direct imaging reveals some important mechanisms of semiconductor growth that previously were completely unforeseen

  19. Electron microscopy of compound oxide laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, Daniel E.; LeBret, Joel B.; Norton, M. G.; Bahr, David F.; Dumm, John Q.

    2003-06-01

    Oxide single crystals, such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4), are important host crystals for solid-state laser applications. These crystals are often grown by the Czochralski process and are doped with neodymium during growth. The microstructure of the resultant crystal affects the overall laser performance and it is necessary to be able to characterize grown-in defects in the material. Scanning electron microscopy has been used to examine the fracture surfaces of YAG and has shown the presence of microscopic voids, which act as stress concentrators and in some cases appear to be the cause of fracture. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to characterize various defects in both YAG and YVO4 crystals. The defects found depend on the growth conditions, specifically the Nd concentration in the crystal and the position within the boule. One of the most common defects identified in both materials were microscopic spherical particles. In YAG these particles appeared to be located primarily in the core regions and analysis of high resolution images indicate that they are due to regions that are both compositionally and orientationally different from the matrix phase. Direct observation of dislocations in YVO4 was made using TEM. In YAG only indirect evidence for dislocations could be found from the observation of river marks on fracture surfaces.

  20. Virtual nanoscopy: Generation of ultra-large high resolution electron microscopy maps

    OpenAIRE

    Faas, Frank G.A.; Avramut, M. Cristina; M. van den Berg, Bernard; Mommaas, A. Mieke; Koster, Abraham J.; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.

    2012-01-01

    A key obstacle in uncovering the orchestration between molecular and cellular events is the vastly different length scales on which they occur. We describe here a methodology for ultrastructurally mapping regions of cells and tissue as large as 1 mm2 at nanometer resolution. Our approach employs standard transmission electron microscopy, rapid automated data collection, and stitching to create large virtual slides. It greatly facilitates correlative light-electron microscopy studies to relate...

  1. Fluorescence microscopy of single autofluorescent proteins for cellular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Cognet, Laurent; Coussen, Françoise; Choquet, Daniel; Lounis, Brahim

    2002-01-01

    International audience In this paper we review the applicability of autofluorescent proteins for single-molecule imaging in biology. The photophysical characteristics of several mutants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and those of DsRed are compared and critically discussed for their use in cellular biology. The alternative use of two-photon excitation at the single-molecule level or Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy is envisaged for the study of individual autofluorescent prote...

  2. Electronic environment for a field emission gun in electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pinna, H.; Liang, K.; Denizart, M.; Jouffrey, B.

    1983-01-01

    The high brightness, the low energy spread and the small diameter of the source given by a field emission gun is particularly interesting in electron microscopy. This paper describes the extracting anode supply, the polarity of which may be reversed in order to remolde the tip. The heating device of the tip enables its cleaning, the room temperature emission, and also the temperature and field emission. A particular attention has been paid to the protection of the tip and supplies, because of...

  3. Transmission electron microscopy and diffractometry of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fultz, Brent

    2001-01-01

    This book teaches graduate students the concepts of trans- mission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) that are important for the characterization of materi- als. It emphasizes themes common to both techniques, such as scattering from atoms and the formation and analysis of dif- fraction patterns. It also describes unique aspects of each technique, especially imaging and spectroscopy in the TEM. The textbook thoroughly develops both introductory and ad- vanced-level material, using over 400 accompanying illustra- tions. Problems are provided at the end of each chapter to reinforce key concepts. Simple citatioins of rules are avoi- ded as much as possible, and both practical and theoretical issues are explained in detail. The book can be used as both an introductory and advanced-level graduate text since sec- tions/chapters are sorted according to difficulty and grou- ped for use in quarter and semester courses on TEM and XRD.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Radivoje D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the characteristics of different types of luting cements (zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer and resin based composite cement using scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis and microleakage for the quality range of materials. Dental cements were mixed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and formed with posts in dental root canals of extracted teeth. The quality of cement was determined by SEM observation on horizontal sectioned roots with fixed posts according to specific pore and marginal gap diameter. The microleakage was measured on specimens immersed in Lofler (methylene blue solution. The mean values of the maximal diameter of pores, marginal gaps and microleakage of conventional cements are remarkably larger in comparison with composite luting agents. In conclusion, the quality and efficiency of composite luting agents in comparison with conventional cements are more successful in protecting the interior of tooth from penetration of oral fluids, bacteria and bacterial toxins into unprotected dentine.

  5. Fluorescence microscopy of single autofluorescent proteins for cellular biology

    CERN Document Server

    Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel; Lounis, Brahim

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we review the applicability of autofluorescent proteins for single-molecule imaging in biology. The photophysical characteristics of several mutants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and those of DsRed are compared and critically discussed for their use in cellular biology. The alternative use of two-photon excitation at the single-molecule level or Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy is envisaged for the study of individual autofluorescent proteins. Single-molecule experiments performed in live cells using eGFP and preferably eYFP fusion proteins are reviewed. Finally, the first use at the single-molecule level of citrine, a more photostable variant of the eYFP is reported when fused to a receptor for neurotransmitter in live cells.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1998-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy provides a description of the physics of electron-probe formation and of electron-specimen interations The different imaging and analytical modes using secondary and backscattered electrons, electron-beam-induced currents, X-ray and Auger electrons, electron channelling effects, and cathodoluminescence are discussed to evaluate specific contrasts and to obtain quantitative information

  7. Medipix 2 detector applied to low energy electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gastel, van R.; Sikharulidze, I.; Schramm, S.; Abrahams, J.P.; Poelsema, B.; Tromp, R.M.; Molen, van der S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and photo-emission electron microscopy (PEEM) traditionally use microchannel plates (MCPs), a phosphor screen and a CCD-camera to record images and diffraction patterns. In recent years, however, MCPs have become a limiting factor for these types of microscopy.

  8. Preparation of Candida albicans Biofilms for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Taff, Heather T.; Andes, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy is a form of microscopy that allows for imaging of distinct portions of an individual cell. For Candida albicans biofilms, it is often used to visualize the cell walls of fixed samples of yeast and hyphae. This protocol describes how to grow, harvest, and fix Candida albicans biofilms in preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  9. Advanced transmission electron microscopy on nanostructured magnetic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Campanini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This doctoral work is focused on the study of nanostructured magnetic materials by advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, with emphasis on Ni2MnGa shape memory alloy thin films and magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications. The combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction to characterize morphology and crystalline structure, with Lorentz microscopy and Electron Holography, permits to achieve a deep insight in the s...

  10. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    OpenAIRE

    Bordelon, David E.; Zhang, Jian; Graboski, Sarah; Cox, Adrienne; Schreiber, Eric; Zhou, Otto Z.; Chang, Sha

    2008-01-01

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiothera...

  11. Advanced electron microscopy characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Subarna Raj

    Research in noble metal nanoparticles has led to exciting progress in a versatile array of applications. For the purpose of better tailoring of nanoparticles activities and understanding the correlation between their structures and properties, control over the composition, shape, size and architecture of bimetallic and multimetallic nanomaterials plays an important role on revealing their new or enhanced functions for potentials application. Advance electron microscopy techniques were used to provide atomic scale insights into the structure-properties of different materials: PtPd, Au-Au3Cu, Cu-Pt, AgPd/Pt and AuCu/Pt nanoparticles. The objective of this work is to understand the physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials and describe synthesis, characterization, surface properties and growth mechanism of various bimetallic and multimetallic nanoparticles. The findings have provided us with novel and significant insights into the physical and chemical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. Different synthesis routes allowed us to synthesize bimetallic: Pt-Pd, Au-Au3Cu, Cu-Pt and trimetallic: AgPd/Pt, AuCu/Pt, core-shell and alloyed nanoparticles with monodispersed sizes, controlled shapes and tunable surface properties. For example, we have synthesized the polyhedral PtPd core-shell nanoparticles with octahedral, decahedral, and triangular plates. Decahedral PtPd core-shell structures are novel morphologies for this system. For the first time we fabricated that the Au core and Au3Cu alloyed shell nanoparticles passivated with CuS2 surface layers and characterized by Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The analysis of the high-resolution micrographs reveals that these nanoparticles have decahedral structure with shell periodicity, and that each of the particles is composed by Au core and Au3Cu ordered superlattice alloyed shell surrounded by CuS 2 surface layer. Additionally, we have described both experimental and theoretical methods of

  12. Characterization of high Tc materials and devices by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a clear and up-to-date account of the application of electron-based microscopies to the study of high Tc superconductors. Written by leading experts, this compilation provides a comprehensive review of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy, together with details of each technique and its applications. Introductory chapters cover the basics of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, including a chapter devoted to specimen preparation techniques and microanalysis by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Ensuring chapters examine identification of new superconducting compounds, imaging of superconducting properties by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy, imaging of vortices by electron holography and electronic structure determination by electron energy loss spectroscopy. The use of scanning tunneling microscopy for exploring surface morphology, growth processes and the mapping of superconducting carrier distributions is also discussed. Final chapters consider applications of electron microscopy to the analysis of grain boundaries, thin films and device structures. Detailed references are included. This book will interest graduate students and researchers in condensed matter physics and material science

  13. Current trends in scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk

    Zagreb: Croatian Society for Electron Microscopy, 2003 - (Milat, O.; Ježek, D.), s. 85 - 86 [MCEM. Pula (HR), 01.06.2003-05.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1065304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * primary beam energy * field emission gun Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. Zeolites - a high resolution electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been used to investigate a number of zeolites (EMT, FAU, LTL, MFI and MOR) and a member of the mesoporous M41S family. The electron optical artefact, manifested as a dark spot in the projected centre of the large zeolite channels, caused by insufficient transfer of certain reflections in the objective lens has been explained. The artefact severely hinders observation of materials confined in the zeolite channels and cavities. It is shown how to circumvent the artefact problem and how to image confined materials in spite of disturbance caused by the artefact. Image processing by means of a Wiener filter has been applied for removal of the artefact. The detailed surface structure of FAU has been investigated. Comparison of experimental micrographs with images simulated using different surface models indicates that the surface can be terminated in different ways depending on synthesis methods. The dealuminated form of FAU (USY) is covered by an amorphous region. Platinum incorporated in FAU has a preponderance to aggregate in the (111) twin planes, probably due to a local difference in cage structure with more spacious cages. It is shown that platinum is intra-zeolitic as opposed to being located on the external surface of the zeolite crystal. This could be deduced from tomography of ultra-thin sections among observations. HRTEM studies of the mesoporous MCM-41 show that the pores have a hexagonal shape and also supports the mechanistic model proposed which involves a cooperative formation of a mesophase including the silicate species as well as the surfactant. 66 refs, 24 figs

  15. Localization microscopy: mapping cellular dynamics with single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A J; Hess, S T

    2014-04-01

    Resolution describes the smallest details within a sample that can be recovered by a microscope lens system. For optical microscopes detecting visible light, diffraction limits the resolution to ∼200-250 nm. In contrast, localization measures the position of an isolated object using its image. Single fluorescent molecules can be localized with an uncertainty of a few tens of nanometres, and in some cases less than one nanometre. Superresolution fluorescence localization microscopy (SRFLM) images and localizes fluorescent molecules in a sample. By controlling the visibility of the fluorescent molecules with light, it is possible to cause a sparse subset of the tags to fluoresce and be spatially separated from each other. A movie is acquired with a camera, capturing images of many sets of visible fluorescent tags over a period of time. The movie is then analysed by a computer whereby all of the single molecules are independently measured, and their positions are recorded. When the coordinates of a sufficient number of molecules are collected, an image can be rendered by plotting the coordinates of the localized molecules. The spatial resolution of these rendered images can be better than 20 nm, roughly an order of magnitude better than the diffraction limited resolution. The invention of SRFLM has led to an explosion of related techniques. Through the use of specialized optics, the fluorescent signal can be split into multiple detection channels. These channels can capture additional information such as colour (emission wavelength), orientation and three-dimensional position of the detected molecules. Measurement of the colour of the detected fluorescence can allow researchers to distinguish multiple types of fluorescent tags and to study the interaction between multiple molecules of interest. Three-dimensional imaging and determination of molecular orientations offer insight into structural organization of the sample. SRFLM is compatible with living samples and

  16. Predicting bulk mechanical properties of cellularized collagen gels using multiphoton microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Raub, CB; Putnam, AJ; Tromberg, BJ; George, SC

    2010-01-01

    Cellularized collagen gels are a common model in tissue engineering, but the relationship between the microstructure and bulk mechanical properties is only partially understood. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an ideal non-invasive tool to examine collagen microstructure, cellularity and crosslink content in these gels. In order to identify robust image parameters that characterize microstructural determinants of the bulk elastic modulus, we performed serial MPM and mechanical tests on acellu...

  17. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  18. Ballistic-electron-emission Microscopy of Semiconductor Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L. Douglas; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh

    1997-01-01

    Balistic-electron-emission microscopy has developed from its beginning as a probe of Schottky barriers into a powerful nanometer-scale method for characterizing semiconductor interfaces and hot-electron transport.

  19. Correlative light and electron microscopy analysis of the centrosome: A step-by-step protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dong; Loncarek, Jadranka

    2015-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy harnesses the best from each of the two modalities of microscopy it utilizes; while light microscopy provides information about the dynamic properties of the cellular structure or fluorescently labeled protein, electron microscopy provides ultrastructural information in an unsurpassed resolution. However, tracing a particular cell and its rare and small structures such as centrosomes throughout numerous steps of the experiment is not a trivial task. In this chapter, we present the experimental workflow for combining live-cell fluorescence microscopy analysis with classical transmission electron microscopy, adapted for the studies of the centrosomes and basal bodies. We describe, in a step-by-step manner, an approach that can be affordably and successfully employed in any typical cell biology laboratory. The article details all key phases of the analysis starting from cell culture, live-cell microscopy, and sample fixation, through the steps of sample preparation for electron microscopy, to the identification of the target cell on the electron microscope. PMID:26175430

  20. Electron and light microscopy of yeast biofilm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubanová, Kamila; Růžička, F.; Nebesářová, J.; Burdíková, Z.; Dluhoš, J.; Collakova, J.; Samek, Ota; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    Vol. 2. Regensburg: University of Regensburg, 2013, s. 19-20. [Microscopy Conference 2013. Regensburg (DE), 25.08.2013-30. 08.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103; GA ČR GAP205/11/1687; GA TA ČR TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : biofilm * cryo-SEM * light microscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  1. Correlative light and electron microscopy: strategies and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Driel, Linda Francina van

    2011-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) refers to the observation of the same structures or ultrastructures with both light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). LM provides an overview of the studied material, and enables the quick localization of structures that are fluorescently labeled, while EM allows high resolution imaging of structures. The thesis describes several technical developments that allow CLEM. In the first chapters, methods are described for room temperatur...

  2. Electron microscopy study of PP/SAN polymer blends

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Kolařík, Jan; Vlková, Helena

    Zagreb : Croatian Society for Electron Microscopy, 2003, s. 503-504. [Multinational Congress on Microscopy /6./. Pula (HR), 01.06.2003-05.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP106/02/P029; GA AV ČR IAA4050105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : polymer blends * co-continuous morphology * electron microscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of individual nanoparticle bio-markers in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liv, Nalan, E-mail: n.liv@tudelft.nl; Lazić, Ivan; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated SEM imaging of nanoparticle biomarkers suspended below a thin membrane, with the ultimate goal of integrating functional fluorescence and structural SEM measurements of samples kept at ambient or hydrated conditions. In particular, we investigated how resolving power in liquid SEM is affected by the interaction of the electron beam with the membrane. Simulations with the Geant4-based Monte Carlo scheme developed by Kieft and Bosch (2008) [1] are compared to experimental results with suspended nanoparticles. For 20 nm and 50 nm thin membranes, we found a beam broadening of 1.5 nm and 3 nm, respectively, with an excellent agreement between simulations and experiments. 15 nm Au nanoparticles and bio-functionalized core-shell quantum dots can be individually resolved in denser clusters. We demonstrated the imaging of single EGF-conjugated quantum dots docked at filopodia during cellular uptake with both fluorescence microscopy and SEM simultaneously. These results open novel opportunities for correlating live fluorescence microscopy with structural electron microscopy. - Highlights: • We investigate the achievable resolution in liquid scanning electron microscopy (SEM). • We demonstrate liquid SEM imaging of individual fluorescent nanoparticle bio-markers • We show imaging of cellular QDot uptake with simultaneous fluorescence microscopy and SEM. • The positions of individual QDots can be resolved with details on cellular structure.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of individual nanoparticle bio-markers in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated SEM imaging of nanoparticle biomarkers suspended below a thin membrane, with the ultimate goal of integrating functional fluorescence and structural SEM measurements of samples kept at ambient or hydrated conditions. In particular, we investigated how resolving power in liquid SEM is affected by the interaction of the electron beam with the membrane. Simulations with the Geant4-based Monte Carlo scheme developed by Kieft and Bosch (2008) [1] are compared to experimental results with suspended nanoparticles. For 20 nm and 50 nm thin membranes, we found a beam broadening of 1.5 nm and 3 nm, respectively, with an excellent agreement between simulations and experiments. 15 nm Au nanoparticles and bio-functionalized core-shell quantum dots can be individually resolved in denser clusters. We demonstrated the imaging of single EGF-conjugated quantum dots docked at filopodia during cellular uptake with both fluorescence microscopy and SEM simultaneously. These results open novel opportunities for correlating live fluorescence microscopy with structural electron microscopy. - Highlights: • We investigate the achievable resolution in liquid scanning electron microscopy (SEM). • We demonstrate liquid SEM imaging of individual fluorescent nanoparticle bio-markers • We show imaging of cellular QDot uptake with simultaneous fluorescence microscopy and SEM. • The positions of individual QDots can be resolved with details on cellular structure

  5. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Isabell Begemann; Abhiyan Viplav; Christiane Rasch; Milos Galic

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for ...

  6. Characterization of High Tc Materials and Devices by Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Nigel D.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2006-11-01

    List of contributors; Preface; 1. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy S. Horiuchi and L. He; 2. Holography in the transmission electron microscope A. Tonomura; 3. Microanalysis by scanning transmission electron microscopy L. M. Brown and J. Yuan; 4. Specimen preparation for transmission electron microscopy J. G. Wen; 5. Low-temperature scanning electron microscopy R. P. Huebener; 6. Scanning tunneling microscopy M. E. Hawley; 7. Identification of new superconducting compounds by electron microscopy G. Van Tendeloo and T. Krekels; 8. Valence band electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of oxide superconductors Y. Y. Wang and V. P. Dravid; 9. Investigation of charge distribution in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 and YBa2Cu3O7 Y. Zhu; 10. Grain boundaries in high Tc materials: transport properties and structure K. L. Merkle, Y. Gao and B. V. Vuchic; 11. The atomic structure and carrier concentration at grain boundaries in YBa2Cu3O7-d N. D. Browning, M. F. Chisholm and S. J. Pennycook; 12. Microstructures in superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 thin films A. F. Marshall; 13. Investigations on the microstructure of YBa2Cu3O7 thin-film edge Josephson junctions by high-resolution electron microscopy C. L. Jia and K. Urban; 14. Controlling the structure and properties of high Tc thin-film devices E. Olsson.

  7. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1993-01-01

    "Transmission Electron Microscopy" presents the theory of image and contrastformation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy Theprinciples of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also analysed are the kinetical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure determination and imaging of lattices and their defects X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The third edition includes a brief discussionof Schottky emission guns, some clarification of minor details, and references to the recent literature

  8. Scanning transmission low energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Frank, Luděk

    New York : IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 2010. s. 25. [LEEM/PEEM /7./. 08.08.2010-13.08.2010, New York] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscope * he low energy electron microscope * graphene Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  9. Scanning electron microscopy - application and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the scanning electron microscope, and other image forming scanning systems (STEM and the nuclear microprobe), to a range of nuclear reactor problems is described. Particular attention is given to the solution of fracture problems. Autoradiography, electron spectroscopy, and an investigation of irradiation damage in boron carbide using the transmission electron microscope are also described. (author)

  10. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Barwick, Brett; Flannigan, David J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2009-01-01

    In materials science and biology, optical near-field microscopies enable spatial resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, but they cannot provide the atomic-scale imaging capabilities of electron microscopy. Given the nature of interactions between electrons and photons, and considering their connections through nanostructures, it should be possible to achieve imaging of evanescent electromagnetic fields with electron pulses when such fields are resolved in both space (nanometre and below) a...

  11. Low Energy Electron Microscopy in Materials Science

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk; Konvalina, Ivo; Matsuda, K.; Mikmeková, Eliška; Pokorná, Zuzana; Walker, Christopher

    Chiang Mai : Chiang Mai University, 2015. s. 20. [International Conference on the Physical Properties and Application of Advanced Materials (ICPMAT) /10./. 17.11.2015-21.11.2015, Chiang Mai] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : low energy electrons * contrast in scanning electron microscope * transmission mode in SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  12. Nanoparticle sizing: a comparative study using atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to unfold the nanoparticle size of a ferrofluid sample. Compared to TEM, the AFM method showed a nanoparticle diameter (Dm) reduction of 20% and standard deviation (σ) increase of 15%. The differences in Dm and σ were associated with the AFM tip and the nanoparticle concentration on the substrate

  13. Specimen Preparation for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: Microscopy Laboratory We recommend consultation with one of the lab directors before preparing specimens. The methods presented here provide an overview of preparation techniques for a variety of specimens. - **Conductive Specimens** (such as metallic objects): Usually, these specimens do not have to be sputter coated. Simply mount the specimen on a SEM stub using conductive paint or putty. - **Non-conductive Dry Specimens** (ex: ceramics, polymers): Mount on...

  14. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the theory of image and contrast formation and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal structure determination and imaging of lattice defects X-ray microanalysis and energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The second edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the areas of energy-loss spectroscopy, crystal-lattice imaging and reflection electron microscopy

  15. Computer-Aided Design for Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lencová, Bohumila

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2004), s. 51-53. ISSN 1439-4243 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : magnetic electron lenses * accuracy of computation * computer - aided design Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  16. Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Nagatani, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage to the specimen caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio...

  17. Correlative light- and electron microscopy with chemical tags

    OpenAIRE

    Perkovic, Mario; Kunz, Michael; Endesfelder, Ulrike; Bunse, Stefanie; Wigge, Christoph; Yu, Zhou; Hodirnau, Victor-Valentin; Scheffer, Margot P.; Seybert, Anja; Malkusch, Sebastian; Schuman, Erin M; Heilemann, Mike; Frangakis, Achilleas S.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy incorporates the specificity of fluorescent protein labeling into high-resolution electron micrographs. Several approaches exist for correlative microscopy, most of which have used the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as the label for light microscopy. Here we use chemical tagging and synthetic fluorophores instead, in order to achieve protein-specific labeling, and to perform multicolor imaging. We show that synthetic fluorophores preserve their post-embedding fluoresce...

  18. Correlation of structure and mass via scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tacke, S.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Reichelt, R.; Klingauf, J.

    Vol. 2. Regensburg: University of Regensburg, 2013, s. 310-311. [Microscopy Conference 2013. Regensburg (DE), 25.08.2013-30. 08.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy * mass measurement Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  19. Preservation of protein fluorescence in embedded human dendritic cells for targeted 3D light and electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    HÖHN, K.; Fuchs, J; FRÖBER, A.; KIRMSE, R.; Glass, B.; ANDERS‐ÖSSWEIN, M.; Walther, P.; KRÄUSSLICH, H.‐G.; Dietrich, C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this study, we present a correlative microscopy workflow to combine detailed 3D fluorescence light microscopy data with ultrastructural information gained by 3D focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy. The workflow is based on an optimized high pressure freezing/freeze substitution protocol that preserves good ultrastructural detail along with retaining the fluorescence signal in the resin embedded specimens. Consequently, cellular structures of interest can readily ...

  20. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1997-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray micronanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fourth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of Schottky emission guns, convergent-beam electron diffraction, electron tomography, holography and the high resolution of crystal lattices.

  1. Stimulated excitation electron microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howie, A.

    2015-04-15

    Recent advances in instrumentation for electron optics and spectroscopy have prompted exploration of ultra-low excitations such as phonons, bond vibrations and Johnson noise. These can be excited not just with fast electrons but also thermally or by other external sources of radiation. The near-field theory of electron energy loss and gain provides a convenient platform for analysing these processes. Possibilities for selected phonon mapping and imaging are discussed. Effects should certainly be observable in atomic resolution structure imaging but diffraction contrast imaging could perhaps be more informative. Additional exciting prospects to be explored include the transition from phonon excitation to single atom recoil and the boosting of energy loss and gain signals with tuned laser illumination. - Highlights: • Electron energy gains and losses measure thermal or laser boosting of excitations. • Electron energy gains and losses are conveniently analysed by near field theory. • Diffraction contrast theory is relevant for phonon imaging by electrons. • The transition from phonon excitation to single atom recoil deserves study.

  2. Stimulated excitation electron microscopy and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in instrumentation for electron optics and spectroscopy have prompted exploration of ultra-low excitations such as phonons, bond vibrations and Johnson noise. These can be excited not just with fast electrons but also thermally or by other external sources of radiation. The near-field theory of electron energy loss and gain provides a convenient platform for analysing these processes. Possibilities for selected phonon mapping and imaging are discussed. Effects should certainly be observable in atomic resolution structure imaging but diffraction contrast imaging could perhaps be more informative. Additional exciting prospects to be explored include the transition from phonon excitation to single atom recoil and the boosting of energy loss and gain signals with tuned laser illumination. - Highlights: • Electron energy gains and losses measure thermal or laser boosting of excitations. • Electron energy gains and losses are conveniently analysed by near field theory. • Diffraction contrast theory is relevant for phonon imaging by electrons. • The transition from phonon excitation to single atom recoil deserves study

  3. Electron microscopy in materials research of historical paintings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hradil, David; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Hradilová, J.

    Princeton, New Jersey : University of Lecce, 2001, s. 53-54. ISBN 1-58949-003-7. [Multinational Congress on Electron Microscopy /5./. Lecce (IT), 20.09.2001-25.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/P203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : electron microscopy * paintings * restoration Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  4. Scanning low-and very low energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk; Knápek, Alexandr; Konvalina, Ivo; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Walker, Christopher; Müllerová, Ilona

    Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2015, s. 218-220. ISBN 978-963-05-9653-4. [MCM 2015. Multinational Congress on Microscopy /12./. Eger (HU), 23.08.2015-28.08.2015] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : very low energy * scanning low energy electron microscopy * crystallography, graphene * tissue sections Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  5. Directed evolution of APEX2 for electron microscopy and proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Stephanie S.; Martell, Jeffrey D.; Kamer, Kimberli J; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    APEX is an engineered peroxidase that functions both as an electron microscopy tag, and as a promiscuous labeling enzyme for live-cell proteomics. Because the limited sensitivity of APEX precludes applications requiring low APEX expression, we used yeast display evolution to improve its catalytic efficiency. Our evolved APEX2 is far more active in cells, enabling the superior enrichment of endogenous mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins and the use of electron microscopy ...

  6. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM. PMID:26206941

  7. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Peddie, Christopher J.; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma; Melia, Charlotte; Marrison, Jo; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; O'Toole, Peter; Larijani, Banafshe; Collinson, Lucy M.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and sc...

  8. Cotton bacterial endotoxin assessed by electron microscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Helander, I; Lounatmaa, K.

    1981-01-01

    A piece of bale cotton was incubated in nutrient broth. Electron microscopic inspection of the cotton and the broth showed Gram-negative bacteria with long flagella, loosely attached to the cotton fibres. Large amounts of endotoxin liberating from these bacteria were visible in the growth medium.

  9. Scanning transmission low-energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Unčovský, M.; Frank, Luděk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), 2:1-6. ISSN 0018-8646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : TEM * STEM * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2011

  10. Quantitative Phase Retrieval in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Robert Alexander

    Phase retrieval in the transmission electron microscope offers the unique potential to collect quantitative data regarding the electric and magnetic properties of materials at the nanoscale. Substantial progress in the field of quantitative phase imaging was made by improvements to the technique of off-axis electron holography. In this thesis, several breakthroughs have been achieved that improve the quantitative analysis of phase retrieval. An accurate means of measuring the electron wavefront coherence in two-dimensions was developed and pratical applications demonstrated. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF) was assessed by slanted-edge, noise, and the novel holographic techniques. It was shown the traditional slanted-edge technique underestimates the MTF. In addition, progress was made in dark and gain reference normalization of images, and it was shown that incomplete read-out is a concern for slow-scan CCD detectors. Last, the phase error due to electron shot noise was reduced by the technique of summation of hologram series. The phase error, which limits the finest electric and magnetic phenomena which can be investigated, was reduced by over 900 % with no loss of spatial resolution. Quantitative agreement between the experimental root-mean-square phase error and the analytical prediction of phase error was achieved.

  11. Electron microscopy investigations of nanoparticles for cancer diagnostic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Ai Leen

    COINs binding to cells and the corresponding SER intensity. Finally, TEM was used to locate intra-cellularly labeled COINs and to trace the phospho-stat6 signaling pathway in U937 leukemia cells, demonstrating that COINs can be used to detect intracellular phosphorylation signaling events. These experiments demonstrate the importance of electron microscopy for analyzing the material-biology interface and for validating the attachment of nanoparticles on and in cells. Thus, electron microscope provides complementary imaging and spectroscopic information to current magnetic and SERS bio-detection technologies. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  12. Transmission electron microscopy of mercury metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Dalaver H; Sougrat, Rachid

    2016-09-01

    Transmission electron microcopy (TEM) analysis of liquid metals, especially mercury (Hg), is difficult to carry out because their specimen preparation poses a daunting task due to the unique surface properties of these metals. This paper reports a cryoTEM study on Hg using a novel specimen preparation technique. Hg metal is mixed with water using sonication and quenched in liquid ethane cryogen. This technique permits research into the morphological, phase and structural properties of Hg at nanoscale dimensions. PMID:27018645

  13. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Sanjay Kashyap; Emre Firlar; Teresa Perez-Gonzalez; Damien Faivre; Denis Trubitsyn; Dennis A. Bazylinski; Tanya Prozorov

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment....

  14. New developments in transmission electron microscopy for nanotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)

    2003-09-16

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is one of the most powerful tools used for characterizing nanomaterials, and it is indispensable for nanotechnology. This paper reviews some of the most recent developments in electron microscopy techniques for characterizing nanomaterials. The review covers the following areas: in-situ microscopy for studying dynamic shape transformation of nanocrystals; in-situ nanoscale property measurements on the mechanical, electrical and field emission properties of nanotubes/nanowires; environmental microscopy for direct observation of surface reactions; aberration-free angstrom-resolution imaging of light elements (such as oxygen and lithium); high-angle annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); imaging of atom clusters with atomic resolution chemical information; electron holography of magnetic materials; and high-spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for nanoscale electronic and chemical analysis. It is demonstrated that the picometer-scale science provided by HRTEM is the foundation of nanometer-scale technology. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. New developments in transmission electron microscopy for nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is one of the most powerful tools used for characterizing nanomaterials, and it is indispensable for nanotechnology. This paper reviews some of the most recent developments in electron microscopy techniques for characterizing nanomaterials. The review covers the following areas: in-situ microscopy for studying dynamic shape transformation of nanocrystals; in-situ nanoscale property measurements on the mechanical, electrical and field emission properties of nanotubes/nanowires; environmental microscopy for direct observation of surface reactions; aberration-free angstrom-resolution imaging of light elements (such as oxygen and lithium); high-angle annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); imaging of atom clusters with atomic resolution chemical information; electron holography of magnetic materials; and high-spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for nanoscale electronic and chemical analysis. It is demonstrated that the picometer-scale science provided by HRTEM is the foundation of nanometer-scale technology. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwick, Brett; Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-12-17

    In materials science and biology, optical near-field microscopies enable spatial resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, but they cannot provide the atomic-scale imaging capabilities of electron microscopy. Given the nature of interactions between electrons and photons, and considering their connections through nanostructures, it should be possible to achieve imaging of evanescent electromagnetic fields with electron pulses when such fields are resolved in both space (nanometre and below) and time (femtosecond). Here we report the development of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), and the associated phenomena. We show that the precise spatiotemporal overlap of femtosecond single-electron packets with intense optical pulses at a nanostructure (individual carbon nanotube or silver nanowire in this instance) results in the direct absorption of integer multiples of photon quanta (nhomega) by the relativistic electrons accelerated to 200 keV. By energy-filtering only those electrons resulting from this absorption, it is possible to image directly in space the near-field electric field distribution, obtain the temporal behaviour of the field on the femtosecond timescale, and map its spatial polarization dependence. We believe that the observation of the photon-induced near-field effect in ultrafast electron microscopy demonstrates the potential for many applications, including those of direct space-time imaging of localized fields at interfaces and visualization of phenomena related to photonics, plasmonics and nanostructures. PMID:20016598

  17. Characterization of Polycaprolactone Films Biodeterioration by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubanová, Kamila; Voberková, S.; Hermanová, S.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, S3 (2014), s. 1950-1951. ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : polycaprolactone films * biodeterioration * scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.877, year: 2014

  18. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    KA. Al-Salihi; NABA. Tarmidzi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (a...

  19. Contributed Review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmermans, F. J.; Otto, C. [Medical Cell Biophysics Group, MIRA Institute, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy.

  20. Contributed Review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, F. J.; Otto, C.

    2015-01-01

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy.

  1. Contributed Review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy

  2. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence - scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  3. Studies of epidermal lipids using electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D C

    1992-06-01

    Ruthenium tetroxide fixation has permitted the electron microscopic visualization of intercellular lipid lamellae in thin sections of stratum corneum. This development complements prior freeze-fracture studies of lipid lamellae and has advanced our knowledge about the ultrastructure of epidermal lipids in several ways. We have demonstrated a continuous lipid envelope that surrounds each differentiated stratum corneum cell and the presence of lipid lamellae throughout the entire stratum corneum of three mammalian species, including humans. Wherever lamellae are seen, they are present in multiples of one, two, or more pairs of bilayers, consistent with their formation from fused, flattened lipid vesicles. A unique pattern of lipid monolayers intervening between each pair of bilayers, based on sharing lipid chains between bilayers, has been proposed. In regions where there are no intercellular lamellae between corneocytes, intervening monolayers are in contact with adjacent lipid envelopes that might be involved in stratum corneum cohesion. However, limitations to the ruthenium technique must be overcome before changes in lamellar patterns can be accurately attributed to, or correlated with, changes in permeability brought about by experimental procedures or in diseased states. PMID:1498019

  4. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Samples in an Electric Field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Hovorka, Miloš; Mikmeková, Šárka; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona; Pokorná, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2012), s. 2731-2756. ISSN 1996-1944 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/11/2270; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * slow electrons * low energy SEM * low energy STEM * cathode lens Subject RIV: JA - Electronic s ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.247, year: 2012

  5. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In a remarkable engineering achievement, the JAXA space agency successfully recovered the Hayabusa space-craft in June 2010, following a non-optimal encounter and sur-face sampling mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. These are the first direct samples ever obtained and returned from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special op-portunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal sur-faces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the effects of space weathering. Here we report on our preliminary TEM measurements on two Itokawa samples. Methods: We were allocated particles RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211. Both particles were embedded in low viscosity epoxy and thin sections were prepared using ultramicrotomy. High resolution images and electron diffraction data were ob-tained using a JEOL 2500SE 200 kV field-emission scanning-transmission electron microscope. Quantitative maps and anal-yses were obtained using a Thermo thin-window energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometer. Results: Both particles are olivine-rich (Fo70) with µm-sized inclusions of FeS and have microstructurally complex rims. Par-ticle RA-QD02-0125 is rounded and has numerous sub-µm grains attached to its surface including FeS, albite, olivine, and rare melt droplets. Solar flare tracks have not been observed, but the particle is surrounded by a continuous 50 nm thick, stuctur-ally disordered rim that is compositionally similar to the core of the grain. One of the surface adhering grains is pyrrhotite show-ing a S-depleted rim (8-10 nm thick) with nanophase Fe metal grains (<5 nm) decorating the outermost surface. The pyrrhotite displays a complex superstructure in its core that is absent in the S-depleted rim. Particle RA-QD02-0211 contains solar flare particle tracks (2x109 cm-2) and shows a structurally disordered rim 100 nm thick. The track density corresponds to a surface exposure of 103-104 years based on the track production rate

  6. The CryoCapsule: Simplifying correlative light to electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Heiligenstein, Xavier; HEILIGENSTEIN, Jérôme; DELEVOYE, Cédric; Hurbain, Ilse; Bardin, Sabine; PERRINE, Paul-Gilloteaux; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Régnier, Gilles; Salamero, Jean; Antony, Claude; Raposo, Graca

    2014-01-01

    Correlating complementary multiple scale images of the same object is a straightforward means to decipher biological processes. Light microscopy and electron microscopy are the most commonly used imaging techniques, yet despite their complementarity, the experimental procedures available to correlate them are technically complex. We designed and manufactured a new device adapted to many biological specimens, the CryoCapsule, that simplifies the multiple sample preparation steps, which at pres...

  7. Preparation Of Ciliated Protozoa For Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: Microscopy Laboratory General notes: The same procedures are used to fix and stain cells for SEM and for TEM. Cells can be fixed using conventional [glutaraldehyde-osmium fixation](http://www.ukans.edu/~bcmic/MEIL/techniques/tetrahy.html) described for transmission electron microscopy. To preserve ciliary orientation, use the "instant fixation" protocol described here. With this method, the cortex and ciliary beat form is well preserved but the cytoplasm is poorly preser...

  8. Piezoelectricity and ferroelectricity of cellular polypropylene electrets films characterized by piezoresponse force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular electrets polymer is a new ferroelectret material exhibiting large piezoelectricity and has attracted considerable attentions in researches and industries. Property characterization is very important for this material and current investigations are mostly on macroscopic properties. In this work, we conduct nanoscale piezoelectric and ferroelectric characterizations of cellular polypropylene (PP) films using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). First, both the single-frequency PFM and dual-frequency resonance-tracking PFM testings were conducted on the cellular PP film. The localized piezoelectric constant d33 is estimated to be 7–11pC/N by correcting the resonance magnification with quality factor and it is about one order lower than the macroscopic value. Next, using the switching spectroscopy PFM (SS-PFM), we studied polarization switching behavior of the cellular PP films. Results show that it exhibits the typical ferroelectric-like phase hysteresis loops and butterfly-shaped amplitude loops, which is similar to that of a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) ferroelectric polymer film. However, both the phase and amplitude loops of the PP film are intensively asymmetric, which is thought to be caused by the nonzero remnant polarization after poling. Then, the D-E hysteresis loops of both the cellular PP film and PVDF film were measured by using the same wave form as that used in the SS-PFM, and the results show significant differences. Finally, we suggest that the ferroelectric-like behavior of cellular electrets films should be distinguished from that of typical ferroelectrics, both macroscopically and microscopically

  9. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  10. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I-V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6x109 A/m2 sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  11. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  12. Improved localization of cellular membrane receptors using combined fluorescence microscopy and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, M; Pfleger, M; Chtcheglova, L A; Neundlinger, I; Bozna, B L; Ebner, A; Schuetz, G J; Hinterdorfer, P [Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Zhu, R; Mayer, B [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rankl, C; Moertelmaier, M; Kada, G; Kienberger, F [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Salio, M; Shepherd, D; Polzella, P; Cerundolo, V [Cancer Research UK Tumor Immunology Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Dieudonne, M, E-mail: ferry_kienberger@agilent.com [Agilent Technologies Belgium, Wingepark 51, Rotselaar, AN B-3110 (Belgium)

    2010-03-19

    The combination of fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy has a great potential in single-molecule-detection applications, overcoming many of the limitations coming from each individual technique. Here we present a new platform of combined fluorescence and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) for improved localization of cellular receptors. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled human sodium-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT1) expressed Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and endothelial cells (MyEnd) from mouse myocardium stained with phalloidin-rhodamine were used as cell systems to study AFM topography and fluorescence microscopy on the same surface area. Topographical AFM images revealed membrane features such as lamellipodia, cytoskeleton fibers, F-actin filaments and small globular structures with heights ranging from 20 to 30 nm. Combined fluorescence and TREC imaging was applied to detect density, distribution and localization of YFP-labeled CD1d molecules on {alpha}-galactosylceramide ({alpha}GalCer)-loaded THP1 cells. While the expression level, distribution and localization of CD1d molecules on THP1 cells were detected with fluorescence microscopy, the nanoscale distribution of binding sites was investigated with molecular recognition imaging by using a chemically modified AFM tip. Using TREC on the inverted light microscope, the recognition sites of cell receptors were detected in recognition images with domain sizes ranging from {approx} 25 to {approx} 160 nm, with the smaller domains corresponding to a single CD1d molecule.

  13. Transmission through thin films by low energy scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Sobota, Jaroslav; Hanzlíková, Renáta; Fořt, Tomáš; Frank, Luděk

    Graz : Verlag der Technischen Universität, 2009, Vol. 1: 163-164. ISBN 978-3-85125-062-6. [MC 2009 - Joint Meeting of Dreiländertagung and Multinational Congress on Microscopy /9./. Graz (AT), 30.08.2009-04.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : low energy electrons * thin fílms * scanning transmission elektron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering http://www.univie.ac.at/asem/Graz_MC_09/papers/95398.pdf

  14. Microstructural study of an iron silicate catalyst by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the effects of various synthesis conditions on the structure of iron silicate analogs of zeolite ZSM-5 considered. Scanning electron microscopy and morphologies. Particle sizes vary from tenths of a micron to several microns, depending on degree of agitation during crystal growth, while morphology is additionally dependent on the concentration of iron in the gel during crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to determine the size and spatial distributions of iron-rich (as compared to the FeZSM-5 matrix) second phase particles within the ZSM-5 framework as a function of SiO2/Fe2O3-ratio, thermal and hydrothermal treatments

  15. Study of titanate nanotubes by X-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brunátová, T.; Popelková, Daniela; Wan, W.; Oleynikov, P.; Daniš, S.; Zou, X.; Kužel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 87, January (2014), s. 166-171. ISSN 1044-5803 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : computer simulations * transmission electron microscopy * electron diffraction Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.845, year: 2014

  16. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babahosseini, H. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Carmichael, B. [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Strobl, J.S. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Mahmoodi, S.N., E-mail: nmahmoodi@eng.ua.edu [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Agah, M., E-mail: agah@vt.edu [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  17. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain

  18. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, David E.; Zhang, Jian; Graboski, Sarah; Cox, Adrienne; Schreiber, Eric; Zhou, Otto Z.; Chang, Sha

    2008-12-01

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiotherapy cancer treatment outcomes. In this paper, initial results of the system development are reported. The relationship between field emission current, the dose rate, and the dose distribution has been investigated. A beam size of 23 μm has been achieved with variable dose rates of 1-100 Gy/s, and the system dosimetry has been measured using a radiochromic film. Cell irradiation has been demonstrated by the visualization of H2AX phosphorylation at DNA double-strand break sites following irradiation in a rat fibroblast cell monolayer. The prototype single beam cellular irradiator is a preliminary step to a multipixel cell irradiator that is under development.

  19. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiotherapy cancer treatment outcomes. In this paper, initial results of the system development are reported. The relationship between field emission current, the dose rate, and the dose distribution has been investigated. A beam size of 23 μm has been achieved with variable dose rates of 1-100 Gy/s, and the system dosimetry has been measured using a radiochromic film. Cell irradiation has been demonstrated by the visualization of H2AX phosphorylation at DNA double-strand break sites following irradiation in a rat fibroblast cell monolayer. The prototype single beam cellular irradiator is a preliminary step to a multipixel cell irradiator that is under development.

  20. Characterization of strained semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Özdöl, Vasfi Burak

    2011-01-01

    Today’s state-of-the-art semiconductor electronic devices utilize the charge transport within very small volumes of the active device regions. The structural, chemical and optical material properties in these small dimensions can critically affect the performance of these devices. The present thesis is focused on the nanometer scale characterization of the strain state in semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although high-resolution TEM has shown to provide t...

  1. Biomechanics of DNA structures visualized by 4D electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, Ulrich J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a technique for in situ visualization of the biomechanics of DNA structural networks using 4D electron microscopy. Vibrational oscillations of the DNA structure are excited mechanically through a short burst of substrate vibrations triggered by a laser pulse. Subsequently, the motion is probed with electron pulses to observe the impulse response of the specimen in space and time. From the frequency and amplitude of the observed oscillations, we determine the normal modes and eig...

  2. Some applications of ballistic electron emission microscopy/spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of ballistic electron emission microscopy and spectroscopy applications is presented. Results of our ballistic electron emission spectroscopy measurements on cleaved n-GaAs are given. The threshold in ballistic current-voltage characteristic is observed at bias 1.93 V which is high above the expected threshold. Explanation of this effect is given in the frame of present theoretical results. (author)

  3. History of Electron Microscopy at the Institute of Scientific Instruments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona

    Brno: Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v. v. i, 2014, s. 9-10. ISBN 978-80-87441-12-1. [Workshop of Interesting Topics of SEM and ESEM. Mikulov (CZ), 26.08.2014-31.08.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Institute of Scientific Instruments * history of electron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  4. Study of the niobium dehydrogenation process by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the micro-structure of Nb-H, during the dehydrogenation process through thermal treatment, has been studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The results are used in order to interpret the variation of the line resolution of Electron Channeling Pattern (ECP) of Nb-H as a function of isochronous annealing temperature. It is concluded that the improvement of the ECP line resolution is enhanced of β hydrate in Nb. (Author)

  5. Surface properties and microporosity of polyhydroxybutyrate under scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to investigate the surface properties especially surface porosity of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) using scanning electron microscopy. PHB granules were sprinkled on the double-sided sticky tape attached on a SEM aluminium stub and sputtered with gold (10nm thickness) in a Polaron SC515 Coater, following which the samples were placed into the SEM specimen chamber for viewing and recording. Scanning electron micrographs with different magnification of PHB surface revealed multiple pores with different sizes. (Author)

  6. Optical and scanning electron microscopies in examination of ultrathin foils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalina, Ivo; Hovorka, Miloš; Fořt, Tomáš; Müllerová, Ilona

    Shanghai : Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2010. s. 224. [Focus on Microscopy - FOM 2010. 28.03.2010-31.03.2010, Shanghai] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : very low energy electrons * laser confocal microscope * free-standing ultra thin films * very low energy transmission mode Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  7. Electron microscopy studies on MoS2 nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Pilsgaard

    Industrial-style MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts are studied using electron microscopy. The MoS2 nanostructures are imaged with single-atom sensitivity to reveal the catalytically important edge structures. Furthermore, the in-situ formation of MoS2 crystals is imaged for the first time....

  8. Fc-mediated immune precipitation. III. Visualization by electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, NPH; Christiansen, Gunna

    1983-01-01

    Fc-mediated interactions between immune complexes are of major importance for the precipitin reaction. In the present study these interactions were investigated by means of electron microscopy. Keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) was adsorbed to a thin glow charged carbon supporting film and reacted...

  9. The Electron Microscopy eXchange (EMX) initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marabini, Roberto; Ludtke, Steven J; Murray, Stephen C; Chiu, Wah; de la Rosa-Trevín, Jose M; Patwardhan, Ardan; Heymann, J Bernard; Carazo, Jose M

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) of ice-embedded samples allows the structural analysis of large biological macromolecules close to their native state. Different techniques have been developed during the last forty years to process cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data. Not surprisingly, success in analysis and interpretation is highly correlated with the continuous development of image processing packages. The field has matured to the point where further progress in data and methods sharing depends on an agreement between the packages on how to describe common image processing tasks. Such standardization will facilitate the use of software as well as seamless collaboration, allowing the sharing of rich information between different platforms. Our aim here is to describe the Electron Microscopy eXchange (EMX) initiative, launched at the 2012 Instruct Image Processing Center Developer Workshop, with the intention of developing a first set of standard conventions for the interchange of information for single-particle analysis (EMX version 1.0). These conventions cover the specification of the metadata for micrograph and particle images, including contrast transfer function (CTF) parameters and particle orientations. EMX v1.0 has already been implemented in the Bsoft, EMAN, Xmipp and Scipion image processing packages. It has been and will be used in the CTF and EMDataBank Validation Challenges respectively. It is also being used in EMPIAR, the Electron Microscopy Pilot Image Archive, which stores raw image data related to the 3DEM reconstructions in EMDB. PMID:26873784

  10. Electron microscopy and ultrastructure of a magnetotactic microorganism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission and scanning electron microscopy of magnetotactic microorganisms with diameter in the order of 6 μm show a complex internal structure indicating that they are a colony or aggregate of similar cells, with a large number of high density regions responsable for the observed magnetotaxis. (Author)

  11. Microfluidic chip for high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A Microfluidic chip (100) for transmission electron microscopy has a monolithic body (101) with a front side (102) and a back side (103). The monolithic body (101) comprises an opening (104) on the back side (103) extending in a vertical direction from the back side (103) to a membrane (107...

  12. Microstructure of lead zirconium titanate (PZT) by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission and high-resolution electron microscopy reveal the microtexture of lead zirconium titanate ceramics. Fine scale (≤ 500 Aangstroem) ferroelastic and ferroelectric twin domains, as well as dislocations were found in a complex texture. Correlations between stoichiometry, microstructure and piezoelectric properties are discussed. 6 refs., 3 figs

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of ULPA and HEPA filtering papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of newly developed ULPA and HEPA filtering papers has been examined in an abnormal condition due to overheating up to 400 degree C. A noteworth failure in mechanical resistance has been observed, whereas efficiency was scarcely affected. Scanning electron microscopy showed that observed anticipated failures were accompanied with ruptures of the glass microfibers of the papers

  14. Ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti (Anoplura, Echinophthiriidae by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores del Carmen Castro

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti Werneck, 1955, mainly the external chorionic features of the egg, is described through electronic microscopy techniques. This species was first cited in Argentina, infesting Arctocephalus australis (Zimmermann, 1873. The morphological adaptations of adults and nymphs are described in both species of Proechinophthirus parasitic on Otariidae: P. fluctus (Ferris, 1916 and P. zumpti.

  15. Electron microscopy in structural studies of Photosystem II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bumba, Ladislav; Vácha, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 77, - (2003), s. 1-19. ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141 Grant ostatní: GA FRVŠ(CZ) 1292/2002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902 Keywords : photosynthesis, electron microscopy Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.239, year: 2003

  16. Improved handling of embedding plastics for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, W A

    1982-08-01

    An improved, safer, rapid method for preparing embedding plastics for electron microscopy is described. The method consists of contained storage and dispensing of individual plastic components on an automatic tare balance. The proportions are based on weight measurements and may be calculated from volume or proportion recipes. The usual problems in and resulting from embedding plastic handling have been eliminated. PMID:6750130

  17. Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy of Individual Cells andCellular Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; Fore, S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Huser, T

    2008-05-15

    Raman spectroscopy provides the unique opportunity to non-destructively analyze chemical concentrations on the submicron length scale in individual cells without the need for optical labels. This enables the rapid assessment of cellular biochemistry inside living cells, and it allows for their continuous analysis to determine cellular response to external events. Here, we review recent developments in the analysis of single cells, subcellular compartments, and chemical imaging based on Raman spectroscopic techniques. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy provides for the full spectral assessment of cellular biochemistry, while coherent Raman techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is primarily used as an imaging tool comparable to confocal fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are complemented by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which provides higher sensitivity and local specificity, and also extends the techniques to chemical indicators, i.e. pH sensing. We review the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, demonstrate some of their applications and discuss their potential for future research in cell biology and biomedicine.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  19. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Harris, Jérémie; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Balboni, Roberto; Mafakheri, Erfan; Dennis, Mark R; Frabboni, Stefano; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-07-01

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. PMID:27203186

  20. Visualization of Microbial Biomarkers by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Norman R.; Allen, Carlton C.; Child, Alice

    2001-01-01

    . Fortunately, many antimicrobial defense systems of higher organisms require sensitive detection to combat microbial pathogens. We employ here the primitive immune system of the evolutionarily ancient horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. This species relies on multi-enzyme signal amplification detection of cell wall molecules and they can be applied to the development of useful detectors of life. An extension of this work includes the visualization of microbial signatures by labeling LAL components with chromogenic or electron dense markers. The protein Limulus Anti-LPS Factor (LALF) has an extremely high affinity for LPS. By coupling LALF binding with colloidal gold labels we demonstrate a correlation of the structures visible by electron microscopy with biochemical evidence of microbial cell wall materials. Pure silica particles were mixed with cultures of E. coli (10(exp 6) cfu/mL). Samples were washed sequentially with buffered saline, LALF, antibody to LALF and finally colloidal gold-labeled Protein A. Negative controls were not exposed to E. coli but received identical treatment otherwise. Samples were coated with carbon and imaged on a JEOL JSM-840 scanning electron microscope with LaB6 source in the back scatter mode with the JEOL annular back scatter detector. 20 nm-scale black spots in this contrast-reversed image originate from electrons back-scattered by gold atoms. Negative controls did not give any signal. Future work will expand application of this technique to soil simulants and mineralized rock samples.

  1. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of catalyst sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Challa, Sivakumar R.;

    2013-01-01

    , we focus on in situ electron microscopy studies of catalysts that shed light on the mechanistic aspects of catalyst sintering. Catalyst sintering is an important mechanism for activity loss, especially for catalysts that operate at elevated temperatures. Literature from the past decade is reviewed......Recent advancements in the field of electron microscopy, such as aberration correctors, have now been integrated into Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), making it possible to study the behavior of supported metal catalysts under operating conditions at atomic resolution. Here...... of Ostwald ripening as well as atomistic Monte Carlo simulations are both in good agreement with these experimental observations, predicting a steep loss in catalyst activity at short times on stream. The in situ studies show the importance of direct observations to deduce mechanisms and show the important...

  2. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy in nanotechnology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Mika, Filip; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, 8/9 (2012), s. 695-716. ISSN 1475-7435 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * very low energy electrons * cathode lens * grain contrast * strain contrast * imaging of participates * dopant contrast * very low energy STEM * graphene Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.087, year: 2012

  3. A Correlative Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy Approach to Locating Nanoparticles in Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Kempen, Paul J.; Kircher, Moritz F; DE LA ZERDA, ADAM; Zavaleta, Cristina L.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Sinclair, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using b...

  4. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references

  5. Vibrational and optical spectroscopies integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we present a measurement platform for collecting multiple types of spectroscopy data during high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy observations of dynamic processes. Such coupled measurements are made possible by a broadband, high-efficiency, free-space optical system. The critical element of the system is a parabolic mirror, inserted using an independent hollow rod and placed below the sample holder which can focus a light on the sample and/or collect the optical response. We demonstrate the versatility of this optical setup by using it to combine in situ atomic-scale electron microscopy observations with Raman spectroscopy. The Raman data is also used to measure the local temperature of the observed sample area. Other applications include, but are not limited to: cathodo- and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and use of the laser as a local, high-rate heating source. - Highlights: • Broadband, high-efficiency design adaptable to other electron microscopes. • Raman spectroscopy integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy. • Raman spectra peak frequency shifts enable measurement of local sample temperature. • Multiple types of optical spectroscopy enabled, e.g. cathodoluminescence

  6. Ballistic electron magnetic microscopy on epitaxial spin valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindl, E.; Vancea, J.; Back, C. H.

    2007-02-01

    The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope has been used as an injector of hot electrons or hot holes into a spin valve epitaxially grown on n-GaAs67P33 . Spin-dependent transport of injected and hole excited electrons has been studied in an external magnetic field at room temperature. Significant variations in the collector current due to the spin-dependent inelastic decay of the hot charge carriers have been measured for parallel and antiparallel configurations of the magnetization of the individual layers. We found magnetocurrent effects on the order of 600% and relative large transmission values compared to other ballistic electron magnetic microscopy studies. In addition, we investigated the excitation of electron-hole pairs with its subsequent electron transport in the spin valve and found a magnetocurrent effect with positive sign.

  7. Current status and perspectives in atomic force microscopy-based identification of cellular transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenbo; Hu, Xiao; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the complex interplay between cells and their biomechanics and how the interplay is influenced by the extracellular microenvironment, as well as how the transforming potential of a tissue from a benign to a cancerous one is related to the dynamics of both the cell and its surroundings, holds promise for the development of targeted translational therapies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of atomic force microscopy-based technology and its applications for identification of cellular progression to a cancerous phenotype. The review also offers insights into the advancements that are required for the next user-controlled tool to allow for the identification of early cell transformation and thus potentially lead to improved therapeutic outcomes. PMID:27274238

  8. Visualizing viral protein structures in cells using genetic probes for correlated light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Horng D; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Ellisman, Mark H; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2015-11-15

    Structural studies of viral proteins most often use high-resolution techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, single particle negative stain, or cryo-electron microscopy (EM) to reveal atomic interactions of soluble, homogeneous viral proteins or viral protein complexes. Once viral proteins or complexes are separated from their host's cellular environment, their natural in situ structure and details of how they interact with other cellular components may be lost. EM has been an invaluable tool in virology since its introduction in the late 1940's and subsequent application to cells in the 1950's. EM studies have expanded our knowledge of viral entry, viral replication, alteration of cellular components, and viral lysis. Most of these early studies were focused on conspicuous morphological cellular changes, because classic EM metal stains were designed to highlight classes of cellular structures rather than specific molecular structures. Much later, to identify viral proteins inducing specific structural configurations at the cellular level, immunostaining with a primary antibody followed by colloidal gold secondary antibody was employed to mark the location of specific viral proteins. This technique can suffer from artifacts in cellular ultrastructure due to compromises required to provide access to the immuno-reagents. Immunolocalization methods also require the generation of highly specific antibodies, which may not be available for every viral protein. Here we discuss new methods to visualize viral proteins and structures at high resolutions in situ using correlated light and electron microscopy (CLEM). We discuss the use of genetically encoded protein fusions that oxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) into an osmiophilic polymer that can be visualized by EM. Detailed protocols for applying the genetically encoded photo-oxidizing protein MiniSOG to a viral protein, photo-oxidation of the fusion protein to yield DAB polymer staining, and

  9. Imaging transient blood vessel fusion events in zebrafish by correlative volume electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah E J Armer

    Full Text Available The study of biological processes has become increasingly reliant on obtaining high-resolution spatial and temporal data through imaging techniques. As researchers demand molecular resolution of cellular events in the context of whole organisms, correlation of non-invasive live-organism imaging with electron microscopy in complex three-dimensional samples becomes critical. The developing blood vessels of vertebrates form a highly complex network which cannot be imaged at high resolution using traditional methods. Here we show that the point of fusion between growing blood vessels of transgenic zebrafish, identified in live confocal microscopy, can subsequently be traced through the structure of the organism using Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM and Serial Block Face/Scanning Electron Microscopy (SBF/SEM. The resulting data give unprecedented microanatomical detail of the zebrafish and, for the first time, allow visualization of the ultrastructure of a time-limited biological event within the context of a whole organism.

  10. 35 years of electron microscopy in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron microscopy has celebrated in 2009 the XXXV anniversary in Costa Rica. The history of the electron microscopy was initiated with the donation of a microscope by Japan and the establishment of the Unidad de Microscopia Electronica (UME), which later, has been consolidated as the Centro de Investigacion en Estructuras Microscopicas (CIEMic) of the Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR). This center has realized its own research and has gave support to different units of the UCR, state universities and the private sector. Currently, the CIEMic has had two transmission electron microscopes (TEM) and two scanning electron microscopes (SEM), besides of optical microscopy equipment, including a laser confocal microscope. The two fundamental types of electron microscopes (TEM and SEM) have generated different images. While the first has had a resolution that has allowed to analyze virus, usually their images have been flat; however, with some special techniques can obtain three-dimensional images. The image in the TEM is generated by electrons that have passed through the sample, and to interact with its atoms have changed its energy and trajectory. This, at the end, has impacted on a photosensitive screen that has become in flashes, whose intensity has depended on its energy and form the image. Meanwhile, in the MER, the image has been normal type, although with less resolution. The electrons in the MER are focused on a small area of the sample in which have interacted with the atoms of this, and has generated a a series of signals, including the most used were the secondary electrons and characteristic X-rays. In both cases, an electron from beam has generated in the filament a collision against an electron of the sample and has given part of its energy to the degree of release of its atom and issued out of the sample; this has been called secondary electrons. X-rays have been generated when an electron of the same atom that has lost the secondary electron, but in an

  11. Electrical scanning probe microscopy on active organic electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingree, Liam S.C.; Reid, Obadiah G.; Ginger, David S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-01-05

    Polymer- and small-molecule-based organic electronic devices are being developed for applications including electroluminescent displays, transistors, and solar cells due to the promise of low-cost manufacturing. It has become clear that these materials exhibit nanoscale heterogeneities in their optical and electrical properties that affect device performance, and that this nanoscale structure varies as a function of film processing and device-fabrication conditions. Thus, there is a need for high-resolution measurements that directly correlate both electronic and optical properties with local film structure in organic semiconductor films. In this article, we highlight the use of electrical scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM), and similar variants to elucidate charge injection/extraction, transport, trapping, and generation/recombination in organic devices. We discuss the use of these tools to probe device structures ranging from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and thin-film transistors (TFT), to light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) and organic photovoltaics. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. A novel cell traction force microscopy to study multi-cellular system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Tang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traction forces exerted by adherent cells on their microenvironment can mediate many critical cellular functions. Accurate quantification of these forces is essential for mechanistic understanding of mechanotransduction. However, most existing methods of quantifying cellular forces are limited to single cells in isolation, whereas most physiological processes are inherently multi-cellular in nature where cell-cell and cell-microenvironment interactions determine the emergent properties of cell clusters. In the present study, a robust finite-element-method-based cell traction force microscopy technique is developed to estimate the traction forces produced by multiple isolated cells as well as cell clusters on soft substrates. The method accounts for the finite thickness of the substrate. Hence, cell cluster size can be larger than substrate thickness. The method allows computing the traction field from the substrate displacements within the cells' and clusters' boundaries. The displacement data outside these boundaries are not necessary. The utility of the method is demonstrated by computing the traction generated by multiple monkey kidney fibroblasts (MKF and human colon cancerous (HCT-8 cells in close proximity, as well as by large clusters. It is found that cells act as individual contractile groups within clusters for generating traction. There may be multiple of such groups in the cluster, or the entire cluster may behave a single group. Individual cells do not form dipoles, but serve as a conduit of force (transmission lines over long distances in the cluster. The cell-cell force can be either tensile or compressive depending on the cell-microenvironment interactions.

  13. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  14. Ultrafast electron microscopy in materials science, biology, and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of pump-probe experiments to study complex transient events has been an area of significant interest in materials science, biology, and chemistry. While the emphasis has been on laser pump with laser probe and laser pump with x-ray probe experiments, there is a significant and growing interest in using electrons as probes. Early experiments used electrons for gas-phase diffraction of photostimulated chemical reactions. More recently, scientists are beginning to explore phenomena in the solid state such as phase transformations, twinning, solid-state chemical reactions, radiation damage, and shock propagation. This review focuses on the emerging area of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which comprises ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM). The topics that are treated include the following: (1) The physics of electrons as an ultrafast probe. This encompasses the propagation dynamics of the electrons (space-charge effect, Child's law, Boersch effect) and extends to relativistic effects. (2) The anatomy of UED and DTEM instruments. This includes discussions of the photoactivated electron gun (also known as photogun or photoelectron gun) at conventional energies (60-200 keV) and extends to MeV beams generated by rf guns. Another critical aspect of the systems is the electron detector. Charge-coupled device cameras and microchannel-plate-based cameras are compared and contrasted. The effect of various physical phenomena on detective quantum efficiency is discussed. (3) Practical aspects of operation. This includes determination of time zero, measurement of pulse-length, and strategies for pulse compression. (4) Current and potential applications in materials science, biology, and chemistry. UEM has the potential to make a significant impact in future science and technology. Understanding of reaction pathways of complex transient phenomena in materials science, biology, and chemistry will provide fundamental

  15. Preparation of gold nanocluster bioconjugates for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinecke, Christine L; Ackerson, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe types of gold nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates and their use in electron microscopy. Included are two detailed protocols for labeling an IgG antibody with gold monolayer protected clusters. The first approach is a direct bonding approach that utilizes the ligand place exchange reaction. The second approach describes NHS-EDC coupling of Au(144)(pMBA)(60) with IgG. Also included are various characterization techniques for determining labeling efficiency. PMID:23086882

  16. Large-Scale Electron Microscopy Image Segmentation in Spark

    OpenAIRE

    Plaza, Stephen M.; Berg, Stuart E.

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of connectomics aims to unlock the mysteries of the brain by understanding the connectivity between neurons. To map this connectivity, we acquire thousands of electron microscopy (EM) images with nanometer-scale resolution. After aligning these images, the resulting dataset has the potential to reveal the shapes of neurons and the synaptic connections between them. However, imaging the brain of even a tiny organism like the fruit fly yields terabytes of data. It can take ye...

  17. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF FILLED SILICONE RUBBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yufu; YANG Qiyun; LI Guangliang

    1988-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of a number of silicone vulcanizates were investigated by the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the difference in the presence and absence of filler, the variation of its surface modification as well as the history of thermal aging of the vulcanizates, all of these factors made difference in surface morphology of the fractured surface. This was correlated with the strength of the vulcanizates. The reinforcing effect of filler and the process of fracture were discussed.

  18. Elimination of Ferromagnetic Particles Aggregation for Investigation by Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.S. Kuzema

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been described the device for sample preparation of highly dispersed ferromagnetic powders including micropowders for permanent magnets, magnetic carriers, machine and mechanism components’ wear products contained in lubricants for investigation of these materials by light and electron microscopy. The device eliminates the coalescence of ferromagnetic particles and improves reliability of the results of such objects investigation. The technique of such device application has been described and exemplified for various materials investigation.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy of ameloblastoma: A study on six cases

    OpenAIRE

    Chawla, Rajeshwar; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Sarkar, Amitabha; Muddiah, Savita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ameloblastoma is a rare, benign tumor of odontogenic epithelium, but with an aggressive clinical behavior. Aim: The present study aims to assess the ultramicroscopic features of the epithelial and connective tissue components of ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods: Six cases of ameloblastoma were subjected to electron microscopy. They included three cases of follicular type and three cases of plexiform type. Results: The study reveals that the ameloblastoma contains the full comp...

  20. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Lactomicroselenium Particles in Probiotic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gabor; Pinczes, Gyula; Pinter, Gabor; Pocsi, Istvan; Prokisch, Jozsef; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to test whether or not (a) in statu nascendi synthesized, and in situ measured, nanoparticle size does not differ significantly from the size of nanoparticles after their purification; and (b) the generation of selenium is detrimental to the bacterial strains that produce them. Elemental nano-sized selenium produced by probiotic latic acid bacteria was used as a lactomicroselenium (lactomicroSel) inhibitor of cell growth in the presence of lactomicroSel, and was followed by time-lapse microscopy. The size of lactomicroSel produced by probiotic bacteria was measured in situ and after isolation and purification. For these measurements the TESLA BS 540 transmission electron microscope was converted from analog (aTEM) to digital processing (dTEM), and further to remote-access internet electron microscopy (iTEM). Lactobacillus acidophilus produced fewer, but larger, lactomicroSel nanoparticles (200-350 nm) than Lactobacillus casei (L. casei), which generated many, smaller lactomicroSel particles (85-200 nm) and grains as a cloudy, less electrodense material. Streptococcus thermophilus cells generated selenoparticles (60-280 nm) in a suicidic manner. The size determined in situ in lactic acid bacteria was significantly lower than those measured by scanning electron microscopy after the isolation of lactomicroSel particles obtained from lactobacilli (100-500 nm), but higher relative to those isolated from Streptococcus thermopilus (50-100 nm). These differences indicate that smaller lactomicroSel particles could be more toxic to the producing bacteria themselves and discrepancies in size could have implications with respect to the applications of selenium nanoparticles as prebiotics. PMID:27376279

  1. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Lactomicroselenium Particles in Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Nagy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy was used to test whether or not (a in statu nascendi synthesized, and in situ measured, nanoparticle size does not differ significantly from the size of nanoparticles after their purification; and (b the generation of selenium is detrimental to the bacterial strains that produce them. Elemental nano-sized selenium produced by probiotic latic acid bacteria was used as a lactomicroselenium (lactomicroSel inhibitor of cell growth in the presence of lactomicroSel, and was followed by time-lapse microscopy. The size of lactomicroSel produced by probiotic bacteria was measured in situ and after isolation and purification. For these measurements the TESLA BS 540 transmission electron microscope was converted from analog (aTEM to digital processing (dTEM, and further to remote-access internet electron microscopy (iTEM. Lactobacillus acidophilus produced fewer, but larger, lactomicroSel nanoparticles (200–350 nm than Lactobacillus casei (L. casei, which generated many, smaller lactomicroSel particles (85–200 nm and grains as a cloudy, less electrodense material. Streptococcus thermophilus cells generated selenoparticles (60–280 nm in a suicidic manner. The size determined in situ in lactic acid bacteria was significantly lower than those measured by scanning electron microscopy after the isolation of lactomicroSel particles obtained from lactobacilli (100–500 nm, but higher relative to those isolated from Streptococcus thermopilus (50–100 nm. These differences indicate that smaller lactomicroSel particles could be more toxic to the producing bacteria themselves and discrepancies in size could have implications with respect to the applications of selenium nanoparticles as prebiotics.

  2. Demonstration of Polysaccharide Capsule in Campylobacter jejuni Using Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Karlyshev, Andrey V.; McCrossan, Maria V.; Wren, Brendan W.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, we reported that Campylobacter jejuni, an important gastrointestinal pathogen, has the genetic determinants to produce a capsular polysaccharide (Karlyshev et al., Mol. Microbiol. 35:529–541, 2000). Despite these data, the presence of a capsule in these bacteria has remained controversial. In this study we stain C. jejuni cells with the cationic dye Alcian blue and demonstrate for the first time by electron microscopy that C. jejuni cells produce a polysaccharide capsule that is ret...

  3. Preparation of nuclear materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of highly radioactive and irradiated nuclear fuels and materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is conjoined with a set of unique challenges, including but not limited to personnel radiation exposure and contamination. The paper evaluates three specimen preparation techniques for preparation of irradiated materials and determines which technique yields to the most reliable characterization of radiation damage microstructure. Various specimen preparation artifacts associated with each technique are considered and ways of minimizing these artifacts are delineated.

  4. Ultrahigh Voltage Electron Microscopy Links Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience/Neuroendocrinology

    OpenAIRE

    Hirotaka Sakamoto; Mitsuhiro Kawata

    2011-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) analysis of anatomical ultrastructures is extremely important in most fields of biological research. Although it is very difficult to perform 3D image analysis on exact serial sets of ultrathin sections, 3D reconstruction from serial ultrathin sections can generally be used to obtain 3D information. However, this technique can only be applied to small areas of a specimen because of technical and physical difficulties. We used ultrahigh voltage electron microscopy (U...

  5. Structure of polyelectrolyte hollow capsules by scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Keller, U.; Sporenberg, N.; Schönhoff, M.

    Budapest : Akadémiai Kiadó, 2015, s. 211-212. ISBN 978-963-05-9653-4. [MCM 2015. Multinational Congress on Microscopy /12./. Eger (HU), 23.08.2015-28.08.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20012S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : cryo-SEM * low voltage STEM * quantitative imaging * hollow capsules Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  6. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Diffractometry of Materials (Third Edition)

    OpenAIRE

    Fultz, Brent; Howe, James M.

    2007-01-01

    This book explains concepts of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) that are important for the characterization of materials. The third edition has been updated to cover important technical developments, including the remarkable recent improvement in resolution of the TEM. This edition is not substantially longer than the second, but all chapters have been updated and revised for clarity. A new chapter on high resolution STEM methods has been added. The book e...

  7. Application of Colloidal Palladium Nanoparticles for Labeling in Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vancová, Marie; Šlouf, Miroslav; Langhans, Jan; Pavlová, Eva; Nebesářová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2011), s. 810-816. ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520704; GA AV ČR KJB600960906; GA ČR GAP205/10/0348 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : electron microscopy * colloidal palladium * nanoparticles * labeling * salivary glands * Ixodes ricinus Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.007, year: 2011

  8. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Tamer Vestlund, Asli; Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, Sean F.; Longhurst, Philip J.; Pollard, Simon J. T.; Drew, Gillian H

    2014-01-01

    This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurri...

  9. Actinomyces viscosus fibril antigens detected by immunogold electron microscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen, R P; Buivids, I A; Simardone, J R

    1989-01-01

    Strains representing taxonomic clusters of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii were studied by indirect immunogold electron microscopy with either monospecific anti-type 1 and anti-type 2 rabbit antibodies or species-specific monoclonal antibodies. The monoclonal and anti-type 2 antibodies localized on long fibrils, whereas the anti-type 1 antibodies mostly localized close to the cell body or on shorter appendages.

  10. Femtosecond time-resolved MeV electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct visualization of fundamental dynamic processes in matter occurring on femtosecond time scales over sub-nanometer (even atomic) spatial dimensions has long been a goal in science. In this paper, the development of a femtosecond time-resolved relativistic transmission electron microscopy (FsTEM) based on a photocathode radio-frequency (RF) gun is reported. The requirements and limitations of the beam parameters used in FsTEM are discussed. Finally, some demonstrations of relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction measurement using the RF gun are presented. (author)

  11. Fixation methods for electron microscopy of human and other liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eddie; Wisse; Filip; Braet; Hans; Duimel; Celien; Vreuls; Ger; Koek; Steven; WM; Olde; Damink; Maartje; AJ; van; den; Broek; Bart; De; Geest; Cees; HC; Dejong; Chise; Tateno; Peter; Frederik

    2010-01-01

    For an electron microscopic study of the liver,expertise and complicated,time-consuming processing of hepatic tissues and cells is needed.The interpretation of electron microscopy(EM) images requires knowledge of the liver fine structure and experience with the numerous artifacts in fixation,embedding,sectioning,contrast staining and microscopic imaging.Hence,the aim of this paper is to present a detailed summary of different methods for the preparation of hepatic cells and tissue,for the purpose of preserv...

  12. Transmission electron microscopy of a model crystalline organic, theophylline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle, J.; S'ari, M.; Hondow, N.; Abellán, P.; Brown, A. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyse the diffraction patterns of the model crystalline organic theophylline to investigate beam damage in relation to changing accelerating voltage, sample temperature and TEM grid support films. We find that samples deposited on graphene film grids have the longest lifetimes when also held at -190 °C and imaged at 200 kV accelerating voltage. Finally, atomic lattice images are obtained in bright field STEM by working close to the estimated critical electron dose for theophylline.

  13. Free-standing graphene by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-standing graphene sheets have been imaged by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We show that the discrete numbers of graphene layers enable an accurate calibration of STEM intensity to be performed over an extended thickness and with single atomic layer sensitivity. We have applied this calibration to carbon nanoparticles with complex structures. This leads to the direct and accurate measurement of the electron mean free path. Here, we demonstrate potentials using graphene sheets as a novel mass standard in STEM-based mass spectrometry.

  14. Optical and scanning electron microscopies in examination of ultrathin foils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalina, Ivo; Hovorka, Miloš; Fořt, Tomáš; Müllerová, Ilona

    Brno : Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i, 2010 - (Mika, F.), s. 23-24 ISBN 978-80-254-6842-5. [International Seminar on Recent Trends in Charged Particle Optics and Surface Physics Instrumentation /12./. Skalský dvůr (CZ), 31.05.2010-04.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : very low energy scanning transmission electron microscopy * ultrathin foils * laser confocal microscope Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  15. Strain Mapping by Scanning Low Energy Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikmeková, Šárka; Man, O.; Pantělejev, L.; Hovorka, Miloš; Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk; Kouřil, M.

    Zurich : Trans Tech Publications, 2011 - (Šandera, P.), s. 338-341 ISBN 978-3-03785-006-0. ISSN 1662-9795. [MSMF-6: Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture VI. Brno (CZ), 28.06.2010-30.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk OE08012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM) * contrast of crystal orientation * microscopic strain Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  16. Advantages of environmental scanning electron microscopy in studies of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S P; Pope, R K; Scheetz, R W; Ray, R I; Wagner, P A; Little, B J

    1993-08-01

    Microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and microalgae, are composed predominantly of water which prohibits direct observation in a traditional scanning electron microscope (SEM). Preparation for SEM requires that microorganisms be fixed, frozen or dehydrated, and coated with a conductive film before observation in a high vacuum environment. Sample preparation may mechanically disturb delicate samples, compromise morphological information, and introduce other artifacts. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) provides a technology for imaging hydrated or dehydrated biological samples with minimal manipulation and without the need for conductive coatings. Sporulating cultures of three fungi, Aspergillus sp., Cunninghamella sp., and Mucor sp., were imaged in the ESEM to assess usefulness of the instrument in the direct observation of delicate, uncoated, biological specimens. Asexual sporophores showed no evidence of conidial displacement or disruption of sporangia. Uncoated algal cells of Euglena gracilis and Spirogyra sp. were examined using the backscatter electron detector (BSE) and the environmental secondary electron detector (ESD) of the ESEM. BSE images had more clearly defined intracellular structures, whereas ESD gave a clearer view of the surface E. gracilis cells fixed with potassium permanganate, Spirogyra sp. stained with Lugol's solution, and Saprolegnia sp. fixed with osmium tetroxide were compared using BSE and ESD to demonstrate that cellular details could be enhanced by the introduction of heavy metals. The effect of cellular water on signal quality was evaluated by comparing hydrated to critical point dried specimens. PMID:8400431

  17. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions and image interpretation in transmission electron mic­ roscopy. The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Munster and is a revised version of the first part of my earlier book Elek­ tronenmikroskopische Untersuchungs- und Priiparationsmethoden, omitting the part which describes specimen-preparation methods. In the introductory chapter, the different types of electron microscope are compared, the various electron-specimen interactions and their applications are summarized and the most important aspects of high-resolution, analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy are discussed. The optics of electron lenses is discussed in Chapter 2 in order to bring out electron-lens properties that are important for an understanding of the function of an electron microscope. In Chapter 3, the wave optics of elec­ trons and the phase shifts by electrostatic and magnetic fields are introduced; Fresne...

  18. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  19. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al2O3 and TiO2) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl2) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al2O3 and TiO2 nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe2O3 nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  20. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  1. X-ray dense cellular inclusions in the cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as seen by soft-x-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft x-rays, having a greater ability to penetrate biological material than electrons, have the potential for producing images of intact, living cells. In addition, by using the so-called open-quotes water windowclose quotes area of the soft x-ray spectrum, a degree of natural contrast is introduced into the image due to differential absorption of the wavelengths by compounds with a high carbon content compared to those with a greater oxygen content. The variation in carbon concentration throughout a cell therefore generates an image which is dependent upon the carbon density within the specimen. Using soft x-ray contact microscopy the authors have previously examined the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the most prominent feature of the cells are the numerous x-ray absorbing spheres, But they were not seen by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Similar structures have also been reported by the Goettingen group using their cryo transmission x-ray microscope at BESSY. Despite the fact that these spheres appear to occupy up to 20% or more of the cell volume when seen by x-ray microscopy, they are not visible by transmission electron microscopy. Given the difficulties and criticisms associated with soft x-ray contact microscopy, the present study was aimed at confirming the existence of these cellular inclusions and learning more of their possible chemical composition

  2. X-ray dense cellular inclusions in the cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as seen by soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Page, A.M. [Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-rays, having a greater ability to penetrate biological material than electrons, have the potential for producing images of intact, living cells. In addition, by using the so-called {open_quotes}water window{close_quotes} area of the soft x-ray spectrum, a degree of natural contrast is introduced into the image due to differential absorption of the wavelengths by compounds with a high carbon content compared to those with a greater oxygen content. The variation in carbon concentration throughout a cell therefore generates an image which is dependent upon the carbon density within the specimen. Using soft x-ray contact microscopy the authors have previously examined the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the most prominent feature of the cells are the numerous x-ray absorbing spheres, But they were not seen by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Similar structures have also been reported by the Goettingen group using their cryo transmission x-ray microscope at BESSY. Despite the fact that these spheres appear to occupy up to 20% or more of the cell volume when seen by x-ray microscopy, they are not visible by transmission electron microscopy. Given the difficulties and criticisms associated with soft x-ray contact microscopy, the present study was aimed at confirming the existence of these cellular inclusions and learning more of their possible chemical composition.

  3. Three-dimensional imaging of normal skin and nonmelanoma skin cancer with cellular resolution using Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kye-Sung; Zhao, Huimin; Ibrahim, Sherrif F; Meemon, Natthani; Khoudeir, Laura; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We investigate morphological differences in three-dimensional (3-D) images with cellular resolution between nonmelanoma skin cancer and normal skin using Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy. As a result, we show for the first time cellular optical coherence images of 3-D features differentiating cancerous skin from normal skin. In addition, in vivo volumetric images of normal skin from different anatomic locations are shown and compared.

  4. Micromachining tools and correlative approaches for cellular cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigort, Alexander; Bäuerlein, Felix J B; Leis, Andrew; Gruska, Manuela; Hoffmann, Christian; Laugks, Tim; Böhm, Ulrike; Eibauer, Matthias; Gnaegi, Helmut; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2010-11-01

    A principal limitation of cryo-transmission electron microscopy performed on cells or tissues is the accessible specimen thickness. This is exacerbated in tomography applications, where the aspect ratio (and thus the apparent specimen thickness) changes considerably during specimen tilting. Cryo-ultramicrotomy is the most obvious way of dealing with this problem; however, frozen-hydrated sections suffer from potentially inconsistent compression that cannot be corrected with certainty, and furthermore, yields of sections that satisfy all of the conditions necessary for tomographic imaging are poor. An alternative approach that avoids mechanical deformations is the use of focused ion beam (FIB) instrumentation, where thinning of the frozen-hydrated specimen occurs through the process of sputtering with heavy ions, typically gallium. Here, we use correlative cryo-fluorescence microscopy to navigate large cellular volumes and to localize specific cellular targets. We show that the selected targets in frozen-hydrated specimens can be accessed directly by focused ion beam milling. We also introduce a novel cryo-planing procedure as a method that could facilitate thinning of large areas of vitreous ice prior to cryo-fluorescence, FIB thinning, and cryo-electron tomography. PMID:20178848

  5. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM

  6. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Uemura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology and Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Motohashi, Hozumi [Department of Gene Expression Regulation, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Mari [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masayuki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Nishihara, Shoko, E-mail: shoko@soka.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM.

  7. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    OpenAIRE

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electr...

  8. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy. PMID:27211523

  9. Low energy electron point source microscopy: beyond imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Andre; Goelzhaeuser, Armin [Physics of Supramolecular Systems and Surfaces, University of Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    Low energy electron point source (LEEPS) microscopy has the capability to record in-line holograms at very high magnifications with a fairly simple set-up. After the holograms are numerically reconstructed, structural features with the size of about 2 nm can be resolved. The achievement of an even higher resolution has been predicted. However, a number of obstacles are known to impede the realization of this goal, for example the presence of electric fields around the imaged object, electrostatic charging or radiation induced processes. This topical review gives an overview of the achievements as well as the difficulties in the efforts to shift the resolution limit of LEEPS microscopy towards the atomic level. A special emphasis is laid on the high sensitivity of low energy electrons to electrical fields, which limits the structural determination of the imaged objects. On the other hand, the investigation of the electrical field around objects of known structure is very useful for other tasks and LEEPS microscopy can be extended beyond the task of imaging. The determination of the electrical resistance of individual nanowires can be achieved by a proper analysis of the corresponding LEEPS micrographs. This conductivity imaging may be a very useful application for LEEPS microscopes. (topical review)

  10. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  11. Cellular electron transfer and radical mechanisms for drug metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerobic and anaerobic reductions of various nitroaromatic compounds by mammalian cells result in the production of reactive intermediates. Drug reduction is dependent upon glucose, nonprotein thiols, endogenous enzyme levels, and drug electron affinity. Drugs with electron affinities approaching that of oxygen are reduced, in the presence of oxygen, beyond a one-electron radical anion. Nitroaromatic radical anion inactivation occurs by reaction with cellular ferricytochrome c, endogenous thiols, and with oxygen. In the latter case the reaction results in the production of peroxide. Drugs that are substrates for the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase remove endogeneous thiols and demonstrate peroxide production without prior thiol removal. Less electron affinic drugs such as misonidazole require thiol removal as well as the presence of cyanide or azide for maximal peroxide production. Under anaerobic conditions radical anion and nitroso intermediates are reactive with glutathione. Removal of endogenous thiols by hypoxic preincubation with misonidazole may be related to the enhanced radiation response and cytotoxicity of this drug. Reduction of nitro compounds in the presence of DNA and chemicals such as dithionite, zinc dust, or polarographic techniques causes binding to macromolecules and DNA breaks. Chemical-reduction of nitro compounds by ascorbate in the presence of cells enhances drug cytotoxic effects

  12. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodighiero, Simona; Torre, Bruno; Sogne, Elisa; Ruffilli, Roberta; Cagnoli, Cinzia; Francolini, Maura; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. PMID:25810353

  14. Analysis of environmental particles by atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrocordatos, D; Pronk, W; Boiler, M

    2004-01-01

    Due to their large specific surface and their abundance, micro and nano particles play an important role in the transport of micropollutants in the environment. Natural particles are usually composed of a mixture of inorganic amorphous or crystalline material (mainly FeOOH, Fe(x)Oy, Mn(x)Oy and clays) and organic material (humics and polysaccharides). They all tend to occur as very small particles (1-1,000 nm in diameter). Most natural amorphous particles are unstable and tend to transform with time towards more crystalline forms, either by aging or possibly, by dissolution and re-crystallization. Such transformations affect the fate of sorbed micropollutants and the scavenging properties are therefore changed. As these entities are sensitive to dehydration (aggregation, changes in the morphology), it is highly important to observe their morphology in their natural environment and understand their composition at the scale of the individual particles. Also for the understanding and optimization of water treatment technologies, the knowledge of the occurrence and behavior of nano-particles is of high importance. Some of the possible particle analysis methods are presented: aggregation processes, biomineralization, bacterial adhesion, biofilms in freshwaters, ferrihydrite as heavy metals remover from storm water. These examples demonstrate the capabilities and focus of the microscopes. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to analyze the particles in their own environment, meaning in air or in the water. Thus, native aspects of particles can be observed. As well, forces of interactions between particles or between particles and other surfaces such as membranes will be highly valuable data. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and for higher lateral resolution, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allow measurement of the morphology and composition. Especially, TEM coupled with Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (TEM-EELS) is a powerful technique for elemental analysis

  15. Scanning tunnelling microscopy: application to field electron emission studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) are extended to the study of field electron emission from metal, semiconducting and semi-insulating materials. A specially designed, high-vacuum STM device called a scanning tunnelling field emission microscope (STFEM) is constructed, and new measuring procedures are developed to examine complex physical properties of emission centres. Providing high bias voltages and fast mapping of large squares, the STFEM allows one to obtain reliable statistical data on surface properties, namely topography, emission intensity, surface potential distribution and local electroconductivity. Results from a study of low-field electron emission from CVD diamond films are described to illustrate the functional capabilities of the new STM device. It was found that the diamond films studied are composed of nanograined phases distinguished by their physical properties. It has also been noted that the low-field electron emission from the studied samples is associated with the interfaces of these phases. (author)

  16. Ultrahigh Voltage Electron Microscopy Links Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience/Neuroendocrinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sakamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional (3D analysis of anatomical ultrastructures is extremely important in most fields of biological research. Although it is very difficult to perform 3D image analysis on exact serial sets of ultrathin sections, 3D reconstruction from serial ultrathin sections can generally be used to obtain 3D information. However, this technique can only be applied to small areas of a specimen because of technical and physical difficulties. We used ultrahigh voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM to overcome these difficulties and to study the chemical neuroanatomy of 3D ultrastructures. This methodology, which links UHVEM and light microscopy, is a useful and powerful tool for studying molecular and/or chemical neuroanatomy at the ultrastructural level.

  17. Electron microscopy imaging of proteins on gallium phosphide semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, Martin; Bauer, Mikael; Gunnarsson, Stefan; Mårsell, Erik; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Karlsson, Gunnel; Sanfins, Elodie; Prinz, Christelle N.; Wallenberg, Reine; Cedervall, Tommy; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2016-02-01

    We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the laminin conformation on the NWs. In blood plasma, an intermediate sized corona around the NWs indicates a corona with a mixture of plasma proteins. The ability to directly visualize proteins on nanostructures in situ holds great promise for assessing the conformation and thickness of the protein corona, which is key to understanding and predicting the properties of engineered nanomaterials in a biological environment.We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the

  18. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  19. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture 1995. Electronic light microscopy: present capabilities and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shotton, D M

    1995-08-01

    Electronic light microscopy involves the combination of microscopic techniques with electronic imaging and digital image processing, resulting in dramatic improvements in image quality and ease of quantitative analysis. In this review, after a brief definition of digital images and a discussion of the sampling requirements for the accurate digital recording of optical images, I discuss the three most important imaging modalities in electronic light microscopy--video-enhanced contrast microscopy, digital fluorescence microscopy and confocal scanning microscopy--considering their capabilities, their applications, and recent developments that will increase their potential. Video-enhanced contrast microscopy permits the clear visualisation and real-time dynamic recording of minute objects such as microtubules, vesicles and colloidal gold particles, an order of magnitude smaller than the resolution limit of the light microscope. It has revolutionised the study of cellular motility, and permits the quantitative tracking of organelles and gold-labelled membrane bound proteins. In combination with the technique of optical trapping (optical tweezers), it permits exquisitely sensitive force and distance measurements to be made on motor proteins. Digital fluorescence microscopy enables low-light-level imaging of fluorescently labelled specimens. Recent progress has involved improvements in cameras, fluorescent probes and fluorescent filter sets, particularly multiple bandpass dichroic mirrors, and developments in multiparameter imaging, which is becoming particularly important for in situ hybridisation studies and automated image cytometry, fluorescence ratio imaging, and time-resolved fluorescence. As software improves and small computers become more powerful, computational techniques for out-of-focus blur deconvolution and image restoration are becoming increasingly important. Confocal microscopy permits convenient, high-resolution, non-invasive, blur-free optical

  20. High resolution transmission electron microscopy: fables, facts and figures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been applied in solid state research since more than five decades. Yet, its application in nuclear materials research is rather limited. The main reason for a limited use of TEM on active material investigation relates to the obvious difficulties of sample preparation. In many aspects, however, only TEM is capable of providing answers on materials problems. Domains such as interfaces between dissimilar materials (a metal and its oxide; substrate and coating etc.) can only be visualized by TEM techniques. In this presentation, we will document two particular TEM techniques, namely High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HREM), i.e. the direct visualization of the atomic lattice, and micro- (or nano-) probe Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) for the determination of the chemical composition of the specimen. The combination of these two techniques in a single instrument has only become possible with the recent evolution in TEM instruments. One can achieve this improvement either by using field-emission gun (FEG)-based microscopes or by using the latest condenser lens technology. The investigation of the oxide layer formed on a Zircaloy-4 cladding material will be used to present applications of interface research obtained with a microscope equipped with a conventional electron source and advanced condenser lens technology

  1. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  2. Electron microscopy study of direct laser deposited IN718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, R.G., E-mail: r.ding@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Huang, Z.W.; Li, H.Y. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Mitchell, I.; Baxter, G. [Rolls-Royce plc., Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom); Bowen, P. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    The microstructure of direct laser deposited (DLD) IN718 has been investigated in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the dendrite core microstructure can be linked to the cooling rate experienced during the deposition. A ~ 100 μm wide δ partially dissolved region in the IN718 substrate was observed close to the substrate/deposit boundary. In the deposited IN718, γ/Laves eutectic constituent is the predominant minor microconstituent. Irregular and regular (small) (Nb,Ti)C carbides and a mixture of the carbides and Laves were observed. Most M{sub 3}B{sub 2} borides were nucleated around a (Nb,Ti)C carbide. Needles of δ phase precipitated from the Laves phase were also observed. A complex constituent (of Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″, and γ matrix) is reported in IN718 for the first time. The formation of α-Cr particles could be related to Cr rejection during the formation and growth of Cr-depleted δ phase. - Highlights: • Secondary phases in IN718 deposits were identified using electron diffraction and EDS. • MC, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, γ/Laves eutectic and γ/NbC/Laves eutectic were observed. • Needle-like δ phases were precipitated from the Laves phase. • A complex constituent (Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″ and γ) was reported for the first time.

  3. Scanning electron and tunneling microscopy of palladium-barium emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of study of metal-alloyed palladium-barium emitters' of modern very high frequency high-powered electronic vacuum tubes by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) are presented. Since the Pd/Ba foil surface is fairly smooth and is not oxidized in air STM/STS investigations are carried out in air in normal laboratory environment. SEM and STM images show that the emitter surface has a complex porous structure. The cathode surface study by STS in tunneling gap modulation mode allowed to take a map of phase distribution with various work function values and high lateral resolution. Obtained images demonstrate the presence of three phases on the Pd/Ba emitter surface, viz. barium-oxygen compounds, intermetallic, and palladium. As it is seen from presented STS image the phase with a low work function value (barium oxides) is concentrated along boundaries of the substance inclusions with work function corresponding to the intemetallic compound Pd5Ba. This supports the model of low work function areas obtained via Ba segregation from the intermetallic compound and oxidation. The presented methods may be used in the Pd/Ba cathode manufacturing process for increasing the yield of electronic devices in microwave tube production and optimize the emitters' characteristics

  4. Large-scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Nanotomy) of Healthy and Injured Zebrafish Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby D; Wolters, Anouk H G; van Ham, Tjakko J; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale 2D electron microscopy (EM), or nanotomy, is the tissue-wide application of nanoscale resolution electron microscopy. Others and we previously applied large scale EM to human skin pancreatic islets, tissue culture and whole zebrafish larvae(1-7). Here we describe a universally applicable method for tissue-scale scanning EM for unbiased detection of sub-cellular and molecular features. Nanotomy was applied to investigate the healthy and a neurodegenerative zebrafish brain. Our method is based on standardized EM sample preparation protocols: Fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium, followed by epoxy-resin embedding, ultrathin sectioning and mounting of ultrathin-sections on one-hole grids, followed by post staining with uranyl and lead. Large-scale 2D EM mosaic images are acquired using a scanning EM connected to an external large area scan generator using scanning transmission EM (STEM). Large scale EM images are typically ~ 5 - 50 G pixels in size, and best viewed using zoomable HTML files, which can be opened in any web browser, similar to online geographical HTML maps. This method can be applied to (human) tissue, cross sections of whole animals as well as tissue culture(1-5). Here, zebrafish brains were analyzed in a non-invasive neuronal ablation model. We visualize within a single dataset tissue, cellular and subcellular changes which can be quantified in various cell types including neurons and microglia, the brain's macrophages. In addition, nanotomy facilitates the correlation of EM with light microscopy (CLEM)(8) on the same tissue, as large surface areas previously imaged using fluorescent microscopy, can subsequently be subjected to large area EM, resulting in the nano-anatomy (nanotomy) of tissues. In all, nanotomy allows unbiased detection of features at EM level in a tissue-wide quantifiable manner. PMID:27285162

  5. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative

  6. Copper Decoration of Carbon Nanotubes and High Resolution Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Camille

    A new process of decorating carbon nanotubes with copper was developed for the fabrication of nanocomposite aluminum-nanotubes. The process consists of three stages: oxidation, activation and electroless copper plating on the nanotubes. The oxidation step was required to create chemical function on the nanotubes, essential for the activation step. Then, catalytic nanoparticles of tin-palladium were deposited on the tubes. Finally, during the electroless copper plating, copper particles with a size between 20 and 60 nm were uniformly deposited on the nanotubes surface. The reproducibility of the process was shown by using another type of carbon nanotube. The fabrication of nanocomposites aluminum-nanotubes was tested by aluminum vacuum infiltration. Although the infiltration of carbon nanotubes did not produce the expected results, an interesting electron microscopy sample was discovered during the process development: the activated carbon nanotubes. Secondly, scanning transmitted electron microscopy (STEM) imaging in SEM was analysed. The images were obtained with a new detector on the field emission scanning electron microscope (Hitachi S-4700). Various parameters were analysed with the use of two different samples: the activated carbon nanotubes (previously obtained) and gold-palladium nanodeposits. Influences of working distance, accelerating voltage or sample used on the spatial resolution of images obtained with SMART (Scanning Microscope Assessment and Resolution Testing) were analysed. An optimum working distance for the best spatial resolution related to the sample analysed was found for the imaging in STEM mode. Finally, relation between probe size and spatial resolution of backscattered electrons (BSE) images was studied. An image synthesis method was developed to generate the BSE images from backscattered electrons coefficients obtained with CASINO software. Spatial resolution of images was determined using SMART. The analysis shown that using a probe

  7. Electron Microscopy Studies of Solid Surfaces and Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija

    1991-02-01

    Electron microscopy techniques for study of surfaces and interfaces have been investigated and applied to (100) and (111) surfaces of MgO and to interfaces of Mo/Si multilayers and CoSi_2/Si epitaxial films. MgO surfaces subjected to different annealing and chemical treatments have been characterized by reflection electron microscopy imaging, reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). An oxygen rich (sqrt {3} times sqrt{3})R 30^circ reconstruction was found on the polar (111) surface upon annealing in oxygen at temperatures higher than 1500 ^circC. Transformation of the surface topography and segregation of calcium were observed on the cleaved (100) surface due to annealing. RHEED resonance conditions have been employed and studied with geometrical constructions, rocking curves and REELS. These conditions are associated with parabolas in the Kikuchi (K) patterns whose nature had been subject of much controversy. The parabolas have been explained as K lines of two-dimensional (2D) lattices in a general scheme which describes the K pattern geometry in terms of intersections of Brillouin zone boundaries with a sphere of reflections. Full treatment of the cases of 2D and 1D real lattices has revealed previously unknown boundaries in the form of parabolic surfaces (2D) and paraboloids of revolution (1D). These boundaries have been applied to lines which arise from electron channeling in 3D crystals and to RHEED parabolas from 2D surface reconstructions. Nanodiffraction, low angle dark-field imaging, electron holography, high spatial resolution EELS, and shadow imaging have been evaluated as means for measuring interface abruptness and change in mean-inner potential and compared to other microscopy techniques. Refraction effects at interfaces were observed as streaking of the nanodiffraction disks which was found to depend on the crystalline nature of the interface. For polycrystalline

  8. Structural studies of T4S systems by electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Redzej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Type IV secretion (T4S systems are large dynamic nanomachines that transport DNA and/or proteins through the membranes of bacteria. Analysis of T4S system architecture is an extremely challenging task taking into account their multi protein organisation and lack of overall global symmetry. Nonetheless the last decade demonstrated an amazing progress achieved by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. In this review we present a structural analysis of this dynamic complex based on recent advances in biochemical, biophysical and structural studies.

  9. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  10. Quantitative analysis of mouse corpus callosum from electron microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L. West

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides morphometric analysis of 72 electron microscopy images from control (n=4 and hypomyelinated (n=2 mouse corpus callosum. Measures of axon diameter and g-ratio were tabulated across all brains from two regions of the corpus callosum and a non-linear relationship between axon diameter and g-ratio was observed. These data are related to the accompanying research article comparing multiple methods of measuring g-ratio entitled ‘A revised model for estimating g-ratio from MRI’ (West et al., NeuroImage, 2015.

  11. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available

  12. ATOMIC RESOLUTION CRYO ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPLEXES

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Z. Hong

    2011-01-01

    Single-particle cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) is a technique for determining three-dimensional (3D) structures from projection images of molecular complexes preserved in their “native,” noncrystalline state. Recently, atomic or near-atomic resolution structures of several viruses and protein assemblies have been determined by single-particle cryoEM, allowing ab initio atomic model building by following the amino acid side chains or nucleic acid bases identifiable in their cryoEM density m...

  13. The thin layer technique and its application to electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the technique of thin layers obtained by evaporation under vacuum, in the thickness range extending from a few monoatomic layers to several hundred angstroms. The great theoretical and practical interest of these layers has, it is well known, given rise to many investigations from Faraday onwards. Within the necessarily restricted limits of this study, we shall approach the problem more particularly from the point of view of: - their production; - their use in electron microscopy. A critical appraisal is made, in the light of present-day knowledge, based on our personal experience and on an extensive bibliography which we have collected on the subject. (author)

  14. Analytical electron microscopy study of radioactive ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ceramic waste form has been developed to immobilize the halide high-level waste stream from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. Analytical electron microscopy studies, using both scanning and transmission instruments, have been performed to characterize the microstructure of this material. The microstructure consists primarily of sodalite granules (containing the bulk of the halides) bonded together with glass. The results of these studies are discussed in detail. Insight into the waste form fabrication process developed as a result of these studies is also discussed

  15. Characterization of nanomaterials in food by electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudkiewicz, Agnieszka; Tiede, Karen; Löschner, Katrin;

    2011-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in the food industry. In order to assess the efficacy and the risks of these materials, it is essential to have access to methods that not only detect the nanomaterials, but also provide information on the characteristics of the materials...... (e.g., size and shape).This review presents an overview of electron microscopy (EM)-based methods that have been, or have the potential to be, applied to imaging ENMs in foodstuffs. We provide an overview of approaches to sample preparation, including drying, chemical treatment, fixation...

  16. Microstrain in Nanocrystalline Copper by High Resolution Electron Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Changping; RUAN Xuefeng; ZOU Huamin

    2009-01-01

    The elastic microstrains in a crystallite of electrodeposited nanocrystalline copper were investigated by analyzing the high resolution electron microscopy(HRTEM)image.The mi-crostrain was considered as consisting of two parts,in which the uniform part was determined with fast Fourier transformation of the HRTEM image,while the non-uniform part of the microstrain in the crystallite was measured by means of peak finding.Atomic column spacing measurements show that the crystal lattice is contracted in the longitudinal direction,while expanded in the transverse direction of the elliptical crystallite,indicating that the variation of microstrain exists mainly near the grain boundary.

  17. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy of catalysts for the methanol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard

    -alcohol through syngas (H2and CO or CO2). Cars can already today use alcohol in their combustion engine and the existing infrastructure for fuel distribution can be used without modifications. But therefore we need better and more efficient catalysts to convert the syngas into the alcohol. The Catalysis for......Ga. Both were synthesized from Cu and Ni nitrate salts as well as Ni and Ga nitrates salts. Both systems got catalytically tested and investigated by in-situ X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy (ETEM). It was possible to follow the synthesis of the catalysts and the...

  18. Analysis of archaeological materials through Scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the purpose to know the uses and the chemical composition of some cultural objects in the pre hispanic epoch this work presents several types of analysis for identifying them by means of the Scanning electron microscopy and its techniques as the Functional analysis of artifacts based on the 'tracks of use' analysis, also the X-ray spectroscopy and the X-ray dispersive energy (EDS) are mentioned, all of them allowing a major approach to the pre hispanic culture in Mexico. (Author)

  19. Rare-earth-doped nanophosphors for multicolor cathodoluminescence nanobioimaging using scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Taichi; Fukushima, Shoichiro; Niioka, Hirohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Miyake, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2015-05-01

    We describe rare-earth-doped nanophosphors (RE-NPs) for biological imaging using cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We report the first demonstration of multicolor CL nanobioimaging using STEM with nanophosphors. The CL spectra of the synthesized nanophosphors (Y2O3:Eu, Y2O3:Tb) were sufficiently narrow to be distinguished. From CL images of RE-NPs on an elastic carbon-coated copper grid, the spatial resolution was beyond the diffraction limit of light. Y2O3:Tb and Y2O3:Eu RE-NPs showed a remarkable resistance against electron beam exposure even at high acceleration voltage (80 kV) and retained a CL intensity of more than 97% compared with the initial intensity for 1 min. In biological CL imaging with STEM, heavy-metal-stained cell sections containing the RE-NPs were prepared, and both the CL images of RE-NPs and cellular structures, such as mitochondria, were clearly observed from STEM images with high contrast. The cellular CL imaging using RE-NPs also had high spatial resolution even though heavy-metal-stained cells are normally regarded as highly scattering media. Moreover, since the RE-NPs exhibit photoluminescence (PL) excited by UV light, they are useful for multimodal correlative imaging using CL and PL.

  20. Direct single electron detection with a CMOS detector for electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqi, A. R.; Henderson, R.; Pryddetch, M.; Allport, P.; Evans, A.

    2005-07-01

    We report the results of an investigation into the use of a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for electron microscopy. MAPS, designed originally for astronomers at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratories, was installed in a 120 kV electron microscope (Philips CM12) at the MRC Laboratory in Cambridge for tests which included recording single electrons at 40 and 120 keV, and measuring signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), spatial resolution and radiation sensitivity. Our results show that, due to the excellent SNR and resolution, it is possible to register single electrons. The radiation damage to the detector is apparent with low doses and gets progressively greater so that its lifetime is limited to 600,000-900,000 electrons/pixel (very approximately 10-15 krad). Provided this detector can be radiation hardened to reduce its radiation sensitivity several hundred fold and increased in size, it will provide excellent performance for all types of electron microscopy.

  1. Direct single electron detection with a CMOS detector for electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of an investigation into the use of a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for electron microscopy. MAPS, designed originally for astronomers at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratories, was installed in a 120 kV electron microscope (Philips CM12) at the MRC Laboratory in Cambridge for tests which included recording single electrons at 40 and 120 keV, and measuring signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), spatial resolution and radiation sensitivity. Our results show that, due to the excellent SNR and resolution, it is possible to register single electrons. The radiation damage to the detector is apparent with low doses and gets progressively greater so that its lifetime is limited to 600,000-900,000 electrons/pixel (very approximately 10-15 krad). Provided this detector can be radiation hardened to reduce its radiation sensitivity several hundred fold and increased in size, it will provide excellent performance for all types of electron microscopy

  2. Correlative video-light-electron microscopy of mobile organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beznoussenko, Galina V; Mironov, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    Correlative microscopy is a method when for the analysis of the very same cell or tissue area, several different methods of light microscopy (LM) and then electron microscopy (EM) are used consecutively. The combination of LM and EM allows researchers to study phenomena at a global scale and then to look for unique or rare events for their subsequent EM examination. Unfortunately, the observation of living cells under EM is still impossible. LM provides the possibility to examine quickly many live cells, whereas EM provides the high level of resolution. On the other side, the final goal of any morphological analysis of a biological sample, whether it is an organism, organ, tissue, cell, organelle, or molecule, is to get an averaged three-dimensional model of the structure examined and to determine the chemical composition of it. This chapter describes the methodology of imaging with the help of CVLEM. The guidelines presented herein enable researchers to analyze structure of organelles and to obtain the three-dimensional model of the structure examined, and in particular rare events captured by low-resolution imaging of a population or transient events captured by live imaging can now also be studied at high resolution by EM. PMID:25702127

  3. Near field and exit wave computations for electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The partial wave phase shift formalism of atomic scattering is applied to compute exit wave functions for isolated Au and Si atoms under both plane wave and focused probe illumination. Connections between the far field and near field (exit) waves are clarified. This approach treats the Coulomb singularity properly though at 100 keV large numbers of phase shifts are required. In principle any form of incident wave can be handled so it may provide a means for testing traditional scattering theories used in electron microscopy. By applying the analysis to an atom embedded in a constant potential rather than free space, exit spheres of radius half the interatomic spacing can be used. - Highlights: • Critique of current theories of electron scattering in EM. • Near field and far field relationship. • Phase shift scattering theory adapted for exit wave computation. • Exit wave computations for an Au atom with plane and focused wave illumination

  4. Detection and identification of light impurities by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrobo Tapia, Juan C [ORNL; Oxley, Mark P [ORNL; Walkosz, Weronika [University of Illinois, Chicago; Klie, Robert F [University of Illinois, Chicago; Ogut, Serdar [University of Illinois, Chicago; Mikijelj, B [Ceradyne Inc., Costa Mesa, CA; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Pantelides, Sokrates T. [Vanderbilt University

    2009-01-01

    For over 40 years impurities have been believed to stabilize the ceramic {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} but there is no direct evidence for their identity or lattice location. In bulk materials electron microscopy can generally image heavy impurities. Here we report direct imaging of N columns in {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} that suggests the presence of excess light elements in specific N columns. First-principles calculations rule out Si or N interstitials and suggest O impurities, which are then confirmed by atomically resolved electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. The result provides a possible explanation for the stability of {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with implications for the design of next-generation structural ceramics.

  5. Examination of living fungal spores by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascospores of Sordaria macrospora germinated and produced hyphae exhibiting normal growth and differentiation after examination by scanning electron microscopy and following numerous, different preparative protocols. Seventy-nine to ninety-nine percent of the ascospores retained normal viability after being observed in the fully frozen-hydrated, partially freeze-dried, and vacuum-dried states at accelerating voltages of 5 and 40 keV. Hyphae did not survive these treatments. From these observations it is concluded that ascospores of S. macrospora can remain in a state of suspended animation while being observed in the scanning electron microscope. The ascospores also survived, but with reduced viability: 6 h in glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde, 6 h in OsO4, or 2 h in glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde followed by 2 h in OsO4. However, the ascospores did not germinate after dehydration in ethanol. (author)

  6. Biomechanics of DNA structures visualized by 4D electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ulrich J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2013-02-19

    We present a technique for in situ visualization of the biomechanics of DNA structural networks using 4D electron microscopy. Vibrational oscillations of the DNA structure are excited mechanically through a short burst of substrate vibrations triggered by a laser pulse. Subsequently, the motion is probed with electron pulses to observe the impulse response of the specimen in space and time. From the frequency and amplitude of the observed oscillations, we determine the normal modes and eigenfrequencies of the structures involved. Moreover, by selective "nano-cutting" at a given point in the network, it was possible to obtain Young's modulus, and hence the stiffness, of the DNA filament at that position. This experimental approach enables nanoscale mechanics studies of macromolecules and should find applications in other domains of biological networks such as origamis. PMID:23382239

  7. Sample heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohashi, Teruo; Motai, Kumi

    2013-08-01

    A sample-heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) has been developed and used for microscopic magnetization analysis at temperatures up to 500°C. In this system, a compact ceramic heater and a preheating operation keep the ultra-high vacuum conditions while the sample is heated during spin SEM measurement. Moreover, the secondary-electron collector, which is arranged close to the sample, was modified so that it is not damaged at high temperatures. The system was used to heat a Co(1000) single-crystal sample from room temperature up to 500°C, and the magnetic-domain structures were observed. Changes of the domain structures were observed around 220 and 400°C, and these changes are considered to be due to phase transitions of this sample. PMID:23349241

  8. Detection and cellular localization of lead by electron probe analysis in the diagnosis of suspected lead poisoning in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead poisoning of unknown source was diagnosed histologically in 2 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) by finding acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies in the epithelial cells of renal cortical tubules. The presence of lead in the inclusions was determined by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray analysis using sections from paraffin embedded tissues. This observation indicates the usefulness of this technique for the detection and cellular localization of lead in tissues, even from archival material

  9. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  10. Transmission electron microscopy a textbook for materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, David B

    1996-01-01

    Electron microscopy has revolutionized our understanding the extraordinary intellectual demands required of the mi­ of materials by completing the processing-structure-prop­ croscopist in order to do the job properly: crystallography, erties links down to atomistic levels. It now is even possible diffraction, image contrast, inelastic scattering events, and to tailor the microstructure (and meso structure ) of materials spectroscopy. Remember, these used to be fields in them­ to achieve specific sets of properties; the extraordinary abili­ selves. Today, one has to understand the fundamentals ties of modem transmission electron microscopy-TEM­ of all of these areas before one can hope to tackle signifi­ instruments to provide almost all of the structural, phase, cant problems in materials science. TEM is a technique of and crystallographic data allow us to accomplish this feat. characterizing materials down to the atomic limits. It must Therefore, it is obvious that any curriculum in modem mate­ be use...

  11. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed

  12. Correlative light and electron microscopy enables viral replication studies at the ultrastructural level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Kirsi; Vihinen, Helena; Kallio, Katri; Jokitalo, Eija; Ahola, Tero

    2015-11-15

    Electron microscopy (EM) is a powerful tool to study structural changes within cells caused e.g. by ectopic protein expression, gene silencing or virus infection. Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) has proven to be useful in cases when it is problematic to identify a particular cell among a majority of unaffected cells at the EM level. In this technique the cells of interest are first identified by fluorescence microscopy and then further processed for EM. CLEM has become crucial when studying positive-strand RNA virus replication, as it takes place in nanoscale replication sites on specific cellular membranes. Here we have employed CLEM for Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replication studies both by transfecting viral replication components to cells or by infecting different cell types. For the transfection-based system, we developed an RNA template that can be detected in the cells even in the absence of replication and thus allows exploration of lethal mutations in viral proteins. In infected mammalian and mosquito cells, we were able to find replication-positive cells by using a fluorescently labeled viral protein even in the cases of low infection efficiency. The fluorescent region within these cells was shown to correspond to an area rich in modified membranes. These results show that CLEM is a valuable technique for studying virus replication and membrane modifications at the ultrastructural level. PMID:25916619

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of individual nanoparticle bio-markers in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liv, Nalan; Lazić, Ivan; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P

    2014-08-01

    We investigated SEM imaging of nanoparticle biomarkers suspended below a thin membrane, with the ultimate goal of integrating functional fluorescence and structural SEM measurements of samples kept at ambient or hydrated conditions. In particular, we investigated how resolving power in liquid SEM is affected by the interaction of the electron beam with the membrane. Simulations with the Geant4-based Monte Carlo scheme developed by Kieft and Bosch (2008) [1] are compared to experimental results with suspended nanoparticles. For 20 nm and 50 nm thin membranes, we found a beam broadening of 1.5 nm and 3 nm, respectively, with an excellent agreement between simulations and experiments. 15 nm Au nanoparticles and bio-functionalized core-shell quantum dots can be individually resolved in denser clusters. We demonstrated the imaging of single EGF-conjugated quantum dots docked at filopodia during cellular uptake with both fluorescence microscopy and SEM simultaneously. These results open novel opportunities for correlating live fluorescence microscopy with structural electron microscopy. PMID:24103705

  14. Characterization of strained semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezdoel, Vasfi Burak

    2011-08-15

    Today's state-of-the-art semiconductor electronic devices utilize the charge transport within very small volumes of the active device regions. The structural, chemical and optical material properties in these small dimensions can critically affect the performance of these devices. The present thesis is focused on the nanometer scale characterization of the strain state in semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although high-resolution TEM has shown to provide the required accuracy at the nanometer scale, optimization of imaging conditions is necessary for accurate strain measurements. An alternative HRTEM method based on strain mapping on complex-valued exit face wave functions is developed to reduce the artifacts arising from objective lens aberrations. However, a much larger field of view is crucial for mapping strain in the active regions of complex structures like latest generation metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). To overcome this, a complementary approach based on electron holography is proposed. The technique relies on the reconstruction of the phase shifts in the diffracted electron beams from a focal series of dark-field images using recently developed exit-face wave function reconstruction algorithm. Combining high spatial resolution, better than 1 nm, with a field of view of about 1 {mu}m in each dimension, simultaneous strain measurements on the array of MOSFETs are possible. Owing to the much lower electron doses used in holography experiments when compared to conventional quantitative methods, the proposed approach allows to map compositional distribution in electron beam sensitive materials such as InGaN heterostructures without alteration of the original morphology and chemical composition. Moreover, dark-field holography experiments can be performed on thicker specimens than the ones required for high-resolution TEM, which in turn reduces the thin foil relaxation. (orig.)

  15. Visualization of the effects of electron microscopy fixatives on the structure of hydrated epidermal hairs of tomato (lycopersicum peruvianum) as revealed by soft x-ray contact microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Anthony D.; Cotton, Robin A.; Page, Anton M.; Dooley, Mike D.; Ford, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    In order to examine the ultrastructure of biological specimens by electron microscopy it is necessary to stabilize the highly labile cellular contents before embedding and sectioning the specimens. This is commonly achieved by treating the tissues with various chemical fixatives. The assessment of the efficacy of these fixative is usually based upon the appearance of the specimen under the microscope although this is somewhat intuitive as the ultrastructure of the living cell cannot be studied. Previous studies, in which the structure of epidermal hairs has been followed under the light microscope as the commonly used fixatives are perfused into the tissue, have shown that the cellular contents are drastically rearranged by these fixatives. This paper describes the effects of some of the commonly used fixatives on cell ultrastructure using firstly electron microscopy and secondly soft x-ray contact microscopy. The latter technique allows not only direct comparisons of the effects of the fixatives but also allows living, hydrated specimens to be imaged so that the true ultrastructural effects of the fixatives can be seen and compared to the ultrastructure of the living material.

  16. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  17. Engineering and Characterization of Collagen Networks Using Wet Atomic Force Microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Jenna; Coffey, Tonya; Conrad, Brad; Burris, Jennifer; Hester, Brooke

    2014-03-01

    Collagen is an abundant protein and its monomers covalently crosslink to form fibrils which form fibers which contribute to forming macrostructures like tendon or bone. While the contribution is well understood at the macroscopic level, it is not well known at the fibril level. We wish to study the mechanical properties of collagen for networks of collagen fibers that vary in size and density. We present here a method to synthesize collagen networks from monomers and that allows us to vary the density of the networks. By using biotynilated collagen and a surface that is functionalized with avidin, we generate two-dimensional collagen networks across the surface of a silicon wafer. During network synthesis, the incubation time is varied from 30 minutes to 3 hours or temperature is varied from 25°C to 45°C. The two-dimensional collagen network created in the process is characterized using environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The network density is measured by the number of strands in one frame using SPIP software. We expect that at body temperature (37°C) and with longer incubation times, the network density should increase.

  18. Analysis of cellular phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate levels and distribution using confocal fluorescent microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Michelle; Nowell, Cameron J; Condron, Melanie; Gardiner, James; Holmes, Andrew B; Desai, Jayesh; Burgess, Antony W; Catimel, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an immunocytochemistry method for the semiquantitative detection of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3) at the cell plasma membrane. This protocol combines the use of a glutathione S-transferase-tagged pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of the general phosphoinositides-1 receptor (GST-GRP1PH) with fluorescence confocal microscopy and image segmentation using cell mask software analysis. This methodology allows the analysis of PI(3,4,5)P3 subcellular distribution in resting and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated HEK293T cells and in LIM1215 (wild-type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)) and LIM2550 (H1047R mutation in PI3K catalytic domain) colonic carcinoma cells. Formation of PI(3,4,5)P3 was observed 5min following EGF stimulation and resulted in an increase of the membrane/cytoplasm fluorescence ratio from 1.03 to 1.53 for HEK293T cells and from 2.2 to 3.3 for LIM1215 cells. Resting LIM2550 cells stained with GST-GRP1PH had an elevated membrane/cytoplasm fluorescence ratio of 9.8, suggesting constitutive PI3K activation. The increase in the membrane/cytoplasm fluorescent ratio was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. This cellular confocal imaging assay can be used to directly assess the effects of PI3K mutations in cancer cell lines and to determine the potential specificity and effectiveness of PI3K inhibitors in cancer cells. PMID:20599646

  19. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy for the study of cardiac muscle ultrastructure at nanoscale resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinali, Christian; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2014-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques have made a significant contribution towards understanding muscle physiology since the 1950s. Subsequent advances in hardware and software have led to major breakthroughs in terms of image resolution as well as the ability to generate three-dimensional (3D) data essential for linking structure to function and dysfunction. In this methodological review we consider the application of a relatively new technique, serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM), for the study of cardiac muscle morphology. Employing SBF-SEM we have generated 3D data for cardiac myocytes within the myocardium with a voxel size of ~15 nm in the X-Y plane and 50 nm in the Z-direction. We describe how SBF-SEM can be used in conjunction with selective staining techniques to reveal the 3D cellular organisation and the relationship between the t-tubule (t-t) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) networks. These methods describe how SBF-SEM can be used to provide qualitative data to investigate the organisation of the dyad, a specialised calcium microdomain formed between the t-ts and the junctional portion of the SR (jSR). We further describe how image analysis methods may be applied to interrogate the 3D volumes to provide quantitative data such as the volume of the cell occupied by the t-t and SR membranes and the volumes and surface area of jSR patches. We consider the strengths and weaknesses of the SBF-SEM technique, pitfalls in sample preparation together with tips and methods for image analysis. By providing a 'big picture' view at high resolutions, in comparison to conventional confocal microscopy, SBF-SEM represents a paradigm shift for imaging cellular networks in their native environment. PMID:25149127

  20. Fluctuation Electron Microscopy of Amorphous and Polycrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezikyan, Aram

    Fluctuation Electron Microscopy (FEM) has become an effective materials' structure characterization technique, capable of probing medium-range order (MRO) that may be present in amorphous materials. Although its sensitivity to MRO has been exercised in numerous studies, FEM is not yet a quantitative technique. The holdup has been the discrepancy between the computed kinematical variance and the experimental variance, which previously was attributed to source incoherence. Although high-brightness, high coherence, electron guns are now routinely available in modern electron microscopes, they have not eliminated this discrepancy between theory and experiment. The main objective of this thesis was to explore, and to reveal, the reasons behind this conundrum. The study was started with an analysis of the speckle statistics of tilted dark-field TEM images obtained from an amorphous carbon sample, which confirmed that the structural ordering is sensitively detected by FEM. This analysis also revealed the inconsistency between predictions of the source incoherence model and the experimentally observed variance. FEM of amorphous carbon, amorphous silicon and ultra nanocrystalline diamond samples was carried out in an attempt to explore the conundrum. Electron probe and sample parameters were varied to observe the scattering intensity variance behavior. Results were compared to models of probe incoherence, diffuse scattering, atom displacement damage, energy loss events and multiple scattering. Models of displacement decoherence matched the experimental results best. Decoherence was also explored by an interferometric diffraction method using bilayer amorphous samples, and results are consistent with strong displacement decoherence in addition to temporal decoherence arising from the electron source energy spread and energy loss events in thick samples. It is clear that decoherence plays an important role in the long-standing discrepancy between experimental FEM and its

  1. Electron microscopy study of radiation effects in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is a disordered non-stoechiometric material with a strongly microtwinned polycristallyne microstructure. This ceramic is among the candidate materials for the first wall coating in fusion reactor and is used as a neutron absorber in the control rods of fast breeder reactors. The present work deals with the nature of radiation damage in this solid. Because of helium internal production, neutron irradiated boron carbide is affected by swelling and by a strong microcracking which can break up a pellet in fine powder. These processes are rather intensitive to the irradiation parameters (temperature, flux and even neutron spectrum). Transmission electron microscopy of samples irradiated by the fast neutrons of a reactor, the electrons of a high voltage electron microscope and of samples implanted with helium ions was used to understand the respective roles of helium and point defects in the processes of swelling and microcracking. The design of an irradiation chamber for helium implantation at controlled temperature from 600 to 17000C was an important technical part of this work

  2. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanome...

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  4. Procoagulant platelet balloons: evidence from cryopreparation and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, M W; Siljander, P

    2001-05-01

    Visualisation of the procoagulant transformation of human platelets has recently become possible through use of an in vitro approach combined with fluorescence and phase contrast microscopy. Here, we extended these studies to the ultrastructural level by employing both rapid freezing/freeze-substitution and conventional ambient-temperature chemical fixation for transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Procoagulant transformation was only inducible by adhering platelets to collagen fibrils or to the collagen-related peptide and exposing them to physiological extracellular Ca2+ levels. Under these conditions prominent, 2- to 4-micron-wide balloon-like structures were regularly observed, regardless of the specimen fixation protocol. In strong contrast to normal platelets in their vicinity, the balloons' subcellular architecture proved remarkably poor: dilute cytoplasm, no cytoskeleton, only a few, randomly distributed organelles and/or their remnants. Cryofixed balloons displayed intact and smooth surfaces whereas conventional specimen processing caused plasma membrane perforations and shrinkage of the balloons. Our results clearly show that neither the balloons themselves, nor their simple ultrastructure reflect fixation artefacts caused by inadequate membrane stabilisation. The balloons are interpreted as to be transformed and/or fragmented procoagulant platelets. Thus, the generation of balloons represents a genuine, final stage of platelet ontogenesis, presumably occurring alternatively to aggregate formation. PMID:11449892

  5. Anti-PSMA antibody-coupled gold nanorods detection by optical and electron microscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schol, D; Fleron, M; Greisch, J F; Jaeger, M; Frenz, M; De Pauw, E; De Pauw-Gillet, M C

    2013-07-01

    While cancer is one of the greatest challenges to public health care, prostate cancer was chosen as cancer model to develop a more accurate imaging assessment than those currently available. Indeed, an efficient imaging technique which considerably improves the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic and predicting the cancer behavior would be extremely valuable. The concept of optoacoustic imaging using home-made functionalized gold nanoparticles coupled to an antibody targeting PSMA (prostate specific membrane antigen) was evaluated on different cancer cell lines to demonstrate the specificity of the designed platform. Two commonly used microscopy techniques (indirect fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy) showed their straightforwardness and versatility for the nanoparticle binding investigations regardless the composition of the investigated nanoobjects. Moreover most of the research laboratories and centers are equipped with fluorescence microscopes, so indirect fluorescence using Quantum dots can be used for any active targeting nanocarriers (polymers, ceramics, metals, etc.). The second technique based on backscattered electron is not only limited to gold nanoparticles but also suits for any study of metallic nanoparticles as the electronic density difference between the nanoparticles and binding surface stays high enough. Optoacoustic imaging was finally performed on a 3D cellular model to assess and prove the concept of the developed platform. PMID:23777855

  6. Time-Lapse Video Microscopy for Assessment of EYFP-Parkin Aggregation as a Marker for Cellular Mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Casimiro, Mathew C; Pestell, Timothy G; Pestell, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Time-lapse video microscopy can be defined as the real time imaging of living cells. This technique relies on the collection of images at different time points. Time intervals can be set through a computer interface that controls the microscope-integrated camera. This kind of microscopy requires both the ability to acquire very rapid events and the signal generated by the observed cellular structure during these events. After the images have been collected, a movie of the entire experiment is assembled to show the dynamic of the molecular events of interest. Time-lapse video microscopy has a broad range of applications in the biomedical research field and is a powerful and unique tool for following the dynamics of the cellular events in real time. Through this technique, we can assess cellular events such as migration, division, signal transduction, growth, and death. Moreover, using fluorescent molecular probes we are able to mark specific molecules, such as DNA, RNA or proteins and follow them through their molecular pathways and functions. Time-lapse video microscopy has multiple advantages, the major one being the ability to collect data at the single-cell level, that make it a unique technology for investigation in the field of cell biology. However, time-lapse video microscopy has limitations that can interfere with the acquisition of high quality images. Images can be compromised by both external factors; temperature fluctuations, vibrations, humidity and internal factors; pH, cell motility. Herein, we describe a protocol for the dynamic acquisition of a specific protein, Parkin, fused with the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) in order to track the selective removal of damaged mitochondria, using a time-lapse video microscopy approach. PMID:27168174

  7. Near field and exit wave computations for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, A

    2013-11-01

    The partial wave phase shift formalism of atomic scattering is applied to compute exit wave functions for isolated Au and Si atoms under both plane wave and focused probe illumination. Connections between the far field and near field (exit) waves are clarified. This approach treats the Coulomb singularity properly though at 100 keV large numbers of phase shifts are required. In principle any form of incident wave can be handled so it may provide a means for testing traditional scattering theories used in electron microscopy. By applying the analysis to an atom embedded in a constant potential rather than free space, exit spheres of radius half the interatomic spacing can be used. PMID:23726769

  8. Electron microscopy of gallium nitride growth on polycrystalline diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) on polycrystalline diamond substrates grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy with a low-temperature aluminium nitride (AlN) nucleation layer. Growth on unmasked substrates was in the (0001) orientation with threading dislocation densities ≈7 × 109 cm−2. An epitaxial layer overgrowth technique was used to reduce the dislocation densities further, by depositing silicon nitride stripes on the surface and etching the unmasked regions down to the diamond substrate. A re-growth was then performed on the exposed side walls of the original GaN growth, reducing the threading dislocation density in the overgrown regions by two orders of magnitude. The resulting microstructures and the mechanisms of dislocation reduction are discussed. (paper)

  9. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  10. Fluctuation electron microscopy studies of complex structured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gongpu; Rougée, Annick; Buseck, Peter; Treacy, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) is a hybrid imaging-diffraction technique. This technique is particularly sensitive to paracrystalline structures of dimension 0.5-2 nm, which are difficult to detect by either imaging or diffraction techniques alone. It has been successfully deployed to study paracrystalline structures in amorphous silicon, germanium thin film. This technique has also been used to study metallic glasses and oxide glasses. Until now, FEM has not been used to study disordered geological materials. In this talk we present our FEM studies of shungite, a naturally occurring disordered carbonaceous material, reveal that trace quantities of tightly curved graphene structures such as C60, or fragments of C60, is present in shungite. We also present results from our study of metamict zircon, whose crystal structure is destroyed by self-radiation during naturally occurring α decay events. Work is in progress to study the structural evolution during the metamictization process.

  11. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of cells using dielectrophoresis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yang Tang

    Full Text Available Ultrastructural analysis of cells can reveal valuable information about their morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM has been widely used to provide high-resolution images from the surface of biological samples. However, samples need to be dehydrated and coated with conductive materials for SEM imaging. Besides, immobilizing non-adherent cells during processing and analysis is challenging and requires complex fixation protocols. In this work, we developed a novel dielectrophoresis based microfluidic platform for interfacing non-adherent cells with high-resolution SEM at low vacuum mode. The system enables rapid immobilization and dehydration of samples without deposition of chemical residues over the cell surface. Moreover, it enables the on-chip chemical stimulation and fixation of immobilized cells with minimum dislodgement. These advantages were demonstrated for comparing the morphological changes of non-budding and budding yeast cells following Lyticase treatment.

  12. High-resolution electron microscopy and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F H

    1987-12-01

    A review of research on high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) carried out at the Institute of Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is presented. Apart from the direct observation of crystal and quasicrystal defects for some alloys, oxides, minerals, etc., and the structure determination for some minute crystals, an approximate image-contrast theory named pseudo-weak-phase object approximation (PWPOA), which shows the image contrast change with crystal thickness, is described. Within the framework of PWPOA, the image contrast of lithium ions in the crystal of R-Li2Ti3O7 has been observed. The usefulness of diffraction analysis techniques such as the direct method and Patterson method in HREM is discussed. Image deconvolution and resolution enhancement for weak-phase objects by use of the direct method are illustrated. In addition, preliminary results of image restoration for thick crystals are given. PMID:3505590

  13. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, C.; Walter, P.; Castaing, J.; Penhoud, P.; Veyssière, P.

    The processing technologies available during the time of ancient Egypt are of present concern to the field of Archaeology and Egyptology. Materials characterization is the best tool for establishing the processing history of archaeological objects. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used, in addition to other techniques, for phase identification and study of the microstructure and characteristic defect structures in ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders. These powders generally consist of a mix of Pb-containing mineral phases: galena (PbS), cerussite (PbCO3), and phosgenite (Pb2Cl2CO3), among others. Modern materials are fabricated according to recipes found in ancient texts to mimic the processing of ancient times and to compare with the archaeological specimens. In particular, a comparison between the dislocation structures of PbS crystals deformed in the laboratory and PbS from archaeological specimens from the collections of the Louvre Museum is presented .

  14. Electron microscopy study of red mud after seawater neutralisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red Mud, residue of Bayer process for extracting alumina from bauxite, is produced in large quantity. This residue is very alkaline and can cause damage to health and the environment. One way to minimize the environmental impact of this residue is neutralization by sea water. The Brazilian Red Mud was treated with sea water. It appears that the initial pH of the samples is reduced to 8. The analysis by x-ray diffraction allows to identify the formation of hydrotalcite and aragonite. The transmission electron microscopy images show that this consists of particles with dimensions between 0.02 to 2 μm. It was possible to identify by EDS/MET particles of magnesium, confirming the formation of hydrotalcite. (author)

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of Strongylus spp. in zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Els, H J; Malan, F S; Scialdo-Krecek, R C

    1983-12-01

    The external ultrastructure of the anterior and posterior extremities of the nematodes, Strongylus asini , Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus equinus and Strongylus edentatus, was studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fresh specimens of S. asini were collected from the caecum, ventral colon and vena portae of Equus burchelli and Equus zebra hartmannae ; S. vulgaris from the caecum, colon and arteria ileocolica of E. burchelli ; S. equinus from the ventral colon of E. z. hartmannae and S. edentatus from the caecum and ventral colon of both zebras , during surveys of parasites in zebras in the Etosha Game Reserve, South West Africa/Namibia, and the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa. The worms were cleaned, fixed and mounted by standard methods and photographed in a JEOL JSM - 35C scanning electron microscope (SEM) operating at 12kV . The SEM showed the following differences: the tips of the external leaf-crowns varied and were fine and delicate in S. asini , coarse and broad in S. vulgaris and, in S. equinus and S. edentatus, closely adherent, separating into single elements for half their length. The excretory pores showed only slight variation, and the morphology of the copulatory bursae did not differ from those seen with light microscopy. The genital cones differed markedly: S. asini had a ventral triangular projection and laterally 2 finger-like projections: in S. vulgaris there were numerous bosses on the lateral and ventral aspects of the cone; in S. equinus 2 finger-like processes projected laterocaudally ; and in S. edentatus 2 pairs of papilla-like processes projected laterally on the ventral aspects, and a pair of rounded projections and a pair of hair-like structures adorned the dorsal aspects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6676687

  16. Electron-beam induced optical superresolution in integrated light-electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Väkeväinen, Aaro

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an optical superresolution method based on electronbleaching of fluorophores in integrated light-electron microscopy. The main advantage of this novel superresolution method is that the non-fluorescent ultrastructure of the sample can be revealed by the simultaneously acquired SEM image. Furthermore, as the fluorescence superresolution image is based on an electron-beam-induced modification of the specimen, by "switching off" fluorescent probes, both the fluorescence and SEM...

  17. Analysis of Brain Mitochondria Using Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Konark; Clark, Helen R; Chavan, Vrushali; Benson, Emily K; Kidd, Grahame J; Srivastava, Sarika

    2016-01-01

    Human brain is a high energy consuming organ that mainly relies on glucose as a fuel source. Glucose is catabolized by brain mitochondria via glycolysis, tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathways to produce cellular energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Impairment of mitochondrial ATP production causes mitochondrial disorders, which present clinically with prominent neurological and myopathic symptoms. Mitochondrial defects are also present in neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism spectrum disorder) and neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Thus, there is an increased interest in the field for performing 3D analysis of mitochondrial morphology, structure and distribution under both healthy and disease states. The brain mitochondrial morphology is extremely diverse, with some mitochondria especially those in the synaptic region being in the range of light microscopy. Expressing a mitochondrially-targeted green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the brain significantly enhances the organellar detection by confocal microscopy. However, it does not overcome the constraints on the sensitivity of detection of relatively small sized mitochondria without oversaturating the images of large sized mitochondria. While serial transmission electron microscopy has been successfully used to characterize mitochondria at the neuronal synapse, this technique is extremely time-consuming especially when comparing multiple samples. The serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) technique involves an automated process of sectioning, imaging blocks of tissue and data acquisition. Here, we provide a protocol to perform SBFSEM of a defined region from rodent brain to rapidly reconstruct and visualize mitochondrial morphology. This technique could also be used to provide accurate information on mitochondrial number, volume, size and distribution in a defined brain

  18. Interferometric time-stretch microscopy for ultrafast quantitative cellular and tissue imaging at 1 μm

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, KSA; Ho, KYK; Tang, MTH; Wei, X; Wong, TTW; Chan, ACS; Lam, EYM; Shum, HC; Wong, KKY; Tsia, KKM

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) has been proven to be a powerful tool for label-free characterization of biological specimens. However, the imaging speed, largely limited by the image sensor technology, impedes its utility in applications where high-throughput screening and efficient big-data analysis are mandated. We here demonstrate interferometric time-stretch (iTS) microscopy for delivering ultrafast quantitative phase cellular and tissue imaging at an imaging line-scan rate >20 MHz-orde...

  19. Aberration Corrected Photoemission Electron Microscopy with Photonics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Joseph P. S.

    Photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) uses photoelectrons excited from material surfaces by incident photons to probe the interaction of light with surfaces with nanometer-scale resolution. The point resolution of PEEM images is strongly limited by spherical and chromatic aberration. Image aberrations primarily originate from the acceleration of photoelectrons and imaging with the objective lens and vary strongly in magnitude with specimen emission characteristics. Spherical and chromatic aberration can be corrected with an electrostatic mirror, and here I develop a triode mirror with hyperbolic geometry that has two adjacent, field-adjustable regions. I present analytic and numerical models of the mirror and show that the optical properties agree to within a few percent. When this mirror is coupled with an electron lens, it can provide a large dynamic range of correction and the coefficients of spherical and chromatic aberration can be varied independently. I report on efforts to realize a triode mirror corrector, including design, characterization, and alignment in our microscope at Portland State University (PSU). PEEM may be used to investigate optically active nanostructures, and we show that photoelectron emission yields can be identified with diffraction, surface plasmons, and dielectric waveguiding. Furthermore, we find that photoelectron micrographs of nanostructured metal and dielectric structures correlate with electromagnetic field calculations. We conclude that photoemission is highly spatially sensitive to the electromagnetic field intensity, allowing the direct visualization of the interaction of light with material surfaces at nanometer scales and over a wide range of incident light frequencies.

  20. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamer Vestlund, A. [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); FIRA International Ltd., Maxwell Road, Stevenage, Herts SG1 2EW (United Kingdom); Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T. [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Drew, G.H., E-mail: g.h.drew@cranfield.ac.uk [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors.

  1. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  2. Atomic resolution cryo electron microscopy of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z Hong

    2011-01-01

    Single-particle cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) is a technique for determining three-dimensional (3D) structures from projection images of molecular complexes preserved in their "native," noncrystalline state. Recently, atomic or near-atomic resolution structures of several viruses and protein assemblies have been determined by single-particle cryoEM, allowing ab initio atomic model building by following the amino acid side chains or nucleic acid bases identifiable in their cryoEM density maps. In particular, these cryoEM structures have revealed extended arms contributing to molecular interactions that are otherwise not resolved by the conventional structural method of X-ray crystallography at similar resolutions. High-resolution cryoEM requires careful consideration of a number of factors, including proper sample preparation to ensure structural homogeneity, optimal configuration of electron imaging conditions to record high-resolution cryoEM images, accurate determination of image parameters to correct image distortions, efficient refinement and computation to reconstruct a 3D density map, and finally appropriate choice of modeling tools to construct atomic models for functional interpretation. This progress illustrates the power of cryoEM and ushers it into the arsenal of structural biology, alongside conventional techniques of X-ray crystallography and NMR, as a major tool (and sometimes the preferred one) for the studies of molecular interactions in supramolecular assemblies or machines. PMID:21501817

  3. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors

  4. Using advanced electron microscopy for the characterization of catalytic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrz, William D.

    Catalysis will continue to be vitally important to the advancement and sustainability of industrialized societies. Unfortunately, the petroleum-based resources that currently fuel the energy and consumer product needs of an advancing society are becoming increasingly difficult and expensive to extract as supplies diminish and the quality of sources degrade. Therefore, the development of sustainable energy sources and the improvement of the carbon efficiency of existing chemical processes are critical. Further challenges require that these initiatives are accomplished in an environmentally friendly fashion since the effects of carbon-based emissions are proving to be a serious threat to global climate stability. In this dissertation, materials being developed for sustainable energy and process improvement initiatives are studied. Our approach is to use materials characterization, namely advanced electron microscopy, to analyze the targeted systems at the nano- or Angstrom-scale with the goal of developing useful relationships between structure, composition, crystalline order, morphology, and catalytic performance. One area of interest is the complex Mo-V-M-O (M=Te, Sb, Ta, Nb) oxide system currently being developed for the selective oxidation/ammoxidation of propane to acrylic acid or acrylonitrile, respectively. Currently, the production of acrylic acid and acrylonitrile rely on propylene-based processes, yet significant cost savings could be realized if the olefin-based feeds could be replaced by paraffin-based ones. The major challenge preventing this feedstock replacement is the development of a suitable paraffin-activating catalyst. Currently, the best candidate is the Mo-V-Nb-Te-O complex oxide catalyst that is composed of two majority phases that are commonly referred to as M1 and M2. However, there is a limited understanding of the roles of each component with respect to how they contribute to catalyst stability and the reaction mechanism. Aberration

  5. Label-free and real-time imaging of dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes in cellular nucleus using second harmonic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Shuangmu Zhuo; Ming Ni

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes have been probed for the first time with the use of second harmonic microscopy. Unlike conventional approaches, second harmonic microscopy provides a label-free and real-time approach to detect DNA conformational changes. Upon dehydration, cellular DNA undergoes a transition from B- to A-form, whereas cellular nuclei change from invisible to visible under second harmonic microscopy. These results showed that DNA is a second order nonlinear optica...

  6. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Terence T W; Ho, Kenneth K Y; Tang, Matthew Y H; Robles, Joseph D F; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C S; Tang, Anson H L; Lam, Edmund Y; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Chan, Godfrey C F; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K

    2013-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity- a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry- permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individu...

  7. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics. PMID:24420248

  8. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, N.; Watanabe, G.; Harada, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1988-11-01

    Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules

  10. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorb, Martin [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Briggs, John A.G., E-mail: john.briggs@embl.de [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision.

  11. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision

  12. The need for a shared database infrastructure: combining X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in structural biology are opening greater opportunities for understanding biological structures from the cellular to the atomic level. Particularly promising are the links that can be established between the information provided by electron microscopy and the atomic structures derived from X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Combining such different kinds of structural data can result in novel biological information on the interaction of biomolecules in large supramolecular assemblies. As a consequence, the need to develop new databases in the field of structural biology that allow for an integrated access to data from all the experimental techniques is becoming critical. Pilot studies performed in recent years have already established a solid background as far as the basic information that an integrated macromolecular structure database should contain, as well as the basic principles for integration. These efforts started in the context of the BioImage project, and resulted in a first complete database prototype that provided a versatile platform for the linking of atomic models of X-ray diffraction data with electron microscopy information. Analysis of the requirements needed to combine data at different levels of resolution have resulted in sets of specifications that make possible the integration of all these different types in the context of a web environment. The case of a structural study linking electron microscopy and X-ray data, which is already contained within the BioImage data base and in the Protein Data Bank, is used here to illustrate the current approach, while a general discussion highlights the urgent need for integrated databases. (orig.)

  13. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  14. Correlating intravital multi-photon microscopy to 3D electron microscopy of invading tumor cells using anatomical reference points.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthia A Karreman

    Full Text Available Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of homing and recirculating lymphocyte populations. [X Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Ewijk, W.; Brons, N.H.C.; Rozing, J.

    1975-10-01

    The surface structure of T and B lymphocytes in vivo was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. For these studies the spleen and mesenteric lymph node of mice enriched for B lymphocytes (adult thymectomized, lethally irradiated, bone marrow reconstituted mice, B mice) and of mice enriched for T lymphocytes (adult, lethally irradiated, thymocyte transferred mice, T mice) were examined. Both types of lymphocytes demonstrated a smooth cell surface when they were situated in their respective microenvironment, whereas recirculating T and B cells exhibited numerous microvilli on the cell surface. In postcapillary venules, known to be the major sites of entry of lymphocytes in lymph nodes, lymphocytes were in contact with the endothelial wall by means of these microvilli. While passing the endothelial lining, lymphocytes withdrew their microvilli and appeared smooth upon arrival in the lymphatic stroma. It is suggested that microvilli on the surface of lymphocytes play a role in cellular recognition mechanisms.

  16. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  17. Label-Free Analysis of Cellular Lipid Droplet Formation by Non-Linear Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schie, Iwan W.

    Cellular lipid droplets (LD) are cellular organelles that can be found in every cell type. Recent research indicates that cellular LD are involved in a large number of cellular metabolic functions, such as lipid metabolism, protection from lipotoxicity, protein storage and degradation, and many more. LD formation is frequently associated with adverse health effects, i.e. alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes type-2, as well as many cardiovascular disorders. Despite their wide presence, LDs are the least studied and most poorly understood cellular organelles. Typically, LDs are investigated using fluorescence-based techniques that require staining with exogenous fluorophores. Other techniques, e.g. biochemical assays, require the destruction of cells that prohibit the analysis of living cells. Therefore, in my thesis research I developed a novel compound fast-scanning nonlinear optical microscope equipped with the ability to also acquire Raman spectra at specific image locations. This system allows us to image label-free cellular LD formation in living cells and analyze the composition of single cellular LDs. Images can be acquired at near video-rate (˜16 frames/s). Furthermore, the system has the ability to acquire very large images of tissue of up to 7.5x15 cm2 total area by stitching together scans with dimensions of 1x1 mm2 in less than 1 minute. The system also enables the user to acquire Raman spectra from points of interest in the multiphoton images and provides chemically-specific data from sample volumes as small as 1 femtoliter. In my thesis I used this setup to determine the effects of VLDL lipolysis products on primary rat hepatocytes. By analyzing the Raman spectra and comparing the peak ratios for saturated and unsaturated fatty acid it was determined that the small cellular LD are highly saturated, while large cellular LDs contain mostly unsaturated lipids. Furthermore, I established a method to determine the specific contribution

  18. Advanced Correlative Light/Electron Microscopy: Current Methods and New Developments Using Tokuyasu Cryosections

    OpenAIRE

    Cortese, Katia; Diaspro, Alberto; Tacchetti, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Microscopy is an essential tool for analysis of cellular structures and function. With the advent of new fluorescent probes and super-resolution light microscopy techniques, the study of dynamic processes in living cells has been greatly facilitated. Fluorescence light microscopy provides analytical, quantitative, and three-dimensional (3D) data with emphasis on analysis of live cells using fluorescent markers. Sample preparation is easy and relatively inexpensive, and the use of appropriate ...

  19. Preservation of protein fluorescence in embedded human dendritic cells for targeted 3D light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, K; Fuchs, J; Fröber, A; Kirmse, R; Glass, B; Anders-Össwein, M; Walther, P; Kräusslich, H-G; Dietrich, C

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present a correlative microscopy workflow to combine detailed 3D fluorescence light microscopy data with ultrastructural information gained by 3D focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy. The workflow is based on an optimized high pressure freezing/freeze substitution protocol that preserves good ultrastructural detail along with retaining the fluorescence signal in the resin embedded specimens. Consequently, cellular structures of interest can readily be identified and imaged by state of the art 3D confocal fluorescence microscopy and are precisely referenced with respect to an imprinted coordinate system on the surface of the resin block. This allows precise guidance of the focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy and limits the volume to be imaged to the structure of interest. This, in turn, minimizes the total acquisition time necessary to conduct the time consuming ultrastructural scanning electron microscope imaging while eliminating the risk to miss parts of the target structure. We illustrate the value of this workflow for targeting virus compartments, which are formed in HIV-pulsed mature human dendritic cells. PMID:25786567

  20. Electron microscopy of iron chalcogenide FeTe(Se) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of Fe1+δTe1−xSex films (x = 0; 0.05) grown on single-crystal MgO and LaAlO3 substrates has been investigated by transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The study of Fe1.11Te/MgO structures has revealed two crystallographic orientation relationships between the film and substrate. It is shown that the lattice mismatch between the film and substrate is compensated for by the formation of misfit dislocations. The Burgers vector projection is determined. The stresses in the film can partially be compensated for due to the formation of an intermediate disordered layer. It is shown that a FeTe0.5Se0.5 film grown on a LaAlO3 substrate is single-crystal and that the FeTe0.5Se0.5/LaAlO3 interface in a selected region is coherent. The orientation relationships between the film and substrate are also determined for this case

  1. Electron microscopy studies of point defect clusters in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been widely used to study point defect clusters in metals following quenching and irradiation. As a result of this work considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the nucleation morphology, and growth of clusters and this paper reviews the current state of this understanding. The cubic metals (fcc and bcc) have been studied most widely. Cluster geometry and how it is affected by a wide range of variables such as the temperature at which clustering occurs has been well characterized. Detailed quantitative studies have also been made of cluster nucleation and growth kinetics and a self-consistent picture has been developed of the physical processes involved which describes the behaviour of quenched-in and radiation-induced defects. It has been shown that fundamental differences exist between fcc and bcc metals particularly with regard to the formation of vacancy clusters. In contrast, comparatively little work has been carried out on hpc metals and a clear picture has not yet emerged of the factors influencing cluster geometry. The results indicate that considerable differences exist on going from one to another within the general class of hexagonal metals. Moreover, virtually no quantitative results have been reported on the nucleation and growth of clusters in hcp metals. (author)

  2. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of minerals in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kuang-Chien

    1982-01-01

    Minerals in eight coals from different mines were characterized in the micron-size range by using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were thinned by ion-milling wafers cut from these coals; a cold stage cooled by liquid nitrogen was used to reduce thermal degradation of the minerals by the ion-beam. Different mineral compounds were observed in different coals. The major minerals are clays, sulfides, oxides, carbonates and some minor-element-bearing phosphates. Clays (kaolinite, illite and others) have been most commonly found as either flat sheets or round globules. Iron sulfide was mostly found in the No. 5 and No. 6 coals from Illinois, distributed as massive polycrystals, as clusters of single crystals (framboids) or as isolated single crystals with size range down to some 0.25 microns. Other sulfides and some oxides were found in other coals with particle size as small as some 200 angstroms. Quartz, titanium oxides and many other carbonates and phosphate compounds were also characterized. Brief TEM work in the organic mass of coal was also introduced to study the nature of the coal macerals.

  3. Ultra fine grained titanium studied by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Since commercially pure titanium is biologically more compatible than Ti alloys it is preferentially used for medical implants. As compared to Ti alloys coarse grained Ti lacks of the necessary strength. Therefore equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) deformation is used to achieve smaller grain sizes and producing work pieces with dimensions large enough for medical applications. In addition the ultrafine grain (UFG) sized Ti was studied after cold rolling with transmission electron microscopy methods. After 8 ECAP passes the sizes of the equiaxed grains in the UFG Ti range from 300 to 800 nm. The misorientations between adjacent grains are in many cases > 15o indicating that various high angle grain boundaries are present. The dislocation density in the interior of the grains is low. With increasing strain imposed by cold rolling on the UFG material the number of small subgrains increases; both equiaxed and elongated subgrains with sizes down to less than 100 nm are present. The dislocation density is higher than that observed in the UFG material without cold rolling. Only the combination of ECAP with a second processing step carried out at low temperatures liKEX cold rolling has the potential to increase both strength and ductility. It is the aim of this work to correlate the microstructures of the different samples with their strength. (author)

  4. Investigation of slider surfaces after wear using photoemission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tribo-chemical interactions between the slider and the hard disk surface strongly influence the performance properties of a disk drive. To study these interactions, uncoated and carbon coated sliders were subjected to various wear tests using different disks. After the wear, the test slider surfaces were studied by photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) using tunable x rays produced by a synchrotron. Using PEEM, one can identify the elemental and chemical state of the surfaces with a high spatial resolution. It was found that wear reduces the thickness of the carbon coating in some local areas of the slider surface. In particular, the coating was removed on elevated areas and in scratches. Scratches were found on the rails of the carbon coated and uncoated sliders after wear that showed the accumulation of a degraded (oxidized) lubricant which was transferred to the slider from the disk. It was also possible to analyze the chemical composition of the debris found on the slider surface. In the present case, the debris had the same chemical composition as the carbon coating of the slider. copyright 1999 American Vacuum Society

  5. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy nanostructural study of shed microparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Issman

    Full Text Available Microparticles (MPs are sub-micron membrane vesicles (100-1000 nm shed from normal and pathologic cells due to stimulation or apoptosis. MPs can be found in the peripheral blood circulation of healthy individuals, whereas elevated concentrations are found in pregnancy and in a variety of diseases. Also, MPs participate in physiological processes, e.g., coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis. Since their clinical properties are important, we have developed a new methodology based on nano-imaging that provides significant new data on MPs nanostructure, their composition and function. We are among the first to characterize by direct-imaging cryogenic transmitting electron microscopy (cryo-TEM the near-to-native nanostructure of MP systems isolated from different cell types and stimulation procedures. We found that there are no major differences between the MP systems we have studied, as most particles were spherical, with diameters from 200 to 400 nm. However, each MP population is very heterogeneous, showing diverse morphologies. We investigated by cryo-TEM the effects of standard techniques used to isolate and store MPs, and found that either high-g centrifugation of MPs for isolation purposes, or slow freezing to -80 °C for storage introduce morphological artifacts, which can influence MP nanostructure, and thus affect the efficiency of these particles as future diagnostic tools.

  6. High-performance probes for light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Sarada; Williams, Megan E; Bloss, Erik B; Stasevich, Timothy J; Speer, Colenso M; Nern, Aljoscha; Pfeiffer, Barret D; Hooks, Bryan M; Li, Wei-Ping; English, Brian P; Tian, Teresa; Henry, Gilbert L; Macklin, John J; Patel, Ronak; Gerfen, Charles R; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Wang, Yalin; Rubin, Gerald M; Looger, Loren L

    2015-06-01

    We describe an engineered family of highly antigenic molecules based on GFP-like fluorescent proteins. These molecules contain numerous copies of peptide epitopes and simultaneously bind IgG antibodies at each location. These 'spaghetti monster' fluorescent proteins (smFPs) distributed well in neurons, notably into small dendrites, spines and axons. smFP immunolabeling localized weakly expressed proteins not well resolved with traditional epitope tags. By varying epitope and scaffold, we generated a diverse family of mutually orthogonal antigens. In cultured neurons and mouse and fly brains, smFP probes allowed robust, orthogonal multicolor visualization of proteins, cell populations and neuropil. smFP variants complement existing tracers and greatly increase the number of simultaneous imaging channels, and they performed well in advanced preparations such as array tomography, super-resolution fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy. In living cells, the probes improved single-molecule image tracking and increased yield for RNA-seq. These probes facilitate new experiments in connectomics, transcriptomics and protein localization. PMID:25915120

  7. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy

  8. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 μm. The collected particles, sampled for short periods (∼15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C60 or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces

  9. Electron microscopy of transformation dislocations at interphase boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, R.; Loubradou, M.; Catana, A.; Stadelmann, P.

    1991-06-01

    The concept of structural units (SU’s) developed in order to describe the atomic structures of twin boundary facets is also used for interphase boundary (IB) facets quasi-parallel to small near-coincident planar cells of the two adjacent lattices. These facets, which have their own SU’s, are separated by transformation dislocations (TD’s), the cores of which are often related to ledges having heights equal to several interplanar spacings. It is shown that the Somigliana dislocation (SD) concept is a good tool for the computation of elastic displacement fields of these TD’s in anisotropic elasticity. Applications are presented concerning the following IB’s observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM): Si/TiSi2, Si/CoSi2, and Ni3Al/Ni3Nb. The identification of the atomic rows around some TD’s at Si/CoSi2 and Ni3Al/Ni3Nb has been obtained by careful comparisons of experimental and calculated images.

  10. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pia C. Lansåker; Anders Hallén; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The v...

  11. Customized patterned substrates for highly versatile correlative light-scanning electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lorena Benedetti; Elisa Sogne; Simona Rodighiero; Davide Marchesi; Paolo Milani; Maura Francolini

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) combines the advantages of light and electron microscopy, thus making it possible to follow dynamic events in living cells at nanometre resolution. Various CLEM approaches and devices have been developed, each of which has its own advantages and technical challenges. We here describe our customized patterned glass substrates, which improve the feasibility of correlative fluorescence/confocal and scanning electron microscopy.

  12. Customized patterned substrates for highly versatile correlative light-scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Lorena; Sogne, Elisa; Rodighiero, Simona; Marchesi, Davide; Milani, Paolo; Francolini, Maura

    2014-11-01

    Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) combines the advantages of light and electron microscopy, thus making it possible to follow dynamic events in living cells at nanometre resolution. Various CLEM approaches and devices have been developed, each of which has its own advantages and technical challenges. We here describe our customized patterned glass substrates, which improve the feasibility of correlative fluorescence/confocal and scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Prospects of the scanning low energy electron microscopy in materials science

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikmeková, Šárka; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk

    Brno : Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i, 2010 - (Mika, F.), s. 37-38 ISBN 978-80-254-6842-5. [International Seminar on Recent Trends in Charged Particle Optics and Surface Physics Instrumentation /12./. Skalský dvůr (CZ), 31.05.2010-04.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning low energy electron microscopy * scanning electron microscopy * transmission electron microscopy * focused ion beam microscopy * cathode lens mode Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. EDITORIAL: Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group Conference 2011 (EMAG 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebus, Guenter; Walther, Thomas; Brydson, Rik; Ozkaya, Dogan; MacLaren, Ian; Donnelly, Steve; Nellist, Pete; Li, Ziyou; Baker, Richard; Chiu, YuLung

    2012-07-01

    The biennial EMAG conference has established a strong reputation as a key event for the national and international electron microscopy community. In 2011 the meeting was held at The University of Birmingham, and I must first take this opportunity of thanking Birmingham for hosting the conference and for the excellent support we received from the local organisers. As a committee, we are delighted to see that enthusiasm for the EMAG conference series continues to be strong. We received more than 160 submitted abstracts, and 157 delegates attended the meeting. The scientific programme organiser, Ian MacLaren, put together an exciting programme. Plenary lectures were presented by Professor Knut Urban, Dr Frances Ross and Dr Richard Henderson. There were a further 10 invited speakers, from the UK, Continental Europe, Australia, the USA and Japan. The quality of the contributed oral and poster presentations was also very high. EMAG is keen to encourage student participation, and a winner and two runners-up were presented with prizes for the best oral and poster presentations from a student. I am always struck by the scientific quality of the oral and poster contributions and the vibrant discussions that occur both in the formal sessions and in the exhibition space at EMAG. I am convinced that a crucial part of maintaining that scientific quality is the opportunity that is offered of having a paper fully reviewed by two internationally selected referees and published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. For many students, this is the first fully reviewed paper they publish. I hope that you, like me, will be struck by the scientific quality of the 87 papers that follow, and that you will find them interesting and informative. Finally I must thank the platinum sponsors for their support of the meeting. These were Gatan, Zeiss, FEI, JEOL and Hitachi. I must also thank the European Microscopy Society for their generous sponsorship and support for the travel costs of

  15. Correlated light and electron microscopy : ultrastructure lights up!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Pascal; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2015-01-01

    Microscopy has gone hand in hand with the study of living systems since van Leeuwenhoek observed living microorganisms and cells in 1674 using his light microscope. A spectrum of dyes and probes now enable the localization of molecules of interest within living cells by fluorescence microscopy. With

  16. [High resolution scanning electron microscopy of isolated outer hair cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitschev, A; Müller, H

    1996-11-01

    Isolated hair cell preparations have gained wide acceptance as a model for studying physiological and molecular properties of the sensory cells involved in the hearing process. Ultrastructural details, such as stereocilia links, lateral membrane substructure or synaptic links are of crucial importance for normal sensory transduction. For this reason, we developed a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) procedure to study the surface of isolated hair cells. Cells were mechanically and/or enzymatically separated, isolated and immobilized on cover slips by alcian blue and fixed by 2% glutardialdehyde or 1% OsO4. After dehydration, preparations were critical point-dried and sputter-coated with gold-palladium (2-4 nm). Up to 5 nm resolution was achieved. Optimal fixation kept the cells in their typical cylindrical forms. Preservation of the stereocilia and the apical plates of the outer hair cells depended strongly on the fixation process. Tip- and side-links were observed only sporadically because of the aggressive preparation procedure. The lateral plasma membranes of the cell bodies showed regular granular structures of 5-7 nm diameter at maximal magnification. The granular structure of the cell membrane seemed to correspond to putative transmembrane proteins believed to generate membrane-based motility. The remnants of the nerve endings and/or supporting cells usually covered the cell base. The preservation of the cells was better when enzymatic isolation was omitted. The technique used allowed for high resolution ultrastructural examination of isolated hair cells and, when combined with immunological labeling, may permit the identification of proteins at a molecular level. PMID:9064297

  17. Transmission electron microscopy study of severe plastically deformed copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: High pressure torsion (HPT) is a procedure to deform materials severely in a controlled way. In the present work Cu samples (purity 99.9 %) were subjected to a quasi-hydrostatic pressure and a torsional straining at the same time. The HPT deformation was performed at a pressure of 8 GPa at room temperature leading to shear strains up to 20000% (depending on the torsion angle, the sample thickness and the effective radius). The evolution of the microstructure was studied as a function of strain with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. At a strain of 120 % the microstructure is dominated by a high dislocation density forming a cell structure. With increasing strain (600 %) the cell structure transforms to a structure consisting of small subgrains (about 300 nm in size) separated by low angle grain boundaries (misorientation smaller than 15o). At a strain of 20000 % the samples show ultra-fine grains (about 250 nm) that contain a high dislocation density and that are bounded mainly by high-angle grain boundaries. It is interesting to note that in the ultra-fine crystalline structure no texture developed even at very high strains indicating that grain boundary sliding is an important feature of the deformation process. To check the thermal stability of the ultra-fine grained structure both in-situ heating and annealing experiments of the bulk material were carried out indicating that already a temperature of 75o C has the potential to change the microstructure of the severely deformed material. (author)

  18. Simulations of Radiation Defect Images from Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Sang Chul; Shin, Chan Sub; Kwon, Jun Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Defect clusters in irradiated materials occur radiation hardening and embrittlement. Behaviors of radiation defects should be understood to clarify radiation damage mechanisms. Properties of irradiated materials depend on density, size, kinds, microstructure and etc. of radiation defects. These can be measured with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), positron annihilation (PA), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and 3D atom probe (3DAP). The TEM is undoubtedly the most important technique having made contributions to analysis of characteristics of radiation defects. The TEM is a unique technique, with which a shape and a microstructure of defect clusters can be observed at the images. Radiation defects are mainly dislocation loops. The behavior of a dislocation loop depends on the direction of Burgers vector and a habit plane. Dislocation loops can be observed with a TEM, when the diameter of a loop is larger than 2 nm. When the size is below 5 nm, special cares are required for a determination of directions of the Burgers vector and the habit plane. Generally, g{center_dot}b=0 invisibility criterion is used to determine the Burgers vectors of line dislocations. However, when the size is below 5 nm, loops with g{center_dot}b=0 are often not invisible and loops with g{center_dot}b{ne}0 may also show very weak contrast under weak beam imaging conditions. A special method such as black-white contrast analysis should be used for the determination. This method can be applied to black=white lobe images obtained under dynamical two beam contrast conditions. The directions can be determined roughly with only experimental images. It is needed for a correct determination to match experimental images with computer-generated images. This paper presents results from analyses of dislocation loops with an image simulation technique, TEMACI which was developed by Zhongfu, the Oxford University.

  19. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Iron Metal in Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikouchi, T.; Yubuta, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yasuhara, A.; Mihira, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AS) is a polymict breccia mainly composed of variable ureilite lithologies with small amounts of chondritic lithologies [1]. Fe metal is a common accessory phase in ureilites, but our earlier study on Fe metals in one of AS fragments (#44) revealed a unique mineralogy never seen in other ureilites [2,3]. In this abstract we report detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these metal grains to better understand the thermal history of ureilites. We prepared FIB sections of AS#44 by JEOL JIB-4000 from the PTS that was well characterized by SEM-EBSD in our earlier study [2]. The sections were then observed by STEM (JEOL JEM- 2100F). One of the FIB sections shows a submicron-sized symplectic intergrown texture composed of Fe metal (kamacite), Fe carbide (cohenite), Fe phosphide (schreibersite), and Fe sulfide (troilite). Each phase has an identical SAED pattern in spite of its complex texture, suggesting co-crystallization of all phases. This is probably caused by shock re-melting of pre-existing metal + graphite to form a eutectic-looking texture. The other FIB section is mostly composed of homogeneous Fe metal (93 wt% Fe, 5 wt% Ni, and 2 wt% Si), but BF-STEM images exhibited the presence of elongated lathy grains (approx. 2 microns long) embedded in the interstitial matrix. The SAED patterns from these lath grains could be indexed by alpha-Fe (bcc) while interstitial areas are gamma-Fe (fcc). The elongated alpha-Fe grains show tweed-like structures suggesting martensite transformation. Such a texture can be formed by rapid cooling from high temperature where gamma-Fe was stable. Subsequently alpha-Fe crystallized, but gamma-Fe remained in the interstitial matrix due to quenching from high temperature. This scenario is consistent with very rapid cooling history of ureilites suggested by silicate mineralogy.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of auto catalyst and cobalt germanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiping

    The modern ceria-zirconia based catalysts are used in automobiles to reduce exhaust pollutants. Cobalt germanides have potential applications as electrical contacts in the future Ge-based semiconductor devices. In this thesis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to study the atomic scale interactions between metallic nanostructures and crystalline substrates in the two material systems mentioned above. The model catalyst samples consisted of precious metal nano-particles (Pd, Rh) supported on the surface of (Ce,Zr)O2 thin films. The response of the microstructure of the metal-oxide interface to the reduction and oxidation treatments was investigated by cross-sectional high resolution TEM. Atomic detail of the metal-oxide interface was obtained. It was found that Pd and Rh showed different sintering and interaction behaviors on the oxide surface. The preferred orientation of Pd particles in this study was Pd(111)//CZO(111). Partial encapsulation of Pd particles by reduced (Ce,Zr)O 2 surface was observed and possible mechanisms of the encapsulation were discussed. The characteristics of the metal-oxide interaction depend on the properties of the oxide, as well as their relative orientation. The results provide experimental evidence for understanding the thermodynamics of the equilibrium morphology of a solid particle supported on a solid surface that is not considered as inert. The reaction of Co with Ge to form epitaxial Co5Ge7 was studied by in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) TEM using two methods. One was reactive deposition of Co on Ge, in which the Ge substrate was maintained at 350°C during deposition. The other method was solid state reaction, in which the deposition of Co on Ge was carried out at room temperature followed by annealing to higher temperatures. During reactive deposition, the deposited Co reacted with Ge to form nanosized 3D Co 5Ge7 islands. During solid state reaction, a continuous epitaxial Co5Ge7 film on the (001) Ge

  1. Nanostructured PLD-grown gadolinia doped ceria: Chemical and structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka; Wang, Hsiang-Jen; Heiroth, Sebastian;

    2011-01-01

    The morphology as well as the spatially resolved elemental and chemical characterization of 10 mol% gadolinia doped ceria (CGO10) structures prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique are investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy accompanied with electron energy loss...

  2. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peddie, Christopher J.; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Melia, Charlotte [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Cell Biophysics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Marrison, Jo [Department of Biology, The University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Carzaniga, Raffaella [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Domart, Marie-Charlotte [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Cell Biophysics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); O' Toole, Peter [Department of Biology, The University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Larijani, Banafshe [Cell Biophysics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Cell Biophysics Laboratory, Unidad de Biofísica (CSIC-UPV/EHU),Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao (Spain); Collinson, Lucy M. [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and scanning electron microscope. We show, for the first time, that GFP is stable and active in resin sections in vacuo. We applied our protocol to study the subcellular localisation of diacylglycerol (DAG), a modulator of membrane morphology and membrane dynamics in nuclear envelope assembly. We show that DAG is localised to the nuclear envelope, nucleoplasmic reticulum and curved tips of the Golgi apparatus. With these developments, we demonstrate that integrated imaging is maturing into a powerful tool for accurate molecular localisation to structure. - Highlights: • GFP and mCherry fluorescence are preserved in heavy-metal stained mammalian cells embedded in resin • Fluorophores are stable and intensity is sufficient for detection in ultrathin sections • Overlay of separate LM and EM images from the same ultrathin section improves CLEM protein localisation precision • GFP is stable and active in the vacuum of an integrated light and scanning EM • Integrated light and electron microscopy shows new subcellular locations of the lipid diacylglycerol.

  3. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and scanning electron microscope. We show, for the first time, that GFP is stable and active in resin sections in vacuo. We applied our protocol to study the subcellular localisation of diacylglycerol (DAG), a modulator of membrane morphology and membrane dynamics in nuclear envelope assembly. We show that DAG is localised to the nuclear envelope, nucleoplasmic reticulum and curved tips of the Golgi apparatus. With these developments, we demonstrate that integrated imaging is maturing into a powerful tool for accurate molecular localisation to structure. - Highlights: • GFP and mCherry fluorescence are preserved in heavy-metal stained mammalian cells embedded in resin • Fluorophores are stable and intensity is sufficient for detection in ultrathin sections • Overlay of separate LM and EM images from the same ultrathin section improves CLEM protein localisation precision • GFP is stable and active in the vacuum of an integrated light and scanning EM • Integrated light and electron microscopy shows new subcellular locations of the lipid diacylglycerol

  4. Adipocyte size and cellular expression of caveolar proteins analyzed by confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulstrøm, Veronica; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Vinten, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    caveolin-1 along with the size of individual adipocytes. The technique was applied on collagenase isolated adipocytes from ad libitum fed Sprague-Dawley rats of different age (4-26 wk) and weight (103-629 g). We found that cellular expression of caveolar proteins was variable (SD of log expression in the...... range from 0.25 to 0.65). Regression analysis of protein expression on adipocyte size revealed that the expression of the caveolar proteins cavin-1 and caveolin-1 on adipocytes from individual rats was tightly related to adipocyte cell surface area (mean coefficient of regression was 0.83 for cavin and....... The different relation between adipocyte size and cellular expression levels of caveolar proteins within and between individuals of different age shows that caveolar density is an age-sensitive characteristic of adipocytes....

  5. High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy on macromolecular complexes and cell organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenger, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    collection exposes its specimens to a large electron dose, which is particularly problematic for frozen-hydrated samples. Currently, cryo-electron tomography is a rapidly emerging technology, on one end driven by the newest developments of hardware such as super-stabile microscopy stages as well as the latest generation of direct electron detectors and cameras. On the other end, success also strongly depends on new software developments on all kinds of fronts such as tilt-series alignment and back-projection procedures that are all adapted to the very low-dose and therefore very noisy primary data. Here, we will review the status quo of cryo-electron microscopy and discuss the future of cellular cryo-electron tomography from data collection to data analysis, CTF-correction of tilt-series, post-tomographic sub-volume averaging, and 3-D particle classification. We will also discuss the pros and cons of plunge freezing of cellular specimens to vitrified sectioning procedures and their suitability for post-tomographic volume averaging despite multiple artifacts that may distort specimens to some degree. PMID:24390311

  6. Characterization of Photocatylitically Active TiO2 by Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bakardjieva, Snejana; Šubrt, Jan; Štengl, Václav; Perez-Maqueda, L. A.; Alario-Franco, M. A.

    Princeton, New Jersey : University of Lecce, 2001, s. 463-464. ISBN 1-58949-003-7. [Multinational Congress on Electron Microscopy /5./. Lecce (IT), 20.09.2001-25.09.2001] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : photocatylitically active TiO2 * electron microscopy * homogenous precipitation Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  7. A toolkit for the characterization of CCD cameras for transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulovic, M.; Rieger, B.; Van Vliet, L.J.; Koster, A.J.; Ravelli, R.B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are nowadays commonly utilized in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for applications in life sciences. Direct access to digitized images has revolutionized the use of electron microscopy, sparking developments such as automated collection of tomographic data, focal

  8. The New Electron Microscopy: Cells and Molecules in Three Dimensions | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI recently announced the launch of the new National Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility (NCEF) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). The launch comes while cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is enjoying the spotlight as a newly emerging, rapidly evolving technology with the potential to revolutionize the field of structural biology. Read more...

  9. Development of a quantitative Correlative Light Electron Microscopy technique to study GLUT4 trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson, Lorna; Tavaré, Jeremy; Verkade, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Correlative Light Electron Microscopy (CLEM) combines advantages of light microscopy and electron microscopy in one experiment to deliver information above and beyond the capability of either modality alone. There are many different CLEM techniques, each having its own special advantages but also its technical challenges. It is however the biological question that (should) drive(s) the development and application of a specific CLEM technique in order to provide the answer. Here we describe th...

  10. High Data Output and Automated 3D Correlative Light–Electron Microscopy Method

    OpenAIRE

    Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Gagliani, Maria C; Canfora, Michela; Cortese, Katia; Frosi, Fabio; Santangelo, Clara; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Boccacci, Patrizia; Diaspro, Alberto; Tacchetti, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Correlative light/electron microscopy (CLEM) allows the simultaneous observation of a given subcellular structure by fluorescence light microscopy (FLM) and electron microscopy. The use of this approach is becoming increasingly frequent in cell biology. In this study, we report on a new high data output CLEM method based on the use of cryosections. We successfully applied the method to analyze the structure of rough and smooth Russell bodies used as model systems. The major advantages of our ...

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor subunit locations determined in hydrated cells with environmental scanning electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Peckys, Diana B.; Jean-Pierre Baudoin; Magdalena Eder; Ulf Werner; Niels de Jonge

    2013-01-01

    Imaging single epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in intact cells is presently limited by the available microscopy methods. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) of whole cells in hydrated state in combination with specific labeling with gold nanoparticles was used to localize activated EGFRs in the plasma membranes of COS7 and A549 cells. The use of a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector yielded a spatial resolution of 3 nm, sufficient to identify the l...

  12. Hepatic Subcellular Compartmentation of Cytoplasmic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Determined by Immunogold Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kuixiong; Cardell, Emma Lou; Morris, Randal E.; Giffin, Bruce F.; Cardell, Robert R.

    1995-08-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is the rate-limiting gluconeogenic enzyme and in liver occurs in a lobular gradient from periportal to pericentral regions. The subcellular distribution of cytoplasmic PEPCK molecules within hepatocytes and its relationship to organelles have not been determined previously. In this study, we have used immunogold electron microscopy to evaluate the subcellar distribution of the enzyme, in addition to brightfield and epipolarized light microscopy. Cryosections (10 [mu]m) of perfusion-fixed rat liver were collected on silanated slides and immunostained using goat anti-rat PEPCK followed by 5-nm gold-labeled secondary and tertiary antibodies. Additionally, free-floating vibratome sections (25, 50, and 100 [mu]m) of perfusion-immersion-fixed rat liver were immunogold stained using goat anti-rat PEPCK and 5-nm gold-labeled secondary antibody, with and without silver enhancement. The immunogold labeled sections from both procedures were embedded in epoxy resin for the preparation of thin sections for electron microscopy. The results showed that the gold-labeled antibodies penetrated the entire thickness of cryosections, resulting in a high signal for PEPCK, but membranes in general, the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in particular, were not identifiable as electron dense unit membranes. On the other hand, the vibratome sections of well-fixed tissue allowed good visualization of the ultrastructure of cellular organelles, with the smooth endoplasmic reticulum appearing as vesicles and tubules with electron dense unit membranes; however, the penetration of the gold-labeled antibody was limited to cells at the surface of the vibratome sections. In both procedures, PEPCK, as indicated by gold particles, is predominantly in the glycogen areas of the cytosome and not in mitochondria, nuclei, Golgi apparatus, or other cell organelles. Hepatocytes in periportal regions have a compact subcellular distribution of PEPCK shown by gold particles

  13. Model-based traction force microscopy reveals differential tension in cellular actin bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soiné, Jérôme R D; Brand, Christoph A; Stricker, Jonathan; Oakes, Patrick W; Gardel, Margaret L; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2015-03-01

    Adherent cells use forces at the cell-substrate interface to sense and respond to the physical properties of their environment. These cell forces can be measured with traction force microscopy which inverts the equations of elasticity theory to calculate them from the deformations of soft polymer substrates. We introduce a new type of traction force microscopy that in contrast to traditional methods uses additional image data for cytoskeleton and adhesion structures and a biophysical model to improve the robustness of the inverse procedure and abolishes the need for regularization. We use this method to demonstrate that ventral stress fibers of U2OS-cells are typically under higher mechanical tension than dorsal stress fibers or transverse arcs. PMID:25748431

  14. Cellular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress: live cell fluorescence microscopy of pseudorabies virus exocytosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hogue, Ian B.; Jens B Bosse; Jiun-Ruey Hu; Thiberge, Stephan Y.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2014-01-01

    Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV) particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluo...

  15. Atom location using scanning transmission electron microscopy based on electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The technique of atom location by channelling enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI) using cross section data, measured as a function of electron beam orientation, has been widely implemented by many researchers. The accurate application of ALCHEMI, usually based on energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), requires knowledge, from first principles, of the relative delocalization of the inner-shell ionization interaction (see for example Oxley and Allen, 1998; Oxley et al., 1999). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) also provides information about the location of atoms of different types within the crystal lattice. Unlike high angle annular dark field (HAADF), EELS provides a unique signal for each atom type. In conjunction with highly focused probes, allowing near atomic resolution, this makes possible, in principle, the application of ALCHEMI like techniques to STEM images to determine the distribution of impurities within the unit cell. The accurate interpretation of STEM results requires that both the inner-shell ionization interaction and resulting ionization cross section or image be correctly modelled. We present model calculations demonstrating the in principle application of ALCHEMI type techniques to STEM images pertinent to EELS. The inner-shell ionisation interaction is modelled using Hartree-Fock wave functions to describe the atomic bound states and Hartree-Slater wave functions to describe the continuum states. The wave function within the crystal is calculated using boundary conditions appropriate for a highly focussed probe (Rossouw and Allen, 2001) and STEM images or ionisation cross sections are simulated using an inelastic cross section formulation that correctly accounts for the contribution from both dynamical electrons and those dechannelled by absorptive scattering processes such as thermal diffuse scattering (TDS). Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy

  16. Soft X-ray Tomography and Cryogenic Light Microscopy: The Cool Combination in Cellular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    McDermott, Gerry; Le Gros, Mark A.; Knoechel, Christian G.; Uchida, Maho; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2009-01-01

    Soft x-ray tomography (SXT) is ideally suited to imaging sub-cellular architecture and organization, particularly in eukaryotic cells. SXT is similar in concept to the well-established medical diagnostic technique computed axial tomography (CAT), except SXT is capable of imaging with a spatial resolution of 50 nm, or better. In soft x-ray tomography (SXT) cells are imaged using photons from a region of the spectrum known as the ‘water window’. This results in quantitative, high-contrast image...

  17. Analysis of acute impact of oleoresin capsicum on rat nasal mucosa using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catli, Tolgahan; Acar, Mustafa; Olgun, Yüksel; Dağ, İlknur; Cengiz, Betül Peker; Cingi, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of acute cellular changes seen in nasal mucosa of Wistar-Albino rats exposed to different doses of oleoresin capsicum for various time periods by means of scanning electron microscopy. Thirty-five Wistar-Albino rats were divided into five groups of seven rats each. 6-gram oleoresin capsicum per second was sprayed into cages of the groups except group 1. Spray times and duration of exposure to pepper gasses were different for each group. Thirty minutes after the exposure, the animals were killed and specimens from their nasal mucosas were harvested and examined under scanning electron microscope. Mucosal damage was scored from 0-4 points. Mean values of nasal mucosa damage scores of the groups were calculated and compared statistically. Average damage scores of the groups exposed to identical doses of oleoresin capsicum for various exposure times were compared and a statistically significant difference was seen between Groups 2 and 3 (p 0.05). Average damage scores of the groups exposed to various doses for identical exposure times were compared, and statistically significant differences were observed between Groups 2 and 4 and also Groups 3 and 5 (p pepper gas exerts destructive changes on rat nasal mucosa. The extent of these destructive changes increases with the prolonged exposure to higher doses. Besides, exposure time also stands out as an influential factor on the extent of the destructive changes. PMID:24627077

  18. Diversity of extracellular vesicles in human ejaculates revealed by cryo-electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna L. Höög

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human ejaculates contain extracellular vesicles (EVs, that to a large extent are considered to originate from the prostate gland, and are often denominated “prostasomes.” These EVs are important for human fertility, for example by promoting sperm motility and by inducing immune tolerance of the female immune system to the spermatozoa. So far, the EVs present in human ejaculate have not been studied in their native state, inside the seminal fluid without prior purification and isolation procedures. Using cryo-electron microscopy and tomography, we performed a comprehensive inventory of human ejaculate EVs. The sample was neither centrifuged, fixed, filtered or sectioned, nor were heavy metals added. Approximately 1,500 extracellular structures were imaged and categorized. The extracellular environment of human ejaculate was found to be diverse, with 5 major subcategories of EVs and 6 subcategories of extracellular membrane compartments, including lamellar bodies. Furthermore, 3 morphological features, including electron density, double membrane bilayers and coated surface, are described in all subcategories. This study reveals that the extracellular environment in human ejaculate is multifaceted. Several novel morphological EV subcategories are identified and clues to their cellular origin may be found in their morphology. This inventory is therefore important for developing future experimental approaches, and to interpret previously published data to understand the role of EVs for human male fertility.

  19. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM

  20. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  1. Exploring the cellular and tissue uptake of nanomaterials in a range of biological samples using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Helinor J.; Mouras, Rabah; Brown, David M.; Elfick, Alistair; Stone, Vicki

    2015-12-01

    The uptake of nanomaterials (NMs) by cells is critical in determining their potential biological impact, whether beneficial or detrimental. Thus, investigation of NM internalization by cells is a common consideration in hazard and efficacy studies. There are currently a number of approaches that are routinely used to investigate NM-cell interactions, each of which have their own advantages and limitations. Ideally, imaging modalities used to investigate NM uptake by cells should not require the NM to be labelled (e.g. with fluorophores) to facilitate its detection. We present a multimodal imaging approach employing a combination of label-free microscopies that can be used to investigate NM-cell interactions. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy was used in combination with either two-photon photoluminescence or four-wave mixing (FWM) to visualize the uptake of gold or titanium dioxide NMs respectively. Live and fixed cell imaging revealed that NMs were internalized by J774 macrophage and C3A hepatocyte cell lines (15-31 μg ml-1). Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to NMs (intratracheal instillation, 62 μg) and NMs were detected in blood and lung leucocytes, lung and liver tissue, demonstrating that NMs could translocate from the exposure site. Obtained data illustrate that multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy may help overcome current challenges in the assessment of NM cellular uptake and biodistribution. It is therefore a powerful tool that can be used to investigate unlabelled NM cellular and tissue uptake in three dimensions, requires minimal sample preparation, and is applicable to live and fixed cells.

  2. Atomic force microscopy-coupled microcoils for cellular-scale nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousoulis, Charilaos; Maleki, Teimour; Ziaie, Babak; Neu, Corey P.

    2013-04-01

    We present the coupling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies to enable topographical, mechanical, and chemical profiling of biological samples. Here, we fabricate and perform proof-of-concept testing of radiofrequency planar microcoils on commercial AFM cantilevers. The sensitive region of the coil was estimated to cover an approximate volume of 19.4 × 103 μm3 (19.4 pl). Functionality of the spectroscopic module of the prototype device is illustrated through the detection of 1Η resonance in deionized water. The acquired spectra depict combined NMR capability with AFM that may ultimately enable biophysical and biochemical studies at the single cell level.

  3. High bandwidth secondary electron detection in variable pressure scanning electron microscopy using a Frisch grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, S. W.; Phillips, M. R.

    2008-03-01

    The bandwidth and contrast of secondary electron (SE) images obtained using variable pressure scanning electron microscopy are enhanced when a grounded Frisch grid is placed between the SE detecting anode and the negatively biased stage. The improvement in SE image quality occurs as a consequence of the grounded Frisch grid electrostatically screening the 'slow' induced ion current signal, generated below the grid, from the induced current detected above the grid by the anode. Ion induced artefacts, such as image smearing at fast scan rates, are virtually eliminated using a Frisch grid. Gas amplification data are presented to illustrate that gas gain can be optimized by varying the Frisch grid-stage (amplification region) separation Frisch grid-anode (drift region) separation and stage bias.

  4. Strain mapping in MOSFETS by high-resolution electron microscopy and electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present two methods for mapping strains in MOSFETs at the nanometer scale. Aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) coupled with geometric phase analysis (GPA) provides sufficient signal-to-noise to accurately determine strain fields across the active regions of devices. Finite element method (FEM) simulations are used to confirm our measurements. The field of view is however limited to about 100 nm2. To overcome this, we have developed a new technique called dark-field holography based on off-axis electron holography and dark-field imaging. This new technique provides us a better strain resolution than HRTEM, a spatial resolution of 4 nm and a field of view of 1 μm

  5. Strain mapping in MOSFETS by high-resolution electron microscopy and electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huee, Florian [CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Hytch, Martin [CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)], E-mail: hytch@cemes.fr; Houdellier, Florent; Snoeck, Etienne; Claverie, Alain [CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2008-12-05

    We present two methods for mapping strains in MOSFETs at the nanometer scale. Aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) coupled with geometric phase analysis (GPA) provides sufficient signal-to-noise to accurately determine strain fields across the active regions of devices. Finite element method (FEM) simulations are used to confirm our measurements. The field of view is however limited to about 100 nm{sup 2}. To overcome this, we have developed a new technique called dark-field holography based on off-axis electron holography and dark-field imaging. This new technique provides us a better strain resolution than HRTEM, a spatial resolution of 4 nm and a field of view of 1 {mu}m.

  6. High bandwidth secondary electron detection in variable pressure scanning electron microscopy using a Frisch grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bandwidth and contrast of secondary electron (SE) images obtained using variable pressure scanning electron microscopy are enhanced when a grounded Frisch grid is placed between the SE detecting anode and the negatively biased stage. The improvement in SE image quality occurs as a consequence of the grounded Frisch grid electrostatically screening the 'slow' induced ion current signal, generated below the grid, from the induced current detected above the grid by the anode. Ion induced artefacts, such as image smearing at fast scan rates, are virtually eliminated using a Frisch grid. Gas amplification data are presented to illustrate that gas gain can be optimized by varying the Frisch grid-stage (amplification region) separation Frisch grid-anode (drift region) separation and stage bias

  7. New fluorogenic dyes for analysis of cellular processes by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Kalina; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Mihaylova, Nikolina; Stoitsova, Stoyanka; Chausheva, Stela; Vasilev, Aleksey; Lesev, Nedyalko; Dimitrova, Petya; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging by flow cytometry are two of the fastest growing areas in the medical and biological research. Innovations in fluorescent chemistry and synthesis of new dye probes are closely related to the development of service equipment such as light sources, and detection techniques. Among compounds known as fluorescent labels, the cyanine-based dyes have become widely used since they have high excitation coefficients, narrow emission bands and high fluorescence upon binding to nucleic acids. The key methods for evaluation of apoptosis and cell cycle allow measuring DNA content by several flow cytometric techniques. We have synthesized new monomethine cyanine dyes and have characterized their applicability for staining of live and/or apoptotic cells. Imaging experiments by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have been also performed. Two of the dyes have shown high-affinity binding to the nuclei at high dilutions, up to 10(-9)M. Flow cytometry and CLSM have confirmed that these dyes labeled selectively non-living, e.g. ethanol-fixed cells that makes them appropriate for estimations of cell viability and apoptosis. The novel structures proved to be appropriate also for analysis of the cell cycle. PMID:24231377

  8. Contribution of scanning Auger microscopy to electron beam damage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron bombardment can produce surface modifications of the analysed sample. The electron beam effects on solid surfaces which have been discussed in the published literature can be classified into the following four categories: (1) heating and its consequent effects, (2) charge accumulation in insulators and its consequent effects, (3) electron stimulated adsorption (ESA), and (4) electron stimulated desorption and/or decomposition (ESD). In order to understand the physico-chemical processes which take place under electron irradiation in an Al-O system, we have carried out experiments in which, effects, such as heating, charging and gas contamination, were absent. Our results point out the role of an enhanced surface diffusion of oxygen during electron bombardment of an Al (111) sample. The importance of this phenomenon and the contribution of near-elastic scattering of the primary electrons (5 keV) to the increase of the oxidation degree observed on Al (111) are discussed, compared to the generally studied effects

  9. Hot Electron Scattering in Thin Metal Films Utilizing Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcan, Christopher; Nolting, Westly; Balsano, Robert; Labella, Vincent

    Electron scattering in nm-thick metal films has fundamental and technological importance. Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM) an STM based technique can be utilized to measure the scattering rate and understand the scattering mechanisms. By injecting electrons from the STM tip in the energy range of 0.2 eV- 1.5 eV into the metal base of a metal semiconductor diode and measuring the amount of current collected in the semiconductor a Schottky barrier height can be measured. In addition, by measuring the decay in the collector or BEEM current vs. metal film thickness, an electron attenuation length can be measured. One question has always been; what are these BEEM attenuation lengths sensitive to? Intrinsic properties of the metal, or extrinsic effects such as the structure of the film? By measuring the attenuation length of W and Cr and comparing to prior measurements of Cu, Ag, Au a comparison between the BEEM attenuation length and resistivity can be achieved over an order of magnitude in resistivity. The results show an inverse relationship that one expects for mean free path and resistivity, indicating that BEEM measurements are sensitive to the intrinsic properties of the metal and not solely the structure of the films.

  10. Morphology of gills of the seawater fish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz (Ariidae by scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daura R. Eiras-Stofella

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Gills of the seawater fish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829 were submitted to routine processing for observation in scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The wrinkled surface of the gill filaments showed well-defined cellular ultrastructures. Microridges on cellular surface were projected over all gill structures, including respiratory lamellae. Chloride cells were usually at primary lamellae. Some rodlet cells were found. Mucous secretory cells were uncommon at all parts of the gill arches. The pharyngeal region of the gill arches showed a lot of taste buds but no spines. There were small and strong rakers. Such morphology is indicative of fishes that swallow small food but do not have filtering habits. At the ultrastructural level the gills of C. spixii presented the typical morphological pattern of Teleostei fishes.

  11. Structure studies by electron microscopy and electron diffraction at Physics Department, University of Oslo, 1976-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the reasearch activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Departmen, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  12. Engineering Electrochemical Setups for Electron Microscopy of Liquid Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eric; Burrows, Andrew

    This work focuses on creating tools for imaging liquid samples at atmospheric pressure and room temperature in two different electron microscopes; the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The main focus of the project was the fabrication of the two sy......-SEM cell. In TEM, holography of graphene multi-layer sheets has been performed and the phase change per sheet has been determined as a step towards in-situ holography of liquid through graphene....

  13. Analytical electron microscopy characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 μm in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level

  14. Analytical electron microscopy characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, E.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

    1994-10-01

    A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 {mu}m in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

  15. Characterisation of bacterial/yeast biofilms by scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubanová, Kamila; Růžička, F.; Nebesářová, J.; Klingauf, J.; Samek, Ota; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    Manchester: The Royal Microscopical Society, 2012, s. 671-672. ISBN 978-0-9502463-5-2. [EMC 2012. European Microscopy Congress /15./. Manchester (US), 16.09.2012-21.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103; GA ČR GAP205/11/1687 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : biofilm * SEM * cryo-SEM Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  16. Identification of magnetic Fe-Ti oxides in marine sediments by electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, C.; Pennock, G.M.; Drury, M.R.; Engelmann, R.; Lattard, D.; Garming, J.F.L.; Dobeneck, T. von; Dekkers, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    In paleomagnetic and environmental magnetic studies the magnetomineralogical identification is usually based on a set of rock magnetic parameters, complemented by crystallographic and chemical information retrieved from X-ray diffraction (XRD), (electron) microscopy or energy dispersive spectroscopy

  17. A novel approach for scanning electron microscopy of colloidal gold- labeled cell surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for the use of scanning electron microscopy on the surface of gold-labeled cells. It includes the use of 45- or 20-nm colloidal gold marker conjugated with Staphylococcal protein A. The marker is best recognized on the basis of its atomic number contrast by using the backscattered electron imaging mode of the scanning electron microscope. When the backscattered electron signal is mixed with the secondary electron signal, an optimum correlation between the distribution of...

  18. Investigations of surface plasmon resonances by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy methods

    OpenAIRE

    Ögüt, Burcu

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concentrates on different plasmonic phenomena which are observed with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) techniques offering high energy and spatial resolution. Plasmonic coupling behaviour of nanoholes and nanoparticles having rectangular, circular, triangular etc. shapes were investigated using different techniques. The electromagnetic nature of the ob...

  19. Low energy (0 to 30 eV) scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Pokorná, Zuzana

    Vienna : IAP, 2015. s. 52. [Low Energy Electrons: Dynamics and Correlation near Surfaces and Nanostructures (LEE2015). 07.09.2015-11.09.2015, Herstein] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  20. Theoretical study of ferroelectric nanoparticles using phase reconstructed electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phatak, C.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Beleggia, Marco;

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric nanostructures are important for a variety of applications in electronic and electro-optical devices, including nonvolatile memories and thin-film capacitors. These applications involve stability and switching of polarization using external stimuli, such as electric fields. We present...... a theoretical model describing how the shape of a nanoparticle affects its polarization in the absence of screening charges, and quantify the electron-optical phase shift for detecting ferroelectric signals with phase-sensitive techniques in a transmission electron microscope. We provide an example...... phase shift computation for a uniformly polarized prolate ellipsoid with varying aspect ratio in the absence of screening charges....

  1. Quantitative measurement of orbital angular momentum in electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, L; Guzzinati, G; Verbeeck, J

    2014-01-01

    Electron vortex beams have been predicted to enable atomic scale magnetic information measurement, via transfer of orbital angular momentum. Research so far has focussed on developing production techniques and applications of these beams. However, methods to measure the outgoing orbital angular momentum distribution are also a crucial requirement towards this goal. Here, we use a method to obtain the orbital angular momentum decomposition of an electron beam, using a multi-pinhole interferometer. We demonstrate both its ability to accurately measure orbital angular momentum distribution, and its experimental limitations when used in a transmission electron microscope.

  2. Resolution enhancement in transmission electron microscopy with 60-kV monochromated electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, Shigeyuki; Mukai, Masaki; Sawada, Hidetaka [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Suenaga, Kazutomo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

    2016-01-04

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at low accelerating voltages is useful to obtain images with low irradiation damage. For a low accelerating voltage, linear information transfer, which determines the resolution for observation of single-layered materials, is largely limited by defocus spread, which improves when a narrow energy spread is used in the electron source. In this study, we have evaluated the resolution of images obtained at 60 kV by TEM performed with a monochromated electron source. The defocus spread has been evaluated by comparing diffractogram tableaux from TEM images obtained under nonmonochromated and monochromated illumination. The information limits for different energy spreads were precisely measured by using diffractograms with a large beam tilt. The result shows that the information limit reaches 0.1 nm with an energy width of 0.10 eV. With this monochromated source and a higher-order aberration corrector, we have obtained images of single carbon atoms in a graphene sheet by TEM at 60 kV.

  3. Resolution enhancement in transmission electron microscopy with 60-kV monochromated electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at low accelerating voltages is useful to obtain images with low irradiation damage. For a low accelerating voltage, linear information transfer, which determines the resolution for observation of single-layered materials, is largely limited by defocus spread, which improves when a narrow energy spread is used in the electron source. In this study, we have evaluated the resolution of images obtained at 60 kV by TEM performed with a monochromated electron source. The defocus spread has been evaluated by comparing diffractogram tableaux from TEM images obtained under nonmonochromated and monochromated illumination. The information limits for different energy spreads were precisely measured by using diffractograms with a large beam tilt. The result shows that the information limit reaches 0.1 nm with an energy width of 0.10 eV. With this monochromated source and a higher-order aberration corrector, we have obtained images of single carbon atoms in a graphene sheet by TEM at 60 kV

  4. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karreman, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope

  5. Auxetic cellular structures through selective electron-beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerdtfeger, J. [Institute of Advanced Materials and Processes (ZMP), University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Dr.-Mack-Str. 81, 90762 Fuerth (Germany); Heinl, P.; Singer, R.F.; Koerner, C. [Institute of Materials Science and Technology (WTM), University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    This paper is concerned with the build up and characterization of well-defined auxetic structures (negative Poisson ratio) from Ti-6Al-4V through selective electron-beam melting (SEBM). SEBM is a rapid prototyping/manufacturing technique allowing for the direct translation of CAD models to real world objects. Using SEBM we are able to produce structures of arbitrary geometry in a well-defined manner. Here, we introduce a self-designed 3D-auxetic structure and determine its mechanical properties. We also address the dependence of Young's modulus on relative density. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Quantitative measurement of orbital angular momentum in electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, L.; Béché, A.; Guzzinati, G.; Verbeeck, J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Electron vortex beams have been predicted to enable atomic scale magnetic information measurement, via transfer of orbital angular momentum. Research so far has focused on developing production techniques and applications of these beams. However, methods to measure the outgoing orbital angular momentum distribution are also a crucial requirement towards this goal. Here, we use a method to obtain the orbital angular momentum decomposition of an electron beam, using a multipinhole int...

  7. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Barnaby D.A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Richard D Robinson

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the cu...

  8. A Nanoaquarium for in situ Electron Microscopy in Liquid Media

    OpenAIRE

    Grogan, Joseph M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of many nanoscale processes occurring in liquids such as colloidal crystal formation, aggregation, nanowire growth, electrochemical deposition, and biological interactions would benefit greatly from real-time, in situ imaging with the nanoscale resolution of transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs). However, these imaging tools cannot readily be used to observe processes occurring in liquid media without addressing two e...

  9. Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy Reveals the HAS3-Induced Dorsal Plasma Membrane Ruffles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Rilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan is a linear sugar polymer synthesized by three isoforms of hyaluronan synthases (HAS1, 2, and 3 that forms a hydrated scaffold around cells and is an essential component of the extracellular matrix. The morphological changes of cells induced by active hyaluronan synthesis are well recognized but not studied in detail with high resolution before. We have previously found that overexpression of HAS3 induces growth of long plasma membrane protrusions that act as platforms for hyaluronan synthesis. The study of these thin and fragile protrusions is challenging, and they are difficult to preserve by fixation unless they are adherent to the substrate. Thus their structure and regulation are still partly unclear despite careful imaging with different microscopic methods in several cell types. In this study, correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM was utilized to correlate the GFP-HAS3 signal and the surface ultrastructure of cells in order to study in detail the morphological changes induced by HAS3 overexpression. Surprisingly, this method revealed that GFP-HAS3 not only localizes to ruffles but in fact induces dorsal ruffle formation. Dorsal ruffles regulate diverse cellular functions, such as motility, regulation of glucose metabolism, spreading, adhesion, and matrix degradation, the same functions driven by active hyaluronan synthesis.

  10. Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy Reveals the HAS3-Induced Dorsal Plasma Membrane Ruffles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilla, Kirsi; Koistinen, Arto

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a linear sugar polymer synthesized by three isoforms of hyaluronan synthases (HAS1, 2, and 3) that forms a hydrated scaffold around cells and is an essential component of the extracellular matrix. The morphological changes of cells induced by active hyaluronan synthesis are well recognized but not studied in detail with high resolution before. We have previously found that overexpression of HAS3 induces growth of long plasma membrane protrusions that act as platforms for hyaluronan synthesis. The study of these thin and fragile protrusions is challenging, and they are difficult to preserve by fixation unless they are adherent to the substrate. Thus their structure and regulation are still partly unclear despite careful imaging with different microscopic methods in several cell types. In this study, correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) was utilized to correlate the GFP-HAS3 signal and the surface ultrastructure of cells in order to study in detail the morphological changes induced by HAS3 overexpression. Surprisingly, this method revealed that GFP-HAS3 not only localizes to ruffles but in fact induces dorsal ruffle formation. Dorsal ruffles regulate diverse cellular functions, such as motility, regulation of glucose metabolism, spreading, adhesion, and matrix degradation, the same functions driven by active hyaluronan synthesis. PMID:26448759

  11. Abstracts of the 9. Colloquium of the Brazilian Society of Electron Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of abstracts is presented, reporting the use of electron microscopy for the study of: crystal structures and defects; corrosion on several metal alloys; ultrastructural changes in biological materials. (C.L.B.)

  12. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  13. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Individual Carbon Nanotube Breakdown Caused by Joule Heating in Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Gudnason, S.B.; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier;

    2006-01-01

    We present repeated structural and electrical measurements on individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes, alternating between electrical measurements under ambient conditions and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The multiwalled carbon nanotubes made by chemical vapor deposition were manipulated...

  14. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Hartsuiker; P. van Es; W. Petersen; T.G. van Leeuwen; L.W.M.M. Terstappen; C. Otto

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  15. Electron microscopy observations of surface morphologies and particle arrangement behaviors of magnetic fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN; Hui; (沈辉); XU; Xueqing; (徐雪青); WANG; Wei; (王伟)

    2003-01-01

    The surface morphology of quasi-periodic stripe-shaped patterns of magnetite fluids was observed in applied perpendicular magnetic fields by means of scanning electron microscopy. The nanoparticles of the magnetite fluids are arranged in oriental quasilinear chains in applied perpendicular magnetic fields as observed using transmission electron microscopy. This arrangement results from particle-particle interactions and particle-carrier liquids interactions, which are eventually controlled by the magnetic fields distribution.

  16. 3D Imaging of mammalian cells with ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, Jurgen A. W.; Shi, Dan; Kim, Sang; Bliss, Donald; Milne, Jacqueline L. S.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the hierarchical organization of molecules and organelles within the interior of large eukaryotic cells is a challenge of fundamental interest in cell biology. We are using ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IA-SEM) to visualize this hierarchical organization in an approach that combines focused ion-beam milling with scanning electron microscopy. Here, we extend our previous studies on imaging yeast cells to image subcellular architecture in human melanoma cells and mela...

  17. 2. Brazilian Congress on Cell Biology and 7. Brazilian Colloquium on Electron Microscopy - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunology, virology, bacteriology, genetics and protozoology are some of the subjects treated in the 2. Brazilian Congress on Cell Biology. Studies using radioisotopic techniques and ultrastructural cytological studies are presented. Use of optical - and electron microscopy in some of these studies is discussed. In the 7. Brazilian Colloquium on Electron Microscopy, the application of this technique to materials science is discussed (failure analysis in metallurgy, energy dispersion X-ray analysis, etc). (I.C.R.)

  18. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Elizabeth S. Howe; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy.

  19. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy. PMID:25581799

  20. Stereological characterization of the γ' particles in a nickel base superalloy: Comparison between transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critical comparison of transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques was provided concerning size measurements of γ' precipitates in a nickel-base superalloy. The divergence between results is explained in terms of the resolution limit for atomic force microscopy, linked both to the tip dimension and the diameter of the investigated particles

  1. In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdi, Beata L.; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R.; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A.; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  2. In-Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdi, Beata L [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Gu, Meng [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Parent, Lucas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Xu, WU [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Nasybulin, Eduard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Chen, Xilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL; Xu, Pinghong [University of California, Davis; Welch, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Abellan, Patricia [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Zhang, Ji-Guang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Evans, James E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Browning, Nigel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  3. Center for Electron Microscopy, CEN-DTU; The building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsewell, Andy

    Center for electron nanoscopy, CEN●DTU; The building Andy Horsewell Technical University of Denmark, DTU Materials Technology, Building 204, 2800 Lyngby ABSTRACT CEN●DTU, having been given[1] the opportunity to create a world-class facility with a unique suite of electron microscopes, is in full...... environmental cell, to provide in-situ observations of gas-solid interactions at high temperatures. 2 dual beam FIB-FEGSEMs, both with EDS and one with EBSD will allow 3D image, composition and crystallographic reconstruction at sub-nanometer resolution. Additional electron microscopes, making 7 in all......, comprise a unique assembly of outstanding instruments for research, teaching and innovation. In order to operate at peak performance, such instruments place extreme demands on the stability of the environment around them. All of the following factors must be minimized through careful building design and...

  4. A theoretical analysis of ballistic electron emission microscopy: band structure effects and attenuation lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using quantum mechanical approach, we compute the ballistic electron emission microscopy current distribution in reciprocal space to compare experimental and theoretical spectroscopic I(V) curves. In the elastic limit, this formalism is a 'parameter free' representation of the problem. At low voltages, low temperatures, and for thin metallic layers, the elastic approximation is enough to explain the experiments (ballistic conditions). At low temperatures, inelastic effects can be taken into account approximately by introducing an effective electron-electron lifetime as an imaginary part in the energy. Ensemble Monte Carlo calculations were also performed to obtain ballistic electron emission microscopy currents in good agreement with the previous approach. (author)

  5. Image simulations of kinked vortices for transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved model of kinked vortices in high-Tc superconductors suitable for the interpretation of Fresnel or holographic observations carried out with a transmission electron microscope. A kinked vortex is composed of two displaced half-vortices, perpendicular to the film plane...... observations of high-Tc superconducting films, where the Fresnel contrast associated with some vortices showed a dumbbell like appearance. Here, we show that under suitable conditions the JV segment may reveal itself in Fresnel imaging or holographic phase mapping in a transmission electron microscope....

  6. Quark Matter - Attoscale Electron Microscopy of the Proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review experiments colliding electrons (/positrons) on protons at high energies at HERA, focusing on the ZEUS experiment. We describe the ZEUS detector, including its data acquisition system, and look at a specific part, namely the electronic system for its calorimeter readout control, in more detail. Data analysis is described, and results pertaining the proton structure is given. It is found that the naieve quark model cannot explain the results obtained at small fractional momentum, and this requires quantum chromodynamics. Also it is found that diffractive reactions, with large rapidity gaps, contribute substantially; efforts are being carried out to understand them

  7. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy in an Aberration-Corrected Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas W.; Wagner, Jakob B.

    2012-01-01

    -resolution imaging. A gaseous atmosphere in the pole-piece gap of the objective lens of the microscope alters both the incoming electron wave prior to interaction with the sample and the outgoing wave below the sample. Whereas conventional TEM samples are usually thin (below 100 nm), the gas in the environmental...

  8. Photoemission electron microscopy using extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new imaging setup, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with the temporal resolution of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains. The very short pulses were provided by high-harmonic generation and used to illuminate lithographic structures and Au nanoparticles, which, in turn, were imaged with a PEEM resolving features below 300 nm. We argue that the spatial resolution is limited by the lack of electron energy filtering in this particular demonstration experiment. Problems with extensive space charge effects, which can occur due to the low probe pulse repetition rate and extremely short duration, are solved by reducing peak intensity while maintaining a sufficient average intensity to allow imaging. Finally, a powerful femtosecond infrared (IR) beam was combined with the XUV beam in a pump-probe setup where delays could be varied from subfemtoseconds to picoseconds. The IR pump beam could induce multiphoton electron emission in resonant features on the surface. The interaction between the electrons emitted by the pump and probe pulses could be observed.

  9. In situ Electrical measurements in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudneva, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present thesis the combination of real-time electricalmeasurements on nano-sampleswith simultaneous examination by transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed. Application of an electrical current may lead to changes in the samples thus the possibility to correlate such changes with t

  10. Photoemission electron microscopy using extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse trains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, A.; Schwenke, J.; Fordell, T.; Luo, G.; Kluender, K.; Hilner, E.; Anttu, N.; Lundgren, E.; Mauritsson, J.; Andersen, J. N.; Xu, H. Q.; L' Huillier, A. [Department of Physics, Lund University, Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Zakharov, A. A. [MAX-lab, Lund University, Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-12-15

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new imaging setup, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with the temporal resolution of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains. The very short pulses were provided by high-harmonic generation and used to illuminate lithographic structures and Au nanoparticles, which, in turn, were imaged with a PEEM resolving features below 300 nm. We argue that the spatial resolution is limited by the lack of electron energy filtering in this particular demonstration experiment. Problems with extensive space charge effects, which can occur due to the low probe pulse repetition rate and extremely short duration, are solved by reducing peak intensity while maintaining a sufficient average intensity to allow imaging. Finally, a powerful femtosecond infrared (IR) beam was combined with the XUV beam in a pump-probe setup where delays could be varied from subfemtoseconds to picoseconds. The IR pump beam could induce multiphoton electron emission in resonant features on the surface. The interaction between the electrons emitted by the pump and probe pulses could be observed.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of photocatalysts for water splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo; Laursen, Anders Bo; Dahl, Søren;

    necessary to understand the fundamentals of their reaction mechanisms, chemical behavior, structure and morphology before, during and after reaction using in situ investigations. Here, we focus on the in situ characterization of photocatalysts [1] in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM...

  12. A rapid method of reprocessing for electronic microscopy of cut histological in paraffin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and rapid method is described for re-processing of light microscopy paraffin sections to observe they under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) The paraffin-embedded tissue is sectioned and deparaffinized in toluene; then exposed to osmium vapor under microwave irradiation using a domestic microwave oven. The tissues were embedded in epoxy resin, polymerized and ultrathin sectioned. The method requires a relatively short time (about 30 minutes for TEM and 15 for SEM), and produces a reasonable quality of the ultrastructure for diagnostic purposes. (Author)

  13. Ultrasoft magnetic films investigated with Lorentz tranmission electron microscopy and electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hosson, Jeff Th M; Chechenin, Nicolai G; Alsem, Daan-Hein; Vystavel, Tomas; Kooi, Bart J; Chezan, Antoni R; Boerma, Dik O

    2002-08-01

    As a tribute to the scientific work of Professor Gareth Thomas in the field of structure-property relationships this paper delineates a new possibility of Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM) to study the magnetic properties of soft magnetic films. We show that in contrast to the traditional point of view, not only does the direction of the magnetization vector in nano-crystalline films make a correlated small-angle wiggling, but also the magnitude of the magnetization modulus fluctuates. This fluctuation produces a rapid modulation in the LTEM image. A novel analysis of the ripple structure in nano-crystalline Fe-Zr-N film corresponds to an amplitude of the transversal component of the magnetization deltaMy of 23 mT and a longitudinal fluctuation of the magnetization of the order of deltaMx = 30 mT. The nano-crystalline (Fe99Zr1)1-xNx films have been prepared by DC magnetron reactive sputtering with a thickness between 50 and 1000 nm. The grain size decreased monotonically with N content from typically 100 nm in the case of N-free films to less than 10 nm for films containing 8 at%. The specimens were examined with a JEOL 2010F 200 kV transmission electron microscope equipped with a post column energy filter (GIF 2000 Gatan Imaging Filter). For holography, the microscope is mounted with a biprism (JEOL biprism with a 0.6 microm diameter platinum wire). PMID:12533225

  14. Structural studies of glasses by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to present information about the applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED) for structural investigations of glasses. TEM investigations have been carried out on some binary and on a large number of ternary borate-telluride systems where glass-forming oxides, oxides of transitional elements and modified oxides of elements from I, II and III groups in the periodic table, are used as third component. The large experimental data given by TEM method allows the fine classification of the micro-heterogeneities. A special case of micro-heterogeneous structure with technological origin occurs near the boundary between the 2 immiscible liquids obtained at macro-phase separation. TEM was also used for the direct observation of the glass structure and we have studied the nano-scale structure of borate glasses obtained at slow and fast cooling of the melts. The ED possesses advantages for analysis of amorphous thin films or micro-pastilles and it is a very useful technique for study in materials containing simultaneously light and heavy elements. A comparison between the possibilities of the 3 diffraction techniques (X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and ED) is presented

  15. Structural analysis of biofilms and pellets of Aspergillus niger by confocal laser scanning microscopy and cryo scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, G K; Fujikawa, T; Tsuyumu, S; Gutiérrez-Correa, M

    2010-03-01

    Biomass organization of Aspergillus niger biofilms and pellets stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate were analyzed by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy and detectable differences between both types of growth were found. Three-dimensional surface plot analysis of biofilm structure revealed interstitial voids and vertical growth compared with pellets. Growth was lower in biofilm and according to fluorescence profile obtained, biomass density increased at the surface (0-20 microm). However, a decrease in fluorescence intensity was observed through optical sections of pellets even though growth was significantly higher than biofilms. Cryo scanning electron microscopy also showed structural differences. While biofilms showed a spatially ordered mycelium and well structured hyphal channels, pellets were characterized by an entangled and notoriously compacted mycelium. These findings revealed common structural characteristics between A. niger biofilms and those found in other microbial biofilms. Thus, biofilm microstructure may represent a key determinant of biofilm growth and physiology of filamentous fungi. PMID:19919894

  16. Correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  17. X-ray Microscopy as an Approach to Increasing Accuracy and Efficiency of Serial Block-face Imaging for Correlated Light and Electron Microscopy of Biological Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Bushong, Eric A; Johnson, Donald D.; Kim, Keun-Young; Terada, Masako; Hatori, Megumi; Peltier, Steven T.; Panda, Satchidananda; Merkle, Arno; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    The recently developed three-dimensional electron microscopic (EM) method of serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) has rapidly established itself as a powerful imaging approach. Volume EM imaging with this scanning electron microscopy (SEM) method requires intense staining of biological specimens with heavy metals to allow sufficient back-scatter electron signal and also to render specimens sufficiently conductive to control charging artifacts. These more extreme heavy metal s...

  18. Multi-color correlative light and electron microscopy using nanoparticle cathodoluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn, David R.; Zhang, Huiliang; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Schalek, Richard; Lo, Peggy K.; Trifonov, Alexei; Park, Hongkun; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2012-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy promises to combine molecular specificity with nanoscale imaging resolution. However, there are substantial technical challenges including reliable co-registration of optical and electron images, and rapid optical signal degradation under electron beam irradiation. Here, we introduce a new approach to solve these problems: multi-color imaging of stable optical cathodoluminescence emitted in a scanning electron microscope by nanoparticles with controll...

  19. Correlative light and electron microscopy using cathodoluminescence from nanoparticles with distinguishable colours

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn, D. R.; Zhang, H.; Kasthuri, N.; SCHALEK, R; Lo, P. K.; A. S. Trifonov; Park, H.; Lichtman, J. W.; Walsworth, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy promises to combine molecular specificity with nanoscale imaging resolution. However, there are substantial technical challenges including reliable co-registration of optical and electron images, and rapid optical signal degradation under electron beam irradiation. Here, we introduce a new approach to solve these problems: imaging of stable optical cathodoluminescence emitted in a scanning electron microscope by nanoparticles with controllable surface...

  20. Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy Simulation with the CASINO Monte Carlo Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Hendrix; Poirier-Demers, Nicolas; Couture, Alexandre Réal; Joly, Dany; Guilmain, Marc; de Jonge, Niels; Drouin, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo softwares are widely used to understand the capabilities of electron microscopes. To study more realistic applications with complex samples, 3D Monte Carlo softwares are needed. In this paper, the development of the 3D version of CASINO is presented. The software feature a graphical user interface, an efficient (in relation to simulation time and memory use) 3D simulation model, accurate physic models for electron microscopy applications, and it is available freely to the scientific community at this website: www.gel.usherbrooke.ca/casino/index.html. It can be used to model backscattered, secondary, and transmitted electron signals as well as absorbed energy. The software features like scan points and shot noise allow the simulation and study of realistic experimental conditions. This software has an improved energy range for scanning electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy applications. PMID:21769885

  1. Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy to Study Microglial Interactions with β-Amyloid Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Kanchan; El Hajj, Hassan; Savage, Julie C; Sánchez, Maria G; Tremblay, Marie-Ève

    2016-01-01

    A detailed protocol is provided here to identify amyloid Aβ plaques in brain sections from Alzheimer's disease mouse models before pre-embedding immunostaining (specifically for ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (IBA1), a calcium binding protein expressed by microglia) and tissue processing for electron microscopy (EM). Methoxy-X04 is a fluorescent dye that crosses the blood-brain barrier and selectively binds to β-pleated sheets found in dense core Aβ plaques. Injection of the animals with methoxy-X04 prior to sacrifice and brain fixation allows pre-screening and selection of the plaque-containing brain sections for further processing with time-consuming manipulations. This is particularly helpful when studying early AD pathology within specific brain regions or layers that may contain very few plaques, present in only a small fraction of the sections. Post-mortem processing of tissue sections with Congo Red, Thioflavin S, and Thioflavin T (or even with methoxy-X04) can label β-pleated sheets, but requires extensive clearing with ethanol to remove excess dye and these procedures are incompatible with ultrastructural preservation. It would also be inefficient to perform labeling for Aβ (and other cellular markers such as IBA1) on all brain sections from the regions of interest, only to yield a small fraction containing Aβ plaques at the right location. Importantly, Aβ plaques are still visible after tissue processing for EM, allowing for a precise identification of the areas (generally down to a few square millimeters) to examine with the electron microscope. PMID:27286292

  2. Label-free and real-time imaging of dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes in cellular nucleus using second harmonic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes have been probed for the first time with the use of second harmonic microscopy. Unlike conventional approaches, second harmonic microscopy provides a label-free and real-time approach to detect DNA conformational changes. Upon dehydration, cellular DNA undergoes a transition from B- to A-form, whereas cellular nuclei change from invisible to visible under second harmonic microscopy. These results showed that DNA is a second order nonlinear optical material. We further confirmed this by characterizing the nonlinear optical properties of extracted DNA from human cells. Our findings open a new path for SHG imaging. DNA can change its conformations under many circumstances. For example: normal cells turning into cancerous cells and drug molecules binding with DNA. Therefore, the detection of DNA conformational changes with second harmonic microscopy will be a useful tool in cancer therapy and new drug discovery.

  3. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruna, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180{\\deg} tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of p...

  4. Astigmatic intensity equation for electron microscopy based phase retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase retrieval, in principle, can be performed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) using arbitrary aberrations of electron waves; provided that the aberrations are well-characterised and known. For example, the transport of intensity equation (TIE) can be used to infer the phase from a through-focus series of images. In this work an 'astigmatic intensity equation' (AIE) is considered, which relates phase gradients to intensity variations caused by TEM objective lens focus and astigmatism variations. Within the paraxial approximation, it is shown that an exact solution of the AIE for the phase can be obtained using efficient Fourier transform methods. Experimental requirements for using the AIE are the measurement of a through-focus derivative and another intensity derivative, which is taken with respect to objective lens astigmatism variation. Two quasi-experimental investigations are conducted to test the validity of the solution

  5. Quantification of interfacial segregation by analytical electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Muellejans, H

    2003-01-01

    The quantification of interfacial segregation by spatial difference and one-dimensional profiling is presented in general where special attention is given to the random and systematic uncertainties. The method is demonstrated for an example of Al-Al sub 2 O sub 3 interfaces in a metal-ceramic composite material investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope. The variation of segregation measured at different interfaces by both methods is within the uncertainties, indicating a constant segregation level and interfacial phase formation. The most important random uncertainty is the counting statistics of the impurity signal whereas the specimen thickness introduces systematic uncertainties (via k factor and effective scan width). The latter could be significantly reduced when the specimen thickness is determined explicitly. (orig.)

  6. A Nanoaquarium for in situ Electron Microscopy in Liquid Media

    CERN Document Server

    Grogan, Joseph M

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of many nanoscale processes occurring in liquids such as colloidal crystal formation, aggregation, nanowire growth, electrochemical deposition, and biological interactions would benefit greatly from real-time, in situ imaging with the nanoscale resolution of transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs). However, these imaging tools cannot readily be used to observe processes occurring in liquid media without addressing two experimental hurdles: sample thickness and sample evaporation in the high vacuum microscope chamber. To address these challenges, we have developed a nano-Hele-Shaw cell, dubbed the nanoaquarium. The device consists of a hermetically-sealed, 100 nm tall, liquid-filled chamber sandwiched between two freestanding, 50 nm thick, silicon nitride membranes. Embedded electrodes are integrated into the device. This fluid dynamics video features particle motion and aggregation during in situ STEM of nanoparticles suspended in liqui...

  7. Electron microscopy of human fascia lata: focus on telocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Dawidowicz, Joanna; Szotek, Sylwia; Matysiak, Natalia; Mielańczyk, Łukasz; Maksymowicz, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    From the histological point of view, fascia lata is a dense connective tissue. Although extracellular matrix is certainly the most predominant fascia’s feature, there are also several cell populations encountered within this structure. The aim of this study was to describe the existence and characteristics of fascia lata cell populations viewed through a transmission electron microscope. Special emphasis was placed on telocytes as a particular interstitial cell type, recently discovered in a ...

  8. Molybdenum work function determined by electron emission microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, D. L.; Campbell, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    A polycrystalline molybdenum sample was recrystallized and thermally stabilized. Quantitative measurements of the emission from each individual grain were obtained with an electron emission microscope. The effective work function for each grain was then calculated. The crystallographic orientation of each grain was determined by Laue back-reflection techniques. A polar plot of effective work function vs crystallographic orientation for the sample was constructed to provide a correlation between effective work function and crystallographic orientation.

  9. Epithelial structure revealed by chemical dissection and unembedded electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fey, E G; Capco, D G; Krochmalnic, G; Penman, S

    1984-01-01

    Cytoskeletal structures obtained after extraction of Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cell monolayers with Triton X-100 were examined in transmission electron micrographs of cell whole mounts and unembedded thick sections. The cytoskeleton, an ordered structure consisting of a peripheral plasma lamina, a complex network of filaments, and chromatin-containing nuclei, was revealed after extraction of intact cells with a nearly physiological buffer containing Triton X-100. The cytoskeleton w...

  10. A comparative analysis of electronic and molecular quantum dot cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of electronic quantum-dot cellular automata (EQCA) and Magnetic quantum dot Cellular Automata (MQCA). QCA is a computing paradigm that encodes and processes information by the position of individual electrons. To enhance the high dense and ultra-low power devices, various researches have been actively carried out to find an alternative way to continue and follow Moore’s law, so called “beyond CMOS technology”. There have been several proposals for physically implementing QCA, EQCA and MQCA are the two important QCAs reported so far. This paper provides a comparative study on these two QCAs

  11. A comparative analysis of electronic and molecular quantum dot cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umamahesvari, H.; Ajitha, D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of electronic quantum-dot cellular automata (EQCA) and Magnetic quantum dot Cellular Automata (MQCA). QCA is a computing paradigm that encodes and processes information by the position of individual electrons. To enhance the high dense and ultra-low power devices, various researches have been actively carried out to find an alternative way to continue and follow Moore's law, so called "beyond CMOS technology". There have been several proposals for physically implementing QCA, EQCA and MQCA are the two important QCAs reported so far. This paper provides a comparative study on these two QCAs

  12. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellenberger, Pascale [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Kaufmann, Rainer [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Wodrich, Harald [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, University of Bordeaux SEGALEN, 146 rue Leo Seignat, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Grünewald, Kay, E-mail: kay@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. - Highlights: • Vitrified mammalian cell were imaged by fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy. • TetraSpeck fluorescence markers were added to correct shifts between cryo fluorescence channels. • FluoSpheres fiducials were used as reference points to assign new coordinates to cryoEM images. • Adenovirus particles were localised with an average correlation precision of 63 nm.

  13. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. - Highlights: • Vitrified mammalian cell were imaged by fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy. • TetraSpeck fluorescence markers were added to correct shifts between cryo fluorescence channels. • FluoSpheres fiducials were used as reference points to assign new coordinates to cryoEM images. • Adenovirus particles were localised with an average correlation precision of 63 nm

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Magnetite Plaquettes in Orgueil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Han, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite sometimes takes the form of a plaquette - barrel-shaped stack of magnetite disks - in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) that show evidence of aqueous alteration. The asymmetric nature of the plaquettes caused Pizzarello and Groy to propose magnetite plaquettes as a naturally asymmetric mineral that can indroduce symmetry-breaking in organic molecules. Our previous synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXRCT) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the magnetite plaquettes in fifteen CCs indicate that magnetite plaquettes are composed of nearly parallel discs, and the crystallographic orientations of the discs change around a rotational axis normal to the discs surfaces. In order to further investigate the nanostructures of magnetite plaquettes, we made two focused ion beam (FIB) sections of nine magnetite plaquettes from a thin section of CI Orgueil for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The X-ray spectrum imaging shows that the magnetite discs are purely iron oxide Fe3O4 (42.9 at% Fe and 57.1 at% O), which suggest that the plaquettes are of aqueous origin as it is difficult to form pure magnetite as a nebular condensate. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns acquired across the plaquettes show that the magnetite discs are single crystals. SEM and EBSD analyses suggest that the planar surfaces of the magnetite discs belong to the {100} planes of the cubic inverse spinel structure, which are supported by our TEM observations. Kerridge et al. suggested that the epitaxial relationship between magnetite plaquette and carbonate determines the magnetite face. However, according to our TEM observation, the association of magnetite with porous networks of phyllosilicate indicates that the epitaxial relationship with carbonate is not essential to the formation of magnetite plaquettes. It was difficult to determine the preferred rotational orientation of the plaquettes due to the symmetry of the cubic structure

  15. Electron microscopy of hydrocarbon production in parthenium argentatum (guayule)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, T.E.

    1977-11-01

    The electron microscope was used to study the biological processes involved in hydrocarbon production. The little desert shrub Guayule (Parthenium argentatum) was selected for study. This shrub can produce hydrocarbons (rubber) in concentrations up to 1/4 of its dry weight. It grows on semi-arid land and has been extensively studied. The potential of Guayule is described in detail. Results of an investigation into the morphology of Guayule at the electron microscope level are given. Experiments, which would allow the biosynthesis of hydrocarbon in Guayule to be followed, were designed. In order to do this, knowledge of the biochemistry of rubber formation was used to select a tracer, mevalonic acid. Mevalonic acid is the precursor of all the terpenoids, a large class of hydrocarbons which includes rubber. It was found that when high enough concentrations of mevalonic acid are administered to seedling Guayule plants, build-ups of metabolized products are found within the chloroplasts of the seedlings. Also, tritium labeled mevalonic acid was used as a precursor, and its metabolic progress was followed by using the technique of electron microscope autoradiography. The results of these experiments also implicated chloroplasts of the Guayule plant in hydrocarbon production. The final task was the development of a system to produce three-dimensional stereo reconstructions of organelles suspected of involvement in hydrocarbon biosynthesis in Guayule. The techniques are designed to reconstruct an object from serial sections of that object. The techniques use stereo imaging both to abstract information for computer processing, and also in the computer produced reconstruction.

  16. Localization of lead in rat peripheral nerve by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead intoxication in rats reliably produces segmental demyelination. Following a single intravenous injection of radioactive lead, localization of tracer was observed sequentially by quantitative electron microscopical autoradiography. The animals injected had been on a lead-containing diet for 70 days; as a result, the blood-nerve barrier was broken down and demyelination was proceeding. Six hours after a single dose, the lead was localized to the endoneurial space of the peroneal nerve, and 72 hours later, to the myelin membrane. Lead may exert a direct effect on the membrane and alter its stability both by altering the lipid content of the membrane and by directly interfering with the lamellar structure

  17. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Ryan, M.P. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  18. Imaging the fine-scale structure of the cellular actin cytoskeleton by Single Particle Tracking and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustata, Gina-Mirela

    It has been proposed that diffusion in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells it is compartmentalized due to the interaction with the underlying actin-based membrane skeleton that comes into close proximity to the lipid bilayer. The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that maintains cell shape, enables cell motion, and plays important roles in both intra-cellular transport and cellular division. We show here the evidence of plasma membrane compartmentalization using Single Particle Tracking (SPT) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging. SPT of Quantum dot labeled lipid in the plasma membrane of live normal rat kidney cells show compartments ranging from 325 nm to 391 nm depending on the sampling time. Using AFM imaging of live NRK cell in the presence of phalloidin, the membrane compartmentalization it is visible with the average size of the compartments of 325 +/- 10 nm (the main peak is centered at 260 nm). Further, the underlying membrane skeleton in fixed cells was directly imaged after partial removal of the plasma membrane to reveal size of the membrane skeleton meshwork of 339 +/- 10 nm. A new method of measuring the characteristics of the actin meshwork was proposed. Probing the local compliance of the plasma membrane through the deflection of a soft AFM cantilever we can expect that the stiffness of the membrane will be higher at locations directly above a cortical actin. This new method provided information about the structure of the skeletal meshwork of neuronal cell body predicting an average compartment size of about 132 nm. This was confirmed through SPT of QD-lipid incorporated into the neuronal cell membrane.

  19. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data. PMID:27272459

  20. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5 Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. -- Highlights: ► TV-rate STEM imaging of heavy atoms is demonstrated. ► DNA sequencing by STEM dark field imaging should be possible at a rate of 106 bases/s. ► Individual silicon atom impurities in graphene are imaged atom-by-atom. ► Single atoms of nitrogen and boron incorporated in graphene are imaged spectroscopically. ► Bonding of individual atoms can be probed by analyzing the fine structures of their EEL spectra.

  1. Molecular shape of Lumbricus terrestris erythrocruorin studied by electron microscopy and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Heel, Marin van

    1989-01-01

    The molecular structure of erythrocruorin (hemoglobin) from Lumbricus terrestris has been studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained particles. Over 1000 molecular projections were selected from a number of electron micrographs and were then classified by multivariate statistical image-pro

  2. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a LEO 438VP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, Fowzia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2016-03-21

    This method describes the characterization of HE powders by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). HE particles are dispersed onto an aluminum standard SEM specimen mount. Electron micrographs are collected at various magnifications (150 to 10,000 X) depending on HE particle size.

  3. Direct observations of the MOF (UiO-66) structure by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Liangkui

    2013-01-01

    As a demonstration of ab initio structure characterizations of nano metal organic framework (MOF) crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction tomography methods, a Zr-MOF (UiO-66) structure was determined and further confirmed by Rietveld refinements of powder X-ray diffraction. HRTEM gave direct imaging of the channels. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Analysis of intermetallic particles in Mg-12 wt.%Zn binyry alloy using transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Martin; Gärtnerová, Viera; Klementová, Mariana; Jäger, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, Aug (2015), s. 428-436. ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : biomedical alloy s * heat treatment * microstructure * transmission electron microscopy * electron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.845, year: 2014

  5. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a LEO 438VP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, Fowzia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2016-03-08

    This method describes the characterization of HE powders by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). HE particles are dispersed onto an aluminum standard SEM specimen mount. Electron micrographs are collected at various magnifications (150 to 10,000 X) depending on HE particle size.

  6. Atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy through 50-nm-thick silicon nitride membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandra, Ranjan; Demers, Hendrix; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nitride membranes can be used for windows of environmental chambers for in situ electron microscopy. We report that aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) achieved atomic resolution on gold nanoparticles placed on both sides of a 50-nm-thick silicon nitride membrane at 200 keV electron beam energy. Spatial frequencies of 1∕1.2 Å were visible for a beam semi-angle of 26.5 mrad. Imaging though a 100-nm-thick membrane was also tested. The achieved imaging c...

  7. In-situ reduction of promoted cobalt oxide supported on alumina by environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehghan, Roya; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal;

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of 12wt.%Co/0.5wt.%Re/α-Al2O3 Fischer–Tropsch catalyst has been studied in-situ in an environmental transmission electron microscope. Reduction of Co3O4 to metallic cobalt was observed dynamically at 360 °C under 3.4 mbar H2. Structural and morphological changes were observed by high...... resolution transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging. The cobalt particles were mainly face centred cubic while some hexagonal close packed particles were also found. Reoxidation of the sample upon cooling to room temperature, still under flowing H2, underlines...

  8. Thermal Properties of Materials Characterized by Scanning Electron-Acoustic Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chun-Ming; ZHANG Shu-Yi; ZHANG Zhong-Ning; SHUI Xiu-Ji; JIANG Tao

    2005-01-01

    @@ A modified technique of scanning electron-acoustic microscopy is employed to determine thermal diffusivity of materials. Using the dependence of the electron-acoustic signal on modulation frequency of the electron beam,the thermal diffusivity of materials is characterized based on a simplified thermoelastic theory. The thermal diffusivities of several metals characterized by the modified scanning electron-acoustic microscopy are in good agreement with the referential values of the corresponding materials, which proves that the scanning electronacoustic microscopy can be used to characterize the thermal diffusivity of materials effectively. In addition, for micro-inhomogeneous materials, such as biological tissues, the macro-effective (average) thermal diffusivities are characterized by the technique.

  9. The application of Graphene as a sample support in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pantelic, R S; Kaiser, U; Stahlberg, H

    2012-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has witnessed rampant development and surging point resolution over the past few years. The improved imaging performance of modern electron microscopes shifts the bottleneck for image contrast and resolution to sample preparation. Hence, it is increasingly being realized that the full potential of electron microscopy will only be realized with the optimization of current sample preparation techniques. Perhaps the most recognized issues are background signal and noise contributed by sample supports, sample charging and instability. Graphene provides supports of single atom thickness, extreme physical stability, periodic structure, and ballistic electrical conductivity. As an increasing number of applications adapting graphene to their benefit emerge, we discuss the unique capabilities afforded by the use of graphene as a sample support for electron microscopy.

  10. Fluorescence microscopy as an alternative to electron microscopy for microscale dispersion evaluation of organic–inorganic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weijiang; Wang, Si; Lu, Chao; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic dispersion is of great importance for actual implementation of advanced properties of organic–inorganic composites. Currently, electron microscopy is the most conventional approach for observing dispersion of inorganic fillers from ultrathin sections of organic–inorganic composites at the nanoscale by professional technicians. However, direct visualization of macrodispersion of inorganic fillers in organic–inorganic composites using high-contrast fluorescent imaging method is hampered. Here we design and synthesize a unique fluorescent surfactant, which combines the properties of the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and amphiphilicity, to image macrodispersion of montmorillonite and layered double hydroxide fillers in polymer matrix. The proposed fluorescence imaging provides a number of important advantages over electron microscope imaging, and opens a new avenue in the development of direct three-dimensional observation of inorganic filler macrodispersion in organic–inorganic composites. PMID:27251015

  11. Kinematics of gold nanoparticles manipulation in situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured materials such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, and nanowires are subject to different forces regimes compared with their macroscopic counterparts. In this work, we report the experimental manipulation of an individual gold nanoparticle (96 nm) capped with PVP considering forces surrounding the nanoparticle such as adhesion, friction, and the external load in real time, and how the differences between these forces produce distinct motions. Combining a scanning probe tool within a transmission electron microscope, we manipulated a gold nanoparticle and recorded the sliding and rolling kinematic motions. Our observations show quantitatively the adhesion force, maximum rolling resistance, and friction coefficients of the probe and the surface of the capped particle as well as particle and substrate surface

  12. Vibrational excitations in molecular layers probed by ballistic electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajen, Rasanayagam Sivasayan; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Feng Xinliang; Muellen, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Postfach 3148, D-55021 Mainz (Germany); Su Haibin, E-mail: n-chandra@imre.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: muellen@mpip-mainz.mpg.de, E-mail: hbsu@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Materials Science, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2011-10-28

    We demonstrate the information on molecular vibrational modes via the second derivative (d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2}) of the ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) current. The proposed method does not create huge fields as in the case of conventional derivative spectroscopy and maintains a zero bias across the device. BEES studies carried out on three different types of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular layers show that the d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2} spectra consist of uniformly spaced peaks corresponding to vibronic excitations. The peak spacing is found to be identical for molecules within the same PAH family though the BEES onset voltage varies for different molecules. In addition, injection into a particular orbital appears to correspond to a specific vibrational mode as the manifestation of the symmetry principle.

  13. Electron microscopy of barium bismuth titanate multilayer ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a number of years bismuth containing compounds have been used with pre-calcined barium titanate to reduce the sintering temperature of the capacitor formulations. As reported earlier the backscattered electron (BSE) SEM micrographs of the bismuth containing barium titanate ceramic reveal that the grains having an average size of 1.2μm consist of a two phase structure consisting of relatively pure barium titanate grain cores surrounded by bismuth rich grain shells. The TEM and STEM studies along with the EDS analyses show that the bismuth concentration increases sharply as one steps towards the grain boundary with a maximum bismuth content at the grain boundary. It is the purpose of this work to investigate the distribution of bismuth in these formulations including the bismuth content, if any, at the ceramic metal interface as affected by the sintering temperature. The subsequent effect on the electrical resistivity of these ceramics in the multilayer configuration is reported

  14. Automatic grading of carbon blacks from transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo, L.; Treuillet, S.; Gomez, E.

    2015-04-01

    Carbon blacks are widely used as filler in industrial products to modify their mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For rubber products, they are the subject of a standard classification system relative to their surface area, particle size and structure. The electron microscope remains the most accurate means of measuring these characteristics on condition that boundaries of aggregates and particles are correctly detected. In this paper, we propose an image processing chain allowing subsequent characterization for automatic grading of the carbon black aggregates. Based on literature review, 31 features are extracted from TEM images to obtain reliable information on the particle size, the shape and microstructure of the carbon black aggregates. Then, they are used for training several classifiers to compare their results for automatic grading. To obtain better results, we suggest to use a cluster identification of aggregates in place of the individual characterization of aggregates.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of human cortical bone failure surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidotti, P; Branca, F P; Stagni, L

    1997-02-01

    Undecalcified samples extracted from human femoral shafts are fractured by bending and the fracture surfaces are examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The investigation is performed on both dry and wet (hydrated with a saline solution) specimens. SEM micrographs show patterns in many respects similar to those observed in fractography studies of laminated fiber-reinforced synthetic composites. In particular, dry and wet samples behave like brittle and ductile matrix laminates, respectively. An analysis carried out on the basis of the mechanisms that dominate the fracture process of laminates shows that a reasonable cortical bone model is that of a laminated composite material whose matrix is composed of extracellular noncollagenous calcified proteins, and the reinforcement is constituted by the calcified collagen fiber system. PMID:9001936

  16. [Scanning electron microscopy study of experimental chorioretinitis in guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, G; Usui, M; De Kozak, Y; Faure, J P

    1976-04-01

    Retinal lesions are described with the scanning electron microscope in the uveo retinitis induced in guinea pigs by immunization with rod outer segments of bovine retina. The two surfaces in contact of the pigment epithelium and the photoreceptors are separated from each other and observed on flat preparations. On the epithelial side, the evolution of the degenerescence of epithelial cells is observed, from the early disappearance of villosities until the total destruction of the cells. Through lacks in the epithelial layer where the choroid appears, inflammatory cells migrate towards the retina. The impairement of the visual cells is characterized by progressive destruction of outer then inner segments, with preservation of the external limiting membrane. In some areas the degenerative process reaches the layer of visual cells nuclei. Macrophages, and local clusters of lymphocytes are seen in contact with the retinal surface. PMID:135548

  17. Sample preparation and electron microscopy of hydrocracking catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, S.; McComb, D. W.; Perkins, J. M.; Haswell, R.

    2008-08-01

    This work focuses on the preparation of zeolite and alumina hydrocracking catalysts for investigation by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). EELS can potentially give new insights into the location and structure of coke which can result in catalyst deactivation. Three sample preparation techniques have been used - microtoming, focussed ion beam milling (LIB) and conventional ion beam milling. Crushing and grinding the catalyst pellets has been discounted as a preparation technique as the spatial relationship between the coke and the catalyst is lost using this method. Microtomed sections show some mechanical damage while sections milled in a single beam LIB microscope show gallium decoration in pores and were too thick for EELS. Conventional ion beam milling has proved to be most successful as it results in extensive thin regions and maintains the spatial distribution of the zeolite and alumina phases.

  18. [Using of scanning electron microscopy for detection of gunshot residue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havel, J; Vajtr, D; Starý, V; Vrána, J; Zelenka, K; Adámek, T

    2006-07-01

    Scanning electron microscope improves the possibility of investigation of surroundings near of gunshot wounds in forensic medicine, it is the next subsequent method for differentiating of area of entrance and exit wound, supplemental method for determination of firing distance, permit of detection (GSR) on the hand of shooter and ensured describing of samples and their stored. Detection of GSR provides many information about composition of bullet and primer. Authors are demonstrating the possibility of detection of GSR on experimental shooting to the krupon (pigs' skin) in different situation (such as in a room and in outside area) and using of different weapon (hand gun CZ No.75 and machine gun No.58). PMID:16948447

  19. PREFACE: Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group Conference (EMAG2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, Ian

    2015-10-01

    2015 marked a new venture for the EMAG group of the Institute of Physics in that the conference was held in conjunction with the MMC2015 conference at the wonderful Manchester Central conference centre. As anyone who was there would be able to confirm, this went exceptionally well and was a really vibrant and top quality conference. The oral sessions were filled with good talks, the poster sessions were very lively, and there was a good balance between oral sessions with a specifically "EMAG" identity, and the integration into a larger conference with the ability to switch between up to six parallel sessions covering physical sciences, techniques, and life sciences. The large conference also attracted a wide range of exhibitors, and this is essential for the ongoing success of all of our work, in a field that is very dependent on continued technical innovation and on collaborations between academic researchers and commercial developers of microscopes, holders, detectors, spectrometers, sample preparation equipment, and software, among other things. As has long been the case at EMAG, all oral and poster presenters were invited to submit papers for consideration for the proceedings. As ever, these papers were independently reviewed by other conference attendees, with the aim of continuing the long tradition of the EMAG proceedings being a top quality, peer-reviewed publication, worthy of reference in future years. Whilst I recognise that not all presenters were able to submit papers to the proceedings (for instance due to the need not to prejudice publication in some other journals, or due to avoiding duplicate publication of data), we are gratified that our presenters submitted as many papers as they did. The 41 papers included provide an interesting snapshot of many of the areas covered in the conference presentations, including functional materials, coatings, 3D microscopy, FIB and SEM, nanomaterials, magnetic and structural materials, advances in EM techniques

  20. Improved Hilbert phase contrast for transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeck, Philip J.B.

    2015-07-15

    Hilbert phase contrast has been recognized as a means of recording high resolution images with high contrast using a transmission electron microscope. This imaging mode could be used to image typical phase objects such as unstained biological molecules or cryo sections of biological tissue. According to the original proposal by (Danev et al., 2002) the Hilbert phase plate applies a phase shift of π to approximately half the focal plane (for example the right half excluding the central beam) and an image is recorded at Gaussian focus. After correction for the inbuilt asymmetry of differential phase contrast this image will have an almost perfect contrast transfer function (close to 1) from the lowest spatial frequency up to a maximum resolution determined by the wave length and spherical aberration of the microscope. In this paper I present theory and simulations showing that this maximum spatial frequency can be increased considerably almost without loss of contrast by using a Hilbert phase plate of half the thickness, leading to a phase shift of π/2, and recording images at Scherzer defocus. The maximum resolution can be improved even more by imaging at extended Scherzer defocus, though at the cost of contrast loss at lower spatial frequencies. - Highlights: • In this paper I present theory and simulations for a Hilbert phase plate that phase shifts the electron wave by π/2 instead of π while images are recorded close to Scherzer defocus instead of Gaussian focus. • I show that the point resolution for this new imaging mode is considerably higher without loss of contrast. • An additional advantage lies in the reduced thickness of the phase plate which leads to reduced inelastic scattering in the phase plate and less noise.

  1. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of CrN films on MgO(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two CrN(001) films with different thickness were grown on MgO(001) substrates using unbalanced d.c. magnetron sputtering. The morphology and interfacial structure of the films are characterized by using conventional transmission electron microscopy, weak-beam dark-field microscopy and spherical aberration (CS)-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The microscopy studies revealed the well-known cube-on-cube orientation relationship. While an interface dislocation network with b→=½aCrN<100> edge dislocations was identified, only part of the lattice mismatch is relaxed. The misfit dislocation structure and growth defects are analyzed and discussed based on the weak-beam dark-field and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy results. - Highlights: • Two CrN films were sputtered on MgO(001) substrates under various deposition conditions. • The CrN films nucleate epitaxially with a cube-on-cube orientation relationship. • Transmission electron microscopy shows the existence of interface dislocation networks. • The misfit between the CrN films and MgO substrates is only partially relaxed. • CrN deposition at higher bias voltage leads to an increased defect density

  2. X-ray fluorescent microscopy reveals large-scale relocalization and extracellular translocation of cellular copper during angiogenesis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finney, L.; Mandava, S.; Ursos, L.; Zhang, W.; Rodi, D.; Vogt, S.; Legnini, D.; Maser, J.; Ikpatt, F.; Olopade, O. I.; Glesne, D.; Univ. of Chicago

    2007-02-13

    Although copper has been reported to influence numerous proteins known to be important for angiogenesis, the enhanced sensitivity of this developmental process to copper bioavailability has remained an enigma, because copper metalloproteins are prevalent and essential throughout all cells. Recent developments in x-ray optics at third-generation synchrotron sources have provided a resource for highly sensitive visualization and quantitation of metalloproteins in biological samples. Here, we report the application of x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to in vitro models of angiogenesis and neurogenesis, revealing a surprisingly dramatic spatial relocalization specific to capillary formation of 80-90% of endogenous cellular copper stores from intracellular compartments to the tips of nascent endothelial cell filopodia and across the cell membrane. Although copper chelation had no effect on process formation, an almost complete ablation of network formation was observed. XFM of highly vascularized ductal carcinomas showed copper clustering in putative neoangiogenic areas. This use of XFM for the study of a dynamic developmental process not only sheds light on the copper requirement for endothelial tube formation but highlights the value of synchrotron-based facilities in biological research.

  3. X-ray fluorescent microscopy reveals large-scale relocalization and extracellular translocation of cellular copper during angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although copper has been reported to influence numerous proteins known to be important for angiogenesis, the enhanced sensitivity of this developmental process to copper bioavailability has remained an enigma, because copper metalloproteins are prevalent and essential throughout all cells. Recent developments in x-ray optics at third-generation synchrotron sources have provided a resource for highly sensitive visualization and quantitation of metalloproteins in biological samples. Here, we report the application of x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to in vitro models of angiogenesis and neurogenesis, revealing a surprisingly dramatic spatial relocalization specific to capillary formation of 80-90% of endogenous cellular copper stores from intracellular compartments to the tips of nascent endothelial cell filopodia and across the cell membrane. Although copper chelation had no effect on process formation, an almost complete ablation of network formation was observed. XFM of highly vascularized ductal carcinomas showed copper clustering in putative neoangiogenic areas. This use of XFM for the study of a dynamic developmental process not only sheds light on the copper requirement for endothelial tube formation but highlights the value of synchrotron-based facilities in biological research

  4. Fine structural analysis of a teleost exocrine pancreas cellular components - a freeze-fracture and transmission electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipp, A C; Ferri, S; Sesso, A

    1980-01-01

    The normal exocrine pancreas of Pimelodus maculatus (Teleostei) has been studied by freeze-fracture and conventional transmission electron microscopy. 4 cellular types in the acini are observed: the acinar cells, the argentaffin cells, the intermediate cells and the centroacinar cells. The most proeminent cytoplasmic feature of the acinar cells is that the well developed rough endoplasmic reticulum, which appear predominantly under the vesicular form. The argentaffin cells are found lodged between the acinar cells and duct cells, in the connective tissue they are isolated principally that surrounds the ducts. The typical granules are the cytoplasmic component wich characterize the argentaffin cells. The indermediate cells are characterized by the presence of two distinct granule types: one resembling that found in the endocrine cells and the other resembling the granules of the acinar cells. The centroacinar cells is similar that found in other species. PMID:7396226

  5. Visualization of newt aragonitic otoconial matrices using transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyger, P. S.; Wiederhold, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Otoconia are calcified protein matrices within the gravity-sensing organs of the vertebrate vestibular system. These protein matrices are thought to originate from the supporting or hair cells in the macula during development. Previous studies of mammalian calcitic, barrel-shaped otoconia revealed an organized protein matrix consisting of a thin peripheral layer, a well-defined organic core and a flocculent matrix inbetween. No studies have reported the microscopic organization of the aragonitic otoconial matrix, despite its protein characterization. Pote et al. (1993b) used densitometric methods and inferred that prismatic (aragonitic) otoconia have a peripheral protein distribution, compared to that described for the barrel-shaped, calcitic otoconia of birds, mammals, and the amphibian utricle. By using tannic acid as a negative stain, we observed three kinds of organic matrices in preparations of fixed, decalcified saccular otoconia from the adult newt: (1) fusiform shapes with a homogenous electron-dense matrix; (2) singular and multiple strands of matrix; and (3) more significantly, prismatic shapes outlined by a peripheral organic matrix. These prismatic shapes remain following removal of the gelatinous matrix, revealing an internal array of organic matter. We conclude that prismatic otoconia have a largely peripheral otoconial matrix, as inferred by densitometry.

  6. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Bombyx Mori Silk Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Martin, D. C.

    1997-03-01

    The microstructure of B. Mori silk fibers before and after degumming was examined by TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), WAXS and low voltage SEM. SEM micrographs of the neat cocoon revealed a network of pairs of twisting filaments. After degumming, there were only individual filaments showing a surface texture consistent with an oriented fibrillar structure in the fiber interior. WAXS patterns confirmed the oriented beta-sheet crystal structure common to silkworm and spider silks. Low dose SAED results were fully consistent with the WAXS data, and revealed that the crystallographic texture did not vary significantly across the fiber diameter. TEM observations of microtomed fiber cross sections indicated a somewhat irregular shape, and also revealed a 0.5-2 micron sericin coating which was removed by the degumming process. TEM observations of the degummed silk fiber showed banded features with a characteristic spacing of nominally 600 nm along the fiber axis. These bands were oriented in a roughly parabolic or V-shape pointing along one axis within a given fiber. We hypothesize that this orientation is induced by the extrusion during the spinning process. Equatorial DF images revealed that axial and lateral sizes of the β-sheet crystallites in silk fibroin ranged from 20 to 170 nm and from 1 to 24 nm, respectively. Crazes developed in the degummed silk fiber parallel to the fiber direction. The formation of these crazes suggests that there are significant lateral interactions between fibrils in silk fibers.

  7. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    Future information technology requires an increased magnetically encoded data density and novel electromagnetic modes of data transfer. While to date magnetic properties are observed and characterized mostly statically, the need emerges to monitor and capture their fast dynamics. In this talk, I will focus on the spin dynamics i.e. spin wave excitations and the dynamics of a new topological distribution of spins termed ``skyrmions''. Wave packets of spin waves offer the unique capability to transport a quantum bit, the spin, without the transport of charge or mass. Here, large wave-vector spin waves are of particular interest as they admit spin localization within a few nanometers. By using our recently developed electron energy loss spectrometer, we could study such spin waves in ultrathin films with an unprecedented energy resolution of 4 meV. By virtue of the finite penetration depth of low energy electrons, spin waves localized at interfaces between a substrate and a thin capping layer can be been studied yielding information about the exchange coupling between atoms at the interface. The quantization of spin waves with wave vectors perpendicular to the film gives rise to standing modes to which EELS has likewise access. Such studies when carried out as function of the film thickness again yield information on the layer dependence of the exchange coupling. Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices. Currently, little is known about the influence of disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. In this talk, I will describe the dynamical role of disorder in a large and flat thin film of Cu2OSeO3, exhibiting a skyrmion phase in an insulating material. We image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the

  8. Interactive stereo electron microscopy enhanced with virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethel, E. W.; Bastacky, S. J.; Schwartz, Ken

    2002-05-01

    An analytical system is presented that is used to take measurements of objects perceived in stereo image pairs obtained from a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our system operates by presenting a single stereo view that contains stereo image data obtained form the SEM, along with geometric representations of two types of virtual measurement instruments, a protractor and a caliper. The measurements obtained form this system are an integral part of a medical study evaluating surfactant, a liquid coating the inner surface of the lung which makes possible the process of breathing. Measurements of the curvature and contact angle of submicrom diameter droplets of a fluorocarbon deposited on the surface of airways are performed in order to determine surface tension of the air/liquid interface. This approach has been extended to a microscopic level from the techniques of traditional surface science by measuring submicrometer rather than millimeter diameter droplets, as well as the lengths and curvature of cilia responsible for movement of the surfactant, the airway's protective liquid blanket. An earlier implementation of this approach for taking angle measurements from objects perceived in stereo image pairs using virtual protractor is extended in this paper to include distance measurements and to use a unified view model. The system is built around a unified view model that is derived from microscope-specific parameters, such as focal length, visible area and magnification. The unified view model ensures that the underlying view models and resultant binocular parallax cues are consistent between synthetic and acquired imagery. When the view models are consistent, it is possible to take measurements of features that are not constrained to lie within the projection plane. The system is first calibrated using non-clinical data of known size and resolution. Using the SEM, stereo image pairs of grids and spheres of known resolution are created to calibrate the measurement

  9. Interactive stereo electron microscopy enhanced with virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical system is presented that is used to take measurements of objects perceived in stereo image pairs obtained from a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our system operates by presenting a single stereo view that contains stereo image data obtained from the SEM, along with geometric representations of two types of virtual measurement instruments, a ''protractor'' and a ''caliper''. The measurements obtained from this system are an integral part of a medical study evaluating surfactant, a liquid coating the inner surface of the lung which makes possible the process of breathing. Measurements of the curvature and contact angle of submicron diameter droplets of a fluorocarbon deposited on the surface of airways are performed in order to determine surface tension of the air/liquid interface. This approach has been extended to a microscopic level from the techniques of traditional surface science by measuring submicrometer rather than millimeter diameter droplets, as well as the lengths and curvature of cilia responsible for movement of the surfactant, the airway's protective liquid blanket. An earlier implementation of this approach for taking angle measurements from objects perceived in stereo image pairs using a virtual protractor is extended in this paper to include distance measurements and to use a unified view model. The system is built around a unified view model that is derived from microscope-specific parameters, such as focal length, visible area and magnification. The unified view model ensures that the underlying view models and resultant binocular parallax cues are consistent between synthetic and acquired imagery. When the view models are consistent, it is possible to take measurements of features that are not constrained to lie within the projection plane. The system is first calibrated using non-clinical data of known size and resolution. Using the SEM, stereo image pairs of grids and spheres of known resolution are created to calibrate the

  10. UROX 2.0: an interactive tool for fitting atomic models into electron-microscopy reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UROX is software designed for the interactive fitting of atomic models into electron-microscopy reconstructions. The main features of the software are presented, along with a few examples. Electron microscopy of a macromolecular structure can lead to three-dimensional reconstructions with resolutions that are typically in the 30–10 Å range and sometimes even beyond 10 Å. Fitting atomic models of the individual components of the macromolecular structure (e.g. those obtained by X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance) into an electron-microscopy map allows the interpretation of the latter at near-atomic resolution, providing insight into the interactions between the components. Graphical software is presented that was designed for the interactive fitting and refinement of atomic models into electron-microscopy reconstructions. Several characteristics enable it to be applied over a wide range of cases and resolutions. Firstly, calculations are performed in reciprocal space, which results in fast algorithms. This allows the entire reconstruction (or at least a sizeable portion of it) to be used by taking into account the symmetry of the reconstruction both in the calculations and in the graphical display. Secondly, atomic models can be placed graphically in the map while the correlation between the model-based electron density and the electron-microscopy reconstruction is computed and displayed in real time. The positions and orientations of the models are refined by a least-squares minimization. Thirdly, normal-mode calculations can be used to simulate conformational changes between the atomic model of an individual component and its corresponding density within a macromolecular complex determined by electron microscopy. These features are illustrated using three practical cases with different symmetries and resolutions. The software, together with examples and user instructions, is available free of charge at http://mem.ibs.fr/UROX/

  11. Hyaline articular cartilage dissected by papain: light and scanning electron microscopy and micromechanical studies.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, P; Brereton, J D; Gardner, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Papain was used to digest the hyaline femoral condylar cartilages of 30 adult Wistar rats. Matrix proteoglycan degradation was assessed by the light microscopy of paraffin sections stained with toluidine blue. The extent of surface structural change was estimated by scanning electron microscopy, and the structural integrity of the hyaline cartilage tested by the controlled impact of a sharp pin. The results demonstrated an early loss of cartilage metachromasia, increasing with time of papain ...

  12. The importance of scanning electron microscopy (sem) in taxonomy and morphology of Chironomidae (Diptera)

    OpenAIRE

    Andrzej Kownacki; Eva Szarek-Gviazda; Olga Woźnicka

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on the value of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in the taxonomy and morphology of Chironomidae. This method has been relatively rarely used in Chironomidae studies. Our studies suggest that the SEM method provides a lot of new information. For example, the plastron plate of the thoracic horn of Macropelopia nebulosa (Meigen) under light microscopy is visible as points, while under SEM we have found that it consists of a reticular structure with holes. By using SEM a more ...

  13. Direct observation of defect structure in protein crystals by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Devaud, G; Furcinitti, P S; Fleming, J. C.; Lyon, M K; Douglas, K

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the structure of S-layers isolated from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From the AFM images, we were able to directly observe individual dimers of the crystal, defects in the crystal structure, and twin boundaries. We have identified two types of boundaries, one defined by a mirror plane and the other by a glide plane. This work shows that twin boundaries are highly structured regions that are directly ...

  14. The Application of Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy During Flour Milling and Wheat Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, R.

    1985-01-01

    Light and scanning electron microscopy have been employed as part of an on-going study on the effect of the milling system on flour composition and quality. Examples are given of some areas where microscopy has been particularly useful in understanding the functional changes that take place during milling or the subsequent processing of the flour . The use of heavy reduction roll pressures was shown to modify gluten protein quality as well as produce the desired increase in starch damage. The...

  15. Ultrastructure of ostrich (Struthio camelus) spermatozoa: I. Transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soley, J T

    1993-06-01

    The origin and relationships of the tinamous (Order Tinamiformes), ratites (Order Struthioniformes, Rheiformes, Casuariiformes, Apterygiformes) and birds of the order Galliformes and Anseriformes is the subject of much debate and it has been suggested that the ultrastructural analysis of a wide variety of avian sperm may provide information relevant to this problem. This paper describes the fine structure of ostrich sperm and compares the results with published information for other non-passerine birds. Ostrich sperm display a short, conical acrosome which covers the tapered tip of the long, cylindrical nucleus. A nuclear invagination housing an acrosomal rod extends deep within the karyoplasm. A centriolar complex is situated beneath the head and consists of a short proximal centriole and a long (3.0 microns) distal centriole which extends the complete length of the midpiece. The central cavity of the distal centriole contains a pair of microtubules embedded in a rod of electron-dense material. The midpiece is surrounded by a mitochondrial sheath. Concentrations of fine granular material are present between the mitochondria. The principal-piece of the tail is demarcated from the midpiece by a distinct annulus and characterized by a ribbed fibrous sheath enclosing a typical axoneme. Rudimentary coarse fibres are observed between the fibrous sheath and the doublet microtubules of the axoneme in the proximal region of the principal-piece. The end-piece contains a disorganized collection of axonemal microtubules. Ostrich sperm differ in a number of respects from that of other non-passerine birds (the absence of a typical perforatorium; the presence of a ribbed fibrous sheath; a deep nuclear invagination; the structure and length of the distal centriole) but show a close similarity to sperm of the rhea and crested tinamou, both representatives of primitive avian families. These observations add further support to the theory that the ratites and tinamous constitute a

  16. Interactive stereo electron microscopy enhanced with virtual reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E.Wes; Bastacky, S.Jacob; Schwartz, Kenneth S.

    2001-12-17

    An analytical system is presented that is used to take measurements of objects perceived in stereo image pairs obtained from a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our system operates by presenting a single stereo view that contains stereo image data obtained from the SEM, along with geometric representations of two types of virtual measurement instruments, a ''protractor'' and a ''caliper''. The measurements obtained from this system are an integral part of a medical study evaluating surfactant, a liquid coating the inner surface of the lung which makes possible the process of breathing. Measurements of the curvature and contact angle of submicron diameter droplets of a fluorocarbon deposited on the surface of airways are performed in order to determine surface tension of the air/liquid interface. This approach has been extended to a microscopic level from the techniques of traditional surface science by measuring submicrometer rather than millimeter diameter droplets, as well as the lengths and curvature of cilia responsible for movement of the surfactant, the airway's protective liquid blanket. An earlier implementation of this approach for taking angle measurements from objects perceived in stereo image pairs using a virtual protractor is extended in this paper to include distance measurements and to use a unified view model. The system is built around a unified view model that is derived from microscope-specific parameters, such as focal length, visible area and magnification. The unified view model ensures that the underlying view models and resultant binocular parallax cues are consistent between synthetic and acquired imagery. When the view models are consistent, it is possible to take measurements of features that are not constrained to lie within the projection plane. The system is first calibrated using non-clinical data of known size and resolution. Using the SEM, stereo image pairs of grids and spheres of

  17. The detection and influence of food soils on microorganisms on stainless steel using scanning electron microscopy and epifluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kathryn A; Smith, Lindsay A; Verran, Joanna

    2010-07-31

    A range of food soils and components (complex [meat extract, fish extract, and cottage cheese extract]; oils [cholesterol, fish oil, and mixed fatty acids]; proteins [bovine serum albumin (BSA), fish peptones, and casein]; and carbohydrates [glycogen, starch, and lactose]) were deposited onto 304 2B finish stainless steel surfaces at different concentrations (10-0.001%). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and epifluorescence microscopy were used to visualise the cell and food soil distribution across the surface. Epifluorescence microscopy was also used to quantify the percentage of a field covered by cells or soil. At 10% concentration, most soils, with the exception of BSA and fish peptone were easily visualised using SEM, presenting differences in gross soil morphology and distribution. When soil was stained with acridine orange and visualised by epifluorescence microscopy, the limit of detection of the method varied between soils, but some (meat, cottage cheese and glycogen) were detected at the lowest concentrations used (0.001%). The decrease in soil concentration did not always relate to the surface coverage measurement. When 10% food soil was applied to a surface with Escherichia coli and compared, cell attachment differed depending on the nature of the soil. The highest percentage coverage of cells was observed on surfaces with fish extract and related products (fish peptone and fish oil), followed by carbohydrates, meat extract/meat protein, cottage cheese/casein and the least to the oils (cholesterol and mixed fatty acids). Cells could not be clearly observed in the presence of some food soils using SEM. Findings demonstrate that food soils heterogeneously covered stainless steel surfaces in differing patterns. The pattern and amount of cell attachment was related to food soil type rather than to the amount of food soil detected. This work demonstrates that in the study of conditioning film and cell retention on the hygienic properties of surfaces, SEM

  18. Laboratory-Based Cryogenic Soft X-ray Tomography with Correlative Cryo-Light and Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, David B.; Gelb, Jeff; Palshin, Vadim; Evans, James E.

    2013-02-01

    Here we present a novel laboratory-based cryogenic soft X-ray microscope for whole cell tomography of frozen hydrated samples. We demonstrate the capabilities of this compact cryogenic microscope by visualizing internal sub-cellular structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The microscope is shown to achieve better than 50 nm spatial resolution with a Siemens star test sample. For whole biological cells, the microscope can image specimens up to 5 micrometers thick. Structures as small as 90 nm can be detected in tomographic reconstructions at roughly 70 nm spatial resolution following a low cumulative radiation dose of only 7.2 MGy. Furthermore, the design of the specimen chamber utilizes a standard sample support that permits multimodal correlative imaging of the exact same unstained yeast cell via cryo-fluorescence light microscopy, cryo-soft x-ray microscopy and cryo-transmission electron microscopy. This completely laboratory-based cryogenic soft x-ray microscope will therefore enable greater access to three-dimensional ultrastructure determination of biological whole cells without chemical fixation or physical sectioning.

  19. Schottky Barrier mapping of the W/Si diode using ballistic electron emission microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcan, Christopher; Balsano, Robert; Pieniazek, Nicholas; Labella, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    The Schottky barrier of the W/Si(001) diode was investigated and spatially mapped at the nanoscale using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) and ballistic hole emission microscopy (BHEM). The miscibility of tungsten and silicon creates a thin silicide upon deposition with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) showing the changes in the silicide over several weeks. Using standard current voltage measurements there is no change in the charge transport across the diode during this time period. However, BEEM measurements do show dramatic changes to the transport of ballistic electrons over time with nanoscale resolution. Time dependent Schottky barrier maps are generated over a 1 μm x 1 μm area and provide valuable insight to the barrier height homogeneity, defect formation, and interfacial effects occurring in the diode.

  20. Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy of Nucleolar Transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, Christophe; Berthaud, Maxime; Gadal, Olivier; Léger-Silvestre, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoli form around RNA polymerase I transcribed ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. The direct electron microscopy observation of rRNA genes after nucleolar chromatin spreading (Miller's spreads) constitutes to date the only system to quantitatively assess transcription at a single molecule level. However, the spreading procedure is likely generating artifact and despite being informative, these spread rRNA genes are far from their in vivo situation. The integration of the structural characterization of spread rRNA genes in the three-dimensional (3D) organization of the nucleolus would represent an important scientific achievement. Here, we describe a correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) protocol allowing detection of tagged-Pol I by fluorescent microscopy and high-resolution imaging of the nucleolar ultrastructural context. This protocol can be implemented in laboratories equipped with conventional fluorescence and electron microscopes and does not require sophisticated "pipeline" for imaging. PMID:27576708

  1. A compilation of cold cases using scanning electron microscopy at the University of Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Michael J.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2015-10-01

    Scanning electron microscopy combined with microchemical analysis has evolved into one of the most widely used instruments in forensic science today. In particular, the environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), has created unique opportunities in forensic science in regard to the examination of trace evidence; i.e. the examination of evidence without altering the evidence with conductive coatings, thereby enabling criminalists to solve cases that were previously considered unsolvable. Two cold cases were solved at URI using a JEOL 5900 LV SEM in conjunction with EDS. A cold case murder and a cold missing person case will be presented from the viewpoint of the microscopist and will include sample preparation, as well as image and chemical analysis of the trace evidence using electron microscopy and optical microscopy.

  2. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  3. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  4. Local variations of HER2 dimerization in breast cancer cells discovered by correlative fluorescence and liquid electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckys, Diana B; Korf, Ulrike; de Jonge, Niels

    2015-07-01

    The formation of HER2 homodimers plays an important role in breast cancer aggressiveness and progression; however, little is known about its localization. We have studied the intra- and intercellular variation of HER2 at the single-molecule level in intact SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Whole cells were visualized in hydrated state with correlative fluorescence microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The locations of individual HER2 receptors were detected using an anti-HER2 affibody in combination with a quantum dot (QD), a fluorescent nanoparticle. Fluorescence microscopy revealed considerable differences of HER2 membrane expression between individual cells and between different membrane regions of the same cell (that is, membrane ruffles and flat areas). Subsequent ESEM of the corresponding cellular regions provided images of individually labeled HER2 receptors. The high spatial resolution of 3 nm and the close proximity between the QD and the receptor allowed quantifying the stoichiometry of HER2 complexes, distinguishing between monomers, dimers, and higher-order clusters. Downstream data analysis based on calculating the pair correlation function from receptor positions showed that cellular regions exhibiting membrane ruffles contained a substantial fraction of HER2 in homodimeric state. Larger-order clusters were also present. Membrane areas with homogeneous membrane topography, on the contrary, displayed HER2 in random distribution. Second, HER2 homodimers appeared to be absent from a small subpopulation of cells exhibiting a flat membrane topography, possibly resting cells. Local differences in homodimer presence may point toward functional differences with possible relevance for studying metastasis and drug response. PMID:26601217

  5. Correlative 3D imaging of Whole Mammalian Cells with Light and Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Gavin E.; Narayan, Kedar; Lowekamp, Bradley C.; Hartnell, Lisa M.; Heymann, Jurgen A. W.; Fu, Jing; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2011-01-01

    We report methodological advances that extend the current capabilities of ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IA–SEM), also known as focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, a newly emerging technology for high resolution imaging of large biological specimens in 3D. We establish protocols that enable the routine generation of 3D image stacks of entire plastic-embedded mammalian cells by IA-SEM at resolutions of ~10 to 20 nm at high contrast and with minimal artifacts from the foc...

  6. Encapsulation of Viscous Foods in Agar Gel Tubes for Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kalab, Miloslav

    1988-01-01

    Viscous food is aspirated into a glass capillary tube with the inner diameter of approximately 0.5 mm if the food is to be examined by transmission electron microscopy. If the sample is destined for examination by scanning electron microscopy, it is aspirated into a Pasteur pipette having the diameter of 1.0 mm. In each case, the lower end of the glass tube is sealed with a droplet of 40°C warm 3% agar sol. After the sol solidifies, the pipette is dipped in the same agar sol and a coating, 0....

  7. Electron microscopy of Mg/TiO2 photocatalyst morphology for deep desulfurization of diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yee Cia; Kait, Chong Fai; Fatimah, Hayyiratul; Wilfred, Cecilia

    2015-07-01

    A series of Mg/TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared and characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The average particle sizes of the photocatalysts were ranging from 25.7 to 35.8 nm. Incorporation of Mg on TiO2 did not lead to any surface lattice distortion to TiO2. HRTEM data indicated the presence of MgO and Mg(OH)2 mixture at low Mg loading while at higher Mg loading, the presence of lamellar Mg-oxyhydroxide intermediates and Mg(OH)2.

  8. Electron microscopy of Mg/TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst morphology for deep desulfurization of diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yee Cia, E-mail: gabrielle.ciayin@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Kait, Chong Fai, E-mail: chongfaikait@petronas.com.my; Fatimah, Hayyiratul, E-mail: hayyiratulfatimah@yahoo.com; Wilfred, Cecilia, E-mail: cecili@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    A series of Mg/TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts were prepared and characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The average particle sizes of the photocatalysts were ranging from 25.7 to 35.8 nm. Incorporation of Mg on TiO{sub 2} did not lead to any surface lattice distortion to TiO{sub 2}. HRTEM data indicated the presence of MgO and Mg(OH){sub 2} mixture at low Mg loading while at higher Mg loading, the presence of lamellar Mg-oxyhydroxide intermediates and Mg(OH){sub 2}.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy study of interface and internal defect structures of homoepitaxial diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarutani, M.; Takai, Y.; Shimizu, R.; Ando, T.; Kamo, M.; Bando, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Defect structures in a homoepitaxial diamond film grown by chemical vapor deposition have been studied by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Many interstitial dislocation loops are discerned in the (001) interface. The internal region grown on the (11¯1) facet comprises stacking faults and twins, while that on the (001) face contains mainly interstitial dislocation loops aligned in rows along ˜ directions. Fe and Si impurities were detected only at the interface by analytical electron microscopy. The origin of the defects is briefly discussed.

  10. The ultrastructure of mono- and holocentric plant centromeres: an immunological investigation by structured illumination microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Gerhard; Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Ma, Wei; Houben, Andreas; Schubert, Veit

    2015-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the three centromere-associated proteins α-tubulin, CENH3, and phosphorylated histone H2A (at threonine 120, H2AThr120ph) was analysed by indirect immunodetection at monocentric cereal chromosomes and at the holocentric chromosomes of Luzula elegans by super-resolution light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using structured illumination microscopy (SIM) as the super-resolution technique on squashed specimens and SEM on uncoated isolated specimens, the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the proteins was visualized at the centromeres. Technical aspects of 3D SEM are explained in detail. We show that CENH3 forms curved "pads" mainly around the lateral centromeric region in the primary constriction of metacentric chromosomes. H2AThr120ph is present in both the primary constriction and in the pericentromere. α-tubulin-labeled microtubule bundles attach to CENH3-containing chromatin structures, either in single bundles with a V-shaped attachment to the centromere or in split bundles to bordering pericentromeric flanks. In holocentric L. elegans chromosomes, H2AThr120ph is located predominantly in the centromeric groove of each chromatid as proven by subsequent FIB/FESEM ablation and 3D reconstruction. α-tubulin localizes to the edges of the groove. In both holocentric and monocentric chromosomes, no additional intermediate structures between microtubules and the centromere were observed. We established models of the distribution of CENH3, H2AThr120ph and the attachment sites of microtubules for metacentric and holocentric plant chromosomes. PMID:26048589

  11. 3D Plant Cell Architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae Using Focused Ion Beam–Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawana

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Focused ion beam–scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM combines the ability to sequentially mill the sample surface and obtain SEM images that can be used to create 3D renderings with micron-level resolution. We have applied FIB-SEM to study Arabidopsis cell architecture. The goal was to determine the efficacy of this technique in plant tissue and cellular studies and to demonstrate its usefulness in studying cell and organelle architecture and distribution. Methods: Seed aleurone, leaf mesophyll, stem cortex, root cortex, and petal lamina from Arabidopsis were fixed and embedded for electron microscopy using protocols developed for animal tissues and modified for use with plant cells. Each sample was sectioned using the FIB and imaged with SEM. These serial images were assembled to produce 3D renderings of each cell type. Results: Organelles such as nuclei and chloroplasts were easily identifiable, and other structures such as endoplasmic reticula, lipid bodies, and starch grains were distinguishable in each tissue. Discussion: The application of FIB-SEM produced 3D renderings of five plant cell types and offered unique views of their shapes and internal content. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FIB-SEM for organelle distribution and cell architecture studies.

  12. SEM, TEM and SLEEM (scanning low energy electron microscopy) of CB2 steel after creep testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand to produce electrical power with higher efficiency and with lower environmental pollution is leading to the use of new advanced materials in the production of power plant equipment. To understand the processes taking place in parts produced from these materials during their operation under severe conditions (such as high temperature, high stress, and environmental corrosion) requires detailed evaluation of their substructure. It is usually necessary to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, this method is very exacting and time-consuming. So there is an effort to use new scanning electron microscopy techniques instead of TEM. One of them is scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM). This paper deals with an assessment of the possibility to use SLEEM for describing the substructure of creep resistant steel CB2 after long-term creep testing. In the SLEEM images more information is contained about the microstructure of the material in comparison with standard scanning electron microscopy. Study of materials using slow and very slow electrons opens the way to better understanding their microstructures

  13. Probing hot-carrier transport and elastic scattering using ballistic-electron-emission microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliken, A. M.; Manion, S. J.; Kaiser, W. J.; Bell, L. D.; Hecht, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) has been used to characterize electron transport and scattering in metal/semiconductor structures. A SiO2 layer at the Au/Si interface was patterned to form transmitting and nontransmitting regions. By analyzing the BEEM current profiles at the boundaries of these regions, information on the spatial distribution of electrons after transport through the Au layer can be derived. A detailed comparison is made between the results presented here and models which involve modification of the electron distribution by scattering.

  14. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  15. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  16. Analysis of acute brain slices by electron microscopy: a correlative light-electron microscopy workflow based on Tokuyasu cryo-sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussert Fonta, Celine; Leis, Andrew; Mathisen, Cliff; Bouvier, David S; Blanchard, Willy; Volterra, Andrea; Lich, Ben; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain slices are slices of brain tissue that are kept vital in vitro for further recordings and analyses. This tool is of major importance in neurobiology and allows the study of brain cells such as microglia, astrocytes, neurons and their inter/intracellular communications via ion channels or transporters. In combination with light/fluorescence microscopies, acute brain slices enable the ex vivo analysis of specific cells or groups of cells inside the slice, e.g. astrocytes. To bridge ex vivo knowledge of a cell with its ultrastructure, we developed a correlative microscopy approach for acute brain slices. The workflow begins with sampling of the tissue and precise trimming of a region of interest, which contains GFP-tagged astrocytes that can be visualised by fluorescence microscopy of ultrathin sections. The astrocytes and their surroundings are then analysed by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). An important aspect of this workflow is the modification of a commercial cryo-ultramicrotome to observe the fluorescent GFP signal during the trimming process. It ensured that sections contained at least one GFP astrocyte. After cryo-sectioning, a map of the GFP-expressing astrocytes is established and transferred to correlation software installed on a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope equipped with a STEM detector. Next, the areas displaying fluorescence are selected for high resolution STEM imaging. An overview area (e.g. a whole mesh of the grid) is imaged with an automated tiling and stitching process. In the final stitched image, the local organisation of the brain tissue can be surveyed or areas of interest can be magnified to observe fine details, e.g. vesicles or gold labels on specific proteins. The robustness of this workflow is contingent on the quality of sample preparation, based on Tokuyasu's protocol. This method results in a reasonable compromise between preservation of morphology and maintenance of

  17. Open-cellular copper structures fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Relative stiffness versus relative density measurements for reticulated mesh and stochastic open cellular copper were shown to follow the Gibson-Ashby foam model. → Microstructures for the mesh struts and foam ligaments illustrated a propensity of copper oxide precipitates which provided structural hardness and strength. → These components, fabricated by electron beam melting, exhibit interesting prospects for specialized, complex heat-transfer devices. - Abstract: Cu reticulated mesh and stochastic open cellular foams were fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting. Fabricated densities ranged from 0.73 g/cm3 to 6.67 g/cm3. The precursor Cu powder contained Cu2O precipitates and the fabricated components contained arrays of Cu2O precipitates and interconnected dislocation microstructures having average spacings of ∼2 μm, which provide hardness values ∼75% above commercial Cu products. Plots of stiffness (Young's modulus) versus density and relative stiffness versus relative density were in very close agreement with the Gibson-Ashby model for open cellular foams. These open cellular structure components exhibit considerable potential for novel, complex, multi-functional electrical and thermal management systems, especially complex, monolithic heat exchange devices.

  18. Self-consistent modelling of nonlinear dynamic ESM microscopy in mixed ionic-electronic conductors

    OpenAIRE

    Varenyk, O. V.; Silibin, M. V.; D.A. Kiselev; Eliseev, E. A.; Kalinin, S. V.; Morozovska, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM) response of mixed ionic-electronic conductors is analysed in the framework of the Thomas-Fermi screening theory and Vegard law with accounting of the steric effects. The emergence of dynamic charge waves and nonlinear deformation of the surface as result of applying probing voltage is numerically explored. 2D maps of the strain and concentration distribution across the mixed ionic-electronic conductor and bias-induced surface displacements for E...

  19. Analyzing the quality of carbon nanotube dispersions in polymers using scanning electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs, Josef Z.; Andresen, Kjer; Pauls, Jan Roman; Garcia, Claudia Pardo; Schossig, Michael; Schulte, Karl; Bauhofer, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The ability to examine conducting filler particles in an insulating polymer matrix by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was investigated. The detection of selected secondary electrons is necessary to resolve sub-micron scale filler particles, but not every SEM detector seems to be able to monitor the small changes introduced by the conducting filler particles. The influence of SEM parameters and the challenge of image interpretation in view of the apparent lack of appropriate information in ...

  20. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy and its Application Possibilites in ISI ASCR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém

    Brno: Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v. v. i, 2014, s. 11-13. ISBN 978-80-87441-12-1. [Workshop of Interesting Topics of SEM and ESEM. Mikulov (CZ), 26.08.2014-31.08.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Institute of Scientific Instruments * Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering