WorldWideScience

Sample records for cellular component curation

  1. Microwave components for cellular portable radiotelephone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraguchi, Masahiro; Aikawa, Masayoshi

    1995-09-01

    Mobile and personal communication systems are expected to represent a huge market for microwave components in the coming years. A number of components in silicon bipolar, silicon Bi-CMOS, GaAs MESFET, HBT and HEMT are now becoming available for system application. There are tradeoffs among the competing technologies with regard to performance, cost, reliability and time-to-market. This paper describes process selection and requirements of cost and r.f. performances to microwave semiconductor components for digital cellular and cordless telephones. Furthermore, new circuit techniques which were developed by NTT are presented.

  2. Colonization of bone matrices by cellular components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchelkunova, E. I.; Voropaeva, A. A.; Korel, A. V.; Mayer, D. A.; Podorognaya, V. T.; Kirilova, I. A.

    2017-09-01

    Practical surgery, traumatology, orthopedics, and oncology require bioengineered constructs suitable for replacement of large-area bone defects. Only rigid/elastic matrix containing recipient's bone cells capable of mitosis, differentiation, and synthesizing extracellular matrix that supports cell viability can comply with these requirements. Therefore, the development of the techniques to produce structural and functional substitutes, whose three-dimensional structure corresponds to the recipient's damaged tissues, is the main objective of tissue engineering. This is achieved by developing tissue-engineering constructs represented by cells placed on the matrices. Low effectiveness of carrier matrix colonization with cells and their uneven distribution is one of the major problems in cell culture on various matrixes. In vitro studies of the interactions between cells and material, as well as the development of new techniques for scaffold colonization by cellular components are required to solve this problem.

  3. Genesis Solar Wind Science Canister Components Curated as Potential Solar Wind Collectors and Reference Contamination Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind for 27 months at Earth-Sun L1 on both passive and active collectors carried inside of a Science Canister, which was cleaned and assembled in an ISO Class 4 cleanroom prior to launch. The primary passive collectors, 271 individual hexagons and 30 half-hexagons of semiconductor materials, are described in. Since the hard landing reduced the 301 passive collectors to many thousand smaller fragments, characterization and posting in the online catalog remains a work in progress, with about 19% of the total area characterized to date. Other passive collectors, surfaces of opportunity, have been added to the online catalog. For species needing to be concentrated for precise measurement (e.g. oxygen and nitrogen isotopes) an energy-independent parabolic ion mirror focused ions onto a 6.2 cm diameter target. The target materials, as recovered after landing, are described in. The online catalog of these solar wind collectors, a work in progress, can be found at: http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/gencatalog/index.cfm This paper describes the next step, the cataloging of pieces of the Science Canister, which were surfaces exposed to the solar wind or component materials adjacent to solar wind collectors which may have contributed contamination.

  4. The Effects Radiation on Cellular Components of the Immune

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubaidah-Alatas

    2001-01-01

    The immune system describes the body's ability to defend itself against various foreign intruders named as antigens by calling on an immune mechanism. Antigens penetration into body activate the body's immune system that may be humoral response, cellular response, or both. The immune response is primarily mediated by two cell types, lymphocyte and macrophage. This paper will discuss the cellular component of immune system and the radiation effects on various cells involved in system. Moreover, the effects of radiation on humoral and cellular responses and the relation among immunity, cancer and radiotherapy are also described. (author)

  5. Modeling cellular networks in fading environments with dominant specular components

    KAUST Repository

    Alammouri, Ahmad; Elsawy, Hesham; Salem, Ahmed Sultan; Di Renzo, Marco; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    to the Nakagami-m fading in some special cases. However, neither the Rayleigh nor the Nakagami-m accounts for dominant specular components (DSCs) which may appear in realistic fading channels. In this paper, we present a tractable model for cellular networks

  6. Modeling cellular networks in fading environments with dominant specular components

    KAUST Repository

    AlAmmouri, Ahmad

    2016-07-26

    Stochastic geometry (SG) has been widely accepted as a fundamental tool for modeling and analyzing cellular networks. However, the fading models used with SG analysis are mainly confined to the simplistic Rayleigh fading, which is extended to the Nakagami-m fading in some special cases. However, neither the Rayleigh nor the Nakagami-m accounts for dominant specular components (DSCs) which may appear in realistic fading channels. In this paper, we present a tractable model for cellular networks with generalized two-ray (GTR) fading channel. The GTR fading explicitly accounts for two DSCs in addition to the diffuse components and offers high flexibility to capture diverse fading channels that appear in realistic outdoor/indoor wireless communication scenarios. It also encompasses the famous Rayleigh and Rician fading as special cases. To this end, the prominent effect of DSCs is highlighted in terms of average spectral efficiency. © 2016 IEEE.

  7. Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buckley, Julliette M

    2012-02-03

    LPS tolerance has been the focus of extensive scientific and clinical research over the last several decades in an attempt to elucidate the sequence of changes that occur at a molecular level in tolerized cells. Tolerance to components of gram-positive bacterial cell walls such as bacterial lipoprotein and lipoteichoic acid is a much lesser studied, although equally important, phenomenon. This review will focus on cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components and examines the alterations in cell surface receptor expression, changes in intracellular signaling, gene expression and cytokine production, and the phenomenon of cross-tolerance.

  8. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche: The Extracellular Matrix and Cellular Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laween Meran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium comprises a monolayer of polarised columnar cells organised along the crypt-villus axis. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of crypts and are constantly nourished by their surrounding niche for maintenance, self-renewal, and differentiation. The cellular microenvironment including the adjacent Paneth cells, stromal cells, smooth muscle cells, and neural cells as well as the extracellular matrix together constitute the intestinal stem cell niche. A dynamic regulatory network exists among the epithelium, stromal cells, and the matrix via complex signal transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of these biological or mechanical signals could potentially lead to intestinal injury and disease. In this review, we discuss the role of different intestinal stem cell niche components and dissect the interaction between dynamic matrix factors and regulatory signalling during intestinal stem cell homeostasis.

  9. DMPD: Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16885502 Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review. Bu...(.csml) Show Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review. PubmedID 16885502 Title... Cellular reprogramming by gram-positive bacterial components: a review. Authors

  10. Data Curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Melissa, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    In their Top Trends of 2012, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) named data curation as one of the issues to watch in academic libraries in the near future (ACRL, 2012, p. 312). Data curation can be summarized as "the active and ongoing management of data through its life cycle of interest and usefulness to scholarship,…

  11. Evaluation of the radioprotective and curative role of a natural antioxidant against cellular ultrastructural hazards induced in rats by gamma radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Azeem, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of Nigella sativa known as black seed in the amelioration of the histological disorders that occur in different tissues of albino rats exposed to 8 Gy whole body gamma irradiation, delivered as a single dose. Nigella sativa oil was administered daily to rats at a dose of 30 mg / 100 g body weight by gavage, 10 days before irradiation and to another group 10 days after irradiation. Experimental investigations performed one day after radiation for the first group and ten days after radiation for the second group showed that Nigella sativa treatment exerted a radioprotective and curative role on the fine structure of the renal tissue detected as swelling and cristalysis of mitochondria, fragmentation and dilatation damage in the rough endoplasmic reticulum which exhibited in various degrees such as active lysosomes, irregular nuclear membrane, clumped marginal chromatin, pyknotic nucleus with abnormal brush border, absence of infolding and irregularity of basement membrane. Moreover, the radiated hepatic cells showed dilation and thickness in membrane of blood sinasoid as well as lysis of cytoplasmic matrix. Treatment of rats with Nigella sativa during 10 consecutive days either before or after exposure to 8 Gy single dose led to partial improvement of hepatic and kidney cells.The results of the current study indicated that Nigella sativa oil exerted an important protective and curative role against radiation-induced damage in the ultrastructure configuration of kidney and liver cells

  12. [Effects of different trophic modes on growth characteristics, metabolism and cellular components of Chlorella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weibao; Wang, Yang; Yang, Hong; Xi, Yuqin; Han, Rui; Niu, Shiquan

    2015-03-04

    We studied the effects of trophic modes related to glucose and light (photoautotrophy, mixotrophy and heterotrophy) on growth, cellular components and carbon metabolic pathway of Chlorella vulgaris. The parameters about growth of algal cells were investigated by using spectroscopy and chromatography techniques. When trophic mode changed from photoautotrophy to mixotrophy and to heterotrophy successively, the concentrations of soluble sugar, lipid and saturated C16/C18 fatty acids in C. vulgaris increased, whereas the concentrations of unsaturated C16, C18 fatty acids, proteins, photosynthetic pigments and 18 relative amino acids decreased. Light and glucose affect the growth, metabolism and the biochemical components biosynthesis of C. vulgaris. Addition of glucose can promote algal biomass accumulation, stimulate the synthesis of carbonaceous components, but inhibit nitrogenous components. Under illumination cultivation, concentration and consumption level of glucose decided the main trophic modes of C. vulgaris. Mixotrophic and heterotrophic cultivation could promote the growth of algal cells.

  13. Various cellular stress components change as the rat ages: An insight into the putative overall age-related cellular stress network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueno, Marni E; Imai, Kenichi

    2018-02-01

    Cellular stress is mainly comprised of oxidative, nitrosative, and endoplasmic reticulum stresses and has long been correlated to the ageing process. Surprisingly, the age-related difference among the various components in each independent stress pathway and the possible significance of these components in relation to the overall cellular stress network remain to be clearly elucidated. In this study, we obtained blood from ageing rats upon reaching 20-, 40-, and 72-wk.-old. Subsequently, we measured representative cellular stress-linked biomolecules (H 2 O 2 , glutathione reductase, heme, NADPH, NADP, nitric oxide, GADD153) and cell signals [substance P (SP), free fatty acid, calcium, NF-κB] in either or both blood serum and cytosol. Subsequently, network analysis of the overall cellular stress network was performed. Our results show that there are changes affecting stress-linked biomolecules and cell signals as the rat ages. Additionally, based on our network analysis data, we postulate that NADPH, H 2 O 2 , GADD153, and SP are the key components and the interactions between these components are central to the overall age-related cellular stress network in the rat blood. Thus, we propose that the main pathway affecting the overall age-related cellular stress network in the rat blood would entail NADPH-related oxidative stress (involving H 2 O 2 ) triggering GADD153 activation leading to SP induction which in-turn affects other cell signals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Feline leukemia virus infection requires a post-receptor binding envelope-dependent cellular component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2011-12-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (10(1) to 10(2) CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (10(4) to 10(6) CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells.

  15. The influence of cellular structures on flow stress of high strength components manufactured using SLM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahshid, Rasoul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Loft Højbjerre, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing has shown significant improvement in material and machines for high-quality solid freeform fabrication processes such as selective laser melting (SLM). In particular, manufacturing lattice structures using the SLM procedure is of interest. This research examines the effect...... of cellular materials on compression strength. The specimens are manufactured additively using industrial 3D printing systems from high-strength alloy. The material has the right mechanical properties for manufacturing tool components. This includes samples with solid and lattice structures. The Compression...

  16. Cellular and soluble components decrease the viable pathogen counts in milk from dairy cows with subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiishi, Tomoko; Watanabe, Masako; Miyake, Hajime; Hisaeda, Keiichi; Isobe, Naoki

    2017-08-10

    The present study was undertaken to clarify the factors that reduce the viable pathogen count in milk collected from the udders of subclinical mastitic cows during preservation. Milk was centrifuged to divide somatic cells (cellular components, precipitates) and antimicrobial peptides (soluble components, supernatants without fat layer); each fraction was cultured with bacteria, and the number of viable bacteria was assessed prior to and after culture. In 28.8% of milk samples, we noted no viable bacteria immediately after collection; this value increased significantly after a 5-hr incubation of milk with cellular components but not with soluble components (48.1 and 28.8%, respectively). After culture with cellular components, the numbers of bacteria (excluding Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus uberis) and yeast decreased dramatically, although the differences were not statistically significant. After cultivation with soluble components, only yeasts showed a tendency toward decreased mean viability, whereas the mean bacterial counts of S. uberis and T. pyogenes tended to increase after 5-hr preservation with soluble components. These results suggest that most pathogens in high somatic cell count (SCC) milk decreased during preservation at 15 to 25°C, due to both the cellular components and antimicrobial components in the milk. Particularly, the cellular components more potently reduced bacterial counts during preservation.

  17. Asymmetric segregation of damaged cellular components in spatially structured multicellular organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Strandkvist

    Full Text Available The asymmetric distribution of damaged cellular components has been observed in species ranging from fission yeast to humans. To study the potential advantages of damage segregation, we have developed a mathematical model describing ageing mammalian tissue, that is, a multicellular system of somatic cells that do not rejuvenate at cell division. To illustrate the applicability of the model, we specifically consider damage incurred by mutations to mitochondrial DNA, which are thought to be implicated in the mammalian ageing process. We show analytically that the asymmetric distribution of damaged cellular components reduces the overall damage level and increases the longevity of the cell population. Motivated by the experimental reports of damage segregation in human embryonic stem cells, dividing symmetrically with respect to cell-fate, we extend the model to consider spatially structured systems of cells. Imposing spatial structure reduces, but does not eliminate, the advantage of asymmetric division over symmetric division. The results suggest that damage partitioning could be a common strategy for reducing the accumulation of damage in a wider range of cell types than previously thought.

  18. Different cellular effects of four anti-inflammatory eye drops on human corneal epithelial cells: independent in active components

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Mingli; Wang, Yao; Yang, Lingling; Zhou, Qingjun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the cellular effects of four commercially available anti-inflammatory eye drops and their active components on human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) in vitro. Methods The cellular effects of four eye drops (Bromfenac Sodium Hydrate Eye Drops, Pranoprofen Eye Drops, Diclofenac Sodium Eye Drops, and Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops) and their corresponding active components were evaluated in an HCEC line with five in vitro assays. Cell proliferation and migration were...

  19. METHODS OF CONTENTS CURATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kukharenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Content curated - a new activity (started in 2008 qualified network users with process large amounts of information to represent her social network users. To prepare content curators developed 7 weeks distance course, which examines the functions, methods and tools curator. Courses showed a significant relationship success learning on the availability of advanced personal learning environment and the ability to process and analyze information.

  20. Expression of cellular components in granulomatous inflammatory response in Piaractus mesopotamicus model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Gómez Manrique

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to describe and characterize the cellular components during the evolution of chronic granulomatous inflammation in the teleost fish pacus (P. mesopotamicus induced by Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG, using S-100, iNOS and cytokeratin antibodies. 50 fish (120±5.0 g were anesthetized and 45 inoculated with 20 μL (40 mg/mL (2.0 x 10(6 CFU/mg and five inoculated with saline (0,65% into muscle tissue in the laterodorsal region. To evaluate the inflammatory process, nine fish inoculated with BCG and one control were sampled in five periods: 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st and 33rd days post-inoculation (DPI. Immunohistochemical examination showed that the marking with anti-S-100 protein and anti-iNOS antibodies was weak, with a diffuse pattern, between the third and seventh DPI. From the 14th to the 33rd day, the marking became stronger and marked the cytoplasm of the macrophages. Positivity for cytokeratin was initially observed in the 14th DPI, and the stronger immunostaining in the 33rd day, period in which the epithelioid cells were more evident and the granuloma was fully formed. Also after the 14th day, a certain degree of cellular organization was observed, due to the arrangement of the macrophages around the inoculated material, with little evidence of edema. The arrangement of the macrophages around the inoculum, the fibroblasts, the lymphocytes and, in most cases, the presence of melanomacrophages formed the granuloma and kept the inoculum isolated in the 33rd DPI. The present study suggested that the granulomatous experimental model using teleost fish P. mesopotamicus presented a similar response to those observed in mammals, confirming its importance for studies of chronic inflammatory reaction.

  1. A Novel Algorithm for Efficient Downlink Packet Scheduling for Multiple-Component-Carrier Cellular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Liang Chung

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous aggregation of multiple component carriers (CCs for use by a base station constitutes one of the more promising strategies for providing substantially enhanced bandwidths for packet transmissions in 4th and 5th generation cellular systems. To the best of our knowledge, however, few previous studies have undertaken a thorough investigation of various performance aspects of the use of a simple yet effective packet scheduling algorithm in which multiple CCs are aggregated for transmission in such systems. Consequently, the present study presents an efficient packet scheduling algorithm designed on the basis of the proportional fair criterion for use in multiple-CC systems for downlink transmission. The proposed algorithm includes a focus on providing simultaneous transmission support for both real-time (RT and non-RT traffic. This algorithm can, when applied with sufficiently efficient designs, provide adequate utilization of spectrum resources for the purposes of transmissions, while also improving energy efficiency to some extent. According to simulation results, the performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of system throughput, mean delay, and fairness constitute substantial improvements over those of an algorithm in which the CCs are used independently instead of being aggregated.

  2. A Novel Power-Saving Transmission Scheme for Multiple-Component-Carrier Cellular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Liang Chung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As mobile data traffic levels have increased exponentially, resulting in rising energy costs in recent years, the demand for and development of green communication technologies has resulted in various energy-saving designs for cellular systems. At the same time, recent technological advances have allowed multiple component carriers (CCs to be simultaneously utilized in a base station (BS, a development that has made the energy consumption of BSs a matter of increasing concern. To help address this concern, herein we propose a novel scheme aimed at efficiently minimizing the power consumption of BS transceivers during transmission, while still ensuring good service quality and fairness for users. Specifically, the scheme utilizes the dynamic activation/deactivation of CCs during data transmission to increase power usage efficiency. To test its effectiveness, the proposed scheme was applied to a model consisting of a BS with orthogonal frequency division multiple access-based CCs in a downlink transmission environment. The results indicated that, given periods of relatively light traffic loads, the total power consumption of the proposed scheme is significantly lower than that of schemes in which all the CCs of a BS are constantly activated, suggesting the scheme’s potential for reducing both energy costs and carbon dioxide emissions.

  3. The roles of cellular and molecular components of a hematoma at early stage of bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Hoi Ting; Leung, Ping Chung; Ko, Chun Hay

    2018-04-01

    Bone healing is a complex repair process that commences with the formation of a blood clot at the injured bone, termed hematoma. It has evidenced that a lack of a stable hematoma causes delayed bone healing or non-union. The hematoma at the injured bone constitutes the early healing microenvironment. It appears to dictate healing pathways that ends in a regenerative bone. However, the hematoma is often clinically removed from the damaged site. Conversely, blood-derived products have been used in bone tissue engineering for treating critical sized defects, including fibrin gels and platelet-rich plasma. A second generation of platelet concentrate that is based on leukocyte and fibrin content has also been developed and introduced in market. Conflicting effect of these products in bone repair are reported. We propose that the bone healing response becomes dysregulated if the blood response and subsequent formation and properties of a hematoma are altered. This review focuses on the central structural, cellular, and molecular components of a fracture hematoma, with a major emphasis on their roles in regulating bone healing mechanism, and their interactions with mesenchymal stem cells. New angles towards a better understanding of these factors and relevant mechanisms involved at the beginning of bone healing may help to clarify limited or adverse effects of blood-derived products on bone repair. We emphasize that the recreation of an early hematoma niche with critical compositions might emerge as a viable therapeutic strategy for enhanced skeletal tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Different cellular effects of four anti-inflammatory eye drops on human corneal epithelial cells: independent in active components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mingli; Wang, Yao; Yang, Lingling; Zhou, Qingjun

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the cellular effects of four commercially available anti-inflammatory eye drops and their active components on human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) in vitro. The cellular effects of four eye drops (Bromfenac Sodium Hydrate Eye Drops, Pranoprofen Eye Drops, Diclofenac Sodium Eye Drops, and Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops) and their corresponding active components were evaluated in an HCEC line with five in vitro assays. Cell proliferation and migration were measured using 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1)-3 5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay and transwell migration assay. Cell damage was determined with the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Cell viability and median lethal time (LT₅₀) were measured by 7-amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) staining and flow cytometry analysis. Cellular effects after exposure of HCECs to the four anti-inflammatory eye drops were concentration dependent. The differences of cellular toxicity on cell proliferation became significant at lower concentrations (Eye Drops showed significant increasing effects on cell damage and viability when compared with the other three solutions. Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops inhibited the migration of HCECs significantly. Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops showed the quickest effect on cell viability: the LT₅₀ was 3.28, 9.23, 10.38, and 23.80 min for Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops, Diclofenac Sodium Eye Drops, Pranoprofen Eye Drops, and Bromfenac Sodium Hydrate Eye Drops, respectively. However, the comparisons of cellular toxicity revealed significant differences between the eye drops and their active components under the same concentration. The corneal epithelial toxicity differences among the active components of the four eye drops became significant as higher concentration (>0.020%). The four anti-inflammatory eye drops showed different cellular effects on HCECs, and the toxicity was not related with their active components, which provides new reference for the clinical application and drug

  5. Mixing of two-component flow in a simplified stirred tank with cellular automaton method; Cellular automaton ho ni yoru kakuhan sonai no niseibunryu no kongo keisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, S; Takahashi, R [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-25

    The applicability of a cellular automaton technique to engineering problems will be examined by dealing with mixing in multicomponent flow. The quality and accumulation rate of the product depend on the mixing of raw materials basically. After thoroughly understanding the mixing process, we optimize the geometrical allocation of such elements as a propeller with casing, a chimney and a product output nozzle in a reactor. Usually mixing is formulated by partial differential equations of conservation laws and empirical formulae, and solved numerically by the finite difference technique. In order to evaluate the fine structure of time-dependent interfacial behavior in multicomponent flow, the cellular automaton technique is used, since this has an advantage of describing the pattern formation in detail. It will be demonstrated in the present paper that mixing of two-component immiscible flow is reasonably simulated mesoscopically. 13 refs., 17 figs.

  6. Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin is a novel structural component of human erythrocytes and a biomarker of cellular stress and senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna H Antonelou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secretory Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin (sCLU is a ubiquitously expressed chaperone that has been functionally implicated in several pathological conditions of increased oxidative injury, including aging. Nevertheless, the biological role of sCLU in red blood cells (RBCs remained largely unknown. In the current study we identified sCLU as a component of human RBCs and we undertook a detailed analysis of its cellular topology. Moreover, we studied the erythrocytic membrane sCLU content during organismal aging, in conditions of increased organismal stress and accelerated RBCs senescence, as well as during physiological in vivo cellular senescence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a combination of molecular, biochemical and high resolution microscopical methods we found that sCLU is a novel structural component of RBCs extra- and intracellular plasma membrane and cytosol. We observed that the RBCs membrane-associated sCLU decreases during organismal aging or exposure to acute stress (e.g. smoking, in patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, as well as during RBCs in vivo senescence. In all cases, sCLU reduction paralleled the expression of typical cellular senescence, redox imbalance and erythrophagocytosis markers which are also indicative of the senescence- and oxidative stress-mediated RBCs membrane vesiculation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that sCLU at the mature RBCs is not a silent remnant of the erythroid precursors, but an active component being functionally implicated in the signalling mechanisms of cellular senescence and oxidative stress-responses in both healthy and diseased organism. The reduced sCLU protein levels in the RBCs membrane following cell exposure to various endogenous or exogenous stressors closely correlates to the levels of cellular senescence and redox imbalance markers, suggesting the usefulness of sCLU as a sensitive biomarker of senescence and cellular stress.

  7. Constructing Data Curation Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a brief literature review and then introduces the methods, design, and construction of the Data Curation Profile, an instrument that can be used to provide detailed information on particular data forms that might be curated by an academic library. These data forms are presented in the context of the related sub-disciplinary research area, and they provide the flow of the research process from which these data are generated. The profiles also represent the needs for data curation from the perspective of the data producers, using their own language. As such, they support the exploration of data curation across different research domains in real and practical terms. With the sponsorship of the Institute of Museum and Library Services, investigators from Purdue University and the University of Illinois interviewed 19 faculty subjects to identify needs for discovery, access, preservation, and reuse of their research data. For each subject, a profile was constructed that includes information about his or her general research, data forms and stages, value of data, data ingest, intellectual property, organization and description of data, tools, interoperability, impact and prestige, data management, and preservation. Each profile also presents a specific dataset supplied by the subject to serve as a concrete example. The Data Curation Profiles are being published to a public wiki for questions and discussion, and a blank template will be disseminated with guidelines for others to create and share their own profiles. This study was conducted primarily from the viewpoint of librarians interacting with faculty researchers; however, it is expected that these findings will complement a wide variety of data curation research and practice outside of librarianship and the university environment.

  8. Effects of cellular structure and cell wall components on water holding capacity of mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paudel, Ekaraj; Boom, Remko M.; Haaren, van Els; Siccama, Joanne; Sman, van der Ruud G.M.

    2016-01-01

    In a sequel of papers we have investigated effects of different physical contributions to the water holding capacity of foods by considering the common white button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus). In the current paper of our sequel, we consider individual contributions of the cellular phase to

  9. Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy of Individual Cells andCellular Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; Fore, S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Huser, T

    2008-05-15

    Raman spectroscopy provides the unique opportunity to non-destructively analyze chemical concentrations on the submicron length scale in individual cells without the need for optical labels. This enables the rapid assessment of cellular biochemistry inside living cells, and it allows for their continuous analysis to determine cellular response to external events. Here, we review recent developments in the analysis of single cells, subcellular compartments, and chemical imaging based on Raman spectroscopic techniques. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy provides for the full spectral assessment of cellular biochemistry, while coherent Raman techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is primarily used as an imaging tool comparable to confocal fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are complemented by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which provides higher sensitivity and local specificity, and also extends the techniques to chemical indicators, i.e. pH sensing. We review the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, demonstrate some of their applications and discuss their potential for future research in cell biology and biomedicine.

  10. Screen Practice in Curating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    During the past one and a half decade, a curatorial orientation towards "screen practice" has expanded the moving image and digital art into the public domain, exploring alternative artistic uses of the screen. The emergence of urban LED screens in the late 1990s provided a new venue that allowed...... for digital art to expand into public space. It also offered a political point of departure, inviting for confrontation with the Spectacle and with the politics and ideology of the screen as a mass communication medium that instrumentalized spectator positions. In this article I propose that screen practice...... to the dispositif of screen practice in curating, resulting in a medium-based curatorial discourse. With reference to the nomadic exhibition project Nordic Outbreak that I co-curated with Nina Colosi in 2013 and 2014, I suggest that the topos of the defined visual display area, frequently still known as "the screen...

  11. Curating Gothic Nightmares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Tilley

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This review takes the occasion of a workshop given by Martin Myrone, curator of Gothic Nightmares: Fuseli, Blake, and the Romantic Imagination (Tate Britain, 2006 as a starting point to reflect on the practice of curating, and its relation to questions of the verbal and the visual in contemporary art historical practice. The exhibition prompted an engagement with questions of the genre of Gothic, through a dramatic display of the differences between ‘the Gothic' in literature and ‘the Gothic' in the visual arts within eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century culture. I also address the various ways in which 'the Gothic' was interpreted and reinscribed by visitors, especially those who dressed up for the exhibition. Finally, I consider some of the show's ‘marginalia' (specifically the catalogue, exploring the ways in which these extra events and texts shaped, and continue to shape, the cultural effect of the exhibition.

  12. The DCC Curation Lifecycle Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Higgins

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Lifecycle management of digital materials is necessary to ensure their continuity. The DCC Curation Lifecycle Model has been developed as a generic, curation-specific, tool which can be used, in conjunction with relevant standards, to plan curation and preservation activities to different levels of granularity. The DCC will use the model: as a training tool for data creators, data curators and data users; to organise and plan their resources; and to help organisations identify risks to their digital assets and plan management strategies for their successful curation.

  13. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  14. Toxins in Botanical Dietary Supplements: Blue Cohosh Components Disrupt Cellular Respiration and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA “Black Box” warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3) exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage. PMID:24328138

  15. Imaging experimental infective endocarditis with indium-111-labeled blood cellular components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riba, A.L.; Thakur, M.L.; Gottschalk, A.; Andriole, V.T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1979-01-01

    The capability of radionuclide imaging to detect experimental aortic valve infective endocarditis was assessed with indium-111 ( 111 In)-labeled blood cells. Sequential cardiac imaging and tissue distribution studies were obtained in 17 rabbits with infective endocarditis after administration of 111 In-platelets and in five after 111 In-polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Forty-eight to 72 hours after platelet administration, in vivo imaging demonstrated abnormal 111 In uptake in all animals in the region of the aortic valve in an anatomically distinct pattern. Images of the excised heart showed discrete cardiac uptake conforming to the in vivo image and gross pathological examination. 111 In-platelet uptake in vegetations from the 17 animals averaged 240 +- 41 times greater than that in normal myocardium and 99 +- 15 times greater uptake in blood. In contrast, 111 In-leukocyte cardiac imaging showed no abnormal aortic valve uptake 24 hours after tracer administration and the lesion myocardium activity ratio was only 5 +- 2 (3 +- 1 for lesion/blood activity). Four normal rabbits demonstrated neither positive 111 In-platelet scintigraphs nor abnormal cardiac tissue uptake. Likewise, noncellular 111 In was not concentrated to any significant extent in three animals with infective endocarditis. This study demonstrates that 111 In-platelet, but not leukocyte cardiac imaging, is a sensitive technique for detecting experimental infective endocarditis. The imaging data conform to the cellular pathology of the infective endocarditis vegetation

  16. Estimation of cellular manufacturing cost components using simulation and activity-based costing

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Savory; Robert Williams

    2010-01-01

    It can be difficult estimating all of the cost components that are attributed to a machined part.  This problem is more pronounced when a factory uses group technology manufacturing cells as opposed to a functional or process layout of a job shop.  This paper describes how activity-based costing (ABC) concepts can be integrated into a discrete-event simulation model of a U-shaped manufacturing cell producing a part family with four members.  The simulation model generates detai...

  17. Estimation of cellular manufacturing cost components using simulation and activity-based costing

    OpenAIRE

    Savory, Paul

    2010-01-01

    It can be difficult estimating all of the cost components that are attributed to a machined part. This problem is more pronounced when a factory uses group technology manufacturing cells as opposed to a functional or process layout of a job shop. This paper describes how activity-based costing (ABC) concepts can be integrated into a discrete-event simulation model of a U-shaped manufacturing cell producing a part family with four members. The simulation model generates detailed Bills of Ac...

  18. Curating the Poster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2017-01-01

    Parallel to the primary functions performed by posters in the urban environment, we find a range of curatorial practices that tie the poster, a mass-produced graphic design media, to the museum institution. Yet little research has attempted to uncover the diverse subject of curatorial work...... and the process where posters created to live in a real-world environment are relocated in a museum. According to Peter Bil’ak (2006), it creates a situation where ”the entire raison d’être of the work is lost as a side effect of losing the context of the work”. The article investigates how environmental...... structures can work as guidelines for curating posters and graphic design in a museum context. By applying an ecological view to design, specifically the semiotic notion “counter-ability”, it stresses the reciprocal relationship of humans and their built and product-designed environments. It further suggests...

  19. Two key temporally distinguishable molecular and cellular components of white adipose tissue browning during cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Aleksandra; Golic, Igor; Markelic, Milica; Stancic, Ana; Otasevic, Vesna; Buzadzic, Biljana; Korac, Aleksandra; Korac, Bato

    2015-08-01

    White to brown adipose tissue conversion and thermogenesis can be ignited by different conditions or agents and its sustainability over the long term is still unclear. Browning of rat retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (rpWAT) during cold acclimation involves two temporally apparent components: (1) a predominant non-selective browning of most adipocytes and an initial sharp but transient induction of uncoupling protein 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) coactivator-1α, PPARγ and PPARα expression, and (2) the subsistence of relatively few thermogenically competent adipocytes after 45 days of cold acclimation. The different behaviours of two rpWAT beige/brown adipocyte subsets control temporal aspects of the browning process, and thus regulation of both components may influence body weight and the potential successfulness of anti-obesity therapies. Conversion of white into brown adipose tissue may have important implications in obesity resistance and treatment. Several browning agents or conditions ignite thermogenesis in white adipose tissue (WAT). To reveal the capacity of WAT to function in a brownish/burning mode over the long term, we investigated the progression of the rat retroperitoneal WAT (rpWAT) browning during 45 days of cold acclimation. During the early stages of cold acclimation, the majority of rpWAT adipocytes underwent multilocularization and thermogenic-profile induction, as demonstrated by the presence of a multitude of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-immunopositive paucilocular adipocytes containing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and PR domain-containing 16 (PRDM16) in their nuclei. After 45 days, all adipocytes remained PRDM16 immunopositive, but only a few multilocular adipocytes rich in mitochondria remained UCP1/PGC-1α immunopositive. Molecular evidence showed that thermogenic recruitment of rpWAT occurred following cold exposure, but returned to starting levels after cold

  20. The iron-sulfur cluster assembly network component NARFL is a key element in the cellular defense against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Monique V; Rockx, Davy A P; Oostra, Anneke B; Joenje, Hans; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this study was to explore cellular changes associated with increased resistance to atmospheric oxygen using high-resolution DNA and RNA profiling combined with functional studies. Two independently selected oxygen-resistant substrains of HeLa cells (capable of proliferating at >80% O2, i.e. hyperoxia) were compared with their parental cells (adapted to growth at 20% O2, but unable to grow at >80% O2). A striking consistent alteration found to be associated with the oxygen-resistant state appeared to be an amplified and overexpressed region on chromosome 16p13.3 harboring 21 genes. The driver gene of this amplification was identified by functional studies as NARFL, which encodes a component of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly system. In line with this result we found the cytosolic c-aconitase activity as well as the nuclear protein RTEL1, both Fe-S dependent proteins, to be protected by NARFL overexpression under hyperoxia. In addition, we observed a protective effect of NARFL against hyperoxia-induced loss of sister-chromatid cohesion. NARFL thus appeared to be a key factor in the cellular defense against hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress in human cells. Our findings suggest that new insight into age-related degenerative processes may come from studies that specifically address the involvement of iron-sulfur proteins. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 454 Transcriptome sequencing suggests a role for two-component signalling in cellularization and differentiation of barley endosperm transfer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Johannes; Hollmann, Julien; Rutten, Twan; Weber, Hans; Scholz, Uwe; Weschke, Winfriede

    2012-01-01

    Cell specification and differentiation in the endosperm of cereals starts at the maternal-filial boundary and generates the endosperm transfer cells (ETCs). Besides the importance in assimilate transfer, ETCs are proposed to play an essential role in the regulation of endosperm differentiation by affecting development of proximate endosperm tissues. We attempted to identify signalling elements involved in early endosperm differentiation by using a combination of laser-assisted microdissection and 454 transcriptome sequencing. 454 sequencing of the differentiating ETC region from the syncytial state until functionality in transfer processes captured a high proportion of novel transcripts which are not available in existing barley EST databases. Intriguingly, the ETC-transcriptome showed a high abundance of elements of the two-component signalling (TCS) system suggesting an outstanding role in ETC differentiation. All components and subfamilies of the TCS, including distinct kinds of membrane-bound receptors, have been identified to be expressed in ETCs. The TCS system represents an ancient signal transduction system firstly discovered in bacteria and has previously been shown to be co-opted by eukaryotes, like fungi and plants, whereas in animals and humans this signalling route does not exist. Transcript profiling of TCS elements by qRT-PCR suggested pivotal roles for specific phosphorelays activated in a coordinated time flow during ETC cellularization and differentiation. ETC-specificity of transcriptionally activated TCS phosphorelays was assessed for early differentiation and cellularization contrasting to an extension of expression to other grain tissues at the beginning of ETC maturation. Features of candidate genes of distinct phosphorelays and transcriptional activation of genes putatively implicated in hormone signalling pathways hint at a crosstalk of hormonal influences, putatively ABA and ethylene, and TCS signalling. Our findings suggest an integral

  2. The Gene Ontology (GO) Cellular Component Ontology: integration with SAO (Subcellular Anatomy Ontology) and other recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The Gene Ontology (GO) (http://www.geneontology.org/) contains a set of terms for describing the activity and actions of gene products across all kingdoms of life. Each of these activities is executed in a location within a cell or in the vicinity of a cell. In order to capture this context, the GO includes a sub-ontology called the Cellular Component (CC) ontology (GO-CCO). The primary use of this ontology is for GO annotation, but it has also been used for phenotype annotation, and for the annotation of images. Another ontology with similar scope to the GO-CCO is the Subcellular Anatomy Ontology (SAO), part of the Neuroscience Information Framework Standard (NIFSTD) suite of ontologies. The SAO also covers cell components, but in the domain of neuroscience. Description Recently, the GO-CCO was enriched in content and links to the Biological Process and Molecular Function branches of GO as well as to other ontologies. This was achieved in several ways. We carried out an amalgamation of SAO terms with GO-CCO ones; as a result, nearly 100 new neuroscience-related terms were added to the GO. The GO-CCO also contains relationships to GO Biological Process and Molecular Function terms, as well as connecting to external ontologies such as the Cell Ontology (CL). Terms representing protein complexes in the Protein Ontology (PRO) reference GO-CCO terms for their species-generic counterparts. GO-CCO terms can also be used to search a variety of databases. Conclusions In this publication we provide an overview of the GO-CCO, its overall design, and some recent extensions that make use of additional spatial information. One of the most recent developments of the GO-CCO was the merging in of the SAO, resulting in a single unified ontology designed to serve the needs of GO annotators as well as the specific needs of the neuroscience community. PMID:24093723

  3. Zika virus infection of cellular components of the blood-retinal barriers: implications for viral associated congenital ocular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Tracoyia; Alcendor, Donald J

    2017-03-03

    Ocular abnormalities present in microcephalic infants with presumed Zika virus (ZIKV) congenital disease includes focal pigment mottling of the retina, chorioretinal atrophy, optic nerve abnormalities, and lens dislocation. Target cells in the ocular compartment for ZIKV infectivity are unknown. The cellular response of ocular cells to ZIKV infection has not been described. Mechanisms for viral dissemination in the ocular compartment of ZIKV-infected infants and adults have not been reported. Here, we identify target cells for ZIKV infectivity in both the inner and outer blood-retinal barriers (IBRB and OBRB), describe the cytokine expression profile in the IBRB after ZIKV exposure, and propose a mechanism for viral dissemination in the retina. We expose primary cellular components of the IBRB including human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, retinal pericytes, and Müller cells as well as retinal pigmented epithelial cells of the OBRB to the PRVABC56 strain of ZIKV. Viral infectivity was analyzed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and qRT-PCR). Angiogenic and proinflammatory cytokines were measured by Luminex assays. We find by immunofluorescent staining using the Flavivirus 4G2 monoclonal antibody that retinal endothelial cells and pericytes of the IBRB and retinal pigmented epithelial cells of the OBRB are fully permissive for ZIKV infection but not Müller cells when compared to mock-infected controls. We confirmed ZIKV infectivity in retinal endothelial cells, retinal pericytes, and retinal pigmented epithelial cells by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR using ZIKV-specific oligonucleotide primers. Expression profiles by Luminex assays in retinal endothelial cells infected with ZIKV revealed a marginal increase in levels of beta-2 microglobulin (β2-m), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP

  4. Teacher Training in Curative Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Kristen D.; Maier, Manfred

    1992-01-01

    This article considers the application of the philosophical and educational principles of Rudolf Steiner, called "anthroposophy," to the training of teachers and curative educators in the Waldorf schools. Special emphasis is on the Camphill movement which focuses on therapeutic schools and communities for children with special needs. (DB)

  5. Digital curation theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Hedges, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Digital curation is a multi-skilled profession with a key role to play not only in domains traditionally associated with the management of information, such as libraries and archives, but in a broad range of market sectors. Digital information is a defining feature of our age. As individuals we increasingly communicate and record our lives and memories in digital form, whether consciously or as a by-product of broader social, cultural and business activities. Throughout government and industry, there is a pressing need to manage complex information assets and to exploit their social, cultural and commercial value. This book addresses the key strategic, technical and practical issues around digital curation, curatorial practice, and locating the discussions within an appropriate theoretical context.

  6. Curative radiotherapy of supraglottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ho; Chai, Gyu Young

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of curative radiotherapy in the management of supraglottic cancer. Twenty-one patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the supraglottis were treated with radiotherapy at Gyeongsang National University Hospital between 1990 and 1994. Median follow-up period was 36 months and 95% were observed for at least 2 years. Actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 39.3% for 21 patients. The 5-year actuarial survival rate was 75.0% in Stage I, 42.9% in Stage II, 33.3% in Stage III, and 28.6% in Stage IV(p=0.54). The 5-year local control rate was 52.0% for 21 patients. The 5-year local control rate was 75.0% in Stage I, 57.1% in Stage II, 66.7% in Stage III, and 28.6% in Stage IV(p=0.33). Double primary cancer was developed in 3 patients and those were all esophageal cancers. In early stage(Stage I and II) supraglottic cancer, curative radiotherapy would be a treatment of choice and surgery would be better to be reserved for salvage of radiotherapy failure. In advanced stage(Stage III and IV), radiotherapy alone is inadequate for curative therapy and combination with surgery should be done in operable patients. This report emphasizes the importance of esophagoscopy and esophagogram at the follow-up of patients with supraglottic cancer

  7. Characterization of the Kin17 gene, a new component of the cellular response to ultra-violet radiations in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannouche, Patricia-Laila

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to characterize the expression of a mammal gene, called Kin-17, which codes for a protein which has a structural homology with the RecA protein of E. coli. This protein plays a crucial role in the cellular response to irradiations and in mutagenesis. In order to better understand the Kin 17 protein function, the author determined the Kin 17 gene expression profile in tissues and cells in culture. It appears that this expression is ubiquitous and weak. The Kin 17 protein quantity and localisation are also studied. The author suggests that this protein belongs to an intra-nuclear network of proteins required during cell growth, and might influence biological processes related to the cellular cycle. The co-localisation of the protein with the T-antigen is studied by immunofluorescence. The expression profile of different Kin-17 genes in cells after UV irradiation has been studied. The obtained results and observations suggest that the Kin 17 protein intervenes in a biological process which allows a cell to counterbalance toxic effects of UV radiations [fr

  8. Cellular Components, Including Stem-Like Cells, of Preterm Mother's Mature Milk as Compared with Those in Her Colostrum: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaingade, Pankaj; Somasundaram, Indumathi; Sharma, Akshita; Patel, Darshan; Marappagounder, Dhanasekaran

    2017-09-01

    Whether the preterm mothers' mature milk retains the same cellular components as those in colostrum including stem-like cell, cell adhesion molecules, and immune cells. A total of five preterm mothers were recruited for the study having an average age of 30.2 years and gestational age of 29.8 weeks from the Pristine Women's Hospital, Kolhapur. Colostrum milk was collected within 2-5 days and matured milk was collected 20-30 days after delivery from the same mothers. Integral cellular components of 22 markers including stem cells, immune cells, and cell adhesion molecules were measured using flowcytometry. Preterm mature milk was found to possess higher expressions of hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem-like cells, immune cells, few cell adhesion molecules, and side population cells than colostrum. The increased level of these different cell components in mature milk may be important in the long-term preterm baby's health growth. Further similar research in a larger population of various gestational ages and lactation stages of preterm mothers is warranted to support these pilot findings.

  9. Systematic genetic array analysis links the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SAGA/SLIK and NuA4 component Tra1 to multiple cellular processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Brenda

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tra1 is an essential 437-kDa component of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SAGA/SLIK and NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complexes. It is a member of a group of key signaling molecules that share a carboxyl-terminal domain related to phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase but unlike many family members, it lacks kinase activity. To identify genetic interactions for TRA1 and provide insight into its function we have performed a systematic genetic array analysis (SGA on tra1SRR3413, an allele that is defective in transcriptional regulation. Results The SGA analysis revealed 114 synthetic slow growth/lethal (SSL interactions for tra1SRR3413. The interacting genes are involved in a range of cellular processes including gene expression, mitochondrial function, and membrane sorting/protein trafficking. In addition many of the genes have roles in the cellular response to stress. A hierarchal cluster analysis revealed that the pattern of SSL interactions for tra1SRR3413 most closely resembles deletions of a group of regulatory GTPases required for membrane sorting/protein trafficking. Consistent with a role for Tra1 in cellular stress, the tra1SRR3413 strain was sensitive to rapamycin. In addition, calcofluor white sensitivity of the strain was enhanced by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, a phenotype shared with the Ada components of the SAGA/SLIK complex. Through analysis of a GFP-Tra1 fusion we show that Tra1 is principally localized to the nucleus. Conclusion We have demonstrated a genetic association of Tra1 with nuclear, mitochondrial and membrane processes. The identity of the SSL genes also connects Tra1 with cellular stress, a result confirmed by the sensitivity of the tra1SRR3413 strain to a variety of stress conditions. Based upon the nuclear localization of GFP-Tra1 and the finding that deletion of the Ada components of the SAGA complex result in similar phenotypes as tra1SRR3413, we suggest that the effects of tra1SRR3413

  10. Effect of secondary metabolite of Actinidia deliciosa on the biofilm and extra-cellular matrix components of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vishvanath; Tiwari, Deepika; Patel, Varsha; Tiwari, Monalisa

    2017-09-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, opportunistic nosocomial pathogen, increases gradually in the clinical setup. The high level of resistance mechanisms acquired by these bacteria makes their eradication difficult and biofilm formation is one of them. Biofilm comprises of closely packed bacterial population crowded together by extra-cellular matrix (ECM). ECM contains bacterial secreted polymers such as exopolysaccharides (EPS), proteins and extracellular-DNA (e-DNA) and rarely amyloidogenic proteins. Biofilm offers protection of underlying bacterial population against chemotherapeutic agents and host immune system. Therefore, present efforts are focused to find a novel therapeutic that targets biofilm-associated infections. Plants are used as a natural therapeutic for numerous ailments. In order to find an alternative of the available antibacterial drugs, we have focused on the natural herbal active compounds. In this study, we have extracted active compounds from various medicinal plants and screened its anti-biofilm activity against carbapenem resistant strain of A. baumannii. Results showed that polar extract of kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa) and clove (Syzygium aromaticum) exhibit effective anti-biofilm activity. These two plants were also used for their phytochemical screening and TLC profiling to find out the constituting secondary metabolites. Actinidia deliciosa extract contains an alkaloid (sanquinarine) as well as a flavonoid (hydroxyflavone). Anti-biofilm effect of this extract on the ECM of A. baumannii showed that it reduces EPS, protein and eDNA contents in the ECM. Proteins of ECM have also shown to form amyloid like structure, which was evident from its interaction with the Congo Red. CFU counting after Actinidia deliciosa extract treatment also supported the results. Therefore, it can be concluded that polar extract of A. deliciosa can be used to find suitable alternative therapeutic to control biofilm formation by carbapenem resistant strain of

  11. Immunisation in a curative setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Nielsen, B; Rahman, A K

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the uptake of vaccination offered to women and children attending a curative health facility. DESIGN: Prospective survey over eight months of the uptake of vaccination offered to unimmunised women and children attending a diarrhoeal treatment centre as patients or attendants....... SETTING: The International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh. SUBJECTS: An estimated 19,349 unimmunised women aged 15 to 45 and 17,372 children attending the centre for treatment or accompanying patients between 1 January and 31 August 1989. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number...... of women and children who were unimmunised or incompletely immunised was calculated and the percentage of this target population accepting vaccination was recorded. RESULTS: 7530 (84.2%) Of 8944 eligible children and 7730 (40.4%) of 19,138 eligible women were vaccinated. Of the children, 63.8% were boys...

  12. MET network in PubMed: a text-mined network visualization and curation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hong-Jie; Su, Chu-Hsien; Lai, Po-Ting; Huang, Ming-Siang; Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Rose Jue, Toni; Rao, Shruti; Chou, Hui-Jou; Milacic, Marija; Singh, Onkar; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the dissemination of a cancer/tumor from one organ to another, and it is the most dangerous stage during cancer progression, causing more than 90% of cancer deaths. Improving the understanding of the complicated cellular mechanisms underlying metastasis requires investigations of the signaling pathways. To this end, we developed a METastasis (MET) network visualization and curation tool to assist metastasis researchers retrieve network information of interest while browsing through the large volume of studies in PubMed. MET can recognize relations among genes, cancers, tissues and organs of metastasis mentioned in the literature through text-mining techniques, and then produce a visualization of all mined relations in a metastasis network. To facilitate the curation process, MET is developed as a browser extension that allows curators to review and edit concepts and relations related to metastasis directly in PubMed. PubMed users can also view the metastatic networks integrated from the large collection of research papers directly through MET. For the BioCreative 2015 interactive track (IAT), a curation task was proposed to curate metastatic networks among PubMed abstracts. Six curators participated in the proposed task and a post-IAT task, curating 963 unique metastatic relations from 174 PubMed abstracts using MET.Database URL: http://btm.tmu.edu.tw/metastasisway. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Pentoxifylline regulates the cellular adhesion and its allied receptors to extracellular matrix components in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Peeyush N; Gude, Rajiv P

    2014-02-01

    Pentoxifylline (PTX) is a methylxanthine derivative that improves blood flow by decreasing its viscosity. Being an inhibitor of platelet aggregation, it can thus reduce the adhesiveness of cancer cells prolonging their circulation time. This delay in forming secondary tumours makes them more prone to immunological surveillance. Recently, we have evaluated its anti-metastatic efficacy against breast cancer, using MDA-MB-231 model system. In view of this, we had ascertained the effect of PTX on adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells to extracellular matrix components (ECM) and its allied receptors such as the integrins. PTX affected adhesion of breast cancer cells to matrigel, collagen type IV, fibronectin and laminin in a dose dependent manner. Further, PTX showed a differential effect on integrin expression profile. The experimental metastasis model using NOD-SCID mice showed lesser tumour island formation when treated with PTX compared to the control. These findings further substantiate the anti-adhesive potential of PTX in breast cancer and warrant further insights into the functional regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of meniscus substitutes using a mixture of biocompatible polymers and extra cellular matrix components by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Calzada, G; Hernandez-Martínez, A R; Cruz-Soto, M; Ramírez-Cardona, M; Rangel, D; Molina, G A; Luna-Barcenas, G; Estevez, M

    2016-04-01

    Despite the significant advances in the meniscus tissue engineering field, it is difficult to recreate the complex structure and organization of the collagenous matrix of the meniscus. In this work, we developed a meniscus prototype to be used as substitute or scaffold for the regeneration of the meniscal matrix, recreating the differential morphology of the meniscus by electrospinning. Synthetic biocompatible polymers were combined with the extracellular matrix component, collagen and used to replicate the meniscus. We studied the correlation between mechanical and structural properties of the polymer blend as a function of collagen concentration. Fibers were collected on a surface of a rapidly rotating precast mold, to accurately replicate each sectional morphology of the meniscus; different electro-tissues were produced. Detailed XRD analyses exhibited structural changes developed by electrospinning. We achieved to integrate all these electro-tissues to form a complete synthetic meniscus. Vascularization tests were performed to assess the potential use of our novel polymeric blend for promising meniscus regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced Curation Activities at NASA: Preparation for Upcoming Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M. D.; Evans, C. A.; McCubbin, F. M.; Harrington, A. D.; Regberg, A. B.; Snead, C. J.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2017-07-01

    NASA Curation cares for NASA's astromaterials and performs advanced curation so as to improve current practices and prepare for future collections. Cold curation, microbial monitoring, contamination control/knowledge and other aspects are reviewed.

  16. Alfred Drury: The Artist as Curator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a series of reflections on the experience of curating the exhibition ‘Alfred Drury and the New Sculpture’ in 2013. In particular, it charts the evolution of the design of the exhibition, notably its central tableau based on a photograph of the sculptor Alfred Drury’s studio in 1900. This photograph records a display of Drury’s works for visiting Australian patrons, and could be said to record evidence of the artist curating his own work. The legitimacy of deriving a curatorial approach from this photographic evidence is discussed, along with the broader problem of ‘historicizing’ approaches to curating.

  17. Cellular components required for mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elledge, S.J.; Perry, K.L.; Krueger, J.H.; Mitchell, B.B.; Walker, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    We have cloned the umuD and umuC genes of Escherichia coli and have shown that they code for two proteins of 16,000 and 45,000 daltons respectively; the two genes are organized in an operon that is repressed by the LexA protein. Similarly, we have shown that the mucA and mucB genes of the mutagenesis-enhancing plasmid pKM101 code for proteins of 16,000 and 45,000 daltons respectively and, like umuD/C, the genes are organized in an operon. Preliminary sequencing studies have indicated that the umuD/C and mucA/B loci are approximately 50% homologous at both the nucleic acid and deduced protein sequence levels and that the umuD gene is preceeded by two putative LexA binding sites separated by 4 basepairs. Like umuD/C, the mucA/B genes of pKM101 are induced by DNA damage and are repressed by LexA. In addition to inducing recA + lexA + -regulated din genes, DNA damaging agents such as uv and nalidixic acid also induce the heat shock proteins GroEL and DnaK in an htpR-dependent fashion. 22 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  18. CellNetVis: a web tool for visualization of biological networks using force-directed layout constrained by cellular components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Henry; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Telles, Guilherme P; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Minghim, Rosane

    2017-09-13

    The advent of "omics" science has brought new perspectives in contemporary biology through the high-throughput analyses of molecular interactions, providing new clues in protein/gene function and in the organization of biological pathways. Biomolecular interaction networks, or graphs, are simple abstract representations where the components of a cell (e.g. proteins, metabolites etc.) are represented by nodes and their interactions are represented by edges. An appropriate visualization of data is crucial for understanding such networks, since pathways are related to functions that occur in specific regions of the cell. The force-directed layout is an important and widely used technique to draw networks according to their topologies. Placing the networks into cellular compartments helps to quickly identify where network elements are located and, more specifically, concentrated. Currently, only a few tools provide the capability of visually organizing networks by cellular compartments. Most of them cannot handle large and dense networks. Even for small networks with hundreds of nodes the available tools are not able to reposition the network while the user is interacting, limiting the visual exploration capability. Here we propose CellNetVis, a web tool to easily display biological networks in a cell diagram employing a constrained force-directed layout algorithm. The tool is freely available and open-source. It was originally designed for networks generated by the Integrated Interactome System and can be used with networks from others databases, like InnateDB. CellNetVis has demonstrated to be applicable for dynamic investigation of complex networks over a consistent representation of a cell on the Web, with capabilities not matched elsewhere.

  19. A relevancy algorithm for curating earth science data around phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskey, Manil; Ramachandran, Rahul; Li, Xiang; Weigel, Amanda; Bugbee, Kaylin; Gatlin, Patrick; Miller, J. J.

    2017-09-01

    Earth science data are being collected for various science needs and applications, processed using different algorithms at multiple resolutions and coverages, and then archived at different archiving centers for distribution and stewardship causing difficulty in data discovery. Curation, which typically occurs in museums, art galleries, and libraries, is traditionally defined as the process of collecting and organizing information around a common subject matter or a topic of interest. Curating data sets around topics or areas of interest addresses some of the data discovery needs in the field of Earth science, especially for unanticipated users of data. This paper describes a methodology to automate search and selection of data around specific phenomena. Different components of the methodology including the assumptions, the process, and the relevancy ranking algorithm are described. The paper makes two unique contributions to improving data search and discovery capabilities. First, the paper describes a novel methodology developed for automatically curating data around a topic using Earth science metadata records. Second, the methodology has been implemented as a stand-alone web service that is utilized to augment search and usability of data in a variety of tools.

  20. Interaction with culture medium components, cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of cobalt nanoparticles, microparticles and ions in Balb/3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbioni, Enrico; Fortaner, Salvador; Farina, Massimo; Del Torchio, Riccardo; Petrarca, Claudia; Bernardini, Giovanni; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Perconti, Silvia; Di Giampaolo, Luca; Gornati, Rosalba; Di Gioacchino, Mario

    2014-02-01

    The mechanistic understanding of nanotoxicity requires the physico-chemical characterisation of nanoparticles (NP), and their comparative investigation relative to the corresponding ions and microparticles (MP). Following this approach, the authors studied the dissolution, interaction with medium components, bioavailability in culture medium, uptake and intracellular distribution of radiolabelled Co forms (CoNP, CoMP and Co(2+)) in Balb/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Co(2+) first saturates the binding sites of molecules in the extracellular milieu (e.g., albumin and histidine) and on the cell surface. Only after saturation, Co(2+) is actively uptaken. CoNP, instead, are predicted to be internalised by endocytosis. Dissolution of Co particles allows the formation of Co compounds (CoNP-rel), whose mechanism of cellular internalisation is unknown. Co uptake (ranking CoMP > CoNP > Co(2+)) reached maximum at 4 h. Once inside the cell, CoNP spread into the cytosol and organelles. Consequently, massive amounts of Co ions and CoNP-rel can reach subcellular compartments normally unexposed to Co(2+). This could explain the fact that the nuclear and mitochondrial Co concentrations resulted significantly higher than those obtained with Co(2+).

  1. UV-B component of sunlight causes measurable damage in field-grown maize (Zea mays L.): developmental and cellular heterogeneity of damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapleton, A.E.; Thornber, C.S.; Walbot, V.

    1997-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation has diverse morphogenetic and damaging effects on plants. The end point of damage is reduced plant growth, but in the short term UV radiation damages specific cellular components. We measured cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in maize DNA from plants grown in natural solar radiation. Green maize tissues had detectable DNA damage, roots had less damage, and anthers had much more damage than green leaves. This heterogeneity in damage levels may reflect differences in dose received or in damage repair. The architecture of green tissues had no measurable effects on DNA damage levels, as leaf sheath and leaf blade were equivalent. We observed a slight increase in damage levels in plants sampled at the end of the day, but there was no accumulation of damage over the growing season. We measured photoreactivation, and found substantial levels of this light-dependent repair in both the epidermis and inner cell layers of leaves, and in all organelles that contain DNA – the nucleus, chloroplasts and mitochondria. We conclude that maize has efficient mechanisms for photo repair of daily UV-induced DNA damage that prevent accumulation

  2. Functional anthology of intrinsic disorder. 2. Cellular components, domains, technical terms, developmental processes, and coding sequence diversities correlated with long disordered regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucetic, Slobodan; Xie, Hongbo; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Oldfield, Christopher J; Dunker, A Keith; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2007-05-01

    Biologically active proteins without stable ordered structure (i.e., intrinsically disordered proteins) are attracting increased attention. Functional repertoires of ordered and disordered proteins are very different, and the ability to differentiate whether a given function is associated with intrinsic disorder or with a well-folded protein is crucial for modern protein science. However, there is a large gap between the number of proteins experimentally confirmed to be disordered and their actual number in nature. As a result, studies of functional properties of confirmed disordered proteins, while helpful in revealing the functional diversity of protein disorder, provide only a limited view. To overcome this problem, a bioinformatics approach for comprehensive study of functional roles of protein disorder was proposed in the first paper of this series (Xie, H.; Vucetic, S.; Iakoucheva, L. M.; Oldfield, C. J.; Dunker, A. K.; Obradovic, Z.; Uversky, V. N. Functional anthology of intrinsic disorder. 1. Biological processes and functions of proteins with long disordered regions. J. Proteome Res. 2007, 5, 1882-1898). Applying this novel approach to Swiss-Prot sequences and functional keywords, we found over 238 and 302 keywords to be strongly positively or negatively correlated, respectively, with long intrinsically disordered regions. This paper describes approximately 90 Swiss-Prot keywords attributed to the cellular components, domains, technical terms, developmental processes, and coding sequence diversities possessing strong positive and negative correlation with long disordered regions.

  3. Functional Anthology of Intrinsic Disorder. II. Cellular Components, Domains, Technical Terms, Developmental Processes and Coding Sequence Diversities Correlated with Long Disordered Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucetic, Slobodan; Xie, Hongbo; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Dunker, A. Keith; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2008-01-01

    Biologically active proteins without stable ordered structure (i.e., intrinsically disordered proteins) are attracting increased attention. Functional repertoires of ordered and disordered proteins are very different, and the ability to differentiate whether a given function is associated with intrinsic disorder or with a well-folded protein is crucial for modern protein science. However, there is a large gap between the number of proteins experimentally confirmed to be disordered and their actual number in nature. As a result, studies of functional properties of confirmed disordered proteins, while helpful in revealing the functional diversity of protein disorder, provide only a limited view. To overcome this problem, a bioinformatics approach for comprehensive study of functional roles of protein disorder was proposed in the first paper of this series (Xie H., Vucetic S., Iakoucheva L.M., Oldfield C.J., Dunker A.K., Obradovic Z., Uversky V.N. (2006) Functional anthology of intrinsic disorder. I. Biological processes and functions of proteins with long disordered regions. J. Proteome Res.). Applying this novel approach to Swiss-Prot sequences and functional keywords, we found over 238 and 302 keywords to be strongly positively or negatively correlated, respectively, with long intrinsically disordered regions. This paper describes ~90 Swiss-Prot keywords attributed to the cellular components, domains, technical terms, developmental processes and coding sequence diversities possessing strong positive and negative correlation with long disordered regions. PMID:17391015

  4. Curating NASA's Past, Present, and Future Extraterrestrial Sample Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Allton, J. H.; Evans, C. A.; Fries, M. D.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Righter, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Zolensky, M.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office (henceforth referred to herein as NASA Curation Office) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. Under the governing document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 7100.10E "Curation of Extraterrestrial Materials", JSC is charged with "...curation of all extra-terrestrial material under NASA control, including future NASA missions." The Directive goes on to define Curation as including "...documentation, preservation, preparation, and distribution of samples for research, education, and public outreach." Here we describe some of the past, present, and future activities of the NASA Curation Office.

  5. Meeting Curation Challenges in a Neuroimaging Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus Whyte

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The SCARP project is a series of short studies with two aims; firstly to discover more about disciplinary approaches and attitudes to digital curation through ‘immersion’ in selected cases; secondly to apply known good practice, and where possible, identify new lessons from practice in the selected discipline areas. The study summarised here is of the Neuroimaging Group in the University of Edinburgh’s Division of Psychiatry, which plays a leading role in eScience collaborations to improve the infrastructure for neuroimaging data integration and reuse. The Group also aims to address growing data storage and curation needs, given the capabilities afforded by new infrastructure. The study briefly reviews the policy context and current challenges to data integration and sharing in the neuroimaging field. It then describes how curation and preservation risks and opportunities for change were identified throughout the curation lifecycle; and their context appreciated through field study in the research site. The results are consistent with studies of neuroimaging eInfrastructure that emphasise the role of local data sharing and reuse practices. These sustain mutual awareness of datasets and experimental protocols through sharing peer to peer, and among senior researchers and students, enabling continuity in research and flexibility in project work. This “human infrastructure” is taken into account in considering next steps for curation and preservation of the Group’s datasets and a phased approach to supporting data documentation.

  6. Curation Micro-Services: A Pipeline Metaphor for Repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Stephen; Cruse, Patricia; Kunze, John; Minor, David

    2010-01-01

    The effective long-term curation of digital content requires expert analysis, policy setting, and decision making, and a robust technical infrastructure that can effect and enforce curation policies and implement appropriate curation activities. Since the number, size, and diversity of content under curation management will undoubtedly continue to grow over time, and the state of curation understanding and best practices relative to that content will undergo a similar constant evolution, one ...

  7. DataShare: Empowering Researcher Data Curation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Abrams

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Researchers are increasingly being asked to ensure that all products of research activity – not just traditional publications – are preserved and made widely available for study and reuse as a precondition for publication or grant funding, or to conform to disciplinary best practices. In order to conform to these requirements, scholars need effective, easy-to-use tools and services for the long-term curation of their research data. The DataShare service, developed at the University of California, is being used by researchers to: (1 prepare for curation by reviewing best practice recommendations for the acquisition or creation of digital research data; (2 select datasets using intuitive file browsing and drag-and-drop interfaces; (3 describe their data for enhanced discoverability in terms of the DataCite metadata schema; (4 preserve their data by uploading to a public access collection in the UC3 Merritt curation repository; (5 cite their data in terms of persistent and globally-resolvable DOI identifiers; (6 expose their data through registration with well-known abstracting and indexing services and major internet search engines; (7 control the dissemination of their data through enforceable data use agreements; and (8 discover and retrieve datasets of interest through a faceted search and browse environment. Since the widespread adoption of effective data management practices is highly dependent on ease of use and integration into existing individual, institutional, and disciplinary workflows, the emphasis throughout the design and implementation of DataShare is to provide the highest level of curation service with the lowest possible technical barriers to entry by individual researchers. By enabling intuitive, self-service access to data curation functions, DataShare helps to contribute to more widespread adoption of good data curation practices that are critical to open scientific inquiry, discourse, and advancement.

  8. Curating the innate immunity interactome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynn, David J

    2010-01-01

    The innate immune response is the first line of defence against invading pathogens and is regulated by complex signalling and transcriptional networks. Systems biology approaches promise to shed new light on the regulation of innate immunity through the analysis and modelling of these networks. A key initial step in this process is the contextual cataloguing of the components of this system and the molecular interactions that comprise these networks. InnateDB (http:\\/\\/www.innatedb.com) is a molecular interaction and pathway database developed to facilitate systems-level analyses of innate immunity.

  9. Annotation of phenotypic diversity: decoupling data curation and ontology curation using Phenex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhoff, James P; Dahdul, Wasila M; Dececchi, T Alexander; Lapp, Hilmar; Mabee, Paula M; Vision, Todd J

    2014-01-01

    Phenex (http://phenex.phenoscape.org/) is a desktop application for semantically annotating the phenotypic character matrix datasets common in evolutionary biology. Since its initial publication, we have added new features that address several major bottlenecks in the efficiency of the phenotype curation process: allowing curators during the data curation phase to provisionally request terms that are not yet available from a relevant ontology; supporting quality control against annotation guidelines to reduce later manual review and revision; and enabling the sharing of files for collaboration among curators. We decoupled data annotation from ontology development by creating an Ontology Request Broker (ORB) within Phenex. Curators can use the ORB to request a provisional term for use in data annotation; the provisional term can be automatically replaced with a permanent identifier once the term is added to an ontology. We added a set of annotation consistency checks to prevent common curation errors, reducing the need for later correction. We facilitated collaborative editing by improving the reliability of Phenex when used with online folder sharing services, via file change monitoring and continual autosave. With the addition of these new features, and in particular the Ontology Request Broker, Phenex users have been able to focus more effectively on data annotation. Phenoscape curators using Phenex have reported a smoother annotation workflow, with much reduced interruptions from ontology maintenance and file management issues.

  10. Solubility Study of Curatives in Various Rubbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, R.; Talma, Auke; Datta, Rabin; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2008-01-01

    The previous works on solubility of curatives in rubbers were mainly carried out in natural rubber. Not too much information available on dissimilar rubbers and this is important because most of the compounds today are blends of dissimilar rubbers. Although solubility can be expected to certain

  11. Research Data Curation Pilots: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Minor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 2011, the UC San Diego Research Cyberinfrastructure (RCI Implementation Team invited researchers and research teams to participate in a research curation and data management pilot program. This invitation took the form of a campus-wide solicitation. More than two dozen applications were received and, after due deliberation, the RCI Oversight Committee selected five curation-intensive projects. These projects were chosen based on a number of criteria, including how they represented campus research, varieties of topics, researcher engagement, and the various services required. The pilot process began in September 2011, and will be completed in early 2014. Extensive lessons learned from the pilots are being compiled and are being used in the on-going design and implementation of the permanent Research Data Curation Program in the UC San Diego Library. In this paper, we present specific implementation details of these various services, as well as lessons learned. The program focused on many aspects of contemporary scholarship, including data creation and storage, description and metadata creation, citation and publication, and long term preservation and access. Based on the lessons learned in our processes, the Research Data Curation Program will provide a suite of services from which campus users can pick and choose, as necessary. The program will provide support for the data management requirements from national funding agencies.

  12. Curating Media Learning: Towards a Porous Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Julian; Potter, John

    2015-01-01

    This article combines research results from a range of projects with two consistent themes. Firstly, we explore the potential for curation to offer a productive metaphor for the convergence of digital media learning across and between home/lifeworld and formal educational/system-world spaces--or between the public and private spheres. Secondly, we…

  13. Curating and Nudging in Virtual CLIL Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Helle Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Foreign language teachers can benefit substantially from the notions of curation and nudging when scaffolding CLIL activities on the internet. This article shows how these principles can be integrated into CLILstore, a free multimedia-rich learning tool with seamless access to online dictionaries, and presents feedback from first and second year…

  14. Smart Mobility Stakeholders - Curating Urban Data & Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, Joshua [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the curation of urban data and models through engaging SMART mobility stakeholders. SMART Mobility Urban Science Efforts are helping to expose key data sets, models, and roles for the U.S. Department of Energy in engaging across stakeholders to ensure useful insights. This will help to support other Urban Science and broader SMART initiatives.

  15. Scaling drug indication curation through crowdsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ritu; Burger, John D; Aberdeen, John S; Tresner-Kirsch, David W; Corrales, Theodore J; Hirchman, Lynette; Lu, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the high cost of human curation of biological databases, there is an increasing interest in using computational approaches to assist human curators and accelerate the manual curation process. Towards the goal of cataloging drug indications from FDA drug labels, we recently developed LabeledIn, a human-curated drug indication resource for 250 clinical drugs. Its development required over 40 h of human effort across 20 weeks, despite using well-defined annotation guidelines. In this study, we aim to investigate the feasibility of scaling drug indication annotation through a crowdsourcing technique where an unknown network of workers can be recruited through the technical environment of Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk). To translate the expert-curation task of cataloging indications into human intelligence tasks (HITs) suitable for the average workers on MTurk, we first simplify the complex task such that each HIT only involves a worker making a binary judgment of whether a highlighted disease, in context of a given drug label, is an indication. In addition, this study is novel in the crowdsourcing interface design where the annotation guidelines are encoded into user options. For evaluation, we assess the ability of our proposed method to achieve high-quality annotations in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner. We posted over 3000 HITs drawn from 706 drug labels on MTurk. Within 8 h of posting, we collected 18 775 judgments from 74 workers, and achieved an aggregated accuracy of 96% on 450 control HITs (where gold-standard answers are known), at a cost of $1.75 per drug label. On the basis of these results, we conclude that our crowdsourcing approach not only results in significant cost and time saving, but also leads to accuracy comparable to that of domain experts. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Agile Data Curation Case Studies Leading to the Identification and Development of Data Curation Design Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, K. K.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Young, J. W.; Gordon, L. C.; Hughes, S.; Santhana Vannan, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    The planning for and development of efficient workflows for the creation, reuse, sharing, documentation, publication and preservation of research data is a general challenge that research teams of all sizes face. In response to: requirements from funding agencies for full-lifecycle data management plans that will result in well documented, preserved, and shared research data products increasing requirements from publishers for shared data in conjunction with submitted papers interdisciplinary research team's needs for efficient data sharing within projects, and increasing reuse of research data for replication and new, unanticipated research, policy development, and public use alternative strategies to traditional data life cycle approaches must be developed and shared that enable research teams to meet these requirements while meeting the core science objectives of their projects within the available resources. In support of achieving these goals, the concept of Agile Data Curation has been developed in which there have been parallel activities in support of 1) identifying a set of shared values and principles that underlie the objectives of agile data curation, 2) soliciting case studies from the Earth science and other research communities that illustrate aspects of what the contributors consider agile data curation methods and practices, and 3) identifying or developing design patterns that are high-level abstractions from successful data curation practice that are related to common data curation problems for which common solution strategies may be employed. This paper provides a collection of case studies that have been contributed by the Earth science community, and an initial analysis of those case studies to map them to emerging shared data curation problems and their potential solutions. Following the initial analysis of these problems and potential solutions, existing design patterns from software engineering and related disciplines are identified as a

  17. Argo: an integrative, interactive, text mining-based workbench supporting curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Rafal; Rowley, Andrew; Black, William; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Curation of biomedical literature is often supported by the automatic analysis of textual content that generally involves a sequence of individual processing components. Text mining (TM) has been used to enhance the process of manual biocuration, but has been focused on specific databases and tasks rather than an environment integrating TM tools into the curation pipeline, catering for a variety of tasks, types of information and applications. Processing components usually come from different sources and often lack interoperability. The well established Unstructured Information Management Architecture is a framework that addresses interoperability by defining common data structures and interfaces. However, most of the efforts are targeted towards software developers and are not suitable for curators, or are otherwise inconvenient to use on a higher level of abstraction. To overcome these issues we introduce Argo, an interoperable, integrative, interactive and collaborative system for text analysis with a convenient graphic user interface to ease the development of processing workflows and boost productivity in labour-intensive manual curation. Robust, scalable text analytics follow a modular approach, adopting component modules for distinct levels of text analysis. The user interface is available entirely through a web browser that saves the user from going through often complicated and platform-dependent installation procedures. Argo comes with a predefined set of processing components commonly used in text analysis, while giving the users the ability to deposit their own components. The system accommodates various areas and levels of user expertise, from TM and computational linguistics to ontology-based curation. One of the key functionalities of Argo is its ability to seamlessly incorporate user-interactive components, such as manual annotation editors, into otherwise completely automatic pipelines. As a use case, we demonstrate the functionality of an in

  18. The baladi curative system of Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, E A

    1988-03-01

    The article explores the symbolic structure of the baladi (traditional) cultural system as revealed in everyday narratives, with a focus on baladi curative action. The everyday illness narrative provides a cultural window to the principles of fluidity and restorative balance of baladi curative practices. The body is seen as a dynamic organism through which both foreign objects and physiological entities can move. The body should be in balance, as with any humorally-influenced system, and so baladi cures aim to restore normal balance and functioning of the body. The article examines in detail a narrative on treatment of a sick child, and another on treatment of fertility problems. It traces such cultural oppositions as insider: outsider; authentic:inauthentic; home remedy:cosmopolitan medicine. In the social as well as the medical arena these themes organize social/medical judgements about correct action and explanations of events.

  19. An emerging role: the nurse content curator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Beth A

    2015-01-01

    A new phenomenon, the inverted or "flipped" classroom, assumes that students are no longer acquiring knowledge exclusively through textbooks or lectures. Instead, they are seeking out the vast amount of free information available to them online (the very essence of open source) to supplement learning gleaned in textbooks and lectures. With so much open-source content available to nursing faculty, it benefits the faculty to use readily available, technologically advanced content. The nurse content curator supports nursing faculty in its use of such content. Even more importantly, the highly paid, time-strapped faculty is not spending an inordinate amount of effort surfing for and evaluating content. The nurse content curator does that work, while the faculty uses its time more effectively to help students vet the truth, make meaning of the content, and learn to problem-solve. Brooks. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Data Curation Education in Research Centers (DCERC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlino, M. R.; Mayernik, M. S.; Kelly, K.; Allard, S.; Tenopir, C.; Palmer, C.; Varvel, V. E., Jr.

    2012-12-01

    Digital data both enable and constrain scientific research. Scientists are enabled by digital data to develop new research methods, utilize new data sources, and investigate new topics, but they also face new data collection, management, and preservation burdens. The current data workforce consists primarily of scientists who receive little formal training in data management and data managers who are typically educated through on-the-job training. The Data Curation Education in Research Centers (DCERC) program is investigating a new model for educating data professionals to contribute to scientific research. DCERC is a collaboration between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Graduate School of Library and Information Science, the University of Tennessee School of Information Sciences, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The program is organized around a foundations course in data curation and provides field experiences in research and data centers for both master's and doctoral students. This presentation will outline the aims and the structure of the DCERC program and discuss results and lessons learned from the first set of summer internships in 2012. Four masters students participated and worked with both data mentors and science mentors, gaining first hand experiences in the issues, methods, and challenges of scientific data curation. They engaged in a diverse set of topics, including climate model metadata, observational data management workflows, and data cleaning, documentation, and ingest processes within a data archive. The students learned current data management practices and challenges while developing expertise and conducting research. They also made important contributions to NCAR data and science teams by evaluating data management workflows and processes, preparing data sets to be archived, and developing recommendations for particular data management activities. The master's student interns will return in summer of 2013

  1. Curating and nudging in virtual CLIL environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Lykke Nielsen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Foreign language teachers can benefit substantially from the notions of curation and nudging when scaffolding CLIL activities on the internet. This article shows how these principles can be integrated into CLILstore, a free multimedia-rich learning tool with seamless access to online dictionaries, and presents feedback from first and second year university students of Arabic as a second language to inform foreign language teachers about students’ needs and preferences in virtual learning environments.

  2. The Distinction Between Curative and Assistive Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramondo, Joseph A

    2018-05-01

    Disability activists have sometimes claimed their disability has actually increased their well-being. Some even say they would reject a cure to keep these gains. Yet, these same activists often simultaneously propose improvements to the quality and accessibility of assistive technology. However, for any argument favoring assistive over curative technology (or vice versa) to work, there must be a coherent distinction between the two. This line is already vague and will become even less clear with the emergence of novel technologies. This paper asks and tries to answer the question: what is it about the paradigmatic examples of curative and assistive technologies that make them paradigmatic and how can these defining features help us clarify the hard cases? This analysis will begin with an argument that, while the common views of this distinction adequately explain the paradigmatic cases, they fail to accurately pick out the relevant features of those technologies that make them paradigmatic and to provide adequate guidance for parsing the hard cases. Instead, it will be claimed that these categories of curative or assistive technologies are defined by the role the technologies play in establishing a person's relational narrative identity as a member of one of two social groups: disabled people or non-disabled people.

  3. [Curative effect of ozone hydrotherapy for pemphigus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fuqiong; Deng, Danqi; Li, Xiaolan; Wang, Wenfang; Xie, Hong; Wu, Yongzhuo; Luan, Chunyan; Yang, Binbin

    2018-02-28

    To determine clinical curative effects of ozone therapy for pemphigus vulgaris.
 Methods: Ozone hydrotherapy was used as an aid treatment for 32 patients with pemphigus vulgaris. The hydropathic compression of potassium permanganate solution for 34 patients with pemphigus vulgaris served as a control. The main treatment for both groups were glucocorticoids and immune inhibitors. The lesions of patients, bacterial infection, usage of antibiotics, patient's satisfaction, and clinical curative effect were evaluated in the 2 groups.
 Results: There was no significant difference in the curative effect and the average length of staying at hospital between the 2 groups (P>0.05). But rate for the usage of antibiotics was significantly reduced in the group of ozone hydrotherapy (P=0.039). The patients were more satisfied in using ozone hydrotherapy than the potassium permanganate solution after 7-day therapy (P>0.05).
 Conclusion: Ozone hydrotherapy is a safe and effective aid method for pemphigus vulgaris. It can reduce the usage of antibiotics.

  4. A comprehensive curated resource for follicle stimulating hormone signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Jyoti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH is an important hormone responsible for growth, maturation and function of the human reproductive system. FSH regulates the synthesis of steroid hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, proliferation and maturation of follicles in the ovary and spermatogenesis in the testes. FSH is a glycoprotein heterodimer that binds and acts through the FSH receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor. Although online pathway repositories provide information about G-protein coupled receptor mediated signal transduction, the signaling events initiated specifically by FSH are not cataloged in any public database in a detailed fashion. Findings We performed comprehensive curation of the published literature to identify the components of FSH signaling pathway and the molecular interactions that occur upon FSH receptor activation. Our effort yielded 64 reactions comprising 35 enzyme-substrate reactions, 11 molecular association events, 11 activation events and 7 protein translocation events that occur in response to FSH receptor activation. We also cataloged 265 genes, which were differentially expressed upon FSH stimulation in normal human reproductive tissues. Conclusions We anticipate that the information provided in this resource will provide better insights into the physiological role of FSH in reproductive biology, its signaling mediators and aid in further research in this area. The curated FSH pathway data is freely available through NetPath (http://www.netpath.org, a pathway resource developed previously by our group.

  5. Research Problems in Data Curation: Outcomes from the Data Curation Education in Research Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, C. L.; Mayernik, M. S.; Weber, N.; Baker, K. S.; Kelly, K.; Marlino, M. R.; Thompson, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The need for data curation is being recognized in numerous institutional settings as national research funding agencies extend data archiving mandates to cover more types of research grants. Data curation, however, is not only a practical challenge. It presents many conceptual and theoretical challenges that must be investigated to design appropriate technical systems, social practices and institutions, policies, and services. This presentation reports on outcomes from an investigation of research problems in data curation conducted as part of the Data Curation Education in Research Centers (DCERC) program. DCERC is developing a new model for educating data professionals to contribute to scientific research. The program is organized around foundational courses and field experiences in research and data centers for both master's and doctoral students. The initiative is led by the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in collaboration with the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee, and library and data professionals at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). At the doctoral level DCERC is educating future faculty and researchers in data curation and establishing a research agenda to advance the field. The doctoral seminar, Research Problems in Data Curation, was developed and taught in 2012 by the DCERC principal investigator and two doctoral fellows at the University of Illinois. It was designed to define the problem space of data curation, examine relevant concepts and theories related to both technical and social perspectives, and articulate research questions that are either unexplored or under theorized in the current literature. There was a particular emphasis on the Earth and environmental sciences, with guest speakers brought in from NCAR, National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Through the assignments, students

  6. Competencies for preservation and digital curation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Boeres

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Information Science, throughout its existence, has been a multi and interdisciplinary field, and has undergone constant change because of its object of study: information. Seen that this element is not static and is increasingly linked to information technology, we have witnessed a challenge arise: how to ensure the permanence of digital libraries? How to secure the terabytes generated with increasing speed, and in various formats, will be available and fully capable of use over time? This is a challenge that Information Science professionals are being challenged to solve in the process of so-called digital preservation and curation. Thus, this article aims to raise the skills that the information professional must have to carry out the process of preservation and digital curation. The article discusses the emergence of professions (from the perspective of Sociology, the need to work for the realization of the human being (Psychology and proficiencies of exercising the office of Information Science to ensure the preservation of digital information in information units.

  7. Curating research data a handbook of current practice

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Lisa R

    2017-01-01

    Curating Research Data, Volume Two: A Handbook of Current Practice guides you across the data lifecycle through the practical strategies and techniques for curating research data in a digital repository setting. The data curation steps for receiving, appraising, selecting, ingesting, transforming, describing, contextualizing, disseminating, and preserving digital research data are each explored, and then supplemented with detailed case studies written by more than forty international practitioners from national, disciplinary, and institutional data repositories. The steps in this volume detail the sequential actions that you might take to curate a data set from receiving the data (Step 1) to eventual reuse (Step 8). Data curators, archivists, research data management specialists, subject librarians, institutional repository managers, and digital library staff will benefit from these current and practical approaches to data curation.

  8. Curating research data practical strategies for your digital repository

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Lisa R

    2017-01-01

    Volume One of Curating Research Data explores the variety of reasons, motivations, and drivers for why data curation services are needed in the context of academic and disciplinary data repository efforts. Twelve chapters, divided into three parts, take an in-depth look at the complex practice of data curation as it emerges around us. Part I sets the stage for data curation by describing current policies, data sharing cultures, and collaborative efforts currently underway that impact potential services. Part II brings several key issues, such as cost recovery and marketing strategy, into focus for practitioners when considering how to put data curation services in action. Finally, Part III describes the full lifecycle of data by examining the ethical and practical reuse issues that data curation practitioners must consider as we strive to prepare data for the future.

  9. Cellular gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.C. Gruau; J.T. Tromp (John)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe consider the problem of establishing gravity in cellular automata. In particular, when cellular automata states can be partitioned into empty, particle, and wall types, with the latter enclosing rectangular areas, we desire rules that will make the particles fall down and pile up on

  10. An Emergent Micro-Services Approach to Digital Curation Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Stephen; Kunze, John; Loy, David

    2010-01-01

    In order better to meet the needs of its diverse University of California (UC) constituencies, the California Digital Library UC Curation Center is re-envisioning its approach to digital curation infrastructure by devolving function into a set of granular, independent, but interoperable micro-services. Since each of these services is small and self-contained, they are more easily developed, deployed, maintained, and enhanced; at the same time, complex curation function can emerge from the str...

  11. Self-Rerouting and Curative Interconnect Technology (SERCUIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    SPECIAL REPORT RDMR-CS-17-01 SELF-REROUTING AND CURATIVE INTERCONNECT TECHNOLOGY (SERCUIT) Shiv Joshi Concepts to Systems, Inc...Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Self-Rerouting and Curative Interconnect Technology (SERCUIT) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Shiv Joshi...concepts2systems.com (p) 434-207-5189 x (f) Click to view full size Title Contract Number SELF-REROUTING AND CURATIVE INTERCONNECT TECHNOLOGY (SERCUIT) W911W6-17-C-0029

  12. Improving the Acquisition and Management of Sample Curation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nancy S.; Evans, Cindy A.; Labasse, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the current sample documentation processes used during and after a mission, examines the challenges and special considerations needed for designing effective sample curation data systems, and looks at the results of a simulated sample result mission and the lessons learned from this simulation. In addition, it introduces a new data architecture for an integrated sample Curation data system being implemented at the NASA Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation department and discusses how it improves on existing data management systems.

  13. The curation of genetic variants: difficulties and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Kapil Raj; Maden, Narendra; Poudel, Barsha; Pradhananga, Sailendra; Sharma, Amit Kumar

    2012-12-01

    The curation of genetic variants from biomedical articles is required for various clinical and research purposes. Nowadays, establishment of variant databases that include overall information about variants is becoming quite popular. These databases have immense utility, serving as a user-friendly information storehouse of variants for information seekers. While manual curation is the gold standard method for curation of variants, it can turn out to be time-consuming on a large scale thus necessitating the need for automation. Curation of variants described in biomedical literature may not be straightforward mainly due to various nomenclature and expression issues. Though current trends in paper writing on variants is inclined to the standard nomenclature such that variants can easily be retrieved, we have a massive store of variants in the literature that are present as non-standard names and the online search engines that are predominantly used may not be capable of finding them. For effective curation of variants, knowledge about the overall process of curation, nature and types of difficulties in curation, and ways to tackle the difficulties during the task are crucial. Only by effective curation, can variants be correctly interpreted. This paper presents the process and difficulties of curation of genetic variants with possible solutions and suggestions from our work experience in the field including literature support. The paper also highlights aspects of interpretation of genetic variants and the importance of writing papers on variants following standard and retrievable methods. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Participation of 14-3-3ε and 14-3-3ζ proteins in the phagocytosis, component of cellular immune response, in Aedes mosquito cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Ocampo, Abel; Cázares-Raga, Febe Elena; Del Angel, Rosa María; Medina-Ramírez, Fernando; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Rodríguez, Mario H; Hernández-Hernández, Fidel de la Cruz

    2017-08-01

    Better knowledge of the innate immune system of insects will improve our understanding of mosquitoes as potential vectors of diverse pathogens. The ubiquitously expressed 14-3-3 protein family is evolutionarily conserved from yeast to mammals, and at least two isoforms of 14-3-3, the ε and ζ, have been identified in insects. These proteins have been shown to participate in both humoral and cellular immune responses in Drosophila. As mosquitoes of the genus Aedes are the primary vectors for arboviruses, causing several diseases such as dengue fever, yellow fever, Zika and chikungunya fevers, cell lines derived from these mosquitoes, Aag-2 from Aedes aegypti and C6/36 HT from Aedes albopictus, are currently used to study the insect immune system. Here, we investigated the role of 14-3-3 proteins (ε and ζ isoform) in phagocytosis, the main cellular immune responses executed by the insects, using Aedes spp. cell lines. We evaluated the mRNA and protein expression of 14-3-3ε and 14-3-3ζ in C6/36 HT and Aag-2 cells, and demonstrated that both proteins were localised in the cytoplasm. Further, in C6/36 HT cells treated with a 14-3-3 specific inhibitor we observed a notable modification of cell morphology with filopodia-like structure caused through cytoskeleton reorganisation (co-localization of 14-3-3 proteins with F-actin), more importantly the decrease in Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli phagocytosis and reduction in phagolysosome formation. Additionally, silencing of 14-3-3ε and 14-3-3ζ expression by mean of specific DsiRNA confirmed the decreased phagocytosis and phagolysosome formation of pHrodo labelled E. coli and S. aureus bacteria by Aag-2 cells. The 14-3-3ε and 14-3-3ζ proteins modulate cytoskeletal remodelling, and are essential for phagocytosis of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in Aedes spp. cell lines.

  15. Sample Curation at a Lunar Outpost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Lofgren, Gary E.; Treiman, A. H.; Lindstrom, Marilyn L.

    2007-01-01

    The six Apollo surface missions returned 2,196 individual rock and soil samples, with a total mass of 381.6 kg. Samples were collected based on visual examination by the astronauts and consultation with geologists in the science back room in Houston. The samples were photographed during collection, packaged in uniquely-identified containers, and transported to the Lunar Module. All samples collected on the Moon were returned to Earth. NASA's upcoming return to the Moon will be different. Astronauts will have extended stays at an out-post and will collect more samples than they will return. They will need curation and analysis facilities on the Moon in order to carefully select samples for return to Earth.

  16. The zebrafish maternal-effect gene cellular atoll encodes the centriolar component sas-6 and defects in its paternal function promote whole genome duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Taijiro; Ge, Xiaoyan; Pelegri, Francisco

    2007-12-01

    A female-sterile zebrafish maternal-effect mutation in cellular atoll (cea) results in defects in the initiation of cell division starting at the second cell division cycle. This phenomenon is caused by defects in centrosome duplication, which in turn affect the formation of a bipolar spindle. We show that cea encodes the centriolar coiled-coil protein Sas-6, and that zebrafish Cea/Sas-6 protein localizes to centrosomes. cea also has a genetic paternal contribution, which when mutated results in an arrested first cell division followed by normal cleavage. Our data supports the idea that, in zebrafish, paternally inherited centrosomes are required for the first cell division while maternally derived factors are required for centrosomal duplication and cell divisions in subsequent cell cycles. DNA synthesis ensues in the absence of centrosome duplication, and the one-cycle delay in the first cell division caused by cea mutant sperm leads to whole genome duplication. We discuss the potential implications of these findings with regards to the origin of polyploidization in animal species. In addition, the uncoupling of developmental time and cell division count caused by the cea mutation suggests the presence of a time window, normally corresponding to the first two cell cycles, which is permissive for germ plasm recruitment.

  17. Curating NASA's Past, Present, and Future Astromaterial Sample Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Allton, J. H.; Evans, C. A.; Fries, M. D.; McCubbin, F. M.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Righter, K.; Zolensky, M.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office at NASA Johnson Space Center (hereafter JSC curation) is responsible for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. JSC presently curates 9 different astromaterials collections in seven different clean-room suites: (1) Apollo Samples (ISO (International Standards Organization) class 6 + 7); (2) Antarctic Meteorites (ISO 6 + 7); (3) Cosmic Dust Particles (ISO 5); (4) Microparticle Impact Collection (ISO 7; formerly called Space-Exposed Hardware); (5) Genesis Solar Wind Atoms (ISO 4); (6) Stardust Comet Particles (ISO 5); (7) Stardust Interstellar Particles (ISO 5); (8) Hayabusa Asteroid Particles (ISO 5); (9) OSIRIS-REx Spacecraft Coupons and Witness Plates (ISO 7). Additional cleanrooms are currently being planned to house samples from two new collections, Hayabusa 2 (2021) and OSIRIS-REx (2023). In addition to the labs that house the samples, we maintain a wide variety of infra-structure facilities required to support the clean rooms: HEPA-filtered air-handling systems, ultrapure dry gaseous nitrogen systems, an ultrapure water system, and cleaning facilities to provide clean tools and equipment for the labs. We also have sample preparation facilities for making thin sections, microtome sections, and even focused ion-beam sections. We routinely monitor the cleanliness of our clean rooms and infrastructure systems, including measurements of inorganic or organic contamination, weekly airborne particle counts, compositional and isotopic monitoring of liquid N2 deliveries, and daily UPW system monitoring. In addition to the physical maintenance of the samples, we track within our databases the current and ever changing characteristics (weight, location, etc.) of more than 250,000 individually numbered samples across our various collections, as well as more than 100,000 images, and countless "analog" records that record the sample processing records of each individual sample. JSC Curation is co-located with JSC

  18. Can we replace curation with information extraction software?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Can we use programs for automated or semi-automated information extraction from scientific texts as practical alternatives to professional curation? I show that error rates of current information extraction programs are too high to replace professional curation today. Furthermore, current IEP programs extract single narrow slivers of information, such as individual protein interactions; they cannot extract the large breadth of information extracted by professional curators for databases such as EcoCyc. They also cannot arbitrate among conflicting statements in the literature as curators can. Therefore, funding agencies should not hobble the curation efforts of existing databases on the assumption that a problem that has stymied Artificial Intelligence researchers for more than 60 years will be solved tomorrow. Semi-automated extraction techniques appear to have significantly more potential based on a review of recent tools that enhance curator productivity. But a full cost-benefit analysis for these tools is lacking. Without such analysis it is possible to expend significant effort developing information-extraction tools that automate small parts of the overall curation workflow without achieving a significant decrease in curation costs.Database URL. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Radiolabelled cellular blood elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinzinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on radiolabelled cellular blood elements, covering new advances made during the past several years, in particular the use of Tc-99 as a tracer for blood elements. Coverage extends to several radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies that are specific for blood components and may label blood elements in vivo

  20. Data Curation in the World Data System: Proposed Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Laughton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The value of data in society is increasing rapidly. Organisations that work with data should have standard practices in place to ensure successful curation of data. The World Data System (WDS consists of a number of data centres responsible for curating research data sets for the scientific community. The WDS has no formal data curation framework or model in place to act as a guideline for member data centres. The objective of this research was to develop a framework for the curation of data in the WDS. A multiple-case case study was conducted. Interviews were used to gather qualitative data and analysis of the data, which led to the development of this framework. The proposed framework is largely based on the Open Archival Information System (OAIS functional model and caters for the curation of both analogue and digital data.

  1. Text mining facilitates database curation - extraction of mutation-disease associations from Bio-medical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Komandur Elayavilli; Wagholikar, Kavishwar B; Li, Dingcheng; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-06-06

    Advances in the next generation sequencing technology has accelerated the pace of individualized medicine (IM), which aims to incorporate genetic/genomic information into medicine. One immediate need in interpreting sequencing data is the assembly of information about genetic variants and their corresponding associations with other entities (e.g., diseases or medications). Even with dedicated effort to capture such information in biological databases, much of this information remains 'locked' in the unstructured text of biomedical publications. There is a substantial lag between the publication and the subsequent abstraction of such information into databases. Multiple text mining systems have been developed, but most of them focus on the sentence level association extraction with performance evaluation based on gold standard text annotations specifically prepared for text mining systems. We developed and evaluated a text mining system, MutD, which extracts protein mutation-disease associations from MEDLINE abstracts by incorporating discourse level analysis, using a benchmark data set extracted from curated database records. MutD achieves an F-measure of 64.3% for reconstructing protein mutation disease associations in curated database records. Discourse level analysis component of MutD contributed to a gain of more than 10% in F-measure when compared against the sentence level association extraction. Our error analysis indicates that 23 of the 64 precision errors are true associations that were not captured by database curators and 68 of the 113 recall errors are caused by the absence of associated disease entities in the abstract. After adjusting for the defects in the curated database, the revised F-measure of MutD in association detection reaches 81.5%. Our quantitative analysis reveals that MutD can effectively extract protein mutation disease associations when benchmarking based on curated database records. The analysis also demonstrates that incorporating

  2. Investigating Astromaterials Curation Applications for Dexterous Robotic Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, C. J.; Jang, J. H.; Cowden, T. R.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2018-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation office at NASA Johnson Space Center is currently investigating tools and methods that will enable the curation of future astromaterials collections. Size and temperature constraints for astromaterials to be collected by current and future proposed missions will require the development of new robotic sample and tool handling capabilities. NASA Curation has investigated the application of robot arms in the past, and robotic 3-axis micromanipulators are currently in use for small particle curation in the Stardust and Cosmic Dust laboratories. While 3-axis micromanipulators have been extremely successful for activities involving the transfer of isolated particles in the 5-20 micron range (e.g. from microscope slide to epoxy bullet tip, beryllium SEM disk), their limited ranges of motion and lack of yaw, pitch, and roll degrees of freedom restrict their utility in other applications. For instance, curators removing particles from cosmic dust collectors by hand often employ scooping and rotating motions to successfully free trapped particles from the silicone oil coatings. Similar scooping and rotating motions are also employed when isolating a specific particle of interest from an aliquot of crushed meteorite. While cosmic dust curators have been remarkably successful with these kinds of particle manipulations using handheld tools, operator fatigue limits the number of particles that can be removed during a given extraction session. The challenges for curation of small particles will be exacerbated by mission requirements that samples be processed in N2 sample cabinets (i.e. gloveboxes). We have been investigating the use of compact robot arms to facilitate sample handling within gloveboxes. Six-axis robot arms potentially have applications beyond small particle manipulation. For instance, future sample return missions may involve biologically sensitive astromaterials that can be easily compromised by physical interaction with

  3. DAMPD: A manually curated antimicrobial peptide database

    KAUST Repository

    Seshadri Sundararajan, Vijayaraghava

    2011-11-21

    The demand for antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is rising because of the increased occurrence of pathogens that are tolerant or resistant to conventional antibiotics. Since naturally occurring AMPs could serve as templates for the development of new anti-infectious agents to which pathogens are not resistant, a resource that contains relevant information on AMP is of great interest. To that extent, we developed the Dragon Antimicrobial Peptide Database (DAMPD, http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/dampd) that contains 1232 manually curated AMPs. DAMPD is an update and a replacement of the ANTIMIC database. In DAMPD an integrated interface allows in a simple fashion querying based on taxonomy, species, AMP family, citation, keywords and a combination of search terms and fields (Advanced Search). A number of tools such as Blast, ClustalW, HMMER, Hydrocalculator, SignalP, AMP predictor, as well as a number of other resources that provide additional information about the results are also provided and integrated into DAMPD to augment biological analysis of AMPs. The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Curated compendium of human transcriptional biomarker data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Nathan P; Bell, Avery; Bischoff, Anna I; Hollingsworth, Parker D; Piccolo, Stephen R

    2018-04-17

    One important use of genome-wide transcriptional profiles is to identify relationships between transcription levels and patient outcomes. These translational insights can guide the development of biomarkers for clinical application. Data from thousands of translational-biomarker studies have been deposited in public repositories, enabling reuse. However, data-reuse efforts require considerable time and expertise because transcriptional data are generated using heterogeneous profiling technologies, preprocessed using diverse normalization procedures, and annotated in non-standard ways. To address this problem, we curated 45 publicly available, translational-biomarker datasets from a variety of human diseases. To increase the data's utility, we reprocessed the raw expression data using a uniform computational pipeline, addressed quality-control problems, mapped the clinical annotations to a controlled vocabulary, and prepared consistently structured, analysis-ready data files. These data, along with scripts we used to prepare the data, are available in a public repository. We believe these data will be particularly useful to researchers seeking to perform benchmarking studies-for example, to compare and optimize machine-learning algorithms' ability to predict biomedical outcomes.

  5. DAMPD: A manually curated antimicrobial peptide database

    KAUST Repository

    Seshadri Sundararajan, Vijayaraghava; Gabere, Musa Nur; Pretorius, Ashley; Adam, Saleem; Christoffels, Alan; Lehvaslaiho, Minna; Archer, John A.C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2011-01-01

    The demand for antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is rising because of the increased occurrence of pathogens that are tolerant or resistant to conventional antibiotics. Since naturally occurring AMPs could serve as templates for the development of new anti-infectious agents to which pathogens are not resistant, a resource that contains relevant information on AMP is of great interest. To that extent, we developed the Dragon Antimicrobial Peptide Database (DAMPD, http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/dampd) that contains 1232 manually curated AMPs. DAMPD is an update and a replacement of the ANTIMIC database. In DAMPD an integrated interface allows in a simple fashion querying based on taxonomy, species, AMP family, citation, keywords and a combination of search terms and fields (Advanced Search). A number of tools such as Blast, ClustalW, HMMER, Hydrocalculator, SignalP, AMP predictor, as well as a number of other resources that provide additional information about the results are also provided and integrated into DAMPD to augment biological analysis of AMPs. The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Trafkintu: seed curators defending food sovereignty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastassja Nicole Mancilla Ivaca

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the resurgence of Trafkintu, an ancient Mapuche ritual of seed trade; now as a folk-communication practice of resistance, against neoliberal transformations in farming that threaten food sovereignty of rural communities in southern Chile. Drawing onparticipant observation and semi-structured interviews with peasant and Mapuche women involved in these practices, we show that seed curators women act as agents that revalue the localness [lo local] through a process of resignification of Trafkintu, this time linking it tofood self-sufficiency. In addition, they build networks between indigenous and peasant communities as a resistance strategy. However, this resurgence of Trafkintu becomes ambivalent as its new symbolic expression is being appropriated by local mainstreampoliticians, for electoral purposes, to promote an image of 'concern about popular culture'. That is, a tool of resistance, on the one hand, and a kind of political folk-marketing, on the other.

  7. WeCurate: Designing for synchronised browsing and social negotiation

    OpenAIRE

    Hazelden, Katina; Yee-King, Matthew; d'Inverno, Mark; Confalonieri, Roberto; De Jonge, Dave; Amgoud, Leila; Osman, Nardine; Prade, Henri; Sierra, Carles

    2012-01-01

    WeCurate is a shared image browser for collaboratively curating a virtual exhibition from a cultural image archive. This paper is concerned with the evaluation and iteration of a prototype UI (User Interface) design to enable this community image browsing. In WeCurate, several remote users work together with autonomic agents to browse the archive and to select, through negotiation and voting, a set of images which are of the greatest interest to the group. The UI allows users to synchronize v...

  8. Curative radiotherapy for primary orbital lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Sudershan; Paulino, Arnold C.; Buatti, John M.; Mayr, Nina A.; Wen, B.-C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To review our institutional experience with primary orbital lymphoma and determine the prognostic factors for survival, local control, and distant metastases. In addition, we also analyzed the risk factors for complications in the radiotherapeutic management of this tumor. Methods and Materials: Between 1973 and 1998, 47 patients (29 women [62%] and 18 men [38%], median age 69 years, range 32-89) with Stage IAE orbital lymphoma were treated with curative intent at one department. Five had bilateral orbital involvement. The tumor was located in the eyelid and extraocular muscles in 23 (44%), conjunctiva in 17 (33%), and lacrimal apparatus in 12 (23%). The histologic features according to the World Heath Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms was follicular lymphoma in 25, extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type in 8, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in 12, mantle cell lymphoma in 6, and peripheral T-cell lymphoma in 1. For the purposes of comparison with the existing literature on orbital lymphomas, the grading system according to the Working Formulation was also recorded. The histologic grade was low in 33 (63%), intermediate in 18 (35%), and high in 1 (2%). All patients were treated with primary radiotherapy alone. The median dose for low-grade tumors was 3000 cGy (range 2000-4020); the median dose for intermediate and high-grade tumors was 4000 cGy (range 3000-5100). A lens-sparing approach was used in 19 patients (37%). Late complications for the lens and cornea were scored according to the subjective, objective, management, and analytic (SOMA) scale of the Late Effects of Normal Tissue (LENT) scoring system. The median follow-up was 55 months (range 6-232). Results: The local control rate was 100% in the 52 orbits treated. The 5-year overall survival and relapse-free survival rate was 73.6% and 65.5%, respectively. Tumor grade and location did not predict for overall survival or relapse-free survival

  9. Cellular metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Walters, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: chromatin structure; the use of circular synthetic polydeoxynucleotides as substrates for the study of DNA repair enzymes; human cellular kinetic response following exposure to DNA-interactive compounds; histone phosphorylation and chromatin structure in cell proliferation; photoaddition products induced in chromatin by uv light; pollutants and genetic information transfer; altered RNA metabolism as a function of cadmium accumulation and intracellular distribution in cultured cells; and thymidylate chromophore destruction by water free radicals

  10. An Emergent Micro-Services Approach to Digital Curation Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Abrams

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In order better to meet the needs of its diverse University of California (UC constituencies, the California Digital Library UC Curation Center is re-envisioning its approach to digital curation infrastructure by devolving function into a set of granular, independent, but interoperable micro-services. Since each of these services is small and self-contained, they are more easily developed, deployed, maintained, and enhanced; at the same time, complex curation function can emerge from the strategic combination of atomistic services. The emergent approach emphasizes the persistence of content rather than the systems in which that content is managemed, thus the paradigmatic archival culture is not unduly coupled to any particular technological context. This results in a curation environment that is comprehensive in scope, yet flexible with regard to local policies and practices and sustainable despite the inevitability of disruptive change in technology and user expectation.

  11. Sample Transport for a European Sample Curation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoud, L.; Vrublevskis, J. B.; Bennett, A.; Pottage, T.; Bridges, J. C.; Holt, J. M. C.; Dirri, F.; Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Russell, S.; Smith, C.

    2018-04-01

    This work has looked at the recovery of Mars Sample Return capsule once it arrives on Earth. It covers possible landing sites, planetary protection requirements, and transportation from the landing site to a European Sample Curation Facility.

  12. Judson_Mansouri_Automated_Chemical_Curation_QSAREnvRes_Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Here we describe the development of an automated KNIME workflow to curate and correct errors in the structure and identity of chemicals using the publically...

  13. Qrator: A web-based curation tool for glycan structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eavenson, Matthew; Kochut, Krys J; Miller, John A; Ranzinger, René; Tiemeyer, Michael; Aoki, Kazuhiro; York, William S

    2015-01-01

    Most currently available glycan structure databases use their own proprietary structure representation schema and contain numerous annotation errors. These cause problems when glycan databases are used for the annotation or mining of data generated in the laboratory. Due to the complexity of glycan structures, curating these databases is often a tedious and labor-intensive process. However, rigorously validating glycan structures can be made easier with a curation workflow that incorporates a structure-matching algorithm that compares candidate glycans to a canonical tree that embodies structural features consistent with established mechanisms for the biosynthesis of a particular class of glycans. To this end, we have implemented Qrator, a web-based application that uses a combination of external literature and database references, user annotations and canonical trees to assist and guide researchers in making informed decisions while curating glycans. Using this application, we have started the curation of large numbers of N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipids. Our curation workflow allows creating and extending canonical trees for these classes of glycans, which have subsequently been used to improve the curation workflow. PMID:25165068

  14. Text Mining to Support Gene Ontology Curation and Vice Versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we explain how text mining can support the curation of molecular biology databases dealing with protein functions. We also show how curated data can play a disruptive role in the developments of text mining methods. We review a decade of efforts to improve the automatic assignment of Gene Ontology (GO) descriptors, the reference ontology for the characterization of genes and gene products. To illustrate the high potential of this approach, we compare the performances of an automatic text categorizer and show a large improvement of +225 % in both precision and recall on benchmarked data. We argue that automatic text categorization functions can ultimately be embedded into a Question-Answering (QA) system to answer questions related to protein functions. Because GO descriptors can be relatively long and specific, traditional QA systems cannot answer such questions. A new type of QA system, so-called Deep QA which uses machine learning methods trained with curated contents, is thus emerging. Finally, future advances of text mining instruments are directly dependent on the availability of high-quality annotated contents at every curation step. Databases workflows must start recording explicitly all the data they curate and ideally also some of the data they do not curate.

  15. NeuroRDF: semantic integration of highly curated data to prioritize biomarker candidates in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyappan, Anandhi; Kawalia, Shweta Bagewadi; Raschka, Tamara; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Senger, Philipp

    2016-07-08

    Neurodegenerative diseases are incurable and debilitating indications with huge social and economic impact, where much is still to be learnt about the underlying molecular events. Mechanistic disease models could offer a knowledge framework to help decipher the complex interactions that occur at molecular and cellular levels. This motivates the need for the development of an approach integrating highly curated and heterogeneous data into a disease model of different regulatory data layers. Although several disease models exist, they often do not consider the quality of underlying data. Moreover, even with the current advancements in semantic web technology, we still do not have cure for complex diseases like Alzheimer's disease. One of the key reasons accountable for this could be the increasing gap between generated data and the derived knowledge. In this paper, we describe an approach, called as NeuroRDF, to develop an integrative framework for modeling curated knowledge in the area of complex neurodegenerative diseases. The core of this strategy lies in the usage of well curated and context specific data for integration into one single semantic web-based framework, RDF. This increases the probability of the derived knowledge to be novel and reliable in a specific disease context. This infrastructure integrates highly curated data from databases (Bind, IntAct, etc.), literature (PubMed), and gene expression resources (such as GEO and ArrayExpress). We illustrate the effectiveness of our approach by asking real-world biomedical questions that link these resources to prioritize the plausible biomarker candidates. Among the 13 prioritized candidate genes, we identified MIF to be a potential emerging candidate due to its role as a pro-inflammatory cytokine. We additionally report on the effort and challenges faced during generation of such an indication-specific knowledge base comprising of curated and quality-controlled data. Although many alternative approaches

  16. Chemical Blistering: Cellular and Macromolecular Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-15

    34’ has been applied. In principle , this experimental technique involves infection ef a permissive host with a virus which is nonvirulent because of...rate of lactate &cowmulation as compared with the control. The ethanol/methyleno chloride mixture Itself appeared to account for a small amount of...D.C., Part III, pp. 479- 518. 6. Ross, W. C. J. (1962) Biologiral Alkylating Agents* Fundmental ChemLsLr and Desi 2f L ds fgr Selive ToxicitX

  17. Curating NASA's Future Extraterrestrial Sample Collections: How Do We Achieve Maximum Proficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, Francis; Evans, Cynthia; Zeigler, Ryan; Allton, Judith; Fries, Marc; Righter, Kevin; Zolensky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office (henceforth referred to herein as NASA Curation Office) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. Under the governing document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 7100.10E "Curation of Extraterrestrial Materials", JSC is charged with "The curation of all extraterrestrial material under NASA control, including future NASA missions." The Directive goes on to define Curation as including "... documentation, preservation, preparation, and distribution of samples for research, education, and public outreach." Here we describe some of the ongoing efforts to ensure that the future activities of the NASA Curation Office are working towards a state of maximum proficiency.

  18. Cellular communications a comprehensive and practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Even as newer cellular technologies and standards emerge, many of the fundamental principles and the components of the cellular network remain the same. Presenting a simple yet comprehensive view of cellular communications technologies, Cellular Communications provides an end-to-end perspective of cellular operations, ranging from physical layer details to call set-up and from the radio network to the core network. This self-contained source forpractitioners and students represents a comprehensive survey of the fundamentals of cellular communications and the landscape of commercially deployed

  19. International survey of academic library data curation practices

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This survey looks closely at the data curation practices of a sample of research-oriented universities largely from the USA, the UK, Australia and Scandinavia but also including India, South Africa and other countries. The study looks at how major universities are assisting faculty in developing data curation and management plans for large scale data projects, largely in the sciences and social sciences, often as pre-conditions for major grants. The report looks at which departments of universities are shouldering the data curation burden, the personnel involved in the efforts, the costs involved, types of software used, difficulties in procuring scientific experiment logs and other hard to obtain information, types of training offered to faculty, and other issues in large scale data management.

  20. Integration of data: the Nanomaterial Registry project and data curation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzan, K A; Mills, K C; Gupta, V; Murry, D; Ostraat, M L; Scheier, C N; Willis, D A

    2013-01-01

    Due to the use of nanomaterials in multiple fields of applied science and technology, there is a need for accelerated understanding of any potential implications of using these unique and promising materials. There is a multitude of research data that, if integrated, can be leveraged to drive toward a better understanding. Integration can be achieved by applying nanoinformatics concepts. The Nanomaterial Registry is using applied minimal information about nanomaterials to support a robust data curation process in order to promote integration across a diverse data set. This paper describes the evolution of the curation methodology used in the Nanomaterial Registry project as well as the current procedure that is used. Some of the lessons learned about curation of nanomaterial data are also discussed. (paper)

  1. Protective, curative and eradicative activities of fungicides against grapevine rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francislene Angelotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective, eradicative and curative activities of the fungicides azoxystrobin, tebuconazole, pyraclostrobin+metiram, and ciproconazole against grapevine rust, were determined in greenhouse. To evaluate the protective activity, leaves of potted ´Niagara´ (Vitis labrusca vines were artificially inoculated with an urediniospore suspension of Phakopsora euvitis four, eight or forteen days after fungicidal spray; and to evaluate the curative and eradicative activities, leaves were sprayed with fungicides two, four or eight days after inoculation. Disease severity was assessed 14 days after each inoculation. All tested fungicides present excellent preventive activity against grapevine rust; however, tebuconazole and ciproconazole provide better curative activity than azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin+metiram. It was observed also that all tested fungicides significantly reduced the germination of urediniospore produced on sprayed leaves.

  2. The curation paradigm and application tool used for manual curation of the scientific literature at the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Allan Peter; Wiegers, Thomas C.; Murphy, Cynthia G.; Mattingly, Carolyn J.

    2011-01-01

    The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) is a public resource that promotes understanding about the effects of environmental chemicals on human health. CTD biocurators read the scientific literature and convert free-text information into a structured format using official nomenclature, integrating third party controlled vocabularies for chemicals, genes, diseases and organisms, and a novel controlled vocabulary for molecular interactions. Manual curation produces a robust, richly annotated dataset of highly accurate and detailed information. Currently, CTD describes over 349 000 molecular interactions between 6800 chemicals, 20 900 genes (for 330 organisms) and 4300 diseases that have been manually curated from over 25 400 peer-reviewed articles. This manually curated data are further integrated with other third party data (e.g. Gene Ontology, KEGG and Reactome annotations) to generate a wealth of toxicogenomic relationships. Here, we describe our approach to manual curation that uses a powerful and efficient paradigm involving mnemonic codes. This strategy allows biocurators to quickly capture detailed information from articles by generating simple statements using codes to represent the relationships between data types. The paradigm is versatile, expandable, and able to accommodate new data challenges that arise. We have incorporated this strategy into a web-based curation tool to further increase efficiency and productivity, implement quality control in real-time and accommodate biocurators working remotely. Database URL: http://ctd.mdibl.org PMID:21933848

  3. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  4. Curating Public Art 2.0: The case of Autopoiesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajana, Btihaj

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the intersections between public art, curation and Web 2.0 technology. Building on the case study of Autopoiesis, a digital art project focusing on the curation and online exhibition of artworks received from members of the public in the United Arab Emirates, the article...... to facilitate autonomous creative self-expressions and enable greater public participation in culture. By providing a critical reflection on the ‘material’ contexts of this digital project, the article also demonstrates the related tensions between the virtual and the physical, and the wider ‘local’ realities...

  5. Organic Contamination Baseline Study on NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Gloveboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Allton, J. H.; Allen, C. C.; Burkett, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Future planned sample return missions to carbon-rich asteroids and Mars in the next two decades will require strict handling and curation protocols as well as new procedures for reducing organic contamination. After the Apollo program, astromaterial collections have mainly been concerned with inorganic contamination [1-4]. However, future isolation containment systems for astromaterials, possibly nitrogen enriched gloveboxes, must be able to reduce organic and inorganic cross-contamination. In 2012, a baseline study was orchestrated to establish the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs.

  6. Observations on the Curative Effect of Acupuncture on Depressive Neurosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Wen-bin; WANG Si-you

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the curative effect of acupuncture on depressive neurosis. Method Sixty-two patients were randomly divided into a treatment group of 32 cases and a control group of 30 cases. The treatment group and the control group were treated with acupuncture and Fluoxetine, respectively. The curative effects were evaluated by HAMD. Results There was a significant difference between pretreatment and posttreatmentin each group ( P 0.05). But acupuncture had no side effects and was good in compliance. Conclusion Acupuncture is an effective method for treating depressive neurosis.

  7. Curation of complex, context-dependent immunological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney John

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB is dedicated to capturing, housing and analyzing complex immune epitope related data http://www.immuneepitope.org. Description To identify and extract relevant data from the scientific literature in an efficient and accurate manner, novel processes were developed for manual and semi-automated annotation. Conclusion Formalized curation strategies enable the processing of a large volume of context-dependent data, which are now available to the scientific community in an accessible and transparent format. The experiences described herein are applicable to other databases housing complex biological data and requiring a high level of curation expertise.

  8. Automatic vs. manual curation of a multi-source chemical dictionary: the impact on text mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Previously, we developed a combined dictionary dubbed Chemlist for the identification of small molecules and drugs in text based on a number of publicly available databases and tested it on an annotated corpus. To achieve an acceptable recall and precision we used a number of automatic and semi-automatic processing steps together with disambiguation rules. However, it remained to be investigated which impact an extensive manual curation of a multi-source chemical dictionary would have on chemical term identification in text. ChemSpider is a chemical database that has undergone extensive manual curation aimed at establishing valid chemical name-to-structure relationships. Results We acquired the component of ChemSpider containing only manually curated names and synonyms. Rule-based term filtering, semi-automatic manual curation, and disambiguation rules were applied. We tested the dictionary from ChemSpider on an annotated corpus and compared the results with those for the Chemlist dictionary. The ChemSpider dictionary of ca. 80 k names was only a 1/3 to a 1/4 the size of Chemlist at around 300 k. The ChemSpider dictionary had a precision of 0.43 and a recall of 0.19 before the application of filtering and disambiguation and a precision of 0.87 and a recall of 0.19 after filtering and disambiguation. The Chemlist dictionary had a precision of 0.20 and a recall of 0.47 before the application of filtering and disambiguation and a precision of 0.67 and a recall of 0.40 after filtering and disambiguation. Conclusions We conclude the following: (1) The ChemSpider dictionary achieved the best precision but the Chemlist dictionary had a higher recall and the best F-score; (2) Rule-based filtering and disambiguation is necessary to achieve a high precision for both the automatically generated and the manually curated dictionary. ChemSpider is available as a web service at http://www.chemspider.com/ and the Chemlist dictionary is freely available as an XML file in

  9. Data Curation Network: How Do We Compare? A Snapshot of Six Academic Library Institutions’ Data Repository and Curation Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Johnston

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Many academic and research institutions are exploring opportunities to better support researchers in sharing their data. As partners in the Data Curation Network project, our six institutions developed a comparison of the current levels of support provided for researchers to meet their data sharing goals through library-based data repository and curation services. Methods: Each institutional lead provided a written summary of their services based on a previously developed structure, followed by group discussion and refinement of descriptions. Service areas assessed include the repository services for data, technologies used, policies, and staffing in place. Conclusions: Through this process we aim to better define the current levels of support offered by our institutions as a first step toward meeting our project's overarching goal to develop a shared staffing model for data curation across multiple institutions.

  10. Cellular dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.L.; Chin, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation dose is a useful predictive parameter for describing radiation toxicity in conventional radiotherapy. Traditionally, in vitro radiation biology dose-effect relations are expressed in the form of cell survival curves, a semilog plot of cell survival versus dose. However, the characteristic linear or linear quadratic survival curve shape, for high- and low-LET radiations respectively, is only strictly valid when the radiation dose is uniform across the entire target population. With an external beam of 60 Co gamma rays or x-rays, a uniform field may be readily achievable. When radionuclides are incorporated into a cell milieu, several new problems emerge which can result in a departure from uniformity in energy deposition throughout a cell population. This nonuniformity can have very important consequences for the shape of the survival curve. Cases in which perturbations of source uniformity may arise include: 1. Elemental sources may equilibrate in the cell medium with partition coefficients between the extracellular, cytosol, and nuclear compartments. The effect of preferential cell internalization or binding to cell membrane of some radionuclides can increase or decrease the slope of the survival curve. 2. Radionuclides bound to antibodies, hormones, metabolite precursors, etc., may result in a source localization pattern characteristic of the carrier agent, i.e., the sources may bind to cell surface receptors or antigens, be internalized, bind to secreted antigen concentrated around a fraction of the cell population, or become directly incorporated into the cell DNA. We propose to relate the distribution of energy deposition in cell nuclei to biological correlates of cellular inactivation. The probability of each cell's survival is weighted by its individual radiation burden, and the summation of these probabilities for the cell population can be used to predict the number or fraction of cell survivors

  11. Cellular structures with interconnected microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaefer, Robert Shahram; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Williams, Brian

    2018-01-30

    A method for fabricating a cellular tritium breeder component includes obtaining a reticulated carbon foam skeleton comprising a network of interconnected ligaments. The foam skeleton is then melt-infiltrated with a tritium breeder material, for example, lithium zirconate or lithium titanate. The foam skeleton is then removed to define a cellular breeder component having a network of interconnected tritium purge channels. In an embodiment the ligaments of the foam skeleton are enlarged by adding carbon using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) prior to melt-infiltration. In an embodiment the foam skeleton is coated with a refractory material, for example, tungsten, prior to melt infiltration.

  12. Curator's process of meaning-making in National museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Anne Jodon

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims to understand the meaning-making process curators engage in designing/developing exhibitions of the nations indigenous peoples. How indigenous people are represented can with perpetuate stereotypes or mediate change while strengthening their personal and group identity. Analysis...

  13. Interview with Smithsonian NASM Spacesuit Curator Dr. Cathleen Lewis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cathleen; Wright, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Cathleen Lewis was interviewed by Rebecca Wright during the presentation of an "Interview with Smithsonian NASM Spacesuit Curator Dr. Cathleen Lewis" on May 14, 2012. Topics included the care, size, and history of the spacesuit collection at the Smithsonian and the recent move to the state-of-the-art permanent storage facility at the Udvar-Hazy facility in Virginia.

  14. Learning relationships: Church of England curates and training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... exploring how this affects the dynamic of the relationship with their curates. Scripture is also ... factors, as employed in the models of personality advanced by Costa and .... psychological type preferences of their training incumbents. The data ..... to conceptualising and implementing Christian vocation.

  15. Collecting, curating, and researching writers' libraries a handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Oram, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    Collecting, Curating, and Researching Writers' Libraries: A Handbook is the first book to examine the history, acquisition, cataloging, and scholarly use of writers' personal libraries. This book also includes interviews with several well-known writers, who discuss their relationship with their books.

  16. Curative care through administration of plant-derived medicines in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Curative care through administration of plant-derived medicines in Sekhukhune district municipality of Limpopo province, South Africa. ... Sources of medicine were mostly herbs followed by shrubs, trees, creepers and aloe collected from the communal land. The leaves, bark, roots and bulbs were prepared into decoctions ...

  17. MS_HistoneDB, a manually curated resource for proteomic analysis of human and mouse histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kennani, Sara; Adrait, Annie; Shaytan, Alexey K; Khochbin, Saadi; Bruley, Christophe; Panchenko, Anna R; Landsman, David; Pflieger, Delphine; Govin, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Histones and histone variants are essential components of the nuclear chromatin. While mass spectrometry has opened a large window to their characterization and functional studies, their identification from proteomic data remains challenging. Indeed, the current interpretation of mass spectrometry data relies on public databases which are either not exhaustive (Swiss-Prot) or contain many redundant entries (UniProtKB or NCBI). Currently, no protein database is ideally suited for the analysis of histones and the complex array of mammalian histone variants. We propose two proteomics-oriented manually curated databases for mouse and human histone variants. We manually curated >1700 gene, transcript and protein entries to produce a non-redundant list of 83 mouse and 85 human histones. These entries were annotated in accordance with the current nomenclature and unified with the "HistoneDB2.0 with Variants" database. This resource is provided in a format that can be directly read by programs used for mass spectrometry data interpretation. In addition, it was used to interpret mass spectrometry data acquired on histones extracted from mouse testis. Several histone variants, which had so far only been inferred by homology or detected at the RNA level, were detected by mass spectrometry, confirming the existence of their protein form. Mouse and human histone entries were collected from different databases and subsequently curated to produce a non-redundant protein-centric resource, MS_HistoneDB. It is dedicated to the proteomic study of histones in mouse and human and will hopefully facilitate the identification and functional study of histone variants.

  18. Advances in Astromaterials Curation: Supporting Future Sample Return Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C. A.; Zeigler, R. A.; Fries, M. D..; Righter, K.; Allton, J. H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Calaway, M. J.; Bell, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Astromaterials, curated at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, are the most extensive, best-documented, and leastcontaminated extraterrestrial samples that are provided to the worldwide research community. These samples include lunar samples from the Apollo missions, meteorites collected over nearly 40 years of expeditions to Antarctica (providing samples of dozens of asteroid bodies, the Moon, and Mars), Genesis solar wind samples, cosmic dust collected by NASA's high altitude airplanes, Comet Wild 2 and interstellar dust samples from the Stardust mission, and asteroid samples from JAXA's Hayabusa mission. A full account of NASA's curation efforts for these collections is provided by Allen, et al [1]. On average, we annually allocate about 1500 individual samples from NASA's astromaterials collections to hundreds of researchers from around the world, including graduate students and post-doctoral scientists; our allocation rate has roughly doubled over the past 10 years. The curation protocols developed for the lunar samples returned from the Apollo missions remain relevant and are adapted to new and future missions. Several lessons from the Apollo missions, including the need for early involvement of curation scientists in mission planning [1], have been applied to all subsequent sample return campaigns. From the 2013 National Academy of Sciences report [2]: "Curation is the critical interface between sample return missions and laboratory research. Proper curation has maintained the scientific integrity and utility of the Apollo, Antarctic meteorite, and cosmic dust collections for decades. Each of these collections continues to yield important new science. In the past decade, new state-of-the-art curatorial facilities for the Genesis and Stardust missions were key to the scientific breakthroughs provided by these missions." The results speak for themselves: research on NASA's astromaterials result in hundreds of papers annually, yield fundamental

  19. Advanced Curation: Solving Current and Future Sample Return Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Calaway, M.; Evans, C.; McCubbin, F.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Curation is a wide-ranging and comprehensive research and development effort at NASA Johnson Space Center that identifies and remediates sample related issues. For current collections, Advanced Curation investigates new cleaning, verification, and analytical techniques to assess their suitability for improving curation processes. Specific needs are also assessed for future sample return missions. For each need, a written plan is drawn up to achieve the requirement. The plan draws while upon current Curation practices, input from Curators, the analytical expertise of the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) team, and suitable standards maintained by ISO, IEST, NIST and other institutions. Additionally, new technologies are adopted on the bases of need and availability. Implementation plans are tested using customized trial programs with statistically robust courses of measurement, and are iterated if necessary until an implementable protocol is established. Upcoming and potential NASA missions such as OSIRIS-REx, the Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM), sample return missions in the New Frontiers program, and Mars sample return (MSR) all feature new difficulties and specialized sample handling requirements. The Mars 2020 mission in particular poses a suite of challenges since the mission will cache martian samples for possible return to Earth. In anticipation of future MSR, the following problems are among those under investigation: What is the most efficient means to achieve the less than 1.0 ng/sq cm total organic carbon (TOC) cleanliness required for all sample handling hardware? How do we maintain and verify cleanliness at this level? The Mars 2020 Organic Contamination Panel (OCP) predicts that organic carbon, if present, will be present at the "one to tens" of ppb level in martian near-surface samples. The same samples will likely contain wt% perchlorate salts, or approximately 1,000,000x as much perchlorate oxidizer as organic carbon

  20. Advanced Curation Protocols for Mars Returned Sample Handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M.; Mickelson, E.; Lindstrom, D.; Allton, J.

    Introduction: Johnson Space Center has over 30 years experience handling precious samples which include Lunar rocks and Antarctic meteorites. However, we recognize that future curation of samples from such missions as Genesis, Stardust, and Mars S mple Return, will require a high degree of biosafety combined witha extremely low levels of inorganic, organic, and biological contamination. To satisfy these requirements, research in the JSC Advanced Curation Lab is currently focused toward two major areas: preliminary examination techniques and cleaning and verification techniques . Preliminary Examination Techniques : In order to minimize the number of paths for contamination we are exploring the synergy between human &robotic sample handling in a controlled environment to help determine the limits of clean curation. Within the Advanced Curation Laboratory is a prototype, next-generation glovebox, which contains a robotic micromanipulator. The remotely operated manipulator has six degrees-of- freedom and can be programmed to perform repetitive sample handling tasks. Protocols are being tested and developed to perform curation tasks such as rock splitting, weighing, imaging, and storing. Techniques for sample transfer enabling more detailed remote examination without compromising the integrity of sample science are also being developed . The glovebox is equipped with a rapid transfer port through which samples can be passed without exposure. The transfer is accomplished by using a unique seal and engagement system which allows passage between containers while maintaining a first seal to the outside environment and a second seal to prevent the outside of the container cover and port door from becoming contaminated by the material being transferred. Cleaning and Verification Techniques: As part of the contamination control effort, innovative cleaning techniques are being identified and evaluated in conjunction with sensitive cleanliness verification methods. Towards this

  1. Content curation en periodismo (y en documentación periodística)

    OpenAIRE

    Guallar, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The last years we have seen the appearance of concepts such as content curation and content curator as, respectively, the activity or system and the professional or specialist. Although the term is originally linked to the world of marketing, -considering marketer's Rohit Bhargava 'Manifesto for the content curator' (2009) as its founding article-, and its features mostly identify with those of the Information Science professional, content curation goes beyond a specific discipline or profess...

  2. Curated routes: the project of developing experiential tracks in sub-urban landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Papathanasiou, Maximi; Uyttenhove, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The Curated Routes project reflects on the visiting routes’ ability to make apparent the internal characteristics of urban environments. The project’s name allude to the intellectual function of curation and the materiality of routes. Curate deals with the practice of arranging material –tangible or intangible- in a way that a new understanding of an area is revealed. The word routes refers to the linear associations that link places and guide movement. The Curated Routes aim to reinforce the...

  3. Digital curation: a proposal of a semi-automatic digital object selection-based model for digital curation in Big Data environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Lima Dutra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This work presents a new approach for Digital Curations from a Big Data perspective. Objective: The objective is to propose techniques to digital curations for selecting and evaluating digital objects that take into account volume, velocity, variety, reality, and the value of the data collected from multiple knowledge domains. Methodology: This is an exploratory research of applied nature, which addresses the research problem in a qualitative way. Heuristics allow this semi-automatic process to be done either by human curators or by software agents. Results: As a result, it was proposed a model for searching, processing, evaluating and selecting digital objects to be processed by digital curations. Conclusions: It is possible to use Big Data environments as a source of information resources for Digital Curation; besides, Big Data techniques and tools can support the search and selection process of information resources by Digital Curations.

  4. Use of Ontologies for Data Integration and Curation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Gelernter

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Data curation includes the goal of facilitating the re-use and combination of datasets, which is often impeded by incompatible data schema. Can we use ontologies to help with data integration? We suggest a semi-automatic process that involves the use of automatic text searching to help identify overlaps in metadata that accompany data schemas, plus human validation of suggested data matches.Problems include different text used to describe the same concept, different forms of data recording and different organizations of data. Ontologies can help by focussing attention on important words, providing synonyms to assist matching, and indicating in what context words are used. Beyond ontologies, data on the statistical behavior of data can be used to decide which data elements appear to be compatible with which other data elements. When curating data which may have hundreds or even thousands of data labels, semi-automatic assistance with data fusion should be of great help.

  5. A Practice and Value Proposal for Doctoral Dissertation Data Curation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Aaron Collie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and publication of dissertations can be viewed as a subsystem of scholarly communication, and the treatment of data that support doctoral research can be mapped in a very controlled manner to the data curation lifecycle. Dissertation datasets represent “low-hanging fruit” for universities who are developing institutional data collections. The current workflow for processing electronic theses and dissertations (ETD at a typical American university is presented, and a new practice is proposed that includes datasets in the process of formulating, awarding, and disseminating dissertations in a way that enables them to be linked and curated together. The value proposition and new roles for the university and its student-authors, faculty, graduate programs and librarians are explored.

  6. The latest evidence for possible HIV-1 curative strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hanh Thi; Mesplède, Thibault

    2018-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains a major health issue worldwide. In developed countries, antiretroviral therapy has extended its reach from treatment of people living with HIV-1 to post-exposure prophylaxis, treatment as prevention, and, more recently, pre-exposure prophylaxis. These healthcare strategies offer the epidemiological tools to curve the epidemic in rich settings and will be concomitantly implemented in developing countries. One of the remaining challenges is to identify an efficacious curative strategy. This review manuscript will focus on some of the current curative strategies aiming at providing a sterilizing or functional cure to HIV-1-positive individuals. These include the following: early treatment initiation in post-treatment controllers as a long-term HIV-1 remission strategy, latency reversal, gene editing with or without stem cell transplantation, and antibodies against either the viral envelope protein or the host integrin α4β7.

  7. Curation of US Martian Meteorites Collected in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, M.; Satterwhite, C.; Allton, J.; Stansbury, E.

    1998-01-01

    To date the ANSMET field team has collected five martian meteorites (see below) in Antarctica and returned them for curation at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Meteorite Processing Laboratory (MPL). ne meteorites were collected with the clean procedures used by ANSMET in collecting all meteorites: They were handled with JSC-cleaned tools, packaged in clean bags, and shipped frozen to JSC. The five martian meteorites vary significantly in size (12-7942 g) and rock type (basalts, lherzolites, and orthopyroxenite). Detailed descriptions are provided in the Mars Meteorite compendium, which describes classification, curation and research results. A table gives the names, classifications and original and curatorial masses of the martian meteorites. The MPL and measures for contamination control are described.

  8. Sharing and community curation of mass spectrometry data with GNPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Don Duy; Watrous, Jeramie; Kapono, Clifford A; Luzzatto-Knaan, Tal; Porto, Carla; Bouslimani, Amina; Melnik, Alexey V; Meehan, Michael J; Liu, Wei-Ting; Crüsemann, Max; Boudreau, Paul D; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Kersten, Roland D; Pace, Laura A; Quinn, Robert A; Duncan, Katherine R; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Floros, Dimitrios J; Gavilan, Ronnie G; Kleigrewe, Karin; Northen, Trent; Dutton, Rachel J; Parrot, Delphine; Carlson, Erin E; Aigle, Bertrand; Michelsen, Charlotte F; Jelsbak, Lars; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Pevzner, Pavel; Edlund, Anna; McLean, Jeffrey; Piel, Jörn; Murphy, Brian T; Gerwick, Lena; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Yang, Yu-Liang; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Maansson, Maria; Keyzers, Robert A; Sims, Amy C; Johnson, Andrew R.; Sidebottom, Ashley M; Sedio, Brian E; Klitgaard, Andreas; Larson, Charles B; P., Cristopher A Boya; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Gonzalez, David J; Silva, Denise B; Marques, Lucas M; Demarque, Daniel P; Pociute, Egle; O'Neill, Ellis C; Briand, Enora; Helfrich, Eric J. N.; Granatosky, Eve A; Glukhov, Evgenia; Ryffel, Florian; Houson, Hailey; Mohimani, Hosein; Kharbush, Jenan J; Zeng, Yi; Vorholt, Julia A; Kurita, Kenji L; Charusanti, Pep; McPhail, Kerry L; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Vuong, Lisa; Elfeki, Maryam; Traxler, Matthew F; Engene, Niclas; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Vining, Oliver B; Baric, Ralph; Silva, Ricardo R; Mascuch, Samantha J; Tomasi, Sophie; Jenkins, Stefan; Macherla, Venkat; Hoffman, Thomas; Agarwal, Vinayak; Williams, Philip G; Dai, Jingqui; Neupane, Ram; Gurr, Joshua; Rodríguez, Andrés M. C.; Lamsa, Anne; Zhang, Chen; Dorrestein, Kathleen; Duggan, Brendan M; Almaliti, Jehad; Allard, Pierre-Marie; Phapale, Prasad; Nothias, Louis-Felix; Alexandrov, Theodore; Litaudon, Marc; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Kyle, Jennifer E; Metz, Thomas O; Peryea, Tyler; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; VanLeer, Danielle; Shinn, Paul; Jadhav, Ajit; Müller, Rolf; Waters, Katrina M; Shi, Wenyuan; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Lixin; Knight, Rob; Jensen, Paul R; Palsson, Bernhard O; Pogliano, Kit; Linington, Roger G; Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Lopes, Norberto P; Gerwick, William H; Moore, Bradley S; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Bandeira, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    The potential of the diverse chemistries present in natural products (NP) for biotechnology and medicine remains untapped because NP databases are not searchable with raw data and the NP community has no way to share data other than in published papers. Although mass spectrometry techniques are well-suited to high-throughput characterization of natural products, there is a pressing need for an infrastructure to enable sharing and curation of data. We present Global Natural Products Social molecular networking (GNPS, http://gnps.ucsd.edu), an open-access knowledge base for community wide organization and sharing of raw, processed or identified tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry data. In GNPS crowdsourced curation of freely available community-wide reference MS libraries will underpin improved annotations. Data-driven social-networking should facilitate identification of spectra and foster collaborations. We also introduce the concept of ‘living data’ through continuous reanalysis of deposited data. PMID:27504778

  9. Data Preservation and Curation for the Planetary Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J. S.; Crichton, D. J.; Joyner, R.; Hardman, S.; Rye, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS) has just released PDS4 Version 1.0, its next generation data standards for the planetary science archive. These data standards are the result of a multi-year effort to develop an information model based on accepted standards for data preservation, data curation, metadata management, and model development. The resulting information model is subsequently used to drive information system development from the generation of data standards documentation to the configuration of federated registries and search engines. This paper will provide an overview of the development of the PDS4 Information Model and focus on the application of the Open Archive Information System (OAIS) Reference Model - ISO 14721:2003, the Metadata Registry (MDR) Standard - ISO/IEC 11179, and the E-Business XML Standard to help ensure the long-term preservation and curation of planetary science data. Copyright 2013 California Institute of Technology Government sponsorship acknowledged

  10. Local high voltage radiotherapy with curative intent for prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, G.H.; Kurth, K.H.; Hohenfellner, R.

    1979-01-01

    In a 10-year interval 179 patients with prostatic carcinoma were treated by cobalt-60 teletherapy (7600 R). A selected group of 47 patients with localized disease and irradiated with curative intent had serial prostatic biopsies and were analized after a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Biopsies of half of the patients rendered definitively negative, on an average 14 months after radiotherapy. 8 patients with initial negative biopsy changed to positive secondarily. In one third of the patients histological conversion was missed, considered as radiation persister. Persistent carcinoma were of predominant low grade. 5 patients developed distant metastases 30 months after irradiation on an average. These patients had persistent positive tissue studies. Over all cumulative 5-years survival was 89%. In patients with prostatic carcinoma and local high voltage radiotherapy with curative intent (stage A through C) serial prostatic biopsies to document therapy effect seen mandatory. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 BRE [de

  11. User-generated content curation with deep convolutional neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Tous Liesa, Rubén; Wust, Otto; Gómez, Mauro; Poveda, Jonatan; Elena, Marc; Torres Viñals, Jordi; Makni, Mouna; Ayguadé Parra, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report a work consisting in using deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for curating and filtering photos posted by social media users (Instagram and Twitter). The final goal is to facilitate searching and discovering user-generated content (UGC) with potential value for digital marketing tasks. The images are captured in real time and automatically annotated with multiple CNNs. Some of the CNNs perform generic object recognition tasks while others perform what we call v...

  12. Sharing Responsibility for Data Stewardship Between Scientists and Curators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedstrom, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Data stewardship is becoming increasingly important to support accurate conclusions from new forms of data, integration of and computation across heterogeneous data types, interactions between models and data, replication of results, data governance and long-term archiving. In addition to increasing recognition of the importance of data management, data science, and data curation by US and international scientific agencies, the National Academies of Science Board on Research Data and Information is sponsoring a study on Data Curation Education and Workforce Issues. Effective data stewardship requires a distributed effort among scientists who produce data, IT staff and/or vendors who provide data storage and computational facilities and services, and curators who enhance data quality, manage data governance, provide access to third parties, and assume responsibility for long-term archiving of data. The expertise necessary for scientific data management includes a mix of knowledge of the scientific domain; an understanding of domain data requirements, standards, ontologies and analytical methods; facility with leading edge information technology; and knowledge of data governance, standards, and best practices for long-term preservation and access that rarely are found in a single individual. Rather than developing data science and data curation as new and distinct occupations, this paper examines the set of tasks required for data stewardship. The paper proposes an alternative model that embeds data stewardship in scientific workflows and coordinates hand-offs between instruments, repositories, analytical processing, publishers, distributors, and archives. This model forms the basis for defining knowledge and skill requirements for specific actors in the processes required for data stewardship and the corresponding educational and training needs.

  13. Curating Big Data Made Simple: Perspectives from Scientific Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowe, Sulayman K; Zettsu, Koji

    2014-03-01

    The digital universe is exponentially producing an unprecedented volume of data that has brought benefits as well as fundamental challenges for enterprises and scientific communities alike. This trend is inherently exciting for the development and deployment of cloud platforms to support scientific communities curating big data. The excitement stems from the fact that scientists can now access and extract value from the big data corpus, establish relationships between bits and pieces of information from many types of data, and collaborate with a diverse community of researchers from various domains. However, despite these perceived benefits, to date, little attention is focused on the people or communities who are both beneficiaries and, at the same time, producers of big data. The technical challenges posed by big data are as big as understanding the dynamics of communities working with big data, whether scientific or otherwise. Furthermore, the big data era also means that big data platforms for data-intensive research must be designed in such a way that research scientists can easily search and find data for their research, upload and download datasets for onsite/offsite use, perform computations and analysis, share their findings and research experience, and seamlessly collaborate with their colleagues. In this article, we present the architecture and design of a cloud platform that meets some of these requirements, and a big data curation model that describes how a community of earth and environmental scientists is using the platform to curate data. Motivation for developing the platform, lessons learnt in overcoming some challenges associated with supporting scientists to curate big data, and future research directions are also presented.

  14. Curative resection of transverse colon cancer via minilaparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Ishiguro, Tohru; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Okada, Norimichi; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Haga, Norihiro

    2011-01-01

    Minilaparotomy has been reported to be a minimally invasive alternative to laparoscopically assisted surgery. We retrospectively evaluated the usefulness of minilaparotomy for the resection of transverse colon cancer, which has generally been considered difficult to resect laparoscopically. Patients for whom curative resection was attempted for transverse colon cancer (n = 21) or sigmoid colon cancer (n = 81) via minilaparotomy (skin incision, transverse colon cancer as well as those with sigmoid colon cancer.

  15. Opening Data in the Long Tail for Community Discovery, Curation and Action Using Active and Social Curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedstrom, M. L.; Kumar, P.; Myers, J.; Plale, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    In data science, the most common sequence of steps for data curation are to 1) curate data, 2) enable data discovery, and 3) provide for data reuse. The Sustainable Environments - Actionable Data (SEAD) project, funded through NSF's DataNet program, is creating an environment for sustainability scientists to discover data first, reuse data next, and curate data though an on-going process that we call Active and Social Curation. For active curation we are developing tools and services that support data discovery, data management, and data enhancement for the community while the data is still being used actively for research. We are creating an Active Content Repository, using drop box, semantic web technologies, and a Flickr-like interface for researchers to "drop" data into a repository where it will be replicated and minimally discoverable. For social curation, we are deploying a social networking tool, VIVO, which will allow researchers to discover data-publications-people (e.g. expertise) through a route that can start at any of those entry points. The other dimension of social curation is developing mechanisms to open data for community input, for example, using ranking and commenting mechanisms for data sets and a community-sourcing capability to add tags, clean up and validate data sets. SEAD's strategies and services are aimed at the sustainability science community, which faces numerous challenges including discovery of useful data, cleaning noisy observational data, synthesizing data of different types, defining appropriate models, managing and preserving their research data, and conveying holistic results to colleagues, students, decision makers, and the public. Sustainability researchers make significant use of centrally managed data from satellites and national sensor networks, national scientific and statistical agencies, and data archives. At the same time, locally collected data and custom derived data products that combine observations and

  16. Reducing Organic Contamination in NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, M. J.; Allen, C. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic and human spaceflight missions to the Moon, Mars, asteroids and comets will require handling and storing astromaterial samples with minimal inorganic and organic contamination to preserve the scientific integrity of each sample. Much was learned from the rigorous attempts to minimize and monitor organic contamination during Apollo, but it was not adequate for current analytical requirements; thus [1]. OSIRIS-REx, Hayabusa-2, and future Mars sample return will require better protocols for reducing organic contamination. Future isolation con-tainment systems for astromaterials, possibly nitrogen enriched gloveboxes, must be able to reduce organic and inorganic cross-contamination. In 2012, a baseline study established the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs [2, 3]. After standard ultra-pure water (UPW) cleaning, the majority of organic contaminates found were hydrocarbons, plasticizers, silicones, and solvents. Hydro-carbons loads (> C7) ranged from 1.9 to 11.8 ng/cm2 for TD-GC-MS wafer exposure analyses and 5.0 to 19.5 ng/L for TD-GC-MS adsorbent tube exposure. Plasticizers included peracetic acid sterilization were used in the atmospheric de-contamination (R) cabinets. Later, Lunar curation gloveboxes were degreased with a pressurized Freon 113 wash. Today, UPW has replaced Freon as the standard cleaning procedure, but does not have the degreasing solvency power of Freon. Future Cleaning Studies: Cleaning experiments are cur-rently being orchestrated to study how to degrease and reduce organics in a JSC curation glovebox lower than the established baseline. Several new chemicals in the industry have replaced traditional degreasing solvents such as Freon and others that are now federally restricted. However, these new suites of chemicals remain untested for lowering organics in curation gloveboxes. 3M's HFE-7100DL and Du

  17. The Hayabusa Curation Facility at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M.; Bastien, R.; McCann, B.; Frank, D.; Gonzalez, C.; Rodriguez, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Hayabusa spacecraft made contact with the asteroid 25143 Itokawa and collected regolith dust from Muses Sea region of smooth terrain [1]. The spacecraft returned to Earth with more than 10,000 grains ranging in size from just over 300 µm to less than 10 µm [2, 3]. These grains represent the only collection of material returned from an asteroid by a spacecraft. As part of the joint agreement between JAXA and NASA for the mission, 10% of the Hayabusa grains are being transferred to NASA for parallel curation and allocation. In order to properly receive process and curate these samples, a new curation facility was established at Johnson Space Center (JSC). Since the Hayabusa samples within the JAXA curation facility have been stored free from exposure to terrestrial atmosphere and contamination [4], one of the goals of the new NASA curation facility was to continue this treatment. An existing lab space at JSC was transformed into a 120 sq.ft. ISO class 4 (equivalent to the original class 10 standard) clean room. Hayabusa samples are stored, observed, processed, and packaged for allocation inside a stainless steel glove box under dry N2. Construction of the clean laboratory was completed in 2012. Currently, 25 Itokawa particles are lodged in NASA's Hayabusa Lab. Special care has been taken during lab construction to remove or contain materials that may contribute contaminant particles in the same size range as the Hayabusa grains. Several witness plates of various materials are installed around the clean lab and within the glove box to permit characterization of local contaminants at regular intervals by SEM and mass spectrometry, and particle counts of the lab environment are frequently acquired. Of particular interest is anodized aluminum, which contains copious sub-mm grains of a multitude of different materials embedded in its upper surface. Unfortunately the use of anodized aluminum was necessary in the construction

  18. A justification for semantic training in data curation frameworks development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Branch, B. D.; Wegner, K.

    2013-12-01

    In the complex data curation activities involving proper data access, data use optimization and data rescue, opportunities exist where underlying skills in semantics may play a crucial role in data curation professionals ranging from data scientists, to informaticists, to librarians. Here, We provide a conceptualization of semantics use in the education data curation framework (EDCF) [1] under development by Purdue University and endorsed by the GLOBE program [2] for further development and application. Our work shows that a comprehensive data science training includes both spatial and non-spatial data, where both categories are promoted by standard efforts of organizations such as the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), as well as organizations such as the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) that share knowledge and propagate best practices in applications. Outside the context of EDCF, semantics training may be same critical to such data scientists, informaticists or librarians in other types of data curation activity. Past works by the authors have suggested that such data science should augment an ontological literacy where data science may become sustainable as a discipline. As more datasets are being published as open data [3] and made linked to each other, i.e., in the Resource Description Framework (RDF) format, or at least their metadata are being published in such a way, vocabularies and ontologies of various domains are being created and used in the data management, such as the AGROVOC [4] for agriculture and the GCMD keywords [5] and CLEAN vocabulary [6] for climate sciences. The new generation of data scientist should be aware of those technologies and receive training where appropriate to incorporate those technologies into their reforming daily works. References [1] Branch, B.D., Fosmire, M., 2012. The role of interdisciplinary GIS and data curation librarians in enhancing authentic scientific

  19. The Importance of Contamination Knowledge in Curation - Insights into Mars Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A. D.; Calaway, M. J.; Regberg, A. B.; Mitchell, J. L.; Fries, M. D.; Zeigler, R. A.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2018-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), in Houston, TX (henceforth Curation Office) manages the curation of extraterrestrial samples returned by NASA missions and shared collections from international partners, preserving their integrity for future scientific study while providing the samples to the international community in a fair and unbiased way. The Curation Office also curates flight and non-flight reference materials and other materials from spacecraft assembly (e.g., lubricants, paints and gases) of sample return missions that would have the potential to cross-contaminate a present or future NASA astromaterials collection.

  20. SolCyc: a database hub at the Sol Genomics Network (SGN) for the manual curation of metabolic networks in Solanum and Nicotiana specific databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Hartmut; Bombarely, Aureliano; Battey, James N D; Sierro, Nicolas; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Mueller, Lukas A

    2018-01-01

    Abstract SolCyc is the entry portal to pathway/genome databases (PGDBs) for major species of the Solanaceae family hosted at the Sol Genomics Network. Currently, SolCyc comprises six organism-specific PGDBs for tomato, potato, pepper, petunia, tobacco and one Rubiaceae, coffee. The metabolic networks of those PGDBs have been computationally predicted by the pathologic component of the pathway tools software using the manually curated multi-domain database MetaCyc (http://www.metacyc.org/) as reference. SolCyc has been recently extended by taxon-specific databases, i.e. the family-specific SolanaCyc database, containing only curated data pertinent to species of the nightshade family, and NicotianaCyc, a genus-specific database that stores all relevant metabolic data of the Nicotiana genus. Through manual curation of the published literature, new metabolic pathways have been created in those databases, which are complemented by the continuously updated, relevant species-specific pathways from MetaCyc. At present, SolanaCyc comprises 199 pathways and 29 superpathways and NicotianaCyc accounts for 72 pathways and 13 superpathways. Curator-maintained, taxon-specific databases such as SolanaCyc and NicotianaCyc are characterized by an enrichment of data specific to these taxa and free of falsely predicted pathways. Both databases have been used to update recently created Nicotiana-specific databases for Nicotiana tabacum, Nicotiana benthamiana, Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis by propagating verifiable data into those PGDBs. In addition, in-depth curation of the pathways in N.tabacum has been carried out which resulted in the elimination of 156 pathways from the 569 pathways predicted by pathway tools. Together, in-depth curation of the predicted pathway network and the supplementation with curated data from taxon-specific databases has substantially improved the curation status of the species–specific N.tabacum PGDB. The implementation of this

  1. Curating NASA's Astromaterials Collections: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Planning for the curation of samples from future sample return missions must begin during the initial planning stages of a mission. Waiting until the samples have been returned to Earth, or even when you begin to physically build the spacecraft is too late. A lack of proper planning could lead to irreversible contamination of the samples, which in turn would compromise the scientific integrity of the mission. For example, even though the Apollo missions first returned samples in 1969, planning for the curation facility began in the early 1960s, and construction of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory was completed in 1967. In addition to designing the receiving facility and laboratory that the samples will be characterized and stored in, there are many aspects of contamination that must be addressed during the planning and building of the spacecraft: planetary protection (both outbound and inbound); cataloging, documenting, and preserving the materials used to build spacecraft (also known as coupons); near real-time monitoring of the environment in which the spacecraft is being built using witness plates for critical aspects of contamination (known as contamination control); and long term monitoring and preservation of the environment in which the spacecraft is being built for most aspects of potential contamination through the use of witness plates (known as contamination knowledge). The OSIRIS REx asteroid sample return mission, currently being built, is dealing with all of these aspects of contamination in order to ensure they return the best preserved sample possible. Coupons and witness plates from OSIRIS REx are currently being studied and stored (for future studies) at the Johnson Space Center. Similarly, planning for the clean room facility at Johnson Space Center to house the OSIRIS-REx samples is well advanced, and construction of the facility should begin in early 2017 (despite a nominal 2023 return date for OSIRIS-REx samples). Similar development is being

  2. Determinants of recurrence after intended curative resection for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Kring, Thomas; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    Despite intended curative resection, colorectal cancer will recur in ∼45% of the patients. Results of meta-analyses conclude that frequent follow-up does not lead to early detection of recurrence, but improves overall survival. The present literature shows that several factors play important roles...... in development of recurrence. It is well established that emergency surgery is a major determinant of recurrence. Moreover, anastomotic leakages, postoperative bacterial infections, and blood transfusions increase the recurrence rates although the exact mechanisms still remain obscure. From pathology studies...

  3. Morbidity of curative cancer surgery and suicide risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakrishnan, Thejus T; Sekigami, Yurie; Rajeev, Rahul; Gamblin, T Clark; Turaga, Kiran K

    2017-11-01

    Curative cancer operations lead to debility and loss of autonomy in a population vulnerable to suicide death. The extent to which operative intervention impacts suicide risk is not well studied. To examine the effects of morbidity of curative cancer surgeries and prognosis of disease on the risk of suicide in patients with solid tumors. Retrospective cohort study using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data from 2004 to 2011; multilevel systematic review. General US population. Participants were 482 781 patients diagnosed with malignant neoplasm between 2004 and 2011 who underwent curative cancer surgeries. Death by suicide or self-inflicted injury. Among 482 781 patients that underwent curative cancer surgery, 231 committed suicide (16.58/100 000 person-years [95% confidence interval, CI, 14.54-18.82]). Factors significantly associated with suicide risk included male sex (incidence rate [IR], 27.62; 95% CI, 23.82-31.86) and age >65 years (IR, 22.54; 95% CI, 18.84-26.76). When stratified by 30-day overall postoperative morbidity, a significantly higher incidence of suicide was found for high-morbidity surgeries (IR, 33.30; 95% CI, 26.50-41.33) vs moderate morbidity (IR, 24.27; 95% CI, 18.92-30.69) and low morbidity (IR, 9.81; 95% CI, 7.90-12.04). Unit increase in morbidity was significantly associated with death by suicide (odds ratio, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P = .02) and decreased suicide-specific survival (hazards ratio, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03, P = .01) in prognosis-adjusted models. In this sample of cancer patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, patients that undergo high-morbidity surgeries appear most vulnerable to death by suicide. The identification of this high-risk cohort should motivate health care providers and particularly surgeons to adopt screening measures during the postoperative follow-up period for these patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Improved Functionality and Curation Support in the ADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, Michael J.; Henneken, Edwin A.; Grant, Carolyn S.; Thompson, Donna; Chyla, Roman; Holachek, Alexandra; Sudilovsky, Vladimir; Murray, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    In this poster we describe the developments of the new ADS platform over the past year, focusing on the functionality which improves its discovery and curation capabilities.The ADS Application Programming Interface (API) is being updated to support authenticated access to the entire suite of ADS services, in addition to the search functionality itself. This allows programmatic access to resources which are specific to a user or class of users.A new interface, built directly on top of the API, now provides a more intuitive search experience and takes into account the best practices in web usability and responsive design. The interface now incorporates in-line views of graphics from the AAS Astroexplorer and the ADS All-Sky Survey image collections.The ADS Private Libraries, first introduced over 10 years ago, are now being enhanced to allow the bookmarking, tagging and annotation of records of interest. In addition, libraries can be shared with one or more ADS users, providing an easy way to collaborate in the curation of lists of papers. A library can also be explicitly made public and shared at large via the publishing of its URL.In collaboration with the AAS, the ADS plans to support the adoption of ORCID identifiers by implementing a plugin which will simplify the import of papers in ORCID via a query to the ADS API. Deeper integration between the two systems will depend on available resources and feedback from the community.

  5. Astrolabe: Curating, Linking, and Computing Astronomy’s Dark Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidorn, P. Bryan; Stahlman, Gretchen R.; Steffen, Julie

    2018-05-01

    Where appropriate repositories are not available to support all relevant astronomical data products, data can fall into darkness: unseen and unavailable for future reference and reuse. Some data in this category are legacy or old data, but newer data sets are also often uncurated and could remain dark. This paper provides a description of the design motivation and development of Astrolabe, a cyberinfrastructure project that addresses a set of community recommendations for locating and ensuring the long-term curation of dark or otherwise at-risk data and integrated computing. This paper also describes the outcomes of the series of community workshops that informed creation of Astrolabe. According to participants in these workshops, much astronomical dark data currently exist that are not curated elsewhere, as well as software that can only be executed by a few individuals and therefore becomes unusable because of changes in computing platforms. Astronomical research questions and challenges would be better addressed with integrated data and computational resources that fall outside the scope of existing observatory and space mission projects. As a solution, the design of the Astrolabe system is aimed at developing new resources for management of astronomical data. The project is based in CyVerse cyberinfrastructure technology and is a collaboration between the University of Arizona and the American Astronomical Society. Overall, the project aims to support open access to research data by leveraging existing cyberinfrastructure resources and promoting scientific discovery by making potentially useful data available to the astronomical community, in a computable format.

  6. Virtual Collections: An Earth Science Data Curation Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, Kaylin; Ramachandran, Rahul; Maskey, Manil; Gatlin, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The role of Earth science data centers has traditionally been to maintain central archives that serve openly available Earth observation data. However, in order to ensure data are as useful as possible to a diverse user community, Earth science data centers must move beyond simply serving as an archive to offering innovative data services to user communities. A virtual collection, the end product of a curation activity that searches, selects, and synthesizes diffuse data and information resources around a specific topic or event, is a data curation service that improves the discoverability, accessibility, and usability of Earth science data and also supports the needs of unanticipated users. Virtual collections minimize the amount of the time and effort needed to begin research by maximizing certainty of reward and by providing a trustworthy source of data for unanticipated users. This presentation will define a virtual collection in the context of an Earth science data center and will highlight a virtual collection case study created at the Global Hydrology Resource Center data center.

  7. On Curating Multimodal Sensory Data for Health and Wellness Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Bilal Amin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the focus of healthcare and wellness technologies has shown a significant shift towards personal vital signs devices. The technology has evolved from smartphone-based wellness applications to fitness bands and smartwatches. The novelty of these devices is the accumulation of activity data as their users go about their daily life routine. However, these implementations are device specific and lack the ability to incorporate multimodal data sources. Data accumulated in their usage does not offer rich contextual information that is adequate for providing a holistic view of a user’s lifelog. As a result, making decisions and generating recommendations based on this data are single dimensional. In this paper, we present our Data Curation Framework (DCF which is device independent and accumulates a user’s sensory data from multimodal data sources in real time. DCF curates the context of this accumulated data over the user’s lifelog. DCF provides rule-based anomaly detection over this context-rich lifelog in real time. To provide computation and persistence over the large volume of sensory data, DCF utilizes the distributed and ubiquitous environment of the cloud platform. DCF has been evaluated for its performance, correctness, ability to detect complex anomalies, and management support for a large volume of sensory data.

  8. AtomPy: an open atomic-data curation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Manuel; Mendoza, Claudio; Boswell, Josiah S; Ajoku, Chukwuemeka

    2014-06-01

    We present a cloud-computing environment for atomic data curation, networking among atomic data providers and users, teaching-and-learning, and interfacing with spectral modeling software. The system is based on Google-Drive Sheets, Pandas (Python Data Analysis Library) DataFrames, and IPython Notebooks for open community-driven curation of atomic data for scientific and technological applications. The atomic model for each ionic species is contained in a multi-sheet Google-Drive workbook, where the atomic parameters from all known public sources are progressively stored. Metadata (provenance, community discussion, etc.) accompanying every entry in the database are stored through Notebooks. Education tools on the physics of atomic processes as well as their relevance to plasma and spectral modeling are based on IPython Notebooks that integrate written material, images, videos, and active computer-tool workflows. Data processing workflows and collaborative software developments are encouraged and managed through the GitHub social network. Relevant issues this platform intends to address are: (i) data quality by allowing open access to both data producers and users in order to attain completeness, accuracy, consistency, provenance and currentness; (ii) comparisons of different datasets to facilitate accuracy assessment; (iii) downloading to local data structures (i.e. Pandas DataFrames) for further manipulation and analysis by prospective users; and (iv) data preservation by avoiding the discard of outdated sets.

  9. Curation Pedagogy for Media Studies: (Further Towards the Inexpert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Andrews

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An educational ‘model’ for participatory learning and media literacy in the contemporary context of digitally mediated lifeworlds is emerging (Jenkins, 2010; Gauntlett, 2011; Fraser and Wardle, 2011. The critical problem, we argue, for its ‘adequacy’ is the privilege granted to curriculum content and skills over pedagogy. Elsewhere, we offered a ‘pedagogy of the inexpert’ as such a model for textconscious disciplines such as, but not restricted to, Media Studies. This strategy removes ‘the media’ from our gaze and looks awry to develop new ways of working with students – to ‘show and tell’ textual agency and more reflexive deconstruction of what it is to read and make media, and to ‘be’ in mediation. In this article, we develop this approach further towards a model of ‘curation’. Understood in this way, students ‘show’ media literacy in new spaces – not by recourse to skills, competences or analytical unmasking of the properties of a (contained text, but by exhibiting, by curating a moment in time of textual meaningmaking and meaning-taking, but with a mindfulness – a critical acceptance of such an attempt to hold and curate the flow of meaning as an artifice.

  10. On Curating Multimodal Sensory Data for Health and Wellness Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Muhammad Bilal; Banos, Oresti; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Muhammad Bilal, Hafiz Syed; Gong, Jinhyuk; Bui, Dinh-Mao; Cho, Soung Ho; Hussain, Shujaat; Ali, Taqdir; Akhtar, Usman; Chung, Tae Choong; Lee, Sungyoung

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the focus of healthcare and wellness technologies has shown a significant shift towards personal vital signs devices. The technology has evolved from smartphone-based wellness applications to fitness bands and smartwatches. The novelty of these devices is the accumulation of activity data as their users go about their daily life routine. However, these implementations are device specific and lack the ability to incorporate multimodal data sources. Data accumulated in their usage does not offer rich contextual information that is adequate for providing a holistic view of a user’s lifelog. As a result, making decisions and generating recommendations based on this data are single dimensional. In this paper, we present our Data Curation Framework (DCF) which is device independent and accumulates a user’s sensory data from multimodal data sources in real time. DCF curates the context of this accumulated data over the user’s lifelog. DCF provides rule-based anomaly detection over this context-rich lifelog in real time. To provide computation and persistence over the large volume of sensory data, DCF utilizes the distributed and ubiquitous environment of the cloud platform. DCF has been evaluated for its performance, correctness, ability to detect complex anomalies, and management support for a large volume of sensory data. PMID:27355955

  11. CCDB: a curated database of genes involved in cervix cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Subhash M; Raghav, Dhwani; Singh, Harinder; Raghava, G P S

    2011-01-01

    The Cervical Cancer gene DataBase (CCDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/ccdb) is a manually curated catalog of experimentally validated genes that are thought, or are known to be involved in the different stages of cervical carcinogenesis. In spite of the large women population that is presently affected from this malignancy still at present, no database exists that catalogs information on genes associated with cervical cancer. Therefore, we have compiled 537 genes in CCDB that are linked with cervical cancer causation processes such as methylation, gene amplification, mutation, polymorphism and change in expression level, as evident from published literature. Each record contains details related to gene like architecture (exon-intron structure), location, function, sequences (mRNA/CDS/protein), ontology, interacting partners, homology to other eukaryotic genomes, structure and links to other public databases, thus augmenting CCDB with external data. Also, manually curated literature references have been provided to support the inclusion of the gene in the database and establish its association with cervix cancer. In addition, CCDB provides information on microRNA altered in cervical cancer as well as search facility for querying, several browse options and an online tool for sequence similarity search, thereby providing researchers with easy access to the latest information on genes involved in cervix cancer.

  12. Strategies for the Curation of CAD Engineering Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Patel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 Product Lifecycle Management (PLM has become increasingly important in the engineering community over the last decade or so, due to the globalisation of markets and the rising popularity of products provided as services. It demands the efficient capture, representation, organisation, retrieval and reuse of product data over its entire life. Simultaneously, there is now a much greater reliance on CAD models for communicating designs to manufacturers, builders, maintenance crews and regulators, and for definitively expressing designs. Creating the engineering record digitally, however, presents problems not only for its long-term maintenance and accessibility - due in part to the rapid obsolescence of the hardware, software and file formats involved - but also for recording the evolution of designs, artefacts and products. We examine the curation and preservation requirements in PLM and suggest ways of alleviating the problems of sustaining CAD engineering models through the use of lightweight formats, layered annotation and the collection of Representation Information as defined in the Open Archival Information System (OAIS Reference Model.  We describe two tools which have been specifically developed to aid in the curation of CAD engineering models in the context of PLM: Lightweight Models with Multilayered Annotation (LiMMA and a Registry/Repository of Representation Information for Engineering (RRoRIfE.

  13. Virtual Collections: An Earth Science Data Curation Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, K.; Ramachandran, R.; Maskey, M.; Gatlin, P. N.

    2016-12-01

    The role of Earth science data centers has traditionally been to maintain central archives that serve openly available Earth observation data. However, in order to ensure data are as useful as possible to a diverse user community, Earth science data centers must move beyond simply serving as an archive to offering innovative data services to user communities. A virtual collection, the end product of a curation activity that searches, selects, and synthesizes diffuse data and information resources around a specific topic or event, is a data curation service that improves the discoverability, accessibility and usability of Earth science data and also supports the needs of unanticipated users. Virtual collections minimize the amount of time and effort needed to begin research by maximizing certainty of reward and by providing a trustworthy source of data for unanticipated users. This presentation will define a virtual collection in the context of an Earth science data center and will highlight a virtual collection case study created at the Global Hydrology Resource Center data center.

  14. Advanced Curation Activities at NASA: Implications for Astrobiological Studies of Future Sample Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Evans, C. A.; Fries, M. D.; Harrington, A. D.; Regberg, A. B.; Snead, C. J.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office (henceforth referred to herein as NASA Curation Office) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. Under the governing document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 7100.10F JSC is charged with curation of all extraterrestrial material under NASA control, including future NASA missions. The Directive goes on to define Curation as including documentation, preservation, preparation, and distribution of samples for re-search, education, and public outreach. Here we briefly describe NASA's astromaterials collections and our ongoing efforts related to enhancing the utility of our current collections as well as our efforts to prepare for future sample return missions. We collectively refer to these efforts as advanced curation.

  15. Cellular players of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization in the bone marrow niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Joshua; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Winkler, Ingrid G

    2017-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) reside in perivascular regions of the bone marrow (BM) embedded within a complex regulatory unit called the niche. Cellular components of HSC niches include vascular endothelial cells, mesenchymal stromal progenitor cells and a variety of mature hematopoietic cells such as macrophages, neutrophils, and megakaryocytes-further regulated by sympathetic nerves and complement components as described in this review. Three decades ago the discovery that cytokines induce a large number of HSC to mobilize from the BM into the blood where they are easily harvested, revolutionised the field of HSC transplantation-curative for immune-deficiencies and some malignancies. However, despite now routine use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilise HSC for transplant, only in last 15 years has research on the mechanisms behind why and how HSC can be induced to move into the blood began. These studies have revealed the complexity of the niche that retains HSC in the BM. This review describes how BM niches and HSC themselves change during administration of G-CSF-or in the recovery phase of chemotherapy-to facilitate movement of HSC into the blood, and research now leading to development of novel therapeutics to further boost HSC mobilization and transplant success.

  16. Science Support: The Building Blocks of Active Data Curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, A.

    2013-12-01

    While the scientific method is built on reproducibility and transparency, and results are published in peer reviewed literature, we have come to the digital age of very large datasets (now of the order of petabytes and soon exabytes) which cannot be published in the traditional way. To preserve reproducibility and transparency, active curation is necessary to keep and protect the information in the long term, and 'science support' activities provide the building blocks for active data curation. With the explosive growth of data in all fields in recent years, there is a pressing urge for data centres to now provide adequate services to ensure long-term preservation and digital curation of project data outputs, however complex those may be. Science support provides advice and support to science projects on data and information management, from file formats through to general data management awareness. Another purpose of science support is to raise awareness in the science community of data and metadata standards and best practice, engendering a culture where data outputs are seen as valued assets. At the heart of Science support is the Data Management Plan (DMP) which sets out a coherent approach to data issues pertaining to the data generating project. It provides an agreed record of the data management needs and issues within the project. The DMP is agreed upon with project investigators to ensure that a high quality documented data archive is created. It includes conditions of use and deposit to clearly express the ownership, responsibilities and rights associated with the data. Project specific needs are also identified for data processing, visualization tools and data sharing services. As part of the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO), the Centre for Environmental Data Archival (CEDA) fulfills this science support role of facilitating atmospheric and Earth observation data generating projects to ensure

  17. The curative management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Dara O; Martin, Joseph; Small, Cormac; Joyce, Myles R; Faul, Clare M; Kelly, Paul J; O'Riordain, Michael; Gillham, Charles M; Armstrong, John G; Salib, Osama; McNamara, Deborah A; McVey, Gerard; O'Neill, Brian D P

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neoadjuvant “long-course” chemoradiation is considered a standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition to prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without androgen suppression (AS) are well established in prostate cancer management. A retrospective review of ten cases was completed to explore the feasibility and safety of applying these standards in patients with dual pathology. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of synchronous rectal and prostate cancers treated with curative intent. Methods: Eligible patients had synchronous histologically proven locally advanced rectal cancer (defined as cT3-4Nx; cTxN1-2) and non-metastatic prostate cancer (pelvic nodal disease permissible). Curative treatment was delivered to both sites simultaneously. Follow-up was as per institutional guidelines. Acute and late toxicities were reviewed, and a literature search performed. Results: Pelvic external beam radiotherapy (RT) 45–50.4 Gy was delivered concurrent with 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Prostate total dose ranged from 70.0 to 79.2 Gy. No acute toxicities occurred, excluding AS-induced erectile dysfunction. Nine patients proceeded to surgery, and one was managed expectantly. Three relapsed with metastatic colorectal cancer, two with metastatic prostate cancer. Five patients have no evidence of recurrence, and four remain alive with metastatic disease. With a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 1.2–6.3 years), two significant late toxicities occurred; G3 proctitis in a patient receiving palliative bevacizumab and a G3 anastomotic stricture precluding stoma reversal. Conclusion: Patients proceeding to synchronous radical treatment of both primary sites should receive 45–50.4 Gy pelvic RT with infusional 5FU. Prostate dose escalation should be given with due consideration to the potential impact of prostate cancer on patient survival, as increasing dose may result in significant late morbidity

  18. Curative Radiation Therapy for T2N0M0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, In Kyu; Kim, Jae Choel

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Surgery is the treatment of choice for resectable non-small cell lung cancer. For patients who are medically unable to tolerate a surgical resection or who refuse surgery, radiation therapy is an acceptable alternative. A retrospective analysis of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with curative radiation therapy was performed to determine the results of curative radiation therapy and patterns of failure, and to identify factors that may influence survival. Materials and Methods : From 1986 through 1993, 39 patients with T2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer were treated with curative radiation therapy at department of radiation oncology, Kyungpook national university hospital All patients were not candidates for surgical resection because of either patient refusal (16 patients), poor pulmonary function (12 patients), old age (7 patients), poor performance (2 patients) or coexisting medical disease (2 patients). Median age of patients was 67 years. Histologic cell type was squamous cell carcinoma in 1. All patients were treated with megavoltage irradiation and radiation dose raged from 5000cGy to 6150 cGy with a median dose of 600cGy. The median follow-up was 17 months with a range of 4 to 82 months. Survival was measured from the date therapy initiated. Results : The overall survival rate for entire patients was 40.6% at 2 years and 27.7% at 3 years, with a median survival time of 21 months he disease-free survival at 2 and 3 years was 51.7% and 25.8%, respectively. Of evaluable 20 Patients with complete response, 15 Patients were considered to have failed. Of these, 13 patients showed local failure and 2 patients failed distantly. Response to treatment (p=0.0001), tumor size (p=0.0019) and age p=0.0247) were favorably associated with overall survival. Only age was predictive for disease-free survival (p=0.0452). Conclusion : Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for small (less than 3 cm) tumors, and should be offered as an

  19. Curating Performance on the Edge of the Art Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Schwarzbart, Judith

    two-day festival offers a format that vary considerable from the exhibition series the museum puts on most of the time. The performance program includes artists such as composers usually working with contemporary music, electronic music composers, as well as performance artists working from......Since the Intermedia and Fluxus movements a variety of timebased artforms have been contained within visual art contexts. The performative works draw often as much on the tradition of theatre, music, dance, and poetry reading as fine art. Although the institutional context plays a role...... art institution. Our research relates specifically to a festival for performative art, ACTS 2014, which we co-curate for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Roskilde. Having grown out of a Fluxus spirit, the museum is not foreign to time-based practices like many museums are. Nevertheless, the intensive...

  20. Orthology prediction methods: a quality assessment using curated protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachana, Kalliopi; Larsson, Tomas A; Powell, Sean; Chen, Wei-Hua; Doerks, Tobias; Muller, Jean; Bork, Peer

    2011-10-01

    The increasing number of sequenced genomes has prompted the development of several automated orthology prediction methods. Tests to evaluate the accuracy of predictions and to explore biases caused by biological and technical factors are therefore required. We used 70 manually curated families to analyze the performance of five public methods in Metazoa. We analyzed the strengths and weaknesses of the methods and quantified the impact of biological and technical challenges. From the latter part of the analysis, genome annotation emerged as the largest single influencer, affecting up to 30% of the performance. Generally, most methods did well in assigning orthologous group but they failed to assign the exact number of genes for half of the groups. The publicly available benchmark set (http://eggnog.embl.de/orthobench/) should facilitate the improvement of current orthology assignment protocols, which is of utmost importance for many fields of biology and should be tackled by a broad scientific community. Copyright © 2011 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The role of endobroncial irradiation as a curative therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Eriko; Kamata, Minoru; Morita, Kozo; Kikuchi, Yuzo.

    1997-01-01

    Endobronchial irradiation for lung cancer has primarily been used in cases of local progression or recurrence. Although its use for palliation of symptoms has been well evaluated, its role in treatment for cure is still unknown. We would like to report on the role of endobronchial irradiation as a curative therapy based on our clinical experience (long time survivors). Forty-one patients treated with endobronchial irradiation using low dose rate 192Iridium between February 1987 and December 1993 were made available for study. Of these, 17 were chest X-P negative cancer, 13 were post operative recurrent cancer, 7 were advanced cancer and 4 were tracheal cancer, respectively. The dose of endobronchial irradiation using an applicator with spacer was 5 to 7 Gy per session, administered either once or twice a week. External irradiation was administered except one case. Local recurrence was observed in two cases of chest X-P negative cancer, three cases of post operative cancer and five cases of advanced cancer. More than three years survivors were observed in 6 cases of chest X-P negative cancer, 5 cases of post operative cancer and one case of tracheal cancer. Complications due to endobronchial irradiation were seen in 2 cases, one case was pulmonary hemorrage and the other was shallow ulceration of the bronchus. It was shown that chest X-P negative lung cancer and part of post operative recurrent cancer could be cured by endobronchial irradiation. This technique is considered to be useful for not only palliative therapy but curative therapy as well. (author)

  2. Characteristics of knowledge content in a curated online evidence library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varada, Sowmya; Lacson, Ronilda; Raja, Ali S; Ip, Ivan K; Schneider, Louise; Osterbur, David; Bain, Paul; Vetrano, Nicole; Cellini, Jacqueline; Mita, Carol; Coletti, Margaret; Whelan, Julia; Khorasani, Ramin

    2018-05-01

    To describe types of recommendations represented in a curated online evidence library, report on the quality of evidence-based recommendations pertaining to diagnostic imaging exams, and assess underlying knowledge representation. The evidence library is populated with clinical decision rules, professional society guidelines, and locally developed best practice guidelines. Individual recommendations were graded based on a standard methodology and compared using chi-square test. Strength of evidence ranged from grade 1 (systematic review) through grade 5 (recommendations based on expert opinion). Finally, variations in the underlying representation of these recommendations were identified. The library contains 546 individual imaging-related recommendations. Only 15% (16/106) of recommendations from clinical decision rules were grade 5 vs 83% (526/636) from professional society practice guidelines and local best practice guidelines that cited grade 5 studies (P < .0001). Minor head trauma, pulmonary embolism, and appendicitis were topic areas supported by the highest quality of evidence. Three main variations in underlying representations of recommendations were "single-decision," "branching," and "score-based." Most recommendations were grade 5, largely because studies to test and validate many recommendations were absent. Recommendation types vary in amount and complexity and, accordingly, the structure and syntax of statements they generate. However, they can be represented in single-decision, branching, and score-based representations. In a curated evidence library with graded imaging-based recommendations, evidence quality varied widely, with decision rules providing the highest-quality recommendations. The library may be helpful in highlighting evidence gaps, comparing recommendations from varied sources on similar clinical topics, and prioritizing imaging recommendations to inform clinical decision support implementation.

  3. Health promotion, preventive and curative aspects of diseases in astrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhuvnesh Kumar; Subhakta, P K J P; Narayana, A

    2007-01-01

    The whole universe is intermingling into a unit in the period of globalization. Different cultures, life-styles and sciences are co-operating with each other in this situation. World Health Organization is working towards collaborating all prevalent medical sciences for attainment of good health and family welfare for each and every individual by 2020. Astrology is a part of Indian heritage. Astrology means the art of predicting or determining the influence of the planets and stars on human affairs. The origin of this word is from Greek word astron, star + logos (discourse). The account of deeds of good and bad during the present life and previous lives, their consequences of health or ill health during this life i.e. what, when and how the things takes place will be clearly known through Astrology. Highly advanced knowledge related to Astrology on medicine is preserved in Indian scriptures and the knowledge was transmitted from generation to generation. It is also a good source for health promotion, preventive, curative and other medical aspects. Brief direction related to astrological medical aspects is also available in Ayurvedic literature (Carakasamhită, Suśrutasamhhită, Aşţăngasangraha, Aşţăngahŗdaya, Sărngadharasamhită , Băvaprakăśa etc.) Some Ayurvedic practitioners, scholars and scientists realize the need of astrological knowledge related to medicine in the present time. In ancient times physician, astrologer and purŏhita (Hindu priest) simultaneously looked after the health and family welfare of individual, families and country. Astrologer guides medication and suitable time for the better cure of ailments. Even the medicinal herbs were collected and treated at appropriate time for their efficacy. Astrology and Ayurvĕda are inseparable sciences of life. Hence, in this article, a concise astrological evaluation related to health promotion, preventive and curative aspects of Astrology is being presented.

  4. Patterns of failure following curative resection of gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, J.; Tepper, J.E.; Wood, W.C.; Moulton, E.O.; Koerner, F.; Sullinger, J. (Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston (USA))

    1990-12-01

    To identify patterns of failure following curative resection of gastric carcinoma, the records of 130 patients undergoing resection with curative intent at the Massachusetts General Hospital were reviewed. The total local-regional failure rate was 38% (49/130 patients), with 21 patients having local-regional failure alone and 28 patients having local-regional failure and distant metastases. The incidence of local failure rose with the more advanced stages of disease. Tumors staged B2, B3, C2, and C3 had local-regional failure rates in excess of 35%. This group of patients might benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy to the tumor bed and regional lymphatics. Local-regional failure rate was highest in the anastomosis or stump 33/130 (25%), followed by the stomach bed 27/130 (21%). The overall incidence of distant metastases was 52% (67/130 patients) and rose in the more advanced disease stages. Tumors staged B2, B3, C2, and C3 had rates of distant metastases greater than 50%. Sixty-one patients (77%) had failure in the abdomen (liver, peritoneal surface, adrenal, kidney, and spleen, but excluding tumor bed, anastomosis, or regional nodes). Patients with Stage B2, B3, C2, and C3 tumors had total abdominal failure rates greater than 40%. The highest failure rates in the liver were in Stages B3 and C3, in which the subsequent development of liver metastasis was 40% and 47%, respectively. Peritoneal seeding occurred in 30/130 (23%) of patients and was highest in Stages C2 and C3, with rates of 27% and 41%, respectively.

  5. Patterns of failure following curative resection of gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, J.; Tepper, J.E.; Wood, W.C.; Moulton, E.O.; Koerner, F.; Sullinger, J.

    1990-01-01

    To identify patterns of failure following curative resection of gastric carcinoma, the records of 130 patients undergoing resection with curative intent at the Massachusetts General Hospital were reviewed. The total local-regional failure rate was 38% (49/130 patients), with 21 patients having local-regional failure alone and 28 patients having local-regional failure and distant metastases. The incidence of local failure rose with the more advanced stages of disease. Tumors staged B2, B3, C2, and C3 had local-regional failure rates in excess of 35%. This group of patients might benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy to the tumor bed and regional lymphatics. Local-regional failure rate was highest in the anastomosis or stump 33/130 (25%), followed by the stomach bed 27/130 (21%). The overall incidence of distant metastases was 52% (67/130 patients) and rose in the more advanced disease stages. Tumors staged B2, B3, C2, and C3 had rates of distant metastases greater than 50%. Sixty-one patients (77%) had failure in the abdomen (liver, peritoneal surface, adrenal, kidney, and spleen, but excluding tumor bed, anastomosis, or regional nodes). Patients with Stage B2, B3, C2, and C3 tumors had total abdominal failure rates greater than 40%. The highest failure rates in the liver were in Stages B3 and C3, in which the subsequent development of liver metastasis was 40% and 47%, respectively. Peritoneal seeding occurred in 30/130 (23%) of patients and was highest in Stages C2 and C3, with rates of 27% and 41%, respectively

  6. Wireless Cellular Mobile Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Zalud, V.

    2002-01-01

    In this article is briefly reviewed the history of wireless cellular mobile communications, examined the progress in current second generation (2G) cellular standards and discussed their migration to the third generation (3G). The European 2G cellular standard GSM and its evolution phases GPRS and EDGE are described somewhat in detail. The third generation standard UMTS taking up on GSM/GPRS core network and equipped with a new advanced access network on the basis of code division multiple ac...

  7. A Phase Blending Study on Rubber Blends Based on the Solubility Preference of Curatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, R.; Talma, Auke; Datta, Rabin; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Using previously obtained data on the solubilities of curatives in SBR, EPDM and in NBR, different mixing procedures were performed on 50/50 SBR/EPDM and NBR/EPDM blends. In contrast to a previous phase-mixing study, the curatives were added to separate phases before final blending, in an attempt to

  8. Digital Curation as a Core Competency in Current Learning and Literacy: A Higher Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerer, Leona M.

    2016-01-01

    Digital curation may be regarded as a core competency in higher education since it contributes to establishing a sense of metaliteracy (an essential requirement for optimally functioning in a modern media environment) among students. Digital curation is gradually finding its way into higher education curricula aimed at fostering social media…

  9. Biomechanics of cellular solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lorna J

    2005-03-01

    Materials with a cellular structure are widespread in nature and include wood, cork, plant parenchyma and trabecular bone. Natural cellular materials are often mechanically efficient: the honeycomb-like microstructure of wood, for instance, gives it an exceptionally high performance index for resisting bending and buckling. Here we review the mechanics of a wide range of natural cellular materials and examine their role in lightweight natural sandwich structures (e.g. iris leaves) and natural tubular structures (e.g. plant stems or animal quills). We also describe two examples of engineered biomaterials with a cellular structure, designed to replace or regenerate tissue in the body.

  10. The art and science of data curation: Lessons learned from constructing a virtual collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, Kaylin; Ramachandran, Rahul; Maskey, Manil; Gatlin, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    A digital, or virtual, collection is a value added service developed by libraries that curates information and resources around a topic, theme or organization. Adoption of the virtual collection concept as an Earth science data service improves the discoverability, accessibility and usability of data both within individual data centers but also across data centers and disciplines. In this paper, we introduce a methodology for systematically and rigorously curating Earth science data and information into a cohesive virtual collection. This methodology builds on the geocuration model of searching, selecting and synthesizing Earth science data, metadata and other information into a single and useful collection. We present our experiences curating a virtual collection for one of NASA's twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), the Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC), and describe lessons learned as a result of this curation effort. We also provide recommendations and best practices for data centers and data providers who wish to curate virtual collections for the Earth sciences.

  11. Reducing data friction through site-based data curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomer, A.; Palmer, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    Much of geoscience research takes place at "scientifically significant sites": localities which have attracted a critical mass of scientific interest, and thereby merit protection by government bodies, as well as the preservation of specimen and data collections and the development of site-specific permitting requirements for access to the site and its associated collections. However, many data standards and knowledge organization schemas do not adequately describe key characteristics of the sites, despite their centrality to research projects. Through work conducted as part of the IMLS-funded Site-Based Data Curation (SBDC) project, we developed a Minimum Information Framework (MIF) for site-based science, in which "information about a site's structure" is considered a core class of information. Here we present our empirically-derived information framework, as well as the methods used to create it. We believe these approaches will lead to the development of more effective data repositories and tools, and thereby will reduce "data friction" in interdisciplinary, yet site-based, geoscience workflows. The Minimum Information Framework for Site-based Research was developed through work at two scientifically significant sites: the hot springs at Yellowstone National Park, which are key to geobiology research; and the La Brea Tar Pits, an important paleontology locality in Southern California. We employed diverse methods of participatory engagement, in which key stakeholders at our sites (e.g. curators, collections managers, researchers, permit officers) were consulted through workshops, focus groups, interviews, action research methods, and collaborative information modeling and systems analysis. These participatory approaches were highly effective in fostering on-going partnership among a diverse team of domain scientists, information scientists, and software developers. The MIF developed in this work may be viewed as a "proto-standard" that can inform future

  12. Genesis Contingency Planning and Mishap Recovery: The Sample Curation View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbery, E. K.; Allton, J. H.; Allen, C. C.; McNamara, K. M.; Calaway, M.; Rodriques, M. C.

    2007-01-01

    Planning for sample preservation and curation was part of mission design from the beginning. One of the scientific objectives for Genesis included collecting samples of three regimes of the solar wind in addition to collecting bulk solar wind during the mission. Collectors were fabricated in different thicknesses for each regime of the solar wind and attached to separate frames exposed to the solar wind during specific periods of solar activity associated with each regime. The original plan to determine the solar regime sampled for specific collectors was to identify to which frame the collector was attached. However, the collectors were dislodged during the hard landing making identification by frame attachment impossible. Because regimes were also identified by thickness of the collector, the regime sampled is identified by measuring fragment thickness. A variety of collector materials and thin films applied to substrates were selected and qualified for flight. This diversity provided elemental measurement in more than one material, mitigating effects of diffusion rates and/or radiation damage. It also mitigated against different material and substrate strengths resulting in differing effects of the hard landing. For example, silicon crystal substrates broke into smaller fragments than sapphire-based substrates and diamond surfaces were more resilient to flying debris damage than gold. The primary responsibility of the curation team for recovery was process documentation. Contingency planning for the recovery phase expanded this responsibility to include not only equipment to document, but also gather, contain and identify samples from the landing area and the recovered spacecraft. The team developed contingency plans for various scenarios as part of mission planning that included topographic maps to aid in site recovery and identification of different modes of transport and purge capability depending on damage. A clean tent, set-up at Utah Test & Training Range

  13. Linearizable cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobe, Atsushi; Yura, Fumitaka

    2007-01-01

    The initial value problem for a class of reversible elementary cellular automata with periodic boundaries is reduced to an initial-boundary value problem for a class of linear systems on a finite commutative ring Z 2 . Moreover, a family of such linearizable cellular automata is given

  14. Earth System Model Development and Analysis using FRE-Curator and Live Access Servers: On-demand analysis of climate model output with data provenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, A.; Balaji, V.; Schweitzer, R.; Nikonov, S.; O'Brien, K.; Vahlenkamp, H.; Burger, E. F.

    2016-12-01

    There are distinct phases in the development cycle of an Earth system model. During the model development phase, scientists make changes to code and parameters and require rapid access to results for evaluation. During the production phase, scientists may make an ensemble of runs with different settings, and produce large quantities of output, that must be further analyzed and quality controlled for scientific papers and submission to international projects such as the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). During this phase, provenance is a key concern:being able to track back from outputs to inputs. We will discuss one of the paths taken at GFDL in delivering tools across this lifecycle, offering on-demand analysis of data by integrating the use of GFDL's in-house FRE-Curator, Unidata's THREDDS and NOAA PMEL's Live Access Servers (LAS).Experience over this lifecycle suggests that a major difficulty in developing analysis capabilities is only partially the scientific content, but often devoted to answering the questions "where is the data?" and "how do I get to it?". "FRE-Curator" is the name of a database-centric paradigm used at NOAA GFDL to ingest information about the model runs into an RDBMS (Curator database). The components of FRE-Curator are integrated into Flexible Runtime Environment workflow and can be invoked during climate model simulation. The front end to FRE-Curator, known as the Model Development Database Interface (MDBI) provides an in-house web-based access to GFDL experiments: metadata, analysis output and more. In order to provide on-demand visualization, MDBI uses Live Access Servers which is a highly configurable web server designed to provide flexible access to geo-referenced scientific data, that makes use of OPeNDAP. Model output saved in GFDL's tape archive, the size of the database and experiments, continuous model development initiatives with more dynamic configurations add complexity and challenges in providing an on

  15. Prognostic Factors of Patients with Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor after Curative Resection: A Retrospective Analysis of 406 Consecutive Cases in a Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Hwan; Kwak, Sang-Gyu; Chae, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have a highly variable clinical course, and recurrent disease sometimes develops despite curative surgery. This study was undertaken to investigate the surgical role in treating gastric GISTs and evaluate the clinicopathological features of a large series of patients who underwent curative resection for gastric GISTs to clarify which features were independent prognostic factors. The clinicopathological data of 406 patients with gastric GISTs who underwent curative resection at 4 university hospitals in Daegu, South Korea, from March 1998 to March 2012 were reviewed. All cases were confirmed as gastric GISTs by immunohistochemical staining, in which CD117 or CD34 was positive. Clinical follow-up was performed periodically, and disease-free survival rates were retrospectively investigated using the medical records. The mean follow-up period was 42.9 months (range: 2-166). There were 11 recurrent patients (2.7%). Due to the small number of recurrences, age, sex and location were controlled using propensity score matching before performing any statistical analysis. Tumor size, mitotic count, NIH classification, and cellularity were judged to be independent prognostic factors for recurrence by univariate analysis. In a multivariate analysis, tumor size and mitotic count were significantly and independently related to recurrence, and tumor size was determined to be the most important prognostic factor for recurrence after curative resection (hazard ratio: 1.204; p < 0.01). The results of this multicenter study demonstrate that disease-free survival rates are good. Tumor size was disclosed as the most important factor for recurrence in gastric GIST patients who underwent radical resection. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Research resources: curating the new eagle-i discovery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevsky, Nicole; Johnson, Tenille; Corday, Karen; Torniai, Carlo; Brush, Matthew; Segerdell, Erik; Wilson, Melanie; Shaffer, Chris; Robinson, David; Haendel, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Development of biocuration processes and guidelines for new data types or projects is a challenging task. Each project finds its way toward defining annotation standards and ensuring data consistency with varying degrees of planning and different tools to support and/or report on consistency. Further, this process may be data type specific even within the context of a single project. This article describes our experiences with eagle-i, a 2-year pilot project to develop a federated network of data repositories in which unpublished, unshared or otherwise ‘invisible’ scientific resources could be inventoried and made accessible to the scientific community. During the course of eagle-i development, the main challenges we experienced related to the difficulty of collecting and curating data while the system and the data model were simultaneously built, and a deficiency and diversity of data management strategies in the laboratories from which the source data was obtained. We discuss our approach to biocuration and the importance of improving information management strategies to the research process, specifically with regard to the inventorying and usage of research resources. Finally, we highlight the commonalities and differences between eagle-i and similar efforts with the hope that our lessons learned will assist other biocuration endeavors. Database URL: www.eagle-i.net PMID:22434835

  17. Agile Data Curation at a State Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    State agencies, including geological surveys, are often the gatekeepers for myriad data products essential for scientific research and economic development. For example, the Geological Survey of Alabama (GSA) is mandated to explore for, characterize, and report Alabama's mineral, energy, water, and biological resources in support of economic development, conservation, management, and public policy for the betterment of Alabama's citizens, communities, and businesses. As part of that mandate, the GSA has increasingly been called upon to make our data more accessible to stakeholders. Even as demand for greater data accessibility grows, budgets for such efforts are often small, meaning that agencies must do more for less. Agile software development has yielded efficient, effective products, most often at lower cost and in shorter time. Taking guidance from the agile software development model, the GSA is working towards more agile data management and curation. To date, the GSA's work has been focused primarily on data rescue. By using workflows that maximize clear communication while encouraging simplicity (e.g., maximizing the amount of work not done or that can be automated), the GSA is bringing decades of dark data into the light. Regular checks by the data rescuer with the data provider (or their proxy) provides quality control without adding an overt burden on either party. Moving forward, these workflows will also allow for more efficient and effective data management.

  18. Crowdsourcing and curation: perspectives from biology and natural language processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschman, Lynette; Fort, Karën; Boué, Stéphanie; Kyrpides, Nikos; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Cohen, Kevin Bretonnel

    2016-01-01

    Crowdsourcing is increasingly utilized for performing tasks in both natural language processing and biocuration. Although there have been many applications of crowdsourcing in these fields, there have been fewer high-level discussions of the methodology and its applicability to biocuration. This paper explores crowdsourcing for biocuration through several case studies that highlight different ways of leveraging 'the crowd'; these raise issues about the kind(s) of expertise needed, the motivations of participants, and questions related to feasibility, cost and quality. The paper is an outgrowth of a panel session held at BioCreative V (Seville, September 9-11, 2015). The session consisted of four short talks, followed by a discussion. In their talks, the panelists explored the role of expertise and the potential to improve crowd performance by training; the challenge of decomposing tasks to make them amenable to crowdsourcing; and the capture of biological data and metadata through community editing.Database URL: http://www.mitre.org/publications/technical-papers/crowdsourcing-and-curation-perspectives. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. The curator/patron: Foundations and contemporary art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Coates

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the role of private foundations in commissioning site-specific ephemeral art works: contemporary art projects of a temporary nature that are realised outside of public institutions. Though small in number, I argue that the private individuals creating and managing private foundations of this nature demonstrate a new form of patronage, creating in the process a new role of ‘curator/patron’. Equally, this process of realisation reflects the changing needs of contemporary art practice. Work of this scale and ambition would increasingly not be possible without the vision, perseverance and funding of these kinds of foundation. In Australia, this trend is demonstrated by two foundations: Kaldor Art Projects, and their commissioning of works by artists such as Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Gilbert & George and Jeff Koons; and the more recently formed Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, whose first project was with Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. In this article, these examples are placed within the broader international context of foundation models such as Artangel, UK, Fondazione Nicola Trussardi, Milan, and The Public Art Fund, New York.

  20. Changing the focus of care: from curative to palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Soffritti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The improvements in the obstetrical and neonatal diagnosis and therapies have resulted into an increase in the survival rate of infants previously considered as non-viable. Debate is focusing on professionals’ behaviour about withdrawal or withholding of life sustaining treatment (LST and administration of palliative care for newborns whose conditions are incompatible with a prolonged life. Decisions about treatment should be made jointly by the professionals’ team and the family, placing the interest of the baby at the very heart of the decision process. It is very important that the environment in which the family has to make the decision is characterized by openness, dialogue and frankness. A proper and effective communication with parents is always necessary and can resolve any conflict caused by disagreement. Furthermore, parents need time in the decision making process. Other supports, which could help the family in the final decision are the possibility to ask for a specialist’s second opinion and the involvement of religious leaders and of an indipendent clinical ethics committee. Withholding or withdrawal of LST does not mean cessation of care for the baby, it means to change the focus of care from curative to palliative care. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou 

  1. Imitating manual curation of text-mined facts in biomedicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Rodriguez-Esteban

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Text-mining algorithms make mistakes in extracting facts from natural-language texts. In biomedical applications, which rely on use of text-mined data, it is critical to assess the quality (the probability that the message is correctly extracted of individual facts--to resolve data conflicts and inconsistencies. Using a large set of almost 100,000 manually produced evaluations (most facts were independently reviewed more than once, producing independent evaluations, we implemented and tested a collection of algorithms that mimic human evaluation of facts provided by an automated information-extraction system. The performance of our best automated classifiers closely approached that of our human evaluators (ROC score close to 0.95. Our hypothesis is that, were we to use a larger number of human experts to evaluate any given sentence, we could implement an artificial-intelligence curator that would perform the classification job at least as accurately as an average individual human evaluator. We illustrated our analysis by visualizing the predicted accuracy of the text-mined relations involving the term cocaine.

  2. MIPS: curated databases and comprehensive secondary data resources in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H Werner; Ruepp, Andreas; Theis, Fabian; Rattei, Thomas; Walter, Mathias; Frishman, Dmitrij; Suhre, Karsten; Spannagl, Manuel; Mayer, Klaus F X; Stümpflen, Volker; Antonov, Alexey

    2011-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS at the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany) has many years of experience in providing annotated collections of biological data. Selected data sets of high relevance, such as model genomes, are subjected to careful manual curation, while the bulk of high-throughput data is annotated by automatic means. High-quality reference resources developed in the past and still actively maintained include Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Neurospora crassa and Arabidopsis thaliana genome databases as well as several protein interaction data sets (MPACT, MPPI and CORUM). More recent projects are PhenomiR, the database on microRNA-related phenotypes, and MIPS PlantsDB for integrative and comparative plant genome research. The interlinked resources SIMAP and PEDANT provide homology relationships as well as up-to-date and consistent annotation for 38,000,000 protein sequences. PPLIPS and CCancer are versatile tools for proteomics and functional genomics interfacing to a database of compilations from gene lists extracted from literature. A novel literature-mining tool, EXCERBT, gives access to structured information on classified relations between genes, proteins, phenotypes and diseases extracted from Medline abstracts by semantic analysis. All databases described here, as well as the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS WWW server (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de).

  3. Integration of curated databases to identify genotype-phenotype associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianrong

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to rapidly characterize an unknown microorganism is critical in both responding to infectious disease and biodefense. To do this, we need some way of anticipating an organism's phenotype based on the molecules encoded by its genome. However, the link between molecular composition (i.e. genotype and phenotype for microbes is not obvious. While there have been several studies that address this challenge, none have yet proposed a large-scale method integrating curated biological information. Here we utilize a systematic approach to discover genotype-phenotype associations that combines phenotypic information from a biomedical informatics database, GIDEON, with the molecular information contained in National Center for Biotechnology Information's Clusters of Orthologous Groups database (NCBI COGs. Results Integrating the information in the two databases, we are able to correlate the presence or absence of a given protein in a microbe with its phenotype as measured by certain morphological characteristics or survival in a particular growth media. With a 0.8 correlation score threshold, 66% of the associations found were confirmed by the literature and at a 0.9 correlation threshold, 86% were positively verified. Conclusion Our results suggest possible phenotypic manifestations for proteins biochemically associated with sugar metabolism and electron transport. Moreover, we believe our approach can be extended to linking pathogenic phenotypes with functionally related proteins.

  4. Data Curation Program Development in U.S. Universities: The Georgia Institute of Technology Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler O. Walters

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The curation of scientific research data at U.S. universities is a story of enterprising individuals and of incremental progress. A small number of libraries and data centers who see the possibilities of becoming “digital information management centers” are taking entrepreneurial steps to extend beyond their traditional information assets and include managing scientific and scholarly research data. The Georgia Institute of Technology (GT has had a similar development path toward a data curation program based in its library. This paper will articulate GT’s program development, which the author offers as an experience common in U.S. universities. The main characteristic is a program devoid of top-level mandates and incentives, but rich with independent, “bottom-up” action. The paper will address program antecedents and context, inter-institutional partnerships that advance the library’s curation program, library organizational developments, partnerships with campus research communities, and a proposed model for curation program development. It concludes that despite the clear need for data curation put forth by researchers such as the groups of neuroscientists and bioscientists referenced in this paper, the university experience examined suggests that gathering resources for developing data curation programs at the institutional level is proving to be a quite onerous. However, and in spite of the challenges, some U.S. research universities are beginning to establish perceptible data curation programs.

  5. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  6. Cellular decomposition in vikalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyatskaya, I.S.; Vintajkin, E.Z.; Georgieva, I.Ya.; Golikov, V.A.; Udovenko, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Austenite decomposition in Fe-Co-V and Fe-Co-V-Ni alloys at 475-600 deg C is investigated. The cellular decomposition in ternary alloys results in the formation of bcc (ordered) and fcc structures, and in quaternary alloys - bcc (ordered) and 12R structures. The cellular 12R structure results from the emergence of stacking faults in the fcc lattice with irregular spacing in four layers. The cellular decomposition results in a high-dispersion structure and magnetic properties approaching the level of well-known vikalloys [ru

  7. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  8. TreeFam: a curated database of phylogenetic trees of animal gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Heng; Coghlan, Avril; Ruan, Jue

    2006-01-01

    TreeFam is a database of phylogenetic trees of gene families found in animals. It aims to develop a curated resource that presents the accurate evolutionary history of all animal gene families, as well as reliable ortholog and paralog assignments. Curated families are being added progressively......, based on seed alignments and trees in a similar fashion to Pfam. Release 1.1 of TreeFam contains curated trees for 690 families and automatically generated trees for another 11 646 families. These represent over 128 000 genes from nine fully sequenced animal genomes and over 45 000 other animal proteins...

  9. Organic Contamination Baseline Study: In NASA JSC Astromaterials Curation Laboratories. Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for OSIRIS-REx and other future sample return missions concerned with analyzing organics, we conducted an Organic Contamination Baseline Study for JSC Curation Labsoratories in FY12. For FY12 testing, organic baseline study focused only on molecular organic contamination in JSC curation gloveboxes: presumably future collections (i.e. Lunar, Mars, asteroid missions) would use isolation containment systems over only cleanrooms for primary sample storage. This decision was made due to limit historical data on curation gloveboxes, limited IR&D funds and Genesis routinely monitors organics in their ISO class 4 cleanrooms.

  10. The Annotometer; Encouraging uptake and use of freely available curation tools.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhe, Xiao Si; Edmunds, Scott; Li, Peter; Goodman, Laurie; Hunter, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that the amount of data being generated worldwide cannot be curated and annotated by any individual or small group. Currently, there is recognition that one of the best ways to provide ongoing curation is to employ the power of the community. To achieve this, the first hurdle to overcome was the development of user-friendly tools and apps that non-expert curators would be comfortable and capable of using. Such tools are now in place, inclu...

  11. Preventive and curative effects of ginger extract against histopathologic changes of gentamicin-induced tubular toxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nasri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gentamicin (GM is a commonly used aminoglycoside, however, renal toxicity has limited its usage. This study was designed to evaluate the curative and protective effects of Zingiber officinale (ginger against gentamicin tubular toxicity in rats. The phenolic and flavonoid components and antioxidant activity of ginger were also evaluated. Methods: In a preclinical study, 50 male Wistar rats were designated into 5 groups of 10 and treated as follows: Group I: vehicle. Group II: 200 mg/kg/d of ginger for 3 days then, GM (80 mg/kg for 7 days. Group III: 200 mg/kg ginger orally for 3 days, then ginger plus GM for 7 days. Group IV: GM for 7 days. Group V: GM for 10 days. Group VI: GM for 7 days, then 200 mg/kg ginger orally for 10 days. At the end of the study, the animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were histologically evaluated. Results: Ginger could prevent degeneration of the renal cells and reduce the severity of tubular damage caused by gentamicin. However, it could not regenerate the GM degeneration. Conclusions: The results indicate that ginger is effective as a prophylaxis agent, but has not curative effect.

  12. Information Models, Data Requirements, and Agile Data Curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John S.; Crichton, Dan; Ritschel, Bernd; Hardman, Sean; Joyner, Ron

    2015-04-01

    The Planetary Data System's next generation system, PDS4, is an example of the successful use of an ontology-based Information Model (IM) to drive the development and operations of a data system. In traditional systems engineering, requirements or statements about what is necessary for the system are collected and analyzed for input into the design stage of systems development. With the advent of big data the requirements associated with data have begun to dominate and an ontology-based information model can be used to provide a formalized and rigorous set of data requirements. These requirements address not only the usual issues of data quantity, quality, and disposition but also data representation, integrity, provenance, context, and semantics. In addition the use of these data requirements during system's development has many characteristics of Agile Curation as proposed by Young et al. [Taking Another Look at the Data Management Life Cycle: Deconstruction, Agile, and Community, AGU 2014], namely adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, and rapid and flexible response to change. For example customers can be satisfied through early and continuous delivery of system software and services that are configured directly from the information model. This presentation will describe the PDS4 architecture and its three principle parts: the ontology-based Information Model (IM), the federated registries and repositories, and the REST-based service layer for search, retrieval, and distribution. The development of the IM will be highlighted with special emphasis on knowledge acquisition, the impact of the IM on development and operations, and the use of shared ontologies at multiple governance levels to promote system interoperability and data correlation.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamics cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, Tadatsugu.

    1990-02-01

    There has been a renewal of interest in cellular automata, partly because they give an architecture for a special purpose computer with parallel processing optimized to solve a particular problem. The lattice gas cellular automata are briefly surveyed, which are recently developed to solve partial differential equations such as hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics. A new model is given in the present paper to implement the magnetic Lorentz force in a more deterministic and local procedure than the previous one. (author)

  14. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wenyi Xu; Fengzhong Wang; Zhongsheng Yu; Fengjiao Xin

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the proce...

  15. Modeling cellular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matthäus, Franziska; Pahle, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    This contributed volume comprises research articles and reviews on topics connected to the mathematical modeling of cellular systems. These contributions cover signaling pathways, stochastic effects, cell motility and mechanics, pattern formation processes, as well as multi-scale approaches. All authors attended the workshop on "Modeling Cellular Systems" which took place in Heidelberg in October 2014. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatori, Tadatsugu [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    1990-03-01

    There has been a renewal of interest in cellular automata, partly because they give an architecture for a special purpose computer with parallel processing optimized to solve a particular problem. The lattice gas cellular automata are briefly surveyed, which are recently developed to solve partial differential equations such as hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics. A new model is given in the present paper to implement the magnetic Lorentz force in a more deterministic and local procedure than the previous one. (author).

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, Tadatsugu

    1990-01-01

    There has been a renewal of interest in cellular automata, partly because they give an architecture for a special purpose computer with parallel processing optimized to solve a particular problem. The lattice gas cellular automata are briefly surveyed, which are recently developed to solve partial differential equations such as hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics. A new model is given in the present paper to implement the magnetic Lorentz force in a more deterministic and local procedure than the previous one. (author)

  18. Curating NASA's future extraterrestrial sample collections: How do we achieve maximum proficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, Francis; Evans, Cynthia; Allton, Judith; Fries, Marc; Righter, Kevin; Zolensky, Michael; Zeigler, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office (henceforth referred to herein as NASA Curation Office) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. Under the governing document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 7100.10E "Curation of Extraterrestrial Materials", JSC is charged with "The curation of all extraterrestrial material under NASA control, including future NASA missions." The Directive goes on to define Curation as including "…documentation, preservation, preparation, and distribution of samples for research, education, and public outreach." Here we describe some of the ongoing efforts to ensure that the future activities of the NASA Curation Office are working to-wards a state of maximum proficiency. Founding Principle: Curatorial activities began at JSC (Manned Spacecraft Center before 1973) as soon as design and construction planning for the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL) began in 1964 [1], not with the return of the Apollo samples in 1969, nor with the completion of the LRL in 1967. This practice has since proven that curation begins as soon as a sample return mission is conceived, and this founding principle continues to return dividends today [e.g., 2]. The Next Decade: Part of the curation process is planning for the future, and we refer to these planning efforts as "advanced curation" [3]. Advanced Curation is tasked with developing procedures, technology, and data sets necessary for curating new types of collections as envisioned by NASA exploration goals. We are (and have been) planning for future curation, including cold curation, extended curation of ices and volatiles, curation of samples with special chemical considerations such as perchlorate-rich samples, curation of organically- and biologically-sensitive samples, and the use of minimally invasive analytical techniques (e.g., micro-CT, [4]) to characterize samples. These efforts will be useful for Mars Sample Return

  19. Cellular MR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Modo

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular MR imaging is a young field that aims to visualize targeted cells in living organisms. In order to provide a different signal intensity of the targeted cell, they are either labeled with MR contrast agents in vivo or prelabeled in vitro. Either (ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide [(USPIO] particles or (polymeric paramagnetic chelates can be used for this purpose. For in vivo cellular labeling, Gd3+- and Mn2+- chelates have mainly been used for targeted hepatobiliary imaging, and (USPIO-based cellular imaging has been focused on imaging of macrophage activity. Several of these magneto-pharmaceuticals have been FDA-approved or are in late-phase clinical trials. As for prelabeling of cells in vitro, a challenge has been to induce a sufficient uptake of contrast agents into nonphagocytic cells, without affecting normal cellular function. It appears that this issue has now largely been resolved, leading to an active research on monitoring the cellular biodistribution in vivo following transplantation or transfusion of these cells, including cell migration and trafficking. New applications of cellular MR imaging will be directed, for instance, towards our understanding of hematopoietic (immune cell trafficking and of novel guided (stem cell-based therapies aimed to be translated to the clinic in the future.

  20. How should the completeness and quality of curated nanomaterial data be evaluated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese Robinson, Richard L.; Lynch, Iseult; Peijnenburg, Willie; Rumble, John; Klaessig, Fred; Marquardt, Clarissa; Rauscher, Hubert; Puzyn, Tomasz; Purian, Ronit; Åberg, Christoffer; Karcher, Sandra; Vriens, Hanne; Hoet, Peter; Hoover, Mark D.; Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Harper, Stacey L.

    2016-05-01

    Nanotechnology is of increasing significance. Curation of nanomaterial data into electronic databases offers opportunities to better understand and predict nanomaterials' behaviour. This supports innovation in, and regulation of, nanotechnology. It is commonly understood that curated data need to be sufficiently complete and of sufficient quality to serve their intended purpose. However, assessing data completeness and quality is non-trivial in general and is arguably especially difficult in the nanoscience area, given its highly multidisciplinary nature. The current article, part of the Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative series, addresses how to assess the completeness and quality of (curated) nanomaterial data. In order to address this key challenge, a variety of related issues are discussed: the meaning and importance of data completeness and quality, existing approaches to their assessment and the key challenges associated with evaluating the completeness and quality of curated nanomaterial data. Considerations which are specific to the nanoscience area and lessons which can be learned from other relevant scientific disciplines are considered. Hence, the scope of this discussion ranges from physicochemical characterisation requirements for nanomaterials and interference of nanomaterials with nanotoxicology assays to broader issues such as minimum information checklists, toxicology data quality schemes and computational approaches that facilitate evaluation of the completeness and quality of (curated) data. This discussion is informed by a literature review and a survey of key nanomaterial data curation stakeholders. Finally, drawing upon this discussion, recommendations are presented concerning the central question: how should the completeness and quality of curated nanomaterial data be evaluated?Nanotechnology is of increasing significance. Curation of nanomaterial data into electronic databases offers opportunities to better understand and predict

  1. 3DSwap: Curated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping

    KAUST Repository

    Shameer, Khader; Shingate, Prashant N.; Manjunath, S. C. P.; Karthika, M.; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2011-01-01

    structures in oligomeric conformation. Protein structures in swapped conformations perform diverse functional roles and are also associated with deposition diseases in humans. We have performed in-depth literature curation and structural bioinformatics

  2. DCC DIFFUSE Standards Frameworks: A Standards Path through the Curation Lifecycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Higgins

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 DCC DIFFUSE Standards Frameworks aims to offer domain specific advice on standards relevant to digital preservation and curation, to help curators identify which standards they should be using and where they can be appropriately implemented, to ensure authoritative digital material. The Project uses the DCC Curation Lifecycle Model and Web 2.0 technology, to visually present standards frameworks for a number of disciplines. The Digital Curation Centre (DCC is actively working with a different relevant organisations to present searchable frameworks of standards, for a number of domains. These include digital repositories, records management, the geo-information sector, archives and the museum sector. Other domains, such as e-science, will shortly be investigated.

  3. Planning Related to the Curation and Processing of Returned Martian Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Harrington, A. D.

    2018-04-01

    Many of the planning activities in the NASA Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office at JSC are centered around Mars Sample Return. The importance of contamination knowledge and the benefits of a mobile/modular receiving facility are discussed.

  4. EURO-CARES as Roadmap for a European Sample Curation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucato, J. R.; Russell, S.; Smith, C.; Hutzler, A.; Meneghin, A.; Aléon, J.; Bennett, A.; Berthoud, L.; Bridges, J.; Debaille, V.; Ferrière, L.; Folco, L.; Foucher, F.; Franchi, I.; Gounelle, M.; Grady, M.; Leuko, S.; Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Pottage, T.; Rettberg, P.; Vrublevskis, J.; Westall, F.; Zipfel, J.; Euro-Cares Team

    2018-04-01

    EURO-CARES is a three-year multinational project funded under the European Commission Horizon2020 research program to develop a roadmap for a European Extraterrestrial Sample Curation Facility for samples returned from solar system missions.

  5. Surveillance Patterns After Curative-Intent Colorectal Cancer Surgery in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postoperative surveillance following curative-intent resection of colorectal cancer (CRC is variably performed due to existing guideline differences and to the limited data supporting different strategies.

  6. Palliative or curative treatment intent affects communication in radiation therapy consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, L.; Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Leer, J.W.H.; Kraaimaat, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether communication in radiotherapy consultations is affected by palliative or curative treatment intent. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study involved 160 patients and 8 radiation oncologists. Eighty patients visited the radiation oncologist (RO) for palliative treatment and 80

  7. Curative and eradicant action of fungicides to control Phakopsora pachyrhizi in soybean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlei Melo Reis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Experiments were carried out in a growth chamber and laboratory to quantify the curative and eradicant actions of fungicides in Asian soybean rust control. The experiments were conducted with the CD 214 RR cultivar, assessing the following fungicides, separately or in association, chlorothalonil, flutriafol, cyproconazole + trifloxystrobin, epoxiconazole + pyraclostrobin, cyproconazole + azoxystrobin, and cyproconazole + picoxystrobin. The fungicides were applied at four (curative and nine days after inoculation (eradicant treatment. Treatments were evaluated according to the density of lesions and uredia/cm2, and the eradicant treatment was assessed based on the necrosis of lesions/uredia and on uredospore viability. Except for the fungicide chlorothalonil, there was curative action of latent/virtual infections by the fungicides. Penetrant fungicides that are absorbed have curative and eradicant action to soybean rust.

  8. CPAD, Curated Protein Aggregation Database: A Repository of Manually Curated Experimental Data on Protein and Peptide Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangakani, A Mary; Nagarajan, R; Kumar, Sandeep; Sakthivel, R; Velmurugan, D; Gromiha, M Michael

    2016-01-01

    Accurate distinction between peptide sequences that can form amyloid-fibrils or amorphous β-aggregates, identification of potential aggregation prone regions in proteins, and prediction of change in aggregation rate of a protein upon mutation(s) are critical to research on protein misfolding diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, as well as biotechnological production of protein based therapeutics. We have developed a Curated Protein Aggregation Database (CPAD), which has collected results from experimental studies performed by scientific community aimed at understanding protein/peptide aggregation. CPAD contains more than 2300 experimentally observed aggregation rates upon mutations in known amyloidogenic proteins. Each entry includes numerical values for the following parameters: change in rate of aggregation as measured by fluorescence intensity or turbidity, name and source of the protein, Uniprot and Protein Data Bank codes, single point as well as multiple mutations, and literature citation. The data in CPAD has been supplemented with five different types of additional information: (i) Amyloid fibril forming hexa-peptides, (ii) Amorphous β-aggregating hexa-peptides, (iii) Amyloid fibril forming peptides of different lengths, (iv) Amyloid fibril forming hexa-peptides whose crystal structures are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and (v) Experimentally validated aggregation prone regions found in amyloidogenic proteins. Furthermore, CPAD is linked to other related databases and resources, such as Uniprot, Protein Data Bank, PUBMED, GAP, TANGO, WALTZ etc. We have set up a web interface with different search and display options so that users have the ability to get the data in multiple ways. CPAD is freely available at http://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/CPAD/. The potential applications of CPAD have also been discussed.

  9. Curating for engagement: Identifying the nature and impact of organizational marketing strategies on Pinterest

    OpenAIRE

    Saxton, Gregory D.; Ghosh, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    In an increasingly overloaded information environment sparked by the explosion of digital media, the ability to curate content has taken on greater importance. This study begins with the supposition that businesses that are able to adopt a content curation role and help consumers sort through the daily influx of information may be more successful in attracting, engaging, and retaining customers while fostering brand awareness and word of mouth. Accordingly, this study investigates organizatio...

  10. The value of imaging examinations in diagnosis and curative effect evaluation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Xiaotian; Zhang Yongxue

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious impact on women's physical and mental health and a life-threatening common disease. Imaging examinations have great significances in diagnosing and evaluating curative effect on breast cancer. This article aims to introduce and comprehensive the value of diagnosis and curative effect evaluation of breast cancer in the context of imaging examinations (ultrasonography, mammography, breast CT, breast MRI, breast 99 Tc m -MIBI imaging, PET, PET-CT, etc). (authors)

  11. LncRNAWiki: harnessing community knowledge in collaborative curation of human long non-coding RNAs

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, L.

    2014-11-15

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) perform a diversity of functions in numerous important biological processes and are implicated in many human diseases. In this report we present lncRNAWiki (http://lncrna.big.ac.cn), a wiki-based platform that is open-content and publicly editable and aimed at community-based curation and collection of information on human lncRNAs. Current related databases are dependent primarily on curation by experts, making it laborious to annotate the exponentially accumulated information on lncRNAs, which inevitably requires collective efforts in community-based curation of lncRNAs. Unlike existing databases, lncRNAWiki features comprehensive integration of information on human lncRNAs obtained from multiple different resources and allows not only existing lncRNAs to be edited, updated and curated by different users but also the addition of newly identified lncRNAs by any user. It harnesses community collective knowledge in collecting, editing and annotating human lncRNAs and rewards community-curated efforts by providing explicit authorship based on quantified contributions. LncRNAWiki relies on the underling knowledge of scientific community for collective and collaborative curation of human lncRNAs and thus has the potential to serve as an up-to-date and comprehensive knowledgebase for human lncRNAs.

  12. Data Curation Education Grounded in Earth Sciences and the Science of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation looks back over ten years of experience advancing data curation education at two Information Schools, highlighting the vital role of earth science case studies, expertise, and collaborations in development of curriculum and internships. We also consider current data curation practices and workforce demand in data centers in the geosciences, drawing on studies conducted in the Data Curation Education in Research Centers (DCERC) initiative and the Site-Based Data Curation project. Outcomes from this decade of data curation research and education has reinforced the importance of key areas of information science in preparing data professionals to respond to the needs of user communities, provide services across disciplines, invest in standards and interoperability, and promote open data practices. However, a serious void remains in principles to guide education and practice that are distinct to the development of data systems and services that meet both local and global aims. We identify principles emerging from recent empirical studies on the reuse value of data in the earth sciences and propose an approach for advancing data curation education that depends on systematic coordination with data intensive research and propagation of current best practices from data centers into curriculum. This collaborative model can increase both domain-based and cross-disciplinary expertise among data professionals, ultimately improving data systems and services in our universities and data centers while building the new base of knowledge needed for a foundational science of data.

  13. Directly e-mailing authors of newly published papers encourages community curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Stephanie M.; Grumbling, Gary B.; Field, Helen I.; Marygold, Steven J.; Brown, Nicholas H.; Millburn, Gillian H.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the data within Model Organism Databases (MODs) comes from manual curation of the primary research literature. Given limited funding and an increasing density of published material, a significant challenge facing all MODs is how to efficiently and effectively prioritize the most relevant research papers for detailed curation. Here, we report recent improvements to the triaging process used by FlyBase. We describe an automated method to directly e-mail corresponding authors of new papers, requesting that they list the genes studied and indicate (‘flag’) the types of data described in the paper using an online tool. Based on the author-assigned flags, papers are then prioritized for detailed curation and channelled to appropriate curator teams for full data extraction. The overall response rate has been 44% and the flagging of data types by authors is sufficiently accurate for effective prioritization of papers. In summary, we have established a sustainable community curation program, with the result that FlyBase curators now spend less time triaging and can devote more effort to the specialized task of detailed data extraction. Database URL: http://flybase.org/ PMID:22554788

  14. JSC Advanced Curation: Research and Development for Current Collections and Future Sample Return Mission Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M. D.; Allen, C. C.; Calaway, M. J.; Evans, C. A.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    Curation of NASA's astromaterials sample collections is a demanding and evolving activity that supports valuable science from NASA missions for generations, long after the samples are returned to Earth. For example, NASA continues to loan hundreds of Apollo program samples to investigators every year and those samples are often analyzed using instruments that did not exist at the time of the Apollo missions themselves. The samples are curated in a manner that minimizes overall contamination, enabling clean, new high-sensitivity measurements and new science results over 40 years after their return to Earth. As our exploration of the Solar System progresses, upcoming and future NASA sample return missions will return new samples with stringent contamination control, sample environmental control, and Planetary Protection requirements. Therefore, an essential element of a healthy astromaterials curation program is a research and development (R&D) effort that characterizes and employs new technologies to maintain current collections and enable new missions - an Advanced Curation effort. JSC's Astromaterials Acquisition & Curation Office is continually performing Advanced Curation research, identifying and defining knowledge gaps about research, development, and validation/verification topics that are critical to support current and future NASA astromaterials sample collections. The following are highlighted knowledge gaps and research opportunities.

  15. Practices of research data curation in institutional repositories: A qualitative view from repository staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Joon; Stvilia, Besiki

    2017-01-01

    The importance of managing research data has been emphasized by the government, funding agencies, and scholarly communities. Increased access to research data increases the impact and efficiency of scientific activities and funding. Thus, many research institutions have established or plan to establish research data curation services as part of their Institutional Repositories (IRs). However, in order to design effective research data curation services in IRs, and to build active research data providers and user communities around those IRs, it is essential to study current data curation practices and provide rich descriptions of the sociotechnical factors and relationships shaping those practices. Based on 13 interviews with 15 IR staff members from 13 large research universities in the United States, this paper provides a rich, qualitative description of research data curation and use practices in IRs. In particular, the paper identifies data curation and use activities in IRs, as well as their structures, roles played, skills needed, contradictions and problems present, solutions sought, and workarounds applied. The paper can inform the development of best practice guides, infrastructure and service templates, as well as education in research data curation in Library and Information Science (LIS) schools.

  16. OzFlux data: network integration from collection to curation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Isaac

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer by the eddy covariance technique has undergone great change in the last 2 decades. Early studies of these exchanges were confined to brief field campaigns in carefully controlled conditions followed by months of data analysis. Current practice is to run tower-based eddy covariance systems continuously over several years due to the need for continuous monitoring as part of a global effort to develop local-, regional-, continental- and global-scale budgets of carbon, water and energy. Efficient methods of processing the increased quantities of data are needed to maximise the time available for analysis and interpretation. Standardised methods are needed to remove differences in data processing as possible contributors to observed spatial variability. Furthermore, public availability of these data sets assists with undertaking global research efforts. The OzFlux data path has been developed (i to provide a standard set of quality control and post-processing tools across the network, thereby facilitating inter-site integration and spatial comparisons; (ii to increase the time available to researchers for analysis and interpretation by reducing the time spent collecting and processing data; (iii to propagate both data and metadata to the final product; and (iv to facilitate the use of the OzFlux data by adopting a standard file format and making the data available from web-based portals. Discovery of the OzFlux data set is facilitated through incorporation in FLUXNET data syntheses and the publication of collection metadata via the RIF-CS format. This paper serves two purposes. The first is to describe the data sets, along with their quality control and post-processing, for the other papers of this Special Issue. The second is to provide an example of one solution to the data collection and curation challenges that are encountered by similar flux

  17. Pain palliation therapy of bone metastases: palliative or curative?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.

    2007-01-01

    about 6 months, for 153 Sm and 186 Re 6-10 weeks. A response rate of about 70-80% is reported, the onset can be expected after 7-day after administration of 153 Sm and 186 Re, after 2 weeks using 89 Sr. This radionuclide therapy can be performed on outpatient basis, depending on national regulations. Radionuclide therapy alone is no curative treatment of bone metastases, but combination therapy with chemo- and/or radiation therapy have shown strong synergistic effect, improving the response on pain syndrome and disease control as well as prolonging mean survival as shown in several clinical trials

  18. Curation and Computational Design of Bioenergy-Related Metabolic Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, Peter D. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-09-12

    Pathway Tools is a systems-biology software package written by SRI International (SRI) that produces Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs) for organisms with a sequenced genome. Pathway Tools also provides a wide range of capabilities for analyzing predicted metabolic networks and user-generated omics data. More than 5,000 academic, industrial, and government groups have licensed Pathway Tools. This user community includes researchers at all three DOE bioenergy centers, as well as academic and industrial metabolic engineering (ME) groups. An integral part of the Pathway Tools software is MetaCyc, a large, multiorganism database of metabolic pathways and enzymes that SRI and its academic collaborators manually curate. This project included two main goals: I. Enhance the MetaCyc content of bioenergy-related enzymes and pathways. II. Develop computational tools for engineering metabolic pathways that satisfy specified design goals, in particular for bioenergy-related pathways. In part I, SRI proposed to significantly expand the coverage of bioenergy-related metabolic information in MetaCyc, followed by the generation of organism-specific PGDBs for all energy-relevant organisms sequenced at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Part I objectives included: 1: Expand the content of MetaCyc to include bioenergy-related enzymes and pathways. 2: Enhance the Pathway Tools software to enable display of complex polymer degradation processes. 3: Create new PGDBs for the energy-related organisms sequenced by JGI, update existing PGDBs with new MetaCyc content, and make these data available to JBEI via the BioCyc website. In part II, SRI proposed to develop an efficient computational tool for the engineering of metabolic pathways. Part II objectives included: 4: Develop computational tools for generating metabolic pathways that satisfy specified design goals, enabling users to specify parameters such as starting and ending compounds, and preferred or disallowed intermediate compounds

  19. Cellularized Cellular Solids via Freeze-Casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, Sarah; Kwiatoszynski, Julien; Coradin, Thibaud; Fernandes, Francisco M

    2016-02-01

    The elaboration of metabolically active cell-containing materials is a decisive step toward the successful application of cell based technologies. The present work unveils a new process allowing to simultaneously encapsulate living cells and shaping cell-containing materials into solid-state macroporous foams with precisely controlled morphology. Our strategy is based on freeze casting, an ice templating materials processing technique that has recently emerged for the structuration of colloids into macroporous materials. Our results indicate that it is possible to combine the precise structuration of the materials with cellular metabolic activity for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc. is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  1. Wireless Cellular Mobile Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zalud

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article is briefly reviewed the history of wireless cellularmobile communications, examined the progress in current secondgeneration (2G cellular standards and discussed their migration to thethird generation (3G. The European 2G cellular standard GSM and itsevolution phases GPRS and EDGE are described somewhat in detail. Thethird generation standard UMTS taking up on GSM/GPRS core network andequipped with a new advanced access network on the basis of codedivision multiple access (CDMA is investigated too. A sketch of theperspective of mobile communication beyond 3G concludes this article.

  2. Capacity on wireless quantum cellular communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang-Zhen; Yu, Xu-Tao; Zhang, Zai-Chen

    2018-03-01

    Quantum technology is making excellent prospects in future communication networks. Entanglement generation and purification are two major components in quantum networks. Combining these two techniques with classical cellular mobile communication, we proposed a novel wireless quantum cellular(WQC) communication system which is possible to realize commercial mobile quantum communication. In this paper, the architecture and network topology of WQC communication system are discussed, the mathematical model of WQC system is extracted and the serving capacity, indicating the ability to serve customers, is defined and calculated under certain circumstances.

  3. A hybrid human and machine resource curation pipeline for the Neuroscience Information Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrowski, A E; Cachat, J; Li, Y; Müller, H M; Sternberg, P W; Ciccarese, P; Clark, T; Marenco, L; Wang, R; Astakhov, V; Grethe, J S; Martone, M E

    2012-01-01

    The breadth of information resources available to researchers on the Internet continues to expand, particularly in light of recently implemented data-sharing policies required by funding agencies. However, the nature of dense, multifaceted neuroscience data and the design of contemporary search engine systems makes efficient, reliable and relevant discovery of such information a significant challenge. This challenge is specifically pertinent for online databases, whose dynamic content is 'hidden' from search engines. The Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF; http://www.neuinfo.org) was funded by the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research to address the problem of finding and utilizing neuroscience-relevant resources such as software tools, data sets, experimental animals and antibodies across the Internet. From the outset, NIF sought to provide an accounting of available resources, whereas developing technical solutions to finding, accessing and utilizing them. The curators therefore, are tasked with identifying and registering resources, examining data, writing configuration files to index and display data and keeping the contents current. In the initial phases of the project, all aspects of the registration and curation processes were manual. However, as the number of resources grew, manual curation became impractical. This report describes our experiences and successes with developing automated resource discovery and semiautomated type characterization with text-mining scripts that facilitate curation team efforts to discover, integrate and display new content. We also describe the DISCO framework, a suite of automated web services that significantly reduce manual curation efforts to periodically check for resource updates. Lastly, we discuss DOMEO, a semi-automated annotation tool that improves the discovery and curation of resources that are not necessarily website-based (i.e. reagents, software tools). Although the ultimate goal of automation was to

  4. Building synthetic cellular organization

    OpenAIRE

    Polka, Jessica K.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    The elaborate spatial organization of cells enhances, restricts, and regulates protein–protein interactions. However, the biological significance of this organization has been difficult to study without ways of directly perturbing it. We highlight synthetic biology tools for engineering novel cellular organization, describing how they have been, and can be, used to advance cell biology.

  5. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  6. Electromagnetic cellular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, Jeremy Z; Farhadi, Ashkan

    2011-05-01

    Chemical and electrical interaction within and between cells is well established. Just the opposite is true about cellular interactions via other physical fields. The most probable candidate for an other form of cellular interaction is the electromagnetic field. We review theories and experiments on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields generally, and if the cell-generated electromagnetic field can mediate cellular interactions. We do not limit here ourselves to specialized electro-excitable cells. Rather we describe physical processes that are of a more general nature and probably present in almost every type of living cell. The spectral range included is broad; from kHz to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. We show that there is a rather large number of theories on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields and discuss experimental evidence on electromagnetic cellular interactions in the modern scientific literature. Although small, it is continuously accumulating. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  8. An Optically-Assisted 3-D Cellular Array Machine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Freddie

    1997-01-01

    .... In this Phase II project, we developed a discrete-component based Cellular Neural Network (CNN) circuitry, which can perform CNN based analog image processing, such as edge detection and image enhancement, in real time...

  9. Other components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter includes descriptions of electronic and mechanical components which do not merit a chapter to themselves. Other hardware requires mention because of particularly high tolerance or intolerance of exposure to radiation. A more systematic analysis of radiation responses of structures which are definable by material was given in section 3.8. The components discussed here are field effect transistors, transducers, temperature sensors, magnetic components, superconductors, mechanical sensors, and miscellaneous electronic components

  10. AtlasT4SS: a curated database for type IV secretion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rangel C; del Rosario Quispe Saji, Guadalupe; Costa, Maiana O C; Netto, Diogo S; Lima, Nicholas C B; Klein, Cecília C; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Nicolás, Marisa F

    2012-08-09

    The type IV secretion system (T4SS) can be classified as a large family of macromolecule transporter systems, divided into three recognized sub-families, according to the well-known functions. The major sub-family is the conjugation system, which allows transfer of genetic material, such as a nucleoprotein, via cell contact among bacteria. Also, the conjugation system can transfer genetic material from bacteria to eukaryotic cells; such is the case with the T-DNA transfer of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to host plant cells. The system of effector protein transport constitutes the second sub-family, and the third one corresponds to the DNA uptake/release system. Genome analyses have revealed numerous T4SS in Bacteria and Archaea. The purpose of this work was to organize, classify, and integrate the T4SS data into a single database, called AtlasT4SS - the first public database devoted exclusively to this prokaryotic secretion system. The AtlasT4SS is a manual curated database that describes a large number of proteins related to the type IV secretion system reported so far in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as in Archaea. The database was created using the RDBMS MySQL and the Catalyst Framework based in the Perl programming language and using the Model-View-Controller (MVC) design pattern for Web. The current version holds a comprehensive collection of 1,617 T4SS proteins from 58 Bacteria (49 Gram-negative and 9 Gram-Positive), one Archaea and 11 plasmids. By applying the bi-directional best hit (BBH) relationship in pairwise genome comparison, it was possible to obtain a core set of 134 clusters of orthologous genes encoding T4SS proteins. In our database we present one way of classifying orthologous groups of T4SSs in a hierarchical classification scheme with three levels. The first level comprises four classes that are based on the organization of genetic determinants, shared homologies, and evolutionary relationships: (i) F-T4SS, (ii) P-T4SS, (iii

  11. EarthCube Data Discovery Hub: Enhancing, Curating and Finding Data across Multiple Geoscience Data Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D.; Richard, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Meier, O.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Hudman, G.; Stocks, K. I.; Hsu, L.; Whitenack, T.; Grethe, J. S.; Ozyurt, I. B.

    2017-12-01

    EarthCube Data Discovery Hub (DDH) is an EarthCube Building Block project using technologies developed in CINERGI (Community Inventory of EarthCube Resources for Geoscience Interoperability) to enable geoscience users to explore a growing portfolio of EarthCube-created and other geoscience-related resources. Over 1 million metadata records are available for discovery through the project portal (cinergi.sdsc.edu). These records are retrieved from data facilities, including federal, state and academic sources, or contributed by geoscientists through workshops, surveys, or other channels. CINERGI metadata augmentation pipeline components 1) provide semantic enhancement based on a large ontology of geoscience terms, using text analytics to generate keywords with references to ontology classes, 2) add spatial extents based on place names found in the metadata record, and 3) add organization identifiers to the metadata. The records are indexed and can be searched via a web portal and standard search APIs. The added metadata content improves discoverability and interoperability of the registered resources. Specifically, the addition of ontology-anchored keywords enables faceted browsing and lets users navigate to datasets related by variables measured, equipment used, science domain, processes described, geospatial features studied, and other dataset characteristics that are generated by the pipeline. DDH also lets data curators access and edit the automatically generated metadata records using the CINERGI metadata editor, accept or reject the enhanced metadata content, and consider it in updating their metadata descriptions. We consider several complex data discovery workflows, in environmental seismology (quantifying sediment and water fluxes using seismic data), marine biology (determining available temperature, location, weather and bleaching characteristics of coral reefs related to measurements in a given coral reef survey), and river geochemistry (discovering

  12. How can the curation of hands-on STEM activities power successful mobile apps and websites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcello, D.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) is University of California, Berkeley's public science center. Over the last decade, the Center for Technology Innovation at LHS has partnered with many institutions to establish a strong track record of developing successful technology solutions to support STEM teaching and learning within informal environments. Curation by subject-matter experts has been at the heart of many educational technology products from LHS and its partners that are directed at educators and families. This work includes: (1) popular digital libraries for inquiry-based activities at Howtosmile.org (NSF DRL #0735007) and NASA Earth and Space science education resources at NASAwavelength.org; and novel mobile apps like DIY Sun Science (NASA NNX10AE05G) and DIY Human Body (NIH 5R25OD010543) designed to scaffold exploration of STEM phenomena at home. Both NASA Wavelength and DIY Sun Science arose out of long-term collaborations with the Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), and other NASA-funded organizations, in partnership with NASA through cooperative agreements. This session will review the development, formative evaluation, and usage metrics for these two Earth and Space science-themed educational technology products directly relevant to the AGU community. Questions reviewed by presenters will include: What makes a good hands-on activity, and what essential information do educators depend on when searching for programming additions? What content and connections do families need to explore hands-on activities? How can technology help incorporate educational standards into the discovery process for learning experiences online? How do all these components drive the design and user experience of websites and apps that showcase STEM content?

  13. The cellular basis of skin injury after cytotoxic insult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potten, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    It is concluded that although the major target in terms of radiation damage is undoubtedly the epidermis, the skin is a complex tissue made up of many inter-dependent components each of which may constitute an important secondary target. Damage to each component has been considered at the cellular level. The precise inter-relationships and interdependencies remain somewhat obscure. Even within one site, the epidermis, a comprehensive cellular explanation of the various post-irradiation changes is difficult. Substantial bibliography. (UK)

  14. Preventive but Not Curative Efficacy of Celecoxib on Bladder Carcinogenesis in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Sereno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of a cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor, celecoxib (CEL, on bladder cancer inhibition in a rat model, when used as preventive versus as curative treatment. The study comprised 52 male Wistar rats, divided in 5 groups, during a 20-week protocol: control: vehicle, carcinogen: 0.05% of N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl nitrosamine (BBN, CEL: 10 mg/kg/day of the selective COX-2 inhibitor Celebrex, preventive CEL (CEL+BBN-P, and curative CEL (BBN+CEL-C groups. Although tumor growth was markedly inhibited by the preventive application of CEL, it was even aggravated by the curative treatment. The incidence of gross bladder carcinoma was: control 0/8(0%, BBN 13/20(65%, CEL 0/8(0%, CEL+BBN-P 1/8(12.5%, and BBN+CEL-C 6/8(75%. The number and volume of carcinomas were significantly lower in the CEL+BBN-P versus BBN, accompanied by an ample reduction in hyperplasia, dysplasia, and papillary tumors as well as COX-2 immunostaining. In spite of the reduction of tumor volumes in the curative BBN+CEL-C group, tumor malignancy was augmented. An anti-inflammatory and antioxidant profile was encountered only in the group under preventive treatment. In conclusion, preventive, but not curative, celecoxib treatment promoted a striking inhibitory effect on bladder cancer development, reinforcing the potential role of chemopreventive strategies based on cyclooxygenase 2 inhibition.

  15. Determination of protective properties of Bardejovske Kuple spa curative waters by rotational viscometry and ABTS assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOPOLSKA Dominika

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mineral waters from Bardejovske Kupele spa are natural, strongly mineralized, with healing effects. They are classified as hydrocarbonic - containing chloride and sodium - carbonic, cold, hypotonic, with a relatively high boric acid content. Potential anti-oxidative effects of curative waters from Bardejovske Kupele were investigated against the hyaluronan (HA degradation. High-molar-mass HA was exposed to the action of ascorbate and cupric ions, which initiate free-radical chain degradation. Time-dependent changes of dynamic viscosity (h of the HA solutions were monitored by rotational viscometry. The radical scavenging capacity of curative waters was determined by the ABTS assay. Despite a significantly high content of transition metal ions, especially iron, remarkable protective effects of the two curative spa waters were found, namely Alzbeta and Klara. Even though “Alzbeta´s“ iron content was 3.5-fold higher than “Klara´s“, “Alzbeta“ was shown to have better protective properties against the HA degradation compared to “Klara“. Bolus addition of ferric ions to the reaction system instead of the natural iron-containing curative water caused a significant HA degradation. The ABTS decolorization assay revealed that the curative spa waters were proven as poorly effective scavengers of the ABTS·+ cation radical.

  16. Content curation en periodismo (y en documentación periodística

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Guallar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Desde hace unos pocos años están con nosotros los conceptos de content curation y de content curator como actividad o sistema y como profesional o especialista, respectivamente. Aunque el origen del término se vincule al mundo del marketing –se considera como artículo fundacional “Manifesto for the content curator” del marketer Rohit Bhargava (2009-, y sus características se identifiquen en buena medida con las del profesional de la Información y la Documentación, la content curation va más allá de una disciplina concreta o de un rol profesional determinado. Ambos perfiles citados, marketers y bibliotecarios-documentalistas, pueden hacer content curation por supuesto, pero también otros, como educadores, por ejemplo. Y, como es el caso que tratamos aquí, periodistas (y documentalistas de prensa. Porque en estas breves líneas nos vamos a centrar en presentar el papel de la content curation en el ámbito del periodismo.

  17. Organic Contamination Baseline Study in NASA Johnson Space Center Astromaterials Curation Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Allen, Carlton C.; Allton, Judith H.

    2014-01-01

    Future robotic and human spaceflight missions to the Moon, Mars, asteroids, and comets will require curating astromaterial samples with minimal inorganic and organic contamination to preserve the scientific integrity of each sample. 21st century sample return missions will focus on strict protocols for reducing organic contamination that have not been seen since the Apollo manned lunar landing program. To properly curate these materials, the Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office under the Astromaterial Research and Exploration Science Directorate at NASA Johnson Space Center houses and protects all extraterrestrial materials brought back to Earth that are controlled by the United States government. During fiscal year 2012, we conducted a year-long project to compile historical documentation and laboratory tests involving organic investigations at these facilities. In addition, we developed a plan to determine the current state of organic cleanliness in curation laboratories housing astromaterials. This was accomplished by focusing on current procedures and protocols for cleaning, sample handling, and storage. While the intention of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the current state of organic cleanliness in JSC curation laboratories, it also provides a baseline for determining whether our cleaning procedures and sample handling protocols need to be adapted and/or augmented to meet the new requirements for future human spaceflight and robotic sample return missions.

  18. The DigCurV Curriculum Framework for Digital Curation in the Cultural Heritage Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Molloy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, the DigCurV collaborative network completed development of a Curriculum Framework for digital curation skills in the European cultural heritage sector. DigCurV synthesised a variety of established skills and competence models in the digital curation and LIS sectors with expertise from digital curation professionals, in order to develop a new Curriculum Framework. The resulting Framework provides a common language and helps define the skills, knowledge and abilities that are necessary for the development of digital curation training; for benchmarking existing programmes; and for promoting the continuing production, improvement and refinement of digital curation training programmes. This paper describes the salient points of this work, including how the project team conducted the research necessary to develop the Framework, the structure of the Framework, the processes used to validate the Framework, and three ‘lenses’ onto the Framework. The paper also provides suggestions as to how the Framework might be used, including a description of potential audiences and purposes.

  19. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In today’s world, three great classes of non-infectious diseases – the metabolic syndromes (such as type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis), the cancers, and the neurodegenerative disorders – have risen to the fore. These diseases, all associated with increasing age of an individual, have proven to be remarkably complex and difficult to treat. This is because, in large measure, when the cellular signaling pathways responsible for maintaining homeostasis and health of the body become dysregulated, they generate equally stable disease states. As a result the body may respond positively to a drug, but only for a while and then revert back to the disease state. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease summarizes our current understanding of these regulatory networks in the healthy and diseased states, showing which molecular components might be prime targets for drug interventions. This is accomplished by presenting models that explain in mechanistic, molecular detail how a particular part of the cellular sign...

  20. Cellular therapies: Day by day, all the way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilla, Erden; Kilic, Pelin; Gurman, Gunhan

    2018-04-18

    Tremendous effort and knowledge have elucidated a new era of 'cellular therapy,' also called "live" or "living" drugs. There are currently thousands of active clinical trials that are ongoing, seeking hope for incurable conditions thanks to the increased accessibility and reliability of gene editing and cellular reprogramming. Accomplishments in various adoptive T cell immunotherapies and chimeric antigen receptor (CART) T cell therapies oriented researchers to the field. Cellular therapies are believed to be the next generation of curative therapeutics in many ways, the classification and nomenclature for these applications have not yet reached a consensus. Trends in recent years are moving towards making tissues and cell processes only in centers with production permits. It is quite promising that competent authorities have increased licensing activities of tissue and cell establishments in their countries, under good practice (GxP) rules, and preclinical and clinical trials involving cell-based therapies have led to significant investments. Despite the initiatives undertaken and the large budgets that have been allocated, only limited success has been achieved in cellular therapy compared to conventional drug development. Cost, and cost effectiveness, are important issues for these novel therapies to meet unmet clinical needs, and there are still many scientific, translational, commercializational, and ethical questions that do not have answers. The main objectives of this review is to underline the current position of cellular therapies in research, highlight the timely topic of immunotherapy and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell treatment, and compile information related to regulations and marketing of cellular therapeutic approaches worldwide. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nested cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasthoff, U.

    1985-07-01

    Cellular automata by definition consist of a finite or infinite number of cells, say of unit length, with each cell having the same transition function. These cells are usually considered as the smallest elements and so the space filled with these cells becomes discrete. Nevertheless, large pictures created by such cellular automata look very fractal. So we try to replace each cell by a couple of smaller cells, which have the same transition functions as the large ones. There are automata where this replacement does not destroy the macroscopic structure. In these cases this nesting process can be iterated. The paper contains large classes of automata with the above properties. In the case of one dimensional automata with two states and next neighbour interaction and a nesting function of the same type a complete classification is given. (author)

  2. Correlation of in vitro lymphocyte radiosensitivity and gene expression with late normal tissue reactions following curative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnon, Paul; Kabacik, Sylwia; MacKay, Alan; Raffy, Claudine; A’Hern, Roger; Owen, Roger; Badie, Christophe; Yarnold, John; Bouffler, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Identification of mechanisms of late normal tissue responses to curative radiotherapy that discriminate individuals with marked or mild responses would aid response prediction. This study aimed to identify differences in gene expression, apoptosis, residual DNA double strand breaks and chromosomal damage after in vitro irradiation of lymphocytes in a series of patients with marked (31 cases) or mild (28 controls) late adverse reaction to adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Gene expression arrays, residual γH2AX, apoptosis, G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity and G0 micronucleus assay were used to compare case and control lymphocyte radiation responses. Results: Five hundred and thirty genes were up-regulated and 819 down-regulated by ionising radiation. Irradiated samples were identified with an overall cross-validated error rate of 3.4%. Prediction analyses to classify cases and controls using unirradiated (0 Gy), irradiated (4 Gy) or radiation response (4–0 Gy) expression profiles correctly identified samples with, respectively, 25%, 22% or 18.5% error rates. Significant inter-sample variation was observed for all cellular endpoints but cases and controls could not be distinguished. Conclusions: Variation in lymphocyte radiosensitivity does not necessarily correlate with normal tissue response to radiotherapy. Gene expression analysis can predict of radiation exposure and may in the future help prediction of normal tissue radiosensitivity.

  3. Predictability in cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Chira, Camelia; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Modelled as finite homogeneous Markov chains, probabilistic cellular automata with local transition probabilities in (0, 1) always posses a stationary distribution. This result alone is not very helpful when it comes to predicting the final configuration; one needs also a formula connecting the probabilities in the stationary distribution to some intrinsic feature of the lattice configuration. Previous results on the asynchronous cellular automata have showed that such feature really exists. It is the number of zero-one borders within the automaton's binary configuration. An exponential formula in the number of zero-one borders has been proved for the 1-D, 2-D and 3-D asynchronous automata with neighborhood three, five and seven, respectively. We perform computer experiments on a synchronous cellular automaton to check whether the empirical distribution obeys also that theoretical formula. The numerical results indicate a perfect fit for neighbourhood three and five, which opens the way for a rigorous proof of the formula in this new, synchronous case.

  4. Probabilistic cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-09-01

    Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case-connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders-the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata.

  5. Wavefront cellular learning automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Behnaz; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes a new cellular learning automaton, called a wavefront cellular learning automaton (WCLA). The proposed WCLA has a set of learning automata mapped to a connected structure and uses this structure to propagate the state changes of the learning automata over the structure using waves. In the WCLA, after one learning automaton chooses its action, if this chosen action is different from the previous action, it can send a wave to its neighbors and activate them. Each neighbor receiving the wave is activated and must choose a new action. This structure for the WCLA is necessary in many dynamic areas such as social networks, computer networks, grid computing, and web mining. In this paper, we introduce the WCLA framework as an optimization tool with diffusion capability, study its behavior over time using ordinary differential equation solutions, and present its accuracy using expediency analysis. To show the superiority of the proposed WCLA, we compare the proposed method with some other types of cellular learning automata using two benchmark problems.

  6. Algorithm for cellular reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquist, Scott; Patterson, Geoff; Muir, Lindsey A; Lindsly, Stephen; Chen, Haiming; Brown, Markus; Wicha, Max S; Bloch, Anthony; Brockett, Roger; Rajapakse, Indika

    2017-11-07

    The day we understand the time evolution of subcellular events at a level of detail comparable to physical systems governed by Newton's laws of motion seems far away. Even so, quantitative approaches to cellular dynamics add to our understanding of cell biology. With data-guided frameworks we can develop better predictions about, and methods for, control over specific biological processes and system-wide cell behavior. Here we describe an approach for optimizing the use of transcription factors (TFs) in cellular reprogramming, based on a device commonly used in optimal control. We construct an approximate model for the natural evolution of a cell-cycle-synchronized population of human fibroblasts, based on data obtained by sampling the expression of 22,083 genes at several time points during the cell cycle. To arrive at a model of moderate complexity, we cluster gene expression based on division of the genome into topologically associating domains (TADs) and then model the dynamics of TAD expression levels. Based on this dynamical model and additional data, such as known TF binding sites and activity, we develop a methodology for identifying the top TF candidates for a specific cellular reprogramming task. Our data-guided methodology identifies a number of TFs previously validated for reprogramming and/or natural differentiation and predicts some potentially useful combinations of TFs. Our findings highlight the immense potential of dynamical models, mathematics, and data-guided methodologies for improving strategies for control over biological processes. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  7. Wavefront cellular learning automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Behnaz; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes a new cellular learning automaton, called a wavefront cellular learning automaton (WCLA). The proposed WCLA has a set of learning automata mapped to a connected structure and uses this structure to propagate the state changes of the learning automata over the structure using waves. In the WCLA, after one learning automaton chooses its action, if this chosen action is different from the previous action, it can send a wave to its neighbors and activate them. Each neighbor receiving the wave is activated and must choose a new action. This structure for the WCLA is necessary in many dynamic areas such as social networks, computer networks, grid computing, and web mining. In this paper, we introduce the WCLA framework as an optimization tool with diffusion capability, study its behavior over time using ordinary differential equation solutions, and present its accuracy using expediency analysis. To show the superiority of the proposed WCLA, we compare the proposed method with some other types of cellular learning automata using two benchmark problems.

  8. Recovery, Transportation and Acceptance to the Curation Facility of the Hayabusa Re-Entry Capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, M.; Fujimura, A.; Yano, H.; Okamoto, C.; Okada, T.; Yada, T.; Ishibashi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The "Hayabusa" re-entry capsule was safely carried into the clean room of Sagamihara Planetary Sample Curation Facility in JAXA on June 18, 2010. After executing computed tomographic (CT) scanning, removal of heat shield, and surface cleaning of sample container, the sample container was enclosed into the clean chamber. After opening the sample container and residual gas sampling in the clean chamber, optical observation, sample recovery, sample separation for initial analysis will be performed. This curation work is continuing for several manths with some selected member of Hayabusa Asteroidal Sample Preliminary Examination Team (HASPET). We report here on the 'Hayabusa' capsule recovery operation, and transportation and acceptance at the curation facility of the Hayabusa re-entry capsule.

  9. State of the Art of Cost and Benefit Models for Digital Curation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kejser, Ulla Bøgvad; Davidson, Joy; Wang, David

    2014-01-01

    , to support decision-making and for selecting the most efficient processes – all of which are critical for ensuring sustainability of digital curation investment. The evaluation revealed that the most prominent challenges are associated with the models’ usability, their inability to model quality and benefits......This paper presents the results of an evaluation carried out by the EU 4C project to assess how well current digital curation cost and benefit models meet a range of stakeholders’ needs. This work aims to elicit a means of modelling that enables comparing financial information across organisations...... of curation, and the lack of a clear terminology and conceptual description of costs and benefits. The paper provides recommendations on how these gaps in cost and benefit modelling can be bridged....

  10. Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) score is a prognostic marker for gastric cancer patients after curative resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Daisuke; Sawayama, Hiroshi; Kurashige, Junji; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Eto, Tsugio; Tokunaga, Ryuma; Kitano, Yuki; Yamamura, Kensuke; Ouchi, Mayuko; Nakamura, Kenichi; Baba, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Yamashita, Yoichi; Yoshida, Naoya; Chikamoto, Akira; Baba, Hideo

    2018-03-01

    Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT), as calculated from serum albumin, total cholesterol concentration, and total lymphocyte count, was previously shown to be useful for nutritional assessment. The current study investigated the potential use of CONUT as a prognostic marker in gastric cancer patients after curative resection. Preoperative CONUT was retrospectively calculated in 416 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative resection at Kumamoto University Hospital from 2005 to 2014. The patients were divided into two groups: CONUT-high (≥4) and CONUT-low (≤3), according to time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The associations of CONUT with clinicopathological factors and survival were evaluated. CONUT-high patients were significantly older (p nutritional status but also for predicting long-term OS in gastric cancer patients after curative resection.

  11. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  12. The MIntAct project--IntAct as a common curation platform for 11 molecular interaction databases

    OpenAIRE

    Orchard, S; Ammari, M; Aranda, B; Breuza, L; Briganti, L; Broackes-Carter, F; Campbell, N; Chavali, G; Chen, C; del-Toro, N; Duesbury, M; Dumousseau, M; Galeota, E; Hinz, U; Iannuccelli, M

    2014-01-01

    IntAct (freely available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/intact) is an open-source, open data molecular interaction database populated by data either curated from the literature or from direct data depositions. IntAct has developed a sophisticated web-based curation tool, capable of supporting both IMEx- and MIMIx-level curation. This tool is now utilized by multiple additional curation teams, all of whom annotate data directly into the IntAct database. Members of the IntAct team supply appropriate l...

  13. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  14. Hospital of Diagnosis Influences the Probability of Receiving Curative Treatment for Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, Margreet; Koëter, Marijn; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Lemmens, Valery E P P; Siersema, Peter D; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Verhoeven, Rob H A; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this article was to study the influence of hospital of diagnosis on the probability of receiving curative treatment and its impact on survival among patients with esophageal cancer (EC). Although EC surgery is centralized in the Netherlands, the disease is often diagnosed in hospitals that do not perform this procedure. Patients with potentially curable esophageal or gastroesophageal junction tumors diagnosed between 2005 and 2013 who were potentially curable (cT1-3,X, any N, M0,X) were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Multilevel logistic regression was performed to examine the probability to undergo curative treatment (resection with or without neoadjuvant treatment, definitive chemoradiotherapy, or local tumor excision) according to hospital of diagnosis. Effects of variation in probability of undergoing curative treatment among these hospitals on survival were investigated by Cox regression. All 13,017 patients with potentially curable EC, diagnosed in 91 hospitals, were included. The proportion of patients receiving curative treatment ranged from 37% to 83% and from 45% to 86% in the periods 2005-2009 and 2010-2013, respectively, depending on hospital of diagnosis. After adjustment for patient- and hospital-related characteristics these proportions ranged from 41% to 77% and from 50% to 82%, respectively (both P < 0.001). Multivariable survival analyses showed that patients diagnosed in hospitals with a low probability of undergoing curative treatment had a worse overall survival (hazard ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.20; hazard ratio = 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.24). The variation in probability of undergoing potentially curative treatment for EC between hospitals of diagnosis and its impact on survival indicates that treatment decision making in EC may be improved.

  15. Textpresso Central: a customizable platform for searching, text mining, viewing, and curating biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H-M; Van Auken, K M; Li, Y; Sternberg, P W

    2018-03-09

    The biomedical literature continues to grow at a rapid pace, making the challenge of knowledge retrieval and extraction ever greater. Tools that provide a means to search and mine the full text of literature thus represent an important way by which the efficiency of these processes can be improved. We describe the next generation of the Textpresso information retrieval system, Textpresso Central (TPC). TPC builds on the strengths of the original system by expanding the full text corpus to include the PubMed Central Open Access Subset (PMC OA), as well as the WormBase C. elegans bibliography. In addition, TPC allows users to create a customized corpus by uploading and processing documents of their choosing. TPC is UIMA compliant, to facilitate compatibility with external processing modules, and takes advantage of Lucene indexing and search technology for efficient handling of millions of full text documents. Like Textpresso, TPC searches can be performed using keywords and/or categories (semantically related groups of terms), but to provide better context for interpreting and validating queries, search results may now be viewed as highlighted passages in the context of full text. To facilitate biocuration efforts, TPC also allows users to select text spans from the full text and annotate them, create customized curation forms for any data type, and send resulting annotations to external curation databases. As an example of such a curation form, we describe integration of TPC with the Noctua curation tool developed by the Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium. Textpresso Central is an online literature search and curation platform that enables biocurators and biomedical researchers to search and mine the full text of literature by integrating keyword and category searches with viewing search results in the context of the full text. It also allows users to create customized curation interfaces, use those interfaces to make annotations linked to supporting evidence statements

  16. CARFMAP: A Curated Pathway Map of Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu T Nim

    Full Text Available The adult mammalian heart contains multiple cell types that work in unison under tightly regulated conditions to maintain homeostasis. Cardiac fibroblasts are a significant and unique population of non-muscle cells in the heart that have recently gained substantial interest in the cardiac biology community. To better understand this renaissance cell, it is essential to systematically survey what has been known in the literature about the cellular and molecular processes involved. We have built CARFMAP (http://visionet.erc.monash.edu.au/CARFMAP, an interactive cardiac fibroblast pathway map derived from the biomedical literature using a software-assisted manual data collection approach. CARFMAP is an information-rich interactive tool that enables cardiac biologists to explore the large body of literature in various creative ways. There is surprisingly little overlap between the cardiac fibroblast pathway map, a foreskin fibroblast pathway map, and a whole mouse organism signalling pathway map from the REACTOME database. Among the use cases of CARFMAP is a common task in our cardiac biology laboratory of identifying new genes that are (1 relevant to cardiac literature, and (2 differentially regulated in high-throughput assays. From the expression profiles of mouse cardiac and tail fibroblasts, we employed CARFMAP to characterise cardiac fibroblast pathways. Using CARFMAP in conjunction with transcriptomic data, we generated a stringent list of six genes that would not have been singled out using bioinformatics analyses alone. Experimental validation showed that five genes (Mmp3, Il6, Edn1, Pdgfc and Fgf10 are differentially regulated in the cardiac fibroblast. CARFMAP is a powerful tool for systems analyses of cardiac fibroblasts, facilitating systems-level cardiovascular research.

  17. CARFMAP: A Curated Pathway Map of Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nim, Hieu T; Furtado, Milena B; Costa, Mauro W; Kitano, Hiroaki; Rosenthal, Nadia A; Boyd, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    The adult mammalian heart contains multiple cell types that work in unison under tightly regulated conditions to maintain homeostasis. Cardiac fibroblasts are a significant and unique population of non-muscle cells in the heart that have recently gained substantial interest in the cardiac biology community. To better understand this renaissance cell, it is essential to systematically survey what has been known in the literature about the cellular and molecular processes involved. We have built CARFMAP (http://visionet.erc.monash.edu.au/CARFMAP), an interactive cardiac fibroblast pathway map derived from the biomedical literature using a software-assisted manual data collection approach. CARFMAP is an information-rich interactive tool that enables cardiac biologists to explore the large body of literature in various creative ways. There is surprisingly little overlap between the cardiac fibroblast pathway map, a foreskin fibroblast pathway map, and a whole mouse organism signalling pathway map from the REACTOME database. Among the use cases of CARFMAP is a common task in our cardiac biology laboratory of identifying new genes that are (1) relevant to cardiac literature, and (2) differentially regulated in high-throughput assays. From the expression profiles of mouse cardiac and tail fibroblasts, we employed CARFMAP to characterise cardiac fibroblast pathways. Using CARFMAP in conjunction with transcriptomic data, we generated a stringent list of six genes that would not have been singled out using bioinformatics analyses alone. Experimental validation showed that five genes (Mmp3, Il6, Edn1, Pdgfc and Fgf10) are differentially regulated in the cardiac fibroblast. CARFMAP is a powerful tool for systems analyses of cardiac fibroblasts, facilitating systems-level cardiovascular research.

  18. The curative effect analysis of 131I-therapy on patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Qin; Lu Shujun; Lu Tianhe

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the curative effect of 131 I-therapy on Graves' disease, the authors analyse conditions of patients who have received 131 I-therapy (n -674). These results showed that the incidence of fully recover, improve, Graves' disease and invalid is 80.11%, 7.28%, 11.87% and 0.74% respectively. Therefore, 131 I-therapy on Graves' disease is convenient. It has little side effect, low cost and better curative effect, it is one of the best therapeutic methods to treat hyperthyroidism

  19. Observation of curative effect of 131I in treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Kebin; Xu Fan; Zhang Yaping; Wang Jingchang; Zhao Mingli; Ye Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the curative effect of 131 I in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. Method: 126 patients with hyperthyroidism were treated with 131 I and the curative effect was analyzed. Result: The results showed that among 126 cases of hyperthyroidism treated with 131 I, 117 cases had recovered and the cure rate was 92.9%. 9 cases were found hypothyroidism in one-year follow-up and the occurrence rate was 7.1%. Conclusion: The treatment of hyperthyroidism with 131 I is safe and effective method. (authors)

  20. Jean-Paul Martinon, ed. - The Curatorial: A Philosophy of Curating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Romualdo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the words of Jean-Paul Martinon, this book’s editor, The Curatorial: A Philosophy of Curating originated from a “wish to talk about curating”, the same wish that led to the creation, in 2006, of a practice-led PhD programme at Goldsmiths College, called Curatorial/Knowledge. The anthology features contributions from tutors, guest speakers and students, all of whom delve into what “the curatorial” is and what it might mean in the future. Curating, or the act of organizing exhibitions, paral...

  1. Sharing and community curation of mass spectrometry data with Global Natural Products Social Molecular Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingxun; Carver, Jeremy J.; Pevzner, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    are well-suited to high-throughput characterization of NP, there is a pressing need for an infrastructure to enable sharing and curation of data. We present Global Natural Products Social Molecular Networking (GNPS; http://gnps.ucsd.edu), an open-access knowledge base for community-wide organization...... and sharing of raw, processed or identified tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry data. In GNPS, crowdsourced curation of freely available community-wide reference MS libraries will underpin improved annotations. Data-driven social-networking should facilitate identification of spectra and foster collaborations...

  2. Cosserat modeling of cellular solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.

    Cellular solids inherit their macroscopic mechanical properties directly from the cellular microstructure. However, the characteristic material length scale is often not small compared to macroscopic dimensions, which limits the applicability of classical continuum-type constitutive models. Cosserat

  3. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  4. Scanning the horizon for high value-add manufacturing science: Accelerating manufacturing readiness for the next generation of disruptive, high-value curative cell therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourd, Paul; Williams, David J

    2018-05-01

    Since the regenerative medicine sector entered the second phase of its development (RegenMed 2.0) more than a decade ago, there is increasing recognition that current technology innovation trajectories will drive the next translational phase toward the production of disruptive, high-value curative cell and gene-based regenerative medicines. To identify the manufacturing science problems that must be addressed to permit translation of these next generation therapeutics. In this short report, a long lens look within the pluripotent stem cell therapeutic space, both embryonic and induced, is used to gain early insights on where critical technology and manufacturing challenges may emerge. This report offers a future perspective on the development and innovation that will be needed within manufacturing science to add value in the production and commercialization of the next generation of advanced cell therapies and precision medicines. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cellular communication through light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fels

    Full Text Available Information transfer is a fundamental of life. A few studies have reported that cells use photons (from an endogenous source as information carriers. This study finds that cells can have an influence on other cells even when separated with a glass barrier, thereby disabling molecule diffusion through the cell-containing medium. As there is still very little known about the potential of photons for intercellular communication this study is designed to test for non-molecule-based triggering of two fundamental properties of life: cell division and energy uptake. The study was performed with a cellular organism, the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. Mutual exposure of cell populations occurred under conditions of darkness and separation with cuvettes (vials allowing photon but not molecule transfer. The cell populations were separated either with glass allowing photon transmission from 340 nm to longer waves, or quartz being transmittable from 150 nm, i.e. from UV-light to longer waves. Even through glass, the cells affected cell division and energy uptake in neighboring cell populations. Depending on the cuvette material and the number of cells involved, these effects were positive or negative. Also, while paired populations with lower growth rates grew uncorrelated, growth of the better growing populations was correlated. As there were significant differences when separating the populations with glass or quartz, it is suggested that the cell populations use two (or more frequencies for cellular information transfer, which influences at least energy uptake, cell division rate and growth correlation. Altogether the study strongly supports a cellular communication system, which is different from a molecule-receptor-based system and hints that photon-triggering is a fine tuning principle in cell chemistry.

  6. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  7. Cellular mechanics and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  8. More Than a Text Message: Dismantling Digital Triggers to Curate Behavior Change in Patient-Centered Health Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, Frederick; Baumel, Amit

    2017-05-26

    Digital triggers such as text messages, emails, and push alerts are designed to focus an individual on a desired goal by prompting an internal or external reaction at the appropriate time. Triggers therefore have an essential role in engaging individuals with digital interventions delivered outside of traditional health care settings, where other events in daily lives and fluctuating motivation to engage in effortful behavior exist. There is an emerging body of literature examining the use of digital triggers for short-term action and longer-term behavior change. However, little attention has been given to understanding the components of digital triggers. Using tailoring as an overarching framework, we separated digital triggers into 5 primary components: (1) who (sender), (2) how (stimulus type, delivery medium, heterogeneity), (3) when (delivered), (4) how much (frequency, intensity), and (5) what (trigger's target, trigger's structure, trigger's narrative). We highlighted key considerations when tailoring each component and the pitfalls of ignoring common mistakes, such as alert fatigue and habituation. As evidenced throughout the paper, there is a broad literature base from which to draw when tailoring triggers to curate behavior change in health interventions. More research is needed, however, to examine differences in efficacy based on component tailoring, to best use triggers to facilitate behavior change over time, and to keep individuals engaged in physical and mental health behavior change efforts. Dismantling digital triggers into their component parts and reassembling them according to the gestalt of one's change goals is the first step in this development work. ©Frederick Muench, Amit Baumel. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 26.05.2017.

  9. Active and Social Data Curation: Reinventing the Business of Community-scale Lifecycle Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, R. H.; Kumar, P.; Plale, B. A.; Myers, J.; Hedstrom, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Effective long-term curation and preservation of data for community use has historically been limited to high-value and homogeneous collections produced by mission-oriented organizations. The technologies and practices that have been applied in these cases, e.g. relational data bases, development of comprehensive standardized vocabularies, and centralized support for reference data collections, are arguably applicable to the much broader range of data generated by the long tail of investigator-led research, with the logical conclusion of such an argument leading to the call for training, evangelism, and vastly increased funding as the best means of broadening community-scale data management. In this paper, we question this reasoning and explore how alternative approaches focused on the overall data lifecycle and the sociological and business realities of distributed multi-disciplinary research communities might dramatically lower costs, increase value, and consequently drive dramatic advances in our ability to use and re-use data, and ultimately enable more rapid scientific advance. Specifically, we introduce the concepts of active and social curation as a means to decrease coordination costs, align costs and values for individual data producers and data consumers, and improve the immediacy of returns for data curation investments. Further, we describe the specific architecture and services for active and social curation that are being prototyped within the Sustainable Environment - Actionable Data (SEAD) project within NSF's DataNet network and discuss how they are motivated by the long-tail dynamics in the cross-disciplinary sustainability research community.

  10. Introverts and Extraverts Reflecting on the Experience of Parish Ministry: Conversation between Training Incumbents and Curates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Leslie J.; Smith, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Psychological type theory suggests that introverts and extraverts may approach Christian ministry somewhat differently. This theory was tested within the context of a residential workshop attended by 15 curates, 12 of whom were accompanied by their training incumbents. Twelve themes were identified within responses to the question, "What does…

  11. Data Stewardship: Environmental Data Curation and a Web-of-Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Baker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific researchers today frequently package measurements and associated metadata as digital datasets in anticipation of storage in data repositories. Through the lens of environmental data stewardship, we consider the data repository as an organizational element central to data curation. One aspect of non-commercial repositories, their distance-from-origin of the data, is explored in terms of near and remote categories. Three idealized repository types are distinguished – local, center, and archive - paralleling research, resource, and reference collection categories respectively. Repository type characteristics such as scope, structure, and goals are discussed. Repository similarities in terms of roles, activities and responsibilities are also examined. Data stewardship is related to care of research data and responsible scientific communication supported by an infrastructure that coordinates curation activities; data curation is defined as a set of repeated and repeatable activities focusing on tending data and creating data products within a particular arena. The concept of “sphere-of-context” is introduced as an aid to distinguishing repository types. Conceptualizing a “web-of-repositories” accommodates a variety of repository types and represents an ecologically inclusive approach to data curation.

  12. [Curative Effects of Hydroxyurea on the Patients with β-thalassaemia Intermadia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Yao, Hong-Xia

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the clinical features of β-thalassaemia intermediate (TI) patients and the curative effect and side reactions of hydroxyurea therapys. Twenty nine patients with TI were divided into hydroxyurea therapy group and no hydroxyurea therapy group; the curative effect and side reactions in 2 groups were compared; the situation of blood transfusion in the 2 groups was evaluated. In hydroxyurea therapy group, the hemoglobin level increased after treatment for 3 months; the reticulocyte percentage obviously decreased after treatment for 12 months; the serum ferritin had been maintained at a low level; while in no hydroxyurea therapy group, the levels of hemoglobin and reticulocytes were not significantly improved after treatment, the serum ferritin level gradually increased. In hydroxyurea therapy group, 12 cases were out of blood transfusion after treatment for 12 months, effective rate of treatment was 85.71%; while in no hydroxyurea therapy group, the blood transfusion dependency was not improved after treatment. No serious side reactions were found in all the hydroxyurea treated patients. The hydroxyurea shows a better curative effect on TI patients, no serious side reactions occur in all the patients treated with hydroxyurea, but the long-term curative effect and side reactions should be observed continuously.

  13. Curation-Based Network Marketing: Strategies for Network Growth and Electronic Word-of-Mouth Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Earnie Mitchell, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    In the last couple of years, a new aspect of online social networking has emerged, in which the strength of social network connections is based not on social ties but mutually shared interests. This dissertation studies these "curation-based" online social networks (CBN) and their suitability for the diffusion of electronic word-of-mouth…

  14. Social Media Selves: College Students' Curation of Self and Others through Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, David Michael

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study used cyber-ethnography and grounded theory to explore the ways in which 35 undergraduate students crafted and refined self-presentations on the social network site Facebook. Findings included the identification of two unique forms of self-presentation that students enacted: a "curated self" and a "commodified…

  15. miRandola 2017: a curated knowledge base of non-invasive biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, Francesco; Di Bella, Sebastiano; Vannini, Federica

    2018-01-01

    databases. Data are manually curated from 314 articles that describe miRNAs, long non-coding RNAs and circular RNAs. Fourteen organisms are now included in the database, and associations of ncRNAs with 25 drugs, 47 sample types and 197 diseases. miRandola also classifies extracellular RNAs based...

  16. A theoretical and experimental study on solubility of curatives in rubbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, R.; Talma, Auke; Datta, Rabin; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The current study provides indications for improving the properties of dissimilar rubber blends. As solubility is a key factor for the distribution and a driving force for the migration of curatives in dissimilar rubber blends, it is of importance to have precise data of their solubilities. The

  17. The curative effect of a second curettage in persistent trophoblastic disease: a retrospective cohort survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trommel, N.E. van; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Verheijen, R.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Thomas, C.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the curative effect of a second curettage in patients with low-risk Persistent Trophoblastic Disease (PTD) after molar pregnancy. METHODS: A retrospective cohort survey was performed on 2122 patients registered with the Dutch Central Registry for Hydatidiform Moles between 1987

  18. Secondary Malignancy As A Manifestation Of Late Toxicity Of Curative Treatment For Testicular Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reckova, M.; Kakalejcik, M.; Beniak, J.; Boljesikova, E.

    2008-01-01

    The case presents the patient with a diagnosis of bladder carcinosarcoma. He was diagnosed 42 years after adjuvant middle abdominal and pelvic radiotherapy for testicular seminoma. We discuss the problem of late toxicity of oncology treatment in patients with potentially curative germ cell tumors of testes together with diagnosis and treatment of patients with bladder carcinoma and carcinosarcoma. (author)

  19. Anastomotic Leak Increases Distant Recurrence and Long-Term Mortality After Curative Resection for Colonic Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Peter-Martin; Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of anastomotic leak (AL) on disease recurrence and long-term mortality in patients alive 120 days after curative resection for colonic cancer. BACKGROUND: There is no solid data as to whether AL after colonic cancer surgery increases the risk of disease...

  20. From idol to art : African 'objects with power': a challenge for missionaries, anthropologists and museum curators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leyten, H.

    2015-01-01

    After his theological studies, Harrie Leyten (1935) worked as a missionary in Ghana for ten years. He studied social anthropology at Oxford University and became Africa curator of the Tropenmuseum in Amsterdam in 1975, and taught at the University of Amsterdam and the Reinwardt Academy in Amsterdam.

  1. The art of curation at a biological database: Principles and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah G. Odell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The variety and quantity of data being produced by biological research has grown dramatically in recent years, resulting in an expansion of our understanding of biological systems. However, this abundance of data has brought new challenges, especially in curation. The role of biocurators is in part to filter research outcomes as they are generated, not only so that information is formatted and consolidated into locations that can provide long-term data sustainability, but also to ensure that the relevant data that was captured is reliable, reusable, and accessible. In many ways, biocuration lies somewhere between an art and a science. At GrainGenes (https://wheat.pw.usda.gov;https://graingenes.org, a long-time, stably-funded centralized repository for data about wheat, barley, rye, oat, and other small grains, curators have implemented a workflow for locating, parsing, and uploading new data so that the most important, peer-reviewed, high-quality research is available to users as quickly as possible with rich links to past research outcomes. In this report, we illustrate the principles and practical considerations of curation that we follow at GrainGenes with three case studies for curating a gene, a quantitative trait locus (QTL, and genomic elements. These examples demonstrate how our work allows users, i.e., small grains geneticists and breeders, to harness high-quality small grains data at GrainGenes to help them develop plants with enhanced agronomic traits.

  2. Case Study: The Mystery of the Seven Deaths--A Case Study in Cellular Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazdik, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Cellular respiration, the central component of cellular metabolism, can be a difficult concept for many students to fully understand. In this interrupted, problem-based case study, students explore the purpose of cellular respiration as they play the role of medical examiner, analyzing autopsy evidence to determine the mysterious cause of death…

  3. Comparative analysis of four active compounds of Baikal skullcap and its classical TCM prescriptions according to different clinical curative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Wei Zhu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A sensitive HPLC-DAD detection method was established for the comparative analysis of the four active compounds (including baicalin, baicalein, wogonoside and wogonin of Baikal Skullcap and its classical TCM prescriptions according to different clinical curative effects. And analyze the relationship between compatibility of medicines, content and clinical curative effect.

  4. Somatic cancer variant curation and harmonization through consensus minimum variant level data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah I. Ritter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To truly achieve personalized medicine in oncology, it is critical to catalog and curate cancer sequence variants for their clinical relevance. The Somatic Working Group (WG of the Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen, in cooperation with ClinVar and multiple cancer variant curation stakeholders, has developed a consensus set of minimal variant level data (MVLD. MVLD is a framework of standardized data elements to curate cancer variants for clinical utility. With implementation of MVLD standards, and in a working partnership with ClinVar, we aim to streamline the somatic variant curation efforts in the community and reduce redundancy and time burden for the interpretation of cancer variants in clinical practice. Methods We developed MVLD through a consensus approach by i reviewing clinical actionability interpretations from institutions participating in the WG, ii conducting extensive literature search of clinical somatic interpretation schemas, and iii survey of cancer variant web portals. A forthcoming guideline on cancer variant interpretation, from the Association of Molecular Pathology (AMP, can be incorporated into MVLD. Results Along with harmonizing standardized terminology for allele interpretive and descriptive fields that are collected by many databases, the MVLD includes unique fields for cancer variants such as Biomarker Class, Therapeutic Context and Effect. In addition, MVLD includes recommendations for controlled semantics and ontologies. The Somatic WG is collaborating with ClinVar to evaluate MVLD use for somatic variant submissions. ClinVar is an open and centralized repository where sequencing laboratories can report summary-level variant data with clinical significance, and ClinVar accepts cancer variant data. Conclusions We expect the use of the MVLD to streamline clinical interpretation of cancer variants, enhance interoperability among multiple redundant curation efforts, and increase submission of

  5. Cellular image classification

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiang; Lin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces new techniques for cellular image feature extraction, pattern recognition and classification. The authors use the antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in patient serum as the subjects and the Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) technique as the imaging protocol to illustrate the applications of the described methods. Throughout the book, the authors provide evaluations for the proposed methods on two publicly available human epithelial (HEp-2) cell datasets: ICPR2012 dataset from the ICPR'12 HEp-2 cell classification contest and ICIP2013 training dataset from the ICIP'13 Competition on cells classification by fluorescent image analysis. First, the reading of imaging results is significantly influenced by one’s qualification and reading systems, causing high intra- and inter-laboratory variance. The authors present a low-order LP21 fiber mode for optical single cell manipulation and imaging staining patterns of HEp-2 cells. A focused four-lobed mode distribution is stable and effective in optical...

  6. Modeling and cellular studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Testing the applicability of mathematical models with carefully designed experiments is a powerful tool in the investigations of the effects of ionizing radiation on cells. The modeling and cellular studies complement each other, for modeling provides guidance for designing critical experiments which must provide definitive results, while the experiments themselves provide new input to the model. Based on previous experimental results the model for the accumulation of damage in Chlamydomonas reinhardi has been extended to include various multiple two-event combinations. Split dose survival experiments have shown that models tested to date predict most but not all the observed behavior. Stationary-phase mammalian cells, required for tests of other aspects of the model, have been shown to be at different points in the cell cycle depending on how they were forced to stop proliferating. These cultures also demonstrate different capacities for repair of sublethal radiation damage

  7. Discovering New Global Climate Patterns: Curating a 21-Year High Temporal (Hourly) and Spatial (40km) Resolution Reanalysis Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, C. Y.; Dattore, R.; Peng, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research's Global Climate Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (CFDDA) Hourly 40km Reanalysis dataset is a dynamically downscaled dataset with high temporal and spatial resolution. The dataset contains three-dimensional hourly analyses in netCDF format for the global atmospheric state from 1985 to 2005 on a 40km horizontal grid (0.4°grid increment) with 28 vertical levels, providing good representation of local forcing and diurnal variation of processes in the planetary boundary layer. This project aimed to make the dataset publicly available, accessible, and usable in order to provide a unique resource to allow and promote studies of new climate characteristics. When the curation project started, it had been five years since the data files were generated. Also, although the Principal Investigator (PI) had generated a user document at the end of the project in 2009, the document had not been maintained. Furthermore, the PI had moved to a new institution, and the remaining team members were reassigned to other projects. These factors made data curation in the areas of verifying data quality, harvest metadata descriptions, documenting provenance information especially challenging. As a result, the project's curation process found that: Data curator's skill and knowledge helped make decisions, such as file format and structure and workflow documentation, that had significant, positive impact on the ease of the dataset's management and long term preservation. Use of data curation tools, such as the Data Curation Profiles Toolkit's guidelines, revealed important information for promoting the data's usability and enhancing preservation planning. Involving data curators during each stage of the data curation life cycle instead of at the end could improve the curation process' efficiency. Overall, the project showed that proper resources invested in the curation process would give datasets the best chance to fulfill their potential to

  8. Cellular modeling of fault-tolerant multicomputers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, G

    1987-01-01

    Work described was concerned with a novel method for investigation of fault tolerance in large regular networks of computers. Motivation was to provide a technique useful in rapid evaluation of highly reliable systems that exploit the low cost and ease of volume production of simple microcomputer components. First, a system model and simulator based upon cellular automata are developed. This model is characterized by its simplicity and ease of modification when adapting to new types of network. Second, in order to test and verify the predictive capabilities of the cellular system, a more-detailed simulation is performed based upon an existing computational model, that of the Transputer. An example application is used to exercise various systems designed using the cellular model. Using this simulator, experimental results are obtained both for existing well-understood configurations and for more novel types also developed here. In all cases it was found that the cellular model and simulator successfully predicted the ranking in reliability improvement of the systems studied.

  9. Cellular thermosetting fluorodiepoxide polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheng Y. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Thermosetting fluoropolymer foams are made by mixing fluid form thermosetting fluoropolymer components having a substantial fluorine content, placing the mixture in a pressure tight chamber, filling the chamber with a gas, at relatively low pressure, that is unreactive with the fluoropolymer components, allowing the mixture to gel, removing the gelled fluoropolymer from the chamber and thereafter heating the fluoropolymer at a relatively low temperature to simultaneously sure and foam the fluoropolymer. The resulting fluoropolymer product is closed celled with the cells storing the gas employed for foaming. The fluoropolymer resins employed may be any thermosetting fluoropolymer including fluoroepoxies, fluoropolyurethanes and fluoroacrylates.

  10. Principal components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallin, M.; Hörmann, S.; Piegorsch, W.; El Shaarawi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Principal Components are probably the best known and most widely used of all multivariate analysis techniques. The essential idea consists in performing a linear transformation of the observed k-dimensional variables in such a way that the new variables are vectors of k mutually orthogonal

  11. Statistical mechanics of cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram, S.

    1983-01-01

    Cellular automata are used as simple mathematical models to investigate self-organization in statistical mechanics. A detailed analysis is given of ''elementary'' cellular automata consisting of a sequence of sites with values 0 or 1 on a line, with each site evolving deterministically in discrete time steps according to p definite rules involving the values of its nearest neighbors. With simple initial configurations, the cellular automata either tend to homogeneous states, or generate self-similar patterns with fractal dimensions approx. =1.59 or approx. =1.69. With ''random'' initial configurations, the irreversible character of the cellular automaton evolution leads to several self-organization phenomena. Statistical properties of the structures generated are found to lie in two universality classes, independent of the details of the initial state or the cellular automaton rules. More complicated cellular automata are briefly considered, and connections with dynamical systems theory and the formal theory of computation are discussed

  12. Outcomes of the 'Data Curation for Geobiology at Yellowstone National Park' Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomer, A.; Palmer, C. L.; Fouke, B. W.; Rodman, A.; Choudhury, G. S.; Baker, K. S.; Asangba, A. E.; Wickett, K.; DiLauro, T.; Varvel, V.

    2013-12-01

    The continuing proliferation of geological and biological data generated at scientifically significant sites (such as hot springs, coral reefs, volcanic fields and other unique, data-rich locales) has created a clear need for the curation and active management of these data. However, there has been little exploration of what these curation processes and policies would entail. To that end, the Site-Based Data Curation (SBDC) project is developing a framework of guidelines and processes for the curation of research data generated at scientifically significant sites. A workshop was held in April 2013 at Yellowstone National Park (YNP) to gather input from scientists and stakeholders. Workshop participants included nine researchers actively conducting geobiology research at YNP, and seven YNP representatives, including permitting staff and information professionals from the YNP research library and archive. Researchers came from a range of research areas -- geology, molecular and microbial biology, ecology, environmental engineering, and science education. Through group discussions, breakout sessions and hands-on activities, we sought to generate policy recommendations and curation guidelines for the collection, representation, sharing and quality control of geobiological datasets. We report on key themes that emerged from workshop discussions, including: - participants' broad conceptions of the long-term usefulness, reusability and value of data. - the benefits of aggregating site-specific data in general, and geobiological data in particular. - the importance of capturing a dataset's originating context, and the potential usefulness of photographs as a reliable and easy way of documenting context. - researchers' and resource managers' overlapping priorities with regards to 'big picture' data collection and management in the long-term. Overall, we found that workshop participants were enthusiastic and optimistic about future collaboration and development of community

  13. A Model of How Different Biology Experts Explain Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Caleb M.; Anderson, Trevor R.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing explanations is an essential skill for all science learners. The goal of this project was to model the key components of expert explanation of molecular and cellular mechanisms. As such, we asked: What is an appropriate model of the components of explanation used by biology experts to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms? Do…

  14. Cellular automata and statistical mechanical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rujan, P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors elaborate on the analogy between the transfer matrix of usual lattice models and the master equation describing the time development of cellular automata. Transient and stationary properties of probabilistic automata are linked to surface and bulk properties, respectively, of restricted statistical mechanical systems. It is demonstrated that methods of statistical physics can be successfully used to describe the dynamic and the stationary behavior of such automata. Some exact results are derived, including duality transformations, exact mappings, disorder, and linear solutions. Many examples are worked out in detail to demonstrate how to use statistical physics in order to construct cellular automata with desired properties. This approach is considered to be a first step toward the design of fully parallel, probabilistic systems whose computational abilities rely on the cooperative behavior of their components

  15. Programmed cellular response to ionizing radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, N.E.A.

    1998-01-01

    Three forms of radiation response were investigated to evaluate the hypothesis that cellular radiation response is the result of active molecular signaling and not simply a passive physicochemical process. The decision whether or not a cell should respond to radiation-induced damage either by induction of rescue systems, e.g. mobilization of repair proteins, or induction of suicide mechanisms, e.g. programmed cell death, appears to be the expression of intricate cellular biochemistry. A cell must recognize damage in its genetic material and then activate the appropriate responses. Cell type is important; the response of a fibroblast to radiation damage is both quantitatively and qualitatively different form that of a lymphocyte. The programmed component of radiation response is significant in radiation oncology and predicted to create unique opportunities for enhanced treatment success. (orig.)

  16. Cellular Particle Dynamics simulation of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Matthew; Kosztin, Ioan

    2013-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is a theoretical-computational-experimental framework for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems, such as fusion, sorting and compression. In CPD, cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through numerical integration of their equations of motion. Here we present CPD simulation results for the fusion of both spherical and cylindrical multi-cellular aggregates. First, we calibrate the relevant CPD model parameters for a given cell type by comparing the CPD simulation results for the fusion of two spherical aggregates to the corresponding experimental results. Next, CPD simulations are used to predict the time evolution of the fusion of cylindrical aggregates. The latter is relevant for the formation of tubular multi-cellular structures (i.e., primitive blood vessels) created by the novel bioprinting technology. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  17. The MIntAct project—IntAct as a common curation platform for 11 molecular interaction databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Sandra; Ammari, Mais; Aranda, Bruno; Breuza, Lionel; Briganti, Leonardo; Broackes-Carter, Fiona; Campbell, Nancy H.; Chavali, Gayatri; Chen, Carol; del-Toro, Noemi; Duesbury, Margaret; Dumousseau, Marine; Galeota, Eugenia; Hinz, Ursula; Iannuccelli, Marta; Jagannathan, Sruthi; Jimenez, Rafael; Khadake, Jyoti; Lagreid, Astrid; Licata, Luana; Lovering, Ruth C.; Meldal, Birgit; Melidoni, Anna N.; Milagros, Mila; Peluso, Daniele; Perfetto, Livia; Porras, Pablo; Raghunath, Arathi; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Roechert, Bernd; Stutz, Andre; Tognolli, Michael; van Roey, Kim; Cesareni, Gianni; Hermjakob, Henning

    2014-01-01

    IntAct (freely available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/intact) is an open-source, open data molecular interaction database populated by data either curated from the literature or from direct data depositions. IntAct has developed a sophisticated web-based curation tool, capable of supporting both IMEx- and MIMIx-level curation. This tool is now utilized by multiple additional curation teams, all of whom annotate data directly into the IntAct database. Members of the IntAct team supply appropriate levels of training, perform quality control on entries and take responsibility for long-term data maintenance. Recently, the MINT and IntAct databases decided to merge their separate efforts to make optimal use of limited developer resources and maximize the curation output. All data manually curated by the MINT curators have been moved into the IntAct database at EMBL-EBI and are merged with the existing IntAct dataset. Both IntAct and MINT are active contributors to the IMEx consortium (http://www.imexconsortium.org). PMID:24234451

  18. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets...

  19. Data Portal for the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) program: integrated access to diverse large-scale cellular perturbation response data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleti, Amar; Terryn, Raymond; Stathias, Vasileios; Chung, Caty; Cooper, Daniel J; Turner, John P; Vidović, Dušica; Forlin, Michele; Kelley, Tanya T; D’Urso, Alessandro; Allen, Bryce K; Torre, Denis; Jagodnik, Kathleen M; Wang, Lily; Jenkins, Sherry L; Mader, Christopher; Niu, Wen; Fazel, Mehdi; Mahi, Naim; Pilarczyk, Marcin; Clark, Nicholas; Shamsaei, Behrouz; Meller, Jarek; Vasiliauskas, Juozas; Reichard, John; Medvedovic, Mario; Ma’ayan, Avi; Pillai, Ajay

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) program is a national consortium funded by the NIH to generate a diverse and extensive reference library of cell-based perturbation-response signatures, along with novel data analytics tools to improve our understanding of human diseases at the systems level. In contrast to other large-scale data generation efforts, LINCS Data and Signature Generation Centers (DSGCs) employ a wide range of assay technologies cataloging diverse cellular responses. Integration of, and unified access to LINCS data has therefore been particularly challenging. The Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) LINCS Data Coordination and Integration Center (DCIC) has developed data standards specifications, data processing pipelines, and a suite of end-user software tools to integrate and annotate LINCS-generated data, to make LINCS signatures searchable and usable for different types of users. Here, we describe the LINCS Data Portal (LDP) (http://lincsportal.ccs.miami.edu/), a unified web interface to access datasets generated by the LINCS DSGCs, and its underlying database, LINCS Data Registry (LDR). LINCS data served on the LDP contains extensive metadata and curated annotations. We highlight the features of the LDP user interface that is designed to enable search, browsing, exploration, download and analysis of LINCS data and related curated content. PMID:29140462

  20. Cellular immune therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kater, Arnon P.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Although chemotherapy can induce complete responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), it is not considered curative. Treated patients generally develop recurrent disease requiring additional therapy, which can cause worsening immune dysfunction, myelosuppression, and selection for

  1. When a Patient Declines Curative Care: Management of a Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Lamba

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The management of major vascular emergencies in the emergency department (ED involves rapid, aggressive resuscitation followed by emergent definitive surgery. However, for some patients this traditional approach may not be consistent with their goals and values. We explore the appropriate way to determine best treatment practices when patients elect to forego curative care in the ED, while reviewing such a case. We present the case of a 72-year-old patient who presented to the ED with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, but refused surgery. We discuss the transition of the patient from a curative to a comfort care approach with appropriate direct referral to hospice from the ED. Using principles of autonomy, decision-making capacity, informed consent, prognostication, and goals-of-care, ED clinicians are best able to align their approach with patients’ goals and values. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:555–558.

  2. Results of adjuvant chemo radiation after curative surgery for gastric cancer. A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Bettina; Balbontin, Paulina; Trujillo, Cristian; Becerra, Sergio; Sola, Antonio; Neveu, Rodrigo; Fernandez, Roberto; Buchholtz, Martin; Villanueva, Luis; Cerda, Berta

    2009-01-01

    Background: Survival rates after curative surgery for gastric cancer are disappointing. Therefore adjuvant therapeutic strategies are required. Aim: To analyze survival and side effects of treatment among gastric cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after curative resection of gastric adenocarcinoma. Material and methods: Retrospective review of medical records of 74 patients aged 20 to 74 years, treated with complete resection of gastric adenocarcinoma followed by adjuvant chemo radiation. Survival analysis was based on the records and information from the National Mortality Registry. Results: Five years survival fluctuated from 50% among patients in stage 1B to 25% among those is stage IV. Significant acute toxicity was observed in 23 patients (31%). No patients died due to acute toxicity. Eleven patients (16.4%) developed significant late toxicity, with two possible deaths related to treatment. Conclusions: Postoperative chemoradiotherapy is feasible in our experience. Continuos infusion of 5- fluoruracil is recommended to reduce toxicity

  3. Curating Research: e-Merging New Roles and Responsibilities in the European Landscape (Conference Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Angevaare

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available On 17 April 2009 LIBER, the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (KB and the Netherlands Coalition for Digital Preservation (NCDD co-organised LIBER’s first workshop on digital curation/preservation, providing an introduction to the theme of digital curation and different perspectives on the roles research libraries can and/or must play in keeping the digital records of science safe for future generations. Speakers included Eileen Fenton (Portico, Dale Peters (DRIVER, Maria Heijne (TU Delft Library, Jeffrey van der Hoeven (KB, PARSE.insight and ninety workshop attendees. The paper includes the conference report and some results of the PARSE.insight online survey into digital preservation practices of LIBER libraries.

  4. Predicting prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma after curative surgery with common clinicopathologic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Ke; Sham, Pak C; Poon, Ronnie TP; Luk, John M; Lee, Nikki PY; Mao, Mao; Zhang, Chunsheng; Ferguson, Mark D; Lamb, John; Dai, Hongyue; Ng, Irene O

    2009-01-01

    Surgical resection is one important curative treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the prognosis following surgery differs substantially and such large variation is mainly unexplained. A review of the literature yields a number of clinicopathologic parameters associated with HCC prognosis. However, the results are not consistent due to lack of systemic approach to establish a prediction model incorporating all these parameters. We conducted a retrospective analysis on the common clinicopathologic parameters from a cohort of 572 ethnic Chinese HCC patients who received curative surgery. The cases were randomly divided into training (n = 272) and validation (n = 300) sets. Each parameter was individually tested and the significant parameters were entered into a linear classifier for model building, and the prediction accuracy was assessed in the validation set Our findings based on the training set data reveal 6 common clinicopathologic parameters (tumor size, number of tumor nodules, tumor stage, venous infiltration status, and serum α-fetoprotein and total albumin levels) that were significantly associated with the overall HCC survival and disease-free survival (time to recurrence). We next built a linear classifier model by multivariate Cox regression to predict prognostic outcomes of HCC patients after curative surgery This analysis detected a considerable fraction of variance in HCC prognosis and the area under the ROC curve was about 70%. We further evaluated the model using two other protocols; leave-one-out procedure (n = 264) and independent validation (n = 300). Both were found to have excellent prediction power. The predicted score could separate patients into distinct groups with respect to survival (p-value = 1.8e-12) and disease free survival (p-value = 3.2e-7). This described model will provide valuable guidance on prognosis after curative surgery for HCC in clinical practice. The adaptive nature allows easy accommodation for future new

  5. BELIEF dashboard - a web-based curation interface to support generation of BEL networks

    OpenAIRE

    Madan, Sumit; Hodapp, Sven; Fluck, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of network-based approaches in systems biology to achieve a better understanding of biological mechanisms has increased enormously. The Biological Expression Language (BEL) is well designed to collate findings from scientific literature into biological network models. To facilitate encoding and biocuration of such findings in BEL, a free and user-friendly web-based curation interface called BELIEF Dashboard has been developed. The interface incorporates an information extraction...

  6. Community Intelligence in Knowledge Curation: An Application to Managing Scientific Nomenclature

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Lin; Xu, Chao; Tian, Ming; Sang, Jian; Zou, Dong; Li, Ang; Liu, Guocheng; Chen, Fei; Wu, Jiayan; Xiao, Jingfa; Wang, Xumin; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing community intelligence in knowledge curation bears significant promise in dealing with communication and education in the flood of scientific knowledge. As knowledge is accumulated at ever-faster rates, scientific nomenclature, a particular kind of knowledge, is concurrently generated in all kinds of fields. Since nomenclature is a system of terms used to name things in a particular discipline, accurate translation of scientific nomenclature in different languages is of critical im...

  7. The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics' resources: focus on curated databases

    OpenAIRE

    Bultet, Lisandra Aguilar; Aguilar Rodriguez, Jose; Ahrens, Christian H; Ahrne, Erik Lennart; Ai, Ni; Aimo, Lucila; Akalin, Altuna; Aleksiev, Tyanko; Alocci, Davide; Altenhoff, Adrian; Alves, Isabel; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Pedone, Pascale Anderle; Angelina, Paolo; Anisimova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (www.isb-sib.ch) provides world-class bioinformatics databases, software tools, services and training to the international life science community in academia and industry. These solutions allow life scientists to turn the exponentially growing amount of data into knowledge. Here, we provide an overview of SIB's resources and competence areas, with a strong focus on curated databases and SIB's most popular and widely used resources. In particular, SIB'...

  8. Estimating the annotation error rate of curated GO database sequence annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Alfred L

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annotations that describe the function of sequences are enormously important to researchers during laboratory investigations and when making computational inferences. However, there has been little investigation into the data quality of sequence function annotations. Here we have developed a new method of estimating the error rate of curated sequence annotations, and applied this to the Gene Ontology (GO sequence database (GOSeqLite. This method involved artificially adding errors to sequence annotations at known rates, and used regression to model the impact on the precision of annotations based on BLAST matched sequences. Results We estimated the error rate of curated GO sequence annotations in the GOSeqLite database (March 2006 at between 28% and 30%. Annotations made without use of sequence similarity based methods (non-ISS had an estimated error rate of between 13% and 18%. Annotations made with the use of sequence similarity methodology (ISS had an estimated error rate of 49%. Conclusion While the overall error rate is reasonably low, it would be prudent to treat all ISS annotations with caution. Electronic annotators that use ISS annotations as the basis of predictions are likely to have higher false prediction rates, and for this reason designers of these systems should consider avoiding ISS annotations where possible. Electronic annotators that use ISS annotations to make predictions should be viewed sceptically. We recommend that curators thoroughly review ISS annotations before accepting them as valid. Overall, users of curated sequence annotations from the GO database should feel assured that they are using a comparatively high quality source of information.

  9. A curated database of cyanobacterial strains relevant for modern taxonomy and phylogenetic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Vitor; Morais, Jo?o; Vasconcelos, Vitor M.

    2017-01-01

    The dataset herein described lays the groundwork for an online database of relevant cyanobacterial strains, named CyanoType (http://lege.ciimar.up.pt/cyanotype). It is a database that includes categorized cyanobacterial strains useful for taxonomic, phylogenetic or genomic purposes, with associated information obtained by means of a literature-based curation. The dataset lists 371 strains and represents the first version of the database (CyanoType v.1). Information for each strain includes st...

  10. Curative Treatment of Severe Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections by a New Class of Antibiotics Targeting LpxC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Lemaître

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The infectious diseases caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria pose serious threats to humankind. It has been suggested that an antibiotic targeting LpxC of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria is a promising strategy for curing Gram-negative bacterial infections. However, experimental proof of this concept is lacking. Here, we describe our discovery and characterization of a biphenylacetylene-based inhibitor of LpxC, an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of the lipid A component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The compound LPC-069 has no known adverse effects in mice and is effective in vitro against a broad panel of Gram-negative clinical isolates, including several multiresistant and extremely drug-resistant strains involved in nosocomial infections. Furthermore, LPC-069 is curative in a murine model of one of the most severe human diseases, bubonic plague, which is caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis. Our results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of LpxC inhibitors as a new class of antibiotic against fatal infections caused by extremely virulent pathogens. The present findings also highlight the potential of LpxC inhibitors for clinical development as therapeutics for infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  11. Distribution and utilization of curative primary healthcare services in Lahej, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawazir, A A; Bin Hawail, T S; Al-Sakkaf, K A Z; Basaleem, H O; Muhraz, A F; Al-Shehri, A M

    2013-09-01

    No evidence-based data exist on the availability, accessibility and utilization of healthcare services in Lahej Governorate, Yemen. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution and utilization of curative services in primary healthcare units and centres in Lahej. Cross-sectional study (clustering sample). This study was conducted in three of the 15 districts in Lahej between December 2009 and August 2010. Household members were interviewed using a questionnaire to determine sociodemographic characteristics and types of healthcare services available in the area. The distribution of health centres, health units and hospitals did not match the size of the populations or areas of the districts included in this study. Geographical accessibility was the main obstacle to utilization. Factors associated with the utilization of curative services were significantly related to the time required to reach the nearest facility, seeking curative services during illness and awareness of the availability of health facilities (P < 0.01). There is an urgent need to look critically and scientifically at the distribution of healthcare services in the region in order to ensure accessibility and quality of services. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Two Cases of Curative Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Noboru; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Kuboki, Satoshi; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Kato, Atsushi; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Reports of conversion in cases of locally advanced colorectal cancer have been increasing. Here, we present 2 cases in which curative resection of locally advanced rectal cancer accompanied by intestinal obstruction was achieved after establishing a stoma and administering chemotherapy. The first case was of a 46-year-old male patient diagnosed with upper rectal cancer and intestinal obstruction. Because of a high level of retroperitoneal invasion, after establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 13 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Around 6 months after the initial surgery, low anterior resection for rectal cancer and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Fourteen days after curative resection, the patient was discharged from the hospital. The second case was of a 66-year-old male patient with a circumferential tumor extending from Rs to R, accompanied by right ureter infiltration and sub-intestinal obstruction. After establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 11 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Five months after the initial surgery, anterior resection of the rectum and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Twenty days after curative resection, the patient was released from the hospital. No recurrences have been detected in either case.

  13. Data Albums: An Event Driven Search, Aggregation and Curation Tool for Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Kulkarni, Ajinkya; Maskey, Manil; Bakare, Rohan; Basyal, Sabin; Li, Xiang; Flynn, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Approaches used in Earth science research such as case study analysis and climatology studies involve discovering and gathering diverse data sets and information to support the research goals. To gather relevant data and information for case studies and climatology analysis is both tedious and time consuming. Current Earth science data systems are designed with the assumption that researchers access data primarily by instrument or geophysical parameter. In cases where researchers are interested in studying a significant event, they have to manually assemble a variety of datasets relevant to it by searching the different distributed data systems. This paper presents a specialized search, aggregation and curation tool for Earth science to address these challenges. The search rool automatically creates curated 'Data Albums', aggregated collections of information related to a specific event, containing links to relevant data files [granules] from different instruments, tools and services for visualization and analysis, and information about the event contained in news reports, images or videos to supplement research analysis. Curation in the tool is driven via an ontology based relevancy ranking algorithm to filter out non relevant information and data.

  14. A comparative study to analyze the cost of curative care at primary health center in Ahmedabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur Neeta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the unit cost of curative care provided at Primary Health Centers (PHCs and to examine the variation in unit cost in different PHCs. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out in three PHCs of Ahmedabad district namely Sanathal, Nandej, and Uperdal, between 1 April, 2006 and 31 March, 2007. For estimating the cost of a health program, information on all the physical and human resources that were basic inputs to the PHC services were collected and grouped into two categories, non-recurrent (capital resources vehicles, buildings, etc. and recurrent resources (salaries, drugs, vaccines, contraceptives, maintenance, etc.. To generate the required data, two types of schedules were developed, daily time schedule and PHC/SC (Subcenter information schedule. Results: The unit cost of curative care was lowest (Rs. 29.43 for the Sanathal PHC and highest (Rs. 88.26 for the Uperdal PHC, followed by the Nandej PHC with Rs. 40.88, implying severe underutilization of curative care at the Uperdal PHC. Conclusions: Location of health facilities is a problem at many places. As relocation is not possible or even feasible, strengthening of infrastructure and facilities at these centers can be taken up immediately.

  15. Stop the Bleeding: the Development of a Tool to Streamline NASA Earth Science Metadata Curation Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, J.; Baker, A.; Caltagirone, S.; Bugbee, K.

    2017-12-01

    The Common Metadata Repository (CMR) is a high-performance, high-quality repository for Earth science metadata records, and serves as the primary way to search NASA's growing 17.5 petabytes of Earth science data holdings. Released in 2015, CMR has the capability to support several different metadata standards already being utilized by NASA's combined network of Earth science data providers, or Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs). The Analysis and Review of CMR (ARC) Team located at Marshall Space Flight Center is working to improve the quality of records already in CMR with the goal of making records optimal for search and discovery. This effort entails a combination of automated and manual review, where each NASA record in CMR is checked for completeness, accuracy, and consistency. This effort is highly collaborative in nature, requiring communication and transparency of findings amongst NASA personnel, DAACs, the CMR team and other metadata curation teams. Through the evolution of this project it has become apparent that there is a need to document and report findings, as well as track metadata improvements in a more efficient manner. The ARC team has collaborated with Element 84 in order to develop a metadata curation tool to meet these needs. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of this metadata curation tool and its current capabilities. Challenges and future plans for the tool will also be discussed.

  16. 3DSwap: Curated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping

    KAUST Repository

    Shameer, Khader

    2011-09-29

    Three-dimensional domain swapping is a unique protein structural phenomenon where two or more protein chains in a protein oligomer share a common structural segment between individual chains. This phenomenon is observed in an array of protein structures in oligomeric conformation. Protein structures in swapped conformations perform diverse functional roles and are also associated with deposition diseases in humans. We have performed in-depth literature curation and structural bioinformatics analyses to develop an integrated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping. The hallmark of 3D domain swapping is the presence of distinct structural segments such as the hinge and swapped regions. We have curated the literature to delineate the boundaries of these regions. In addition, we have defined several new concepts like \\'secondary major interface\\' to represent the interface properties arising as a result of 3D domain swapping, and a new quantitative measure for the \\'extent of swapping\\' in structures. The catalog of proteins reported in 3DSwap knowledgebase has been generated using an integrated structural bioinformatics workflow of database searches, literature curation, by structure visualization and sequence-structure-function analyses. The current version of the 3DSwap knowledgebase reports 293 protein structures, the analysis of such a compendium of protein structures will further the understanding molecular factors driving 3D domain swapping. The Author(s) 2011.

  17. Curative effects of small incision cataract surgery versus phacoemulsification: a Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jian Yang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the curative efficacy of small incision cataract surgery(SICSversus phacoemulsification(Phaco.METHODS: A computerized literature search was carried out in Chinese Biomedical Database(CBM, Wanfang Data, VIP and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure(CNKIto collect articles published between 1989-2013 concerning the curative efficacy of SICS versus Phaco. The studies were assessed in terms of clinical case-control criteria. Meta-analysis were performed to assess the visual acuity, the complications rates between SICS and Phaco 90 days after surgery. Treatment effects were measured as risk difference(RDbetween SICS and Phaco. Fixed and random effect models were employed to combine results after a heterogeneity test. RESULTS:A total of 8 studies were included in our Meta-analysis. At 90 days postoperative time, there were no significant differences between the two groups at the visual acuity >0.5(P=0.14; and no significant differences on the complications rates of corneal astigmatism, corneal edema, posterior capsular rupture and anterior iris reaction(P>0.05.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that there is no different on the curative effects of SICS and Phaco for cataract.

  18. Curative Treatment of Severe Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections by a New Class of Antibiotics Targeting LpxC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaître, Nadine; Liang, Xiaofei; Najeeb, Javaria; Lee, Chul-Jin; Titecat, Marie; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Simonet, Michel; Toone, Eric J; Zhou, Pei; Sebbane, Florent

    2017-07-25

    The infectious diseases caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria pose serious threats to humankind. It has been suggested that an antibiotic targeting LpxC of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria is a promising strategy for curing Gram-negative bacterial infections. However, experimental proof of this concept is lacking. Here, we describe our discovery and characterization of a biphenylacetylene-based inhibitor of LpxC, an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of the lipid A component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The compound LPC-069 has no known adverse effects in mice and is effective in vitro against a broad panel of Gram-negative clinical isolates, including several multiresistant and extremely drug-resistant strains involved in nosocomial infections. Furthermore, LPC-069 is curative in a murine model of one of the most severe human diseases, bubonic plague, which is caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis Our results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of LpxC inhibitors as a new class of antibiotic against fatal infections caused by extremely virulent pathogens. The present findings also highlight the potential of LpxC inhibitors for clinical development as therapeutics for infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. IMPORTANCE The rapid spread of antimicrobial resistance among Gram-negative bacilli highlights the urgent need for new antibiotics. Here, we describe a new class of antibiotics lacking cross-resistance with conventional antibiotics. The compounds inhibit LpxC, a key enzyme in the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria, and are active in vitro against a broad panel of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacilli involved in nosocomial and community infections. The present study also constitutes the first demonstration of the curative treatment of bubonic plague by a novel, broad-spectrum antibiotic targeting LpxC. Hence, the data highlight the therapeutic potential of Lpx

  19. Curative Treatment of Severe Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections by a New Class of Antibiotics Targeting LpxC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaître, Nadine; Liang, Xiaofei; Najeeb, Javaria; Lee, Chul-Jin; Titecat, Marie; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Simonet, Michel; Toone, Eric J.; Zhou, Pei; Sebbane, Florent; Nacy, Carol A.

    2017-07-25

    ABSTRACT

    The infectious diseases caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria pose serious threats to humankind. It has been suggested that an antibiotic targeting LpxC of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria is a promising strategy for curing Gram-negative bacterial infections. However, experimental proof of this concept is lacking. Here, we describe our discovery and characterization of a biphenylacetylene-based inhibitor of LpxC, an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of the lipid A component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The compound LPC-069 has no known adverse effects in mice and is effectivein vitroagainst a broad panel of Gram-negative clinical isolates, including several multiresistant and extremely drug-resistant strains involved in nosocomial infections. Furthermore, LPC-069 is curative in a murine model of one of the most severe human diseases, bubonic plague, which is caused by the Gram-negative bacteriumYersinia pestis. Our results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of LpxC inhibitors as a new class of antibiotic against fatal infections caused by extremely virulent pathogens. The present findings also highlight the potential of LpxC inhibitors for clinical development as therapeutics for infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    IMPORTANCEThe rapid spread of antimicrobial resistance among Gram-negative bacilli highlights the urgent need for new antibiotics. Here, we describe a new class of antibiotics lacking cross-resistance with conventional antibiotics. The compounds inhibit LpxC, a key enzyme in the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria, and are activein vitroagainst a broad panel of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacilli involved in nosocomial and community infections. The present study also constitutes the first demonstration of the curative treatment of bubonic plague by a novel, broad

  20. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  1. Cellular automata analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hadeler, Karl-Peter

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on a coherent representation of the main approaches to analyze the dynamics of cellular automata. Cellular automata are an inevitable tool in mathematical modeling. In contrast to classical modeling approaches as partial differential equations, cellular automata are straightforward to simulate but hard to analyze. In this book we present a review of approaches and theories that allow the reader to understand the behavior of cellular automata beyond simulations. The first part consists of an introduction of cellular automata on Cayley graphs, and their characterization via the fundamental Cutis-Hedlund-Lyndon theorems in the context of different topological concepts (Cantor, Besicovitch and Weyl topology). The second part focuses on classification results: What classification follows from topological concepts (Hurley classification), Lyapunov stability (Gilman classification), and the theory of formal languages and grammars (Kůrka classification). These classifications suggest to cluster cel...

  2. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  3. Level Set Structure of an Integrable Cellular Automaton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichiro Takagi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on a group theoretical setting a sort of discrete dynamical system is constructed and applied to a combinatorial dynamical system defined on the set of certain Bethe ansatz related objects known as the rigged configurations. This system is then used to study a one-dimensional periodic cellular automaton related to discrete Toda lattice. It is shown for the first time that the level set of this cellular automaton is decomposed into connected components and every such component is a torus.

  4. Cellular fatty acids and aldehydes of oral Eubacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, U; Sato, M; Tsuchiya, H; Namikawa, I

    1995-02-01

    The cellular fatty acids and aldehydes of oral Eubacterium species were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. E. brachy and E. lentum contained mainly branched-chain fatty acids, whereas the others contained straight-chain acids. E. brachy, E. lentum, E. yurii ssp. yurii, E. yurii spp. margaretiae, E. limosum, E. plauti and E. aerofaciens also contained aldehydes with even carbon numbers. In addition to species-specific components, the compositional ratios of fatty acids and aldehydes characterized each individual species. The 10 species tested were divided into 5 groups by the principal component analysis. Cellular fatty acids and aldehydes would be chemical markers for interspecies differentiation of oral Eubacterium.

  5. Programmable cellular arrays. Faults testing and correcting in cellular arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cercel, L.

    1978-03-01

    A review of some recent researches about programmable cellular arrays in computing and digital processing of information systems is presented, and includes both combinational and sequential arrays, with full arbitrary behaviour, or which can realize better implementations of specialized blocks as: arithmetic units, counters, comparators, control systems, memory blocks, etc. Also, the paper presents applications of cellular arrays in microprogramming, in implementing of a specialized computer for matrix operations, in modeling of universal computing systems. The last section deals with problems of fault testing and correcting in cellular arrays. (author)

  6. Viable Cancer Cells in the Remnant Stomach are a Potential Source of Peritoneal Metastasis after Curative Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kaida, Sachiko; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Kodama, Hirokazu; Takebayashi, Katsushi; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Miyake, Toru; Tani, Tohru; Kushima, Ryoji; Tani, Masaji

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying peritoneal metastasis (PM) after curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC) are not well elucidated. This study assessed whether viable cancer cells, including cancer stemlike cells (CSCs), were present in the remnant stomach immediately before gastrointestinal (GI) tract reconstruction because these could be a source of PM after gastrectomy. Saline fluid used for remnant stomach lumen irrigation before GI reconstruction was prospectively collected from 142 consecutive patients undergoing distal gastrectomy for GC and cytologically examined. Proliferative activity (Ki67 staining) and stemness (expression of the CSC surface markers CD44s or CD44v6) were evaluated in detected cancer cells. Viable cancer cells were detected in 33 (23.2 %) of the 142 remnant stomachs. These cells formed clusters and stained positively for Ki67, indicating proliferation. Cancer cells in remnant stomachs and surface cancer cells in primary GCs from 10 (30.3 %) of these 33 cases also stained positively for CD44s or CD44v6. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, advanced cancer (odds ratio [OR], 4.65; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.32-16.4; P = 0.017), tumor size of 40 mm or larger (OR, 3.78; 95 % CI, 1.12-12.8; P = 0.033), and histologic differentiation (OR, 3.10; 95 % CI, 1.30-7.40; P = 0.011) were associated independently with the presence of cancer cells in the remnant stomach. Viable, proliferative, and clustered cancer cells, including CSCs, were found in remnant gastric lumens immediately before GI reconstruction, indicating a possible cellular source of PM after curative gastrectomy for GC. Dissemination of gastric contents into the peritoneal cavity should be avoided during GI reconstruction.

  7. The importance of community building for establishing data management and curation practices for physical samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdeen, S.; Hangsterfer, A.; Stanley, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    There is growing enthusiasm for curation of physical samples in the Earth Science community (see sessions at AGU, GSA, ESIP). Multiple federally funded efforts aim to develop best practices for curation of physical samples; however, these efforts have not yet been consolidated. Harmonizing these concurrent efforts would enable the community as a whole to build the necessary tools and community standards to move forward together. Preliminary research indicate the various groups focused on this topic are working in isolation, and the development of standards needs to come from the broadest view of `community'. We will investigate the gaps between communities by collecting information about preservation policies and practices from curators, who can provide a diverse cross-section of the grand challenges to the overall community. We will look at existing reports and study results to identify example cases, then develop a survey to gather large scale data to reinforce or clarify the example cases. We will be targeting the various community groups which are working on similar issues, and use the survey to improve the visibility of developed best practices. Given that preservation and digital collection management for physical samples are both important and difficult at present (GMRWG, 2015; NRC, 2002), barriers to both need to be addressed in order to achieve open science goals for the entire community. To address these challenges, EarthCube's iSamples, a research coordination network established to advance discoverability, access, and curation of physical samples using cyberinfrastructure, has formed a working group to collect use cases to examine the breadth of earth scientists' work with physical samples. This research team includes curators of state survey and oceanographic geological collections, and a researcher from information science. In our presentation, we will share our research and the design of the proposed survey. Our goal is to engage the audience in a

  8. Digital Management and Curation of the National Rock and Ore Collections at NMNH, Smithsonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, E.; Andrews, B.; Sorensen, S. S.; Hale, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    The National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, is home to the world's largest curated rock collection. The collection houses 160,680 physical rock and ore specimen lots ("samples"), all of which already have a digital record that can be accessed by the public through a searchable web interface (http://collections.mnh.si.edu/search/ms/). In addition, there are 66 accessions pending that when catalogued will add approximately 60,000 specimen lots. NMNH's collections are digitally managed on the KE EMu° platform which has emerged as the premier system for managing collections in natural history museums worldwide. In 2010 the Smithsonian released an ambitious 5 year Digitization Strategic Plan. In Mineral Sciences, new digitization efforts in the next five years will focus on integrating various digital resources for volcanic specimens. EMu sample records will link to the corresponding records for physical eruption information housed within the database of Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program (GVP). Linkages are also planned between our digital records and geochemical databases (like EarthChem or PetDB) maintained by third parties. We anticipate that these linkages will increase the use of NMNH collections as well as engender new scholarly directions for research. Another large project the museum is currently undertaking involves the integration of the functionality of in-house designed Transaction Management software with the EMu database. This will allow access to the details (borrower, quantity, date, and purpose) of all loans of a given specimen through its catalogue record. We hope this will enable cross-referencing and fertilization of research ideas while avoiding duplicate efforts. While these digitization efforts are critical, we propose that the greatest challenge to sample curation is not posed by digitization and that a global sample registry alone will not ensure that samples are available for reuse. We suggest instead that the ability

  9. Advancing Site-Based Data Curation for Geobiology: The Yellowstone Exemplar (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, C. L.; Fouke, B. W.; Rodman, A.; Choudhury, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    While advances in the management and archiving of scientific digital data are proceeding apace, there is an urgent need for data curation services to collect and provide access to high-value data fit for reuse. The Site-Based Data Curation (SBDC) project is establishing a framework of guidelines and processes for the curation of research data generated at scientifically significant sites. The project is a collaboration among information scientists, geobiologists, data archiving experts, and resource managers at Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Based on our previous work with the Data Conservancy on indicators of value for research data, several factors made YNP an optimal site for developing the SBDC framework, including unique environmental conditions, a permitting process for data collection, and opportunities for geo-located longitudinal data and multiple data sources for triangulation and context. Stakeholder analysis is informing the SBDC requirements, through engagement with geologists, geochemists, and microbiologists conducting research at YNP and personnel from the Yellowstone Center for Resources and other YNP units. To date, results include data value indicators specific to site-based research, minimum and optimal parameters for data description and metadata, and a strategy for organizing data around sampling events. New value indicators identified by the scientists include ease of access to park locations for verification and correction of data, and stable environmental conditions important for controlling variables. Researchers see high potential for data aggregated from the many individual investigators conducting permitted research at YNP, however reuse is clearly contingent on detailed and consistent sampling records. Major applications of SBDC include identifying connections in dynamic systems, spatial temporal synthesis, analyzing variability within and across geological features, tracking site evolution, assessing anomalies, and greater awareness

  10. A predictive model for swallowing dysfunction after curative radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langendijk, Johannes A.; Doornaert, Patricia; Rietveld, Derek H.F.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Rene Leemans, C.; Slotman, Ben J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, we found that swallowing dysfunction after curative (chemo) radiation (CH) RT has a strong negative impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), even more than xerostomia. The purpose of this study was to design a predictive model for swallowing dysfunction after curative radiotherapy or chemoradiation. Materials and methods: A prospective study was performed including 529 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with curative (CH) RT. In all patients, acute and late radiation-induced morbidity (RTOG Acute and Late Morbidity Scoring System) was scored prospectively. To design the model univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out with grade 2 or higher RTOG swallowing dysfunction at 6 months as the primary (SWALL 6months ) endpoint. The model was validated by comparing the predicted and observed complication rates and by testing if the model also predicted acute dysphagia and late dysphagia at later time points (12, 18 and 24 months). Results: After univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses, the following factors turned out to be independent prognostic factors for SWALL 6months : T3-T4, bilateral neck irradiation, weight loss prior to radiation, oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal tumours, accelerated radiotherapy and concomitant chemoradiation. By summation of the regression coefficients derived from the multivariate model, the Total Dysphagia Risk Score (TDRS) could be calculated. In the logistic regression model, the TDRS was significantly associated with SWALL 6months ((p 6months was 5%, 24% and 46% in case of low-, intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively. These observed percentages were within the 95% confidence intervals of the predicted values. The TDRS risk group classification was also significantly associated with acute dysphagia (P < 0.001 at all time points) and with late swallowing dysfunction at 12, 18 and 24 months (p < 0.001 at all time points

  11. Curative resection for locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer using neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX plus panitumumab: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Tomizawa

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of a successful curative resection in a patient with initially unresectable, locally advanced colorectal cancer who was treated with FOLFOX4 combined with panitumumab.

  12. Archive of Geosample Information from the Geological Survey of Canada Atlantic (GSC A) Marine Geoscience Curation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Geological Survey of Canada Atlantic (GSC A) Marine Geoscience Curation Facility contributed information on 40,428 cores, grabs, and dredges in their holdings to...

  13. Text mining effectively scores and ranks the literature for improving chemical-gene-disease curation at the comparative toxicogenomics database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Peter Davis

    Full Text Available The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/ is a public resource that curates interactions between environmental chemicals and gene products, and their relationships to diseases, as a means of understanding the effects of environmental chemicals on human health. CTD provides a triad of core information in the form of chemical-gene, chemical-disease, and gene-disease interactions that are manually curated from scientific articles. To increase the efficiency, productivity, and data coverage of manual curation, we have leveraged text mining to help rank and prioritize the triaged literature. Here, we describe our text-mining process that computes and assigns each article a document relevancy score (DRS, wherein a high DRS suggests that an article is more likely to be relevant for curation at CTD. We evaluated our process by first text mining a corpus of 14,904 articles triaged for seven heavy metals (cadmium, cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, and nickel. Based upon initial analysis, a representative subset corpus of 3,583 articles was then selected from the 14,094 articles and sent to five CTD biocurators for review. The resulting curation of these 3,583 articles was analyzed for a variety of parameters, including article relevancy, novel data content, interaction yield rate, mean average precision, and biological and toxicological interpretability. We show that for all measured parameters, the DRS is an effective indicator for scoring and improving the ranking of literature for the curation of chemical-gene-disease information at CTD. Here, we demonstrate how fully incorporating text mining-based DRS scoring into our curation pipeline enhances manual curation by prioritizing more relevant articles, thereby increasing data content, productivity, and efficiency.

  14. Text Mining Effectively Scores and Ranks the Literature for Improving Chemical-Gene-Disease Curation at the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robin J.; Lay, Jean M.; Lennon-Hopkins, Kelley; Saraceni-Richards, Cynthia; Sciaky, Daniela; Murphy, Cynthia Grondin; Mattingly, Carolyn J.

    2013-01-01

    The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) is a public resource that curates interactions between environmental chemicals and gene products, and their relationships to diseases, as a means of understanding the effects of environmental chemicals on human health. CTD provides a triad of core information in the form of chemical-gene, chemical-disease, and gene-disease interactions that are manually curated from scientific articles. To increase the efficiency, productivity, and data coverage of manual curation, we have leveraged text mining to help rank and prioritize the triaged literature. Here, we describe our text-mining process that computes and assigns each article a document relevancy score (DRS), wherein a high DRS suggests that an article is more likely to be relevant for curation at CTD. We evaluated our process by first text mining a corpus of 14,904 articles triaged for seven heavy metals (cadmium, cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, and nickel). Based upon initial analysis, a representative subset corpus of 3,583 articles was then selected from the 14,094 articles and sent to five CTD biocurators for review. The resulting curation of these 3,583 articles was analyzed for a variety of parameters, including article relevancy, novel data content, interaction yield rate, mean average precision, and biological and toxicological interpretability. We show that for all measured parameters, the DRS is an effective indicator for scoring and improving the ranking of literature for the curation of chemical-gene-disease information at CTD. Here, we demonstrate how fully incorporating text mining-based DRS scoring into our curation pipeline enhances manual curation by prioritizing more relevant articles, thereby increasing data content, productivity, and efficiency. PMID:23613709

  15. Strict follow-up programme including CT and (18) F-FDG-PET after curative surgery for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N F; Jensen, A B; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2010-01-01

    Aim The risk of local recurrence following curative surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) is up to 50%. A rigorous follow-up program may increase survival. Guidelines on suitable methods for scheduled follow up examinations are needed. This study evaluates a strict follow-up program including...... supported a strict follow-up program following curative surgery for colorectal cancer. FDG-PET combined with CT should be included in control programs....

  16. Top-down cellular pyramids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, A Y; Rosenfeld, A

    1983-10-01

    A cellular pyramid is an exponentially tapering stack of arrays of processors (cells), where each cell is connected to its neighbors (siblings) on its own level, to a parent on the level above, and to its children on the level below. It is shown that in some situations, if information flows top-down only, from fathers to sons, then a cellular pyramid may be no faster than a one-level cellular array; but it may be possible to use simpler cells in the pyramid case. 23 references.

  17. Three-component homeostasis control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Hong, Hyunsuk; Jo, Junghyo

    2014-03-01

    Two reciprocal components seem to be sufficient to maintain a control variable constant. However, pancreatic islets adapt three components to control glucose homeostasis. They are α (secreting glucagon), β (insulin), and δ (somatostatin) cells. Glucagon and insulin are the reciprocal hormones for increasing and decreasing blood glucose levels, while the role of somatostatin is unknown. However, it has been known how each hormone affects other cell types. Based on the pulsatile hormone secretion and the cellular interactions, this system can be described as coupled oscillators. In particular, we used the Landau-Stuart model to consider both amplitudes and phases of hormone oscillations. We found that the presence of the third component, δ cell, was effective to resist under glucose perturbations, and to quickly return to the normal glucose level once perturbed. Our analysis suggested that three components are necessary for advanced homeostasis control.

  18. Taming the sphinx: Mechanisms of cellular sphingolipid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D K; Fröhlich, F; Farese, R V; Walther, T C

    2016-08-01

    Sphingolipids are important structural membrane components of eukaryotic cells, and potent signaling molecules. As such, their levels must be maintained to optimize cellular functions in different cellular membranes. Here, we review the current knowledge of homeostatic sphingolipid regulation. We describe recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have provided insights into how cells sense changes in sphingolipid levels in the plasma membrane and acutely regulate sphingolipid biosynthesis by altering signaling pathways. We also discuss how cellular trafficking has emerged as an important determinant of sphingolipid homeostasis. Finally, we highlight areas where work is still needed to elucidate the mechanisms of sphingolipid regulation and the physiological functions of such regulatory networks, especially in mammalian cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Cellular senescence and organismal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyapalan, Jessie C; Sedivy, John M

    2008-01-01

    Cellular senescence, first observed and defined using in vitro cell culture studies, is an irreversible cell cycle arrest which can be triggered by a variety of factors. Emerging evidence suggests that cellular senescence acts as an in vivo tumor suppression mechanism by limiting aberrant proliferation. It has also been postulated that cellular senescence can occur independently of cancer and contribute to the physiological processes of normal organismal aging. Recent data have demonstrated the in vivo accumulation of senescent cells with advancing age. Some characteristics of senescent cells, such as the ability to modify their extracellular environment, could play a role in aging and age-related pathology. In this review, we examine current evidence that links cellular senescence and organismal aging.

  20. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Tachi, Tomohiro; Calisch, Sam; Miura, Koryo

    2014-01-01

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis. (paper)

  1. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kenneth C.; Tachi, Tomohiro; Calisch, Sam; Miura, Koryo

    2014-09-01

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis.

  2. Cellular Angiofibroma of the Nasopharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Zülküf Burak; Yener, Haydar Murat; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Karaaltin, Ayşegül Batioğlu; Inan, Hakki Caner; Alaskarov, Elvin; Gozen, Emine Deniz

    2017-11-01

    Angiofibroma is a common tumor of the nasopharynx region but cellular type is extremely rare in head and neck. A 13-year-old boy presented with frequent epistaxis and nasal obstruction persisting for 6 months. According to the clinical symptoms and imaging studies juvenile angiofibroma was suspected. Following angiographic embolization total excision of the lesion by midfacial degloving approach was performed. Histological examination revealed that the tumor consisted of staghorn blood vessels and irregular fibrous stroma. Stellate fibroblasts with small pyknotic to large vesicular nuclei were seen in a highly cellular stroma. These findings identified cellular angiofibroma mimicking juvenile angiofibroma. This article is about a very rare patient of cellular angiofibroma of nasopharynx.

  3. Technology Development and Advanced Planning for Curation of Returned Mars Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, David J.; Allen, Carlton C.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) curates extraterrestrial samples, providing the international science community with lunar rock and soil returned by the Apollo astronauts, meteorites collected in Antarctica, cosmic dust collected in the stratosphere, and hardware exposed to the space environment. Curation comprises initial characterization of new samples, preparation and allocation of samples for research, and clean, secure long-term storage. The foundations of this effort are the specialized cleanrooms (class 10 to 10,000) for each of the four types of materials, the supporting facilities, and the people, many of whom have been doing detailed work in clean environments for decades. JSC is also preparing to curate the next generation of extraterrestrial samples. These include samples collected from the solar wind, a comet, and an asteroid. Early planning and R\\&D are underway to support post-mission sample handling and curation of samples returned from Mars. One of the strong scientific reasons for returning samples from Mars is to search for evidence of current or past life in the samples. Because of the remote possibility that the samples may contain life forms that are hazardous to the terrestrial biosphere, the National Research Council has recommended that all samples returned from Mars be kept under strict biological containment until tests show that they can safely be released to other laboratories. It is possible that Mars samples may contain only scarce or subtle traces of life or prebiotic chemistry that could readily be overwhelmed by terrestrial contamination . Thus, the facilities used to contain, process, and analyze samples from Mars must have a combination of high-level biocontainment and organic / inorganic chemical cleanliness that is unprecedented. JSC has been conducting feasibility studies and developing designs for a sample receiving facility that would offer biocontainment at least the equivalent of current maximum containment BSL-4 (Bio

  4. Improving Access to NASA Earth Science Data through Collaborative Metadata Curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, A. W.; Bugbee, K.; Shum, D.; Baynes, K.; Dixon, V.; Ramachandran, R.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA-developed Common Metadata Repository (CMR) is a high-performance metadata system that currently catalogs over 375 million Earth science metadata records. It serves as the authoritative metadata management system of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), enabling NASA Earth science data to be discovered and accessed by a worldwide user community. The size of the EOSDIS data archive is steadily increasing, and the ability to manage and query this archive depends on the input of high quality metadata to the CMR. Metadata that does not provide adequate descriptive information diminishes the CMR's ability to effectively find and serve data to users. To address this issue, an innovative and collaborative review process is underway to systematically improve the completeness, consistency, and accuracy of metadata for approximately 7,000 data sets archived by NASA's twelve EOSDIS data centers, or Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs). The process involves automated and manual metadata assessment of both collection and granule records by a team of Earth science data specialists at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The team communicates results to DAAC personnel, who then make revisions and reingest improved metadata into the CMR. Implementation of this process relies on a network of interdisciplinary collaborators leveraging a variety of communication platforms and long-range planning strategies. Curating metadata at this scale and resolving metadata issues through community consensus improves the CMR's ability to serve current and future users and also introduces best practices for stewarding the next generation of Earth Observing System data. This presentation will detail the metadata curation process, its outcomes thus far, and also share the status of ongoing curation activities.

  5. The prognostic importance of jaundice in surgical resection with curative intent for gallbladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin-wei; Yuan, Jian-mao; Chen, Jun-yi; Yang, Jue; Gao, Quan-gen; Yan, Xing-zhou; Zhang, Bao-hua; Feng, Shen; Wu, Meng-chao

    2014-09-03

    Preoperative jaundice is frequent in gallbladder cancer (GBC) and indicates advanced disease. Resection is rarely recommended to treat advanced GBC. An aggressive surgical approach for advanced GBC remains lacking because of the association of this disease with serious postoperative complications and poor prognosis. This study aims to re-assess the prognostic value of jaundice for the morbidity, mortality, and survival of GBC patients who underwent surgical resection with curative intent. GBC patients who underwent surgical resection with curative intent at a single institution between January 2003 and December 2012 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. A total of 192 patients underwent surgical resection with curative intent, of whom 47 had preoperative jaundice and 145 had none. Compared with the non-jaundiced patients, the jaundiced patients had significantly longer operative time (p jaundice was the only independent predictor of postoperative complications. The jaundiced patients had lower survival rates than the non-jaundiced patients (p jaundiced patients. The survival rates of the jaundiced patients with preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) were similar to those of the jaundiced patients without PBD (p = 0.968). No significant differences in the rate of postoperative intra-abdominal abscesses were found between the jaundiced patients with and without PBD (n = 4, 21.1% vs. n = 5, 17.9%, p = 0.787). Preoperative jaundice indicates poor prognosis and high postoperative morbidity but is not a surgical contraindication. Gallbladder neck tumors significantly increase the surgical difficulty and reduce the opportunities for radical resection. Gallbladder neck tumors can independently predict poor outcome. PBD correlates with neither a low rate of postoperative intra-abdominal abscesses nor a high survival rate.

  6. Lifestyle changes in cancer patients undergoing curative or palliative chemotherapy: is it feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassbakk-Brovold, Karianne; Berntsen, Sveinung; Fegran, Liv; Lian, Henrik; Mjåland, Odd; Mjåland, Svein; Nordin, Karin; Seiler, Stephen; Kersten, Christian

    2017-12-14

    This study aimed to explore the feasibility of an individualized comprehensive lifestyle intervention in cancer patients undergoing curative or palliative chemotherapy. At one cancer center, serving a population of 180,000, 100 consecutive of 161 eligible newly diagnosed cancer patients starting curative or palliative chemotherapy entered a 12-month comprehensive, individualized lifestyle intervention. Participants received a grouped startup course and monthly counseling, based on self-reported and electronically evaluated lifestyle behaviors. Patients with completed baseline and end of study measurements are included in the final analyses. Patients who did not complete end of study measurements are defined as dropouts. More completers (n = 61) vs. dropouts (n = 39) were married or living together (87 vs. 69%, p = .031), and significantly higher baseline physical activity levels (960 vs. 489 min . wk -1 , p = .010), more healthy dietary choices (14 vs 11 points, p = .038) and fewer smokers (8 vs. 23%, p = .036) were observed among completers vs. dropouts. Logistic regression revealed younger (odds ratios (OR): 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.91, 0.99) and more patients diagnosed with breast cancer vs. more severe cancer types (OR: 0.16, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.56) among completers vs. dropouts. Improvements were observed in completers healthy (37%, p < 0.001) and unhealthy dietary habits (23%, p = .002), and distress (94%, p < .001). No significant reductions were observed in physical activity levels. Patients treated with palliative intent did not reduce their physical activity levels while healthy dietary habits (38%, p = 0.021) and distress (104%, p = 0.012) was improved. Favorable and possibly clinical relevant lifestyle changes were observed in cancer patients undergoing curative or palliative chemotherapy after a 12-month comprehensive and individualized lifestyle intervention. Palliative patients were able to

  7. Long-term results of curative intraluminal high dose rate brachytherapy for endobronchial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura Hidemasa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment strategy of central lung tumors is not established. Intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT is widely used for palliative treatment of endobronchial tumors, however, it is also a promising option for curative treatment with limited data. This study evaluates the results after ILBT for endobronchial carcinoma. Method Sixteen-endobronchial carcinoma of 13 patients treated with ILBT in curative intent for 2000 to 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. ILBT using high dose rate 192 iridium thin wire system was performed with 5 Gy/fraction at mucosal surface. The patient age ranged from 57 to 82 years old with median 75 years old. The 16 lesions consisted of 13 central endobronchial cancers including 7 roentgenographically occult lung cancers and 3 of tracheal cancers. Of them, 10 lesions were treated with ILBT of median 20 Gy combined with external beam radiation therapy of median 45 Gy and 6 lesions were treated with ILBT alone of median 25 Gy. Results Median follow-up time was 32.5 months. Two-year survival rate and local control rate were 92.3% and 86.2%, respectively. Local recurrences were observed in 2 lesions. Three patients died due to lung cancer (1 patient and intercurrent disease (2 patients. Complications greater than grade 2 were not observed except for one grade 3 dyspnea. Conclusions ILBT combined with or without EBRT might be a curative treatment option in inoperable endobronchial carcinoma patients with tolerable complication.

  8. Opioid Prescribing After Curative-Intent Surgery: A Qualitative Study Using the Theoretical Domains Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jay S; Parashar, Vartika; Miller, Jacquelyn B; Bremmer, Samantha M; Vu, Joceline V; Waljee, Jennifer F; Dossett, Lesly A

    2018-07-01

    Excessive opioid prescribing is common after curative-intent surgery, but little is known about what factors influence prescribing behaviors among surgeons. To identify targets for intervention, we performed a qualitative study of opioid prescribing after curative-intent surgery using the Theoretical Domains Framework, a well-established implementation science method for identifying factors influencing healthcare provider behavior. Prior to data collection, we constructed a semi-structured interview guide to explore decision making for opioid prescribing. We then conducted interviews with surgical oncology providers at a single comprehensive cancer center. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, then independently coded by two investigators using the Theoretical Domains Framework to identify theoretical domains relevant to opioid prescribing. Relevant domains were then linked to behavior models to select targeted interventions likely to improve opioid prescribing. Twenty-one subjects were interviewed from November 2016 to May 2017, including attending surgeons, resident surgeons, physician assistants, and nurses. Five theoretical domains emerged as relevant to opioid prescribing: environmental context and resources; social influences; beliefs about consequences; social/professional role and identity; and goals. Using these domains, three interventions were identified as likely to change opioid prescribing behavior: (1) enablement (deploy nurses during preoperative visits to counsel patients on opioid use); (2) environmental restructuring (provide on-screen prompts with normative data on the quantity of opioid prescribed); and (3) education (provide prescribing guidelines). Key determinants of opioid prescribing behavior after curative-intent surgery include environmental and social factors. Interventions targeting these factors are likely to improve opioid prescribing in surgical oncology.

  9. Cynodon dactylon extract as a preventive and curative agent in experimentally induced nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmani, F; Sadki, C; Aziz, M; Mimouni, M; Hacht, B

    2009-04-01

    Cynodon dactylon (Poaceae family) decoction was used in the treatment of kidney stones. However, no scientific study was undertaken so far to demonstrate the beneficial effect of the plant. Thus, the aim of the current study is to evaluate the effect of Cynodon aqueous extract as a preventive and curative agent in experimentally induced nephrolithiasis in a rat model. Ethylene glycol (EG) was used in the experiment to induce calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition into kidneys. In preventive protocol, Cynodon decoction was administered in the same day with EG to evaluate the ability of the extract to prevent crystal deposition. However, in curative protocol, rats were first rendered nephrolithiasic and then the extract was administered to assess the ability of the plant to eliminate the pre-existing crystal deposition. In both protocols, urinary biochemical and other variables were measured during the course of the study. Crystalluria and renal histology were examined as well. The results showed that, in both protocols, all measured variables were similar for both the rat groups. Nevertheless, urinary biochemical analysis was apparently unaffected by the extract except oxalate in preventive protocol, and calcium, sodium, and potassium in curative protocol which were significantly highly excreted in treated rats compared to untreated animals. Crystalluria was characterized mostly by the presence of large quantities of CaOx monohydrate and CaOx dihydrate particles in untreated rats. However, crystalluria was mainly dominated by the presence of CaOx dihydrate particles with reduced size. The most apparent beneficial effect of Cynodon extract was seen in kidney tissues where reduced levels of CaOx deposition have been noticed especially in medullary and papillary sections from treated rats. We concluded that C. dactylon extract has beneficial effect in preventing and eliminating CaOx deposition into kidneys. Such findings provide a scientific explanation for its use in the

  10. From Map Curator to Information Manager Or The Last of the Dinosaurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Korsgaard

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The National Survey and Cadastre of Denmark has now made such progress in scanning its collection of maps and putting it on the internet that the question arises: What to do next? There are several options: improving the quality of the metadata; incorporating maps from other institutions etc. But the expert knowledge of map curators is crucial in serving users, and their knowledge must be passed on to future generations. Finally, the author points out that much thought must be given to the process of collecting maps digitally made.

  11. The French initiative for scientific cores virtual curating : a user-oriented integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignol, Cécile; Godinho, Elodie; Galabertier, Bruno; Caillo, Arnaud; Bernardet, Karim; Augustin, Laurent; Crouzet, Christian; Billy, Isabelle; Teste, Gregory; Moreno, Eva; Tosello, Vanessa; Crosta, Xavier; Chappellaz, Jérome; Calzas, Michel; Rousseau, Denis-Didier; Arnaud, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Managing scientific data is probably one the most challenging issue in modern science. The question is made even more sensitive with the need of preserving and managing high value fragile geological sam-ples: cores. Large international scientific programs, such as IODP or ICDP are leading an intense effort to solve this problem and propose detailed high standard work- and dataflows thorough core handling and curating. However most results derived from rather small-scale research programs in which data and sample management is generally managed only locally - when it is … The national excellence equipment program (Equipex) CLIMCOR aims at developing French facilities for coring and drilling investigations. It concerns indiscriminately ice, marine and continental samples. As part of this initiative, we initiated a reflexion about core curating and associated coring-data management. The aim of the project is to conserve all metadata from fieldwork in an integrated cyber-environment which will evolve toward laboratory-acquired data storage in a near future. In that aim, our demarche was conducted through an close relationship with field operators as well laboratory core curators in order to propose user-oriented solutions. The national core curating initiative currently proposes a single web portal in which all scientifics teams can store their field data. For legacy samples, this will requires the establishment of a dedicated core lists with associated metadata. For forthcoming samples, we propose a mobile application, under Android environment to capture technical and scientific metadata on the field. This application is linked with a unique coring tools library and is adapted to most coring devices (gravity, drilling, percussion, etc...) including multiple sections and holes coring operations. Those field data can be uploaded automatically to the national portal, but also referenced through international standards or persistent identifiers (IGSN, ORCID and INSPIRE

  12. EURO-CARES: European Roadmap for a Sample Return Curation Facility and Planetary Protection Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucato, John Robert

    2016-07-01

    A mature European planetary exploration program and evolving sample return mission plans gathers the interest of a wider scientific community. The interest is generated from studying extraterrestrial samples in the laborato-ry providing new opportunities to address fundamental issues on the origin and evolution of the Solar System, on the primordial cosmochemistry, and on the nature of the building blocks of terrestrial planets and on the origin of life. Major space agencies are currently planning for missions that will collect samples from a variety of Solar Sys-tem environments, from primitive (carbonaceous) small bodies, from the Moon, Mars and its moons and, final-ly, from icy moons of the outer planets. A dedicated sample return curation facility is seen as an essential re-quirement for the receiving, assessment, characterization and secure preservation of the collected extraterrestrial samples and potentially their safe distribution to the scientific community. EURO-CARES is a European Commission study funded under the Horizon-2020 program. The strategic objec-tive of EURO-CARES is to create a roadmap for the implementation of a European Extraterrestrial Sample Cu-ration Facility. The facility has to provide safe storage and handling of extraterrestrial samples and has to enable the preliminary characterization in order to achieve the required effectiveness and collaborative outcomes for the whole international scientific community. For example, samples returned from Mars could pose a threat on the Earth's biosphere if any living extraterrestrial organism are present in the samples. Thus planetary protection is an essential aspect of all Mars sample return missions that will affect the retrival and transport from the point of return, sample handling, infrastructure methodology and management of a future curation facility. Analysis of the state of the art of Planetary Protection technology shows there are considerable possibilities to define and develop

  13. Locally Advanced Rectal Carcinoma: Curative Surgery Alone vs. postoperative Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Sang Hee

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the effects of postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the pattern of failure and survival for locally advanced rectal carcinoma, we analyzed the two groups of patients who received curative resection only and who received postoperative radiochemotherapy retrospectively. Materials and Methods : From June 1989 to December 1992, ninety nine patients with rectal cancer were treated by curative resection and staged as B2-3 or C. Group I(25) patients received curative resection only and group II(74) patients postoperative adjuvant therapy. Postoperative adjuvant group received radiation therapy (4500 cGy/ 25fx to whole pelvis)with 5-FU (500 mg/m 2 , day 1-3 IV infusion) as radiosensitizer and maintenance chemotherapy with 5-FU(400mg/m 2 for 5 days) and leucovorin (20mg/m 2 for 5 days) for 6 cycles. Results : The patients in group I and group II were comparable in terms of age, sex, performance status, but in group II 74% of patients showed stage C compared with 56% of group I. All patients were flowed from 6 to 60 months with a median follow up of 29 months. Three year overall survival rates and disease free survival rates were 68%, 64% respectively in group I and 64%, 61%, respectively in group II. There was no statistical difference between the two treatment groups in overall survival rate and disease free survival rate. Local recurrences occurred in 28% of group I, 21% of group II (p>.05) and distant metastases occurred in 20% of group I, 27% of group II(p>.05). The prognostic value of several variables other that treatment modality was assessed. In multivariate analysis for prognostic factors stage and histologic grade showed statistically significant effect on local recurrences, and lymphatic or vessel invasion on distant metastasis. Conclusion : This retrospective study showed no statistical difference between two groups on the pattern of failure and survival. But considering that group II had more advanced stage and poor prognostic

  14. Angiosarcoma of the scalp treated with curative radiotherapy plus recombinant interleukin-2 immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohguri, Takayuki; Imada, Hajime; Nomoto, Satoshi; Yahara, Katsuya; Hisaoka, Masanori; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Tokura, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi; Terashima, Hiromi; Moroi, Yoiichi; Furue, Masutaka; Korogi, Yukunori

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of curative radiotherapy (RT) plus recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) immunotherapy regarding the treatment results for angiosarcoma of the scalp. Curative resection of angiosarcoma of the scalp is usually difficult because of the diffuse, clinically undetectable local spread. RT is a rational therapeutic approach, because a wide region of the dermis can be treated, while sparing the underlying normal tissues. Recently, the effectiveness of immunotherapy with rIL-2 has also been reported in the treatment of angiosarcoma of the scalp. Methods and Materials: The data of 20 patients with angiosarcoma of the scalp treated with curative RT plus rIL-2 immunotherapy between January 1988 and June 2002 were retrospectively analyzed. The total radiation dose was 70.3 ± 6.9 Gy. The fractions were 2-3 Gy daily, given 5 d/wk. rIL-2 immunotherapy was performed by transcatheter arterial administration in 10 patients, systemic administration in 11 during the course of RT, and intratumoral injection in 10 during and/or after RT; 12 patients received a combination of two. Five patients underwent limited surgery, and concomitant pacilitaxel chemotherapy was also used in 2 patients. Results: The median survival time for overall, local recurrence-free, and distant metastasis-free survival was 36.2, 11.1, and 17.8 months, respectively. Local recurrence developed in 7 patients (35%), 4 of whom also had evidence of distant metastases. An additional 7 patients (35%) developed distant metastases alone. Recurrence within the radiation field was recognized in 2 patients with systemic rIL-2 administration alone (p < 0.05). Arterial or intratumoral administration combined with systemic administration of rIL-2 resulted in better distant metaststasis-free survival rates (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Curative RT plus rIL-2 immunotherapy provided an efficient, effective means of treating angiosarcoma of the scalp. Arterial or intratumoral administration combined

  15. Non-imputability, criminal dangerousness and curative safety measures: myths and realities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Harbottle Quirós

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The curative safety measures are imposed in a criminal proceeding to the non-imputable people provided that through a prognosis it is concluded in an affirmative way about its criminal dangerousness. Although this statement seems very elementary, in judicial practice several myths remain in relation to these legal institutes whose versions may vary, to a greater or lesser extent, between the different countries of the world. In this context, the present article formulates ten myths based on the experience of Costa Rica and provides an explanation that seeks to weaken or knock them down, inviting the reader to reflect on them.

  16. Text Mining Genotype-Phenotype Relationships from Biomedical Literature for Database Curation and Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Ayush; Simmons, Michael; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-11-01

    The practice of precision medicine will ultimately require databases of genes and mutations for healthcare providers to reference in order to understand the clinical implications of each patient's genetic makeup. Although the highest quality databases require manual curation, text mining tools can facilitate the curation process, increasing accuracy, coverage, and productivity. However, to date there are no available text mining tools that offer high-accuracy performance for extracting such triplets from biomedical literature. In this paper we propose a high-performance machine learning approach to automate the extraction of disease-gene-variant triplets from biomedical literature. Our approach is unique because we identify the genes and protein products associated with each mutation from not just the local text content, but from a global context as well (from the Internet and from all literature in PubMed). Our approach also incorporates protein sequence validation and disease association using a novel text-mining-based machine learning approach. We extract disease-gene-variant triplets from all abstracts in PubMed related to a set of ten important diseases (breast cancer, prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, acute myeloid leukemia, Alzheimer's disease, hemochromatosis, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes mellitus, and cystic fibrosis). We then evaluate our approach in two ways: (1) a direct comparison with the state of the art using benchmark datasets; (2) a validation study comparing the results of our approach with entries in a popular human-curated database (UniProt) for each of the previously mentioned diseases. In the benchmark comparison, our full approach achieves a 28% improvement in F1-measure (from 0.62 to 0.79) over the state-of-the-art results. For the validation study with UniProt Knowledgebase (KB), we present a thorough analysis of the results and errors. Across all diseases, our approach returned 272 triplets (disease

  17. Text Mining Genotype-Phenotype Relationships from Biomedical Literature for Database Curation and Precision Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayush Singhal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The practice of precision medicine will ultimately require databases of genes and mutations for healthcare providers to reference in order to understand the clinical implications of each patient's genetic makeup. Although the highest quality databases require manual curation, text mining tools can facilitate the curation process, increasing accuracy, coverage, and productivity. However, to date there are no available text mining tools that offer high-accuracy performance for extracting such triplets from biomedical literature. In this paper we propose a high-performance machine learning approach to automate the extraction of disease-gene-variant triplets from biomedical literature. Our approach is unique because we identify the genes and protein products associated with each mutation from not just the local text content, but from a global context as well (from the Internet and from all literature in PubMed. Our approach also incorporates protein sequence validation and disease association using a novel text-mining-based machine learning approach. We extract disease-gene-variant triplets from all abstracts in PubMed related to a set of ten important diseases (breast cancer, prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, acute myeloid leukemia, Alzheimer's disease, hemochromatosis, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, diabetes mellitus, and cystic fibrosis. We then evaluate our approach in two ways: (1 a direct comparison with the state of the art using benchmark datasets; (2 a validation study comparing the results of our approach with entries in a popular human-curated database (UniProt for each of the previously mentioned diseases. In the benchmark comparison, our full approach achieves a 28% improvement in F1-measure (from 0.62 to 0.79 over the state-of-the-art results. For the validation study with UniProt Knowledgebase (KB, we present a thorough analysis of the results and errors. Across all diseases, our approach returned 272 triplets

  18. Connecting Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration: Preservice Teachers' Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mary H.; Schwartz, Renee S.

    2009-01-01

    The biological processes of photosynthesis and plant cellular respiration include multiple biochemical steps, occur simultaneously within plant cells, and share common molecular components. Yet, learners often compartmentalize functions and specialization of cell organelles relevant to these two processes, without considering the interconnections…

  19. Efficient Workflows for Curation of Heterogeneous Data Supporting Modeling of U-Nb Alloy Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Logan Timothy; Hackenberg, Robert Errol

    2016-01-01

    These are slides from a presentation summarizing a graduate research associate's summer project. The following topics are covered in these slides: data challenges in materials, aging in U-Nb Alloys, Building an Aging Model, Different Phase Trans. in U-Nb, the Challenge, Storing Materials Data, Example Data Source, Organizing Data: What is a Schema?, What does a 'XML Schema' look like?, Our Data Schema: Nice and Simple, Storing Data: Materials Data Curation System (MDCS), Problem with MDCS: Slow Data Entry, Getting Literature into MDCS, Staging Data in Excel Document, Final Result: MDCS Records, Analyzing Image Data, Process for Making TTT Diagram, Bottleneck Number 1: Image Analysis, Fitting a TTP Boundary, Fitting a TTP Curve: Comparable Results, How Does it Compare to Our Data?, Image Analysis Workflow, Curating Hardness Records, Hardness Data: Two Key Decisions, Before Peak Age? - Automation, Interactive Viz, Which Transformation?, Microstructure-Informed Model, Tracking the Entire Process, General Problem with Property Models, Pinyon: Toolkit for Managing Model Creation, Tracking Individual Decisions, Jupyter: Docs and Code in One File, Hardness Analysis Workflow, Workflow for Aging Models, and conclusions.

  20. SABIO-RK: an updated resource for manually curated biochemical reaction kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Maja; Weidemann, Andreas; Kania, Renate; Müller, Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    Abstract SABIO-RK (http://sabiork.h-its.org/) is a manually curated database containing data about biochemical reactions and their reaction kinetics. The data are primarily extracted from scientific literature and stored in a relational database. The content comprises both naturally occurring and alternatively measured biochemical reactions and is not restricted to any organism class. The data are made available to the public by a web-based search interface and by web services for programmatic access. In this update we describe major improvements and extensions of SABIO-RK since our last publication in the database issue of Nucleic Acid Research (2012). (i) The website has been completely revised and (ii) allows now also free text search for kinetics data. (iii) Additional interlinkages with other databases in our field have been established; this enables users to gain directly comprehensive knowledge about the properties of enzymes and kinetics beyond SABIO-RK. (iv) Vice versa, direct access to SABIO-RK data has been implemented in several systems biology tools and workflows. (v) On request of our experimental users, the data can be exported now additionally in spreadsheet formats. (vi) The newly established SABIO-RK Curation Service allows to respond to specific data requirements. PMID:29092055

  1. Salvage liver transplantation for patients with recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LinWei Wu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To summarize the experience with salvage liver transplantation (SLT for patients with recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC after primary hepatic resection in a single center. METHODS: A total of 376 adult patients with HCC underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT at Organ Transplantation Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, between 2004 and 2008. Among these patients, 36 underwent SLT after primary liver curative resection due to intrahepatic recurrence. During the same period, one hundred and forty-seven patients with HCC within Milan criteria underwent primary OLT (PLTW group, the intra-operative and post-operative parameters were compared between these two groups. Furthermore, we compared tumor recurrence and patient survival of patients with SLT to 156 patients with HCC beyond Milan criteria (PLTB group. Cox Hazard regression was made to identify the risk factors for tumor recurrence. RESULTS: The median interval between initial liver resection and SLT was 35 months (1-63 months. The intraoperative blood loss (P0.05. When compared to those patients with HCC beyond Milan criteria undergoing primary OLT, patients undergoing SLT achieved a better survival and a lower tumor recurrence. Cox Proportional Hazards model showed that vascular invasion, including macrovascular and microvascular invasion, as well as AFP level >400 IU/L were risk factors for tumor recurrence after LT. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with primary OLT, although SLT is associated with increased operation difficulties, it provides a good option for patients with HCC recurrence after curative resection.

  2. Curative effect of moisturizing eye decoction combined with artificial tears in treatment on ophthalmoxerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ping Ren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical effects of moisturizing eye decoction combined with artificial tears in the treatment of ophthalmoxerosis.METHODS: A randomized controlled clinical research method was employed. One hundred-sixty patients diagnosed with ophthalmoxerosis were equally divided into a treatment group and a control group. In the treatment group, patients were given one dose per day of the moisturizing eye decoction as well as artificial tear drops three times a day. The patients in the control group were treated with artificial tears drops three times a day. The course of treatment was 3mo. Dry-eye symptoms, tear break-up time(BUTby the slit lamp, the time of tear secretion(Schirmers Ⅰ test, corneal fluorescein staining(FL, and curative effects were observed before treatment as well as in the first and third months after treatment.RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of BUT, SⅠt, and FL before treatment(P>0.05. After treatment in the first and the third months, the BUT, SⅠt, FL, and curative effects were significantly different between the two groups(PCONCLUSION: Moisturizing eye decoction combined with artificial tears in the treatment of ophthalmoxerosis can improve efficacy.

  3. NSDNA: a manually curated database of experimentally supported ncRNAs associated with nervous system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjian; Cao, Yuze; Zhang, Huixue; Wang, Tianfeng; Tian, Qinghua; Lu, Xiaoyu; Lu, Xiaoyan; Kong, Xiaotong; Liu, Zhaojun; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Shuai; Ma, Heping; Ning, Shangwei; Wang, Lihua

    2017-01-04

    The Nervous System Disease NcRNAome Atlas (NSDNA) (http://www.bio-bigdata.net/nsdna/) is a manually curated database that provides comprehensive experimentally supported associations about nervous system diseases (NSDs) and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). NSDs represent a common group of disorders, some of which are characterized by high morbidity and disabilities. The pathogenesis of NSDs at the molecular level remains poorly understood. ncRNAs are a large family of functionally important RNA molecules. Increasing evidence shows that diverse ncRNAs play a critical role in various NSDs. Mining and summarizing NSD-ncRNA association data can help researchers discover useful information. Hence, we developed an NSDNA database that documents 24 713 associations between 142 NSDs and 8593 ncRNAs in 11 species, curated from more than 1300 articles. This database provides a user-friendly interface for browsing and searching and allows for data downloading flexibility. In addition, NSDNA offers a submission page for researchers to submit novel NSD-ncRNA associations. It represents an extremely useful and valuable resource for researchers who seek to understand the functions and molecular mechanisms of ncRNA involved in NSDs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Data Curation for the Exploitation of Large Earth Observation Products Databases - The MEA system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Simone; Natali, Stefano; Barboni, Damiano; Cavicchi, Mario; Della Vecchia, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    National Space Agencies under the umbrella of the European Space Agency are performing a strong activity to handle and provide solutions to Big Data and related knowledge (metadata, software tools and services) management and exploitation. The continuously increasing amount of long-term and of historic data in EO facilities in the form of online datasets and archives, the incoming satellite observation platforms that will generate an impressive amount of new data and the new EU approach on the data distribution policy make necessary to address technologies for the long-term management of these data sets, including their consolidation, preservation, distribution, continuation and curation across multiple missions. The management of long EO data time series of continuing or historic missions - with more than 20 years of data available already today - requires technical solutions and technologies which differ considerably from the ones exploited by existing systems. Several tools, both open source and commercial, are already providing technologies to handle data and metadata preparation, access and visualization via OGC standard interfaces. This study aims at describing the Multi-sensor Evolution Analysis (MEA) system and the Data Curation concept as approached and implemented within the ASIM and EarthServer projects, funded by the European Space Agency and the European Commission, respectively.

  5. Heritage and archaeology in the digital age acquisition, curation, and dissemination of spatial cultural heritage data

    CERN Document Server

    Bendicho, Víctor; Ioannides, Marinos; Levy, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This book examines how computer-based programs can be used to acquire ‘big’ digital cultural heritage data, curate, and disseminate it over the Internet and in 3D visualization platforms with the ultimate goal of creating long-lasting “digital heritage repositories.’ The organization of the book reflects the essence of new technologies applied to cultural heritage and archaeology. Each of these stages bring their own challenges and considerations that need to be dealt with. The authors in each section present case studies and overviews of how each of these aspects might be dealt with. While technology is rapidly changing, the principles laid out in these chapters should serve as a guide for many years to come. The influence of the digital world on archaeology and cultural heritage will continue to shape these disciplines as advances in these technologies facilitate new lines of research.  The book is divided into three sections covering acquisition, curation, and dissemination (the major life cycles ...

  6. Curation of Laboratory Experimental Data as Part of the Overall Data Lifecycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Frey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The explosion in the production of scientific data in recent years is placing strains upon conventional systems supporting integration, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of data and thus constraining the whole scientific process. Support for handling large quantities of diverse information can be provided by e-Science methodologies and the cyber-infrastructure that enables collaborative handling of such data. Regard needs to be taken of the whole process involved in scientific discovery. This includes the consideration of the requirements of the users and consumers further down the information chain and what they might ideally prefer to impose on the generators of those data. As the degree of digital capture in the laboratory increases, it is possible to improve the automatic acquisition of the ‘context of the data’ as well as the data themselves. This process provides an opportunity for the data creators to ensure that many of the problems they often encounter in later stages are avoided. We wish to elevate curation to an operation to be considered by the laboratory scientist as part of good laboratory practice, not a procedure of concern merely to the few specialising in archival processes. Designing curation into experiments is an effective solution to the provision of high-quality metadata that leads to better, more re-usable data and to better science.

  7. Curative effect of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius tuber on experimental hemorrhoids in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Yadu Nandan; Wanjari, Manish M; Kumar, Dharmendra; Lomash, Vinay; Jadhav, Ankush D

    2016-11-04

    Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Dennst.) Nicolson (Family- Araceae) is a crop of south East Asian origin. In India, its tuber is widely used in ethnomedicinal practices by different tribes for the treatment of piles (hemorrhoids). The present study evaluated the effect of methanolic and aqueous extract of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius tuber on croton oil induced hemorrhoids in rats. The methanolic extract was standardized with the major phenolic compound, betulinic acid, by HPLC. The hemorrhoids were induced by applying 6% croton oil preparation in the ano-rectal region. Rats were orally administered methanolic and aqueous extract at doses of 250 and 500mg/kg, each for 7 days. Pilex (200mg/kg) was used as reference anti-hemorrhoidal drug. Hemorrhoids were assessed on eighth day by measuring hemorrhoidal and biochemical parameters along with histology of ano-rectal tissue. Croton oil application caused induction of hemorrhoids as indicated by significant (phemorrhoidal parameters and other biochemical parameters with attenuation of tissue damage compared to hemorrhoid control rats. The results indicate that tuber extracts exhibited curative action on hemorrhoids. The aqueous extract showed more pronounced effect than methanolic extract. The effects may be attributed to anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Results indicate that tuber of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius exhibited curative action on hemorrhoids through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The study validates the ethnomedicinal use of tuber in hemorrhoids and implicates its therapeutic potential as an anti-hemorrhoidal agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Neotoma Paleoecology Database: An International Community-Curated Resource for Paleoecological and Paleoenvironmental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. W.; Grimm, E. C.; Ashworth, A. C.; Blois, J.; Charles, D. F.; Crawford, S.; Davis, E.; Goring, S. J.; Graham, R. W.; Miller, D. A.; Smith, A. J.; Stryker, M.; Uhen, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Neotoma Paleoecology Database supports global change research at the intersection of geology and ecology by providing a high-quality, community-curated data repository for paleoecological data. These data are widely used to study biological responses and feedbacks to past environmental change at local to global scales. The Neotoma data model is flexible and can store multiple kinds of fossil, biogeochemical, or physical variables measured from sedimentary archives. Data additions to Neotoma are growing and include >3.5 million observations, >16,000 datasets, and >8,500 sites. Dataset types include fossil pollen, vertebrates, diatoms, ostracodes, macroinvertebrates, plant macrofossils, insects, testate amoebae, geochronological data, and the recently added organic biomarkers, stable isotopes, and specimen-level data. Neotoma data can be found and retrieved in multiple ways, including the Explorer map-based interface, a RESTful Application Programming Interface, the neotoma R package, and digital object identifiers. Neotoma has partnered with the Paleobiology Database to produce a common data portal for paleobiological data, called the Earth Life Consortium. A new embargo management is designed to allow investigators to put their data into Neotoma and then make use of Neotoma's value-added services. Neotoma's distributed scientific governance model is flexible and scalable, with many open pathways for welcoming new members, data contributors, stewards, and research communities. As the volume and variety of scientific data grow, community-curated data resources such as Neotoma have become foundational infrastructure for big data science.

  9. Advanced Cancer and End-of-Life Preferences: Curative Intent Surgery Versus Noncurative Intent Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubart, Jane R; Green, Michael J; Van Scoy, Lauren J; Lehman, Erik; Farace, Elana; Gusani, Niraj J; Levi, Benjamin H

    2015-12-01

    People with cancer face complex medical decisions, including whether to receive life-sustaining treatments at the end of life. It is not unusual for clinicians to make assumptions about patients' wishes based on whether they had previously chosen to pursue curative treatment. We hypothesized that cancer patients who initially underwent curative intent surgery (CIS) would prefer more aggressive end-of-life treatments compared to patients whose treatment was noncurative intent (non-CIT). This study was a retrospective review of data from a large, randomized controlled trial examining the use of an online decision aid for advance care planning, "Making Your Wishes Known" (MYWK), with patients who had advanced cancer. We reviewed patients' medical records to determine which patients underwent CIS versus non-CIT. In the parent trial, conducted at an academic medical center (2007-2012), 200 patients were enrolled with stage IV malignancy or other poor prognosis cancer. Patients' preferences for aggressive treatment were measured in two ways: using patient-selected General Wishes statements generated by the decision aid and patient-selected wishes for specific treatments under various hypothetical clinical scenarios (Specific Wishes). We evaluated 79 patients. Of these, 48 had undergone initial CIS and 31 had non-CIT. Cancer patients who initially underwent CIS did not prefer more aggressive end-of-life treatments compared to patients whose treatment was non-CIT. Clinicians should avoid assumptions about patients' preferences for life-sustaining treatment based on their prior choices for aggressive treatment.

  10. Hepatoprotective and curative properties of Kombucha tea against carbon tetrachloride-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, G S; Sathishkumar, M; Jayabalan, R; Binupriya, A R; Swaminathan, K; Yun, S E

    2009-04-01

    Kombucha tea (KT) is sugared black tea fermented with a symbiotic culture of acetic acid bacteria and yeasts, which is said to be tea fungus. KT is claimed to have various beneficial effects on human health, but there is very little scientific evidence available in the literature. In the present study, KT along with black tea (BT) and black tea manufactured with tea fungus enzymes (enzyme-processed tea, ET) was evaluated for hepatoprotective and curative properties against CCl4-induced toxicity, using male albino rats as an experimental model by analyzing aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase in plasma and malondialdehyde content in plasma and liver tissues. Histopathological analysis of liver tissue was also included. Results showed that BT, ET, and KT have the potential to revert the CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. Among the three types of teas tried, KT was found to be more efficient than BT and ET. Antioxidant molecules produced during the fermentation period could be the reason for the efficient hepatoprotective and curative properties of KT against CCI4-induced hepatotoxicity.

  11. The Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB): a curated neurogenetics knowledge base with clinical and research applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Millen, Kathleen J; Barkovich, A James; Dobyns, William B; Paciorkowski, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    The number of single genes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders has increased dramatically over the past decade. The identification of causative genes for these disorders is important to clinical outcome as it allows for accurate assessment of prognosis, genetic counseling, delineation of natural history, inclusion in clinical trials, and in some cases determines therapy. Clinicians face the challenge of correctly identifying neurodevelopmental phenotypes, recognizing syndromes, and prioritizing the best candidate genes for testing. However, there is no central repository of definitions for many phenotypes, leading to errors of diagnosis. Additionally, there is no system of levels of evidence linking genes to phenotypes, making it difficult for clinicians to know which genes are most strongly associated with a given condition. We have developed the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB: https://www.dbdb.urmc.rochester.edu/home), a publicly available, online-curated repository of genes, phenotypes, and syndromes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. DBDB contains the first referenced ontology of developmental brain phenotypes, and uses a novel system of levels of evidence for gene-phenotype associations. It is intended to assist clinicians in arriving at the correct diagnosis, select the most appropriate genetic test for that phenotype, and improve the care of patients with developmental brain disorders. For researchers interested in the discovery of novel genes for developmental brain disorders, DBDB provides a well-curated source of important genes against which research sequencing results can be compared. Finally, DBDB allows novel observations about the landscape of the neurogenetics knowledge base. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of recent curative effect of chemotherapy on hepatocellular carcinoma with MSCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jing; Zheng Keguo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of MSCT in evaluating the recent curative effect of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after the chemotherapy with Oxaliplatin combined with 5-FU and Folinic Acid. Methods: 6 cases with HCC or post hepatectomy metastasis HCC confirmed by pathohistology underwent chemotherapy with Oxaliplatin combined with 5-FU and Folinic Acid. MultiSpiral Computed Tomography was used to determine the target lesions before and after the chemotherapy. The size of the target lesions before the chemotherapy was refer as the basic value (x0), and that after the chemotherapy was regarded as the observed value (y1). The theoretic value was obtained based on tumor growth dynamics mathematic model y2(x)=X 0 2 t/3td . Results: Before and after the first chemotherapy or between the consecutive chemotherapy cycles, the target lesions could be follow-up one by one with MSCT. There was significant statistical difference between observed increase size and theoretical increase size, P=0.0442. Conclusion: Tumor growth velocity can be effectively controlled with this chemotherapy plan, and MSCT may used to be an objective tool to evaluate the recent curative effect of chemotherapy on hepatocellular carcinoma. (authors)

  13. Modern oncologic and operative outcomes for oesophageal cancer treated with curative intent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reynolds, J V

    2011-09-01

    The curative approach to oesophageal cancer carries significant risks and a cure is achieved in approximately 20 per cent. There has been a recent trend internationally to observe improved operative and oncological outcomes. This report audits modern outcomes from a high volume centre with a prospective database for the period 2004-08. 603 patients were referred and 310 (52%) were treated with curative intent. Adenocarcinoma represented 68% of the cohort, squamous cell cancer 30%. Of the 310 cases, 227 (73%) underwent surgery, 105 (46%) underwent surgery alone, and 122 (54%) had chemotherapy or combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The postoperative mortality rate was 1.7%. The median and 5-year survival of the 310 patients based on intention to treat was 36 months and 36%, respectively, and of the 181 patients undergoing R0 resection, 52 months and 42%, respectively. An in-hospital postoperative mortality rate of less than 2 per cent, and 5-year survival of between 35 and 42% is consistent with benchmarks from international series.

  14. IMPPAT: A curated database of Indian Medicinal Plants, Phytochemistry And Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Karthikeyan; Karthikeyan, Bagavathy Shanmugam; Vivek-Ananth, R P; Chand, R P Bharath; Aparna, S R; Mangalapandi, Pattulingam; Samal, Areejit

    2018-03-12

    Phytochemicals of medicinal plants encompass a diverse chemical space for drug discovery. India is rich with a flora of indigenous medicinal plants that have been used for centuries in traditional Indian medicine to treat human maladies. A comprehensive online database on the phytochemistry of Indian medicinal plants will enable computational approaches towards natural product based drug discovery. In this direction, we present, IMPPAT, a manually curated database of 1742 Indian Medicinal Plants, 9596 Phytochemicals, And 1124 Therapeutic uses spanning 27074 plant-phytochemical associations and 11514 plant-therapeutic associations. Notably, the curation effort led to a non-redundant in silico library of 9596 phytochemicals with standard chemical identifiers and structure information. Using cheminformatic approaches, we have computed the physicochemical, ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) and drug-likeliness properties of the IMPPAT phytochemicals. We show that the stereochemical complexity and shape complexity of IMPPAT phytochemicals differ from libraries of commercial compounds or diversity-oriented synthesis compounds while being similar to other libraries of natural products. Within IMPPAT, we have filtered a subset of 960 potential druggable phytochemicals, of which majority have no significant similarity to existing FDA approved drugs, and thus, rendering them as good candidates for prospective drugs. IMPPAT database is openly accessible at: https://cb.imsc.res.in/imppat .

  15. Primary observation of clinical curative effect of superselective uterine artery embolization for treatment of placenta increta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changfu; Zhang Heping; Zhang Hongxia; Jin Haiying; Wang Binjie; He Xiang; Zhang Jie; Li Changbo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the curative effect on superselective uterine artery embolization for treatment of placenta increta. Methods: Pelvic arteriography was performed to confirm bleeding vessels. Then a 5 F Cobra catheter was inserted superselectively into uterine artery ipsilateral to bleeding, through which methotrexatum (MTX) and gelatin sponge were injected for embolization. After the procedure, bleeding, blood pressure, dischargement of placenta tissue, uterine recuperation, and plasma β-HCG were monitored. Results: Bleeding vessels were confirmed in all of the 5 cases of placenta increta. Uterine artery embolization was successful at sole procedure. The operation time was 25.0 to 60.0 min, with the mean time (37.4 ± 5.8) min. Vaginal bleeding stoped in 3.0 to 12.0 minutes after embolization and the mean time was (5.7 ± 2.4) min. Blood pressure returned to normal after operation and vital signs were stable. Placenta tissue discharged on the 5th day to the 4th week after embolization and the mean time was 17 d. The uterus recuperated and blood β-HCG recovered simutaneously. The menstruation and ovulation during follow-up returned to normal. Conclusion: Superselective uterine artery embolization for treatment of placenta increta has advantages such as short operation time, minimal invasion, definite curative effect and reservation of uterus, which is worthy in clinical application. (authors)

  16. Effects of the protective, curative, and eradicative applications of chitosan against Penicillium expansum in apples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Cecília Darolt

    Full Text Available Abstract Apple is one of the most important temperate fruit to Brazil economy, and the use of synthetic chemicals has been the main method for reducing postharvest diseases, such as the blue mold, caused by Penicillium expansum. This work intends to evaluate the practical utilization of chitosan for blue mold control. For this purpose, fruits were treated in a preventive and curative way, immersing the fruits in chitosan solution (5 or 10 mg mL-1, or adding a single drop of this solution (10 mg mL-1 directly into the injuries. The eradicative effect of the polysaccharide was also evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Chitosan did not show a curative effect against the blue mold, and its eradicative effect was only evidenced on the higher concentration (10 mg mL-1. On the other hand, preventively, without the addition of adjuvants, chitosan reduced blue mold incidence in fruits by 24% and 93%, through the immersion or the single drop methods, respectively. Thus, it was found that, for long scale utilization, some improvements in the physico-chemical properties of the chitosan are needed, since it was only capable to prevent the infection by P. expansum when directly added on the fruit injury.

  17. Efficient Workflows for Curation of Heterogeneous Data Supporting Modeling of U-Nb Alloy Aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Logan Timothy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hackenberg, Robert Errol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    These are slides from a presentation summarizing a graduate research associate's summer project. The following topics are covered in these slides: data challenges in materials, aging in U-Nb Alloys, Building an Aging Model, Different Phase Trans. in U-Nb, the Challenge, Storing Materials Data, Example Data Source, Organizing Data: What is a Schema?, What does a "XML Schema" look like?, Our Data Schema: Nice and Simple, Storing Data: Materials Data Curation System (MDCS), Problem with MDCS: Slow Data Entry, Getting Literature into MDCS, Staging Data in Excel Document, Final Result: MDCS Records, Analyzing Image Data, Process for Making TTT Diagram, Bottleneck Number 1: Image Analysis, Fitting a TTP Boundary, Fitting a TTP Curve: Comparable Results, How Does it Compare to Our Data?, Image Analysis Workflow, Curating Hardness Records, Hardness Data: Two Key Decisions, Before Peak Age? - Automation, Interactive Viz, Which Transformation?, Microstructure-Informed Model, Tracking the Entire Process, General Problem with Property Models, Pinyon: Toolkit for Managing Model Creation, Tracking Individual Decisions, Jupyter: Docs and Code in One File, Hardness Analysis Workflow, Workflow for Aging Models, and conclusions.

  18. Cellular-based preemption system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Aaron D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cellular-based preemption system that uses existing cellular infrastructure to transmit preemption related data to allow safe passage of emergency vehicles through one or more intersections. A cellular unit in an emergency vehicle is used to generate position reports that are transmitted to the one or more intersections during an emergency response. Based on this position data, the one or more intersections calculate an estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the emergency vehicle, and transmit preemption commands to traffic signals at the intersections based on the calculated ETA. Additional techniques may be used for refining the position reports, ETA calculations, and the like. Such techniques include, without limitation, statistical preemption, map-matching, dead-reckoning, augmented navigation, and/or preemption optimization techniques, all of which are described in further detail in the above-referenced patent applications.

  19. Novel Materials for Cellular Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi

    The monitoring of cellular behavior is useful for the advancement of biomedical diagnostics, drug development and the understanding of a cell as the main unit of the human body. Micro- and nanotechnology allow for the creation of functional devices that enhance the study of cellular dynamics...... modifications for electrochemical nanosensors for the detection of analytes released from cells. Two type of materials were investigated, each pertaining to the two different aspects of such devices: peptide nanostructures were studied for the creation of cellular sensing substrates that mimic in vivo surfaces...... and that offer advantages of functionalization, and conducting polymers were used as electrochemical sensor surface modifications for increasing the sensitivity towards relevant analytes, with focus on the detection of dopamine released from cells via exocytosis. Vertical peptide nanowires were synthesized from...

  20. Global properties of cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, E.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular automata are discrete mathematical systems that generate diverse, often complicated, behavior using simple deterministic rules. Analysis of the local structure of these rules makes possible a description of the global properties of the associated automata. A class of cellular automata that generate infinitely many aperoidic temporal sequences is defined,a s is the set of rules for which inverses exist. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived characterizing the classes of ''nearest-neighbor'' rules for which arbitrary finite initial conditions (i) evolve to a homogeneous state; (ii) generate at least one constant temporal sequence

  1. A curated gluten protein sequence database to support development of proteomics methods for determination of gluten in gluten-free foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromilow, Sophie; Gethings, Lee A; Buckley, Mike; Bromley, Mike; Shewry, Peter R; Langridge, James I; Clare Mills, E N

    2017-06-23

    The unique physiochemical properties of wheat gluten enable a diverse range of food products to be manufactured. However, gluten triggers coeliac disease, a condition which is treated using a gluten-free diet. Analytical methods are required to confirm if foods are gluten-free, but current immunoassay-based methods can unreliable and proteomic methods offer an alternative but require comprehensive and well annotated sequence databases which are lacking for gluten. A manually a curated database (GluPro V1.0) of gluten proteins, comprising 630 discrete unique full length protein sequences has been compiled. It is representative of the different types of gliadin and glutenin components found in gluten. An in silico comparison of their coeliac toxicity was undertaken by analysing the distribution of coeliac toxic motifs. This demonstrated that whilst the α-gliadin proteins contained more toxic motifs, these were distributed across all gluten protein sub-types. Comparison of annotations observed using a discovery proteomics dataset acquired using ion mobility MS/MS showed that more reliable identifications were obtained using the GluPro V1.0 database compared to the complete reviewed Viridiplantae database. This highlights the value of a curated sequence database specifically designed to support the proteomic workflows and the development of methods to detect and quantify gluten. We have constructed the first manually curated open-source wheat gluten protein sequence database (GluPro V1.0) in a FASTA format to support the application of proteomic methods for gluten protein detection and quantification. We have also analysed the manually verified sequences to give the first comprehensive overview of the distribution of sequences able to elicit a reaction in coeliac disease, the prevalent form of gluten intolerance. Provision of this database will improve the reliability of gluten protein identification by proteomic analysis, and aid the development of targeted mass

  2. Recommendations for the use of irradiated components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The disease 'graft-versus-host' associated with the transfusion (EIVH TA) is an adverse reaction rare but fatal, linked to the proliferation of T cells that are found in cellular components and reacting against the receptor's tissues). Gamma irradiation of cellular components is used as a prevention method because it deactivates the lymphocytes T by reducing its survival and by restraining its proliferation without producing alterations in others cells function. Recommendations for the use of gamma irradiation along with clinical indications for pediatric patients, patients with acquired immunosuppression and immunocompetent patients are given in this study. A brief description of operative aspects of irradiation procedures such as components to be irradiated, irradiation method, irradiation dose and viability of irradiated components is given [es

  3. The observation of curative effects by therapy with low-dose 131I in younger with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Liqun; Li Lingling; Zhang Chenggang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the the curative effects in younger with Graves disease therapied by 131 I. Methods: The dose of 131 I is administrated with 1480-2220kBq/g of thyroid tissue which was decided by many factors that include the paticnt's Age, volume of thyroid, course and if antihyroid drug is administrated. The curative effects was classfide into four groups: complete remission, excellence, parts of remission, no effect. Results: 47 were complete remission, 34 were excellence, 10 were the parts of remission and 0 was no effects. The total effective power was 100%. Conclusions: Therapy with low-dose of mi for younger with Graves' disease is an effect, simple and safe method. Repeating treatment with 131 I will improve the curative rate of Graves' disease in younger, and the incidence of hypothyroidism cannot be increased. (authors)

  4. Discrete dynamic modeling of cellular signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Réka; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Understanding signal transduction in cellular systems is a central issue in systems biology. Numerous experiments from different laboratories generate an abundance of individual components and causal interactions mediating environmental and developmental signals. However, for many signal transduction systems there is insufficient information on the overall structure and the molecular mechanisms involved in the signaling network. Moreover, lack of kinetic and temporal information makes it difficult to construct quantitative models of signal transduction pathways. Discrete dynamic modeling, combined with network analysis, provides an effective way to integrate fragmentary knowledge of regulatory interactions into a predictive mathematical model which is able to describe the time evolution of the system without the requirement for kinetic parameters. This chapter introduces the fundamental concepts of discrete dynamic modeling, particularly focusing on Boolean dynamic models. We describe this method step-by-step in the context of cellular signaling networks. Several variants of Boolean dynamic models including threshold Boolean networks and piecewise linear systems are also covered, followed by two examples of successful application of discrete dynamic modeling in cell biology.

  5. Cellular self-assembly and biomaterials-based organoid models of development and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shivem B; Singh, Ankur

    2017-04-15

    Organogenesis and morphogenesis have informed our understanding of physiology, pathophysiology, and avenues to create new curative and regenerative therapies. Thus far, this understanding has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically relevant yet accessible model that affords biological control. Recently, three-dimensional ex vivo cellular cultures created through cellular self-assembly under natural extracellular matrix cues or through biomaterial-based directed assembly have been shown to physically resemble and recapture some functionality of target organs. These "organoids" have garnered momentum for their applications in modeling human development and disease, drug screening, and future therapy design or even organ replacement. This review first discusses the self-organizing organoids as materials with emergent properties and their advantages and limitations. We subsequently describe biomaterials-based strategies used to afford more control of the organoid's microenvironment and ensuing cellular composition and organization. In this review, we also offer our perspective on how multifunctional biomaterials with precise spatial and temporal control could ultimately bridge the gap between in vitro organoid platforms and their in vivo counterparts. Several notable reviews have highlighted PSC-derived organoids and 3D aggregates, including embryoid bodies, from a development and cellular assembly perspective. The focus of this review is to highlight the materials-based approaches that cells, including PSCs and others, adopt for self-assembly and the controlled development of complex tissues, such as that of the brain, gut, and immune system. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Mai Thanh Quynh; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2016-01-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN...

  7. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  8. Cellular automaton for surface reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechatnikov, E L [AN SSSR, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation). Otdelenie Inst. Khimicheskoj Fiziki; Frankowicz, A; Danielak, R [Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland)

    1994-06-01

    A new algorithm which overcomes some specific difficulties arising in modeling of heterogeneous catalytic processes by cellular automata (CA) technique is proposed. The algorithm was tested with scheme introduced by Ziff, Gulari and Barshad and showed a good agreement with their results. The problem of the physical adequacy and interpretation of the algorithm was discussed. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs.

  9. Cellular Automata and the Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Ernest

    1994-01-01

    The use of cellular automata to analyze several pre-Socratic hypotheses about the evolution of the physical world is discussed. These hypotheses combine characteristics of both rigorous and metaphoric language. Since the computer demands explicit instructions for each step in the evolution of the automaton, such models can reveal conceptual…

  10. Cellular buckling in long structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, G.W.; Peletier, M.A.; Champneys, A.R.; Woods, P.D.; Wadee, M.A.; Budd, C.J.; Lord, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    A long structural system with an unstable (subcritical)post-buckling response that subsequently restabilizes typically deformsin a cellular manner, with localized buckles first forming and thenlocking up in sequence. As buckling continues over a growing number ofcells, the response can be described

  11. Cumulative Radiation Exposure during Follow-Up after Curative Surgery for Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeo Jin; Chung, Yong Eun; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hye Jeong; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Ki Whang; You, Je Sung

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the cumulative effective dose (cED) of radiation due to repeated CT and PET/CT examinations after curative resection of gastric cancer and to assess the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) estimates based on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII models. Patients who underwent a curative resection for gastric cancer between January 2006 and December 2006 and were followed-up until May 2010 were included in this study. The cED was calculated by using the dose-length product values and conversion factors for quantitative risk assessment of radiation exposure. cED and LAR were compared between early and advanced gastric cancer patients and among American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM stage groups (stage I, II, and III). The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, followed by a post-hoc analysis with Bonferroni adjustment, were employed as part of the statistical analysis. The overall median cED was 57.8 mSv (interquartile range [IQR], 43.9-74.7). The cED was significantly higher in the advanced (median, 67.0; IQR, 49.1-102.3) than in the early gastric cancer group (median, 52.3; IQR, 41.5-67.9) (p < 0.001), and increased as the TNM stage increased. For radiation exposure, 62% of all patients received an estimated cED of over 50 mSv, while 11% of patients received over 100 mSv. The median LAR of cancer incidence was 0.28% (IQR, 0.20-0.40) and there were significant differences between the early gastric cancer and advanced gastric cancer group (p < 0.001) as well as among the three TNM stage groups (p = 0.015). The LAR of cancer incidence exceeded 1% in 2.4% of the patients. The cED increases proportionally along with tumor stage and, even in early gastric cancer or stage I patients, cED is much higher than that found among the general population. Considering the very good prognosis of early gastric cancer after curative surgery, the cED should be considered when designing a postoperative follow-up CT protocol.

  12. Hayabusa Asteroidal Sample Preliminary Examination Team (HASPET) and the Astromaterial Curation Facility at JAXA/ISAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, H.; Fujiwara, A.

    After the successful launch in May 2003, the Hayabusa (MUSES-C) mission of JAXA/ISAS will collect surface materials (e.g., regolith) of several hundred mg to several g in total from the S-type near Earth asteroid (25143) Itokawa in late 2005 and bring them back to ground laboratories in the summer of 2007. The retrieved samples will be given initial analysis at the JAXA/ISAS astromaterial curation facility, which is currently in the preparation for its construction, by the Hayabusa Asteroidal Sample Preliminary Examination Team (HASPET). HASPET is consisted of the ISAS Hayabusa team, the international partners from NASA and Australia and all-Japan meteoritic scientists to be selected as outsourcing parts of the initial analyses. The initial analysis to characterize general aspects of returned samples can consume only 15 % of its total mass and must complete the whole analyses including the database building before international AO for detailed analyses within the maximum of 1 year. Confident exercise of non-destructive, micro-analyses whenever possible are thus vital for the HASPET analysis. In the purpose to survey what kinds and levels of micro-analysis techniques in respective fields, from major elements and mineralogy to trace and isotopic elements and organics, are available in Japan at present, ISAS has conducted the HASPET open competitions in 2000-01 and 2004. The initial evaluation was made by multiple domestic peer reviews. Applicants were then provided two kinds of unknown asteroid sample analogs in order to conduct proposed analysis with self-claimed amount of samples in self-claimed duration. After the completion of multiple, international peer reviews, the Selection Committee compiled evaluations and recommended the finalists of each round. The final members of the HASPET will be appointed about 2 years prior to the Earth return. Then they will conduct a test-run of the whole initial analysis procedures at the ISAS astromaterial curation facility and

  13. Older age impacts on survival outcome in patients receiving curative surgery for solid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hsien Lu

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: Given the global increase in aging populations and cancer incidence, understanding the influence of age on postoperative outcome after cancer surgery is imperative. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of age on survival outcome in solid cancer patients receiving curative surgery. Methods: A total of 37,288 patients receiving curative surgeries for solid cancers between 2007 and 2012 at four affiliated Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were included in the study. All patients were categorized into age groups by decades for survival analysis. Results: The percentages of patient populations aged <40 years, 40–49 years, 50–59 years, 60–69 years, 70–79 years, and ≥80 years were 9.7%, 17.7%, 27.8%, 22.1%, 16.9%, and 5.7%, respectively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months (range, 22.8–60.4 months and the overall, cancer-specific, and noncancer-specific mortality rates were 26.0%, 17.6%, and 8.5%, respectively. The overall mortality rate of patients in different age groups were 18.5%, 21.1%, 22.0%, 25.3%, 35.3%, and 49.0%, respectively. Compared to patients aged <40 years, more significant decrease in long-term survival were observed in aging patients. Multivariate analysis showed higher postoperative short-term mortality rates in patients older than 70 years, and the adjusted odds ratio of mortality risk ranged from 1.47 to 1.74 and 2.26 to 3.03 in patients aged 70–79 years and ≥80 years, respectively, compared to those aged <40 years. Conclusion: Aging was a negative prognostic factor of survival outcome in solid cancer patients receiving curative surgery. After adjustment of other clinicopathologic factors, the influence of age on survival outcome was less apparent in the elderly. Keywords: Age, Solid cancer, Surgical resection, Prognosis

  14. Using random forests for assistance in the curation of G-protein coupled receptor databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkurin, Aleksei; Vellido, Alfredo

    2017-08-18

    Biology is experiencing a gradual but fast transformation from a laboratory-centred science towards a data-centred one. As such, it requires robust data engineering and the use of quantitative data analysis methods as part of database curation. This paper focuses on G protein-coupled receptors, a large and heterogeneous super-family of cell membrane proteins of interest to biology in general. One of its families, Class C, is of particular interest to pharmacology and drug design. This family is quite heterogeneous on its own, and the discrimination of its several sub-families is a challenging problem. In the absence of known crystal structure, such discrimination must rely on their primary amino acid sequences. We are interested not as much in achieving maximum sub-family discrimination accuracy using quantitative methods, but in exploring sequence misclassification behavior. Specifically, we are interested in isolating those sequences showing consistent misclassification, that is, sequences that are very often misclassified and almost always to the same wrong sub-family. Random forests are used for this analysis due to their ensemble nature, which makes them naturally suited to gauge the consistency of misclassification. This consistency is here defined through the voting scheme of their base tree classifiers. Detailed consistency results for the random forest ensemble classification were obtained for all receptors and for all data transformations of their unaligned primary sequences. Shortlists of the most consistently misclassified receptors for each subfamily and transformation, as well as an overall shortlist including those cases that were consistently misclassified across transformations, were obtained. The latter should be referred to experts for further investigation as a data curation task. The automatic discrimination of the Class C sub-families of G protein-coupled receptors from their unaligned primary sequences shows clear limits. This study has

  15. The role of non-governmental organizations in providing curative health services in North Darfur State, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagub, Abdallah I A; Mtshali, Khondlo

    2015-09-01

    Conflict in North Darfur state, Western Sudan started in 2003, and the delivering of curative health services was becoming a greater challenge for the country's limited resources. NGOs have played an important role in providing curative health services. To examine the role that Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) have played in providing curative health services, as well as to identify the difficulties and challenges that affect NGOs in delivering curative health services. Secondary data was collected from different sources, including government offices and medical organizations in Sudan and in North Darfur state. Primary data was obtained through interviews with government and NGOs representatives. The interviews were conducted with (1) expatriates working for international NGOs (N=15) (2) health professionals and administrators working in health sector (N= 45) in the period from November 2010 to January 2011. The government in North Darfur state spent 70% of its financial budget on security, while it spent it less than 1% on providing health services. The international NGOs have been providing 70% of curative health services to the State's population by contributing 52.9% of the health budget and 1 390 health personnel. Since 2003 NGOs have provided technical assistance to the health staff. As a result, more than fifty nurses have been trained to provide care and treatment, more than twenty-three doctors have been trained in laboratory equipment operation, and approximately six senior doctors and hospital directors have received management training. NGOs have been managing and supporting 89 public health facilities, and established 24 health centres in IDP camps, and 20 health centres across all the districts in North Darfur state. The NGOs have played an important role in providing curative health services and in establishing good health facilities, but a future problem is how the government will run these health facilities after a peaceful settlement has been

  16. Ebola Preparedness in the Netherlands: The Need for Coordination Between the Public Health and the Curative Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaan, Corien M; Öry, Alexander V; Schol, Lianne G C; Jacobi, André; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Timen, Aura

    During the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015, close cooperation between the curative sector and the public health sector in the Netherlands was necessary for timely identification, referral, and investigation of patients with suspected Ebola virus disease (EVD). In this study, we evaluated experiences in preparedness among stakeholders of both curative and public health sectors to formulate recommendations for optimizing preparedness protocols. Timeliness of referred patients with suspected EVD was used as indicator for preparedness. In focus group sessions and semistructured interviews, experiences of curative and public health stakeholders about the regional and national process of preparedness and response were listed. Timeliness recordings of all referred patients with suspected EVD (13) were collected from first date of illness until arrival in the referral academic hospital. Ebola preparedness was considered extensive compared with the risk of an actual patient, however necessary. Regional coordination varied between regions. More standardization of regional preparation and operational guidelines was requested, as well as nationally standardized contingency criteria, and the National Centre for Infectious Disease Control was expected to coordinate the development of these guidelines. For the timeliness of referred patients with suspected EVD, the median delay between first date of illness until triage was 2.0 days (range: 0-10 days), and between triage and arrival in the referral hospital, it was 5.0 hours (range: 2-7.5 hours). In none of these patients Ebola infection was confirmed. Coordination between the public health sector and the curative sector needs improvement to reduce delay in patient management in emerging infectious diseases. Standardization of preparedness and response practices, through guidelines for institutional preparedness and blueprints for regional and national coordination, is necessary, as preparedness for emerging infectious

  17. Strict follow-up programme including CT and (18) F-FDG-PET after curative surgery for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N F; Jensen, A B; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2010-01-01

    carcinogenic embryonic antigen (CEA), chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and (18) F-FDG positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Method  A cohort of 132 patients, treated by surgery with curative intent for CRC, was included. Patients were followed prospectively with scheduled...... controls at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after curative surgery. CEA, chest X-ray, US, CT and FDG-PET supplemented by clinical examination. The end-point was recurrence. Sensitivity and specificity was estimated 2 years after surgery. Results  Of the 132 patients included in the study, 25 experienced recurrence...

  18. Possible curative role of the anti psychotic drug fluphenazine against post-irradiation injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, S.H.M.; Abu-Ghadeer, A.R.M.; Osman, S.A.A.; Roushdy, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    In the present study, investigation of the possible curative role of the anti psychotic agent ''fluphenazine'' against post irradiation injury of certain sensitive biological targets has been studied in rats. Such investigation includes evaluation of the haematological levels, liver function as manifested by levels of relevant serum enzymes and kidney function as reflected by level of serum creatinine and rate of urine creatinine clearance. Data of the present study indicated that fractionated whole body gamma-irradiation resulted in haematological disorders, significant elevation in serum enzyme activities of both serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) and serum alkaline phosphatase (SALKPH.), significant decrease in serum cholinesterase (SCHE) activity and a significant increase in serum creatinine accompanied by a significant decrease in creatinine clearance. 4 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Synthetic Polymer with a Structure-Driven Hepatic Deposition and Curative Pharmacological Activity in Hepatic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Camilla Frich; Halling Folkmar Andersen, Anna; Anegaard Rolskov, Lærke

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic polymers make strong contributions as tools for delivery of biological drugs and chemotherapeutics. The most praised characteristic of polymers in these applications is complete lack of pharmacological function such as to minimize the side effects within the human body. In contrast......, synthetic polymers with curative pharmacological activity are truly rare. Moreover, such activity is typically nonspecific rather than structure-defined. In this work, we present the discovery of poly(ethylacrylic acid) (PEAA) as a polymer with a suit of structure-defined, unexpected, pharmacological......, and pharmacokinetic properties not observed in close structural analogues. Specifically, PEAA reveals capacity to bind to albumin with ensuing natural hepatic deposition in vivo and exhibits concurrent inhibitory activity against the hepatitis C virus and inflammation in hepatic cells. Our findings provide a view...

  20. Culto: AN Ontology-Based Annotation Tool for Data Curation in Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garozzo, R.; Murabito, F.; Santagati, C.; Pino, C.; Spampinato, C.

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes CulTO, a software tool relying on a computational ontology for Cultural Heritage domain modelling, with a specific focus on religious historical buildings, for supporting cultural heritage experts in their investigations. It is specifically thought to support annotation, automatic indexing, classification and curation of photographic data and text documents of historical buildings. CULTO also serves as a useful tool for Historical Building Information Modeling (H-BIM) by enabling semantic 3D data modeling and further enrichment with non-geometrical information of historical buildings through the inclusion of new concepts about historical documents, images, decay or deformation evidence as well as decorative elements into BIM platforms. CulTO is the result of a joint research effort between the Laboratory of Surveying and Architectural Photogrammetry "Luigi Andreozzi" and the PeRCeiVe Lab (Pattern Recognition and Computer Vision Lab) of the University of Catania,

  1. First year university student engagement using digital curation and career goal setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The engagement of students is one of the most pressing issues facing higher education in the 21st century. Around the world, participation rates in tertiary education are on the rise and one of the key challenges facing educators is finding ways to engage these students. We present the results of a project that assesses the impact of an engagement strategy in which a cohort of students entering their first year of university (1 establish and maintain a clear goal of their ideal future career and (2 make use of a web-based digital curation tool to research and present their findings. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the strategy, which could arguably be applied to a broad range of disciplines given that the majority of students today are technologically literate.

  2. The Global Registry of Biodiversity Repositories: A Call for Community Curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott E.; Trizna, Michael G.; Graham, Eileen; Crane, Adele E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Global Registry of Biodiversity Repositories is an online metadata resource for biodiversity collections, the institutions that contain them, and associated staff members. The registry provides contact and address information, characteristics of the institutions and collections using controlled vocabularies and free-text descripitons, links to related websites, unique identifiers for each institution and collection record, text fields for loan and use policies, and a variety of other descriptors. Each institution record includes an institutionCode that must be unique, and each collection record must have a collectionCode that is unique within that institution. The registry is populated with records imported from the largest similar registries and more can be harmonized and added. Doing so will require community input and curation and would produce a truly comprehensive and unifying information resource. PMID:27660523

  3. Unique molecular landscapes in cancer: implications for individualized, curated drug combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheler, Jennifer; Lee, J Jack; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2014-12-15

    With increasingly sophisticated technologies in molecular biology and "omic" platforms to analyze patients' tumors, more molecular diversity and complexity in cancer are being observed. Recently, we noted unique genomic profiles in a group of patients with metastatic breast cancer based on an analysis with next-generation sequencing. Among 57 consecutive patients, no two had the same molecular portfolio. Applied genomics therefore appears to represent a disruptive innovation in that it unveils a heterogeneity to metastatic cancer that may be ill-suited to canonical clinical trials and practice paradigms. Upon recognizing that patients have unique tumor landscapes, it is possible that there may be a "mismatch" between our traditional clinical trials system that selects patients based on common characteristics to evaluate a drug (drug-centric approach) and optimal treatment based on curated, individualized drug combinations for each patient (patient-centric approach). ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Short-Term Results of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Curative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sung Ja; Park, Seung Jin; Chung, Woong Ki; Nah, Byung Sik

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 102 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received the curative radiotherapy from August 1985 to October 1988 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Chonnam University Hospital. The follow-up period was ranged from 1 to 37 months and the median follow-up time was 15 months. The actuarial 1 and 2 year survival rate of all the patients was 28% and 5%, respectively. The median survival was 10 months for stage II, 6 months for stage III A, and 9 for III B and the actuarial 2 year survival tate was 12.5%, 12.1%, and 0% respectively. The treatment failure was identified in 32 patients and the locoregional failure was seem in 9 patients (28%) and the distant failure in 23 patients (72%). The initial performance status was related to the survival with statistical significance (p 0.05)

  5. Digital curation of research data experiences of a baseline study in Germany

    CERN Document Server

    Strathmann, Stefan; Oßwald, Achim; Ludwig, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The relevance of research data today and for the future is well documented and discussed, in Germany as well as internationally. Ensuring that research data are accessible, sharable, and re-usable over time is increasingly becoming an essential task for researchers and research infrastructure institutions. Some reasons for this development include the following: - research data are documented and could therefore be validated - research data could be the basis for new research questions - research data could be re-analyzed by using innovative digital methods - research data could be used by other disciplines Therefore, it is essential that research data are curated, which means they are kept accessible and interpretable over time. In Germany, a baseline study was undertaken analyzing the situation in eleven research disciplines in 2012. The results were then published in a German-language edition. To address an international audience, the German-language edition of the study has been translated and abridged. T...

  6. CULTO: AN ONTOLOGY-BASED ANNOTATION TOOL FOR DATA CURATION IN CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Garozzo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes CulTO, a software tool relying on a computational ontology for Cultural Heritage domain modelling, with a specific focus on religious historical buildings, for supporting cultural heritage experts in their investigations. It is specifically thought to support annotation, automatic indexing, classification and curation of photographic data and text documents of historical buildings. CULTO also serves as a useful tool for Historical Building Information Modeling (H-BIM by enabling semantic 3D data modeling and further enrichment with non-geometrical information of historical buildings through the inclusion of new concepts about historical documents, images, decay or deformation evidence as well as decorative elements into BIM platforms. CulTO is the result of a joint research effort between the Laboratory of Surveying and Architectural Photogrammetry “Luigi Andreozzi” and the PeRCeiVe Lab (Pattern Recognition and Computer Vision Lab of the University of Catania,

  7. The Global Registry of Biodiversity Repositories: A Call for Community Curation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindel, David E; Miller, Scott E; Trizna, Michael G; Graham, Eileen; Crane, Adele E

    2016-01-01

    The Global Registry of Biodiversity Repositories is an online metadata resource for biodiversity collections, the institutions that contain them, and associated staff members. The registry provides contact and address information, characteristics of the institutions and collections using controlled vocabularies and free-text descripitons, links to related websites, unique identifiers for each institution and collection record, text fields for loan and use policies, and a variety of other descriptors. Each institution record includes an institutionCode that must be unique, and each collection record must have a collectionCode that is unique within that institution. The registry is populated with records imported from the largest similar registries and more can be harmonized and added. Doing so will require community input and curation and would produce a truly comprehensive and unifying information resource.

  8. Aggregation Tool to Create Curated Data albums to Support Disaster Recovery and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, R.; Kulkarni, A.; Maskey, M.; Li, X.; Flynn, S.

    2014-12-01

    Economic losses due to natural hazards are estimated to be around 6-10 billion dollars annually for the U.S. and this number keeps increasing every year. This increase has been attributed to population growth and migration to more hazard prone locations. As this trend continues, in concert with shifts in weather patterns caused by climate change, it is anticipated that losses associated with natural disasters will keep growing substantially. One of challenges disaster response and recovery analysts face is to quickly find, access and utilize a vast variety of relevant geospatial data collected by different federal agencies. More often analysts may be familiar with limited, but specific datasets and are often unaware of or unfamiliar with a large quantity of other useful resources. Finding airborne or satellite data useful to a natural disaster event often requires a time consuming search through web pages and data archives. The search process for the analyst could be made much more efficient and productive if a tool could go beyond a typical search engine and provide not just links to web sites but actual links to specific data relevant to the natural disaster, parse unstructured reports for useful information nuggets, as well as gather other related reports, summaries, news stories, and images. This presentation will describe a semantic aggregation tool developed to address similar problem for Earth Science researchers. This tool provides automated curation, and creates "Data Albums" to support case studies. The generated "Data Albums" are compiled collections of information related to a specific science topic or event, containing links to relevant data files (granules) from different instruments; tools and services for visualization and analysis; information about the event contained in news reports, and images or videos to supplement research analysis. An ontology-based relevancy-ranking algorithm drives the curation of relevant data sets for a given event. This

  9. Curative procedures of oral health and structural characteristics of primary dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Baumgarten

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate if the provision of clinical dental care, by means of the main curative procedures recommended in Primary Health Care, is associated with team structural characteristics, considering the presence of a minimum set of equipment, instrument, and supplies in Brazil’s primary health care services. METHODS A cross-sectional exploratory study based on data collected from 18,114 primary healthcare services with dental health teams in Brazil, in 2014. The outcome was created from the confirmation of five clinical procedures performed by the dentist, accounting for the presence of minimum equipment, instrument, and supplies to carry them out. Covariables were related to structural characteristics. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to obtain crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS A total of 1,190 (6.5% dental health teams did not present the minimum equipment to provide clinical dental care and only 2,498 (14.8% had all the instrument and supplies needed and provided the five curative procedures assessed. There was a positive association between the outcome and the composition of dental health teams, higher workload, performing analysis of health condition, and monitoring of oral health indicators. Additionally, the dental health teams that planned and programmed oral health actions with the primary care team monthly provided the procedures more frequently. Dentists with better employment status, career plans, graduation in public health or those who underwent permanent education activities provided the procedures more frequently. CONCLUSIONS A relevant number of Primary Health Care services did not have the infrastructure to provide clinical dental care. However, better results were found in dental health teams with oral health technicians, with higher workload and that plan their activities, as well as in those that employed dentists with better working relationships

  10. Curative procedures of oral health and structural characteristics of primary dental care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Alexandre; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Bulgarelli, Alexandre Fávero; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate if the provision of clinical dental care, by means of the main curative procedures recommended in Primary Health Care, is associated with team structural characteristics, considering the presence of a minimum set of equipment, instrument, and supplies in Brazil’s primary health care services. METHODS A cross-sectional exploratory study based on data collected from 18,114 primary healthcare services with dental health teams in Brazil, in 2014. The outcome was created from the confirmation of five clinical procedures performed by the dentist, accounting for the presence of minimum equipment, instrument, and supplies to carry them out. Covariables were related to structural characteristics. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to obtain crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS A total of 1,190 (6.5%) dental health teams did not present the minimum equipment to provide clinical dental care and only 2,498 (14.8%) had all the instrument and supplies needed and provided the five curative procedures assessed. There was a positive association between the outcome and the composition of dental health teams, higher workload, performing analysis of health condition, and monitoring of oral health indicators. Additionally, the dental health teams that planned and programmed oral health actions with the primary care team monthly provided the procedures more frequently. Dentists with better employment status, career plans, graduation in public health or those who underwent permanent education activities provided the procedures more frequently. CONCLUSIONS A relevant number of Primary Health Care services did not have the infrastructure to provide clinical dental care. However, better results were found in dental health teams with oral health technicians, with higher workload and that plan their activities, as well as in those that employed dentists with better working relationships, who had dentists

  11. Refusal of Curative Radiation Therapy and Surgery Among Patients With Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizer, Ayal A., E-mail: aaaizer@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States); Parekh, Arti [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kim, Simon P. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Martin, Neil E. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hu, Jim C. [Department of Urology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Trinh, Quoc-Dien [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Nguyen, Paul L. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. Results: In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (P<.001 in all cases). Refusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; P<.001 and HR 1.97 [95% CI, 1.78-2.18]; P<.001, respectively). Conclusions: Nonwhite, less affluent, and unmarried patients are more likely to refuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life

  12. Comprehensive curation and analysis of global interaction networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguly, Teresa; Breitkreutz, Ashton; Boucher, Lorrie; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Hon, Gary C; Myers, Chad L; Parsons, Ainslie; Friesen, Helena; Oughtred, Rose; Tong, Amy; Stark, Chris; Ho, Yuen; Botstein, David; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Troyanskya, Olga G; Ideker, Trey; Dolinski, Kara; Batada, Nizar N; Tyers, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Background The study of complex biological networks and prediction of gene function has been enabled by high-throughput (HTP) methods for detection of genetic and protein interactions. Sparse coverage in HTP datasets may, however, distort network properties and confound predictions. Although a vast number of well substantiated interactions are recorded in the scientific literature, these data have not yet been distilled into networks that enable system-level inference. Results We describe here a comprehensive database of genetic and protein interactions, and associated experimental evidence, for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as manually curated from over 31,793 abstracts and online publications. This literature-curated (LC) dataset contains 33,311 interactions, on the order of all extant HTP datasets combined. Surprisingly, HTP protein-interaction datasets currently achieve only around 14% coverage of the interactions in the literature. The LC network nevertheless shares attributes with HTP networks, including scale-free connectivity and correlations between interactions, abundance, localization, and expression. We find that essential genes or proteins are enriched for interactions with other essential genes or proteins, suggesting that the global network may be functionally unified. This interconnectivity is supported by a substantial overlap of protein and genetic interactions in the LC dataset. We show that the LC dataset considerably improves the predictive power of network-analysis approaches. The full LC dataset is available at the BioGRID () and SGD () databases. Conclusion Comprehensive datasets of biological interactions derived from the primary literature provide critical benchmarks for HTP methods, augment functional prediction, and reveal system-level attributes of biological networks. PMID:16762047

  13. The Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics: An Example of Software Curation and Citation in the Geodynamics Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, L.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2017-12-01

    Curation of software promotes discoverability and accessibility and works hand in hand with scholarly citation to ascribe value to, and provide recognition for software development. To meet this challenge, the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) maintains a community repository built on custom and open tools to promote discovery, access, identification, credit, and provenance of research software for the geodynamics community. CIG (geodynamics.org) originated from recognition of the tremendous effort required to develop sound software and the need to reduce duplication of effort and to sustain community codes. CIG curates software across 6 domains and has developed and follows software best practices that include establishing test cases, documentation, and a citable publication for each software package. CIG software landing web pages provide access to current and past releases; many are also accessible through the CIG community repository on github. CIG has now developed abc - attribution builder for citation to enable software users to give credit to software developers. abc uses zenodo as an archive and as the mechanism to obtain a unique identifier (DOI) for scientific software. To assemble the metadata, we searched the software's documentation and research publications and then requested the primary developers to verify. In this process, we have learned that each development community approaches software attribution differently. The metadata gathered is based on guidelines established by groups such as FORCE11 and OntoSoft. The rollout of abc is gradual as developers are forward-looking, rarely willing to go back and archive prior releases in zenodo. Going forward all actively developed packages will utilize the zenodo and github integration to automate the archival process when a new release is issued. How to handle legacy software, multi-authored libraries, and assigning roles to software remain open issues.

  14. Advanced Age is Not a Contraindication for Treatment With Curative Intent in Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voncken, Francine E M; van der Kaaij, Rosa T; Sikorska, Karolina; van Werkhoven, Erik; van Dieren, Jolanda M; Grootscholten, Cecile; Snaebjornsson, Petur; van Sandick, Johanna W; Aleman, Berthe M P

    2017-07-31

    The objective of this study is to compare long-term outcomes between younger and older (70 y and above) esophageal cancer patients treated with curative intent. Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and locoregional recurrence-free interval were compared between older (70 y and above) and younger (below 70 y) esophageal cancer patients treated between 1998 and 2013. Treatment consisted of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with surgery or definitive chemoradiotherapy: 36 to 50.4 Gy in 18 to 28 fractions combined with 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin or carboplatin/paclitaxel. The study comprised 253 patients, of whom 76 were 70 years and older. Median age was 64 years (range, 41 to 83). Most patients had stage II-IIIA disease (83%). Planned treatment was neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with surgery for 169 patients (41 patients aged 70 y and older) and definitive chemoradiotherapy for 84 patients (31 patients aged 70 y and older). The compliance to radiotherapy was 92%, with no difference between older and younger patients. In 33 patients (13 patients aged 70 y and older) planned surgery was not performed. Median follow-up was 4.9 years. Three-year OS was 42%. The multivariable analysis showed no statistical difference in OS or in DFS comparing older and younger patients: OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-1.28), DFS (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.60-1.25). Elderly showed a longer locoregional recurrence-free interval; HR, 0.53 (95% CI, 0.30-0.92; P=0.02) and a higher pathologic complete response rate (50% vs. 25%; P=0.02). Long-term outcomes of older esophageal cancer patients (70 y and above) selected for treatment with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery or definitive chemoradiotherapy were comparable with the outcomes of their younger counterparts. Advanced age alone should not be a contraindication for potentially curative chemoradiotherapy-based treatment in esophageal cancer patients.

  15. Curative procedures of oral health and structural characteristics of primary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Alexandre; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Bulgarelli, Alexandre Fávero; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot

    2018-04-09

    To evaluate if the provision of clinical dental care, by means of the main curative procedures recommended in Primary Health Care, is associated with team structural characteristics, considering the presence of a minimum set of equipment, instrument, and supplies in Brazil's primary health care services. A cross-sectional exploratory study based on data collected from 18,114 primary healthcare services with dental health teams in Brazil, in 2014. The outcome was created from the confirmation of five clinical procedures performed by the dentist, accounting for the presence of minimum equipment, instrument, and supplies to carry them out. Covariables were related to structural characteristics. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to obtain crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, with 95% confidence intervals. A total of 1,190 (6.5%) dental health teams did not present the minimum equipment to provide clinical dental care and only 2,498 (14.8%) had all the instrument and supplies needed and provided the five curative procedures assessed. There was a positive association between the outcome and the composition of dental health teams, higher workload, performing analysis of health condition, and monitoring of oral health indicators. Additionally, the dental health teams that planned and programmed oral health actions with the primary care team monthly provided the procedures more frequently. Dentists with better employment status, career plans, graduation in public health or those who underwent permanent education activities provided the procedures more frequently. A relevant number of Primary Health Care services did not have the infrastructure to provide clinical dental care. However, better results were found in dental health teams with oral health technicians, with higher workload and that plan their activities, as well as in those that employed dentists with better working relationships, who had dentists with degrees in public health and who underwent

  16. Preventative and Curative Effects of Several Plant Derived Agents Against Powdery Mildew Disease of Okra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Hemdan Ahmed MOHARAM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The preventative and curative effects of some plant derived agents based on plant extracts or essential oils were studied at different concentrations against Erysiphe cichoracearum DC. ex Merat, the causal pathogen of okra powdery mildew by the detached leaf-disk and potted plants bioassays. Through detached leaf-disk assay, the highest mean preventative effect (97.74% was recorded by neem seed oil followed by jojoba oil (89.82% and extract of Rynoutria sachalinensis (82.77%. Neem seed oil at 1% was the most effective agent followed by jojoba oil and extract of R. sachalinensis at 1.5% and 2%, respectively, where they suppressed E. cichoracearum completely. Potted plants assay revealed that neem seed oil, jojoba oil and extract of R. sachalinensis as well as the fungicide (active ingredient dinocap showed higher preventative efficacy at all leaf olds treated after 7 and 14 days of inoculation as compared with extracts of henna and garlic. Moreover, the preventative efficacy partly remained apparent after 14 days of inoculation at all leaf olds tested. In field trials through 2010 and 2011 growing seasons, when the first symptoms of powdery mildew appeared naturally, 1.5% jojoba oil, 2% extract of R. sachalinensis and 1% neem seed oil were sprayed individually twice on grown plants to evaluate their efficacy on controlling powdery mildew, growth and yield of okra. Resulted showed that neem seed oil was the most effective agent and highly decreased the disease severity to 29.92%, recorded the highly curative effect (68.15% and also improved plant growth and pods yield.

  17. Outcome following curative-intent surgery for oral melanoma in dogs: 70 cases (1998-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohy, Joanne L; Selmic, Laura E; Worley, Deanna R; Ehrhart, Nicole P; Withrow, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome in terms of progression-free interval (PFI) and overall survival time (ST) after curative-intent resection of oral melanoma in dogs. Retrospective case series. 70 client-owned dogs. An electronic medical record search and review was performed for dogs that underwent curative-intent resection of oral melanoma (May 1, 1998, to December 31, 2011). Information gathered included signalment, oral location of tumor, staging results, type of surgery, type of adjuvant therapy, findings on histologic evaluation, and outcome. 36 (51.4%), 16 (22.9%), 13 (18.6%), and 1 (1.4%) of 70 dogs had tumors classified as stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively; tumor stage could not be determined for 4 (5.7%) dogs because of the lack of tumor size information. Fifty-one (72.9%) dogs had tumors completely excised. Twenty-nine (41.4%) dogs received adjuvant therapy. Median PFI and ST were 508 and 723 days, respectively. Thirty-two (45.7%) dogs had disease progression. Significant associations with PFI or ST were found for administration of adjuvant therapy, presence of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, higher tumor stage (III or IV), increased tumor size (> 3 cm), and sexually intact female dogs. Administration of adjuvant treatment was associated with a 130% increased hazard (hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0 to 5.0) of disease progression; the presence of metastases at the time of diagnosis was associated with a 281% increased hazard (hazard ratio, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5 to 9.6) of death. Results indicated that dogs with oral melanoma can have a long PFI and ST after resection with wide margins.

  18. Refusal of Curative Radiation Therapy and Surgery Among Patients With Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Parekh, Arti; Choueiri, Toni K.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Kim, Simon P.; Martin, Neil E.; Hu, Jim C.; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. Results: In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (P<.001 in all cases). Refusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; P<.001 and HR 1.97 [95% CI, 1.78-2.18]; P<.001, respectively). Conclusions: Nonwhite, less affluent, and unmarried patients are more likely to refuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life

  19. Refusal of curative radiation therapy and surgery among patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizer, Ayal A; Chen, Ming-Hui; Parekh, Arti; Choueiri, Toni K; Hoffman, Karen E; Kim, Simon P; Martin, Neil E; Hu, Jim C; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L

    2014-07-15

    Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (PRefusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; Prefuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life-saving care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Short-term curative effects of Tantalum rod treatment in early avascular necrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fu-Sheng; Ni, Zhe-Ji; Chu, Xiao-Bing; He, Bang-Jian; Li, Ju; Tong, Pei-Jian

    2013-08-01

    To explore the recent clinical curative effect of Tantalum rod in treating the early avascular necrosis. From January 2008 to November 2008, the 25 patients (39 hips) with early avascular necrosis accepted tantalum rod placement and included 9 males (11 hips) and 16 females (28 hips) with an average age of 37 years old ranging from 18 to 74 years old. Four patients (6 hips) caused by Alcoholic, 6 patients (8 hips) by hormone, 2 cases (2 hips) by traumatic, 13 cases (23 hips) by idiopathic. Steinberg preoperative stage involved 7 hips in period I, 24 hips in period II, 8 hips in period III. Curative effect analysis included preoperative and postoperative Harris score, radiographic changes and hip replacement for follow-up to accept the end of the femoral head survival rate. All patients were followed up for 6 to 47 months (averaged 37.4 months). All 12 hips imaging appeard progress,including tantalum rod exit in 1 hip, hip hemiarthroplasty collapse in 3 hips, the area increased to avascular necrosis in 8 hips. Six hips accepted total hip replacement, including imaging progress in 5 hips (41.7%, 5/12), no imaging progress in 1 hip (3.7%,1/27). All hips' Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed 6-month survival rate was (97.4 +/- 2.5)% after tantalum stick insertion, 1-year survival rate was (94.7 +/- 3.6), and 2-year survival rate was (88.6 +/- 5.4)%, 3-year survival rate was (72.5 +/- 11.2). It is effective for treatment of avascular necrosis of femoral head in Steinberg I and II by Tantalum rod, and it can effectively relieve femoral head replacement time.

  1. A spindle cell anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma with rhabdoid features following curative resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Amano, Hironobu; Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihisa; Yonehara, Shuji; Kuranishi, Fumito; Nakahara, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yoshinori; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    Anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (ANPC) accounts for ~5% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases. Due to its rarity, its clinical features and surgical outcomes remain to be clearly understood. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to Onomichi General Hospital (Onomichi, Japan) in April 2015 without any significant past medical history. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a 9.5×8.0 cm tumor in the body and tail of the pancreas. The patient developed acute abdominal pain 3 weeks later and the CT revealed massive abdominal bleeding caused by tumor rupture. The tumor increased in size and reached 12.0×10.0 cm in maximal diameter. The tumor doubling time was estimated to be 13 days. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT confirmed the absence of distant metastasis since FDG accumulation was detected only in the tumor lesion. Emergency distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histologically, the tumor was classified as a spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features. The patient succumbed to mortality 8 months following the surgery while undergoing systemic adjuvant chemotherapy for multiple liver metastases. ANPC is difficult to detect in the early stages due to its progressive nature and atypical radiological findings. Long-term survival can be achieved only by curative resection; therefore, surgical resection must be performed whenever possible, even if the chance of long-term survival following surgery is considered dismal. As the present case suggested, spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features is highly aggressive and curative-intent resection must not be delayed.

  2. Tissue Engineering Strategies for Myocardial Regeneration: Acellular Versus Cellular Scaffolds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Maribella; Polo-Corrales, Lilliana; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E; Freytes, Donald O

    2016-12-01

    Heart disease remains one of the leading causes of death in industrialized nations with myocardial infarction (MI) contributing to at least one fifth of the reported deaths. The hypoxic environment eventually leads to cellular death and scar tissue formation. The scar tissue that forms is not mechanically functional and often leads to myocardial remodeling and eventual heart failure. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine principles provide an alternative approach to restoring myocardial function by designing constructs that will restore the mechanical function of the heart. In this review, we will describe the cellular events that take place after an MI and describe current treatments. We will also describe how biomaterials, alone or in combination with a cellular component, have been used to engineer suitable myocardium replacement constructs and how new advanced culture systems will be required to achieve clinical success.

  3. Pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema – cellular and molecular events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Di Petta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary emphysema is a chronic obstructive disease, resulting fromimportant alterations in the whole distal structure of terminal bronchioles, either by enlargement of air spaces or by destruction of the alveolar wall, leading to loss of respiratory surface, decreased elastic recoil and lung hyperinflation. For many years, the hypothesis of protease-antiprotease unbalance prevailed as the central theme in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. According to this hypothesis, the release of active proteolytic enzymes, produced mainly by neutrophils and macrophages, degrades the extracellular matrix, affecting the integrity of its components, especially collagen and elastic fibers. However, new concepts involving cellular and molecular events were proposed, including oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, cellular senescence and failed lung tissue repair. The aim of this review paper was to evaluate the cellular and molecular mechanisms seen in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema.

  4. Universal map for cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2012-01-01

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived. -- Highlights: ► A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA). ► The map is generalized to 2D for Von Neumann, Moore and hexagonal neighborhoods. ► A map for all Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs is derived. ► A map for Conway's “Game of Life” is obtained.

  5. Simulating physics with cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichniac, G Y

    1984-01-01

    Cellular automata are dynamical systems where space, time, and variables are discrete. They are shown on two-dimensional examples to be capable of non-numerical simulations of physics. They are useful for faithful parallel processing of lattice models. At another level, they exhibit behaviours and illustrate concepts that are unmistakably physical, such as non-ergodicity and order parameters, frustration, relaxation to chaos through period doublings, a conspicuous arrow of time in reversible microscopic dynamics, causality and light-cone, and non-separability. In general, they constitute exactly computable models for complex phenomena and large-scale correlations that result from very simple short-range interactions. The author studies their space, time, and intrinsic symmetries and the corresponding conservation laws, with an emphasis on the conservation of information obeyed by reversible cellular automata. 60 references.

  6. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  7. Cellular automata with voting rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowiec, D.

    1996-01-01

    The chosen local interaction - the voting (majority) rule applied to the square lattice is known to cause the non ergodic cellular automata behaviour. Presented computer simulation results verify two cases of non ergodicity. The first one is implicated by the noise introduced to the local interactions and the second one follows properties of the initial lattice configuration selected at random. For the simplified voting rule - non symmetric voting, the critical behaviour has been explained rigorously. (author)

  8. Ebola Preparedness in the Netherlands: The Need for Coordination Between the Public Health and the Curative Sector.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaan, Corien M; Öry, Alexander V; Schol, Lianne G C; Jacobi, André; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Timen, Aura

    2018-01-01

    During the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015, close cooperation between the curative sector and the public health sector in the Netherlands was necessary for timely identification, referral, and investigation of patients with suspected Ebola virus disease (EVD).

  9. Predictive performance of TPA testing for recurrent disease during follow-up after curative intent surgery for colorectal carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Frederik J.; Zhan, Zhuozhao; Verberne, Charlotte J.; Muller Kobold, Anneke C.; Wiggers, Theo; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive performance of serial tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) testing after curative intent resection for detection of recurrence of colorectal malignancy. Methods: Serum samples were obtained in 572 patients from three different

  10. Ebola Preparedness in the Netherlands: The Need for Coordination Between the Public Health and the Curative Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Swaan (Corien); Öry, A.V. (Alexander V.); Schol, L.G.C. (Lianne G. C.); A. Jacobi (Andre); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); A. Timen (Aura)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractContext: During the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015, close cooperation between the curative sector and the public health sector in the Netherlands was necessary for timely identification, referral, and investigation of patients with suspected Ebola virus disease (EVD).

  11. Dosimetric analysis of tapered midline shielding block and rectangular central shield utilised in the curative treatment of carcinoma of cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badkul, Rajeev K.; Kumar, S.; Sanyal, B.; Panday, R.K.; Patel, Aarti K.

    1998-01-01

    Carcinoma of uterine cervix is the most common malignant neoplasm among the Indian women. The incidence of cervical carcinoma is substantially higher among the women in low socio-economic classes. Radiotherapy is one of the effective modality in the curative treatment of carcinoma of cervix

  12. Estimation of annual committed effective dose due to radioactivity of curative drinking thermal spring waters in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirican, A.; Shahin, M.; Serefinoglu, M.; Erden, P.E.; Shahin, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : Spa customers protection against natural radioactivity in curative drinking thermal water is not regulated in Europe and Turkey. For this reason, a technical cooperation project was conducted to provide a report containing radioactivity measurement results, dosimetric calculations and analysis of the radiation protection regulations to be applied in spas

  13. Correcting Inconsistencies and Errors in Bacterial Genome Metadata Using an Automated Curation Tool in Excel (AutoCurE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedes, Sarah E; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome data are invaluable for large-scale comparative genomic studies. Current sequencing technologies have made it feasible to sequence entire bacterial genomes with relative ease and time with a substantially reduced cost per nucleotide, hence cost per genome. More than 3,000 bacterial genomes have been sequenced and are available at the finished status. Publically available genomes can be readily downloaded; however, there are challenges to verify the specific supporting data contained within the download and to identify errors and inconsistencies that may be present within the organizational data content and metadata. AutoCurE, an automated tool for bacterial genome database curation in Excel, was developed to facilitate local database curation of supporting data that accompany downloaded genomes from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. AutoCurE provides an automated approach to curate local genomic databases by flagging inconsistencies or errors by comparing the downloaded supporting data to the genome reports to verify genome name, RefSeq accession numbers, the presence of archaea, BioProject/UIDs, and sequence file descriptions. Flags are generated for nine metadata fields if there are inconsistencies between the downloaded genomes and genomes reports and if erroneous or missing data are evident. AutoCurE is an easy-to-use tool for local database curation for large-scale genome data prior to downstream analyses.

  14. Semi-automated curation of metabolic models via flux balance analysis: a case study with Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy J Bautista

    Full Text Available Primarily used for metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, genome-scale metabolic modeling shows tremendous potential as a tool for fundamental research and curation of metabolism. Through a novel integration of flux balance analysis and genetic algorithms, a strategy to curate metabolic networks and facilitate identification of metabolic pathways that may not be directly inferable solely from genome annotation was developed. Specifically, metabolites involved in unknown reactions can be determined, and potentially erroneous pathways can be identified. The procedure developed allows for new fundamental insight into metabolism, as well as acting as a semi-automated curation methodology for genome-scale metabolic modeling. To validate the methodology, a genome-scale metabolic model for the bacterium Mycoplasma gallisepticum was created. Several reactions not predicted by the genome annotation were postulated and validated via the literature. The model predicted an average growth rate of 0.358±0.12[Formula: see text], closely matching the experimentally determined growth rate of M. gallisepticum of 0.244±0.03[Formula: see text]. This work presents a powerful algorithm for facilitating the identification and curation of previously known and new metabolic pathways, as well as presenting the first genome-scale reconstruction of M. gallisepticum.

  15. The KnownLeaf literature curation system captures knowledge about Arabidopsis leaf growth and development and facilitates integrated data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szakonyi, D.; Landeghem, van S.; Baerenfaller, K.; Baeyens, L.; Blomme, J.; Casanova-Saéz, R.; Bodt, De S.; Esteve-Bruna, D.; Fiorani, F.; Gonzalez, N.; Grønlund, J.; Immink, R.G.H.; Jover-Gil, S.; Kuwabara, A.; Muñoz-Nortes, T.; Dijk, van A.D.J.; Wilson-Sánchez, D.; Buchanan-Wollaston, V.; Angenent, G.C.; Peer, Van de Y.; Inzé, D.; Micol, J.L.; Gruissem, W.; Walsh, S.; Hilson, P.

    2015-01-01

    The information that connects genotypes and phenotypes is essentially embedded in research articles written in natural language. To facilitate access to this knowledge, we constructed a framework for the curation of the scientific literature studying the molecular mechanisms that control leaf growth

  16. Patient-reported symptoms during radiotherapy : Clinically relevant symptom burden in patients treated with palliative and curative intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Philipp; Ehrmann, Katja; Hartmannsgruber, Johann; Metz, Michaela; Steigerwald, Sabrina; Flentje, Michael; van Oorschot, Birgitt

    2017-07-01

    The benefits of patient-reported symptom assessment combined with integrated palliative care are well documented. This study assessed the symptom burden of palliative and curative-intent radiation oncology patients. Prior to first consultation and at the end of RT, all adult cancer patients planned to receive fractionated percutaneous radiotherapy (RT) were asked to answer the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS; nine symptoms from 0 = no symptoms to 10 = worst possible symptoms). Mean values were used for curative vs. palliative and pre-post comparisons, and the clinical relevance was evaluated (symptom values ≥ 4). Of 163 participating patients, 151 patients (90.9%) completed both surveys (116 curative and 35 palliative patients). Before beginning RT, 88.6% of palliative and 72.3% of curative patients showed at least one clinically relevant symptom. Curative patients most frequently named decreased general wellbeing (38.6%), followed by tiredness (35.0%), anxiety (32.4%), depression (30.0%), pain (26.3%), lack of appetite (23.5%), dyspnea (17.8%), drowsiness (8.0%) and nausea (6.1%). Palliative patients most frequently named decreased general wellbeing (62.8%), followed by pain (62.8%), tiredness (60.0%), lack of appetite (40.0%), anxiety (38.0%), depression (33.3%), dyspnea (28.5%), drowsiness (25.7%) and nausea (14.2%). At the end of RT, the proportion of curative and palliative patients with a clinically relevant symptom had increased significantly to 79.8 and 91.4%, respectively; whereas the proportion of patients reporting clinically relevant pain had decreased significantly (42.8 vs. 62.8%, respectively). Palliative patients had significantly increased tiredness. Curative patients reported significant increases in pain, tiredness, nausea, drowsiness, lack of appetite and restrictions in general wellbeing. Assessment of patient-reported symptoms was successfully realized in radiation oncology routine. Overall, both groups showed a high symptom

  17. Patient-reported symptoms during radiotherapy. Clinically relevant symptom burden in patients treated with palliative and curative intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, Philipp; Ehrmann, Katja; Hartmannsgruber, Johann; Metz, Michaela; Steigerwald, Sabrina; Flentje, Michael; Oorschot, Birgitt van

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of patient-reported symptom assessment combined with integrated palliative care are well documented. This study assessed the symptom burden of palliative and curative-intent radiation oncology patients. Prior to first consultation and at the end of RT, all adult cancer patients planned to receive fractionated percutaneous radiotherapy (RT) were asked to answer the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS; nine symptoms from 0 = no symptoms to 10 = worst possible symptoms). Mean values were used for curative vs. palliative and pre-post comparisons, and the clinical relevance was evaluated (symptom values ≥ 4). Of 163 participating patients, 151 patients (90.9%) completed both surveys (116 curative and 35 palliative patients). Before beginning RT, 88.6% of palliative and 72.3% of curative patients showed at least one clinically relevant symptom. Curative patients most frequently named decreased general wellbeing (38.6%), followed by tiredness (35.0%), anxiety (32.4%), depression (30.0%), pain (26.3%), lack of appetite (23.5%), dyspnea (17.8%), drowsiness (8.0%) and nausea (6.1%). Palliative patients most frequently named decreased general wellbeing (62.8%), followed by pain (62.8%), tiredness (60.0%), lack of appetite (40.0%), anxiety (38.0%), depression (33.3%), dyspnea (28.5%), drowsiness (25.7%) and nausea (14.2%). At the end of RT, the proportion of curative and palliative patients with a clinically relevant symptom had increased significantly to 79.8 and 91.4%, respectively; whereas the proportion of patients reporting clinically relevant pain had decreased significantly (42.8 vs. 62.8%, respectively). Palliative patients had significantly increased tiredness. Curative patients reported significant increases in pain, tiredness, nausea, drowsiness, lack of appetite and restrictions in general wellbeing. Assessment of patient-reported symptoms was successfully realized in radiation oncology routine. Overall, both groups showed a high symptom burden

  18. The BioC-BioGRID corpus: full text articles annotated for curation of protein–protein and genetic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Chang, Christie S.; Oughtred, Rose; Rust, Jennifer; Wilbur, W. John; Comeau, Donald C.; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike

    2017-01-01

    A great deal of information on the molecular genetics and biochemistry of model organisms has been reported in the scientific literature. However, this data is typically described in free text form and is not readily amenable to computational analyses. To this end, the BioGRID database systematically curates the biomedical literature for genetic and protein interaction data. This data is provided in a standardized computationally tractable format and includes structured annotation of experimental evidence. BioGRID curation necessarily involves substantial human effort by expert curators who must read each publication to extract the relevant information. Computational text-mining methods offer the potential to augment and accelerate manual curation. To facilitate the development of practical text-mining strategies, a new challenge was organized in BioCreative V for the BioC task, the collaborative Biocurator Assistant Task. This was a non-competitive, cooperative task in which the participants worked together to build BioC-compatible modules into an integrated pipeline to assist BioGRID curators. As an integral part of this task, a test collection of full text articles was developed that contained both biological entity annotations (gene/protein and organism/species) and molecular interaction annotations (protein–protein and genetic interactions (PPIs and GIs)). This collection, which we call the BioC-BioGRID corpus, was annotated by four BioGRID curators over three rounds of annotation and contains 120 full text articles curated in a dataset representing two major model organisms, namely budding yeast and human. The BioC-BioGRID corpus contains annotations for 6409 mentions of genes and their Entrez Gene IDs, 186 mentions of organism names and their NCBI Taxonomy IDs, 1867 mentions of PPIs and 701 annotations of PPI experimental evidence statements, 856 mentions of GIs and 399 annotations of GI evidence statements. The purpose, characteristics and possible future

  19. The BioC-BioGRID corpus: full text articles annotated for curation of protein-protein and genetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamaj Dogan, Rezarta; Kim, Sun; Chatr-Aryamontri, Andrew; Chang, Christie S; Oughtred, Rose; Rust, Jennifer; Wilbur, W John; Comeau, Donald C; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike

    2017-01-01

    A great deal of information on the molecular genetics and biochemistry of model organisms has been reported in the scientific literature. However, this data is typically described in free text form and is not readily amenable to computational analyses. To this end, the BioGRID database systematically curates the biomedical literature for genetic and protein interaction data. This data is provided in a standardized computationally tractable format and includes structured annotation of experimental evidence. BioGRID curation necessarily involves substantial human effort by expert curators who must read each publication to extract the relevant information. Computational text-mining methods offer the potential to augment and accelerate manual curation. To facilitate the development of practical text-mining strategies, a new challenge was organized in BioCreative V for the BioC task, the collaborative Biocurator Assistant Task. This was a non-competitive, cooperative task in which the participants worked together to build BioC-compatible modules into an integrated pipeline to assist BioGRID curators. As an integral part of this task, a test collection of full text articles was developed that contained both biological entity annotations (gene/protein and organism/species) and molecular interaction annotations (protein-protein and genetic interactions (PPIs and GIs)). This collection, which we call the BioC-BioGRID corpus, was annotated by four BioGRID curators over three rounds of annotation and contains 120 full text articles curated in a dataset representing two major model organisms, namely budding yeast and human. The BioC-BioGRID corpus contains annotations for 6409 mentions of genes and their Entrez Gene IDs, 186 mentions of organism names and their NCBI Taxonomy IDs, 1867 mentions of PPIs and 701 annotations of PPI experimental evidence statements, 856 mentions of GIs and 399 annotations of GI evidence statements. The purpose, characteristics and possible future

  20. Pattern of failure in 5001 patients treated for glottic squamous cell carcinoma with curative intent - A population based study from the DAHANCA group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Nina Munk; Johansen, Jørgen; Kristensen, Claus A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the pattern of failure in a national consecutive cohort of patients with glottic squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) treated with primary radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent over a 41-year period. Materials and methods All patients undergoing curative treatment for a glottic SCC...

  1. Uptake of [3H]PAH and [14C]urate into isolated proximal tubular segments of the pig kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schali, C.; Roch-Ramel, F.

    1981-01-01

    Segments of proximal convoluted (PCT) and proximal straight (PST) tubules of minipigs and normal-sized pigs were microdissected (without collagenase treatment) and incubated (30 min, 37 0 C, pH 7.4) in Ringer solution (under O 2 ) containing [ 3 H]PAH (3.10 -5 M) or [ 14 C]urate (9.10 -5 M) and, in inhibitor studies, probenecid, pyrazinoic acid (PZA), urate, or PAH, all at 1 mM. In both strains the uptake of [ 3 H]PAH expressed as mean T/M ratio (cpm per ml tissue water/cpm per ml incubation medium) was significantly higher (P 14 C]urate. In eight minipigs the T/M was 4.9 +/- 0.5 in 24 PCT and 2 +/- 0.2 in 25 PST. In normal-sized pigs the T/M was 3.8 +/- 0.3 in 35 PCT (five pigs) and 1.9 +/- 0.4 in eight PST (two pigs). In inhibitor studies urate significantly depressed the uptake of [ 3 H]PAH, and unlabeled PAH depressed the uptake of [ 14 C]urate. PZA significantly inhibited the uptake of [ 14 C]urate but not that of [ 3 H]PAH, whereas probenecid had a strong inhibitory efect on the uptake of both compounds. These results suggest that [ 14 C]urate and [ 3 H]PAH are transported by a transport system located mainly in the proximal convoluted tubule. These findings are in contrast in the findings are in contrast to the findings obtained in rabbits in which the transport system of PAH and urate is mainly located in the proximal part of the pars recta

  2. Improving the Discoverability and Availability of Sample Data and Imagery in NASA's Astromaterials Curation Digital Repository Using a New Common Architecture for Sample Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, N. S.; Evans, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) is the designated facility for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. The suite of collections includes the lunar samples from the Apollo missions, cosmic dust particles falling into the Earth's atmosphere, meteorites collected in Antarctica, comet and interstellar dust particles from the Stardust mission, asteroid particles from the Japanese Hayabusa mission, and solar wind atoms collected during the Genesis mission. To support planetary science research on these samples, NASA's Astromaterials Curation Office hosts the Astromaterials Curation Digital Repository, which provides descriptions of the missions and collections, and critical information about each individual sample. Our office is implementing several informatics initiatives with the goal of better serving the planetary research community. One of these initiatives aims to increase the availability and discoverability of sample data and images through the use of a newly designed common architecture for Astromaterials Curation databases.

  3. Nanoparticle Surface Functionality Dictates Cellular and Systemic Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saei, Amir Ata; Yazdani, Mahdieh; Lohse, Samuel E.

    2017-01-01

    can greatly enhance subsequent therapeutic effects of NPs while diminishing their adverse side effects. In this review, we will focus on the effect of surface functionality on the cellular uptake and the transport of NPs by various subcellular processes.......Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) have opened new frontiers in therapeutics and diagnostics in recent years. The surface functionality of these nanoparticles often predominates their interactions with various biological components of human body, and proper selection or control of surface functionality...

  4. Movies of cellular and sub-cellular motion by digital holographic microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lingfeng

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological specimens, such as living cells and their intracellular components, often exhibit very little amplitude contrast, making it difficult for conventional bright field microscopes to distinguish them from their surroundings. To overcome this problem phase contrast techniques such as Zernike, Normarsky and dark-field microscopies have been developed to improve specimen visibility without chemically or physically altering them by the process of staining. These techniques have proven to be invaluable tools for studying living cells and furthering scientific understanding of fundamental cellular processes such as mitosis. However a drawback of these techniques is that direct quantitative phase imaging is not possible. Quantitative phase imaging is important because it enables determination of either the refractive index or optical thickness variations from the measured optical path length with sub-wavelength accuracy. Digital holography is an emergent phase contrast technique that offers an excellent approach in obtaining both qualitative and quantitative phase information from the hologram. A CCD camera is used to record a hologram onto a computer and numerical methods are subsequently applied to reconstruct the hologram to enable direct access to both phase and amplitude information. Another attractive feature of digital holography is the ability to focus on multiple focal planes from a single hologram, emulating the focusing control of a conventional microscope. Methods A modified Mach-Zender off-axis setup in transmission is used to record and reconstruct a number of holographic amplitude and phase images of cellular and sub-cellular features. Results Both cellular and sub-cellular features are imaged with sub-micron, diffraction-limited resolution. Movies of holographic amplitude and phase images of living microbes and cells are created from a series of holograms and reconstructed with numerically adjustable

  5. The cellular approach to band structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwoerd, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    A short introduction to the cellular approach in band structure calculations is given. The linear cellular approach and its potantial applicability in surface structure calculations is given some consideration in particular

  6. Two Phase Flow Simulation Using Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcel, C.P.

    2002-01-01

    channel. It was noticed that the CHF phenomena generally starts in cells located at the boundary.The fact that the phenomena can be well described by using simple rules shows that the related physics and even the physics with stochastic characteristics, has been captured with t his simple model. Some fractal properties of automata were also studied, arriving at the conclusion that the internal dynamics present fractal characteristics.Findings hint towards a new approach to solve open issues.Finally, a calculus related to the Australian reactor designed by INVAP was performed.The problem consists of a simulation of helium bubble production by the mechanism of mass diffusion in heavy water.It was verified that cellular automata systems are a powerful tool for describing problems with high complexity and short reach interactions between components.It was proved that two-phase flows could be described very well with this model.The approach is a powerful tool to describe non-equilibrium features, such as boiling flow development and interfacial topological transitions.A novel computer model of boiling crisis was encountered following this type of analysis.By means of this research, without invalidating the important advances obtained in other directions, a new tool is offered which can be useful regarding the modeling of boiling heat transfer systems

  7. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials on curative and health enhancement effects of forest therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamioka H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hiroharu Kamioka,1 Kiichiro Tsutani,2 Yoshiteru Mutoh,3 Takuya Honda,4 Nobuyoshi Shiozawa,5 Shinpei Okada,6 Sang-Jun Park,6 Jun Kitayuguchi,7 Masamitsu Kamada,8 Hiroyasu Okuizumi,9 Shuichi Handa91Faculty of Regional Environment Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Tokyo, 2Department of Drug Policy and Management, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 3Todai Policy Alternatives Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 4Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, 5Food Labeling Division, Consumer Affairs Agency, Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, Tokyo, 6Physical Education and Medicine Research Foundation, Nagano, 7Physical Education and Medicine Research Center Unnan, Shimane, 8Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Shimane University School of Medicine, Shimane, 9Mimaki Onsen (Spa Clinic, Tomi City, Nagano, JapanObjective: To summarize the evidence for curative and health enhancement effects through forest therapy and to assess the quality of studies based on a review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs.Study design: A systematic review based on RCTs.Methods: Studies were eligible if they were RCTs. Studies included one treatment group in which forest therapy was applied. The following databases – from 1990 to November 9, 2010 – were searched: MEDLINE via PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Ichushi-Web. All Cochrane databases and Campbell Systematic Reviews were also searched up to November 9, 2010.Results: Two trials met all inclusion criteria. No specific diseases were evaluated, and both studies reported significant effectiveness in one or more outcomes for health enhancement. However, the results of evaluations with the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials 2010 and CLEAR NPT (A Checklist to Evaluate a Report of a Nonpharmacological Trial checklists generally showed a remarkable lack of description in the studies. Furthermore, there was a

  8. Definitive chemoradiation for locoregional recurrences of esophageal cancer after primary curative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeene, P M; Versteijne, E; van Berge Henegouwen, M I; Bergmann, J J G H M; Geijsen, E D; Muller, K; van Laarhoven, H W M; Hulshof, M C C M

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the outcome of salvage definitive chemoradiation (dCRT) for a locoregional recurrence after any prior curative treatment outside previously irradiated areas. Thirty-nine patients treated between January 2005 and December 2014 were reviewed for locoregional recurrent esophageal cancer outside previously irradiated areas. All patients received salvage treatment with external beam radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions) combined with weekly concurrent paclitaxel and carboplatin. The median follow-up period was 15 months (range 1.7-120). The median overall survival (OS) for all patients after salvage dCRT was 22 months (95% CI 6.2-37.6). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS was 72%, 31%, and 28%, respectively. Median survival after salvage dCRT for a regional lymph node recurrence was 33 months (95% CI 5.8-60.3) versus 14 months (95% CI 6.8-21.6) for a recurrence at the anastomosis (P = 0.022, logrank). Median OS was 35 months for the squamous cell carcinoma group and 19 months for the adenocarcinoma group (P = 0.67). Sixteen of 39 patients developed a locoregional recurrence after salvaged dCRT. The median locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was 24 months. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year LRFS was 79%, 36%, and 36%, respectively. Median disease-free survival (DFS) was 15 months. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year DFS was 66%, 27%, and 27%, respectively. Of 16 patients, 8 (50%) with a primary failure at the site of the anastomosis developed a local recurrence after salvaged dCRT compared to 7 of 22 patients (32%) with a primary recurrence in a lymph node. Definitive chemoradiation is a feasible and effective treatment for locoregional recurrent esophageal cancer outside a previously irradiated area, and should be given with a curative intent. This holds true for recurrence of both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Lymph node recurrences have a markedly better prognosis than recurrences at the site of the anastomosis. © 2016

  9. Quality of life after curative radiotherapy in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langendijk, Johannes A.; Aaronson, Neil K.; Jong, Jos M.A. de; Velde, Guul P.M. ten; Muller, Martin J.; Slotman, Ben J.; Wouters, Emiel F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate changes in quality of life (QOL) among medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: The study sample was composed of 46 patients irradiated for Stage I NSCLC. Quality of life was assessed before, during, and after radiotherapy using the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-LC13. Changes in symptom and QOL scores over time were evaluated with a repeated measurement analysis of variance using the mixed effect modeling procedure, SAS Proc Mixed. Twenty-seven patients were treated only at the primary site, whereas for 19 patients, the regional lymph nodes were included in the target volume as well. Results: The median follow-up time of patients alive was 34 months. The median survival was 19.0 months. None of the locally treated patients developed regional recurrence. A significant, gradual increase over time was observed for dyspnea, fatigue, and appetite loss. A significant, gradual deterioration was observed also for role functioning. No significant changes were noted for the other symptoms or the functioning scales. Significantly higher levels of dysphagia, which persisted up to 12 months, were observed in those in which the regional lymph nodes were treated, as compared to the locally treated patients. Radiation-induced pulmonary changes assessed with chest radiograph were more pronounced in the group treated with locoregional radiotherapy. Conclusions: After curative radiotherapy for Stage I medically inoperable NSCLC, a gradual increase in dyspnea, fatigue, and appetite loss, together with a significant deterioration of role functioning, was observed, possibly because of pre-existing, slowly progressive chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and radiation-induced pulmonary changes. Taking into account the low incidence of regional recurrences after local irradiation, the higher incidence

  10. Collection, Curation, Citation at Source: Publication@Source 10 Years On

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Frey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Southampton chemical information group had its genesis in 2001, when we began an e-Science pilot project to investigate structure-property mapping, combinatorial chemistry, and the Grid. CombeChem instigated a range of activities that have since been underway for more than ten years, in many ways matching the expansion of interest in using the Web as a vehicle for collection, curation, dissemination, reuse, and exploitation of scientific data and information. Chemistry has frequently provided the exemplar case studies, notably for the series of projects – funded by Jisc and EPSRC – that investigated the issues associated with the long-term preservation of data to support the scholarly knowledge cycle, such as the eBank UK project. Rapid developments in Internet access and mobile technology have significantly influenced the way researchers view connectivity, data standards, and the increasing importance and power of semantics and the Semantic Web. These technical advances interact strongly with the social dimension and have led to a reconsideration of the responsibilities of researchers for the quality of their research and for satisfying the requirements of modern stakeholders. Such obligations have given rise to discussions about Open Access and Open Data, creating a range of alternatives that are now technically feasible but need to be socially acceptable. Business plans are changing too, but in a strange contradiction, desire can run ahead of what is possible, sensible, and affordable, while lagging behind in imagination of what would be technically possible and potentially game-changing! Taking the chemical sciences as our example and focusing on the curation of research data, we explore from our perspective, ten years back and ten years forward, how far we have been able to re-imagine the data/information value pathway from bench to publication. We assess not only the major advances and changes that have been achieved, but also

  11. [Cellular subcutaneous tissue. Anatomic observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart-Elbaz, C; Varnaison, E; Sick, H; Grosshans, E; Cribier, B

    2001-11-01

    We showed in a companion paper that the definition of the French "subcutaneous cellular tissue" considerably varied from the 18th to the end of the 20th centuries and has not yet reached a consensus. To address the anatomic reality of this "subcutaneous cellular tissue", we investigated the anatomic structures underlying the fat tissue in normal human skin. Sixty specimens were excised from the surface to the deep structures (bone, muscle, cartilage) on different body sites of 3 cadavers from the Institut d'Anatomie Normale de Strasbourg. Samples were paraffin-embedded, stained and analysed with a binocular microscope taking x 1 photographs. Specimens were also excised and fixed after subcutaneous injection of Indian ink, after mechanic tissue splitting and after performing artificial skin folds. The aspects of the deep parts of the skin greatly varied according to their anatomic localisation. Below the adipose tissue, we often found a lamellar fibrous layer which extended from the interlobular septa and contained horizontally distributed fat cells. No specific tissue below the hypodermis was observed. Artificial skin folds concerned either exclusively the dermis, when they were superficial or included the hypodermis, but no specific structure was apparent in the center of the fold. India ink diffused to the adipose tissue, mainly along the septa, but did not localise in a specific subcutaneous compartment. This study shows that the histologic aspects of the deep part of the skin depend mainly on the anatomic localisation. Skin is composed of epidermis, dermis and hypodermis and thus the hypodermis can not be considered as being "subcutaneous". A difficult to individualise, fibrous lamellar structure in continuity with the interlobular septa is often found under the fat lobules. This structure is a cleavage line, as is always the case with loose connective tissues, but belongs to the hypodermis (i.e. fat tissue). No specific tissue nor any virtual space was

  12. Complex cellular logic computation using ribocomputing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alexander A; Kim, Jongmin; Ma, Duo; Silver, Pamela A; Collins, James J; Yin, Peng

    2017-08-03

    Synthetic biology aims to develop engineering-driven approaches to the programming of cellular functions that could yield transformative technologies. Synthetic gene circuits that combine DNA, protein, and RNA components have demonstrated a range of functions such as bistability, oscillation, feedback, and logic capabilities. However, it remains challenging to scale up these circuits owing to the limited number of designable, orthogonal, high-performance parts, the empirical and often tedious composition rules, and the requirements for substantial resources for encoding and operation. Here, we report a strategy for constructing RNA-only nanodevices to evaluate complex logic in living cells. Our 'ribocomputing' systems are composed of de-novo-designed parts and operate through predictable and designable base-pairing rules, allowing the effective in silico design of computing devices with prescribed configurations and functions in complex cellular environments. These devices operate at the post-transcriptional level and use an extended RNA transcript to co-localize all circuit sensing, computation, signal transduction, and output elements in the same self-assembled molecular complex, which reduces diffusion-mediated signal losses, lowers metabolic cost, and improves circuit reliability. We demonstrate that ribocomputing devices in Escherichia coli can evaluate two-input logic with a dynamic range up to 900-fold and scale them to four-input AND, six-input OR, and a complex 12-input expression (A1 AND A2 AND NOT A1*) OR (B1 AND B2 AND NOT B2*) OR (C1 AND C2) OR (D1 AND D2) OR (E1 AND E2). Successful operation of ribocomputing devices based on programmable RNA interactions suggests that systems employing the same design principles could be implemented in other host organisms or in extracellular settings.

  13. Zeno's paradox in quantum cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groessing, G.; Zeilinger, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of Zeno's paradox in quantum theory is demonstrated with the aid of quantum mechanical cellular automata. It is shown that the degree of non-unitarity of the cellular automaton evolution and the frequency of consecutive measurements of cellular automaton states are operationally indistinguishable. (orig.)

  14. Zeno's paradox in quantum cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groessing, G [Atominst. der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna (Austria); Zeilinger, A [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik, Univ. Innsbruck (Austria)

    1991-07-01

    The effect of Zeno's paradox in quantum theory is demonstrated with the aid of quantum mechanical cellular automata. It is shown that the degree of non-unitarity of the cellular automaton evolution and the frequency of consecutive measurements of cellular automaton states are operationally indistinguishable. (orig.).

  15. Game of Life Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1960s, British mathematician John Conway invented a virtual mathematical machine that operates on a two-dimensional array of square cell. Each cell takes two states, live and dead. The cells' states are updated simultaneously and in discrete time. A dead cell comes to life if it has exactly three live neighbours. A live cell remains alive if two or three of its neighbours are alive, otherwise the cell dies. Conway's Game of Life became the most programmed solitary game and the most known cellular automaton. The book brings together results of forty years of study into computational

  16. 'Biomoleculas': cellular metabolism didactic software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menghi, M L; Novella, L P; Siebenlist, M R

    2007-01-01

    'Biomoleculas' is a software that deals with topics such as the digestion, cellular metabolism and excretion of nutrients. It is a pleasant, simple and didactic guide, made by and for students. In this program, each biomolecule (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) is accompanied until its degradation and assimilation by crossing and interrelating the different metabolic channels to finally show the destination of the different metabolites formed and the way in which these are excreted. It is used at present as a teaching-learning process tool by the chair of Physiology and Biophysics at the Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios

  17. Symmetry analysis of cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2013-01-01

    By means of B-calculus [V. García-Morales, Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 2645] a universal map for deterministic cellular automata (CAs) has been derived. The latter is shown here to be invariant upon certain transformations (global complementation, reflection and shift). When constructing CA rules in terms of rules of lower range a new symmetry, “invariance under construction” is uncovered. Modular arithmetic is also reformulated within B-calculus and a new symmetry of certain totalistic CA rules, which calculate the Pascal simplices modulo an integer number p, is then also uncovered.

  18. On two integrable cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobenko, A [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich Mathematik; Bordemann, M [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Gunn, C [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich Mathematik; Pinkall, U [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich Mathematik

    1993-11-01

    We describe two simple cellular automata (CA) models which exhibit the essential attributes of soliton systems. The first one is an invertible, 2-state, 1-dimensional CA or, in other words, a nonlinear Z[sub 2]-valued dynamical system with discrete space and time. Against a vacuum state of 0, the system exhibits light cone particles in both spatial directions, which interact in a soliton-like fashion. A complete solution of this system is obtained. We also consider another CA, which is described by the Hirota equation over a finite field, and present a Lax representation for it. (orig.)

  19. Cellular automata a parallel model

    CERN Document Server

    Mazoyer, J

    1999-01-01

    Cellular automata can be viewed both as computational models and modelling systems of real processes. This volume emphasises the first aspect. In articles written by leading researchers, sophisticated massive parallel algorithms (firing squad, life, Fischer's primes recognition) are treated. Their computational power and the specific complexity classes they determine are surveyed, while some recent results in relation to chaos from a new dynamic systems point of view are also presented. Audience: This book will be of interest to specialists of theoretical computer science and the parallelism challenge.

  20. Melanoma screening with cellular phones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Massone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mobile teledermatology has recently been shown to be suitable for teledermatology despite limitations in image definition in preliminary studies. The unique aspect of mobile teledermatology is that this system represents a filtering or triage system, allowing a sensitive approach for the management of patients with emergent skin diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigated the feasibility of teleconsultation using a new generation of cellular phones in pigmented skin lesions. 18 patients were selected consecutively in the Pigmented Skin Lesions Clinic of the Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria. Clinical and dermoscopic images were acquired using a Sony Ericsson with a built-in two-megapixel camera. Two teleconsultants reviewed the images on a specific web application (http://www.dermahandy.net/default.asp where images had been uploaded in JPEG format. Compared to the face-to-face diagnoses, the two teleconsultants obtained a score of correct telediagnoses of 89% and of 91.5% reporting the clinical and dermoscopic images, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work is the first study performing mobile teledermoscopy using cellular phones. Mobile teledermatology has the potential to become an easy applicable tool for everyone and a new approach for enhanced self-monitoring for skin cancer screening in the spirit of the eHealth program of the European Commission Information for Society and Media.

  1. Curative effect of sesame oil in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan-Teng; Chien, Se-Ping; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Periasamy, Srinivasan; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease causes a progressive and irreversible loss of renal function. We investigated the curative effect of sesame oil, a natural, nutrient-rich, potent antioxidant, in a rat model of chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease was induced by subcutaneously injecting uni-nephrectomized rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) and 1% NaCl [DOCA/salt] in drinking water. Four weeks later, the rats were gavaged with sesame oil (0.5 or 1 mL/kg per day) for 7 days. Renal injury, histopathological changes, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite, lipid peroxidation, Nrf2, osteopontin expression, and collagen were assessed 24 h after the last dose of sesame oil. Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, urine volume, and albuminuria were significantly higher in the DOCA/salt treated rats than in control rats. Sesame oil significantly decreased these four tested parameters in DOCA/salt treated rats. In addition, creatinine clearance rate and nuclear Nrf2 expression were significantly decreased in the DOCA/salt treated rats compared to control rats. Sesame oil significantly decreased hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite level, lipid peroxidation, osteopontin, and renal collagen deposition, but increased creatinine clearance rate and nuclear Nrf2 expression in DOCA/salt treated rats. We conclude that supplementation of sesame oil mitigates DOCA/salt induced chronic kidney disease in rats by activating Nrf2 and attenuating osteopontin expression and inhibiting renal fibrosis in rats. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  2. Preventive and curative effects of dicaffeoylquinic acid on early pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tao; Song Liangwen; Dong Junxing; Huang Shanying; Li Yang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of dicaffeoylquinic acid (IBE5) on prevention and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin (BLM) in mice and its mechanism. Methods: Hydroxyproline content determination, imaging analysis, collagen I and III assay, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7 ) immunohistochemistry were performed. Results: 1)Hydroxyproline content decreased in fibrotic lung tissue after administration of IBE5(P<0.05). 2)The number of pulmonary alveoli reduced, alveolus interstitium was thickened and collagen deposition and fibrosis were formed in lung tissue of BLM group. The break of pulmonary alveoli and extension of pulmonary fibrosis were decreased by use of IBE5 (P<0.05). 3)A lot of collagen I and III were synthesized in lung interstitium in BLM group and their quantity was reduced in IBE5 group (P<0.05). 4) In BLM group, α-SMA expression increased and located in myofibroblasts in fibrotic area, and MMP7 immunohistochemical signal was located in myofibroblasts also. They were decreased in IBE5 group(P<0.05). Conclusion: IBE5 plays a preventive and curative role in pulmonary fibrosis by inhibition of transformation of fibroblasts towards myofibroblasts and MMP7 expression. (authors)

  3. DataStaR: Using the Semantic Web approach for Data Curation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Khan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In disciplines as varied as medicine, social sciences, and economics, data and their analyses are essential parts of researchers’ contributions to their respective fields. While sharing research data for review and analysis presents new opportunities for furthering research, capturing these data in digital forms and providing the digital infrastructure for sharing data and metadata pose several challenges. This paper reviews the motivations behind and design of the Data Staging Repository (DataStaR platform that targets specific portions of the research data curation lifecycle: data and metadata capture and sharing prior to publication, and publication to permanent archival repositories. The goal of DataStaR is to support both the sharing and publishing of data while at the same time enabling metadata creation without imposing additional overheads for researchers and librarians. Furthermore, DataStaR is intended to provide cross-disciplinary support by being able to integrate different domain-specific metadata schemas according to researchers’ needs. DataStaR’s strategy of a usable interface coupled with metadata flexibility allows for a more scaleable solution for data sharing, publication, and metadata reuse.

  4. The AraGWAS Catalog: a curated and standardized Arabidopsis thaliana GWAS catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togninalli, Matteo; Seren, Ümit; Meng, Dazhe; Fitz, Joffrey; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The abundance of high-quality genotype and phenotype data for the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana enables scientists to study the genetic architecture of many complex traits at an unprecedented level of detail using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). GWAS have been a great success in A. thaliana and many SNP-trait associations have been published. With the AraGWAS Catalog (https://aragwas.1001genomes.org) we provide a publicly available, manually curated and standardized GWAS catalog for all publicly available phenotypes from the central A. thaliana phenotype repository, AraPheno. All GWAS have been recomputed on the latest imputed genotype release of the 1001 Genomes Consortium using a standardized GWAS pipeline to ensure comparability between results. The catalog includes currently 167 phenotypes and more than 222 000 SNP-trait associations with P < 10−4, of which 3887 are significantly associated using permutation-based thresholds. The AraGWAS Catalog can be accessed via a modern web-interface and provides various features to easily access, download and visualize the results and summary statistics across GWAS. PMID:29059333

  5. Individualized Comprehensive Lifestyle Intervention in Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy with Curative or Palliative Intent: Who Participates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karianne Vassbakk-Brovold

    Full Text Available Knowledge about determinants of participation in lifestyle interventions in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, particularly with palliative intent, remains poor. The objective of the present study was to identify determinants of participating in a 12 month individualized, comprehensive lifestyle intervention, focusing on diet, physical activity, mental stress and smoking cessation, in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with curative or palliative intent. The secondary objective was to identify participation determinants 4 months into the study.Newly diagnosed cancer patients starting chemotherapy at the cancer center in Kristiansand/Norway (during a 16 month inclusion period were screened. Demographic and medical data (age, sex, body mass index, education level, marital status, smoking status, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG, diagnosis, tumor stage and treatment intention was analyzed for screened patients.100 of 161 invited patients participated. There were more females (69 vs. 48%; P = 0.004, breast cancer patients (46 vs. 25%; P = 0.007, non-smokers (87 vs. 74%; P = 0.041, younger (mean age 60 vs. 67 yrs; P 70 years were less likely to participate at baseline and 4 months.Individualized lifestyle interventions in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy appear to facilitate a high participation rate that declines with increasing age; both during the enrollment process and completing the intervention. Neither oncologic nor socioeconomic variables deterred participation.

  6. Network Thermodynamic Curation of Human and Yeast Genome-Scale Metabolic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Verónica S.; Quek, Lake-Ee; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-scale models are used for an ever-widening range of applications. Although there has been much focus on specifying the stoichiometric matrix, the predictive power of genome-scale models equally depends on reaction directions. Two-thirds of reactions in the two eukaryotic reconstructions Homo sapiens Recon 1 and Yeast 5 are specified as irreversible. However, these specifications are mainly based on biochemical textbooks or on their similarity to other organisms and are rarely underpinned by detailed thermodynamic analysis. In this study, a to our knowledge new workflow combining network-embedded thermodynamic and flux variability analysis was used to evaluate existing irreversibility constraints in Recon 1 and Yeast 5 and to identify new ones. A total of 27 and 16 new irreversible reactions were identified in Recon 1 and Yeast 5, respectively, whereas only four reactions were found with directions incorrectly specified against thermodynamics (three in Yeast 5 and one in Recon 1). The workflow further identified for both models several isolated internal loops that require further curation. The framework also highlighted the need for substrate channeling (in human) and ATP hydrolysis (in yeast) for the essential reaction catalyzed by phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase in purine metabolism. Finally, the framework highlighted differences in proline metabolism between yeast (cytosolic anabolism and mitochondrial catabolism) and humans (exclusively mitochondrial metabolism). We conclude that network-embedded thermodynamics facilitates the specification and validation of irreversibility constraints in compartmentalized metabolic models, at the same time providing further insight into network properties. PMID:25028891

  7. Bookshelf: a simple curation system for the storage of biomolecular simulation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Shabana; Hall, Benjamin A; Holdbrook, Daniel A; Khalid, Syma; Biggin, Philip C

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations can now routinely generate data sets of several hundreds of gigabytes in size. The ability to generate this data has become easier over recent years and the rate of data production is likely to increase rapidly in the near future. One major problem associated with this vast amount of data is how to store it in a way that it can be easily retrieved at a later date. The obvious answer to this problem is a database. However, a key issue in the development and maintenance of such a database is its sustainability, which in turn depends on the ease of the deposition and retrieval process. Encouraging users to care about meta-data is difficult and thus the success of any storage system will ultimately depend on how well used by end-users the system is. In this respect we suggest that even a minimal amount of metadata if stored in a sensible fashion is useful, if only at the level of individual research groups. We discuss here, a simple database system which we call 'Bookshelf', that uses python in conjunction with a mysql database to provide an extremely simple system for curating and keeping track of molecular simulation data. It provides a user-friendly, scriptable solution to the common problem amongst biomolecular simulation laboratories; the storage, logging and subsequent retrieval of large numbers of simulations. Download URL: http://sbcb.bioch.ox.ac.uk/bookshelf/

  8. Evaluation of the Radioprotective and Curative Capacities of Certain Vitamins and Sulfhydryl Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, S.H.M.; El-Kady, M.H.R.

    2002-01-01

    The present work was directed to review and evaluate the development of effective of certain vitamins and/or chemical radiation in modifying post-irradiation injury induced by radiation exposure. Sulfhydryl radioprotectors are one of the best radioprotectors known today. Their use encounters two great difficulties their toxicity and the short period during which they are active.In parallel with the use of single radioprotectors, observations have been made in rats using combined treatment with vitamins and SH bearing radioprotectors. Such combinations of radioprotective drugs via different mechanisms, hence, markedly improve the degree of protection and keep toxicity to acceptable level. The selected vitamins were : vitamin A alone and in combination with vitamins of B group (B complex), vitamins of group B and folic acid as well as combination of vitamin E and cysteine in addition to vitamin C with cystamine. ata completed in this study showed the efficacy of vitamin A administered alone as a radio-prophylactic agent. Combination treatment with vitamins of B complex with folic acid as well as the use of vitamins with chemical radioprotector seem to be promising as curative agents. Consequently, treatment of radiation injury using multi - vitamins preparation may be fruitful understanding in radiotherapy as well as to control incidence of radiation over exposure among radiation workers

  9. Evaluation of the protective and curative role of curcumin and venoruton against biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloyl methane) and venoruton [O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides] are powerful antioxidants and are important in protecting the cells from damage. The present study aims to evaluate the role of curcumin alone and curcumin with venoruton on radiation-induced changes in male rats exposed to a dose of 5 Gy gamma irradiation. Experimental analyses were performed 1, 7 and 14 days post-irradiation in all animal groups. Exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in decrease in glutathione content and SOD, G6PD and CPK activities and increase in lactate dehydrogenase and GOT activities and creatinine level. The results obtained showed that treatment of rats with olive oil pre and post-irradiation has significantly minimized radiation-induced changes. Curcumin dissolved in olive oil pre and post-irradiation significantly improved the radiation-induced changes while administration of venoruton with curcumin in olive oil provided a better amelioration. It could be concluded that, curcumin in olive oil plus venoruton showed an obvious protective and curative role against the hazards of gamma radiation in male rats

  10. Curative effect of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside combined with Xingnaojing injection on acute cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-xing SUN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to observe the curative effect of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside combined with Xingnaojing injection on acute cerebral hemorrhage. A total of 120 cases with acute cerebral hemorrhage were treated with Xingnaojing injection monotherapy (control group, N = 60 or monosialotetrahexosylganglioside combined with Xingnaojing injection (combined treatment group, N = 60. Bleeding amount and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores of 2 groups were both significantly reduced on the 21th day after treatment (P = 0.000, for all, but bleeding amount and NIHSS scores in combined treatment group were significantly lower than those in control group (P = 0.000, for all. After 21 d treatment, total effective rate of combined treatment group was 86.67% (52/60, which was significantly higher than that of control group [66.67% (40/60; χ2 = 1.493, P = 0.024]. For patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage, monosialotetrahexosylganglioside combined with Xingnaojing injection can significantly improve the neurological function. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.07.014

  11. An Intelligent Web Digital Image Metadata Service Platform for Social Curation Commerce Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Yong Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Information management includes multimedia data management, knowledge management, collaboration, and agents, all of which are supporting technologies for XML. XML technologies have an impact on multimedia databases as well as collaborative technologies and knowledge management. That is, e-commerce documents are encoded in XML and are gaining much popularity for business-to-business or business-to-consumer transactions. Recently, the internet sites, such as e-commerce sites and shopping mall sites, deal with a lot of image and multimedia information. This paper proposes an intelligent web digital image information retrieval platform, which adopts XML technology for social curation commerce environment. To support object-based content retrieval on product catalog images containing multiple objects, we describe multilevel metadata structures representing the local features, global features, and semantics of image data. To enable semantic-based and content-based retrieval on such image data, we design an XML-Schema for the proposed metadata. We also describe how to automatically transform the retrieval results into the forms suitable for the various user environments, such as web browser or mobile device, using XSLT. The proposed scheme can be utilized to enable efficient e-catalog metadata sharing between systems, and it will contribute to the improvement of the retrieval correctness and the user’s satisfaction on semantic-based web digital image information retrieval.

  12. dinoref: A curated dinoflagellate (Dinophyceae) reference database for the 18S rRNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, Solenn; Piredda, Roberta; Vaulot, Daniel; Montresor, Marina; Kooistra, Wiebe H C F; Sarno, Diana

    2018-03-30

    Dinoflagellates are a heterogeneous group of protists present in all aquatic ecosystems where they occupy various ecological niches. They play a major role as primary producers, but many species are mixotrophic or heterotrophic. Environmental metabarcoding based on high-throughput sequencing is increasingly applied to assess diversity and abundance of planktonic organisms, and reference databases are definitely needed to taxonomically assign the huge number of sequences. We provide an updated 18S rRNA reference database of dinoflagellates: dinoref. Sequences were downloaded from genbank and filtered based on stringent quality criteria. All sequences were taxonomically curated, classified taking into account classical morphotaxonomic studies and molecular phylogenies, and linked to a series of metadata. dinoref includes 1,671 sequences representing 149 genera and 422 species. The taxonomic assignation of 468 sequences was revised. The largest number of sequences belongs to Gonyaulacales and Suessiales that include toxic and symbiotic species. dinoref provides an opportunity to test the level of taxonomic resolution of different 18S barcode markers based on a large number of sequences and species. As an example, when only the V4 region is considered, 374 of the 422 species included in dinoref can still be unambiguously identified. Clustering the V4 sequences at 98% similarity, a threshold that is commonly applied in metabarcoding studies, resulted in a considerable underestimation of species diversity. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Opera Instrument: An Advanced Curation Development for Mars Sample Return Organic Contamination Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M. D.; Fries, W. D.; McCubbin, F. M.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2018-01-01

    Mars Sample Return (MSR) requires strict organic contamination control (CC) and contamination knowledge (CK) as outlined by the Mars 2020 Organic Contamination Panel (OCP). This includes a need to monitor surficial organic contamination to a ng/sq. cm sensitivity level. Archiving and maintaining this degree of surface cleanliness may be difficult but has been achieved. MSR's CK effort will be very important because all returned samples will be studied thoroughly and in minute detail. Consequently, accurate CK must be collected and characterized to best interpret scientific results from the returned samples. The CK data are not only required to make accurate measurements and interpretations for carbon-depleted martian samples, but also to strengthen the validity of science investigations performed on the samples. The Opera instrument prototype is intended to fulfill a CC/CK role in the assembly, cleaning, and overall contamination history of hardware used in the MSR effort, from initial hardware assembly through post-flight sample curation. Opera is intended to monitor particulate and organic contamination using quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs), in a self-contained portable package that is cleanroom-compliant. The Opera prototype is in initial development capable of approximately 100 ng/sq. cm organic contamination sensitivity, with additional development planned to achieve 1 ng/sq. cm. The Opera prototype was funded by the 2017 NASA Johnson Space Center Innovation Charge Account (ICA), which provides funding for small, short-term projects.

  14. A Comprehensive Curation Shows the Dynamic Evolutionary Patterns of Prokaryotic CRISPRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqin Mai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR is a genetic element with active regulation roles for foreign invasive genes in the prokaryotic genomes and has been engineered to work with the CRISPR-associated sequence (Cas gene Cas9 as one of the modern genome editing technologies. Due to inconsistent definitions, the existing CRISPR detection programs seem to have missed some weak CRISPR signals. Results. This study manually curates all the currently annotated CRISPR elements in the prokaryotic genomes and proposes 95 updates to the annotations. A new definition is proposed to cover all the CRISPRs. The comprehensive comparison of CRISPR numbers on the taxonomic levels of both domains and genus shows high variations for closely related species even in the same genus. The detailed investigation of how CRISPRs are evolutionarily manipulated in the 8 completely sequenced species in the genus Thermoanaerobacter demonstrates that transposons act as a frequent tool for splitting long CRISPRs into shorter ones along a long evolutionary history.

  15. Prognostic significance of microsatellite instability in curatively resected adenocarcinoma of the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckl, Wolfgang M; Heinze, Elvira; Milsmann, Catrin; Wein, Axel; Koebnick, Corinna; Jung, Andreas; Croner, Roland S; Brabletz, Thomas; Günther, Klaus; Kirchner, Thomas; Hahn, Eckhart G; Hohenberger, Werner; Becker, Heinz; Reingruber, Bertram

    2004-01-20

    Adenocarcinoma of the small intestine (ACSI) is a rare condition with few studies addressing follow-up and prognosis. Tumors of 35 patients with curative resection of an ACSI were retrospectively analyzed by immunohistochemistry: p53, hMLH1, hMSH2 and hMSH6 and microsatellite instability (MSI): BAT-26, BAX, TGF-beta RII. With a median follow up of 6.1 years, the median cancer-specific survival (CSS) was 36.2 months. Patients who were highly instable (MSI-H) (n=10) had a CSS of 49.6 months in contrast to patients with stable tumors (23.2 months) (P=0.010). Additionally, a low tumor stage according to UICC and MSI-H were shown to be independent factors (P=0.005 and P<0.001) for an increased survival in multivariate analysis. Therefore, it is suggested that analysis of the MSI status might prove useful in discerning prognosis within cancers of the same stage.

  16. Curating blood: how students' and researchers' drawings bring potential phenomena to light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, D. B.; Pitchford, S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores students and researchers drawings of white blood cell recruitment. The data combines interviews with exhibit of review-type academic images and analyses of student model-drawings. The analysis focuses on the material aspects of bio-scientific data-making and we use the literature of concrete bioscience modelling to differentiate the qualities of students model-making choices: novelty versus reproduction; completeness versus simplicity; and the achievement of similarity towards selected model targets. We show that while drawing on already published images, some third-year undergraduates are able to curate novel, and yet plausible causal channels in their graphic representations, implicating new phenomenal potentials as lead researchers do in their review-type academic publications. Our work links the virtues of drawing to learn to the disclosure of potential epistemic things, involving close attention to the contours of non-linguistic stuff and corresponding sensory perception of substance; space; time; shape and size; position; and force. The paper documents the authority and power students may achieve through making knowledge rather than repeating it. We show the ways in which drawing on the images elicited by others helps to develop physical, sensory, and sometimes affective relations towards the real and concrete world of scientific practice.

  17. Curated genome annotation of Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and comparative genome analysis with Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takeshi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Barrero, Roberto A.; Yamasaki, Chisato; Fujii, Yasuyuki; Hilton, Phillip B.; Antonio, Baltazar A.; Aono, Hideo; Apweiler, Rolf; Bruskiewich, Richard; Bureau, Thomas; Burr, Frances; Costa de Oliveira, Antonio; Fuks, Galina; Habara, Takuya; Haberer, Georg; Han, Bin; Harada, Erimi; Hiraki, Aiko T.; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Hoen, Douglas; Hokari, Hiroki; Hosokawa, Satomi; Hsing, Yue; Ikawa, Hiroshi; Ikeo, Kazuho; Imanishi, Tadashi; Ito, Yukiyo; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Kanno, Masako; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Toshiyuki; Kawashima, Hiroaki; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Komatsu, Setsuko; Koyanagi, Kanako O.; Kubooka, Hiromi; Lieberherr, Damien; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Lonsdale, David; Matsumoto, Takashi; Matsuya, Akihiro; McCombie, W. Richard; Messing, Joachim; Miyao, Akio; Mulder, Nicola; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Nam, Jongmin; Namiki, Nobukazu; Numa, Hisataka; Nurimoto, Shin; O’Donovan, Claire; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Okido, Toshihisa; OOta, Satoshi; Osato, Naoki; Palmer, Lance E.; Quetier, Francis; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Saichi, Naomi; Sakai, Hiroaki; Sakai, Yasumichi; Sakata, Katsumi; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Sato, Fumihiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Schoof, Heiko; Seki, Motoaki; Shibata, Michie; Shimizu, Yuji; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Shinso, Yuji; Singh, Nagendra K.; Smith-White, Brian; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Tanino, Motohiko; Tatusova, Tatiana; Thongjuea, Supat; Todokoro, Fusano; Tsugane, Mika; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Vanavichit, Apichart; Wang, Aihui; Wing, Rod A.; Yamaguchi, Kaori; Yamamoto, Mayu; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yu, Yeisoo; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Qiang; Higo, Kenichi; Burr, Benjamin; Gojobori, Takashi; Sasaki, Takuji

    2007-01-01

    We present here the annotation of the complete genome of rice Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cultivar Nipponbare. All functional annotations for proteins and non-protein-coding RNA (npRNA) candidates were manually curated. Functions were identified or inferred in 19,969 (70%) of the proteins, and 131 possible npRNAs (including 58 antisense transcripts) were found. Almost 5000 annotated protein-coding genes were found to be disrupted in insertional mutant lines, which will accelerate future experimental validation of the annotations. The rice loci were determined by using cDNA sequences obtained from rice and other representative cereals. Our conservative estimate based on these loci and an extrapolation suggested that the gene number of rice is ∼32,000, which is smaller than previous estimates. We conducted comparative analyses between rice and Arabidopsis thaliana and found that both genomes possessed several lineage-specific genes, which might account for the observed differences between these species, while they had similar sets of predicted functional domains among the protein sequences. A system to control translational efficiency seems to be conserved across large evolutionary distances. Moreover, the evolutionary process of protein-coding genes was examined. Our results suggest that natural selection may have played a role for duplicated genes in both species, so that duplication was suppressed or favored in a manner that depended on the function of a gene. PMID:17210932

  18. Lumière Word Cloud (voicesonfilm, 2017: Creativity, Curation, Projection in Film Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor, Barnaby

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lumière Word Cloud (voicesonfilm, 2017 is a co-curated experiment in the design and execution of academic/student collaborative assessment methods at Third Level. Inspired by classroom conversations regarding the parallels between the earliest forms of cinema – as exemplified by the films of Auguste and Louis Lumière – and the ubiquitous gif file that now appears on every social media platform, Lumière Word Cloud also asks us to reconsider the position and role that cinema history occupies in the contemporary classroom. A film composed entirely of gif files, Lumière Word Cloud also acts as an opportunity to interrogate exactly what cinema means in 2017. The film does not seek to eschew narrative altogether but rather aims to demonstrate the multifarious ways in which the collaborative nature of a film’s construction can enhance our understanding of storytelling in the digital age. In this way, Lumière Word Cloud also stands as a challenge to more traditional understandings of not only assessment methods but also to older pedagogic models regarding the status of skills and the transfer of knowledge in the contemporary learning environment.

  19. Reporting Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Curative Radiation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Souhami, Luis; Joshua, Bosede; Vuong, Te; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term rectal toxicity is a concern for patients with prostate cancer treated with curative radiation. However, comparing results of late toxicity may not be straightforward. This article reviews the complexity of reporting long-term side effects by using data for patients treated in our institution with hypofractionated irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy alone to a dose of 66 Gy in 22 fractions were prospectively assessed for late rectal toxicity according to the Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3, scoring system. Ninety percent of patients had more than 24 months of follow-up. Results are compared with data published in the literature. Results: We found an actuarial incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 27% at 30 months and a crude incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 18%. This was mostly severe toxicity documented during follow-up. The incidence of Grade 3 rectal toxicity at the last visit was 3% compared with 13% documented at any time during follow-up. Conclusion: Comparison of late toxicity after radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer must be undertaken with caution because many factors need to be taken into consideration. Because accurate assessment of late toxicity in the evaluation of long-term outcome after radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer is essential, there is a need to develop by consensus guidelines for assessing and reporting late toxicity in this group of patients

  20. Sample Curation in Support of the OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, Kevin; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2017-01-01

    The OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission launched to asteroid Bennu Sept. 8, 2016. The spacecraft will arrive at Bennu in late 2019, orbit and map the asteroid, and perform a touch and go (TAG) sampling maneuver in July 2020. After sample is stowed and confirmed the spacecraft will return to Earth, and the sample return capsule (SRC) will land in Utah in September 2023. Samples will be recovered from Utah [2] and then transported and stored in a new sample cleanroom at NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston [3]. The materials curated for the mission are described here. a) Materials Archive and Witness Plate Collection: The SRC and TAGSAM were built between March 2014 and Summer of 2015, and instruments (OTES,OVIRS, OLA, OCAMS, REXIS) were integrated from Summer 2015 until May 2016. A total of 395 items were received for the materials archive at NASA-JSC, with archiving finishing 30 days after launch (with the final archived items being related to launch operations)[4]. The materials fall into several general categories including metals (stainless steel, aluminum, titanium alloys, brass and BeCu alloy), epoxies, paints, polymers, lubricants, non-volatile-residue samples (NVR), sapphire, and various miscellaneous materials. All through the ATLO process (from March 2015 until late August 2016) contamination knowledge witness plates (Si wafer and Al foil) were deployed in the various cleanrooms in Denver and KSC to provide an additional record of particle counts and volatiles that is archived for current and future scientific studies. These plates were deployed in roughly monthly increments with each unit containing 4 Si wafers and 4 Al foils. We archived 128 individual witness plates (64 Si wafers and 64 Al foils); one of each witness plate (Si and Al) was analyzed immediately by the science team after archiving, while the remaining 3 of each are archived indefinitely. Information about each material archived is stored in an extensive database at NASA-JSC, and key