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Sample records for cells yettheir extracellular

  1. Extracellular matrix, cell skeletons, and embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, E D

    1989-09-01

    During embryonic development, the extracellular matrix (ECM) promotes the production of differentiated products by epithelial cells and the migration of mesenchymal cells, and probably also plays a role in epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. Here we examine the role of the cell skeleton (actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments) in mediating matrix effects on mesenchymal cell morphology, migration, and formation. The interaction of both epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells with ECM seems to involve the actin cortex, which is best developed in the base of the epithelial cell, where it attaches to underlying matrix via membrane-intercalated receptors. To interact with the matrix, the fibroblast has appropriate ECM receptors and an actin cortex around the whole cell. The actin cortex is absolutely required for assumption of bipolar shape, elongation, and movement through the matrix. Since the cortex seems to be anchored to the matrix, it is unlikely that it moves during cell migration. A new hypothesis states that the microtubule- and intermediate filament-rich endoplasm, containing the nucleus, moves past the actin cortex-receptor-matrix complex into the newly synthesized front end of the mesenchymal cell to effect forward movement. When epithelial cells transform into mesenchyme in the embryo, or when they are induced to do this in vitro, they switch from the keratin intermediate filament profile to one rich in vimentin, and the effect of cell matrix interaction on cell shape is profoundly altered. Vimentin-actin interactions with ECM may be a major factor in the ability of a cell to become mesenchymal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

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    Wilschut, Karlijn J. [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Haagsman, Henk P. [Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3584 CL, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelen, Bernard A.J., E-mail: b.a.j.roelen@uu.nl [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  3. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-01-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles attenuate kidney inflammation.

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    Eirin, Alfonso; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Puranik, Amrutesh S; Tang, Hui; McGurren, Kelly A; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2017-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have distinct capability for renal repair, but may have safety concerns. MSC-derived extracellular vesicles emerged as a novel noncellular alternative. Using a porcine model of metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis we tested whether extracellular vesicles attenuate renal inflammation, and if this capacity is mediated by their cargo of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10. Pigs with metabolic syndrome were studied after 16 weeks of renal artery stenosis untreated or treated four weeks earlier with a single intrarenal delivery of extracellular vesicles harvested from adipose tissue-derived autologous MSCs. Lean and sham metabolic syndrome animals served as controls (seven each). Five additional pigs with metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis received extracellular vesicles with pre-silenced IL10 (IL10 knock-down). Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and oxygenation were studied in vivo and renal injury pathways ex vivo. Retention of extracellular vesicles in the stenotic kidney peaked two days after delivery and decreased thereafter. Four weeks after injection, extracellular vesicle fragments colocalized with stenotic-kidney tubular cells and macrophages, indicating internalization or fusion. Extracellular vesicle delivery attenuated renal inflammation, and improved medullary oxygenation and fibrosis. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate fell in metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis compared to metabolic syndrome, but was restored in pigs treated with extracellular vesicles. These renoprotective effects were blunted in pigs treated with IL10-depleted extracellular vesicles. Thus, extracellular vesicle-based regenerative strategies might be useful for patients with metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Extracellular protectants produced by Clostridium perfringens cells at elevated temperatures.

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    Heredia, N; Ybarra, P; Hernández, C; García, S

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of adaptation of Clostridium perfringens to high temperatures are not well understood. In this work, the involvement of extracellular compounds in protection to heat was determined. Cells were grown in fluid thioglycollate medium or chicken broth. When mid-log phase was reached, they were heat-shocked at 50 degrees C for 30 min. Then cultures were centrifuged and supernatants were transferred to nonshocked cells. Heat tolerance of these cells was performed at 55 degrees C. Viable cells were determined. In some cases, supernatants were heated at 65 degrees C or 100 degrees C or treated with trypsin. Supernatants were fractionated and PAGE was made of fractions showing heat-protective activity. When C. perfringens was exposed to a heat shock at 50 degrees C, extracellular factors were found in the culture supernatant that provided protection to cells not exposed to a heat shock. The extracellular factors were sensitive to heat and trypsin treatment suggesting a protein component. SDS-PAGE analysis of supernatant fractions from heat-treated cells revealed two induced proteins (56 and 125 kDa) that could be involved in heat tolerance. In this work, the presence and thermoprotective activity of extracellular factors produced by C. perfringens under a heat shock was demonstrated. The detection of thermoprotective extracellular factors of C. perfringens will aid in our understanding of the physiology of survival of C. perfringens in foods.

  6. Extracellular Acidification Alters Lysosomal Trafficking in Human Breast Cancer Cells

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    Kristine Glunde

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells invade by secreting degradative enzymes, which are sequestered in lysosomal vesicles. In this study, the impact of an acidic extracellular environment on lysosome size, number, and distance from the nucleus in human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs and breast cancer cells of different degrees of malignancy was characterized because the physiological microenvironment of tumors is frequently characterized by extracellular acidity. An acidic extracellular pH (pHe resulted in a distinct shift of lysosomes from the perinuclear region to the cell periphery irrespective of the HMECs' degree of malignancy. With decreasing pH, larger lysosomal vesicles were observed more frequently in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, whereas smaller lysosomes were observed in poorly metastatic breast cancer cells and HMECs. The number of lysosomes decreased with acidic pH values. The displacement of lysosomes to the cell periphery driven by extracellular acidosis may facilitate exocytosis of these lysosomes and increase secretion of degradative enzymes. Filopodia formations, which were observed more frequently in highly metastatic breast cancer cells maintained at acidic pHe, may also contribute to invasion.

  7. Shedding light on the cell biology of extracellular vesicles.

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    van Niel, Guillaume; D'Angelo, Gisela; Raposo, Graça

    2018-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous group of cell-derived membranous structures comprising exosomes and microvesicles, which originate from the endosomal system or which are shed from the plasma membrane, respectively. They are present in biological fluids and are involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes. Extracellular vesicles are now considered as an additional mechanism for intercellular communication, allowing cells to exchange proteins, lipids and genetic material. Knowledge of the cellular processes that govern extracellular vesicle biology is essential to shed light on the physiological and pathological functions of these vesicles as well as on clinical applications involving their use and/or analysis. However, in this expanding field, much remains unknown regarding the origin, biogenesis, secretion, targeting and fate of these vesicles.

  8. Interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans extracellular vesicles with the cell wall.

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    Wolf, Julie M; Espadas-Moreno, Javier; Luque-Garcia, Jose L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans produces extracellular vesicles containing a variety of cargo, including virulence factors. To become extracellular, these vesicles not only must be released from the plasma membrane but also must pass through the dense matrix of the cell wall. The greatest unknown in the area of fungal vesicles is the mechanism by which these vesicles are released to the extracellular space given the presence of the fungal cell wall. Here we used electron microscopy techniques to image the interactions of vesicles with the cell wall. Our goal was to define the ultrastructural morphology of the process to gain insights into the mechanisms involved. We describe single and multiple vesicle-leaving events, which we hypothesized were due to plasma membrane and multivesicular body vesicle origins, respectively. We further utilized melanized cells to "trap" vesicles and visualize those passing through the cell wall. Vesicle size differed depending on whether vesicles left the cytoplasm in single versus multiple release events. Furthermore, we analyzed different vesicle populations for vesicle dimensions and protein composition. Proteomic analysis tripled the number of proteins known to be associated with vesicles. Despite separation of vesicles into batches differing in size, we did not identify major differences in protein composition. In summary, our results indicate that vesicles are generated by more than one mechanism, that vesicles exit the cell by traversing the cell wall, and that vesicle populations exist as a continuum with regard to size and protein composition. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche: The Extracellular Matrix and Cellular Components

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    Laween Meran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium comprises a monolayer of polarised columnar cells organised along the crypt-villus axis. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of crypts and are constantly nourished by their surrounding niche for maintenance, self-renewal, and differentiation. The cellular microenvironment including the adjacent Paneth cells, stromal cells, smooth muscle cells, and neural cells as well as the extracellular matrix together constitute the intestinal stem cell niche. A dynamic regulatory network exists among the epithelium, stromal cells, and the matrix via complex signal transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of these biological or mechanical signals could potentially lead to intestinal injury and disease. In this review, we discuss the role of different intestinal stem cell niche components and dissect the interaction between dynamic matrix factors and regulatory signalling during intestinal stem cell homeostasis.

  10. Activation of retinal glial (Müller cells by extracellular ATP induces pronounced increases in extracellular H+ flux.

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    Boriana K Tchernookova

    Full Text Available Small alterations in extracellular acidity are potentially important modulators of neuronal signaling within the vertebrate retina. Here we report a novel extracellular acidification mechanism mediated by glial cells in the retina. Using self-referencing H+-selective microelectrodes to measure extracellular H+ fluxes, we show that activation of retinal Müller (glial cells of the tiger salamander by micromolar concentrations of extracellular ATP induces a pronounced extracellular H+ flux independent of bicarbonate transport. ADP, UTP and the non-hydrolyzable analog ATPγs at micromolar concentrations were also potent stimulators of extracellular H+ fluxes, but adenosine was not. The extracellular H+ fluxes induced by ATP were mimicked by the P2Y1 agonist MRS 2365 and were significantly reduced by the P2 receptor blockers suramin and PPADS, suggesting activation of P2Y receptors. Bath-applied ATP induced an intracellular rise in calcium in Müller cells; both the calcium rise and the extracellular H+ fluxes were significantly attenuated when calcium re-loading into the endoplasmic reticulum was inhibited by thapsigargin and when the PLC-IP3 signaling pathway was disrupted with 2-APB and U73122. The anion transport inhibitor DIDS also markedly reduced the ATP-induced increase in H+ flux while SITS had no effect. ATP-induced H+ fluxes were also observed from Müller cells isolated from human, rat, monkey, skate and lamprey retinae, suggesting a highly evolutionarily conserved mechanism of potential general importance. Extracellular ATP also induced significant increases in extracellular H+ flux at the level of both the outer and inner plexiform layers in retinal slices of tiger salamander which was significantly reduced by suramin and PPADS. We suggest that the novel H+ flux mediated by ATP-activation of Müller cells and of other glia as well may be a key mechanism modulating neuronal signaling in the vertebrate retina and throughout the brain.

  11. Clara cell adhesion and migration to extracellular matrix

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    deMello Daphne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clara cells are the epithelial progenitor cell of the small airways, a location known to be important in many lung disorders. Although migration of alveolar type II and bronchiolar ciliated epithelial cells has been examined, the migratory response of Clara cells has received little attention. Methods Using a modification of existing procedures for Clara cell isolation, we examined mouse Clara cells and a mouse Clara-like cell line (C22 for adhesion to and migration toward matrix substrate gradients, to establish the nature and integrin dependence of migration in Clara cells. Results We observed that Clara cells adhere preferentially to fibronectin (Fn and type I collagen (Col I similar to previous reports. Migration of Clara cells can be directed by a fixed gradient of matrix substrates (haptotaxis. Migration of the C22 cell line was similar to the Clara cells so integrin dependence of migration was evaluated with this cell line. As determined by competition with an RGD containing-peptide, migration of C22 cells toward Fn and laminin (Lm 511 (formerly laminin 10 was significantly RGD integrin dependent, but migration toward Col I was RGD integrin independent, suggesting that Clara cells utilize different receptors for these different matrices. Conclusion Thus, Clara cells resemble alveolar type II and bronchiolar ciliated epithelial cells by showing integrin mediated pro-migratory changes to extracellular matrix components that are present in tissues after injury.

  12. Extracellular adenosine controls NKT-cell-dependent hepatitis induction.

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    Subramanian, Meenakshi; Kini, Radhika; Madasu, Manasa; Ohta, Akiko; Nowak, Michael; Exley, Mark; Sitkovsky, Michail; Ohta, Akio

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular adenosine regulates inflammatory responses via the A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR). A2AR deficiency results in much exaggerated acute hepatitis, indicating nonredundancy of adenosine-A2AR pathway in inhibiting immune activation. To identify a critical target of immunoregulatory effect of extracellular adenosine, we focused on NKT cells, which play an indispensable role in hepatitis. An A2AR agonist abolished NKT-cell-dependent induction of acute hepatitis by concanavalin A (Con A) or α-galactosylceramide in mice, corresponding to downregulation of activation markers and cytokines in NKT cells and of NK-cell co-activation. These results show that A2AR signaling can downregulate NKT-cell activation and suppress NKT-cell-triggered inflammatory responses. Next, we hypothesized that NKT cells might be under physiological control of the adenosine-A2AR pathway. Indeed, both Con A and α-galactosylceramide induced more severe hepatitis in A2AR-deficient mice than in WT controls. Transfer of A2AR-deficient NKT cells into A2AR-expressing recipients resulted in exaggeration of Con A-induced liver damage, suggesting that NKT-cell activation is controlled by endogenous adenosine via A2AR, and this physiological regulatory mechanism of NKT cells is critical in the control of tissue-damaging inflammation. The current study suggests the possibility to manipulate NKT-cell activity in inflammatory disorders through intervention to the adenosine-A2AR pathway. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Steven S.; Kim, Jina; Ahn, Kwangmi; Trepat, Xavier; Drake, Kenneth J.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Biswal, Shyam

    2009-01-01

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  14. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

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    An, Steven S., E-mail: san@jhsph.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Kim, Jina [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Ahn, Kwangmi [Division of Biostatistics, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Trepat, Xavier [CIBER, Enfermedades Respiratorias, 07110 Bunyola (Spain); Drake, Kenneth J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Fredberg, Jeffrey J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Biswal, Shyam [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  15. Nanostructured gold microelectrodes for extracellular recording from electrogenic cells

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    Brueggemann, D; Wolfrum, B; Maybeck, V; Mourzina, Y; Jansen, M; Offenhaeusser, A, E-mail: a.offenhaeusser@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Complex Systems and Peter Gruenberg Institute: Bioelectronics (ICS8/PGI8), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Strasse, 52428 Juelich (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance-Fundamental of Future Information Technology (JARA-FIT) (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We present a new biocompatible nanostructured microelectrode array for extracellular signal recording from electrogenic cells. Microfabrication techniques were combined with a template-assisted approach using nanoporous aluminum oxide to develop gold nanopillar electrodes. The nanopillars were approximately 300-400 nm high and had a diameter of 60 nm. Thus, they yielded a higher surface area of the electrodes resulting in a decreased impedance compared to planar electrodes. The interaction between the large-scale gold nanopillar arrays and cardiac muscle cells (HL-1) was investigated via focused ion beam milling. In the resulting cross-sections we observed a tight coupling between the HL-1 cells and the gold nanostructures. However, the cell membranes did not bend into the cleft between adjacent nanopillars due to the high pillar density. We performed extracellular potential recordings from HL-1 cells with the nanostructured microelectrode arrays. The maximal amplitudes recorded with the nanopillar electrodes were up to 100% higher than those recorded with planar gold electrodes. Increasing the aspect ratio of the gold nanopillars and changing the geometrical layout can further enhance the signal quality in the future.

  16. Comprehensive proteomic characterization of stem cell-derived extracellular matrices.

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    Ragelle, Héloïse; Naba, Alexandra; Larson, Benjamin L; Zhou, Fangheng; Prijić, Miralem; Whittaker, Charles A; Del Rosario, Amanda; Langer, Robert; Hynes, Richard O; Anderson, Daniel G

    2017-06-01

    In the stem-cell niche, the extracellular matrix (ECM) serves as a structural support that additionally provides stem cells with signals that contribute to the regulation of stem-cell function, via reciprocal interactions between cells and components of the ECM. Recently, cell-derived ECMs have emerged as in vitro cell culture substrates to better recapitulate the native stem-cell microenvironment outside the body. Significant changes in cell number, morphology and function have been observed when mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were cultured on ECM substrates as compared to standard tissue-culture polystyrene (TCPS). As select ECM components are known to regulate specific stem-cell functions, a robust characterization of cell-derived ECM proteomic composition is critical to better comprehend the role of the ECM in directing cellular processes. Here, we characterized and compared the protein composition of ECM produced in vitro by bone marrow-derived MSC, adipose-derived MSC and neonatal fibroblasts from different donors, employing quantitative proteomic methods. Each cell-derived ECM displayed a specific and unique matrisome signature, yet they all shared a common set of proteins. We evaluated the biological response of cells cultured on the different matrices and compared them to cells on standard TCPS. The matrices lead to differential survival and gene-expression profiles among the cell types and as compared to TCPS, indicating that the cell-derived ECMs influence each cell type in a different manner. This general approach to understanding the protein composition of different tissue-specific and cell-derived ECM will inform the rational design of defined systems and biomaterials that recapitulate critical ECM signals for stem-cell culture and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Extracellular Vesicles: Evolving Factors in Stem Cell Biology

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    Muhammad Nawaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are proposed to continuously secrete trophic factors that potentially serve as mediators of autocrine and paracrine activities, associated with reprogramming of the tumor microenvironment, tissue regeneration, and repair. Hitherto, significant efforts have been made to understand the level of underlying paracrine activities influenced by stem cell secreted trophic factors, as little is known about these interactions. Recent findings, however, elucidate this role by reporting the effects of stem cell derived extracellular vesicles (EVs that mimic the phenotypes of the cells from which they originate. Exchange of genetic information utilizing persistent bidirectional communication mediated by stem cell-EVs could regulate stemness, self-renewal, and differentiation in stem cells and their subpopulations. This review therefore discusses stem cell-EVs as evolving communication factors in stem cell biology, focusing on how they regulate cell fates by inducing persistent and prolonged genetic reprogramming of resident cells in a paracrine fashion. In addition, we address the role of stem cell-secreted vesicles in shaping the tumor microenvironment and immunomodulation and in their ability to stimulate endogenous repair processes during tissue damage. Collectively, these functions ensure an enormous potential for future therapies.

  18. Extracellular Vesicles: Evolving Factors in Stem Cell Biology

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    Nawaz, Muhammad; Fatima, Farah; Vallabhaneni, Krishna C.; Penfornis, Patrice; Valadi, Hadi; Ekström, Karin; Kholia, Sharad; Whitt, Jason D.; Fernandes, Joseph D.; Pochampally, Radhika; Squire, Jeremy A.; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are proposed to continuously secrete trophic factors that potentially serve as mediators of autocrine and paracrine activities, associated with reprogramming of the tumor microenvironment, tissue regeneration, and repair. Hitherto, significant efforts have been made to understand the level of underlying paracrine activities influenced by stem cell secreted trophic factors, as little is known about these interactions. Recent findings, however, elucidate this role by reporting the effects of stem cell derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) that mimic the phenotypes of the cells from which they originate. Exchange of genetic information utilizing persistent bidirectional communication mediated by stem cell-EVs could regulate stemness, self-renewal, and differentiation in stem cells and their subpopulations. This review therefore discusses stem cell-EVs as evolving communication factors in stem cell biology, focusing on how they regulate cell fates by inducing persistent and prolonged genetic reprogramming of resident cells in a paracrine fashion. In addition, we address the role of stem cell-secreted vesicles in shaping the tumor microenvironment and immunomodulation and in their ability to stimulate endogenous repair processes during tissue damage. Collectively, these functions ensure an enormous potential for future therapies. PMID:26649044

  19. Extracellular Vesicles from Ovarian Carcinoma Cells Display Specific Glycosignatures

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    Joana Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cells release vesicles to the extracellular environment with characteristic nucleic acid, protein, lipid, and glycan composition. Here we have isolated and characterized extracellular vesicles (EVs and total cell membranes (MBs from ovarian carcinoma OVMz cells. EVs were enriched in specific markers, including Tsg101, CD63, CD9, annexin-I, and MBs contained markers of cellular membrane compartments, including calnexin, GRASP65, GS28, LAMP-1, and L1CAM. The glycoprotein galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP was strongly enriched in EVs and it contained sialylated complex N-glycans. Lectin blotting with a panel of lectins showed that EVs had specific glycosignatures relative to MBs. Furthermore, the presence of glycoproteins bearing complex N-glycans with α2,3-linked sialic acid, fucose, bisecting-GlcNAc and LacdiNAc structures, and O-glycans with the T-antigen were detected. The inhibition of N-glycosylation processing from high mannose to complex glycans using kifunensine caused changes in the composition of EVs and induced a decrease of several glycoproteins. In conclusion, the results showed that glycosignatures of EVs were specific and altered glycosylation within the cell affected the composition and/or dynamics of EVs release. Furthermore, the identified glycosignatures of EVs could provide novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

  20. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells.

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    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R; Marcec, Matthew J; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-derived elicitors in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also assessed the defense response against a variety of potato pathogens, such as protists ( Phytophthora infestans and Spongospora subterranea ) and fungi ( Verticillium dahliae and Colletotrichum coccodes ). Our results show that extracellular pH increases within 30 min in proportion to the number of pathogen spores added. Consistently with the alkalinization effect, the higher transcription level of several defense-related genes and production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Our results demonstrate that the alkalinization response is an effective marker to study early stages of defense response in potatoes.

  1. An immunofluorescence assay for extracellular matrix components highlights the role of epithelial cells in producing a stable, fibrillar extracellular matrix

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    Omar S. Qureshi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Activated fibroblasts are considered major drivers of fibrotic disease progression through the production of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM in response to signals from damaged epithelial and inflammatory cells. Nevertheless, epithelial cells are capable of expressing components of the ECM, cross-linking enzymes that increase its stability and are sensitive to factors involved in the early stages of fibrosis. We therefore wanted to test the hypothesis that epithelial cells can deposit ECM in response to stimulation in a comparable manner to fibroblasts. We performed immunofluorescence analysis of components of stable, mature extracellular matrix produced by primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells and renal fibroblasts in response to cytokine stimulation. Whilst fibroblasts produced a higher basal level of extracellular matrix components, epithelial cells were able to deposit significant levels of fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV in response to cytokine stimulation. In response to hypoxia, epithelial cells showed an increase in collagen IV deposition but not in response to the acute stress stimuli aristolochic acid or hydrogen peroxide. When epithelial cells were in co-culture with fibroblasts we observed significant increases in the level of matrix deposition which could be reduced by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β blockade. Our results highlight the role of epithelial cells acting as efficient producers of stable extracellular matrix which could contribute to renal tubule thickening in fibrosis.

  2. New advances in probing cell-extracellular matrix interactions.

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    Liu, Allen P; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Parekh, Sapun H

    2017-05-22

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural and biochemical support to cells within tissues. An emerging body of evidence has established that the ECM plays a key role in cell mechanotransduction - the study of coupling between mechanical inputs and cellular phenotype - through either mediating transmission of forces to the cells, or presenting mechanical cues that guide cellular behaviors. Recent progress in cell mechanotransduction research has been facilitated by advances of experimental tools, particularly microtechnologies, engineered biomaterials, and imaging and analytical methods. Microtechnologies have enabled the design and fabrication of controlled physical microenvironments for the study and measurement of cell-ECM interactions. Advances in engineered biomaterials have allowed researchers to develop synthetic ECMs that mimic tissue microenvironments and investigate the impact of altered physicochemical properties on various cellular processes. Finally, advanced imaging and spectroscopy techniques have facilitated the visualization of the complex interaction between cells and ECM in vitro and in living tissues. This review will highlight the application of recent innovations in these areas to probing cell-ECM interactions. We believe cross-disciplinary approaches, combining aspects of the different technologies reviewed here, will inspire innovative ideas to further elucidate the secrets of ECM-mediated cell control.

  3. Melanoma affects the composition of blood cell-derived extracellular vesicles

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    Nina Koliha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are specifically loaded with nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins from their parental cell. Therefore, the constitution of extracellular vesicles reflects the type and status of the originating cell and extracellular vesicles in melanoma patient’s plasma could be indicative for the tumor. Likewise, extracellular vesicles might influence tumor progression by regulating immune responses. We performed a broad protein characterization of extracellular vesicles from plasma of melanoma patients and healthy donors as well as from T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and platelets using a multiplex bead-based platform. Using this method, we succeeded in analyzing 58 proteins that were differentially displayed on extracellular vesicles. Hierarchal clustering of protein intensity patterns grouped extracellular vesicles according to their originating cell type. The analysis of extracellular vesicles from stimulated B cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells revealed the transfer of surface proteins to vesicles depending on the cell status. The protein profiles of plasma vesicles resembled the protein profiles of extracellular vesicles from platelets, antigen presenting cells and natural cells as shown by platelet markers, costimulatory proteins, and a natural killer cell subpopulation marker. In comparison to healthy plasma vesicles, melanoma plasma vesicles showed altered signals for platelet markers indicating a changed vesicle secretion or protein loading of extracellular vesicles by platelets and a lower CD8 signal that might be associated with a diminished activity of natural killer cells or T cells. As we hardly detected melanoma-derived vesicles in patient’s plasma, we concluded that blood cells induced the observed differences. In summary, our results question a direct effect of melanoma cells on the composition of extracellular vesicles in melanoma plasma, but rather argue

  4. Cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell adhesion are linked by syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakideeri Karat, Sandeep Gopal; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-cell junctions that employ microfilaments are sites of tension. They are important for tissue repair, morphogenetic movements and can be emblematic of matrix contraction in fibrotic disease and the stroma of solid tumors. One cell surface receptor, syndecan......-4, has been shown to regulate focal adhesions, junctions that form at the ends of microfilament bundles in response to matrix components such as fibronectin. Recently it has been shown that signaling emanating from this proteoglycan receptor includes regulation of Rho family GTPases and cytosolic...

  5. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Mataveli, Fábio D’Aguiar [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Evaluate the effects of VEGF{sub 165} gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF{sub 165} treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF{sub 165}. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF{sub 165}, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF{sub 165} seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct.

  6. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz; Mataveli, Fábio D'Aguiar; Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Evaluate the effects of VEGF165 gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF165 treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF165. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF165, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF165 seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct.

  7. Nanoparticle facilitated extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Lieber, Alexander M; Jackan, Charles S; Biffinger, Justin C; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-11-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been the focus of substantial research interest due to their potential for long-term, renewable electrical power generation via the metabolism of a broad spectrum of organic substrates, although the low power densities have limited their applications to date. Here, we demonstrate the potential to improve the power extraction by exploiting biogenic inorganic nanoparticles to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in MFCs. Simultaneous short-circuit current recording and optical imaging on a nanotechnology-enabled platform showed substantial current increase from Shewanella PV-4 after the formation of cell/iron sulfide nanoparticle aggregates. Detailed characterization of the structure and composition of the cell/nanoparticle interface revealed crystalline iron sulfide nanoparticles in intimate contact with and uniformly coating the cell membrane. In addition, studies designed to address the fundamental mechanisms of charge transport in this hybrid system showed that charge transport only occurred in the presence of live Shewanella, and moreover demonstrated that the enhanced current output can be attributed to improved electron transfer at cell/electrode interface and through the cellular-networks. Our approach of interconnecting and electrically contacting bacterial cells through biogenic nanoparticles represents a unique and promising direction in MFC research and has the potential to not only advance our fundamental knowledge about electron transfer processes in these biological systems but also overcome a key limitation in MFCs by constructing an electrically connected, three-dimensional cell network from the bottom-up.

  8. Oxidized Extracellular DNA as a Stress Signal in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei V. Ermakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “cell-free DNA” (cfDNA was recently coined for DNA fragments from plasma/serum, while DNA present in in vitro cell culture media is known as extracellular DNA (ecDNA. Under oxidative stress conditions, the levels of oxidative modification of cellular DNA and the rate of cell death increase. Dying cells release their damaged DNA, thus, contributing oxidized DNA fragments to the pool of cfDNA/ecDNA. Oxidized cell-free DNA could serve as a stress signal that promotes irradiation-induced bystander effect. Evidence points to TLR9 as a possible candidate for oxidized DNA sensor. An exposure to oxidized ecDNA stimulates a synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS that evokes an adaptive response that includes transposition of the homologous loci within the nucleus, polymerization and the formation of the stress fibers of the actin, as well as activation of the ribosomal gene expression, and nuclear translocation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2 that, in turn, mediates induction of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, the oxidized DNA is a stress signal released in response to oxidative stress in the cultured cells and, possibly, in the human body; in particular, it might contribute to systemic abscopal effects of localized irradiation treatments.

  9. CD47-dependent immunomodulatory and angiogenic activities of extracellular vesicles produced by T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Singh, Satya P; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Wu, Weiwei; Abu-Asab, Mones S; Roberts, David D

    2014-07-01

    Intercellular communication is critical for integrating complex signals in multicellular eukaryotes. Vascular endothelial cells and T lymphocytes closely interact during the recirculation and trans-endothelial migration of T cells. In addition to direct cell-cell contact, we show that T cell derived extracellular vesicles can interact with endothelial cells and modulate their cellular functions. Thrombospondin-1 and its receptor CD47 are expressed on exosomes/ectosomes derived from T cells, and these extracellular vesicles are internalized and modulate signaling in both T cells and endothelial cells. Extracellular vesicles released from cells expressing or lacking CD47 differentially regulate activation of T cells induced by engaging the T cell receptor. Similarly, T cell-derived extracellular vesicles modulate endothelial cell responses to vascular endothelial growth factor and tube formation in a CD47-dependent manner. Uptake of T cell derived extracellular vesicles by recipient endothelial cells globally alters gene expression in a CD47-dependent manner. CD47 also regulates the mRNA content of extracellular vesicles in a manner consistent with some of the resulting alterations in target endothelial cell gene expression. Therefore, the thrombospondin-1 receptor CD47 directly or indirectly regulates intercellular communication mediated by the transfer of extracellular vesicles between vascular cells. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Extracellular KCl effect on organic bound tritium in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonen, Rafi; Uzi, German; Priel, Esther; Alfassi, Zeev B.

    2008-01-01

    Tritium atoms can replace hydrogen atoms in organic compounds, forming Organic Bound Tritium. Therefore, exposure of the body to tritium may lead to binding of tritium in tissue molecules, retaining it in the body longer than HTO, and causing higher doses. Ignoring this effect when evaluating inner exposures, may lead to under-estimation of tritium exposures. It was published, that tritium bound to some organic molecules has the potential to accumulate in organisms at higher levels as in the surrounding media. In order to investigate this effect and to identify physiological factors, OBT production in human malignant MG-63 osteoblast cells was studied. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the influence of the ionic extracellular potassium concentration on the amount of tritium in cells. Potassium is known as an ionic compound present in the body, which has the potential to cause cells swelling. Therefore, cells were exposed to isotonic and hypotonic media, supplemented with different concentrations of KCl, and the tritium accumulations were determined after incubation with HTO. An increase in the total Organic Bound Tritium production was observed, as well as an increase of the intracellular HTO content when increasing the KCl concentration. (author)

  11. Notochordal-cell derived extracellular vesicles exert regenerative effects on canine and human nucleus pulposus cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bach, Frances; Libregts, Sten; Creemers, Laura; Meij, Björn P; Ito, Keita; Wauben, Marca H M; Tryfonidou, Marianna A

    2017-01-01

    During intervertebral disc ageing, chondrocyte-like cells (CLCs) replace notochordal cells (NCs). NCs have been shown to induce regenerative effects in CLCs. Since vesicles released by NCs may be responsible for these effects, we characterized NC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) and determined

  12. Regulation of pituitary hormones and cell proliferation by components of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paez-Pereda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is a three-dimensional network of proteins, glycosaminoglycans and other macromolecules. It has a structural support function as well as a role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The extracellular matrix conveys signals through membrane receptors called integrins and plays an important role in pituitary physiology and tumorigenesis. There is a differential expression of extracellular matrix components and integrins during the pituitary development in the embryo and during tumorigenesis in the adult. Different extracellular matrix components regulate adrenocorticotropin at the level of the proopiomelanocortin gene transcription. The extracellular matrix also controls the proliferation of adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cells. On the other hand, laminin regulates the production of prolactin. Laminin has a dynamic pattern of expression during prolactinoma development with lower levels in the early pituitary hyperplasia and a strong reduction in fully grown prolactinomas. Therefore, the expression of extracellular matrix components plays a role in pituitary tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the remodeling of the extracellular matrix affects pituitary cell proliferation. Matrix metalloproteinase activity is very high in all types of human pituitary adenomas. Matrix metalloproteinase secreted by pituitary cells can release growth factors from the extracellular matrix that, in turn, control pituitary cell proliferation and hormone secretion. In summary, the differential expression of extracellular matrix components, integrins and matrix metalloproteinase contributes to the control of pituitary hormone production and cell proliferation during tumorigenesis.

  13. Identification of EDIL3 on extracellular vesicles involved in breast cancer cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Cho, Young-Eun; Kim, Young-Bum; Kim, In-San; Park, Hoyong; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2016-01-10

    Cancer cell-derived extracellular vesicles have been linked to the pathogenesis of various cancers; however, the role of extracellular vesicles in tumorigenesis remains unclear. To identify extracellular vesicle proteins involved in cancer metastasis, quantitative proteomic analyses were performed on extracellular vesicles derived from two representative breast cancer cell lines: the less invasive MCF-7 and the invasive MDA-MB-231. Proteomic analysis allowed for the identification of 270 proteins in the extracellular vesicles. Here we report a new function of EDIL3 on extracellular vesicles, which are sufficient for enhancement of cell invasion and for acceleration of lung metastasis in vivo. This invasion is most likely mediated via the integrin-FAK signaling cascade in breast cancer cells. However, these effects are suppressed when EDIL3 is inactivated, providing evidence for a critical role of EDIL3 in development of cancer. Consistently, in human patients with metastatic breast cancer, the levels of EDIL3 on circulating extracellular vesicles are significantly elevated. This information is a remarkable breakthrough in understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying metastasis of breast cancer as well as in the research for cancer biomarkers using circulating extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, targeting EDIL3 on extracellular vesicles may lead to a new therapeutic option for treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles: novel frontiers in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Somayeh; Azarpira, Negar; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein

    2018-03-09

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells that have gained significant attention in the field of regenerative medicine. The differentiation potential along with paracrine properties of MSCs have made them a key option for tissue repair. The paracrine functions of MSCs are applied through secreting soluble factors and releasing extracellular vesicles like exosomes and microvesicles. Extracellular vesicles are predominantly endosomal in origin and contain a cargo of miRNA, mRNA, and proteins that are transferred from their original cells to target cells. Recently it has emerged that extracellular vesicles alone are responsible for the therapeutic effect of MSCs in plenty of animal diseases models. Hence, MSC-derived extracellular vesicles may be used as an alternative MSC-based therapy in regenerative medicine. In this review we discuss MSC-derived extracellular vesicles and their therapeutic potential in various diseases.

  15. Trash or Treasure: extracellular microRNAs and cell-to-cell communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi eKosaka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Circulating RNAs in human body fluids are promising candidates for diagnostic purposes. However, the biological significance of circulating RNAs remains elusive. Recently, small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs, were isolated from multiple human body fluids, and these circulating miRNAs have been implicated as novel disease biomarkers. Concurrently, miRNAs were also identified in the extracellular space associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs, which are small membrane vesicles secreted from various types of cells. The function of these secreted miRNAs has been revealed in several papers. Circulating miRNAs have been experimentally found to be associated with EVs, however, other types of extracellular miRNAs were also described. This review discusses studies related to extracellular miRNAs, including circulating miRNAs and secreted miRNAs, to highlight the importance of studying not only secreted miRNAs but also circulating miRNAs to determine the contribution of extracellular miRNAs especially in cancer development.

  16. Cell Adhesions: Actin-Based Modules that Mediate Cell-Extracellular Matrix and Cell-Cell Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Alexia; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Nelson, W. James; Bianchini, Julie M.

    2018-01-01

    Cell adhesions link cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to each other, and depend on interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. Both cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites contain discrete, yet overlapping functional modules. These modules establish physical association with the actin cytoskeleton, locally modulate actin organization and dynamics, and trigger intracellular signaling pathways. Interplay between these modules generates distinct actin architectures that underlie different stages, types, and functions of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions. Actomyosin contractility is required to generate mature, stable adhesions, as well as sense and translate the mechanical properties of the cellular environment to changes in cell organization and behavior. In this chapter we discuss the organization and function of different adhesion modules and how they interact with the actin cytoskeleton. We highlight the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in adhesions, and how adhesion molecules mediate crosstalk between cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites. PMID:28679638

  17. Transferring intercellular signals and traits between cancer cells: extracellular vesicles as "homing pigeons".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesi, Giulia; Walbrecq, Geoffroy; Margue, Christiane; Kreis, Stephanie

    2016-06-10

    Extracellular vesicles are cell-derived vesicles, which can transport various cargos out of cells. From their cell of origin, the content molecules (proteins, non-coding RNAs including miRNAs, DNA and others) can be delivered to neighboring or distant cells and as such extracellular vesicles can be regarded as vehicles of intercellular communication or "homing pigeons". Extracellular vesicle shuttling is able to actively modulate the tumor microenvironment and can partake in tumor dissemination. In various diseases, including cancer, levels of extracellular vesicle secretion are altered resulting in different amounts and/or profiles of detectable vesicular cargo molecules and these distinct content profiles are currently being evaluated as biomarkers. Apart from their potential as blood-derived containers of specific biomarkers, the transfer of extracellular vesicles to surrounding cells also appears to be involved in the propagation of phenotypic traits. These interesting properties have put extracellular vesicles into the focus of many recent studies.Here we review findings on the involvement of extracellular vesicles in transferring traits of cancer cells to their surroundings and briefly discuss new data on oncosomes, a larger type of vesicle. A pressing issue in cancer treatment is rapidly evolving resistance to many initially efficient drug therapies. Studies investigating the role of extracellular vesicles in this phenomenon together with a summary of the technical challenges that this field is still facing, are also presented. Finally, emerging areas of research such as the analysis of the lipid composition on extracellular vesicles and cutting-edge techniques to visualise the trafficking of extracellular vesicles are discussed.

  18. An innovative protocol for schwann cells extracellular matrix proteins extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, L; Zomer Volpato, F; Cagol, N; Siciliano, M; Migliaresi, C; Motta, A; Sala, R

    2016-12-01

    The evidence that extracellular matrix (ECM) components could represent new targets for drugs designed to approach degenerative disease, requires their analysis. Before the analysis, proteins should be extracted from ECM and solubilized. Currently, few protocols for ECM proteins extraction and solubilization are available in literature, and most of them are based mainly on the use of proteolytic enzymes, such as trypsin, which often lead to proteins damage. Moreover, no methods have been so far proposed to solubilize Schwann Cell ECM, which may represent an important target for the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders. In our study, we propose to solubilize SC ECM through the use of surfactants and urea. We compared our method of solubilization, with one of that proposed in literature for a general ECM, mainly based on the use of enzymes. We want to highlight the benefit of solubilizing SC ECM, avoiding the use of proteolytic enzymes. To compare the amount of proteins extracted with both methods, MicroBCA assay was used, while the quality of the proteins extracted was observed through the SDS-PAGE. The results obtained confirm a better solubilization of SC ECM proteins with the proposed protocol, both quantitatively and qualitatively, showing a higher concentration of proteins extracted and a better enrichment of protein fractions, if compared to the enzyme-based protocol. Our results show that SC ECM could be efficiently solubilized through the use of surfactant and urea, avoiding the use of enzyme-base methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3175-3180, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. AHNAK enables mammary carcinoma cells to produce extracellular vesicles that increase neighboring fibroblast cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thaiomara A; Smuczek, Basílio; Valadão, Iuri C; Dzik, Luciana M; Iglesia, Rebeca P; Cruz, Mário C; Zelanis, André; de Siqueira, Adriane S; Serrano, Solange M T; Goldberg, Gary S; Jaeger, Ruy G; Freitas, Vanessa M

    2016-08-02

    Extracellular vesicles play important roles in tumor development. Many components of these structures, including microvesicles and exosomes, have been defined. However, mechanisms by which extracellular vesicles affect tumor progression are not fully understood. Here, we investigated vesicular communication between mammary carcinoma cells and neighboring nontransformed mammary fibroblasts. Nonbiased proteomic analysis found that over 1% of the entire proteome is represented in these vesicles, with the neuroblast differentiation associated protein AHNAK and annexin A2 being the most abundant. In particular, AHNAK was found to be the most prominent component of these vesicles based on peptide number, and appeared necessary for their formation. In addition, we report here that carcinoma cells produce vesicles that promote the migration of recipient fibroblasts. These data suggest that AHNAK enables mammary carcinoma cells to produce and release extracellular vesicles that cause disruption of the stroma by surrounding fibroblasts. This paradigm reveals fundamental mechanisms by which vesicular communication between carcinoma cells and stromal cells can promote cancer progression in the tumor microenvironment.

  20. Extracellular matrix induces doxorubicin-resistance in human osteosarcoma cells by suppression of p53 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harisi, Revekka; Dudas, Jozsef; Nagy-Olah, Julia; Timar, Ferenc; Szendroi, Miklos; Jeney, Andras

    2007-08-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in childhood and adolescence. The several chemotherapy-resistant cases of osteosarcoma are at a higher risk of relapse and adverse outcome. The aim of the current study was to determine the role of extracellular matrix in the resistance developed against chemotherapeutic treatments of human osteosarcoma cells. A cell line, named OSCORT was established from the biopsy of a 17-year-old male patient with primary osteosarcoma. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and quantification of DNA damage after treatments with doxorubicin were investigated in classical and three-dimensional cell culture systems using an extracellular matrix gel. The experimental results were related to the clinical observations of the case. The cells cultured in extracellular matrix gel have shown resistance to doxorubicin similar to that seen in the clinical case, as demonstrated by their proliferation, apoptosis and doxorubicin-induced DNA damage characteristics. Among the extracellular matrix components, the heparan sulfate proteoglycan and-to a lesser extent-fibronectin were involved in the doxorubicin resistance. Laminin and nidogen did not decrease the cytoreductive effect of doxorubicin, while collagen IV even increased it. The extracellular matrix gel decreased the protein levels of p53 and abrogated its cell nuclear translocalization. The most frequent known mutations in the p53 gene were not found in OSCORT cells. The current study provides experimental evidence for an epigenetical, extracellular matrix-induced loss of p53 function, which lead to a potent chemotherapy resistance showing accordance with the clinical experience.

  1. Malignant cell-derived extracellular vesicles express different chromogranin epitopes compared to prostasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Louise; Stridsberg, Mats; Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Meersman, Niels; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Ronquist, K Göran

    2015-07-01

    Prostasomes are nanosized extracellular vesicles exocytosed by prostate epithelial cells. They have been assigned many roles propitious to sperm in favor of fertilization. Prostatic cancer cells can also produce and secrete extracellular vesicles. We assessed using ELISA, the surface expression of chromogranin proproteins on prostasomes and malignant extracellular vesicles of four different prostate cancer cell-lines, two hormone sensitive and two hormone refractory. We used a panel of chromogranin A and chromogranin B antibodies against peptides in-between hypothetical cleavage sites along the proproteins. A diverging pattern of chromogranin peptides was apparent when comparing prostasomes and malignant extracellular vesicles indicating a phenotypical change. We also compared western blot patterns (prostasomes and malignant extracellular vesicles) for selected antibodies that displayed high absorbances in the ELISA. Western blot analyses revealed various cleavage patterns of those proproteins that were analyzed in prostasomes and extracellular vesicles. Chromogranins are constituents of not only prostasomes but also of malignant prostate cell-derived extracellular vesicles with different amino acid sequences exposed at the membrane surface giving rise to a mosaic pattern. These findings may be of relevance for designing new assays for detection or even possible treatment of prostate cancers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. AKI Recovery Induced by Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Carrying MicroRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Incarnato, Danny; Dettori, Daniela; Neri, Francesco; Provero, Paolo; Pomatto, Margherita; Oliviero, Salvatore; Tetta, Ciro; Quesenberry, Peter J.; Camussi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic changes induced by extracellular vesicles have been implicated in mesenchymal stromal cell–promoted recovery of AKI. MicroRNAs are potential candidates for cell reprogramming toward a proregenerative phenotype. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether microRNA deregulation inhibits the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal cells and derived extracellular vesicles in a model of glycerol-induced AKI in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We generated mesenchymal stroma...

  3. Effects of Extracellular pH on Dental Pulp Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Yujiro; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kawabata, Shigetada; Murakami, Masashi; Nakashima, Misako; Gotoh, Momokazu; Yamamoto, Tokunori

    2016-05-01

    The proliferation and migration of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), a population comprised of dental pulp cells (DPCs), are important processes for pulp tissue repair. Dental pulp is exposed to changes in extracellular pH under various conditions, such as acidosis and exposure to caries-associated bacteria or a pulp capping agent. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of extracellular pH on DPC proliferation and migration in vitro. To evaluate the proliferation potency of DPCs in various extracellular pH conditions, 2 × 10(4) cells were seeded into 35-mm dishes. The following day, we changed to NaHCO3-free medium, which was adjusted to different extracellular pH levels. After 120 hours, DPCs cultured in media from a pH of 3.5 to 5.5 showed cell death, those cultured in conditions from a pH of 6.5 to 7.5 showed growth arrest or cell death, and those grown at a pH of 9.5 showed mild proliferation. The migratory activity of living DPCs was not affected by extracellular pH. For histologic analysis, human teeth possessing a small abscess in the coronal pulp chamber were sliced for histologic analysis. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunolocalization was used as an index of cell proliferation for the sections and cultured cells. Acidic extracellular pH conditions resulted in reduced numbers of PCNA-positive DPCs in the dishes. As for pulp tissue affected by a small abscess, a PCNA-negative pulp cell layer was observed in close proximity to the infectious lesion. Together, these results suggest that an acidic extracellular pH condition is associated with DPC growth arrest or cell death. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. miR-200–containing extracellular vesicles promote breast cancer cell metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Minh T.N.; Hamar, Peter; Guo, Changying; Basar, Emre; Perdigão-Henriques, Ricardo; Balaj, Leonora; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Not all cancer cells within a tumor are capable of metastasizing. The microRNA-200 (miR-200) family, which regulates the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, is enriched in the serum of patients with metastatic cancers. Ectopic expression of miR-200 can confer metastatic ability to poorly metastatic tumor cells in some settings. Here, we investigated whether metastatic capability could be transferred between metastatic and nonmetastatic cancer cells via extracellular vesicles. miR-200 was secreted in extracellular vesicles from metastatic murine and human breast cancer cell lines, and miR-200 levels were increased in sera of mice bearing metastatic tumors. In culture, murine and human metastatic breast cancer cell extracellular vesicles transferred miR-200 microRNAs to nonmetastatic cells, altering gene expression and promoting mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. In murine cancer and human xenograft models, miR-200–expressing tumors and extracellular vesicles from these tumors promoted metastasis of otherwise weakly metastatic cells either nearby or at distant sites and conferred to these cells the ability to colonize distant tissues in a miR-200–dependent manner. Together, our results demonstrate that metastatic capability can be transferred by the uptake of extracellular vesicles. PMID:25401471

  5. Proteomic profiling of extracellular vesicles released from vascular smooth muscle cells during initiation of phosphate-induced mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Sandeep C; Khalid, Sana; Smethurst, Victoria; Monier, Daisy; Mobley, James; Huet, Alexis; Conway, James F; Napierala, Dobrawa

    2018-02-22

    Elevated serum phosphate is one of the major factors contributing to vascular calcification. Studies suggested that extracellular vesicles released from vascular smooth muscle cells significantly contribute to the initiation and progression of this pathology. Recently, we have demonstrated that elevated phosphate stimulates release of extracellular vesicles from osteogenic cells at the initiation of the mineralization process. Here, we used MOVAS cell line as an in vitro model of vascular calcification to examine whether vascular smooth muscle cells respond to high phosphate levels in a similar way and increase formation of extracellular vesicles. Vesicles residing in extracellular matrix as well as vesicles released to culture medium were evaluated by nanoparticle tracking analyses. In addition, using mass spectrometry and protein profiling, protein composition of extracellular vesicles released by MOVAS cells under standard growth conditions and upon exposure to high phosphate was compared. Significant increase of the number of extracellular vesicles was detected after 72 hours of exposure of cells to high phosphate. Elevated phosphate levels also affected protein composition of extracellular vesicles released from MOVAS cells. Finally, the comparative analyses of proteins in extracellular vesicles isolated from extracellular matrix and from conditioned medium identified significant differences in protein composition in these two groups of extracellular vesicles. In conclusion, results of this study demonstrate that exposure of MOVAS cells to high phosphate levels stimulates the release of extracellular vesicles and changes their protein composition.

  6. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haqqani Arsalan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes. Extracellular microvesicles contain cell-specific collections of proteins, glycoproteins, lipids, nucleic acids and other molecules. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by acting as carrier for essential cell-specific information to target cells. Endothelial cells in the brain form the blood–brain barrier, a specialized interface between the blood and the brain that tightly controls traffic of nutrients and macromolecules between two compartments and interacts closely with other cells forming the neurovascular unit. Therefore, brain endothelial cell extracellular microvesicles could potentially play important roles in ‘externalizing’ brain-specific biomarkers into the blood stream during pathological conditions, in transcytosis of blood-borne molecules into the brain, and in cell-cell communication within the neurovascular unit. Methods To study cell-specific molecular make-up and functions of brain endothelial cell exosomes, methods for isolation of extracellular microvesicles using mass spectrometry-compatible protocols and the characterization of their signature profiles using mass spectrometry -based proteomics were developed. Results A total of 1179 proteins were identified in the isolated extracellular microvesicles from brain endothelial cells. The microvesicles were validated by identification of almost 60 known markers, including Alix, TSG101 and the tetraspanin proteins CD81 and CD9. The surface proteins on isolated microvesicles could potentially

  7. Guided extracellular matrix formation from fibroblast cells cultured on bio-inspired configurable multiscale substrata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Gyu Bae

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering complex extracellular matrix (ECM is an important challenge for cell and tissue engineering applications as well as for understanding fundamental cell biology. We developed the methodology for fabrication of precisely controllable multiscale hierarchical structures using capillary force lithography in combination with original wrinkling technique for the generation of well-defined native ECM-like platforms by culturing fibroblast cells on the multiscale substrata [1]. This paper provides information on detailed characteristics of polyethylene glycol-diacrylate multiscale substrata. In addition, a possible model for guided extracellular matrix formation from fibroblast cells cultured on bio-inspired configurable multiscale substrata is proposed.

  8. Effects of intraocular irrigating solutions on the spreading of rabbit corneal endothelial cells on extracellular matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, T; Otori, T

    1991-01-01

    The effects of four commercially available irrigating solutions on the spreading of rabbit corneal endothelial cells on various extracellular matrices were studied. Cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells, suspended in one of the following intraocular irrigating solutions, Opeguard MA, BSS, BSS Plus, lactated Ringer solution (Lactec) or physiological saline, were placed on uncoated tissue culture plates or on plates coated with extracellular matrices (fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I, or collagen type IV). The cell area was measured after 45 minutes' incubation. The cells spread on all of the extracellular matrices examined but not on the uncoated tissue culture plates. On the fibronectin or laminin matrix, the cell area was significantly greater with Opeguard MA or BSS Plus. On laminin and collagen type IV, the cell area was the greatest with Opeguard MA. On collagen type I, the cell area was significantly greater with Opeguard MA, BSS, or BSS Plus. These results demonstrated that the rabbit corneal endothelial cells responded to the extracellular matrices, and that Opeguard MA or BSS Plus provided more favorable conditions for the spreading of these cells. These results indicated that both Opeguard MA and BSS Plus might aid the spreading of corneal endothelial cells during wound-healing immediately after intraocular surgery.

  9. Investigation of extracellular microRNAs in oral squamous cell carcinoma, rheumatoid arthritis and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Yan

    Extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) refer to cell-free miRNAs that are protected by extracellular vesicles (EVs) and protein complexes from degradation. Extracellular miRNAs are also known as circulating miRNAs that can circulate in bodily fluids. Studies have reported that extracellular miRNAs can...... serve as biomarkers for human diseases and can also act as mediators in cell-cell communication. In cancer, the abnormal expression of miRNAs in plasma has been observed. However, there is no report on the association of plasma miRNA expression with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) recurrence after...... MSCs contained differentially regulated miRNAs. However, the change in EV miRNA derived from BMSCs and ASCs during osteogenesis has not been characterized by NGS. In the third project, it was found that osteogenic differentiation regulated miRNA expression in BMSCs and ASCs, as well as their EV mi...

  10. Extracellular Vesicles within the Bone Marrow Niche : A novel way of communication between osteoblasts and hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Morhayim (Jess)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractCell-to-cell communication plays an essential role in regulating homeostasis in multicellular organisms. Recent evidence indicates that cells effectively communicate via extracellular vesicles (EVs), which carry bioactive cargo, such as proteins, lipids and RNA, between cells.

  11. AKI Recovery Induced by Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Carrying MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Incarnato, Danny; Dettori, Daniela; Neri, Francesco; Provero, Paolo; Pomatto, Margherita; Oliviero, Salvatore; Tetta, Ciro; Quesenberry, Peter J; Camussi, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Phenotypic changes induced by extracellular vesicles have been implicated in mesenchymal stromal cell-promoted recovery of AKI. MicroRNAs are potential candidates for cell reprogramming toward a proregenerative phenotype. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether microRNA deregulation inhibits the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal cells and derived extracellular vesicles in a model of glycerol-induced AKI in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We generated mesenchymal stromal cells depleted of Drosha to alter microRNA expression. Drosha-knockdown cells produced extracellular vesicles that did not differ from those of wild-type cells in quantity, surface molecule expression, and internalization within renal tubular epithelial cells. However, these vesicles showed global downregulation of microRNAs. Whereas wild-type mesenchymal stromal cells and derived vesicles administered intravenously induced morphologic and functional recovery in AKI, the Drosha-knockdown counterparts were ineffective. RNA sequencing analysis showed that kidney genes deregulated after injury were restored by treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells and derived vesicles but not with Drosha-knockdown cells and vesicles. Gene ontology analysis showed in AKI an association of downregulated genes with fatty acid metabolism and upregulated genes with inflammation, matrix-receptor interaction, and cell adhesion molecules. These alterations reverted after treatment with wild-type mesenchymal stromal cells and extracellular vesicles but not after treatment with the Drosha-knockdown counterparts. In conclusion, microRNA depletion in mesenchymal stromal cells and extracellular vesicles significantly reduced their intrinsic regenerative potential in AKI, suggesting a critical role of microRNAs in recovery after AKI. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Neurotransmitter modulation of extracellular H+ fluxes from isolated retinal horizontal cells of the skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Anthony J A; Verzi, Michael P; Birnbaum, Andrea D; Yamoah, Ebenezer N; Hammar, Katherine; Smith, Peter J S; Malchow, Robert Paul

    2004-01-01

    Self-referencing H+-selective microelectrodes were used to measure extracellular H+ fluxes from horizontal cells isolated from the skate retina. A standing H+ flux was detected from quiescent cells, indicating a higher concentration of free hydrogen ions near the extracellular surface of the cell as compared to the surrounding solution. The standing H+ flux was reduced by removal of extracellular sodium or application of 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA), suggesting activity of a Na+–H+ exchanger. Glutamate decreased H+ flux, lowering the concentration of free hydrogen ions around the cell. AMPA/kainate receptor agonists mimicked the response, and the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) eliminated the effects of glutamate and kainate. Metabotropic glutamate agonists were without effect. Glutamate-induced alterations in H+ flux required extracellular calcium, and were abolished when cells were bathed in an alkaline Ringer solution. Increasing intracellular calcium by photolysis of the caged calcium compound NP-EGTA also altered extracellular H+ flux. Immunocytochemical localization of the plasmalemma Ca2+–H+-ATPase (PMCA pump) revealed intense labelling within the outer plexiform layer and on isolated horizontal cells. Our results suggest that glutamate modulation of H+ flux arises from calcium entry into cells with subsequent activation of the plasmalemma Ca2+–H+-ATPase. These neurotransmitter-induced changes in extracellular pH have the potential to play a modulatory role in synaptic processing in the outer retina. However, our findings argue against the hypothesis that hydrogen ions released by horizontal cells normally act as the inhibitory feedback neurotransmitter onto photoreceptor synaptic terminals to create the surround portion of the centre-surround receptive fields of retinal neurones. PMID:15272044

  13. Adherence of Staphylococci to plastic, mesothelial cells and mesothelial extracellular matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Betjes, M. G.; Tuk, C. W.; Struijk, D. G.; Krediet, R. T.; Arisz, L.; Beelen, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we have investigated whether mesothelial cells (MC) and mesothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) are suitable substrates for the adherence of Staphylococci. Mesothelial cells were isolated from the peritoneal dialysis effluent by making use of their lack of Fc-receptors and capacity to

  14. Biological roles and potential applications of immune cell-derived extracellular vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Chuan; Seeger, Robert C.; Fabbri, Muller; Wang, Larry; Wayne, Alan S.; Jong, Ambrose Y.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular vesicles (EVs) deliver bioactive macromolecules (i.e. proteins, lipids and nucleic acids) for intercellular communication in multicellular organisms. EVs are secreted by all cell types including immune cells. Immune cell-derived EVs modulate diverse aspects of the immune system to either enhance or suppress immune activities. The extensive effects of immune cell-derived EVs have become the focus of great interest for various nano-biomedical applications, ranging from th...

  15. Vaccinia virus phospholipase protein F13 promotes the rapid entry of extracellular virions into cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryk, Peter; Brewer, Matthew G; Ward, Brian M

    2018-03-14

    The vaccinia virus protein F13, encoded by the F13L gene, is conserved across the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae and is critical among orthopoxviruses to produce the wrapped form of virus that is required for cell-to-cell spread. F13 is the major envelope protein on the membrane of extracellular forms of virus, however it is not known if F13 is required in steps post-wrapping. In this report, we utilize two temperature-sensitive vaccinia virus mutants from the Condit collection of temperature-sensitive viruses whose small plaque phenotypes have been mapped to the F13L gene. Despite the drastic reduction in plaque size, the temperature-sensitive viruses were found to produce similar levels of extracellular virions to the parental strain, Western Reserve (WR), at the permissive and non-permissive temperature, suggesting that they are not defective in extracellular virion formation. Analyses of extracellular virions produced by one temperature-sensitive mutant found that those produced at the non-permissive temperature had undetectable levels of F13 and bound cells with similar efficiency to WR, but displayed delayed cell entry kinetics. Additionally, low-pH treatment of cells bound by extracellular virions produced at the non-permissive temperature by the temperature-sensitive reporter virus was unable to overcome a block in infection by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that these virions display increased resistance to dissolution of the extracellular virion envelope. Taken together, our results suggest F13 plays a role in both the formation of extracellular virions, and promotes their rapid entry into cells by enhancing the sensitivity of the membrane to acid-induced dissolution. IMPORTANCE Vaccinia virus (VACV) is an orthopoxvirus, and produces two infectious forms, mature virions (MV) and extracellular virions (EV). EV are derived from MV and contain an additional membrane that must first be removed prior to cell entry. F13 is critical for the formation of EV, but a post

  16. Extracellular cleavage of E-cadherin promotes epithelial cell extrusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grieve, Adam G; Rabouille, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cell extrusion and subsequent apoptosis is a key mechanism to prevent the accumulation of excess cells. By contrast, when driven by oncogene expression, apical cell extrusion is followed by proliferation and represents an initial step of tumorigenesis. E-cadherin (E-cad), the main

  17. New insights in the composition of extracellular vesicles from pancreatic cancer cells: implications for biomarkers and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Scory, Susanne; Tehrani, Mahnaz Moradian; Eilert-Micus, Christina; Adamczyk, Kamila A; Wojtalewicz, Nathalie; Schnölzer, Martina; Hahn, Stephan A; Schmiegel, Wolff; Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer development is associated with characteristic alterations like desmoplastic reaction and immune escape which are mediated by the cell-cell communication mechanism and by the microenvironment of the cells. The whole of released components are important determinants in these processes. Especially the extracellular vesicles released by pancreatic cancer cells play a role in cell communication and modulate cell growth and immune responses. Here, we present the proteomic description of affinity purified extracellular vesicles from pancreatic tumour cells, compared to the secretome, defined as the whole of the proteins released by pancreatic cancer cells. The proteomic data provide comprehensive catalogues of hundreds of proteins, and the comparison reveals a special proteomic composition of pancreatic cancer cell derived extracellular vesicles. The functional analysis of the protein composition displayed that membrane proteins, glycoproteins, small GTP binding proteins and a further, heterogeneous group of proteins are enriched in vesicles, whereas proteins derived from proteasomes and ribosomes, as well as metabolic enzymes, are not components of the vesicles. Furthermore proteins playing a role in carcinogenesis and modulators of the extracellular matrix (ECM) or cell-cell interactions are components of affinity purified extracellular vesicles. The data deepen the knowledge of extracellular vesicle composition by hundreds of proteins that have not been previously described as vesicle components released by pancreatic cancer cells. Extracellular vesicles derived from pancreatic cancer cells show common proteins shared with other vesicles as well as cell type specific proteins indicating biomarker candidates and suggesting functional roles in cancer cell stroma interactions.

  18. Extracellular vesicles - new players in cell-cell communication in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Daniella; Vardi, Assaf

    2018-02-12

    Communication between microorganisms in aquatic environments can influence ecosystem function and determine the structure and composition of microbial populations. This microbial cross talk can be mediated by excretion of specialized metabolites or extracellular vesicles (EVs). Recently it has become apparent that cells across all domains of life produce EVs that may convey specific targeted signals that can modulate cell fate, morphology and susceptibility to viruses. The vast majority of knowledge about EVs is derived from studies of mammalian tissues, parasitic host-pathogen interactions and model bacterial systems. Very little is known about the role of EVs in aquatic environments, although they have potential to influence community structure and trophic-level interactions. We propose functions and ecological implications of communication via EVs in aquatic microbial ecosystems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. From glioblastoma to endothelial cells through extracellular vesicles: messages for angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Ilaria; Delle Monache, Simona; Di Francesco, Marianna; Sanità, Patrizia; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Festuccia, Claudio; Dolo, Vincenza

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastoma has one of the highest mortality rates among cancers, and it is the most common and malignant form of brain cancer. Among the typical features of glioblastoma tumors, there is an aberrant vascularization: all gliomas are among the most vascularized/angiogenic tumors. In recent years, it has become clear that glioblastoma cells can secrete extracellular vesicles which are spherical and membrane-enclosed particles released, in vitro or in vivo, by both normal and tumor cells; they are involved in the regulation of both physiological and pathological processes; among the latter, cancer is the most widely studied. Extracellular vesicles from tumor cells convey messages to other tumor cells, but also to normal stromal cells in order to create a microenvironment that supports cancer growth and progression and are implicated in drug resistance, escape from immunosurveillance and from apoptosis, as well as in metastasis formation; they are also involved in angiogenesis stimulation, inducing endothelial cells proliferation, and other pro-angiogenic activities. To this aim, the present paper assesses in detail the extracellular vesicles phenomenon in the human glioblastoma cell line U251 and evaluates extracellular vesicles ability to promote the processes required to achieve the formation of new blood vessels in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, highlighting that they stimulate proliferation, motility, and tube formation in a dose-response manner. Moreover, a molecular characterization shows that extracellular vesicles are fully equipped for angiogenesis stimulation in terms of proteolytic enzymes (gelatinases and plasminogen activators), pro-angiogenic growth factors (VEGF and TGFβ), and the promoting-angiogenic CXCR4 chemokine receptor.

  20. Mimicking cell/extracellular matrix adhesion with lipid membranes and solid substrates: requirements, pitfalls and proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvelier, Damien; Vezy, Cyrille; Viallat, Annie; Bassereau, Patricia; Nassoy, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    The interest in physical approaches to the study of cell adhesion has generated numerous recent works on the development of substrates mimicking the extracellular matrix and the use of giant synthetic liposomes, commonly considered as basic models of living cells. The use of well-characterized bioactive substrates and artificial cells should allow us to gain new insight into the cell-extracellular matrix interactions, provided that their biomimetic relevance has been really proved. The aim of this paper is to define some minimal requirements for effective biomimetic features and to propose simple adhesion assays. We show, for instance, that immobilization of specific ligands is sometimes not sufficient to ensure specific adhesion of cells expressing the corresponding receptors. By investigating comparatively the adhesive behaviour of decorated erythrocytes and vesicles, we also discuss the potentialities and limitations of synthetic vesicles as test cells.

  1. Lrp4 modulates extracellular integration of cell signaling pathways in development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Ohazama

    Full Text Available The extent to which cell signaling is integrated outside the cell is not currently appreciated. We show that a member of the low-density receptor-related protein family, Lrp4 modulates and integrates Bmp and canonical Wnt signalling during tooth morphogenesis by binding the secreted Bmp antagonist protein Wise. Mouse mutants of Lrp4 and Wise exhibit identical tooth phenotypes that include supernumerary incisors and molars, and fused molars. We propose that the Lrp4/Wise interaction acts as an extracellular integrator of epithelial-mesenchymal cell signaling. Wise, secreted from mesenchyme cells binds to BMP's and also to Lrp4 that is expressed on epithelial cells. This binding then results in the modulation of Wnt activity in the epithelial cells. Thus in this context Wise acts as an extracellular signaling molecule linking two signaling pathways. We further show that a downstream mediator of this integration is the Shh signaling pathway.

  2. The extracellular protein VlsE is destabilized inside cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Irisbel; Gelman, Hannah; Tai, Jonathan; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-09

    We use U2OS cells as in vivo "test tubes" to study how the same cytoplasmic environment has opposite effects on the stability of two different proteins. Protein folding stability and kinetics were compared by fast relaxation imaging, which combines a temperature jump with fluorescence microscopy of FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer)-labeled proteins. While the stability of the cytoplasmic enzyme PGK (phosphoglycerate kinase) increases in cells, the stability of the cell surface antigen VlsE, which presumably did not evolve for stability inside cells, decreases. VlsE folding also slows down more than PGK folding in cells, relative to their respective aqueous buffer kinetics. Our FRET measurements provide evidence that VlsE is more compact inside cells than in aqueous buffer. Two kinetically distinct protein populations exist inside cells, making a connection with previous in vitro crowding studies. In addition, we confirm previous studies showing that VlsE is stabilized by 150mg/mL of the carbohydrate crowder Ficoll, even though it is destabilized in the cytoplasm relative to aqueous buffer. We propose two mechanisms for the observed destabilization of VlsE in U2OS cells: long-range interactions competing with crowding or shape-dependent crowding favoring more compact states inside the cell over the elongated aqueous buffer native state. © 2013.

  3. Cranial and trunk neural crest cells use different mechanisms for attachment to extracellular matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Lallier, Thomas; Leblanc, Gabrielle; Artinger, Kristin B.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    1992-01-01

    We have used a quantitative cell attachment assay to compare the interactions of cranial and trunk neural crest cells with the extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules fibronectin, laminin and collagen types I and IV. Antibodies to the β_1 subunit of integrin inhibited attachment under all conditions tested, suggesting that integrins mediate neural crest cell interactions with these ECM molecules. The HNK-1 antibody against a surface carbohydrate epitope under certain conditions inhibited both cr...

  4. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Identifies Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression by Pancreatic Circulating Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Ting

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are shed from primary tumors into the bloodstream, mediating the hematogenous spread of cancer to distant organs. To define their composition, we compared genome-wide expression profiles of CTCs with matched primary tumors in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, isolating individual CTCs using epitope-independent microfluidic capture, followed by single-cell RNA sequencing. CTCs clustered separately from primary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, showing low-proliferative signatures, enrichment for the stem-cell-associated gene Aldh1a2, biphenotypic expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and expression of Igfbp5, a gene transcript enriched at the epithelial-stromal interface. Mouse as well as human pancreatic CTCs exhibit a very high expression of stromal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, including SPARC, whose knockdown in cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasiveness. The aberrant expression by CTCs of stromal ECM genes points to their contribution of microenvironmental signals for the spread of cancer to distant organs.

  5. Single-cell RNA sequencing identifies extracellular matrix gene expression by pancreatic circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David T; Wittner, Ben S; Ligorio, Matteo; Vincent Jordan, Nicole; Shah, Ajay M; Miyamoto, David T; Aceto, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Brannigan, Brian W; Xega, Kristina; Ciciliano, Jordan C; Zhu, Huili; MacKenzie, Olivia C; Trautwein, Julie; Arora, Kshitij S; Shahid, Mohammad; Ellis, Haley L; Qu, Na; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Rivera, Miguel N; Deshpande, Vikram; Ferrone, Cristina R; Kapur, Ravi; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2014-09-25

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors into the bloodstream, mediating the hematogenous spread of cancer to distant organs. To define their composition, we compared genome-wide expression profiles of CTCs with matched primary tumors in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, isolating individual CTCs using epitope-independent microfluidic capture, followed by single-cell RNA sequencing. CTCs clustered separately from primary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, showing low-proliferative signatures, enrichment for the stem-cell-associated gene Aldh1a2, biphenotypic expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and expression of Igfbp5, a gene transcript enriched at the epithelial-stromal interface. Mouse as well as human pancreatic CTCs exhibit a very high expression of stromal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including SPARC, whose knockdown in cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasiveness. The aberrant expression by CTCs of stromal ECM genes points to their contribution of microenvironmental signals for the spread of cancer to distant organs. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Capillary network formation from dispersed endothelial cells: Influence of cell traction, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, João R. D.; Travasso, Rui; Carvalho, João

    2018-01-01

    The formation of a functional vascular network depends on biological, chemical, and physical processes being extremely well coordinated. Among them, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix and cell adhesion are fundamental to achieve a functional network of endothelial cells, able to fully cover a required domain. By the use of a Cellular Potts Model and Finite Element Method it is shown that there exists a range of values of endothelial traction forces, cell-cell adhesion, and matrix rigidities where the network can spontaneously be formed, and its properties are characterized. We obtain the analytical relation that the minimum traction force required for cell network formation must obey. This minimum value for the traction force is approximately independent on the considered cell number and cell-cell adhesion. We quantify how these two parameters influence the morphology of the resulting networks (size and number of meshes).

  7. The Effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles on Hematopoietic Stem Cells Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamze Timari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are multipotent stem cells, with self-renewal ability as well as ability to generate all blood cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent stem cells, with self-renewal ability, and capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types. MSCs have supporting effects on hematopoiesis; through direct intercellular communications as well as secreting cytokines, chemokines, and extracellular vesicles (EVs. Recent investigations demonstrated that some biological functions and effects of MSCs are mediated by their EVs. MSC-EVs are the cell membrane and endosomal membrane compartments, which are important mediators in the intercellular communications. MSC-EVs contain some of the molecules such as proteins, mRNA, siRNA, and miRNA from their parental cells. MSC-EVs are able to inhibit tumor, repair damaged tissue, and modulate immune system responses. MSC-EVs compared to their parental cells, may have the specific safety advantages such as the lower potential to trigger immune system responses and limited side effects. Recently some studies demonstrated the effect of MSC-EVs on the expansion, differentiation, and clinical applications of HSCs such as improvement of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and inhibition of graft versus host disease (GVHD. HSCT may be the only therapeutic choice for patients who suffer from malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders. However, there are several severe side effects such GVHD that restricts the successfulness of HSCT. In this review, we will discuss the most important effects of MSCs and MSC-EVs on the improvement of HSCT, inhibition and treatment of GVHD, as well as, on the expansion of HSCs.

  8. Extracellular Matrix Regulation of Estrogen Receptors in Mouse Mammary Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Novaro, Virginia

    2002-01-01

    .... We present evidence that cell adhesion to the BM components collagen-IV, through alpha 2 and beta 1 integrin subunits and laminin-l, through alpha 2, alpha 6 and beta 1 subunits are the relevant...

  9. Extracellular histones, cell-free DNA, or nucleosomes: differences in immunostimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, Gerben; Zeerleder, Sacha; Luken, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    In inflammation, extensive cell death may occur, which results in the release of chromatin components into the extracellular environment. Individually, the purified chromatin components double stranded (ds)DNA and histones have been demonstrated, both in vitro and in vivo, to display various

  10. Extracellular IL-33 cytokine, but not endogenous nuclear IL-33, regulates protein expression in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Violette; Cayrol, Corinne; Farache, Dorian; Roga, Stéphane; Monsarrat, Bernard; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-03

    IL-33 is a nuclear cytokine from the IL-1 family that plays important roles in health and disease. Extracellular IL-33 activates a growing number of target cells, including group 2 innate lymphoid cells, mast cells and regulatory T cells, but it remains unclear whether intracellular nuclear IL-33 has additional functions in the nucleus. Here, we used a global proteomic approach based on high-resolution mass spectrometry to compare the extracellular and intracellular roles of IL-33 in primary human endothelial cells, a major source of IL-33 protein in human tissues. We found that exogenous extracellular IL-33 cytokine induced expression of a distinct set of proteins associated with inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous nuclear IL-33 expression using two independent RNA silencing strategies had no reproducible effect on the endothelial cell proteome. These results suggest that IL-33 acts as a cytokine but not as a nuclear factor regulating gene expression in endothelial cells.

  11. Sensitivity of Bladder Cancer Cells to Curcumin and Its Derivatives Depends on the Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul J.; Han, Zhiyong; Sindhwani, Puneet; Hurst, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Because the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents depends upon the supporting extracellular matrix (ECM), the response in vivo may not be reproduced in 2-dimensional cell culture. The dose-response to curcumin and two derivatives by bladder cancer cells grown on both normal (SISgel) and cancer-derived ECM (Matrigel) and on plastic were contrasted. Cells grown on Matrigel were resistant to curcumins, but cells growing on SISgel, which mimic cancer cells suppressed by normal ECM, were nearly as sensitive as cells grown on plastic. SV40-immortalized urothelial cells, which are models for premalignant cells, were the most sensitive, but even aggressive cell lines were nearly as sensitive when grown on SISgel as on plastic. Curcumin response depends highly on the supporting ECM, and cells grown on plastic poorly models cells growing on natural ECM. Curcumin could prove an effective chemopreventive for bladder cancer recurrence when administered intravesically post-therapy. PMID:17465196

  12. Extracellular localization of catalase is associated with the transformed state of malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Britta; Heinzelmann, Sonja; Motz, Manfred; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Oncogenic transformation is dependent on activated membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX). However, the resultant extracellular superoxide anions are also driving the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl pathway, which eliminates NOX-expressing transformed cells through selective apoptosis induction. Tumor progression is dependent on dominant interference with intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through membrane-associated catalase, which decomposes H2O2 and peroxynitrite and oxidizes NO. Particularly, the decomposition of extracellular peroxynitrite strictly requires membrane-associated catalase. We utilized small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of catalase and neutralizing antibodies directed against the enzyme in combination with challenging H2O2 or peroxynitrite to determine activity and localization of catalase in cells from three distinct steps of multistage oncogenesis. Nontransformed cells did not generate extracellular superoxide anions and only showed intracellular catalase activity. Transformed cells showed superoxide anion-dependent intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling in the presence of suboptimal catalase activity in their membrane. Tumor cells exhibited tight control of intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through a high local concentration of membrane-associated catalase. These data demonstrate that translocation of catalase to the outside of the cell membrane is already associated with the transformation step. A strong local increase in the concentration of membrane-associated catalase is achieved during tumor progression and is controlled by tumor cell-derived H2O2 and by transglutaminase.

  13. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-08-09

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated.

  14. Stem cell-extracellular vesicles as drug delivery systems: New frontiers for silk/curcumin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perteghella, Sara; Crivelli, Barbara; Catenacci, Laura; Sorrenti, Milena; Bruni, Giovanna; Necchi, Vittorio; Vigani, Barbara; Sorlini, Marzio; Torre, Maria Luisa; Chlapanidas, Theodora

    2017-03-30

    The aim of this work was to develop a novel carrier-in-carrier system based on stem cell-extracellular vesicles loaded of silk/curcumin nanoparticles by endogenous technique. Silk nanoparticles were produced by desolvation method and curcumin has been selected as drug model because of its limited water solubility and poor bioavailability. Nanoparticles were stable, with spherical geometry, 100nm in average diameter and the drug content reached about 30%. Cellular uptake studies, performed on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), showed the accumulation of nanoparticles in the cytosol around the nuclear membrane, without cytotoxic effects. Finally, MSCs were able to release extracellular vesicles entrapping silk/curcumin nanoparticles. This combined biological-technological approach represents a novel class of nanosystems, combining beneficial effects of both regenerative cell therapies and pharmaceutical nanomedicine, avoiding the use of viable replicating stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of extracellular modulation through hypoxia on the glucose metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustisia, I.; Jusman, S. W. A.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer stem cells have been reported to maintain stemness under certain extracellular changes. This study aimed to analyze the effect of extracellular O2 level modulation on the glucose metabolism of human CD24-/CD44+ breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were cultured under hypoxia (1% O2) for 0.5, 4, 6, 24 and 48 hours. After each incubation period, HIF1α, GLUT1 and CA9 expressions, as well as glucose metabolism status, including glucose consumption, lactate production, O2 consumption and extracellular pH (pHe) were analyzed using qRT-PCR, colorimetry, fluorometry, and enzymatic reactions, respectively. Hypoxia caused an increase in HIF1α mRNA expressions and protein levels and shifted the metabolic states to anaerobic glycolysis, as demonstrated by increased glucose consumption and lactate production, as well as decreased O2 consumption and pHe. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GLUT1 and CA9 mRNA expressions simultaneously increased, in line with HIF1α expression. In conclusion, modulation of the extracellular environment of human BCSCs through hypoxia shifedt the metabolic state of BCSCs to anaerobic glycolysis, which might be associated with GLUT1 and CA9 expressions regulated by HIFlα transcription factor.

  16. Electrochemical Quantification of Extracellular Local H2O2 Kinetics Originating from Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozem, Monika; Knapp, Phillip; Mirčeski, Valentin; Slowik, Ewa J; Bogeski, Ivan; Kappl, Reinhard; Heinemann, Christian; Hoth, Markus

    2017-05-15

    H 2 O 2 is produced by all eukaryotic cells under physiological and pathological conditions. Due to its enormous relevance for cell signaling at low concentrations and antipathogenic function at high concentrations, precise quantification of extracellular local H 2 O 2 concentrations ([H 2 O 2 ]) originating from single cells is required. Using a scanning electrochemical microscope and bare platinum disk ultramicroelectrodes, we established sensitive long-term measurements of extracellular [H 2 O 2 ] kinetics originating from single primary human monocytes (MCs) ex vivo. For the electrochemical techniques square wave voltammetry, cyclic and linear scan voltammetry, and chronoamperometry, detection limits for [H 2 O 2 ] were determined to be 5, 50, and 500 nM, respectively. Following phorbol ester stimulation, local [H 2 O 2 ] 5-8 μm above a single MC increased by 3.4 nM/s within the first 10 min before reaching a plateau. After extracellular addition of H 2 O 2 to an unstimulated MC, the local [H 2 O 2 ] decreased on average by 4.2 nM/s due to degradation processes of the cell. Using the scanning mode of the setup, we found that H 2 O 2 is evenly distributed around the producing cell and can still be detected up to 30 μm away from the cell. The electrochemical single-cell measurements were validated in MC populations using electron spin resonance spectroscopy and the Amplex ® UltraRed assay. Innovation and Conclusion: We demonstrate a highly sensitive, spatially, and temporally resolved electrochemical approach to monitor dynamics of production and degradation processes for H 2 O 2 separately. Local extracellular [H 2 O 2 ] kinetics originating from single cells is quantified in real time. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  17. Defining the Ail Ligand-Binding Surface: Hydrophobic Residues in Two Extracellular Loops Mediate Cell and Extracellular Matrix Binding To Facilitate Yop Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Tiffany M; Wiese, Jeffrey S; Alhabeil, Jamal A; Usselman, Lisa D; Thomson, Joshua J; Matti, Rafla; Kronshage, Malte; Maricic, Natalie; Williams, Shanedah; Sleiman, Naama H; Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S

    2017-04-01

    Yersinia pestis , the causative agent of plague, binds host cells to deliver cytotoxic Yop proteins into the cytoplasm that prevent phagocytosis and generation of proinflammatory cytokines. Ail is an eight-stranded β-barrel outer membrane protein with four extracellular loops that mediates cell binding and resistance to human serum. Following the deletion of each of the four extracellular loops that potentially interact with host cells, the Ail-Δloop 2 and Ail-Δloop 3 mutant proteins had no cell-binding activity while Ail-Δloop 4 maintained cell binding (the Ail-Δloop 1 protein was unstable). Using the codon mutagenesis scheme SWIM (selection without isolation of mutants), we identified individual residues in loops 1, 2, and 3 that contribute to host cell binding. While several residues contributed to the binding of host cells and purified fibronectin and laminin, as well as Yop delivery, three mutations, F80A (loop 2), S128A (loop 3), and F130A (loop 3), produced particularly severe defects in cell binding. Combining these mutations led to an even greater reduction in cell binding and severely impaired Yop delivery with only a slight defect in serum resistance. These findings demonstrate that Y. pestis Ail uses multiple extracellular loops to interact with substrates important for adhesion via polyvalent hydrophobic interactions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Extracellular vesicle associated long non-coding RNAs functionally enhance cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Hewson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells communicate with one another to create microenvironments and share resources. One avenue by which cells communicate is through the action of exosomes. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that are released by one cell and taken up by neighbouring cells. But how exosomes instigate communication between cells has remained largely unknown. We present evidence here that particular long non-coding RNA molecules are preferentially packaged into exosomes. We also find that a specific class of these exosome associated non-coding RNAs functionally modulate cell viability by direct interactions with l-lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB, high-mobility group protein 17 (HMG-17, and CSF2RB, proteins involved in metabolism, nucleosomal architecture and cell signalling respectively. Knowledge of this endogenous cell to cell pathway, those proteins interacting with exosome associated non-coding transcripts and their interacting domains, could lead to a better understanding of not only cell to cell interactions but also the development of exosome targeted approaches in patient specific cell-based therapies. Keywords: Non-coding RNA, Extracellular RNA, Exosomes, Retroelement, Pseudogene

  19. Cigarette smoke extract induces the release of extracellular vesicles by airway epithelial cells via cellular carbonyl stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benedikter, B.J.; Volgers, C.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Savelkoul, P.H.M.; Wouters, E.F.M.; Rohde, G.G.U.; Weseler, A.R.; Stassen, F.R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) participate in multiple processes by transferring proteins and RNA between cells. Yet, their contribution to chronic inflammation in the lungs is largely unexplored. We determined if exposure of airway epithelial cells (AEC) to cigarette smoke

  20. Extracellular Vesicles from Vascular Endothelial Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation and Motility of Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Kurachi

    Full Text Available We previously examined the effect of brain microvascular endothelial cell (MVEC transplantation on rat white matter infarction, and found that MVEC transplantation promoted remyelination of demyelinated axons in the infarct region and reduced apoptotic death of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs. We also found that the conditioned medium (CM from cultured MVECs inhibited apoptosis of cultured OPCs. In this study, we examined contribution of extracellular vesicles (EVs contained in the CM to its inhibitory effect on OPC apoptosis. Removal of EVs from the CM by ultracentrifugation reduced its inhibitory effect on OPC apoptosis. To confirm whether EVs derived from MVECs are taken up by cultured OPCs, we labeled EVs with PKH67, a fluorescent dye, and added them to OPC cultures. Many vesicular structures labeled with PKH67 were found within OPCs immediately after their addition. Next we examined the effect of MVEC-derived EVs on OPC behaviors. After 2 days in culture with EVs, there was significantly less pyknotic and more BrdU-positive OPCs when compared to control. We also examined the effect of EVs on motility of OPCs. OPCs migrated longer in the presence of EVs when compared to control. To examine whether these effects on cultured OPCs are shared by EVs from endothelial cells, we prepared EVs from conditioned media of several types of endothelial cells, and tested their effects on cultured OPCs. EVs from all types of endothelial cells we examined reduced apoptosis of OPCs and promoted their motility. Identification of the molecules contained in EVs from endothelial cells may prove helpful for establishment of effective therapies for demyelinating diseases.

  1. Production of Monascus pigments as extracellular crystals by cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fengling; Liu, Lujie; Huang, Yaolin; Zhang, Xuehong; Wang, Zhilong

    2018-01-01

    It is generally accepted that Monascus pigments are predominantly cell-bound, including both intracellular and surface-bound pigments. This long-term misconception was corrected in the present work. Production of extracellular crystal pigments by submerged culture of Monascus sp. was confirmed by microscopic observation and collection of Monascus pigments from extracellular broth by direct membrane filtration. Following up the new fact, the bioactivity of mycelia as whole-cell biocatalyst for biosynthesis and biodegradation of Monascus pigments had been detailedly examined in both an aqueous solution and a nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution. Based on those experimental results, cell suspension culture in an aqueous medium was developed as a novel strategy for accumulation of high concentration of Monascus pigments. Thus, glucose feeding during submerged culture in the aqueous medium was carried out successfully and high orange Monascus pigments concentration of near 4 g/L was achieved.

  2. Signal transduction events induced by extracellular guanosine 5?triphosphate in excitable cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrangelo, T.; Guarnieri, S.; Fulle, S.; Fan?, G.; Mariggi?, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    A better understanding of the physiological effects of guanosine-based purines should help clarify the complex subject of purinergic signalling. We studied the effect of extracellular guanosine 5?triphosphate (GTP) on the differentiation of two excitable cell lines that both have specific binding sites for GTP: PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells and C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. PC12 cells can be differentiated into fully functional sympathetic-like neurons with 50?00 ng ml?1 of nerve growt...

  3. Extracellular matrix elasticity and topography: material-based cues that affect cell function via conserved mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Isaac A.; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical, mechanical, and topographic extracellular matrix (ECM) cues have been extensively studied for their influence on cell behavior. These ECM cues alter cell adhesion, cell shape, and cell migration, and activate signal transduction pathways to influence gene expression, proliferation, and differentiation. ECM elasticity and topography, in particular, have emerged as material properties of intense focus based on strong evidence these physical cue can partially dictate stem cell differentiation. Cells generate forces to pull on their adhesive contacts, and these tractional forces appear to be a common element of cells’ responses to both elasticity and topography. This review focuses on recently published work that links ECM topography and mechanics and their influence on differentiation and other cell behaviors, We also highlight signaling pathways typically implicated in mechanotransduction that are (or may be) shared by cells subjected to topographic cues. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the potential implications of these commonalities for cell based therapies and biomaterial design. PMID:24910444

  4. Extracellular histones disarrange vasoactive mediators release through a COX-NOS interaction in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cremades, Daniel; Bueno-Betí, Carlos; García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibañez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Pallardó, Federico V; Novella, Susana

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular histones are mediators of inflammation, tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Interactions between circulating histones and vascular endothelial cells are key events in histone-mediated pathologies. Our aim was to investigate the implication of extracellular histones in the production of the major vasoactive compounds released by human endothelial cells (HUVECs), prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). HUVEC exposed to increasing concentrations of histones (0.001 to 100 μg/ml) for 4 hrs induced prostacyclin (PGI2) production in a dose-dependent manner and decreased thromboxane A2 (TXA2) release at 100 μg/ml. Extracellular histones raised cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) mRNA and protein expression, decreased COX-1 mRNA levels and did not change thromboxane A2 synthase (TXAS) expression. Moreover, extracellular histones decreased both, eNOS expression and NO production in HUVEC. The impaired NO production was related to COX-2 activity and superoxide production since was reversed after celecoxib (10 μmol/l) and tempol (100 μmol/l) treatments, respectively. In conclusion, our findings suggest that extracellular histones stimulate the release of endothelial-dependent mediators through an up-regulation in COX-2-PGIS-PGI2 pathway which involves a COX-2-dependent superoxide production that decreases the activity of eNOS and the NO production. These effects may contribute to the endothelial cell dysfunction observed in histone-mediated pathologies. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. Cell survival, activation and apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells: modulation by extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Sulochana; Sudhakaran, Perumana R

    2008-12-01

    Cytokines and growth factors released by various hepatic cells exert both paracrine and autocrine effects on hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation during liver injury. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the activation, transdifferentiation and survival of HSCs. An in vitro model system of isolated HSCs maintained in culture on different matrix protein substrata was employed. The rate of loss of HSC-specific retinol uptake activity and gain of myofibroblast-like activity such as (35)[S] proteoglycan synthesis varied in cells maintained on different matrix proteins and was in the order collagen I > collagen IV >/= laminin. (3)[H]-thymidine incorporation by HSCs maintained on different matrix proteins varied and was in the order collagen I > collagen IV > laminin. MTT assay revealed that the growth inhibition in response to curcumin was significantly low in cells maintained on collagen I. Apoptotic marker activities such as DNA fragmentation, 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining, annexin staining and caspase-3 activities showed that cells maintained on collagen I showed minimal apoptosis than those maintained on collagen IV, laminin and polylysine, showing the influence of ECM on HSC apoptosis. Experiments using blocking antibodies showed that the collagen I effect was mediated through alpha(2)beta(1) integrin. These results indicate that ECM influences activation, transdifferentiation and survival of HSCs, and suggest that apart from diffusible factors, the surrounding ECM also influences HSC behavior critical in both the progression of the fibrosis and the restitution of the liver during recovery after hepatic injury.

  6. The contribution of the extracellular matrix to gravisensing in characean cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-extracellular matrix junction, which includes the cell wall and the outer surface of the plasma membrane, may be an essential region for the perception of gravity by the internodal cells of Chara corallina. Typically, when an internodal cell is oriented vertically, the downwardly directed cytoplasmic stream travels at a velocity that is 10% faster than that of the upwardly directed stream. However when the cells are treated with impermeant hydrolytic enzymes that partially digest cellulose or hemicellulose, the cells lose their ability to respond to gravity even though streaming continues. By contrast, enzymes that digest pectins have no effect on the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, gravisensing is sensitive to protease treatment; Proteinase K, thermolysin and collagenase but not trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin or carboxypeptidase B, inhibit gravisensing. These findings indicate that proteins in the cell-extracellular matrix junction may be required for gravisensing. Moreover, the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) inhibits gravisensing in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that the gravireceptor may be an integrin-like protein. The macromolecules necessary for gravisensing have been localized to the cell ends. As a consequence of the exoplasmic site of action of the enzymes and the tetrapeptides, we interpret the results to mean that they are acting on the gravireceptor, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that they are acting on the signal transduction chain. On the whole, our observations indicate that the cell-extracellular matrix junction is a sine qua non for graviperception in statolith-free Chara internodal cells and we suggest that the gravireceptor is located in this region.

  7. Extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent enhancement of cytocidal potency of zoledronic acid in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Sayaka; Arai, Naoya; Tomihara, Kei; Takashina, Michinori; Hattori, Yuichi; Noguchi, Makoto

    2015-08-15

    Direct antitumor effects of bisphosphonates (BPs) have been demonstrated in various cancer cells in vitro. However, the effective concentrations of BPs are typically much higher than their clinically relevant concentrations. Oral cancers frequently invade jawbone and may lead to the release of Ca(2+) in primary lesions. We investigated the effects of the combined application of zoledronic acid (ZA) and Ca(2+) on proliferation and apoptosis of oral cancer cells. Human oral cancer cells, breast cancer cells, and colon cancer cells were treated with ZA at a wide range of concentrations in different Ca(2+) concentration environments. Under a standard Ca(2+) concentration (0.6mM), micromolar concentrations of ZA were required to inhibit oral cancer cell proliferation. Increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations greatly enhanced the potency of the ZA cytocidal effect. The ability of Ca(2+) to enhance the cytocidal effects of ZA was negated by the Ca(2+)-selective chelator EGTA. In contrast, the cytocidal effect of ZA was less pronounced in breast and colon cancer cells regardless of whether extracellular Ca(2+) was elevated. In oral cancer cells incubated with 1.6mM Ca(2+), ZA up-regulated mitochondrial Bax expression and increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. This was associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased release of cytochrome c. We suggest that ZA can specifically produce potent cytocidal activity in oral cancer cells in an extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent manner, implying that BPs may be useful for treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma with jawbone invasion leading to the hypercalcemic state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  9. Myogenic Progenitor Cells Control Extracellular Matrix Production by Fibroblasts during Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher S; Kirby, Tyler J; Kosmac, Kate; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2017-01-05

    Satellite cells, the predominant stem cell population in adult skeletal muscle, are activated in response to hypertrophic stimuli and give rise to myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) within the extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds myofibers. This ECM is composed largely of collagens secreted by interstitial fibrogenic cells, which influence satellite cell activity and muscle repair during hypertrophy and aging. Here we show that MPCs interact with interstitial fibrogenic cells to ensure proper ECM deposition and optimal muscle remodeling in response to hypertrophic stimuli. MPC-dependent ECM remodeling during the first week of a growth stimulus is sufficient to ensure long-term myofiber hypertrophy. MPCs secrete exosomes containing miR-206, which represses Rrbp1, a master regulator of collagen biosynthesis, in fibrogenic cells to prevent excessive ECM deposition. These findings provide insights into how skeletal stem and progenitor cells interact with other cell types to actively regulate their extracellular environments for tissue maintenance and adaptation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cytoskeletal filament assembly and the control of cell spreading and function by extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, D. J.; Langer, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze how cell binding to extracellular matrix produces changes in cell shape. We focused on the initial process of cell spreading that follows cell attachment to matrix and, thus, cell 'shape' changes are defined here in terms of alterations in projected cell areas, as determined by computerized image analysis. Cell spreading kinetics and changes in microtubule and actin microfilament mass were simultaneously quantitated in hepatocytes plated on different extracellular matrix substrata. The initial rate of cell spreading was highly dependent on the matrix coating density and decreased from 740 microns 2/h to 50 microns 2/h as the coating density was lowered from 1000 to 1 ng/cm2. At approximately 4 to 6 hours after plating, this initial rapid spreading rate slowed and became independent of the matrix density regardless of whether laminin, fibronectin, type I collagen or type IV collagen was used for cell attachment. Analysis of F-actin mass revealed that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix resulted in a 20-fold increase in polymerized actin within 30 minutes after plating, before any significant change in cell shape was observed. This was followed by a phase of actin microfilament disassembly which correlated with the most rapid phase of cell extension and ended at about 6 hours; F-actin mass remained relatively constant during the slow matrix-independent spreading phase. Microtubule mass increased more slowly in spreading cells, peaking at 4 hours, the time at which the transition between rapid and slow spreading rates was observed. However, inhibition of this early rise in microtubule mass using either nocodazole or cycloheximide did not prevent this transition. Use of cytochalasin D revealed that microfilament integrity was absolutely required for hepatocyte spreading whereas interference with microtubule assembly (using nocodazole or taxol) or protein synthesis (using cycloheximide) only partially suppressed cell extension. In

  11. Cytoskeletal filament assembly and the control of cell spreading and function by extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, D J; Langer, R; Ingber, D E

    1995-06-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze how cell binding to extracellular matrix produces changes in cell shape. We focused on the initial process of cell spreading that follows cell attachment to matrix and, thus, cell 'shape' changes are defined here in terms of alterations in projected cell areas, as determined by computerized image analysis. Cell spreading kinetics and changes in microtubule and actin microfilament mass were simultaneously quantitated in hepatocytes plated on different extracellular matrix substrata. The initial rate of cell spreading was highly dependent on the matrix coating density and decreased from 740 microns 2/h to 50 microns 2/h as the coating density was lowered from 1000 to 1 ng/cm2. At approximately 4 to 6 hours after plating, this initial rapid spreading rate slowed and became independent of the matrix density regardless of whether laminin, fibronectin, type I collagen or type IV collagen was used for cell attachment. Analysis of F-actin mass revealed that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix resulted in a 20-fold increase in polymerized actin within 30 minutes after plating, before any significant change in cell shape was observed. This was followed by a phase of actin microfilament disassembly which correlated with the most rapid phase of cell extension and ended at about 6 hours; F-actin mass remained relatively constant during the slow matrix-independent spreading phase. Microtubule mass increased more slowly in spreading cells, peaking at 4 hours, the time at which the transition between rapid and slow spreading rates was observed. However, inhibition of this early rise in microtubule mass using either nocodazole or cycloheximide did not prevent this transition. Use of cytochalasin D revealed that microfilament integrity was absolutely required for hepatocyte spreading whereas interference with microtubule assembly (using nocodazole or taxol) or protein synthesis (using cycloheximide) only partially suppressed cell extension. In

  12. Analysis of the interaction of extracellular matrix and phenotype of bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Kyker, Kimberly D; Saban, Ricardo; Knowlton, Nicholas; Dozmorov, Igor; Centola, Michael B; Hurst, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix has a major effect upon the malignant properties of bladder cancer cells both in vitro in 3-dimensional culture and in vivo. Comparing gene expression of several bladder cancer cells lines grown under permissive and suppressive conditions in 3-dimensional growth on cancer-derived and normal-derived basement membrane gels respectively and on plastic in conventional tissue culture provides a model system for investigating the interaction of malignancy and extracellular matrix. Understanding how the extracellular matrix affects the phenotype of bladder cancer cells may provide important clues to identify new markers or targets for therapy. Five bladder cancer cell lines and one immortalized, but non-tumorigenic, urothelial line were grown on Matrigel, a cancer-derived ECM, on SISgel, a normal-derived ECM, and on plastic, where the only ECM is derived from the cells themselves. The transcriptomes were analyzed on an array of 1186 well-annotated cancer derived cDNAs containing most of the major pathways for malignancy. Hypervariable genes expressing more variability across cell lines than a set expressing technical variability were analyzed further. Expression values were clustered, and to identify genes most likely to represent biological factors, statistically over-represented ontologies and transcriptional regulatory elements were identified. Approximately 400 of the 1186 total genes were expressed 2 SD above background. Approximately 100 genes were hypervariable in cells grown on each ECM, but the pattern was different in each case. A core of 20 were identified as hypervariable under all 3 growth conditions, and 33 were hypervariable on both SISgel and Matrigel, but not on plastic. Clustering of the hypervariable genes showed very different patterns for the same 6 cell types on the different ECM. Even when loss of cell cycle regulation was identified, different genes were involved, depending on the ECM. Under the most permissive conditions

  13. Evaluation of viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells cultured onto xenogenic tissue-engineered extracellular matrices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells (HUCs) cultured on tissue-engineered extracellular matrix scaffolds and to assess the potential of extracellular matrixes to support the growth of HUCs in their expected in vivo urine environment.

  14. Delivery of viral vectors to tumor cells: extracellular transport, systemic distribution, and strategies for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yuan, Fan

    2006-01-01

    It is a challenge to deliver therapeutic genes to tumor cells using viral vectors because (i) the size of these vectors are close to or larger than the space between fibers in extracellular matrix and (ii) viral proteins are potentially toxic in normal tissues. In general, gene delivery is hindered by various physiological barriers to virus transport from the site of injection to the nucleus of tumor cells and is limited by normal tissue tolerance of toxicity determined by local concentrations of transgene products and viral proteins. To illustrate the obstacles encountered in the delivery and yet limit the scope of discussion, this review focuses only on extracellular transport in solid tumors and distribution of viral vectors in normal organs after they are injected intravenously or intratumorally. This review also discusses current strategies for improving intratumoral transport and specificity of viral vectors.

  15. Suppression of ICE and Apoptosis in Mammary Epithelial Cells by Extracellular Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreau, Nancy; Sympson, C. J.; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J.

    1994-12-01

    Apoptosis (programmed cell death) plays a major role in development and tissue regeneration. Basement membrane extracellular matrix (ECM), but not fibronectin or collagen, was shown to suppress apoptosis of mammary epithelial cells in tissue culture and in vivo. Apoptosis was induced by antibodies to beta 1 integrins or by overexpression of stromelysin-1, which degrades ECM. Expression of interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE) correlated with the loss of ECM, and inhibitors of ICE activity prevented apoptosis. These results suggest that ECM regulates apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells through an integrin-dependent negative regulation of ICE expression.

  16. PATHOGEN IMPACT ON THE ACTIVITY DYNAMICS OF POTATO SUSPENSION CELLS EXTRA-CELLULAR PEROXIDASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graskova I.A.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the activity of extracellular peroxidases were measured in cell suspension cultures of potato infected by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus (Spieck. et Kotth. Skapt et Burkh. The total extracellular peroxidases activity of the resistant potato variety was higher than that of the sensitive variety both before and after infection. The enzyme of the resistant variety had a рН optimum of 6.2, while that of the sensitive variety was 5.4. Extracellular peroxidases of the sensitive potato variety were activated 10 minutes after infection, and displayed highest activity 1.5-2 hours later. In the resistant variety, peroxidase activity rose sharply in the first minutes of infection, and second peak of activity occurred 1.5-2 hours later. The increase of extracellular peroxidases activity of the sensitive potato variety under pathogenesis is connected with the change of genome expression and synthesis of proteins. The increase of enzyme activity of resistant potato variety in the first moments of infection is not related to proteins synthesis and is apparently conditioned by the change of kinetic parameters.

  17. Simple and high yielding method for preparing tissue specific extracellular matrix coatings for cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeQuach, Jessica A; Mezzano, Valeria; Miglani, Amar; Lange, Stephan; Keller, Gordon M; Sheikh, Farah; Christman, Karen L

    2010-09-27

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of a highly complex, tissue-specific network of proteins and polysaccharides, which help regulate many cellular functions. Despite the complex nature of the ECM, in vitro cell-based studies traditionally assess cell behavior on single ECM component substrates, which do not adequately mimic the in vivo extracellular milieu. We present a simple approach for developing naturally derived ECM coatings for cell culture that provide important tissue-specific cues unlike traditional cell culture coatings, thereby enabling the maturation of committed C2C12 skeletal myoblast progenitors and human embryonic stem cells differentiated into cardiomyocytes. Here we show that natural muscle-specific coatings can (i) be derived from decellularized, solubilized adult porcine muscle, (ii) contain a complex mixture of ECM components including polysaccharides, (iii) adsorb onto tissue culture plastic and (iv) promote cell maturation of committed muscle progenitor and stem cells. This versatile method can create tissue-specific ECM coatings, which offer a promising platform for cell culture to more closely mimic the mature in vivo ECM microenvironment.

  18. Inhibition of extracellular matrix production and remodeling by doxycycline in smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rogelio Palomino-Morales; Carolina Torres; Sonia Perales; Ana Linares; Maria Jose Alejandre

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) production and remodeling of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have been implicated in processes related to the differentiation in atherosclerosis. Due to the anti-atherosclerotic properties of the tetracyclines, we aimed to investigate whether cholesterol supplementation changes the effect of doxycycline over the ECM proteins synthesis and whether isoprenylated proteins and Rho A protein activation are affected. SMC primary culture isolated from chicks ...

  19. Glioblastoma stem-like cells secrete the pro-angiogenic VEGF-A factor in extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treps, Lucas; Perret, Raul; Edmond, Sébastien; Ricard, Damien; Gavard, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are mortifying brain tumours that contain a subpopulation of tumour cells with stem-like properties, termed glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs). GSCs largely contribute to tumour initiation, propagation and resistance to current anti-cancer therapies. GSCs are situated in perivascular niches, closely associated with brain microvascular endothelial cells, thereby involved in bidirectional molecular and cellular interactions. Moreover, extracellular vesicles are suspected to carry essential information that can adapt the microenvironment to the tumour's needs, including tumour-induced angiogenesis. In GBM, extracellular vesicles produced by differentiated tumour cells and GSCs were demonstrated to disseminate locally and at distance. Here, we report that the pro-angiogenic pro-permeability factor VEGF-A is carried in extracellular vesicles secreted from ex vivo cultured patient-derived GSCs. Of note, extracellular vesicle-derived VEGF-A contributes to the in vitro elevation of permeability and angiogenic potential in human brain endothelial cells. Indeed, VEGF-A silencing in GSCs compromised in vitro extracellular vesicle-mediated increase in permeability and angiogenesis. From a clinical standpoint, extracellular vesicles isolated from circulating blood of GBM patients present higher levels of VEGF-A, as compared to healthy donors. Overall, our results suggest that extracellular vesicle-harboured VEGF-A targets brain endothelial cells and might impact their ability to form new vessels. Thus, tumour-released EV cargo might emerge as an instrumental part of the tumour-induced angiogenesis and vascular permeability modus operandi in GBM.

  20. Mechanical phenotyping of cells and extracellular matrix as grade and stage markers of lung tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzetta, Valeria; Musella, Ida; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; Netti, Paolo A; Fusco, Sabato

    2017-07-15

    The mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) regulates the properties, functions and healthiness of the tissues. When this is disturbed it changes the mechanical state of the tissue components, singularly or together, and cancer, along with other diseases, may start and progress. However, the bi-univocal mechanical interplay between cells and the ECM is still not properly understood. In this study we show how a microrheology technique gives us the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. The mechanical phenotyping was performed on the surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung. A correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Our findings suggest a sort of asymmetric modification of the mechanical properties of the cells and the extra-cellular matrix in the tumor, being the more compliant cell even though it resides in a stiffer matrix. Overall, the simultaneous mechanical characterization of the tissues constituents (cells and ECM) provided new support for diagnosis and offered alternative points of analysis for cancer mechanobiology. When the integrity of the mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix is disturbed cancer, along with other diseases, may initiate and progress. Here, we show how a new technique gives the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. It was applied on surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung and a correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms of redox metabolism and cancer cell survival during extracellular matrix detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Mark A; Schafer, Zachary T

    2018-01-16

    Non-transformed cells that become detached from the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergo dysregulation of redox homeostasis and cell death. In contrast, cancer cells often acquire the ability to mitigate programmed cell death pathways and recalibrate the redox balance to survive after ECM detachment, facilitating metastatic dissemination. Accordingly, recent studies of the mechanisms by which cancer cells overcome ECM detachment-induced metabolic alterations have focused on mechanisms in redox homeostasis. The insights into these mechanisms may inform the development of therapeutics that manipulate redox homeostasis to eliminate ECM-detached cancer cells. Here, we review how ECM-detached cancer cells balance redox metabolism for survival. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  3. Cell contraction induces long-ranged stress stiffening in the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu Long; Ronceray, Pierre; Xu, Guoqiang; Malandrino, Andrea; Kamm, Roger D; Lenz, Martin; Broedersz, Chase P; Guo, Ming

    2018-04-04

    Animal cells in tissues are supported by biopolymer matrices, which typically exhibit highly nonlinear mechanical properties. While the linear elasticity of the matrix can significantly impact cell mechanics and functionality, it remains largely unknown how cells, in turn, affect the nonlinear mechanics of their surrounding matrix. Here, we show that living contractile cells are able to generate a massive stiffness gradient in three distinct 3D extracellular matrix model systems: collagen, fibrin, and Matrigel. We decipher this remarkable behavior by introducing nonlinear stress inference microscopy (NSIM), a technique to infer stress fields in a 3D matrix from nonlinear microrheology measurements with optical tweezers. Using NSIM and simulations, we reveal large long-ranged cell-generated stresses capable of buckling filaments in the matrix. These stresses give rise to the large spatial extent of the observed cell-induced matrix stiffness gradient, which can provide a mechanism for mechanical communication between cells.

  4. Effect of extracellular adenosine triphosphate on activity of osteoblast like cells - biomed 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Siddhant K; Tucci, Michelle A; Benghuzzi, Hamed A

    2013-01-01

    Platelet dense granules contain serotonin, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). These molecules are present in platelet rich plasma (PRP), and may therefore have an impact on the efficacy of PRP therapy. Additionally, nucleotides are important extracellular signaling molecules in a variety of tissue types including bone. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the in vitro dose-dependent effects of extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) exposure on activity of human osteoblast-like cells. MG-63 cells were exposed to phosphate buffered saline (control group) or ATP solution (20 µM, 100µM, 200 µM). Osteoblast viability was evaluated at 24, 48, and 72 hours using nonspecific and osteoblast-specific markers and cellular morphology. No significant differences in total protein, malonlydialdehyde (MDA), or glutathione were observed with ATP exposure at any timepoint. High dose ATP exposure resulted in a significantly higher production of nitric oxide compared to controls and other groups. With respect to alkaline phosphatase activity and osteopontin production, no significant differences were present with ATP exposure. Overall conclusion: Extracellular ATP exposure modulated osteoblast activity with no change in cell viability in vitro.

  5. Large-scale isolation and cytotoxicity of extracellular vesicles derived from activated human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Ambrose Y; Wu, Chun-Hua; Li, Jingbo; Sun, Jianping; Fabbri, Muller; Wayne, Alan S; Seeger, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been the focus of great interest, as they appear to be involved in numerous important cellular processes. They deliver bioactive macromolecules such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, allowing intercellular communication in multicellular organisms. EVs are secreted by all cell types, including immune cells such as natural killer cells (NK), and they may play important roles in the immune system. Currently, a large-scale procedure to obtain functional NK EVs is lacking, limiting their use clinically. In this report, we present a simple, robust, and cost-effective method to isolate a large quantity of NK EVs. After propagating and activating NK cells ex vivo and then incubating them in exosome-free medium for 48 h, EVs were isolated using a polymer precipitation method. The isolated vesicles contain the tetraspanin CD63, an EV marker, and associated proteins (fibronectin), but are devoid of cytochrome C, a cytoplasmic marker. Nanoparticle tracking analysis showed a size distribution between 100 and 200 nm while transmission electron microscopy imaging displayed vesicles with an oval shape and comparable sizes, fulfilling the definition of EV. Importantly, isolated EV fractions were cytotoxic against cancer cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrate for the first time that isolated activated NK (aNK) cell EVs contain the cytotoxic proteins perforin, granulysin, and granzymes A and B, incorporated from the aNK cells. Activation of caspase -3, -7 and -9 was detected in cancer cells incubated with aNK EVs, and caspase inhibitors blocked aNK EV-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting that aNK EVs activate caspase pathways in target cells. The ability to isolate functional aNK EVs on a large scale may lead to new clinical applications. Abbreviations : NK: natural killer cells; activated NK (aNK) cells; EVs: extracellular vesicles; ALL: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia; aAPC: artificial antigen-presenting cell; TEM: transmission electron

  6. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells: Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genzel Yvonne

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus production capacities. A detailed metabolic characterization of an influenza infected adherent cell line (MDCK was carried out based on extracellular and intracellular measurements of metabolite concentrations. Results For most metabolites the comparison of infected (human influenza A/PR/8/34 and mock-infected cells showed a very similar behavior during the first 10-12 h post infection (pi. Significant changes were observed after about 12 h pi: (1 uptake of extracellular glucose and lactate release into the cell culture supernatant were clearly increased in infected cells compared to mock-infected cells. At the same time (12 h pi intracellular metabolite concentrations of the upper part of glycolysis were significantly increased. On the contrary, nucleoside triphosphate concentrations of infected cells dropped clearly after 12 h pi. This behaviour was observed for two different human influenza A/PR/8/34 strains at slightly different time points. Conclusions Comparing these results with literature values for the time course of infection with same influenza strains, underline the hypothesis that influenza infection only represents a minor additional burden for host cell metabolism. The metabolic changes observed after12 h pi are most probably caused by the onset of apoptosis in infected cells. The comparison of experimental data from two variants of the A/PR/8/34 virus strain (RKI versus NIBSC with different productivities and infection dynamics showed comparable metabolic patterns but a clearly different timely behavior. Thus, infection dynamics are obviously reflected in host cell metabolism.

  7. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Epithelial Transition Induced by Renal Tubular Cells-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Chiabotto

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal-epithelial interactions play an important role in renal tubular morphogenesis and in maintaining the structure of the kidney. The aim of this study was to investigate whether extracellular vesicles (EVs produced by human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs may induce mesenchymal-epithelial transition of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. To test this hypothesis, we characterized the phenotype and the RNA content of EVs and we evaluated the in vitro uptake and activity of EVs on MSCs. MicroRNA (miRNA analysis suggested the possible implication of the miR-200 family carried by EVs in the epithelial commitment of MSCs. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were incubated with EVs, or RPTEC-derived total conditioned medium, or conditioned medium depleted of EVs. As a positive control, MSCs were co-cultured in a transwell system with RPTECs. Epithelial commitment of MSCs was assessed by real time PCR and by immunofluorescence analysis of cellular expression of specific mesenchymal and epithelial markers. After one week of incubation with EVs and total conditioned medium, we observed mesenchymal-epithelial transition in MSCs. Stimulation with conditioned medium depleted of EVs did not induce any change in mesenchymal and epithelial gene expression. Since EVs were found to contain the miR-200 family, we transfected MSCs using synthetic miR-200 mimics. After one week of transfection, mesenchymal-epithelial transition was induced in MSCs. In conclusion, miR-200 carrying EVs released from RPTECs induce the epithelial commitment of MSCs that may contribute to their regenerative potential. Based on experiments of MSC transfection with miR-200 mimics, we suggested that the miR-200 family may be involved in mesenchymal-epithelial transition of MSCs.

  8. Notochordal-cell derived extracellular vesicles exert regenerative effects on canine and human nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Frances; Libregts, Sten; Creemers, Laura; Meij, Björn; Ito, Keita; Wauben, Marca; Tryfonidou, Marianna

    2017-10-24

    During intervertebral disc ageing, chondrocyte-like cells (CLCs) replace notochordal cells (NCs). NCs have been shown to induce regenerative effects in CLCs. Since vesicles released by NCs may be responsible for these effects, we characterized NC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) and determined their effect on CLCs. EVs were purified from porcine NC-conditioned medium (NCCM) through size exclusion chromatography, ultracentrifugation or density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, the EVs were quantitatively analyzed by high-resolution flow cytometry. The effect of NCCM-derived EVs was studied on canine and human CLC micro-aggregates in vitro and compared with NCCM-derived proteins and unfractionated NCCM. Porcine NCCM contained a considerable amount of EVs. NCCM-derived EVs induced GAG deposition in canine CLCs to a comparable level as NCCM-derived proteins and unfractionated NCCM, and increased the DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of human micro-aggregates, although to a lesser extent than unfractionated NCCM. The biological EV effects were not considerably influenced by ultracentrifugation compared with size exclusion-based purification. Upon ultracentrifugation, interfering GAGs, but not collagens, were lost. Nonetheless, collagen type I or II supplemented to CLCs in a concentration as present in NCCM induced no anabolic effects. Porcine NCCM-derived EVs exerted anabolic effects comparable to NCCM-derived proteins, while unfractionated NCCM was more potent in human CLCs. GAGs and collagens appeared not to mediate the regenerative EV effects. Thus, NC-derived EVs have regenerative potential, and their effects may be influenced by the proteins present in NCCM. The optimal combination of NC-secreted factors needs to be determined to fully exploit the regenerative potential of NC-based technology.

  9. Cell sex affects extracellular matrix protein expression and proliferation of smooth muscle progenitor cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhui; Wen, Yan; Green, Morgaine; Cabral, Elise K; Wani, Prachi; Zhang, Fan; Wei, Yi; Baer, Thomas M; Chen, Bertha

    2017-07-04

    Smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for treating diseases or degenerative conditions involving smooth muscle pathologies. However, the therapeutic potential of pSMCs derived from men and women may be very different. Cell sex can exert a profound impact on the differentiation process of stem cells into somatic cells. In spite of advances in translation of stem cell technologies, the role of cell sex and the effect of sex hormones on the differentiation towards mesenchymal lineage pSMCs remain largely unexplored. Using a standard differentiation protocol, two human embryonic stem cell lines (one male line and one female line) and three induced pluripotent stem cell lines (one male line and two female lines) were differentiated into pSMCs. We examined differences in the differentiation of male and female hPSCs into pSMCs, and investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol (E2) on the extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolisms and cell proliferation rates of the pSMCs. Statistical analyses were performed by using Student's t test or two-way ANOVA, p cell proliferation rates. E2 treatment induced the expression of myogenic gene markers and suppressed ECM degradation activities through reduction of MMP activity and increased expression of TIMP-1 in female pSMCs, but not in male pSMCs. hPSC-derived pSMCs from different sexes show differential expression of ECM proteins and proliferation rates. Estrogen appears to promote maturation and ECM protein expression in female pSMCs, but not in male pSMCs. These data suggest that intrinsic cell-sex differences may influence progenitor cell biology.

  10. Extracellular adenosine sensing-a metabolic cell death priming mechanism downstream of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jaclyn S; Crighton, Diane; O'Prey, James; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Palmer, Timothy M; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ryan, Kevin M

    2013-05-09

    Tumor cells undergo changes in metabolism to meet their energetic and anabolic needs. It is conceivable that mechanisms exist to sense these changes and link them to pathways that eradicate cells primed for cancer development. We report that the tumor suppressor p53 activates a cell death priming mechanism that senses extracellular adenosine. Adenosine, the backbone of ATP, accumulates under conditions of cellular stress or altered metabolism. We show that its receptor, A2B, is upregulated by p53. A2B expression has little effect on cell viability, but ligand engagement activates a caspase- and Puma-dependent apoptotic response involving downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Stimulation of A2B also significantly enhances cell death mediated by p53 and upon accumulation of endogenous adenosine following chemotherapeutic drug treatment and exposure to hypoxia. Since extracellular adenosine also accumulates within many solid tumors, this distinct p53 function links programmed cell death to both a cancer- and therapy-associated metabolic change. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Sriram; Huang, Chun-Chieh; George, Anne

    2014-01-06

    Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world's population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinical translation. We have investigated the possibility of using somatic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from other sources for dental pulp tissue regeneration using a biomimetic dental pulp extracellular matrix (ECM) incorporated scaffold. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (HMSCs) were investigated for their ability to differentiate toward an odontogenic lineage. In vitro real-time PCR results coupled with histological and immunohistochemical examination of the explanted tissues confirmed the ability of PDLSCs and HMSCs to form a vascularized pulp-like tissue. These findings indicate that the dental pulp stem derived ECM scaffold stimulated odontogenic differentiation of PDLSCs and HMSCs without the need for exogenous addition of growth and differentiation factors. This study represents a translational perspective toward possible therapeutic application of using a combination of somatic stem cells and extracellular matrix for pulp regeneration.

  12. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: Applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram eRavindran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world’s population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinical translation. We have investigated the possibility of using somatic mesenchymal stem cells from other sources for dental pulp tissue regeneration using a biomimetic dental pulp extracellular matrix (ECM incorporated scaffold. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and human bone marrow stromal cells (HMSCs were investigated for their ability to differentiate towards an odontogenic lineage. In vitro real-time PCR results coupled with histological and immunohistochemical examination of the explanted tissues confirmed the ability of PDLSCs and HMSCs to form a vascularized pulp-like tissue. These findings indicate that the dental pulp stem derived ECM scaffold stimulated odontogenic differentiation of PDLSCs and HMSCs without the need for exogenous addition of growth and differentiation factors. This study represents a translational perspective toward possible therapeutic application of using a combination of somatic stem cells and extracellular matrix for pulp regeneration.

  13. Extracellular ATP: a modulator of cell death and pathogen defense in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivasa, Stephen; Tomé, Daniel F A; Murphy, Alex M; Hamilton, John M; Lindsey, Keith; Carr, John P

    2009-11-01

    Living organisms acquire or synthesize high energy molecules, which they frugally conserve and use to meet their cellular metabolic demands. Therefore, it is surprising that ATP, the most accessible and commonly utilized chemical energy carrier, is actively secreted to the extracellular matrix of cells. It is now becoming clear that in plants this extracellular ATP (eATP) is not wasted, but harnessed at the cell surface to signal across the plasma membrane of the secreting cell and neighboring cells to control gene expression and influence plant development. Identification of the gene/protein networks regulated by eATP-mediated signaling should provide insight into the physiological roles of eATP in plants. By disrupting eATP-mediated signaling, we have identified pathogen defense genes as part of the eATP-regulated gene circuitry, leading us to the discovery that eATP is a negative regulator of pathogen defense in plants.(1) Previously, we reported that eATP is a key signal molecule that modulates programmed cell death in plants.(2) A complex picture is now emerging, in which eATP-mediated signaling cross-talks with signaling mediated by the major plant defense hormone, salicylic acid, in the regulation of pathogen defense and cell death.

  14. Extracellular Trapping of Soil Contaminants by Root Border Cells: New Insights into Plant Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha C. Hawes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil and water pollution by metals and other toxic chemicals is difficult to measure and control, and, as such, presents an ongoing global threat to sustainable agriculture and human health. Efforts to remove contaminants by plant-mediated pathways, or “phytoremediation”, though widely studied, have failed to yield consistent, predictable removal of biological and chemical contaminants. Emerging research has revealed that one major limitation to using plants to clean up the environment is that plants are programmed to protect themselves: Like white blood cells in animals, border cells released from plant root tips carry out an extracellular trapping process to neutralize threats and prevent injury to the host. Variability in border cell trapping has been found to be correlated with variation in sensitivity of roots to aluminum, and removal of border cell results in increased Al uptake into the root tip. Studies now have implicated border cells in responses of diverse plant roots to a range of heavy metals, including arsenic, copper, cadmium, lead, mercury, iron, and zinc. A better understanding of border cell extracellular traps and their role in preventing toxin uptake may facilitate efforts to use plants as a nondestructive approach to neutralize environmental threats.

  15. Evidence of Extracellular Vesicles Biogenesis and Release in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Lilian; Arevalo Romero, Jenny Andrea; Brandão Prado, Mariana; Santos, Tiago G; Hohmuth Lopes, Marilene

    2017-10-14

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) are considered a source of bioactive molecules that modulate their microenvironment by acting on intercellular communication. Either intracellular endosomal machinery or their derived EVs have been considered a relevant system of signal circuits processing. Herein, we show that these features are found in mESCs. Ultrastructural analysis revealed structures and organelles of the endosomal system such as coated pits and endocytosis-related vesicles, prominent rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, and multivesicular bodies (MVBs) containing either few or many intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) that could be released as exosomes to extracellular milieu. Besides, budding vesicles shed from the plasma membrane to the extracellular space is suggestive of microvesicle biogenesis in mESCs. mESCs and mouse blastocyst express specific markers of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) system. Ultrastructural analysis and Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) of isolated EVs revealed a heterogeneous population of exosomes and microvesicles released by mESCs. These vesicles contain Wnt10b and the Notch ligand Delta-like 4 (DLL4) and also the co-chaperone stress inducible protein 1 (STI1) and its partner Hsp90. Wnt10b and Dll4 colocalize with EVs biogenesis markers in mESCs. Overall, the present study supports the function of the mESCs endocytic network and their EVs as players in stem cell biology.

  16. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Protect the Fetal Brain After Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophelders, Daan R M G; Wolfs, Tim G A M; Jellema, Reint K; Zwanenburg, Alex; Andriessen, Peter; Delhaas, Tammo; Ludwig, Anna-Kristin; Radtke, Stefan; Peters, Vera; Janssen, Leon; Giebel, Bernd; Kramer, Boris W

    2016-06-01

    Preterm neonates are susceptible to perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, for which no treatment is available. In a preclinical animal model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in ovine fetuses, we have demonstrated the neuroprotective potential of systemically administered mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). The mechanism of MSC treatment is unclear but suggested to be paracrine, through secretion of extracellular vesicles (EVs). Therefore, we investigated in this study the protective effects of mesenchymal stromal cell-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) in a preclinical model of preterm hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Ovine fetuses were subjected to global hypoxia-ischemia by transient umbilical cord occlusion, followed by in utero intravenous administration of MSC-EVs. The therapeutic effects of MSC-EV administration were assessed by analysis of electrophysiological parameters and histology of the brain. Systemic administration of MSC-EVs improved brain function by reducing the total number and duration of seizures, and by preserving baroreceptor reflex sensitivity. These functional protections were accompanied by a tendency to prevent hypomyelination. Cerebral inflammation remained unaffected by the MSC-EV treatment. Our data demonstrate that MSC-EV treatment might provide a novel strategy to reduce the neurological sequelae following hypoxic-ischemic injury of the preterm brain. Our study results suggest that a cell-free preparation comprising neuroprotective MSC-EVs could substitute MSCs in the treatment of preterm neonates with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, thereby circumventing the potential risks of systemic administration of living cells. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) show promise in treating hypoxic-ischemic injury of the preterm brain. Study results suggest administration of extracellular vesicles, rather than intact MSCs, is sufficient to exert therapeutic effects and avoids potential concerns associated with administration

  17. PGE2/EP4Signaling Controls the Transfer of the Mammary Stem Cell State by Lipid Rafts in Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Chieh; Chen, Shih-Yin; Tsai, Ho-Min; He, Pei-Lin; Lin, Yen-Chun; Herschman, Harvey; Li, Hua-Jung

    2017-02-01

    Prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 )-initiated signaling contributes to stem cell homeostasis and regeneration. However, it is unclear how PGE 2 signaling controls cell stemness. This study identifies a previously unknown mechanism by which PGE 2 /prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP 4 ) signaling regulates multiple signaling pathways (e.g., PI3K/Akt signaling, TGFβ signaling, Wnt signaling, EGFR signaling) which maintain the basal mammary stem cell phenotype. A shift of basal mammary epithelial stem cells (MaSCs) from a mesenchymal/stem cell state to a non-basal-MaSC state occurs in response to prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP 4 ) antagonism. EP 4 antagonists elicit release of signaling components, by controlling their trafficking into extracellular vesicles/exosomes in a lipid raft/caveolae-dependent manner. Consequently, EP 4 antagonism indirectly inactivates, through induced extracellular vesicle/exosome release, pathways required for mammary epithelial stem cell homeostasis, e.g. canonical/noncanonical Wnt, TGFβ and PI3K/Akt pathways. EP 4 antagonism causes signaling receptors and signaling components to shift from non-lipid raft fractions to lipid raft fractions, and to then be released in EP 4 antagonist-induced extracellular vesicles/exosomes, resulting in the loss of the stem cell state by mammary epithelial stem cells. In contrast, luminal mammary epithelial cells can acquire basal stem cell properties following ingestion of EP 4 antagonist-induced stem cell extracellular vesicles/exosomes, and can then form mammary glands. These findings demonstrate that PGE 2 /EP 4 signaling controls homeostasis of mammary epithelial stem cells through regulating extracellular vesicle/exosome release. Reprogramming of mammary epithelial cells can result from EP 4 -mediated stem cell property transfer by extracellular vesicles/exosomes containing caveolae-associated proteins, between mammary basal and luminal epithelial cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:425-444. © 2016 The Authors STEM CELLS

  18. The Effect of Valproic Acid on Mesenchymal Pluripotent Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in Extracellular Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Hatakeyama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid (2- n -propylpentanoic acid, VPA is a widely used antiepileptic and anticonvulsant drug. Previous studies have reported that VPA effects osteogenesis in vivo and in vitro, yet it remains unclear whether VPA promotes cell differentiation of osteoblasts derived from mesenchymal cells. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of VPA on undifferentiated pluripotent mesenchymal cell proliferation and differentiation into osteoblasts while analyzing the impact of the absence or presence of extracellular matrices (ECMs. Mouse mesenchymal cells were cultured on non-coated plastic, type I collagen-coated, and fibronectin-coated plates in the absence or presence of VPA. A cell proliferation assay was performed in which modified formazan dye content was analyzed and proliferation nuclear antigen (PCNA-positive cells were counted at various concentrations of VPA. A high concentration of VPA did not clearly alter cell morphology, but large numbers of stress fibers were observed in these cells and the cell proliferation ratio was decreased with positive PCNA counts. In the presence of matrices, the cell proliferation ratio decreased at low VPA concentrations compared with the ratio obtained in the absence of these ECMs. On the other hand, VPA promoted osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of type I collagen. These findings indicate that for undifferentiated mesenchymal cells, VPA promotes a decrease in the cell proliferation rate in the presence of ECMs and promotes osteoblastic differentiation, both of which could provide insight into additional mechanisms of osteoblastic cell differentiation caused by VPA.

  19. Extracellular vesicles from a muscle cell line (C2C12) enhance cell survival and neurite outgrowth of a motor neuron cell line (NSC-34).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Roger D; McGee, Christopher; Rawson, Renee; Robinson, Grant A

    2014-01-01

    There is renewed interest in extracellular vesicles over the past decade or 2 after initially being thought of as simple cellular garbage cans to rid cells of unwanted components. Although there has been intense research into the role of extracellular vesicles in the fields of tumour and stem cell biology, the possible role of extracellular vesicles in nerve regeneration is just in its infancy. When a peripheral nerve is damaged, the communication between spinal cord motor neurons and their target muscles is disrupted and the result can be the loss of coordinated muscle movement. Despite state-of-the-art surgical procedures only approximately 10% of adults will recover full function after peripheral nerve repair. To improve upon such results will require a better understanding of the basic mechanisms that influence axon outgrowth and the interplay between the parent motor neuron and the distal end organ of muscle. It has previously been shown that extracellular vesicles are immunologically tolerated, display targeting ligands on their surface, and can be delivered in vivo to selected cell populations. All of these characteristics suggest that extracellular vesicles could play a significant role in nerve regeneration. We have carried out studies using 2 very well characterized cell lines, the C2C12 muscle cell line and the motor neuron cell line NSC-34 to ask the question: Do extracellular vesicles from muscle influence cell survival and/or neurite outgrowth of motor neurons? Our results show striking effects of extracellular vesicles derived from the muscle cell line on the motor neuron cell line in terms of neurite outgrowth and survival.

  20. Extracellular peptidase hunting for improvement of protein production in plant cells and roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eLallemand

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-based recombinant protein production systems have gained an extensive interest over the past few years, because of their reduced cost and relative safety. Although the first products are now reaching the market, progress are still needed to improve plant hosts and strategies for biopharming. Targeting recombinant proteins toward the extracellular space offers several advantages in terms of protein folding and purification, but degradation events are observed, due to endogenous peptidases. This paper focuses on the analysis of extracellular proteolytic activities in two production systems: cell cultures and root-secretion (rhizosecretion, in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. Proteolytic activities of extracellular proteomes (secretomes were evaluated in vitro against two substrate proteins: bovine serum albumin (BSA and human serum immunoglobulins G (hIgGs. Both targets were found to be degraded by the secretomes, BSA being more prone to proteolysis than hIgGs. The analysis of the proteolysis pH-dependence showed that target degradation was mainly dependent upon the production system: rhizosecretomes contained more peptidase activity than extracellular medium of cell suspensions, whereas variations due to plant species were smaller. Using class-specific peptidase inhibitors, serine and metallopeptidases were found to be responsible for degradation of both substrates. An in-depth in silico analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data from Arabidopsis was then performed and led to the identification of a limited number of serine and metallo-peptidases that are consistently expressed in both production systems. These peptidases should be prime candidates for further improvement of plant hosts by targeted silencing.

  1. Single Cell Responses to Spatially Controlled Photosensitized Production of Extracellular Singlet Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Brian Wett; Sinks, Louise E.; Breitenbach, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The response of individual HeLa cells to extracellularly produced singlet oxygen was examined. The spatial domain of singlet oxygen production was controlled using the combination of a membrane-impermeable Pd porphyrin-dendrimer, which served as a photosensitizer, and a focused laser, which served...... to localize the sensitized production of singlet oxygen. Cells in close proximity to the domain of singlet oxygen production showed morphological changes commonly associated with necrotic cell death. The elapsed post-irradiation “waiting period” before necrosis became apparent depended on (a) the distance...... between the cell membrane and the domain irradiated, (b) the incident laser fluence and, as such, the initial concentration of singlet oxygen produced, and (c) the lifetime of singlet oxygen. The data imply that singlet oxygen plays a key role in this process of light-induced cell death. The approach...

  2. Extracellular acidosis activates ASIC-like channels in freshly isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wen-Shuo; Farley, Jerry M; Swenson, Alyssa; Barnard, John M; Hamilton, Gina; Chiposi, Rumbidzayi; Drummond, Heather A

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that certain acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and are required for VSMC functions. However, electrophysiological evidence of ASIC channels in VSMCs is lacking. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that isolated cerebral artery VSMCs express ASIC-like channels. To address this hypothesis, we used RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunolabeling, and conventional whole cell patch-clamp technique. We found extracellular H(+)-induced inward currents in 46% of cells tested (n = 58 of 126 VSMCs, pH 6.5-5.0). The percentage of responsive cells and the current amplitude increased as the external H(+) concentration increased (pH(6.0), n = 28/65 VSMCs responsive, mean current density = 8.1 +/- 1.2 pA/pF). Extracellular acidosis (pH(6.0)) shifted the whole cell reversal potential toward the Nernst potential of Na(+) (n = 6) and substitution of extracellular Na(+) by N-methyl-d-glucamine abolished the inward current (n = 6), indicating that Na(+) is a major charge carrier. The broad-spectrum ASIC blocker amiloride (20 microM) inhibited proton-induced currents to 16.5 +/- 8.7% of control (n = 6, pH(6.0)). Psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1), an ASIC1a inhibitor and ASIC1b activator, had mixed effects: PcTx1 either 1) abolished H(+)-induced currents (11% of VSMCs, 5/45), 2) enhanced or promoted activation of H(+)-induced currents (76%, 34/45), or 3) failed to promote H(+) activation in nonresponsive VSMCs (13%, 6/45). These findings suggest that freshly dissociated cerebral artery VSMCs express ASIC-like channels, which are predominantly formed by ASIC1b.

  3. Extracellular HSP60 triggers tissue regeneration and wound healing by regulating inflammation and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Wuhong; Tanaka, Katsuya; Huang, Sunny C; Xu, Lisha; Liu, Baoying; Sinclair, Jason; Idol, Jennifer; Varshney, Gaurav K; Huang, Haigen; Lin, Shuo; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Mori, Ryoichi; Burgess, Shawn M

    2016-01-01

    After injury, zebrafish can restore many tissues that do not regenerate well in mammals, making it a useful vertebrate model for studying regenerative biology. We performed a systematic screen to identify genes essential for hair cell regeneration in zebrafish, and found that the heat shock protein Hspd1 (Hsp60) has a critical role in the regeneration of hair cells and amputated caudal fins. We showed HSP60-injected extracellularly promoted cell proliferation and regeneration in both hair cells and caudal fins. We showed that hspd1 mutant was deficient in leukocyte infiltration at the site of injury. Topical application of HSP60 in a diabetic mouse skin wound model dramatically accelerated wound healing compared with controls. Stimulation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with HSP60 triggered a specific induction of M2 phase CD163-positive monocytes. Our results demonstrate that the normally intracellular chaperonin HSP60 has an extracellular signalling function in injury inflammation and tissue regeneration, likely through promoting the M2 phase for macrophages.

  4. Extracellular ATP4- promotes cation fluxes in the J774 mouse macrophage cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, T.H.; Silverstein, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    Extracellular ATP stimulates transmembrane ion fluxes in the mouse macrophage cell line J774. In the presence of Mg2+, nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs and other purine and pyrimidine nucleotides do not elicit this response, suggesting the presence of a specific receptor for ATP on the macrophage plasma membrane. One candidate for such a receptor is the ecto-ATPase expressed on these cells. We, therefore, investigated the role of this enzyme in ATP-induced 86 Rb+ efflux in J774 cells. The ecto-ATPase had a broad nucleotide specificity and did not hydrolyze extracellular ATP in the absence of divalent cations. 86 Rb+ efflux was not blocked by inhibition of the ecto-ATPase and did not require Ca2+ or Mg2+. In fact, ATP-stimulated 86 Rb+ efflux was inhibited by Mg2+ and correlated with the availability of ATP4- in the medium. In the absence of divalent cations, the slowly hydrolyzable ATP analogs adenosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) and adenosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate (ATP-gamma-S) also stimulated 86 Rb+ efflux, albeit at higher concentrations than that required for ATP4-. Exposure of J774 cells to 10 mM ATP for 45 min caused death of 95% of cells. By this means we selected variant J774 cells that did not exhibit 86 Rb+ efflux in the presence of extracellular ATP but retained ecto-ATPase activity. These results show that the ecto-ATPase of J774 cells does not mediate the effects of ATP on these cells; that ATP4- and not MgATP2- promotes 86 Rb+ efflux from these cells; and that hydrolysis of ATP is not required to effect this change in membrane permeability. These findings suggest that J774 cells possess a plasma membrane receptor which binds ATP4-, AMP-PNP, and ATP-gamma-S, and that the ecto-ATPase limits the effects of ATP on these cells by hydrolyzing Mg-ATP2-

  5. Enterococcus faecalis produces extracellular superoxide and hydrogen peroxide that damages colonic epithelial cell DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huycke, Mark M; Abrams, Victoria; Moore, Danny R

    2002-03-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a commensal microorganism of the human intestinal tract that produces substantial extracellular superoxide (O(-)(2)), and derivative reactive oxygen species such as H(2)O(2) and hydroxyl radical, through autoxidation of membrane-associated demethylmenaquinone. Because these oxidants may be important as a cause of chromosomal instability (CIN) associated with sporadic adenomatous polyps and colorectal cancer, the ability of E.faecalis to damage eukaryotic cell DNA was examined using the alkaline lysis single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Both Chinese hamster ovary and HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells showed increased DNA damage after co-incubation with wild-type E. faecalis strain OG1RF, but not a transposon-inactivated mutant with attenuated extracellular O(-)(2) production. E. faecalis-mediated DNA damage was prevented by catalase, but not manganese superoxide dismutase, indicating H(2)O(2) arising from O(-)(2) was the genotoxin. In a rat model of intestinal colonization, OG1RF resulted in significantly higher stool concentrations of H(2)O(2) and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide adducts of hydroxyl and thiyl radicals, as identified by electron spin resonance-spin trapping, compared with rats colonized with a mutant strain having attenuated O(-)(2) production. Using the comet assay, luminal cells from the colon of rats colonized with O(-)(2)-producing E. faecalis showed significantly increased DNA damage compared with control rats colonized with the mutant. These findings suggest a potentially profound role for extracellular free radical production by E. faecalis in promoting CIN associated with sporadic adenomatous polyps and colorectal cancer.

  6. Biological roles and potential applications of immune cell-derived extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chuan; Seeger, Robert C; Fabbri, Muller; Wang, Larry; Wayne, Alan S; Jong, Ambrose Y

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) deliver bioactive macromolecules (i.e. proteins, lipids and nucleic acids) for intercellular communication in multicellular organisms. EVs are secreted by all cell types including immune cells. Immune cell-derived EVs modulate diverse aspects of the immune system to either enhance or suppress immune activities. The extensive effects of immune cell-derived EVs have become the focus of great interest for various nano-biomedical applications, ranging from the medical use of nanoplatform-based diagnostic agents to the development of therapeutic interventions as well as vaccine applications, and thus may be ideal for 'immune-theranostic'. Here, we review the latest advances concerning the biological roles of immune cell-derived EVs in innate and acquired immunity. The intercellular communication amongst immune cells through their EVs is highlighted, showing that all immune cell-derived EVs have their unique function(s) in immunity through intricate interaction(s). Natural-killer (NK) cell-derived EVs, for example, contain potent cytotoxic proteins and induce apoptosis to targeted cancer cells. On the other hand, cancer cell-derived EVs bearing NK ligands may evade immune surveillance and responses. Finally, we discuss possible medical uses for the immune cell-derived EVs as a tool for immune-theranostic: as diagnostic biomarkers, for use in therapeutic interventions and for vaccination.

  7. Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrix: Basic Characteristics and Current Applications in Orthopedic Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixiang; Zhu, Yun; Li, Jia; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Liu, Shichen; Yang, Jianhua; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and intricate microenvironment with excellent biophysical, biomechanical, and biochemical properties, which can directly or indirectly regulate cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and differentiation, as well as plays key roles in homeostasis and regeneration of tissues and organs. The ECM has attracted a great deal of attention with the rapid development of tissue engineering in the field of regenerative medicine. Tissue-derived ECM scaffolds (also referred to as decellularized tissues and whole organs) are considered a promising therapy for the repair of musculoskeletal defects, including those that are widely used in orthopedics, although there are a few shortcomings. Similar to tissue-derived ECM scaffolds, cell-derived ECM scaffolds also have highly advantageous biophysical and biochemical properties, in particular their ability to be produced in vitro from a number of different cell types. Furthermore, cell-derived ECM scaffolds more closely resemble native ECM microenvironments. The products of cell-derived ECM have a wide range of biomedical applications; these include reagents for cell culture substrates and biomaterials for scaffolds, hybrid scaffolds, and living cell sheet coculture systems. Although cell-derived ECM has only just begun to be investigated, it has great potential as a novel approach for cell-based tissue repair in orthopedic tissue engineering. This review summarizes and analyzes the various types of cell-derived ECM products applied in cartilage, bone, and nerve tissue engineering in vitro or in vivo and discusses future directions for investigation of cell-derived ECM.

  8. Vectorization of biomacromolecules into cells using extracellular vesicles with enhanced internalization induced by macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Noguchi, Kosuke; Fujii, Ikuo; Futaki, Shiroh

    2016-10-17

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs, exosomes) are approximately 30- to 200-nm-long vesicles that have received increased attention due to their role in cell-to-cell communication. Although EVs are highly anticipated to be a next-generation intracellular delivery tool because of their pharmaceutical advantages, including non-immunogenicity, their cellular uptake efficacy is low because of the repulsion of EVs and negatively charged cell membranes and size limitations in endocytosis. Here, we demonstrate a methodology for achieving enhanced cellular EV uptake using arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to induce active macropinocytosis. The induction of macropinocytosis via a simple modification to the exosomal membrane using stearylated octaarginine, which is a representative CPP, significantly enhanced the cellular EV uptake efficacy. Consequently, effective EV-based intracellular delivery of an artificially encapsulated ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin, in EVs was attained.

  9. NG2 proteoglycan increases mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jing; Wang Yang; Zhu, Zhonghua; Liu Jianshe; Wang Yumei; Zhang Chun; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Lang, Florian; Feng Yuxi

    2007-01-01

    As a membrane-spanning protein, NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan interacts with molecules on both sides of plasma membrane. The present study explored the role of NG2 in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In the normal kidneys, NG2 was observed predominantly in glomerular mesangium, Bowman's capsule and interstitial vessels. Both mRNA and protein expression in kidneys was significantly higher in strepozotocin-induced diabetic rats than that in normal rats. In the cultured rat mesangial cell line HBZY-1, overexpression of NG2 promoted mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production, such as type VI collagen and laminin. Furthermore, target knockdown of NG2 resulted in decreased cell proliferation and ECM formation. The observations suggest that NG2 is up-regulated in diabetic nephropathy. It actively participates in the development and progression of glomerulosclerosis by stimulating proliferation of mesangial cells and deposition of ECM

  10. Rho-kinase regulates extracellular matrix-mediated osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugawa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kawamura, Mari; Yamashiro, Keisuke; Shimoe, Masayuki; Tomikawa, Kazuya; Hongo, Shoichi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Takashiba, Shogo

    2017-06-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) cells contain heterogeneous mesenchymal cell populations, which have the ability to differentiate into cells that produce adjacent mineralized tissues and abundant extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM is essential not only for the homeostasis of the periodontal tissue, but also for controlling the differentiation of the PDL cells. The process of differentiation involves mechanotransduction, which links the ECM to the cytoskeleton. The present study investigated the roles of Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) signaling, a crucial regulator of the cytoskeleton, during ECM-mediated osteogenic differentiation of PDL cells in vitro. The PDL cells were isolated from human periodontal ligaments of extracted teeth and cultured in osteogenic medium with or without Y-27632, a pharmacological inhibitor of ROCK. ECM-coated plates were used for ECM-mediated differentiation. The osteogenic phenotype was evaluated at different time points by real-time RT-PCR for the gene encoding alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and an ALP activity assay. The effects of ROCK on cytoskeletal changes and ECM synthesis were examined by immunofluorescence analysis. Y-27632 significantly inhibited ALP at the mRNA and protein activity levels in the late stage of differentiation; concomitantly, the actin filament content and the extracellular levels of collagen-I and fibronectin were markedly decreased by Y-27632. Exogenous collagen-I and fibronectin temporally increased ALP activity, with fibronectin showing a more pronounced effect. Importantly, ECM-mediated differentiation was almost completely inhibited by Y-27632. These findings indicated that ECM-mediated differentiation is dependent on ROCK signaling, and ROCK signaling contributes to the establishment of the ECM microenvironment for PDL cell differentiation. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  11. Hyaluronan protection of corneal endothelial cells against extracellular histones after phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Taiji; Ito, Takashi; Miyata, Kazunori; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2014-11-01

    To determine the effect of histones on corneal endothelial cells generated during cataract surgery. Kagoshima University Hospital, Kagoshima, Japan. Experimental study. Standard phacoemulsification was performed on enucleated pig eyes. Histones in the anterior segment of the eye were determined by immunohistochemistry. Cultured human corneal endothelial cells were exposed to histones for 18 hours, and cell viability was determined by 2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitro-phenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, monosodium salt assay. The concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the culture medium of human corneal endothelial cells was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effects of signal inhibitors U0126, SB203580, and SP600125 were evaluated. The protective effect of hyaluronan against histones was evaluated in human corneal endothelial cells with and without hyaluronan. Cellular debris containing histones was observed in the anterior chamber of pig eyes after phacoemulsification. Exposure of human corneal endothelial cells to 50 μg/mL of histones or more led to cytotoxic effects. The IL-6 concentration was significantly increased dose dependently after exposure of human corneal endothelial cells to histones (Phistone-induced IL-6 production was significantly decreased by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and p-38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors (Phistones caused formation of histone aggregates, decreased the cytotoxic effects of the histones, and blocked the increase in IL-6 (PHistones were released extracellularly during phacoemulsification and exposure of human corneal endothelial cells to histones increased the IL-6 secretion. The intraoperative use of hyaluronan may decrease the cytotoxic effects of histones released during cataract surgery. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Extracellular histones reduce survival and angiogenic responses of late outgrowth progenitor and mature endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, H A; Carestia, A; Scotti, L; Parborell, F; Schattner, M; Negrotto, S

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Extracellular histones are highly augmented in sites of neovessel formation, such as regeneration tissues. We studied histone effect on survival and angiogenic activity of mature and progenitor endothelial cells. Extracellular histones trigger apoptosis and pyroptosis and reduce angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Histone blockade can be useful as a therapeutic strategy to improve angiogenesis and tissue regeneration. Extracellular histones are highly augmented in sites of neovessel formation, like regeneration tissues. Their cytotoxic effect has been studied in endothelial cells, although the mechanism involved and their action on endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) remain unknown. To study the effect of histones on ECFC survival and angiogenic functions and compare it with mature endothelial cells. Nuclear morphology analysis showed that each human recombinant histone triggered both apoptotic-like and necrotic-like cell deaths in both mature and progenitor endothelial cells. While H1 and H2A exerted a weak toxicity, H2B, H3 and H4 were the most powerful. The percentage of apoptosis correlated with the percentage of ECFCs exhibiting caspase-3 activation and was zeroed by the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Necrotic-like cell death was also suppressed by this compound and the caspase-1 inhibitor Ac-YVAD-CMK, indicating that histones triggered ECFC pyroptosis. All histones, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, reduced migration and H2B, H3 and H4 induced cell cycle arrest and impaired tubulogenesis via p38 activation. Neutrophil-derived histones exerted similar effects. In vivo blood vessel formation in the quail chorioallantoic membrane was also reduced by H2B, H3 and H4. Their cytotoxic and antiangiogenic effects were suppressed by unfractioned and low-molecular-weight heparins and the combination of TLR2 and TLR4 blocking antibodies. Histones trigger both apoptosis and pyroptosis of ECFCs and inhibit their angiogenic functions. Their cytotoxic and

  13. Inhibitory effect of extracellular purine nucleotide and nucleoside concentrations on T cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiler, Monica [Department of Medicine III and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany); Schmetzer, Helga [Helmholtz Center Munich (Germany); German Research Center for Environmental Health, Munich (Germany); Braeu, Marion; Buhmann, Raymund [Helmholtz Center Munich (Germany); German Research Center for Environmental Health, Munich (Germany); Department of Medicine III and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The release of nucleic acids and derivatives after tissue-injury may affect cellular immune-response. We studied the impact of extracellular ribo-, desoxyribonucleotides and nucleosides on T-cell immunity. Peripheral-blood-mononuclear-cells (PBMCs) or isolated CD3{sup +}T-cells obtained from 6 healthy donors were stimulated via CD3/CD28 Dynabeads or dendritic cells (DCs) in the presence or absence of pyrimidine-, purine-nucleotides and -nucleosides (range 2–200 µM). Addition of deoxy-, guanosine-triphosphate (dGTP, GTP) and guanosine resulted concentration dependent in a complete, adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) in a partial inhibition of the induced T-cell-proliferation. Deoxyadenosine-triphosphate (dATP), adenosine and the pyrimidine-ribo- and -deoxyribonucleotides displayed no inhibitory capacity. Inhibitory effects of dGTP and GTP, but not of guanosine and ATP were culture-media-dependent and could be almost abrogated by use of the serum-free lymphocyte-culture-media X-Vivo15 instead of RPMI1640 with standard-supplementation. In contrast to RPMI1640, X-Vivo15 resulted in a significant down-regulation of the cell-surface-located ectonucleotidases CD39 (Ecto-Apyrase) and CD73 (Ecto-5′-Nucleotidase), critical for the extracellular nucleotides-hydrolysis to nucleosides, explaining the loss of inhibition mediated by dGTP and GTP, but not Guanosine. In line with previous findings ATP was found to exert immunosuppressive effects on T-cell-proliferation. Purine-nucleotides, dGTP and GTP displayed a higher inhibitory capacity, but seem to be strictly dependent on the microenvironmental conditions modulating the responsiveness of the respective T-lymphocytes. Further evaluation of experimental and respective clinical settings should anticipate these findings.

  14. Inhibitory effect of extracellular purine nucleotide and nucleoside concentrations on T cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiler, Monica; Schmetzer, Helga; Braeu, Marion; Buhmann, Raymund

    2016-01-01

    The release of nucleic acids and derivatives after tissue-injury may affect cellular immune-response. We studied the impact of extracellular ribo-, desoxyribonucleotides and nucleosides on T-cell immunity. Peripheral-blood-mononuclear-cells (PBMCs) or isolated CD3 + T-cells obtained from 6 healthy donors were stimulated via CD3/CD28 Dynabeads or dendritic cells (DCs) in the presence or absence of pyrimidine-, purine-nucleotides and -nucleosides (range 2–200 µM). Addition of deoxy-, guanosine-triphosphate (dGTP, GTP) and guanosine resulted concentration dependent in a complete, adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) in a partial inhibition of the induced T-cell-proliferation. Deoxyadenosine-triphosphate (dATP), adenosine and the pyrimidine-ribo- and -deoxyribonucleotides displayed no inhibitory capacity. Inhibitory effects of dGTP and GTP, but not of guanosine and ATP were culture-media-dependent and could be almost abrogated by use of the serum-free lymphocyte-culture-media X-Vivo15 instead of RPMI1640 with standard-supplementation. In contrast to RPMI1640, X-Vivo15 resulted in a significant down-regulation of the cell-surface-located ectonucleotidases CD39 (Ecto-Apyrase) and CD73 (Ecto-5′-Nucleotidase), critical for the extracellular nucleotides-hydrolysis to nucleosides, explaining the loss of inhibition mediated by dGTP and GTP, but not Guanosine. In line with previous findings ATP was found to exert immunosuppressive effects on T-cell-proliferation. Purine-nucleotides, dGTP and GTP displayed a higher inhibitory capacity, but seem to be strictly dependent on the microenvironmental conditions modulating the responsiveness of the respective T-lymphocytes. Further evaluation of experimental and respective clinical settings should anticipate these findings.

  15. Na(+)/H(+) exchange subtype 1 inhibition during extracellular acidification and hypoxia in glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glunde, Kristine; Düssmann, Heiko; Juretschke, Hans-Paul; Leibfritz, Dieter

    2002-01-01

    Lactacidosis is a common feature of ischaemic brain tissue, but its role in ischaemic neuropathology is still not fully understood. Na(+)/H(+) exchange, a mechanism involved in the regulation of intracellular pH (pH(i)), is activated by low pH(i). The role of Na(+)/H(+) exchange subtype 1 was investigated during extracellular acidification and subsequent pH recovery in the absence and presence of (4-isopropyl-3-methylsulphonyl-benzoyl)-guanidine methanesulfonate (HOE642, Cariporid), a new selective and powerful inhibitor of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger subtype 1 (NHE-1). It was compared for normoxia and hypoxia in two glioma cell lines (C6 and F98). pH(i) was monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy using the intracellularly trapped pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). Alterations in glial cell metabolism were characterized using high-resolution (1)H, (13)C and (31)P NMR spectroscopy of perchloric acid extracts. NHE-1 contributed to glial pH regulation, especially at pathologically low pH(i) values. NHE-1 inhibition with HOE642 during acidification caused exacerbated metabolic disorders which were prolonged during extracellular pH recovery. However, NHE-1 inhibition during hypoxia protected the energy state of glial cells.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles: a glimmer of hope in treating Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Lee Chuen; Katsuda, Takeshi; Gailhouste, Luc; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the presence of extracellular plaques resulting from the accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ). To date, a definitive cure for this disease is still lacking as the currently approved drugs used are mainly symptomatic treatments. The revolutionary discovery of extracellular vesicles (EVs) has shed new light on the development of disease-modifying treatments for AD, owing to their potential in delivering the therapeutic agents to the brain. The feasibility of harnessing EVs for clinical applications is highly dependent on the donor cell, which determines the intrinsic properties of EVs. The merit of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as therapeutic delivery vehicles, and the proven therapeutic effects of the EVs derived from these cells, make researchers esteem MSCs as ideal producers of EVs. Therefore, MSC-derived EVs (MSC-EVs) emerge to be an appealing therapeutic delivery approach for the treatment of AD. Here, we discuss perspectives on the therapeutic strategies using MSC-EVs to treat AD and the associated challenges in clinical application. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. In vitro extracellular matrix model to evaluate stroma cell response to transvaginal mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Ping; Huang, Kuan-Hui; Long, Cheng-Yu; Yang, Chau-Chen; Tong, Yat-Ching

    2014-04-01

    The use of surgical mesh for female pelvic floor reconstruction has increased in recent years. However, there is paucity of information about the biological responses of host stroma cells to different meshes. This study was aimed to establish an in vitro experimental model to study the micro-environment of extracellular matrix (ECM) with embedded mesh and the stroma cell behaviors to different synthetic meshes. Matrigel multi-cellular co-culture system with embedded mesh was used to evaluate the interaction of stroma cells and synthetic mesh in a simulated ECM environment. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and NIH3T3 fibroblasts were inoculated in the system. The established multi-cellular Matrigel co-culture system was used to detect stroma cell recruitment and tube formation ability for different synthetic meshes. HUVEC and NIH3T3 cells were recruited into the mesh interstices and organized into tube-like structures in type I mesh material from Perigee, Marlex and Prolift 24 hr after cell inoculation. On the contrary, there was little recruitment of HUVEC and NIH3T3 cells into the type III mesh of intra-vaginal sling (IVS). The Matrigel multi-cellular co-culture system with embedded mesh offers a useful in vitro model to study the biological behaviors of stroma cells in response to different types of synthetic meshes. The system can help to select ideal mesh candidates before actual implantation into the human body. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. In vitro evaluation of the interactions between human corneal endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin San; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Giegengack, Matthew; Khan, Faraaz A; Soker, Shay; Khang, Gilson

    2013-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is the innermost cell layer of the cornea and rests on Descemet's membrane consisting of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins which can directly affect the cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, proliferation, polarity, morphogenesis and function. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between the ECM environment and human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), with the ultimate goal to improve cell proliferation and function in vitro. To evaluate the interaction of HCECs with ECM proteins, cells were seeded on ECM-coated tissue culture dishes, including collagen type I (COL I), collagen type IV (COL IV), fibronectin (FN), FNC coating mix (FNC) and laminin (LM). Cell adhesion and proliferation of HCECs on each substratum and expression of CEC markers were studied. The results showed that HCECs plated on the COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC-coated plates had enhanced cell adhesion initially; the number for COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC was significantly higher than the control (P < 0.05). In addition, cells grown on ECM protein-coated dishes showed more compact cellular morphology and CEC marker expression compared to cells seeded on uncoated dishes. Collectively, our results suggest that an adequate ECM protein combination can provide a long-term culture environment for HCECs for corneal endothelium transplantation. (paper)

  19. Do endothelial cells belong to the primitive stem leukemic clone in CML? Role of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Teresa L; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; López-Ruano, Guillermo; Muntión, Sandra; Preciado, Silvia; Hernández-Ruano, Montserrat; Rosado, Belén; de las Heras, Natalia; Chillón, M Carmen; Hernández-Hernández, Ángel; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2015-08-01

    The expression of BCR-ABL in hematopoietic stem cells is a well-defined primary event in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Some reports have described the presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells from CML patients, suggesting the origin of the disease in a primitive hemangioblastic cell. On the other hand, extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by CML leukemic cells are involved in the angiogenesis modulation process. In the current work we hypothesized that EVs released from BCR-ABL(+) cells may carry inside the oncogene that can be transferred to endothelial cells leading to the expression of both BCR-ABL transcript and the oncoprotein. EVs from K562 cells and plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients were isolated by ultracentrifugation. RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of BCR-ABL RNA in the EVs isolated from both K562 cells and plasma of CML patients. The incorporation of these EVs into endothelial cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that after 24h of incubation most EVs were incorporated. BCR-ABL transcripts were detected in all experiments on endothelial cells incubated with EVs from both sources. The presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells incubated with Philadelphia(+) EVs was also confirmed by Western blot assays. In summary, endothelial cells acquire BCR-ABL RNA and the oncoprotein after incubation with EVs released from Ph(+) positive cells (either from K562 cells or from plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients). This results challenge the hypothesis that endothelial cells may be part of the Philadelphia(+) clone in CML. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs in 3D Collagen Microspheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejin Han

    Full Text Available Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering.

  1. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:26760956

  2. Extracellular magnesium decreases the secretory response of rat peritoneal mast cells to compound 48/80 in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Johansen, Torben

    1991-01-01

    Exposure of rat peritoneal mast cells to magnesium in the absence of extracellular calcium resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in the secretory response induced by compound 48/80. The decrease was prevented by a low extracellular concentration of calcium. Furthermore, the decreased se...... that magnesium may decrease the secretory response by displacing the cellular calcium which is utilized in stimulus-secretion coupling....

  3. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better

  4. The effect of isochoric freezing on mammalian cells in an extracellular phosphate buffered solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, J; Rubinsky, B

    2018-04-20

    Isochoric (constant volume) freezing has been recently suggested as a new method for cell and organ preservation. As a first step in studying the effect of isochoric freezing on mammalian cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells (MDCK), were frozen in an isochoric system, in a simple extracellular phosphate buffered solution to -10 °C (96.5 MPa), - 15 °C (162 MPa) and -20 °C (205 MPa) for 60 and 120 min. Cell membrane integrity and cell metabolism were studied with a Live/Dead cell vitality assay and flow cytometry. We found that cell survival decreases with an increase in pressure (lower temperatures) and time of exposure. For example, 60% of cells survived 60 min at - 10 °C and only 18% survived 120 min at this temperature. Negligible survival was measured at - 20 °C. This study may serve as the baseline towards further research on techniques to optimize the effects of isochoric freezing on living biological matter. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Differential fates of biomolecules delivered to target cells via extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Masamitsu; Bachmann, Michael H; Hardy, Jonathan W; Frimannson, Daniel Omar; Bronsart, Laura; Wang, Andrew; Sylvester, Matthew D; Schmidt, Tobi L; Kaspar, Roger L; Butte, Manish J; Matin, A C; Contag, Christopher H

    2015-03-24

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), specifically exosomes and microvesicles (MVs), are presumed to play key roles in cell-cell communication via transfer of biomolecules between cells. The biogenesis of these two types of EVs differs as they originate from either the endosomal (exosomes) or plasma (MVs) membranes. To elucidate the primary means through which EVs mediate intercellular communication, we characterized their ability to encapsulate and deliver different types of macromolecules from transiently transfected cells. Both EV types encapsulated reporter proteins and mRNA but only MVs transferred the reporter function to recipient cells. De novo reporter protein expression in recipient cells resulted only from plasmid DNA (pDNA) after delivery via MVs. Reporter mRNA was delivered to recipient cells by both EV types, but was rapidly degraded without being translated. MVs also mediated delivery of functional pDNA encoding Cre recombinase in vivo to tissues in transgenic Cre-lox reporter mice. Within the parameters of this study, MVs delivered functional pDNA, but not RNA, whereas exosomes from the same source did not deliver functional nucleic acids. These results have significant implications for understanding the role of EVs in cellular communication and for development of EVs as delivery tools. Moreover, studies using EVs from transiently transfected cells may be confounded by a predominance of pDNA transfer.

  6. Modular extracellular sensor architecture for engineering mammalian cell-based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daringer, Nichole M; Dudek, Rachel M; Schwarz, Kelly A; Leonard, Joshua N

    2014-12-19

    Engineering mammalian cell-based devices that monitor and therapeutically modulate human physiology is a promising and emerging frontier in clinical synthetic biology. However, realizing this vision will require new technologies enabling engineered circuitry to sense and respond to physiologically relevant cues. No existing technology enables an engineered cell to sense exclusively extracellular ligands, including proteins and pathogens, without relying upon native cellular receptors or signal transduction pathways that may be subject to crosstalk with native cellular components. To address this need, we here report a technology we term a Modular Extracellular Sensor Architecture (MESA). This self-contained receptor and signal transduction platform is maximally orthogonal to native cellular processes and comprises independent, tunable protein modules that enable performance optimization and straightforward engineering of novel MESA that recognize novel ligands. We demonstrate ligand-inducible activation of MESA signaling, optimization of receptor performance using design-based approaches, and generation of MESA biosensors that produce outputs in the form of either transcriptional regulation or transcription-independent reconstitution of enzymatic activity. This systematic, quantitative platform characterization provides a framework for engineering MESA to recognize novel ligands and for integrating these sensors into diverse mammalian synthetic biology applications.

  7. Switch-like genes populate cell communication pathways and are enriched for extracellular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have placed gene expression in the context of distribution profiles including housekeeping, graded, and bimodal (switch-like. Single-gene studies have shown bimodal expression results from healthy cell signaling and complex diseases such as cancer, however developing a comprehensive list of human bimodal genes has remained a major challenge due to inherent noise in human microarray data. This study presents a two-component mixture analysis of mouse gene expression data for genes on the Affymetrix MG-U74Av2 array for the detection and annotation of switch-like genes. Two-component normal mixtures were fit to the data to identify bimodal genes and their potential roles in cell signaling and disease progression. Results Seventeen percent of the genes on the MG-U74Av2 array (1519 out of 9091 were identified as bimodal or switch-like. KEGG pathways significantly enriched for bimodal genes included ECM-receptor interaction, cell communication, and focal adhesion. Similarly, the GO biological process "cell adhesion" and cellular component "extracellular matrix" were significantly enriched. Switch-like genes were found to be associated with such diseases as congestive heart failure, Alzheimer's disease, arteriosclerosis, breast neoplasms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, and type I and type II diabetes. In diabetes alone, over two hundred bimodal genes were in a different mode of expression compared to normal tissue. Conclusion This research identified and annotated bimodal or switch-like genes in the mouse genome using a large collection of microarray data. Genes with bimodal expression were enriched within the cell membrane and extracellular environment. Hundreds of bimodal genes demonstrated alternate modes of expression in diabetic muscle, pancreas, liver, heart, and adipose tissue. Bimodal genes comprise a candidate set of biomarkers for a large number of disease states because

  8. The extracellular matrix niche microenvironment of neural and cancer stem cells in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Jacqueline; Brösicke, Nicole; Theocharidis, Ursula; Faissner, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that neural stem cells and cancer stem cells (NSCs/CSCs) share several overlapping characteristics such as self-renewal, multipotency and a comparable molecular repertoire. In addition to the intrinsic cellular properties, NSCs/CSCs favor a similar environment to acquire and maintain their characteristics. In the present review, we highlight the shared properties of NSCs and CSCs in regard to their extracellular microenvironment called the NSC/CSC niche. Moreover, we point out that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and their complementary receptors influence the behavior of NSCs/CSCs as well as brain tumor progression. Here, we focus on the expression profile and functional importance of the ECM glycoprotein tenascin-C, the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan DSD-1-PG/phosphacan but also on other important glycoprotein/proteoglycan constituents. Within this review, we specifically concentrate on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults and is associated with poor prognosis despite intense and aggressive surgical and therapeutic treatment. Recent studies indicate that GBM onset is driven by a subpopulation of CSCs that display self-renewal and recapitulate tumor heterogeneity. Based on the CSC hypothesis the cancer arises just from a small subpopulation of self-sustaining cancer cells with the exclusive ability to self-renew and maintain the tumor. Besides the fundamental stem cell properties of self-renewal and multipotency, GBM stem cells share further molecular characteristics with NSCs, which we would like to review in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in cell shape, cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion sites of cultured cells after extracellular Ca2+ chelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Mermelstein

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Although much is known about the molecules involved in extracellular Ca2+ regulation, the relationship of the ion with overall cell morphology is not understood. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of the Ca2+ chelator EGTA on the major cytoskeleton components, at integrin-containing adhesion sites, and their consequences on cell shape. Control mouse cell line C2C12 has a well-spread morphology with long stress fibers running in many different directions, as detected by fluorescence microscopy using rhodamine-phalloidin. In contrast, cells treated with EGTA (1.75 mM in culture medium for 24 h became bipolar and showed less stress fibers running in one major direction. The adhesion plaque protein alpha5-integrin was detected by immunofluorescence microscopy at fibrillar adhesion sites in both control and treated cells, whereas a dense labeling was seen only inside treated cells. Microtubules shifted from a radial arrangement in control cells to a longitudinal distribution in EGTA-treated cells, as analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Desmin intermediate filaments were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in a fragmented network dispersed within the entire cytoplasm in EGTA-treated cells, whereas a dense network was seen in the whole cytoplasm of control cells. The present results suggest that the role of extracellular Ca2+ in the regulation of C2C12 cell shape can be mediated by actin-containing stress fibers and microtubules and by intermediate filament reorganization, which may involve integrin adhesion sites.

  10. Extracellular matrix-dependent myosin dynamics during G1-S phase cell cycle progression in hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Hansen, Linda K.

    2004-01-01

    Cell spreading and proliferation are tightly coupled in anchorage-dependent cells. While adhesion-dependent proliferation signals require an intact actin cytoskeleton, and some of these signals such as ERK activation have been characterized, the role of myosin in spreading and cell cycle progression under different extracellular matrix (ECM) conditions is not known. Studies presented here examine changes in myosin activity in freshly isolated hepatocytes under ECM conditions that promote either proliferation (high fibronectin density) or growth arrest (low fibronectin density). Three different measures were obtained and related to both spreading and cell cycle progression: myosin protein levels and association with cytoskeleton, myosin light chain phosphorylation, and its ATPase activity. During the first 48 h in culture, corresponding with transit through G1 phase, there was a six-fold increase in both myosin protein levels and myosin association with actin cytoskeleton. There was also a steady increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation and ATPase activity with spreading, which did not occur in non-spread, growth-arrested cells on low density of fibronectin. Myosin-inhibiting drugs blocked ERK activation, cyclin D1 expression, and S phase entry. Overexpression of the cell cycle protein cyclin D1 overcame both ECM-dependent and actomyosin-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that cyclin D1 is a key event downstream of myosin-dependent cell cycle regulation

  11. Inflammation-induced endothelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles modulate the cellular status of pericytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiji; Niida, Shumpei; Azuma, Erika; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Muramatsu, Masashi; Huang, Ting Ting; Sagara, Hiroshi; Higaki, Sayuri; Ikutani, Masashi; Nagai, Yoshinori; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Miyazaki, Kenji; Hamashima, Takeru; Mori, Hisashi; Matsuda, Naoyuki; Ishii, Yoko; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2015-02-17

    Emerging lines of evidence have shown that extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate cell-to-cell communication by exporting encapsulated materials, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), to target cells. Endothelial cell-derived EVs (E-EVs) are upregulated in circulating blood in different pathological conditions; however, the characteristics and the role of these E-EVs are not yet well understood. In vitro studies were conducted to determine the role of inflammation-induced E-EVs in the cell-to-cell communication between vascular endothelial cells and pericytes/vSMCs. Stimulation with inflammatory cytokines and endotoxin immediately induced release of shedding type E-EVs from the vascular endothelial cells, and flow cytometry showed that the induction was dose dependent. MiRNA array analyses revealed that group of miRNAs were specifically increased in the inflammation-induced E-EVs. E-EVs added to the culture media of cerebrovascular pericytes were incorporated into the cells. The E-EV-supplemented cells showed highly induced mRNA and protein expression of VEGF-B, which was assumed to be a downstream target of the miRNA that was increased within the E-EVs after inflammatory stimulation. The results suggest that E-EVs mediate inflammation-induced endothelial cell-pericyte/vSMC communication, and the miRNAs encapsulated within the E-EVs may play a role in regulating target cell function. E-EVs may be new therapeutic targets for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  12. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander A. A. Kooijmans

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods: EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF. EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results: V analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression, but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions: We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules.

  13. Extracellular vesicle-mediated phenotype switching in malignant and non-malignant colon cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvey, Hillary E.; Chang, Audrey; Adler, Jason; Del Tatto, Michael; Perez, Kimberly; Quesenberry, Peter J.; Chatterjee, Devasis

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted from many cells, carrying cargoes including proteins and nucleic acids. Research has shown that EVs play a role in a variety of biological processes including immunity, bone formation and recently they have been implicated in promotion of a metastatic phenotype. EVs were isolated from HCT116 colon cancer cells, 1459 non-malignant colon fibroblast cells, and tumor and normal colon tissue from a patient sample. Co-cultures were performed with 1459 cells and malignant vesicles, as well as HCT116 cells and non-malignant vesicles. Malignant phenotype was measured using soft agar colony formation assay. Co-cultures were also analyzed for protein levels using mass spectrometry. The importance of 14-3-3 zeta/delta in transfer of malignant phenotype was explored using siRNA. Additionally, luciferase reporter assay was used to measure the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. This study demonstrates the ability of EVs derived from malignant colon cancer cell line and malignant patient tissue to induce the malignant phenotype in non-malignant colon cells. Similarly, EVs derived from non-malignant colon cell lines and normal patient tissue reversed the malignant phenotype of HCT116 cells. Cells expressing an EV-induced malignant phenotype showed increased transcriptional activity of NF-κB which was inhibited by the NF--κB inhibitor, BAY117082. We also demonstrate that knock down of 14-3-3 zeta/delta reduced anchorage-independent growth of HCT116 cells and 1459 cells co-cultured with HCT derived EVs. Evidence of EV-mediated induction of malignant phenotype, and reversal of malignant phenotype, provides rational basis for further study of the role of EVs in tumorigenesis. Identification of 14-3-3 zeta/delta as up-regulated in malignancy suggests its potential as a putative drug target for the treatment of colorectal cancer

  14. Extracellular ATP is internalized by macropinocytosis and induces intracellular ATP increase and drug resistance in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yanrong; Wang, Xuan; Liu, Yi; Li, Yunsheng; Colvin, Robert A; Tong, Lingying; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Xiaozhuo

    2014-09-01

    ATP plays central roles in cancer metabolism and the Warburg effect. Intratumoral ATP concentrations are up to 10(4) times higher than those of interstitial ATP in normal tissues. However, extracellular ATP is not known to enter cancer cells. Here we report that human A549 lung cancer cells internalized extracellular ATP by macropinocytosis as demonstrated by colocalization of a nonhydrolyzable fluorescent ATP and a macropinocytosis tracer high-molecular-weight dextran, as well as by a macropinocytosis inhibitor study. Extracellular ATP also induced increase of intracellular ATP levels, without involving transcription and translation at significant levels, and cancer cells' resistance to ATP-competitor anticancer drugs, likely through the mechanism of ATP internalization. These findings, described for the first time, have profound implications in ATP-sharing among cancer cells in tumors and highlight a novel anticancer target. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phospholipids reduce gastric cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Petra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nidation of floating tumour cells initiates peritoneal carcinosis and limits prognosis of gastro-intestinal tumours. Adhesion of tumour cells to extracellular matrix components is a pivotal step in developing peritoneal dissemination of intraabdominal malignancies. Since phospholipids efficaciously prevented peritoneal adhesion formation in numerous animal studies we investigated their capacity to reduce adhesions of gastric cancer cells to extracellular matrix components (ECM. Methods Human gastric cancer cells (NUGC-4, Japanese Cancer Research Resources Bank, Tokyo, Japan were used in this study. Microtiter plates were coated with collagen IV (coll, laminin (ln and fibronectin (fn. Non-specific protein binding of the coated wells was blocked by adding 1% (w/v BSA (4°C, 12 h and rinsing the wells with Hepes buffer. 50.000 tumour cells in 100 μl medium were seeded into each well. Beside the controls, phospholipids were added in concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0/100 μl medium. After an incubation interval of 30 min, attached cells were fixed and stained with 0.1% (w/v crystal violet. The dye was resuspended with 50 μl of 0.2% (v/v Triton X-100 per well and colour yields were then measured by an ELISA reader at 590 nm. Optical density (OD showed a linear relationship to the amount of cells and was corrected for dying of BSA/polystyrene without cells. Results The attachment of gastric cancer cells to collagen IV, laminin, and fibronectin could be significantly reduced up to 53% by phospholipid concentrations of 0.5 mg/100 μl and higher. Conclusion These results, within the scope of additional experimental studies on mice and rats which showed a significant reduction of peritoneal carcinosis, demonstrated the capacity of phospholipids in controlling abdominal nidation of tumour cells to ECM components. Lipid emulsions may be a beneficial adjunct in surgery of gastrointestinal malignancies.

  16. Effect of dexamethasone on extracellular secretion of cystatin C in cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAMAWAKI, CHIKA; TAKAHASHI, MINORU; TAKARA, KOHJI; KUME, MANABU; HIRAI, MIDORI; YASUI, HIROYUKI; NAKAMURA, TSUTOMU

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate dexamethasone (DEX)-induced secretion of cystatin C (Cys C) and the effect of cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on Cys C secretion in human cancer cell lines. KYSE150, A549 and Caki-2 human cancer cell lines were cultured on plastic dishes and treated with DEX (100 nM) for 24, 48 and 72 h. KYSE150 cells were co-treated with DEX, CDDP (10 μM), and 5-FU (2 μM). The effects of DEX, CDDP and 5-FU on cell viability were evaluated. Results showed Cys C secretion levels in the culture medium of DEX-treated KYSE150 cells to be 1.8- to 2.3-fold higher compared to those in the culture medium of control cells. A similar tendency was observed in A549 cells at all the time points, whereas a significant increase in the Cys C secretion by Caki-2 cells was observed only 24 h after DEX treatment. Regarding KYSE150 cells, the secretion of Cys C was also enhanced by co-treatment of CDDP or 5-FU with DEX, although it was not affected by the co-administration of DEX and mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. At concentrations that are typically used in esophageal cancer chemotherapy, CDDP and 5-FU demonstrated a moderate level of cytotoxicity in KYSE150 cells in contrast to DEX. These findings suggested that DEX has the potential to enhance the extracellular secretion of Cys C in esophageal cancer cells, possibly due to the transcriptional regulation mediated by glucocorticoid receptor activity. PMID:24648905

  17. Extracellular acidification by lactic acid suppresses glucose deprivation-induced cell death and autophagy in B16 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Taisuke; Sadzuka, Yasuyuki

    2018-02-19

    In solid tumors, cancer cells survive and proliferate under conditions of microenvironment stress such as poor nutrients and hypoxia due to inadequate vascularization. These stress conditions in turn activate autophagy, which is important for cancer cell survival. However, autophagy has a contrary effect of inducing cell death in cancer cells cultured in vitro under conditions of glucose deprivation. In this study, we hypothesized that supplementation of lactic acid serves as a means of cell survival under glucose-deprived conditions. At neutral pH, cell death of B16 murine melanoma cells by autophagy under glucose-deprived conditions was observed. However, supplementation of lactic acid suppressed cell death and autophagy in B16 melanoma cells when cultured in glucose-deprived conditions. Sodium lactate, which does not change extracellular pH, did not inhibit cell death, while HCl-adjusted acidic pH suppressed cell death under glucose-deprived conditions. These results suggested that an acidic pH is crucial for cell survival under glucose-deprived conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential Proteome Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles from Breast Cancer Cell Lines by Chaperone Affinity Enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G. Griffiths

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of human tissue fluid precludes timely identification of cancer biomarkers by immunoassay or mass spectrometry. An increasingly attractive strategy is to primarily enrich extracellular vesicles (EVs released from cancer cells in an accelerated manner compared to normal cells. The Vn96 peptide was herein employed to recover a subset of EVs released into the media from cellular models of breast cancer. Vn96 has affinity for heat shock proteins (HSPs decorating the surface of EVs. Reflecting their cells of origin, cancer EVs displayed discrete differences from those of normal phenotype. GELFrEE LC/MS identified an extensive proteome from all three sources of EVs, the vast majority having been previously reported in the ExoCarta database. Pathway analysis of the Vn96-affinity proteome unequivocally distinguished EVs from tumorigenic cell lines (SKBR3 and MCF-7 relative to a non-tumorigenic source (MCF-10a, particularly with regard to altered metabolic enzymes, signaling, and chaperone proteins. The protein data sets provide valuable information from material shed by cultured cells. It is probable that a vast amount of biomarker identities may be collected from established and primary cell cultures using the approaches described here.

  19. Neutrophil Attack Triggers Extracellular Trap-Dependent Candida Cell Wall Remodeling and Altered Immune Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Hopke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens hide immunogenic epitopes from the host to evade immunity, persist and cause infection. The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised patient populations, offers a good example as it masks the inflammatory epitope β-glucan in its cell wall from host recognition. It has been demonstrated previously that β-glucan becomes exposed during infection in vivo but the mechanism behind this exposure was unknown. Here, we show that this unmasking involves neutrophil extracellular trap (NET mediated attack, which triggers changes in fungal cell wall architecture that enhance immune recognition by the Dectin-1 β-glucan receptor in vitro. Furthermore, using a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, we demonstrate the requirement for neutrophils in triggering these fungal cell wall changes in vivo. Importantly, we found that fungal epitope unmasking requires an active fungal response in addition to the stimulus provided by neutrophil attack. NET-mediated damage initiates fungal MAP kinase-driven responses, particularly by Hog1, that dynamically relocalize cell wall remodeling machinery including Chs3, Phr1 and Sur7. Neutrophil-initiated cell wall disruptions augment some macrophage cytokine responses to attacked fungi. This work provides insight into host-pathogen interactions during disseminated candidiasis, including valuable information about how the C. albicans cell wall responds to the biotic stress of immune attack. Our results highlight the important but underappreciated concept that pattern recognition during infection is dynamic and depends on the host-pathogen dialog.

  20. Ornithine decarboxylase and extracellular polyamines regulate microvascular sprouting and actin cytoskeleton dynamics in endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucharzewska, Paulina; Welch, Johanna E.; Svensson, Katrin J.; Belting, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    The polyamines are essential for cancer cell proliferation during tumorigenesis. Targeted inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), i.e. a key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis, by α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) has shown anti-neoplastic activity in various experimental models. This activity has mainly been attributed to the anti-proliferative effect of DFMO in cancer cells. Here, we provide evidence that unperturbed ODC activity is a requirement for proper microvessel sprouting ex vivo as well as the migration of primary human endothelial cells. DFMO-mediated ODC inhibition was reversed by extracellular polyamine supplementation, showing that anti-angiogenic effects of DFMO were specifically related to polyamine levels. ODC inhibition was associated with an abnormal morphology of the actin cytoskeleton during cell spreading and migration. Moreover, our data suggest that de-regulated actin cytoskeleton dynamics in DFMO treated endothelial cells may be related to constitutive activation of the small GTPase CDC42, i.e. a well-known regulator of cell motility and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. These insights into the potential role of polyamines in angiogenesis should stimulate further studies testing the combined anti-tumor effect of polyamine inhibition and established anti-angiogenic therapies in vivo.

  1. Combinatorial Extracellular Matrix Microenvironments for Probing Endothelial Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Luqia; Kim, Joseph J; Wanjare, Maureen; Patlolla, Bhagat; Coller, John; Natu, Vanita; Hastie, Trevor J; Huang, Ngan F

    2017-07-26

    Endothelial cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells are a promising cell type for enhancing angiogenesis in ischemic cardiovascular tissues. However, our understanding of microenvironmental factors that modulate the process of endothelial differentiation is limited. We examined the role of combinatorial extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on endothelial differentiation systematically using an arrayed microscale platform. Human pluripotent stem cells were differentiated on the arrayed ECM microenvironments for 5 days. Combinatorial ECMs composed of collagen IV + heparan sulfate + laminin (CHL) or collagen IV + gelatin + heparan sulfate (CGH) demonstrated significantly higher expression of CD31, compared to single-factor ECMs. These results were corroborated by fluorescence activated cell sorting showing a 48% yield of CD31 + /VE-cadherin + cells on CHL, compared to 27% on matrigel. To elucidate the signaling mechanism, a gene expression time course revealed that VE-cadherin and FLK1 were upregulated in a dynamically similar manner as integrin subunit β3 (>50 fold). To demonstrate the functional importance of integrin β3 in promoting endothelial differentiation, the addition of neutralization antibody inhibited endothelial differentiation on CHL-modified dishes by >50%. These data suggest that optimal combinatorial ECMs enhance endothelial differentiation, compared to many single-factor ECMs, in part through an integrin β3-mediated pathway.

  2. Pathogenic or Therapeutic Extracellular Vesicles in Rheumatic Diseases: Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosenza, Stella; Ruiz, Maxime; Maumus, Marie; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2017-04-22

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of cell-to-cell communication pathways via the transport of proteins, mRNA, miRNA and lipids. There are three main types of EVs, exosomes, microparticles and apoptotic bodies, which are classified according to their size and biogenesis. EVs are secreted by all cell types and their function reproduces that of the parental cell. They are involved in many biological processes that regulate tissue homeostasis and physiopathology of diseases. In rheumatic diseases, namely osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), EVs have been isolated from synovial fluid and shown to play pathogenic roles contributing to progression of both diseases. By contrast, EVs may have therapeutic effect via the delivery of molecules that may stop disease evolution. In particular, EVs derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reproduce the main functions of the parental cells and therefore represent the ideal type of EVs for modulating the course of either disease. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of EVs in OA and RA focusing on their potential pathogenic effect and possible therapeutic options. Special attention is given to MSCs and MSC-derived EVs for modulating OA and RA progression with the perspective of developing innovative therapeutic strategies.

  3. beta-Catenin signaling is required for TGF-beta(1)-induced extracellular matrix production by airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarsma, Hoeke A.; Menzen, Mark H.; Halayko, Andrew J.; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2011-01-01

    Baarsma HA, Menzen MH, Halayko AJ, Meurs H, Kerstjens HA, Gosens R. beta-Catenin signaling is required for TGF-beta(1)-induced extracellular matrix production by airway smooth muscle cells. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 301: L956-L965, 2011. First published September 9, 2011; doi:

  4. Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappa, Germana [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Le, Thuc T. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Johlfs, Mary G. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Fiscus, Ronald R. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela [Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstr. 108, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Corbeil, Denis [Tissue Engineering Laboratories (BIOTEC) and DFG Research Center and Cluster of Excellence for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Technische Universität Dresden, Tatzberg 47–49, 01307 Dresden, Germany Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Lorico, Aurelio, E-mail: alorico@roseman.edu [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1–positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ≤40 nm; intermediates ∼40–80 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1–containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. - Highlights: ► First report of release of prominin-1–containing microvesicles from cancer cells. ► Pro-metastatic role of prominin-1–containing microvesicles in

  5. Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio; Le, Thuc T.; Johlfs, Mary G.; Fiscus, Ronald R.; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Corbeil, Denis; Lorico, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1–positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ≤40 nm; intermediates ∼40–80 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1–containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. - Highlights: ► First report of release of prominin-1–containing microvesicles from cancer cells. ► Pro-metastatic role of prominin-1–containing microvesicles in

  6. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian; Schelhaas, Mario

    2015-07-01

    The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural alterations that

  7. PML-RARa modulates the vascular signature of extracellular vesicles released by acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Garnier, Delphine; Lee, Tae Hoon; D'Asti, Esterina; Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation is believed to impact the vascular phenotype and microenvironment in cancer, at least in part, through mechanisms involving extracellular vesicles (EVs). We explored these questions in the context of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells (NB4) expressing oncogenic fusion protein, PML-RARa and exquisitely sensitive to its clinically used antagonist, the all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). We report that NB4 cells produce considerable numbers of EVs, which are readily taken up by cultured endothelial cells triggering their increased survival. NB4 EVs contain PML-RARa transcript, but no detectable protein, which is also absent in endothelial cells upon the vesicle uptake, thereby precluding an active intercellular trafficking of this oncogene in this setting. ATRA treatment changes the emission profile of NB4-related EVs resulting in preponderance of smaller vesicles, an effect that occurs in parallel with the onset of cellular differentiation. ATRA also increases IL-8 mRNA and protein content in NB4 cells and their EVs, while decreasing the levels of VEGF and tissue factor (TF). Endothelial cell uptake of NB4-derived EVs renders these cells more TF-positive and procoagulant, and this effect is diminished by pre-treatment of EV donor cells with ATRA. Profiling angiogenesis-related transcripts in intact and ATRA-treated APL cells and their EVs reveals multiple differences attributable to cellular responses and EV molecular packaging. These observations point to the potential significance of changes in the angiogenic signature and activity associated with EVs released from tumor cells subjected to targeted therapy.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell derived secretome and extracellular vesicles for acute lung injury and other inflammatory lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-Gang; Gudapati, Varun; Lim, Hyungsun; Lee, Jae W

    2016-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a major cause of respiratory failure in critically ill patients. Despite extensive research into its pathophysiology, mortality remains high. No effective pharmacotherapy exists. Based largely on numerous preclinical studies, administration of mesenchymal stem or stromal cell (MSC) as a therapeutic for acute lung injury holds great promise, and clinical trials are currently underway. However, concern for the use of stem cells, specifically the risk of iatrogenic tumor formation, remains unresolved. Accumulating evidence now suggest that novel cell-free therapies including MSC-derived conditioned medium and extracellular vesicles released from MSCs might constitute compelling alternatives. The current review summarizes the preclinical studies testing MSC conditioned medium and/or MSC extracellular vesicles as treatment for acute lung injury and other inflammatory lung diseases. While certain logistical obstacles limit the clinical applications of MSC conditioned medium such as the volume required for treatment, the therapeutic application of MSC extracellular vesicles remains promising, primarily due to ability of extracellular vesicles to maintain the functional phenotype of the parent cell. However, utilization of MSC extracellular vesicles will require large-scale production and standardization concerning identification, characterization and quantification.

  9. Cell adhesion control by ion implantation into extra-cellular matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kusakabe, Masahiro; Kaibara, Makoto; Iwaki, Masaya; Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Nishisaka, Tsuyoshi

    1994-01-01

    Cell adhesion control of polymer surfaces by ion implantation into polymers and extra-cellular matrix has been studied by means of in vitro adhesion measurements of the carcinoma of the cervix (HeLa cell). The specimens used were polystyrene (PS), oxygen plasma treated polystyrene (PS-O), extra-cellular matrix (Collagen: Type I) coated polystyrene (PS-C), and gelatin coated polystyrene (PS-G). Ne + , Na + , and Ar + implantations were performed with a fluence of 1x10 15 ions/cm 2 at energies of 50, 100 and 150 keV. The chemical and physical structures of ion implanted specimens have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR-ATR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Ion implanted PS demonstrated a dramatic improvement of adhesion of HeLa cell. HeLa cell adhered only to ion implanted circular domains of a diameter about 0.1 mm on PS. By contrast, ion implanted PS-C, PS-G and PS-O domains inhibited the cell adhesion. These phenomena were observed on Ne + , Na + , and Ar + implanted specimens at energies of 50, 100, and 150 keV. Ion implantation broke the original chemical bonds to form new radicals such as =C=O, condensed rings, C-C, C-O and OH radical. Ion implanted PS had a large amount of new radicals compared with that of PS-C, PS-G and PS-O. Ion implantation broke NH and NH 3 bonds originating from amino acid in PS-C and PS-G. OH and =C=O caused by oxygen treatment in PS-O were also destroyed by ion implantation. It is concluded that cell adhesion to ion implanted PS was caused by carbon structure and new radicals induced by ion implantation. The inhibition of HeLa cell adhesion on PS-C, PS-G and PS-O was caused by the destruction of cell adhesion properties of amino acid, OH and =C=O by radiation effects. ((orig.))

  10. Investigation of the Extracellular Matrix Effect for the QCM/CCD Cell Activity Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyen-Wook; Otani, Naoya; Hiroshi, Muramatsu; Chang, Sang-Mok; Kim, Jong Min

    2018-08-01

    A real-time quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) cell activity monitoring system coupled with micro CCD cameras was developed to investigate the cultured cell activity, which could measure the viscoelastic characteristics of the cell with the QCM and observe the cell morphology changes with CCD camera simultaneously. Both the viscoelastic characteristics and the shape of the cultured cell are important factors to estimate the cell activity and the cell adhesion. The extracellular matrix (ECM) on the surface of the QCM is essential to culture the cell stably in the QCM monitoring system. To find the ECM optimization condition, the adhesive strength of cultured cells on the ECM modified glass surface was measured by using rotating water stream and CCD camera. After culturing HepG2 cells for 24 hours on the ECM modified glass plates, the glass plates were dipped in the PBS solution and rotated with 1,000, 1,300, and 1,500 rpm for 30 seconds. The adhesiveness of ECMs was investigated by calculating the remained cells after rotating. Four types of ECM, such as amino group, carboxyl group, collagen monomer, and collagen polymer, were used and tested. The current paper improves the sensing system of previous report so that measurements of four ECMs can be simultaneously conducted under the same conditions in order to enhance reliability. A collagen polymer exposed ECM was the most stable on an adhesiveness point of view, but not suitable for the QCM cell activity monitoring due to the decrease of the QCM sensitivity. The sensitivity of the QCM cell activity monitoring system using collagen monomer as ECM is about 2.6 times better than that using collagen polymer. A collagen monomer exposed ECM was more stable than amino group and carboxyl group exposed ECMs based on an adhesiveness point of view. Therefore, a collagen monomer exposed ECM was the most stable and suitable for the QCM cell activity monitoring system among the four ECMs. The changes of the resonance frequency

  11. Neutrophil Extracellular DNA Traps Induce Autoantigen Production by Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngwoo Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis of autoimmune involvement in asthma has received much recent interest. Autoantibodies, such as anti-cytokeratin (CK 18, anti-CK19, and anti-α-enolase antibodies, react with self-antigens and are found at high levels in the sera of patients with severe asthma (SA. However, the mechanisms underlying autoantibody production in SA have not been fully determined. The present study was conducted to demonstrate that neutrophil extracellular DNA traps (NETs, cytotoxic molecules released from neutrophils, are a key player in the stimulation of airway epithelial cells (AECs to produce autoantigens. This study showed that NETs significantly increased the intracellular expression of tissue transglutaminase (tTG but did not affect that of CK18 in AECs. NETs induced the extracellular release of both tTG and CK18 in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, NETs directly degraded intracellular α-enolase into small fragments. However, antibodies against neutrophil elastase (NE or myeloperoxidase (MPO attenuated the effects of NETs on AECs. Furthermore, each NET isolated from healthy controls (HC, nonsevere asthma (NSA, and SA had different characteristics. Taken together, these findings suggest that AECs exposed to NETs may exhibit higher autoantigen production, especially in SA. Therefore, targeting of NETs may represent a new therapy for neutrophilic asthma with a high level of autoantigens.

  12. Extracellular histones, cell-free DNA, or nucleosomes: differences in immunostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Gerben; Zeerleder, Sacha; Luken, Brenda M

    2016-12-08

    In inflammation, extensive cell death may occur, which results in the release of chromatin components into the extracellular environment. Individually, the purified chromatin components double stranded (ds)DNA and histones have been demonstrated, both in vitro and in vivo, to display various immunostimulatory effects, for example, histones induce cytotoxicity and proinflammatory signaling through toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and 4, while DNA induces signaling through TLR9 and intracellular nucleic acid sensing mechanisms. However, DNA and histones are organized in nucleosomes in the nucleus, and evidence suggests that nucleosomes are released as such in inflammation. The cytotoxicity and proinflammatory signaling induced by nucleosomes have not been studied as extensively as the separate effects brought about by histones and dsDNA, and there appear to be some marked differences. Remarkably, little distinction between the different forms in which histones circulate has been made throughout literature. This is partly due to the limitations of existing techniques to differentiate between histones in their free or DNA-bound form. Here we review the current understanding of immunostimulation induced by extracellular histones, dsDNA and nucleosomes, and discuss the importance of techniques that in their detection differentiate between these different chromatin components.

  13. Extracellular vesicles derived from mesenchymal stem cells induce features of diabetic retinopathy in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Elena; Lopatina, Tatiana; Berrone, Elena; Mazzeo, Aurora; Iavello, Alessandra; Camussi, Giovanni; Porta, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    Loss of pericytes in the early phases of diabetic retinopathy (DR) may disrupt their stable association with endothelial cells (EC), leading to EC proliferation and, eventually, angiogenesis. Extracellular vesicles (EV) are small membrane particles derived from different cells which contain biologically active proteins and RNA and are known to promote phenotypic changes in target cells. In diabetic-like conditions, EV derived from MSC may play a role in vessel destabilization by interfering with the strict interactions between EC/pericytes and pericyte/extracellular matrix. We examined the behaviour of retinal pericytes exposed to EV derived from MSC cultured in physiological and diabetic-like conditions (high glucose and/or hypoxia). MSC-derived EV are able to enter the pericytes, cause their detachment and migration from the substrate, and increase blood-barrier permeability. Moreover, EV added to EC/pericytes co-cultures in Matrigel promote in vitro angiogenesis. These effects may be mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-2, expressed by both EV and EV-stimulated pericytes, and are exacerbated if MSC are previously cultured in conditions (high glucose and/or hypoxia) mimicking the diabetic microvascular milieu. We confirm that MSC-derived EV contribute to angiogenesis, showing that they may not only exert a direct stimulus to EC proliferation, but also induce pericyte detachment, thus leaving EC free to proliferate. In addition, we demonstrate a possible link between EV and the early stages of the pathogenesis of DR. Diabetic-like conditions may influence vessel remodelling during angiogenesis through EV paracrine signalling.

  14. Phagocytosis of Extracellular Vesicles Extruded From the Placenta by Ovarian Cancer Cells Inhibits Growth of the Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Rutten, Victoria; Cheng, Wei-Tzu; Tong, Mancy; Wei, Jia; Stone, Peter; Ching, Lai-Ming; Chamley, Lawrence W

    2018-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a common gynecological cancer, and parity is negatively associated with the incidence of this disease. This negative association is hypothesized to be due in part to shifting the balance of estrogen and progesterone toward more progesterone and reduced ovulation during pregnancy. However, studies suggested that parity is also associated with estrogen-independent gynecological cancers suggesting balance of hormones may not be the only protective factor. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play an important role in cell-to-cell communication in physiological and pathological conditions. During pregnancy, large amounts of EVs are extruded from the placenta, and they seem to be involved in the remarkable adaptation of a woman's body to normal pregnancy. We hypothesized that EVs extruded from the placenta play a role in this protective effect. Placental EVs were collected from first-trimester placentae, and cancer cell EVs were isolated from ovarian cancer cells. The EVs were exposed to ovarian cancer cells for 48 hours. The proliferation of cancer cells and the cell cycle were measured. In addition, phagocytosis of deported placental EVs by cancer cells was also measured. The proliferation of cancer cells was significantly reduced by treatment with placental EVs (P = 0.001, analysis of variance), but not EVs from monocytes (P = 0.195), compared with untreated cancer cells. Furthermore, placental EVs also prevented the proliferation of cancer cells induced by cancer cell-derived EVs (P = 0.001). This inhibition of proliferation of ovarian cancer cells was partially due to phagocytosis of placental EVs by cancer cells. Phagocytosis of placental EVs delayed progression through the cell cycle. Calreticulin, a phagocytic "eat me" signal carried by placental EVs significantly inhibited ovarian cancer growth (P = 0.001). Our data demonstrated that EVs extruded from the placenta prevented ovarian cancer cell growth by a mechanism that involved delaying progression

  15. ALS Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Approaches: The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafede, Roberta; Mariotti, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive muscle paralysis determined by the degeneration of motoneurons in the motor cortex brainstem and spinal cord. The ALS pathogenetic mechanisms are still unclear, despite the wealth of studies demonstrating the involvement of several altered signaling pathways, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, glutamate excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. To date, the proposed therapeutic strategies are targeted to one or a few of these alterations, resulting in only a minimal effect on disease course and survival of ALS patients. The involvement of different mechanisms in ALS pathogenesis underlines the need for a therapeutic approach targeted to multiple aspects. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can support motoneurons and surrounding cells, reduce inflammation, stimulate tissue regeneration and release growth factors. On this basis, MSC have been proposed as promising candidates to treat ALS. However, due to the drawbacks of cell therapy, the possible therapeutic use of extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by stem cells is raising increasing interest. The present review summarizes the main pathological mechanisms involved in ALS and the related therapeutic approaches proposed to date, focusing on MSC therapy and their preclinical and clinical applications. Moreover, the nature and characteristics of EVs and their role in recapitulating the effect of stem cells are discussed, elucidating how and why these vesicles could provide novel opportunities for ALS treatment.

  16. Extracellular Vesicles Arising from Apoptotic Cells in Tumors: Roles in Cancer Pathogenesis and Potential Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lynch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is known that apoptotic cells can have diverse effects on the tumor microenvironment. Emerging evidence indicates that, despite its renowned role in tumor suppression, apoptosis may also promote oncogenic evolution or posttherapeutic relapse through multiple mechanisms. These include immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and trophic environmental responses to apoptosis, which drive tumor progression. Our group has introduced the term “onco-regenerative niche (ORN” to describe a conceptual network of conserved cell death-driven tissue repair and regeneration mechanisms that are hijacked in cancer. We propose that, among the key elements of the ORN are extracellular vesicles (EVs, notably those derived from apoptotic tumor cells. EVs are membrane-delimited subcellular particles, which contain multiple classes of bioactive molecules including markers of the cell from which they are derived. EVs are implicated in an increasing number of physiological and pathological contexts as mediators of local and systemic intercellular communication and detection of specific EVs may be useful in monitoring disease progression. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which EVs produced by apoptotic tumor cells—both constitutively and as a consequence of therapy—may mediate host responsiveness to cell death in cancer. We also consider how the monitoring of such EVs and their cargoes may in the future help to improve cancer diagnosis, staging, and therapeutic efficacy.

  17. Neural cell alignment by patterning gradients of the extracellular matrix protein laminin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelli, Beatrice; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Valle, Francesco; Greco, Pierpaolo; Bystrenova, Eva; Bianchi, Michele; Biscarini, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropic orientation and accurate positioning of neural cells is achieved by patterning stripes of the extracellular matrix protein laminin on the surface of polystyrene tissue culture dishes by micromoulding in capillaries (MIMICs). Laminin concentration decreases from the entrance of the channels in contact with the reservoir towards the end. Immunofluorescence analysis of laminin shows a decreasing gradient of concentration along the longitudinal direction of the stripes. The explanation is the superposition of diffusion and convection of the solute, the former dominating at length scales near the entrance (characteristic length around 50 μm), the latter further away (length scale in excess of 900 μm). These length scales are independent of the channel width explored from about 15 to 45 μm. Neural cells are randomly seeded and selectively adhere to the pattern, leaving the unpatterned areas depleted even upon 6 days of incubation. Cell alignment was assessed by the orientation of the long axis of the 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained nuclei. Samples on patterned the laminin area exhibit a large orientational order parameter. As control, cells on the unpatterned laminin film exhibit no preferential orientation. This implies that the anisotropy of laminin stripes is an effective chemical stimulus for cell recruiting and alignment. PMID:24501672

  18. Neutrophil extracellular traps directly induce epithelial and endothelial cell death: a predominant role of histones.

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    Mona Saffarzadeh

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an important role in innate immunity by defending the host organism against invading microorganisms. Antimicrobial activity of neutrophils is mediated by release of antimicrobial peptides, phagocytosis as well as formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET. These structures are composed of DNA, histones and granular proteins such as neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase. This study focused on the influence of NET on the host cell functions, particularly on human alveolar epithelial cells as the major cells responsible for gas exchange in the lung. Upon direct interaction with epithelial and endothelial cells, NET induced cytotoxic effects in a dose-dependent manner, and digestion of DNA in NET did not change NET-mediated cytotoxicity. Pre-incubation of NET with antibodies against histones, with polysialic acid or with myeloperoxidase inhibitor but not with elastase inhibitor reduced NET-mediated cytotoxicity, suggesting that histones and myeloperoxidase are responsible for NET-mediated cytotoxicity. Although activated protein C (APC did decrease the histone-induced cytotoxicity in a purified system, it did not change NET-induced cytotoxicity, indicating that histone-dependent cytotoxicity of NET is protected against APC degradation. Moreover, in LPS-induced acute lung injury mouse model, NET formation was documented in the lung tissue as well as in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These data reveal the important role of protein components in NET, particularly histones, which may lead to host cell cytotoxicity and may be involved in lung tissue destruction.

  19. Decellularized Tissue and Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrices as Scaffolds for Orthopaedic Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Christina W.; Solorio, Loran D.; Alsberg, Eben

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of musculoskeletal defects is a constant challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Musculoskeletal injuries such as fractures, chondral lesions, infections and tumor debulking can often lead to large tissue voids requiring reconstruction with tissue grafts. Autografts are currently the gold standard in orthopaedic tissue reconstruction; however, there is a limit to the amount of tissue that can be harvested before compromising the donor site. Tissue engineering strategies using allogeneic or xenogeneic decellularized bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament have emerged as promising potential alternative treatment. The extracellular matrix provides a natural scaffold for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Decellularization of in vitro cell-derived matrices can also enable the generation of autologous constructs from tissue specific cells or progenitor cells. Although decellularized bone tissue is widely used clinically in orthopaedic applications, the exciting potential of decellularized cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament cell-derived matrices has only recently begun to be explored for ultimate translation to the orthopaedic clinic. PMID:24417915

  20. Transchromosomic cell model of Down syndrome shows aberrant migration, adhesion and proteome response to extracellular matrix

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    Cotter Finbarr E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic birth defect. Congenital heart defects (CHD are seen in 40% of DS children, and >50% of all atrioventricular canal defects in infancy are caused by trisomy 21, but the causative genes remain unknown. Results Here we show that aberrant adhesion and proliferation of DS cells can be reproduced using a transchromosomic model of DS (mouse fibroblasts bearing supernumerary HSA21. We also demonstrate a deacrease of cell migration in transchromosomic cells independently of their adhesion properties. We show that cell-autonomous proteome response to the presence of Collagen VI in extracellular matrix is strongly affected by trisomy 21. Conclusion This set of experiments establishes a new model system for genetic dissection of the specific HSA21 gene-overdose contributions to aberrant cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and specific proteome response to collagen VI, cellular phenotypes linked to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  1. Advances in the quantification of mitochondrial function in primary human immune cells through extracellular flux analysis.

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    Dequina Nicholas

    Full Text Available Numerous studies show that mitochondrial energy generation determines the effectiveness of immune responses. Furthermore, changes in mitochondrial function may regulate lymphocyte function in inflammatory diseases like type 2 diabetes. Analysis of lymphocyte mitochondrial function has been facilitated by introduction of 96-well format extracellular flux (XF96 analyzers, but the technology remains imperfect for analysis of human lymphocytes. Limitations in XF technology include the lack of practical protocols for analysis of archived human cells, and inadequate data analysis tools that require manual quality checks. Current analysis tools for XF outcomes are also unable to automatically assess data quality and delete untenable data from the relatively high number of biological replicates needed to power complex human cell studies. The objectives of work presented herein are to test the impact of common cellular manipulations on XF outcomes, and to develop and validate a new automated tool that objectively analyzes a virtually unlimited number of samples to quantitate mitochondrial function in immune cells. We present significant improvements on previous XF analyses of primary human cells that will be absolutely essential to test the prediction that changes in immune cell mitochondrial function and fuel sources support immune dysfunction in chronic inflammatory diseases like type 2 diabetes.

  2. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

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    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  3. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-dependent cell responses by extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pedrazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein can operate in a synergistic fashion with different signal molecules promoting an increase of cell Ca(2+ influx. However, the mechanisms responsible for this effect of HMGB1 are still unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that, at concentrations of agonist per se ineffective, HMGB1 potentiates the activation of the ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals and in a neuroblastoma cell line. This effect was abolished by the NMDA channel blocker MK-801. The HMGB1-facilitated NMDAR opening was followed by activation of the Ca(2+-dependent enzymes calpain and nitric oxide synthase in neuroblastoma cells, resulting in an increased production of NO, a consequent enhanced cell motility, and onset of morphological differentiation. We have also identified NMDAR as the mediator of HMGB1-stimulated murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation, induced by hexamethylenebisacetamide. The potentiation of NMDAR activation involved a peptide of HMGB1 located in the B box at the amino acids 130-139. This HMGB1 fragment did not overlap with binding sites for other cell surface receptors of HMGB1, such as the advanced glycation end products or the Toll-like receptor 4. Moreover, in a competition assay, the HMGB1((130-139 peptide displaced the NMDAR/HMGB1 interaction, suggesting that it comprised the molecular and functional site of HMGB1 regulating the NMDA receptor complex. CONCLUSION: We propose that the multifunctional cytokine-like molecule HMGB1 released by activated, stressed, and damaged or necrotic cells can facilitate NMDAR-mediated cell responses, both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, independently of other known cell surface receptors for HMGB1.

  4. Extracellular Vesicles Secreted by Atherogenic Macrophages Transfer MicroRNA to Inhibit Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, My-Anh; Karunakaran, Denuja; Geoffrion, Michèle; Cheng, Henry S; Tandoc, Kristofferson; Perisic Matic, Ljubica; Hedin, Ulf; Maegdefessel, Lars; Fish, Jason E; Rayner, Katey J

    2018-01-01

    During inflammation, macrophages secrete vesicles carrying RNA, protein, and lipids as a form of extracellular communication. In the vessel wall, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been shown to be transferred between vascular cells during atherosclerosis; however, the role of macrophage-derived EVs in atherogenesis is not known. Here, we hypothesize that atherogenic macrophages secrete microRNAs (miRNAs) in EVs to mediate cell-cell communication and promote proinflammatory and proatherogenic phenotypes in recipient cells. We isolated EVs from mouse and human macrophages treated with an atherogenic stimulus (oxidized low-density lipoprotein) and characterized the EV miRNA expression profile. We confirmed the enrichment of miR-146a, miR-128, miR-185, miR-365, and miR-503 in atherogenic EVs compared with controls and demonstrate that these EVs are taken up and transfer exogenous miRNA to naive recipient macrophages. Bioinformatic pathway analysis suggests that atherogenic EV miRNAs are predicted to target genes involved in cell migration and adhesion pathways, and indeed delivery of EVs to naive macrophages reduced macrophage migration both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of miR-146a, the most enriched miRNA in atherogenic EVs, reduced the inhibitory effect of EVs on macrophage migratory capacity. EV-mediated delivery of miR-146a repressed the expression of target genes IGF2BP1 (insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 1) and HuR (human antigen R or ELAV-like RNA-binding protein 1) in recipient cells, and knockdown of IGF2BP1 and HuR using short interfering RNA greatly reduced macrophage migration, highlighting the importance of these EV-miRNA targets in regulating macrophage motility. EV-derived miRNAs from atherogenic macrophages, in particular miR-146a, may accelerate the development of atherosclerosis by decreasing cell migration and promoting macrophage entrapment in the vessel wall. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Effects of extracellular nucleotides on single cells and populations of human osteoblasts: contribution of cell heterogeneity to relative potencies

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Dixon, C; Bowler, Wayne B; Walsh, Catherine A; Gallagher, James A

    1997-01-01

    Human osteoblasts responded to the application of extracellular nucleotides, acting at P2-receptors, with increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i).In populations of human osteoblasts, adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) evoked a rise in [Ca2+]i with less than 40% of the amplitude of that induced by adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP).ATP and uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP) were applied to single human osteoblasts and induced [Ca2+]i rises of comparable amplitude in every cell tested.H...

  6. Decellularized extracellular matrix of human umbilical vein endothelial cells promotes endothelial differentiation of stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ting; Heng, Boon Chin; Xu, Jianguang; Zhu, Shaoyue; Yuan, Changyong; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Zhang, Chengfei

    2017-04-01

    Dental stem cells can serve as a potential source of functional endothelial cells for tissue engineering applications, but the endothelial-lineage differentiation efficiency is rather low even with growth factors and mechanical stimuli, which greatly limits their clinical applications. This is partly due to the deficiency of standard two-dimensional (2-D) culture systems, which is unable to recapitulate the three-dimensional (3-D) in vivo milieu that is rich in extracellular matrix. Hence, we extracted decellularized extracellular matrix from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs-DECM) to provide a bioactive substratum conducive to the endothelial differentiation of dental stem cells. Compared to cells plated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) cultured on the HUVECs-DECM demonstrated more regular arrangement and elongated morphology. HUVECs-DECM significantly enhanced the rapid adhesion and proliferation rates of SHED, as demonstrated by WST-8 assay and immunocytochemistry indicating higher expression levels of vinculin by newly adherent SHED on HUVECs-DECM versus TCP. In addition, there was twofold to fivefold higher mRNA expression levels of endothelial-specific markers CD31 and VEGFR-2 in SHED after seven days of culture on DECM versus TCP. Functional testing with in vitro matrigel angiogenesis assay identified more capillary-like structure formation with significantly higher tubule length in SHED induced by DECM versus TCP. Hence, the results of this study provide a better understanding of the unique characteristics of cell-specific ECM and demonstrated the potential use of HUVECs-DECM as a culture substratum conducive for stimulating the endothelial differentiation of SHED for therapeutic angiogenic applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1083-1093, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Up-regulated expression of extracellular matrix remodeling genes in phagocytically challenged trabecular meshwork cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine M Porter

    Full Text Available Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, the tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic function in TM cells is thought to play an important role in the normal functioning of the outflow pathway. Dysfunction of phagocytosis could lead to abnormalities of outflow resistance and increased intraocular pressure (IOP. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are completely unknown.Gene expression profile analysis of human TM cells phagocytically challenged to E. coli or pigment under physiological and oxidative stress environment were performed using Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 array and analyzed with Genespring GX. Despite the differential biological response elicited by E. coli and pigment particles, a number of genes, including MMP1, MMP3, TNFSF11, DIO2, KYNU, and KCCN2 showed differential expression with both phagocytic ligands in all conditions. Data was confirmed by qPCR in both human and porcine TM cells. Metacore pathway analysis and the usage of recombinant adenovirus encoding the dominant negative mutant of IkB identified NF-κB as a transcription factor mediating the up-regulation of at least MMP1 and MMP3 in TM cells with phagocytosis. In-gel zymography demonstrated increased collagenolytic and caseinolytic activities in the culture media of TM cells challenge to E. coli. In addition, collagenolytic I activity was further confirmed using the self-quenched fluorescent substrate DQ-Collagen I.Here we report for the first time the differential gene expression profile of TM cells phagocytically challenged with either E. coli or pigment. Our data indicate a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  8. Expression of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human osteoblastic MG-63 cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Ye, C.; Vassilev, P. M.; Sanders, J. L.; Brown, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown the expression of the extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor (CaR) in osteoblast-like cell lines, and others have documented its expression in sections of murine, bovine, and rat bone. The existence of the CaR in osteoblasts remains controversial, however, since some studies have failed to document its expression in the same osteoblast-like cell lines. The goals of the present study were twofold. 1) We sought to determine whether the CaR is expressed in the human osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63, which has recently been reported by others not to express this receptor. 2) We investigated whether the CaR, if present in MG-63 cells, is functionally active, since most previous studies have not proven the role of the CaR in mediating known actions of Ca2+o on osteoblast-like cells. We used immunocytochemistry and Western blotting with the specific, affinity-purified anti-CaR antiserum 4637 as well as Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR using a riboprobe and PCR primers specific for the human CaR, respectively, to show readily detectable CaR protein and mRNA expression in MG-63 cells. Finally, we employed the patch-clamp technique to show that an elevation in Ca2+o as well as the specific, allosteric CaR activator NPS R-467 (0.5 microM), but not its less active stereoisomer NPS S-467 (0.5 microM), activate an outward K+ channel in MG-63 cells, strongly suggesting that the CaR in MG-63 cells is not only expressed but is functionally active.

  9. Electrospun polyvinyl alcohol–collagen–hydroxyapatite nanofibers: a biomimetic extracellular matrix for osteoblastic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Wei; Shi Tong; Ren Weiping; Markel, David C; Wang Sunxi; Mao Guangzhao

    2012-01-01

    The failure of prosthesis after total joint replacement is due to the lack of early implant osseointegration. In this study polyvinyl alcohol–collagen–hydroxyapatite (PVA-Col-HA) electrospun nanofibrous meshes were fabricated as a biomimetic bone-like extracellular matrix for the modification of orthopedic prosthetic surfaces. In order to reinforce the PVA nanofibers, HA nanorods and Type I collagen were incorporated into the nanofibers. We investigated the morphology, biodegradability, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the prepared nanofibers. Our results showed these inorganic–organic blended nanofibers to be degradable in vitro. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen interacted with the PVA content, reinforcing the hydrolytic resistance and mechanical properties of nanofibers that provided longer lasting stability. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen also enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of murine bone cells (MC3T3) in vitro. We propose the PVA-Col-HA nanofibers might be promising modifying materials on implant surfaces for orthopedic applications. (paper)

  10. Endothelial cells suppress monocyte activation through secretion of extracellular vesicles containing antiinflammatory microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njock, Makon-Sébastien; Cheng, Henry S; Dang, Lan T; Nazari-Jahantigh, Maliheh; Lau, Andrew C; Boudreau, Emilie; Roufaiel, Mark; Cybulsky, Myron I; Schober, Andreas; Fish, Jason E

    2015-05-14

    The blood contains high concentrations of circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs), and their levels and contents are altered in several disease states, including cardiovascular disease. However, the function of circulating EVs, especially the microRNAs (miRNAs) that they contain, are poorly understood. We sought to determine the effect of secreted vesicles produced by quiescent endothelial cells (ECs) on monocyte inflammatory responses and to assess whether transfer of microRNAs occurs between these cells. We observed that monocytic cells cocultured (but not in contact) with ECs were refractory to inflammatory activation. Further characterization revealed that endothelium-derived EVs (EC-EVs) suppressed monocyte activation by enhancing immunomodulatory responses and diminishing proinflammatory responses. EVs isolated from mouse plasma also suppressed monocyte activation. Importantly, injection of EC-EVs in vivo repressed monocyte/macrophage activation, confirming our in vitro findings. We found that several antiinflammatory microRNAs were elevated in EC-EV-treated monocytes. In particular, miR-10a was transferred to monocytic cells from EC-EVs and could repress inflammatory signaling through the targeting of several components of the NF-κB pathway, including IRAK4. Our findings reveal that ECs secrete EVs that can modulate monocyte activation and suggest that altered EV secretion and/or microRNA content may affect vascular inflammation in the setting of cardiovascular disease. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Spatially Coordinated Changes in Intracellular Rheology and Extracellular Force Exertion during Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Quach, Nhat D.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties within the cell are regulated by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is linked to the extracellular environment through focal adhesion proteins that transmit force. Chemical and mechanical stimuli alter the organization of cytoskeletal actin, which results in changes in cell shape, adhesion, and differentiation. By combining particle-tracking microrheology and traction force cytometry, we can monitor the mechanical properties of the actin meshwork and determine how changes in the intracellular network contribute to force generation. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemical (differentiation factors) and mechanical (substrate rigidity) stimuli important in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation on the intracellular mechanics and traction stress generation. We found the presence of adipogenic factors resulted in stiffening of the actin meshwork regardless of substrate rigidity. In contrast, these factors increased traction stresses on hard substrates, which was associated with increased expression of contractility genes. Furthermore, MSCs cultured on hard substrates expressed both adipogenic and osteogenic markers indicative of mixed differentiation. On hard substrates, heterogeneity in the local elastic modulus-traction stress correlation was also increased in response to adipogenic factors, indicating that these mechanical properties may be reflective of differences in level of MSC differentiation. These results suggest intracellular rheology and traction stress generation are spatially regulated and contribute insight into how single cell mechanical forces contribute to MSC differentiation. PMID:25156989

  12. Extracellular vesicles of stromal origin target and support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stik, Gregoire; Crequit, Simon; Petit, Laurence; Durant, Jennifer; Charbord, Pierre; Jaffredo, Thierry; Durand, Charles

    2017-07-03

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recently reported as crucial mediators in cell-to-cell communication in development and disease. In this study, we investigate whether mesenchymal stromal cells that constitute a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) released EVs that could affect the gene expression and function of HSPCs. By taking advantage of two fetal liver-derived stromal lines with widely differing abilities to maintain HSPCs ex vivo, we demonstrate that stromal EVs play a critical role in the regulation of HSPCs. Both supportive and nonsupportive stromal lines secreted EVs, but only those delivered by the supportive line were taken up by HSPCs ex vivo and in vivo. These EVs harbored a specific molecular signature, modulated the gene expression in HSPCs after uptake, and maintained the survival and clonogenic potential of HSPCs, presumably by preventing apoptosis. In conclusion, our study reveals that EVs are an important component of the HSPC niche, which may have major applications in regenerative medicine. © 2017 Stik et al.

  13. Is DRM lipid composition relevant in cell-extracellular matrix adhesion structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, María Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    Focal adhesions mediate cell-extracellular matrix adhesion. They are inserted in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains enriched in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. In spite of the relevance that membrane lipids appear to have on cell adhesion structures, to our knowledge, there are no previous reports on the membrane lipid composition where focal adhesions are located in vivo or on how changes in local membrane composition contribute to focal adhesion maintenance. This may be due to the fact that the explosion of information in the fields of genomics and proteomics has not been matched by a corresponding advancement of knowledge in the field of lipids. The physiological importance of lipids is illustrated by the numerous diseases to which lipid abnormalities contribute. To gain insight into the role of membrane lipid composition in the preservation of epithelial cell adhesion to the substratum, how specific changes in the membrane lipid composition in vivo affect the maintenance of focal adhesions in renal papillae collecting duct cells has been previously studied. It is currently considered that phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate plays a crucial role in the maintenance of assembled focal adhesion. However, such pool of polyphosphoinositides has to be part of a domain of a specific lipid composition to serve as a membrane lipid stabilizing the focal adhesion plaque.

  14. Extracellular vesicles in physiology, pathology and therapy of the immune and central nervous system, with focus on extracellular vesicles derived from mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia eKoniusz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are membrane-surrounded structures released by most cell types. They are characterized by a specific set of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. EVs have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication to transmit biological signals between cells. In addition, pathophysiological roles of EVs in conditions like cancer, infectious diseases and neurodegenerative disorders are well established. In recent years focus has been shifted on therapeutic use of stem cell derived-EVs. Use of stem cell derived-EVs present distinct advantage over the whole stem cells as EVs do not replicate and after intravenous administration, they are less likely to trap inside the lungs. From the therapeutic perspective, the most promising cellular sources of EVs are mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which are easy to obtain and maintain. Therapeutic activity of MSCs has been shown in numerous animal models and the beneficial paracrine effect of MSCs may be mediated by EVs. The various components of MSC derived-EVs such as proteins, lipids and RNA might play a specific therapeutic role. In this review, we characterize the role of EVs in immune and central nervous system (CNS; present evidences for defective signalling of these vesicles in neurodegeneration and therapeutic role of EVs in CNS.

  15. Acid-sensing ion channels contribute to the effect of extracellular acidosis on proliferation and migration of A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Gao, Bo; Xiong, Qiu-Ju; Wang, Yu-Chan; Huang, Da-Ke; Wu, Wen-Ning

    2017-06-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels, a proton-gated cation channel, can be activated by low extracellular pH and involved in pathogenesis of some tumors such as glioma and breast cancer. However, the role of acid-sensing ion channels in the growth of lung cancer cell is unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression of acid-sensing ion channels in human lung cancer cell line A549 and their possible role in proliferation and migration of A549 cells. The results show that acid-sensing ion channel 1, acid-sensing ion channel 2, and acid-sensing ion channel 3 are expressed in A549 cells at the messenger RNA and protein levels, and acid-sensing ion channel-like currents were elicited by extracellular acid stimuli. Moreover, we found that acidic extracellular medium or overexpressing acid-sensing ion channel 1a promotes proliferation and migration of A549 cells. In addition psalmotoxin 1, a specific acid-sensing ion channel 1a inhibitor, or acid-sensing ion channel 1a knockdown can abolish the effect of acid stimuli on A549 cells. In addition, acid-sensing ion channels mediate increase of [Ca 2+ ] i induced by low extracellular pH in A549 cells. All these results indicate that acid-sensing ion channel-calcium signal mediate lung cancer cell proliferation and migration induced by extracellular acidosis, and acid-sensing ion channels may serve as a prognostic marker and a therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  16. An extracellular DNA mediated bystander effect produced from low dose irradiated endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Malinovskaya, Elena M.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    The human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture was exposed to X-ray radiation in a low dose of 10 cGy. The fragments of extracellular genomic DNA (ecDNA{sup R}) were isolated from the culture medium after the short-term incubation. A culture medium of unirradiated endothelial cells was then supplemented with ecDNA{sup R}, followed by analysing the cells along the series of parameters (bystander effect). The exposed cells and bystander endotheliocytes showed similar response to low doses: approximation of the 1q12 loci of chromosome 1 and their transposition into the cellular nucleus, change in shape of the endotheliocytic nucleus, activation of the nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), actin polymerization, and an elevated level of DNA double-stranded breaks. Following blockade of TLR9 receptors with oligonucleotide-inhibitor or chloroquine in the bystander cells these effects - except of activation of NORs - on exposure to ecDNA{sup R} disappeared, with no bystander response thus observed. The presence of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the bystander effect being studied suggests a possibility for radiation-modified ecDNA fragments (i.e., stress signaling factors) to be released into the culture medium, whereas inhibition of TLR9 suggests the binding these ligands to the recipient cells. A similar DNA-signaling pathway in the bystander effect we previously described for human lymphocytes. Integrity of data makes it possible to suppose that a similar signaling mechanism which we demonstrated for lymphocytes (humoral system) might also be mediated in a monolayer culture of cells (cellular tissue) after the development of the bystander effect in them and transfer of stress signaling factors (ecDNA{sup R}) through the culture medium.

  17. Extracellular visfatin activates gluconeogenesis in HepG2 cells through the classical PKA/CREB-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y J; Choi, S-E; Ha, E S; Kang, Y; Han, S J; Kim, D J; Lee, K W; Kim, H J

    2014-04-01

    Adipokines reportedly affect hepatic gluconeogenesis, and the adipokine visfatin is known to be related to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, whether visfatin contributes to hepatic gluconeogenesis remains unclear. Visfatin, also known as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), modulates sirtuin1 (SIRT1) through the regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). Therefore, we investigated the effect of extracellular visfatin on glucose production in HepG2 cells, and evaluated whether extracellular visfatin affects hepatic gluconeogenesis via an NAD+-SIRT1-dependent pathway. Treatment with visfatin significantly increased glucose production and the mRNA expression and protein levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in HepG2 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Knockdown of SIRT1 had no remarkable effect on the induction of gluconeogenesis by visfatin. Subsequently, we evaluated if extracellular visfatin stimulates the production of gluconeogenic enzymes through the classical protein kinase A (PKA)/cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB)-dependent process. The phosphorylation of CREB and PKA increased significantly in HepG2 cells treated with visfatin. Additionally, knockdown of CREB and PKA inhibited visfatin-induced gluconeogenesis in HepG2 cells. In summary, extracellular visfatin modulates glucose production in HepG2 cells through the PKA/CREB pathway, rather than via SIRT1 signaling. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Illustration of extensive extracellular matrix at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface within the renal stem/progenitor cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minuth Will W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem/progenitor cells are promising candidates to treat diseased renal parenchyma. However, implanted stem/progenitor cells are exposed to a harmful atmosphere of degenerating parenchyma. To minimize hampering effects after an implantation investigations are in progress to administer these cells within an artificial polyester interstitum supporting survival. Learning from nature the renal stem/progenitor cell niche appears as a valuable model. At this site epithelial stem/progenitor cells within the collecting duct ampulla face mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells. Both cell types do not have close contact but are separated by a wide interstitium. Methods To analyze extracellular matrix in this particular interstitium, special contrasting for transmission electron microscopy was performed. Kidneys of neonatal rabbits were fixed in solutions containing glutaraldehyde (GA or in combination with cupromeronic blue, ruthenium red and tannic acid. Results GA revealed a basal lamina at the ampulla and a bright but inconspicuously looking interstitial space. In contrast, GA containing cupromeronic blue exhibits numerous proteoglycan braces lining from the ampulla towards the interstitial space. GA containing ruthenium red or tannic acid demonstrates clouds of extracellular matrix protruding from the basal lamina of the ampulla to the surface of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells. Conclusions The actual data show that the interstitium between epithelial and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells contains much more and up to date unknown extracellular matrix than earlier observed by classical GA fixation.

  19. Monocyte-mediated activation of endothelial cells occurs only after binding to extracellular vesicles from red blood cell products, a process mediated by β-integrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straat, Marleen; van Hezel, Maike E.; Böing, Anita; Tuip-de Boer, Anita; Weber, Nina; Nieuwland, Rienk; van Bruggen, Robin; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is associated with organ failure. The mechanism remains unknown, but may include adherence of blood cells to the microvasculature. We hypothesized that RBC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) interact with monocytes to activate endothelial cells. Human umbilical

  20. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: New Frontiers of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Ciardiello

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular Vesicles (EVs have received considerable attention in recent years, both as mediators of intercellular communication pathways that lead to tumor progression, and as potential sources for discovery of novel cancer biomarkers. For many years, research on EVs has mainly investigated either the mechanism of biogenesis and cargo selection and incorporation, or the methods of EV isolation from available body fluids for biomarker discovery. Recent studies have highlighted the existence of different populations of cancer-derived EVs, with distinct molecular cargo, thus pointing to the possibility that the various EV populations might play diverse roles in cancer and that this does not happen randomly. However, data attributing cancer specific intercellular functions to given populations of EVs are still limited. A deeper functional, biochemical and molecular characterization of the various EV classes might identify more selective clinical markers, and significantly advance our knowledge of the pathogenesis and disease progression of many cancer types.

  1. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: New Frontiers of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardiello, Chiara; Cavallini, Lorenzo; Spinelli, Cristiana; Yang, Julie; Reis-Sobreiro, Mariana; de Candia, Paola; Minciacchi, Valentina Renè; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2016-02-06

    Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) have received considerable attention in recent years, both as mediators of intercellular communication pathways that lead to tumor progression, and as potential sources for discovery of novel cancer biomarkers. For many years, research on EVs has mainly investigated either the mechanism of biogenesis and cargo selection and incorporation, or the methods of EV isolation from available body fluids for biomarker discovery. Recent studies have highlighted the existence of different populations of cancer-derived EVs, with distinct molecular cargo, thus pointing to the possibility that the various EV populations might play diverse roles in cancer and that this does not happen randomly. However, data attributing cancer specific intercellular functions to given populations of EVs are still limited. A deeper functional, biochemical and molecular characterization of the various EV classes might identify more selective clinical markers, and significantly advance our knowledge of the pathogenesis and disease progression of many cancer types.

  2. Extracellular Vesicles: How the External and Internal Environment Can Shape Cell-To-Cell Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neven, Kristof Y; Nawrot, Tim S; Bollati, Valentina

    2017-03-01

    To summarize the scientific evidence regarding the effects of environmental exposures on extracellular vesicle (EV) release and their contents. As environmental exposures might influence the aging phenotype in a very strict way, we will also report the role of EVs in the biological aging process. EV research is a new and quickly developing field. With many investigations conducted so far, only a limited number of studies have explored the potential role EVs play in the response and adaptation to environmental stimuli. The investigations available to date have identified several exposures or lifestyle factors able to modify EV trafficking including air pollutants, cigarette smoke, alcohol, obesity, nutrition, physical exercise, and oxidative stress. EVs are a very promising tool, as biological fluids are easily obtainable biological media that, if successful in identifying early alterations induced by the environment and predictive of disease, would be amenable to use for potential future preventive and diagnostic applications.

  3. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celebi, Betuel; Pineault, Nicolas [Hema-Quebec, Research and Development Department, Quebec City, G1V 5C3, PQ (Canada); Mantovani, Diego, E-mail: nicolas.pineault@hema-quebec.qc.ca [Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Materials Engineering and University Hospital Research Center, Laval University, Quebec City, G1V 0A6, PQ (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  4. Extracellular Matrix Glycoprotein-Derived Synthetic Peptides Differentially Modulate Glioma and Sarcoma Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brösicke, Nicole; Sallouh, Muhammad; Prior, Lisa-Marie; Job, Albert; Weberskirch, Ralf; Faissner, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulate proliferation, migration, and differentiation in numerous cell lineages. ECM functions are initiated by small peptide sequences embedded in large constituents that are recognized by specific cellular receptors. In this study, we have investigated the biological effects of peptides derived from collagen type IV and tenascin-C compared to the well-known RGD peptide originally discovered in fibronectin. The influence of glycoproteins and corresponding peptides on the migration of the glioma cell lines U-251-MG and U-373-MG and the sarcoma line S-117 was studied. When the cell lines were tested in a modified Boyden chamber assay on filters coated with the ECM glycoproteins, glioma cells showed a strong migration response on tenascin-C and the basal lamina constituent collagen IV, in contrast to S-117 cells. In order to identify relevant stimulatory motifs, peptides derived from fibronectin (6NHX-GRGDSF), tenascin-C (TN-C, VSWRAPTA), and collagen type IV (MNYYSNS) were compared, either applied in solution in combination with ECM glycoprotein substrates, in solution in the presence of untreated membranes, or coated on the filters of the Boyden chambers. Using this strategy, we could identify the novel tenascin-C-derived peptide motif VSWRAPTA as a migration stimulus for glioma cells. Furthermore, while kin peptides generally blocked the effects of the respective homologous ECM proteins, unexpected effects were observed in heterologous situations. There, in several cases, addition of soluble peptides strongly boosted the response to the coated ECM proteins. We propose that peptides may synergize or antagonize each other by stimulating different signaling pathways.

  5. Polymer-based precipitation preserves biological activities of extracellular vesicles from an endometrial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ziru; Pang, Ronald T K; Liu, Weimin; Li, Qian; Cheng, Ranran; Yeung, William S B

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-bound vesicles released by cells and act as media for transfer of proteins, small RNAs and mRNAs to distant sites. They can be isolated by different methods. However, the biological activities of the purified EVs have seldom been studied. In this study, we compared the use of ultracentrifugation (UC), ultra-filtration (UF), polymer-based precipitation (PBP), and PBP with size-based purification (PBP+SP) for isolation of EVs from human endometrial cells and mouse uterine luminal fluid (ULF). Electron microscopy revealed that the diameters of the isolated EVs were similar among the tested methods. UF recovered the highest number of EVs followed by PBP, while UC and PBP+SP were significantly less efficient (P<0.05). Based on the number of EVs-to-protein ratios, PBP had the least protein contamination, significantly better than the other methods (P<0.05). All the isolated EVs expressed exosome-enriched proteins CD63, TSG101 and HSP70. Incubation of the trophoblast JEG-3 cells with an equal amount of the fluorescence-labelled EVs isolated by the studied methods showed that many of the PBP-EVs treated cells were fluorescence positive but only a few cells were labelled in the UC- and UF-EVs treated groups. Moreover, the PBP-EVs could transfer significantly more miRNA to the recipient cells than the other 3 methods (P<0.05). The PBP method could isolate EVs from mouse ULF; the diameter of the isolated EVs was 62±19 nm and expressed CD63, TSG101 and HSP70 proteins. In conclusion, PBP could best preserve the activities of the isolated EVs among the 4 methods studied and was able to isolate EVs from a small volume of sample. The simple setup and low equipment demands makes PBP the most suitable method for rapid EV assessment and isolation of EVs in clinical and basic research settings.

  6. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celebi, Betuel; Pineault, Nicolas; Mantovani, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  7. Inflammation-Stimulated Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Attenuate Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, Matthew T; Srivastava, Amit K; Zhaorigetu, Siqin; Bair, Henry; Prabhakara, Karthik S; Toledano Furman, Naama E; Vykoukal, Jody V; Ruppert, Katherine A; Cox, Charles S; Olson, Scott D

    2018-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been proposed to be a key mechanistic link in the therapeutic efficacy of cells in response to cellular injuries through paracrine effects. We hypothesize that inflammatory stimulation of MSCs results in the release of EVs that have greater anti-inflammatory effects. The present study evaluates the immunomodulatory abilities of EVs derived from inflammation-stimulated and naive MSCs (MSCEv + and MSCEv, respectively) isolated using a current Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant tangential flow filtration system. Detailed characterization of both EVs revealed differences in protein composition, cytokine profiles, and RNA content, despite similarities in size and expression of common surface markers. MSCEv + further attenuated release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro when compared to MSCEv, with a distinctly different pattern of EV-uptake by activated primary leukocyte subpopulations. The efficacy of EVs was partially attributed to COX2/PGE 2 expression. The present study demonstrates that inflammatory stimulation of MSCs renders release of EVs that have enhanced anti-inflammatory properties partially due to COX2/PGE 2 pathway alteration. Stem Cells 2018;36:79-90. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Elastase effect on the extracellular matrix of rat aortic smooth muscle cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kispert, J.; Mogayzel, P.J. Jr.; Pratt, C.A.; Toselli, P.; Wolfe, B.L.; Faris, B.; Franzblau, C.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of porcine pancreatic elastase on the extracellular matrix (ECM) of neonatal rat aortic smooth muscle cell cultures was monitored both chemically and ultrastructurally. Initially, the elastin appeared as non-coalesced material closely associated with filaments, presumably microfibrils. The insoluble elastin accumulated in the ECM of cells in culture for 6 weeks accounted for 40-45% of the total protein. After exposure to elastase for 30-60 minutes, the elastin content was reduced to 14-20%. The reduction in the total protein content of the cultures after elastase treatment was due primarily to the loss of elastin. Although the amino acid compositions of the elastin isolated from cultures both before and after elastase treatment were similar, there were striking ultrastructural differences in the amorphous elastin. The elastin assumed a mottled appearance after elastase exposure, similar to that seen in in vivo emphysema models. Pulse experiments with 3 H-valine demonstrated an increase in protein synthesis by the cells 20 hours after elastase exposure, suggesting the potential for elastin repair. The use of this culture system will aid in clarifying the role of elastolysis in pulmonary and vascular injuries

  9. Fibroblast reticular cells engineer a blastema extracellular network during digit tip regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Luis; Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi; Muneoka, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The regeneration blastema which forms following amputation of the mouse digit tip is composed of undifferentiated cells bound together by an organized network of fibers. A monoclonal antibody (ER-TR7) that identifies extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers produced by fibroblast reticular cells during lymphoid organogenesis was used to characterize the ECM of the digit, the blastema, and the regenerate. Digit fibroblast reticular cells produce an ER-TR7 + ECM network associated with different tissues and represent a subset of loose connective tissue fibroblasts. During blastema formation there is an upregulation of matrix production that returns to its pre-existing level and anatomical pattern in the endpoint regenerate. Co-localization studies demonstrate a strong spatial correlation between the ER-TR7 antigen and collagen type III (COL3) in histological sections. ER-TR7 and COL3 are co-induced in cultured digit fibroblasts following treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha and a lymphotoxin beta receptor agonist. These results provide an initial characterization of the ECM during digit regeneration and identify a subpopulation of fibroblasts involved in producing the blastema provisional matrix that is remodeled during the regeneration response.

  10. Group A Streptococcus Prevents Mast Cell Degranulation to Promote Extracellular Trap Formation

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    Mary Clark

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The resurgence of Group A Streptococcus (GAS infections in the past two decades has been a rising major public health concern. Due to a large number of GAS infections occurring in the skin, mast cells (MCs, innate immune cells known to localize to the dermis, could play an important role in controlling infection. MCs can exert their antimicrobial activities either early during infection, by degranulation and release of antimicrobial proteases and the cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptide LL-37, or by forming antibacterial MC extracellular traps (MCETs in later stages of infection. We demonstrate that MCs do not directly degranulate in response to GAS, reducing their ability to control bacterial growth in early stages of infection. However, MC granule components are highly cytotoxic to GAS due to the pore-forming activity of LL-37, while MC granule proteases do not significantly affect GAS viability. We therefore confirmed the importance of MCETs by demonstrating their capacity to reduce GAS survival. The data therefore suggests that LL-37 from MC granules become embedded in MCETs, and are the primary effector molecule by which MCs control GAS infection. Our work underscores the importance of a non-traditional immune effector cell, utilizing a non-conventional mechanism, in the defense against an important human pathogen.

  11. Extracellular vesicle in vivo biodistribution is determined by cell source, route of administration and targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar P. B. Wiklander

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs have emerged as important mediators of intercellular communication in a diverse range of biological processes. For future therapeutic applications and for EV biology research in general, understanding the in vivo fate of EVs is of utmost importance. Here we studied biodistribution of EVs in mice after systemic delivery. EVs were isolated from 3 different mouse cell sources, including dendritic cells (DCs derived from bone marrow, and labelled with a near-infrared lipophilic dye. Xenotransplantation of EVs was further carried out for cross-species comparison. The reliability of the labelling technique was confirmed by sucrose gradient fractionation, organ perfusion and further supported by immunohistochemical staining using CD63-EGFP probed vesicles. While vesicles accumulated mainly in liver, spleen, gastrointestinal tract and lungs, differences related to EV cell origin were detected. EVs accumulated in the tumour tissue of tumour-bearing mice and, after introduction of the rabies virus glycoprotein-targeting moiety, they were found more readily in acetylcholine-receptor-rich organs. In addition, the route of administration and the dose of injected EVs influenced the biodistribution pattern. This is the first extensive biodistribution investigation of EVs comparing the impact of several different variables, the results of which have implications for the design and feasibility of therapeutic studies using EVs.

  12. Endothelial Cell-derived Extracellular Vesicles Size-dependently Exert Procoagulant Activity Detected by Thromboelastometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Bonstingl, Cornelia; Hromada, Carina; Muehleder, Severin; Zipperle, Johannes; Stojkovic, Stefan; Redl, Heinz; Wojta, Johann; Schöchl, Herbert; Grillari, Johannes; Weilner, Sylvia; Schlimp, Christoph J

    2017-06-16

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are major modulators of hemostasis by expressing and releasing pro- and anticoagulant mediators into the circulation. Previous studies showed that cultured ECs release procoagulant mediators into cell culture supernatants as evidenced by the reduction of viscoelastic clotting time. This effect was reversed with an anti-tissue factor antibody. Here, we aimed to investigate whether tissue factor (TF) was released by endothelial-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) and which portion of the released vesicles displays the most prominent procoagulant properties. After stimulation of ECs with tumor-necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) the supernatants of EC cultures were subjected to differential centrifugation steps to collect larger and smaller EVs which were then characterised by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and flow cytometry. Mixed with fresh human blood and analysed by thromboelastometry EVs exerted a significant procoagulant stimulus, which could be partly reversed by addition of an anti-TF antibody. Moreover, TF activity was confirmed in the centrifuged fractions. In summary, our results provide evidence of the procoagulant potential of smaller and larger endothelial-derived EV fractions detected by thromboelastometry. The observed effect is most likely due to the release of TF-bearing EVs of different dimensions, which are released upon TNF-α stimulation of endothelial cell cultures.

  13. Tissue-specific extracellular matrix coatings for the promotion of cell proliferation and maintenance of cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; He, Yujiang; Bharadwaj, Shantaram; Hammam, Nevin; Carnagey, Kristen; Myers, Regina; Atala, Anthony; Van Dyke, Mark

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that extracellular matrix (ECM) substitutes can have a dramatic impact on cell growth, differentiation and function. However, these ECMs are often applied generically and have yet to be developed for specific cell types. In this study, we developed tissue-specific ECM-based coating substrates for skin, skeletal muscle and liver cell cultures. Cellular components were removed from adult skin, skeletal muscle, and liver tissues, and the resulting acellular matrices were homogenized and dissolved. The ECM solutions were used to coat culture dishes. Tissue matched and non-tissue matched cell types were grown on these coatings to assess adhesion, proliferation, maintenance of phenotype and cell function at several time points. Each cell type showed better proliferation and differentiation in cultures containing ECM from their tissue of origin. Although subtle compositional differences in the three ECM types were not investigated in this study, these results suggest that tissue-specific ECMs provide a culture microenvironment that is similar to the in vivo environment when used as coating substrates, and this new culture technique has the potential for use in drug development and the development of cell-based therapies.

  14. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Vehicles for Brain Cell-to-Cell Interactions in Physiological as well as Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Schiera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are involved in a great variety of physiological events occurring in the nervous system, such as cross talk among neurons and glial cells in synapse development and function, integrated neuronal plasticity, neuronal-glial metabolic exchanges, and synthesis and dynamic renewal of myelin. Many of these EV-mediated processes depend on the exchange of proteins, mRNAs, and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, which occurs among glial and neuronal cells. In addition, production and exchange of EVs can be modified under pathological conditions, such as brain cancer and neurodegeneration. Like other cancer cells, brain tumours can use EVs to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance, and to transfer molecules into the surrounding cells, thus transforming their phenotype. Moreover, EVs can function as a way to discard material dangerous to cancer cells, such as differentiation-inducing proteins, and even drugs. Intriguingly, EVs seem to be also involved in spreading through the brain of aggregated proteins, such as prions and aggregated tau protein. Finally, EVs can carry useful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of diseases. Herein we summarize possible roles of EVs in brain physiological functions and discuss their involvement in the horizontal spreading, from cell to cell, of both cancer and neurodegenerative pathologies.

  15. Cell migration in schizophrenia: Patient-derived cells do not regulate motility in response to extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Jing Yang; Sutharsan, Ratneswary; Fan, Yongjun; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2017-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychiatric disorder linked to a large number of risk genes. The function of these genes in disease etiology is not fully understood but pathway analyses of genomic data suggest developmental dysregulation of cellular processes such as neuronal migration and axon guidance. Previous studies of patient-derived olfactory cells show them to be more motile than control-derived cells when grown on a fibronectin substrate, motility that is dependent on focal adhesion kinase signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate whether schizophrenia patient-derived cells are responsive to other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that bind integrin receptors. Olfactory neurosphere-derived cells from nine patients and nine matched controls were grown on ECM protein substrates at increasing concentrations and their movement was tracked for 24h using automated high-throughput imaging. Control-derived cells increased their motility as the ECM substrate concentration increased, whereas patient-derived cell motility was little affected by ECM proteins. Patient and control cells had appropriate integrin receptors for these ECM substrates and detected them as shown by increases in focal adhesion number and size in response to ECM proteins, which also induced changes in cell morphology and cytoskeleton. These observations indicate that patient cells failed to translate the detection of ECM proteins into appropriate changes in cell motility. In a sense, patient cells act like a moving car whose accelerator is jammed, moving at the same speed without regard to the external environment. This focuses attention on cell motility regulation rather than speed as key to impairment of neuronal migration in the developing brain in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of HLA-G and extracellular vesicles in renal cancer stem cell-induced inhibition of dendritic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Tritta, Stefania; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Battaglia, Antonino; Gontero, Paolo; Frea, Bruno; Camussi, Giovanni

    2015-12-24

    Tumor immune-escape has been related to the ability of cancer cells to inhibit T cell activation and dendritic cell (DC) differentiation. We previously identified a tumor initiating population, expressing the mesenchymal marker CD105, which fulfills the criteria for definition as cancer stem cells (CD105(+) CSCs) able to release extracellular vesicles (EVs) that favor tumor progression and metastases. The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of renal CSCs and derived EVs to modulate the behavior of monocyte-derived DCs with a non-tumor initiating renal cancer cell population (CD105(-) TCs) and their EVs. Maturation of monocyte-derived DCs was studied in presence of CD105(+) CSCs and CD105(-) TCs and their derived EVs. DC differentiation experiments were evaluated by cytofluorimetric analysis. T cell proliferation and ELISA assays were performed. Monocytes and T cells were purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from healthy donors. The results obtained demonstrate that both CD105(+) CSCs and CD105(-) TCs impaired the differentiation process of DCs from monocytes. However, the immune-modulatory effect of CD105(+) CSCs was significantly greater than that of CD105(-) TCs. EVs derived from CD105(+) CSCs and in less extent, those derived from CD105(-) TCs retained the ability to impair monocyte maturation and T cell activation. The mechanism has been mainly related to the expression of HLA-G by tumor cells and to its release in a form associated to EVs. HLA-G blockade significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of EVs on DC differentiation. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that renal cancer cells and in particular CSCs and derived EVs impair maturation of DCs and T cell immune response by a mechanism involving HLA-G.

  17. Extracellular pH Modulates Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Cell Metabolism and Susceptibility to the Mitochondrial Inhibitor Niclosamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Joseph E.; Brandenburg, Matthew W.; Ge, Xia; Crowley, Jan R.; Kirmess, Kristopher M.; Som, Avik; D’Avignon, D. Andre; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Achilefu, Samuel; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is a lethal variant of prostate cancer that is associated with castrate-resistant growth, metastasis, and mortality. The tumor environment of neuroendocrine prostate cancer is heterogeneous and characterized by hypoxia, necrosis, and numerous mitoses. Although acidic extracellular pH has been implicated in aggressive cancer features including metastasis and therapeutic resistance, its role in neuroendocrine prostate cancer physiology and metabolism has not yet been explored. We used the well-characterized PNEC cell line as a model to establish the effects of extracellular pH (pH 6.5, 7.4, and 8.5) on neuroendocrine prostate cancer cell metabolism. We discovered that alkalinization of extracellular pH converted cellular metabolism to a nutrient consumption-dependent state that was susceptible to glucose deprivation, glutamine deprivation, and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) mediated inhibition of glycolysis. Conversely, acidic pH shifted cellular metabolism toward an oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent state that was susceptible to OXPHOS inhibition. Based upon this mechanistic knowledge of pH-dependent metabolism, we identified that the FDA-approved anti-helminthic niclosamide depolarized mitochondrial potential and depleted ATP levels in PNEC cells whose effects were enhanced in acidic pH. To further establish relevance of these findings, we tested the effects of extracellular pH on susceptibility to nutrient deprivation and OXPHOS inhibition in a cohort of castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines C4-2B, PC-3, and PC-3M. We discovered similar pH-dependent toxicity profiles among all cell lines with these treatments. These findings underscore a potential importance to acidic extracellular pH in the modulation of cell metabolism in tumors and development of an emerging paradigm that exploits the synergy of environment and therapeutic efficacy in cancer. PMID:27438712

  18. CD73 protein as a source of extracellular precursors for sustained NAD+ biosynthesis in FK866-treated tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozio, Alessia; Sociali, Giovanna; Sturla, Laura; Caffa, Irene; Soncini, Debora; Salis, Annalisa; Raffaelli, Nadia; De Flora, Antonio; Nencioni, Alessio; Bruzzone, Santina

    2013-09-06

    NAD(+) is mainly synthesized in human cells via the "salvage" pathways starting from nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, or nicotinamide riboside (NR). The inhibition with FK866 of the enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), catalyzing the first reaction in the "salvage" pathway from nicotinamide, showed potent antitumor activity in several preclinical models of solid and hematologic cancers. In the clinical studies performed with FK866, however, no tumor remission was observed. Here we demonstrate that low micromolar concentrations of extracellular NAD(+) or NAD(+) precursors, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and NR, can reverse the FK866-induced cell death, this representing a plausible explanation for the failure of NAMPT inhibition as an anti-cancer therapy. NMN is a substrate of both ectoenzymes CD38 and CD73, with generation of NAM and NR, respectively. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD38 and CD73 in providing ectocellular NAD(+) precursors for NAD(+) biosynthesis and in modulating cell susceptibility to FK866. By specifically silencing or overexpressing CD38 and CD73, we demonstrated that endogenous CD73 enables, whereas CD38 impairs, the conversion of extracellular NMN to NR as a precursor for intracellular NAD(+) biosynthesis in human cells. Moreover, cell viability in FK866-treated cells supplemented with extracellular NMN was strongly reduced in tumor cells, upon pharmacological inhibition or specific down-regulation of CD73. Thus, our study suggests that genetic or pharmacologic interventions interfering with CD73 activity may prove useful to increase cancer cell sensitivity to NAMPT inhibitors.

  19. Implication of SPARC in the modulation of the extracellular matrix and mitochondrial function in muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aicha Melouane

    Full Text Available Secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC is differentially associated with cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM assembly. We show here the effect of exogenous SPARC inhibition/induction on ECM and mitochondrial proteins expression and on the differentiation of C2C12 cells. The cells were cultured in growth medium (GM supplemented with different experimental conditions. The differentiation of myoblasts was studied for 5 days, the expressions of ECM and mitochondrial proteins were measured and the formation of the myotubes was quantified after exogenous induction/inhibition of SPARC. The results indicate that the addition of recombinant SPARC protein (rSPARC in cell culture medium increased the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts and myogenin expression during the myotube formation. However, the treatment with antibody specific for SPARC (anti-SPARC prevented the differentiation and decreased myogenin expression. The induction of SPARC in the proliferating and differentiating C2C12 cells increased collagen 1a1 protein expression, whereas the inhibition decreased it. The effects on fibronectin protein expression were opposite. Furthermore, the addition of rSPARC in C2C12 myoblast increased the expression of mitochondrial proteins, ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase core protein II (UQCRC2 and succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur subunit (SDHB, whereas the anti-SPARC decreased them. During the differentiation, only the anti-SPARC had the effects on mitochondrial proteins, NADH dehydrogenase ubiquinone 1 beta subcomplex subunit 8 (NADHB8, SDHB and cytochrome c oxidase 1 (MTCO1. Thus, SPARC plays a crucial role in the proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 and may be involved in the link between the ECM remodeling and mitochondrial function.

  20. Bacterial cell surface properties: role of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Yang, Shanshan; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) on the comprehensive surface properties of four bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus suis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida). The removal of LB-EPS from bacterial surfaces by high-speed centrifugation (12,000×g) was confirmed by SEM images. Viability tests showed that the percentages of viable cells ranged from 95.9% to 98.0%, and no significant difference was found after treatment (P>0.05). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of phosphodiester, carboxylic, phosphate, and amino functional groups on bacteria surfaces, and the removal of LB-EPS did not alter the types of cell surface functional groups. Potentiometric titration results suggested the total site concentrations on the intact bacteria were higher than those on LB-EPS free bacteria. Most of the acidity constants (pKa) were almost identical, except the increased pKa values of phosphodiester groups on LB-EPS free S. suis and E. coli surfaces. The electrophoretic mobilities and hydrodynamic diameters of the intact and LB-EPS free bacteria were statistically unchanged (P>0.05), indicating LB-EPS had no influence on the net surface charges and size distribution of bacteria. However, LB-ESP could enhance cell aggregation processes. The four LB-EPS free bacteria all exhibited fewer hydrophobicity values (26.1-65.0%) as compared to the intact cells (47.4-69.3%), suggesting the removal of uncharged nonpolar compounds (e.g., carbohydrates) in LB-EPS. These findings improve our understanding of the changes in cell surface characterizations induced by LB-EPS, and have important implications for assessing the role of LB-EPS in bacterial adhesion and transport behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioprinting 3D cell-laden hydrogel microarray for screening human periodontal ligament stem cell response to extracellular matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yufei; Ji, Yuan; Huang, Guoyou; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng; Ling, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease negatively affecting up to 15% of adults worldwide. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) hold great promises for periodontal tissue regeneration, where it is necessary to find proper extracellular matrix (ECM) materials (e.g., composition, concentration). In this study, we proposed a bioprinting-based approach to generate nano-liter sized three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden hydrogel array with gradient of ECM components, through controlling the volume ratio of two hydrogels, such as gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) dimethacrylate. The resulting cell-laden array with a gradient of GelMA/PEG composition was used to screen human PDLSC response to ECM. The behavior (e.g., cell viability, spreading) of human PDLSCs in GelMA/PEG array were found to be depended on the volume ratios of GelMA/PEG, with cell viability and spreading area decreased along with increasing the ratio of PEG. The developed approach would be useful for screening cell-biomaterial interaction in 3D and promoting regeneration of functional tissue. (paper)

  2. Effect of Extracellular Zinc Chelator on Rat Retinal Ganglion Cell Number, and Taurine and Zinc Transporters in These Cells

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    Asarí Márquez García

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zinc deficiency in humans causes decreased antioxidants in the retina and is related with abnormal darkness adaptation, cataracts, blindness, and macular degeneration. There is little information about the effects of zinc on the taurine system in mammalian retinal cells. Therefore, we studied the effect of zinc on the taurine transporter (TAUT and zinc transporters (ZnT-1 and 3 using the extracellular zinc chelator, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA by fluorescence immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry in the ganglion cells (CG and cell layers of the retina of rats. Three days after administration of DTPA (10µM primary antibodies and secondary antibodies conjugated with rhodamine or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC were used as required. For immunocytochemical labeling approximately three hundred cells per condition were counted. For immunohistochemical labeling, the fluorescence intensity was measured as integrated optical density (DOI in four areas for each layer of tissue. DTPA produced a decrease of 32 % and 29 % in GC of the total cells labeled with antibody against glycoprotein Thy 1.1 and γ-synuclein, respectively. It also produced a significant decrease in TAUT localization in 27 and 28 % compared to controls. DTPA produced a decrease in the localization of ZnT-1 and ZnT-3 in the retina layers (ganglion cells, GCC and the outer and inner plexiform, CEP and CIP. The study of these molecules in the retina is relevant to understanding the interactions of taurine and zinc in this structure.

  3. Staurosporine and extracellular matrix proteins mediate the conversion of small cell lung carcinoma cells into a neuron-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Murmann

    Full Text Available Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs represent highly aggressive tumors with an overall five-year survival rate in the range of 5 to 10%. Here, we show that four out of five SCLC cell lines reversibly develop a neuron-like phenotype on extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, laminin or thrombospondin upon staurosporine treatment in an RGD/integrin-mediated manner. Neurite-like processes extend rapidly with an average speed of 10 µm per hour. Depending on the cell line, staurosporine treatment affects either cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase or induction of polyploidy. Neuron-like conversion, although not accompanied by alterations in the expression pattern of a panel of neuroendocrine genes, leads to changes in protein expression as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It is likely that SCLC cells already harbour the complete molecular repertoire to convert into a neuron-like phenotype. More extensive studies are needed to evaluate whether the conversion potential of SCLC cells is suitable for therapeutic interventions.

  4. Nitric oxide diffusion to red blood cells limits extracellular, but not intraphagosomal, peroxynitrite formation by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolo, Carolina; Álvarez, María Noel; Ríos, Natalia; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Radi, Rafael; Romero, Natalia

    2015-10-01

    Macrophage-derived nitric oxide ((•)NO) participates in cytotoxic mechanisms against diverse microorganisms and tumor cells. These effects can be mediated by (•)NO itself or (•)NO-derived species such as peroxynitrite formed by its diffusion-controlled reaction with NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide radical anion (O(2)(•-)). In vivo, the facile extracellular diffusion of (•)NO as well as different competing consumption routes limit its bioavailability for the reaction with O(2)(•-) and, hence, peroxynitrite formation. In this work, we evaluated the extent by which (•)NO diffusion to red blood cells (RBC) can compete with activated macrophages-derived O(2)(•-) and affect peroxynitrite formation yields. Macrophage-dependent peroxynitrite production was determined by boron-based probes that react directly with peroxynitrite, namely, coumarin-7-boronic acid (CBA) and fluorescein-boronate (Fl-B). The influence of (•)NO diffusion to RBC on peroxynitrite formation was experimentally analyzed in co-incubations of (•)NO and O(2)(•-)-forming macrophages with erythrocytes. Additionally, we evaluated the permeation of (•)NO to RBC by measuring the intracellular oxidation of oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin. Our results indicate that diluted RBC suspensions dose-dependently inhibit peroxynitrite formation, outcompeting the O(2)(•-) reaction. Computer-assisted kinetic studies evaluating peroxynitrite formation by its precursor radicals in the presence of RBC are in accordance with experimental results. Moreover, the presence of erythrocytes in the proximity of (•)NO and O(2)(•-)-forming macrophages prevented intracellular Fl-B oxidation pre-loaded in L1210 cells co-cultured with activated macrophages. On the other hand, Fl-B-coated latex beads incorporated in the macrophage phagocytic vacuole indicated that intraphagosomal probe oxidation by peroxynitrite was not affected by nearby RBC. Our data support that in the proximity of a blood vessel, (

  5. Stimulation of vasculogenesis and leukopoiesis of embryonic stem cells by extracellular transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifpanah, Fatemeh; De Silva, Sepali; Bekhite, Mohamed M; Hurtado-Oliveros, Jorge; Preissner, Klaus T; Wartenberg, Maria; Sauer, Heinrich

    2015-12-01

    Cell injury releases nucleic acids supporting inflammation and stem cell activation. Here, the impact of extracellular ribonucleic acid, especially transfer RNA (ex-tRNA), on vasculogenesis and leukopoiesis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells was investigated. ex-tRNA, whole cell RNA and ribosomal RNA (ex-rRNA) but not DNA increased CD31-positive vascular structures in embryoid bodies. Ex-tRNA and ex-rRNA increased numbers of VEGFR2(+), CD31(+) and VE-cadherin(+) vascular cells as well as CD18(+), CD45(+) and CD68(+) cells, indicating leukocyte/macrophage differentiation. This was paralleled by mRNA and protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF165) and neuropilin 1 (NRP1), phosphorylation of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) as well as mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). ex-tRNA was taken up by endosomes, increased expression of the pro-angiogenic semaphorin B4 receptor plexin B1 as well as the ephrin-type B receptor 4 (EphB4) and ephrinB2 ligand and enhanced cell migration, which was inhibited by the VEGFR2 antagonist SU5614 and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. This likewise abolished the effects of ex-tRNA on vasculogenesis and leukopoiesis of ES cells. Ex-tRNA increased NOX1, NOX2, NOX4 and DUOX2 mRNA and boosted the generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide which was inhibited by radical scavengers, the NADPH oxidase inhibitors apocynin, VAS2870, ML171, and plumbagin as well as shRNA silencing of NOX1 and NOX4. Our findings indicate that ex-tRNA treatment induces vasculogenesis and leukopoiesis of ES cells via superoxide/hydrogen peroxide generated by NADPH oxidase and activation of VEGFR2 and PI3K. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical, Spatial, and Molecular Aspects of Extracellular Matrix of In Vivo Niches and Artificial Scaffolds Relevant to Stem Cells Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Akhmanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix can influence stem cell choices, such as self-renewal, quiescence, migration, proliferation, phenotype maintenance, differentiation, or apoptosis. Three aspects of extracellular matrix were extensively studied during the last decade: physical properties, spatial presentation of adhesive epitopes, and molecular complexity. Over 15 different parameters have been shown to influence stem cell choices. Physical aspects include stiffness (or elasticity, viscoelasticity, pore size, porosity, amplitude and frequency of static and dynamic deformations applied to the matrix. Spatial aspects include scaffold dimensionality (2D or 3D and thickness; cell polarity; area, shape, and microscale topography of cell adhesion surface; epitope concentration, epitope clustering characteristics (number of epitopes per cluster, spacing between epitopes within cluster, spacing between separate clusters, cluster patterns, and level of disorder in epitope arrangement, and nanotopography. Biochemical characteristics of natural extracellular matrix molecules regard diversity and structural complexity of matrix molecules, affinity and specificity of epitope interaction with cell receptors, role of non-affinity domains, complexity of supramolecular organization, and co-signaling by growth factors or matrix epitopes. Synergy between several matrix aspects enables stem cells to retain their function in vivo and may be a key to generation of long-term, robust, and effective in vitro stem cell culture systems.

  7. Extracellular Matrix Promotes Highly Efficient Cardiac Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: The Matrix Sandwich Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Klos, Matthew; Wilson, Gisela F.; Herman, Amanda M.; Lian, Xiaojun; Raval, Kunil K.; Barron, Matthew R.; Hou, Luqia; Soerens, Andrew G.; Yu, Junying; Palecek, Sean P.; Lyons, Gary E.; Thomson, James A.; Herron, Todd J.; Jalife, José; Kamp, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Cardiomyocytes differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are increasingly being used for cardiovascular research including disease modeling and hold promise for clinical applications. Current cardiac differentiation protocols exhibit variable success across different PSC lines and are primarily based on the application of growth factors. However, extracellular matrix (ECM) is also fundamentally involved in cardiac development from the earliest morphogenetic events such as gastrulation. Objective We sought to develop a more effective protocol for cardiac differentiation of human PSCs by using ECM in combination with growth factors known to promote cardiogenesis. Methods and Results PSCs were cultured as monolayers on Matrigel, an ECM preparation, and subsequently overlayed with Matrigel. The matrix sandwich promoted an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as in gastrulation with the generation of N-cadherin+ mesenchymal cells. Combining the matrix sandwich with sequential application of growth factors (Activin A, BMP4, and bFGF) generated cardiomyocytes with high purity (up to 98%) and yield (up to 11 cardiomyocytes/input PSC) from multiple PSC lines. The resulting cardiomyocytes progressively mature over 30 days in culture based on myofilament expression pattern and mitotic activity. Action potentials typical of embryonic nodal, atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes were observed, and monolayers of electrically coupled cardiomyocytes modeled cardiac tissue and basic arrhythmia mechanisms. Conclusions Dynamic ECM application promoted EMT of human PSCs and complemented growth factor signaling to enable robust cardiac differentiation. PMID:22912385

  8. Naturally Occurring Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Dermal Regeneration: Do They Really Need Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Eweida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pronounced effect of extracellular matrix (ECM scaffolds in supporting tissue regeneration is related mainly to their maintained 3D structure and their bioactive components. These decellularized matrix scaffolds could be revitalized before grafting via adding stem cells, fibroblasts, or keratinocytes to promote wound healing. We reviewed the online published literature in the last five years for the studies that performed ECM revitalization and discussed the results of these studies and the related literature. Eighteen articles met the search criteria. Twelve studies included adding cells to acellular dermal matrix (ADM, 3 studies were on small intestinal mucosa (SIS, one study was on urinary bladder matrix (UBM, one study was on amniotic membrane, and one study included both SIS and ADM loaded constructs. We believe that, in chronic and difficult-to-heal wounds, revitalizing the ECM scaffolds would be beneficial to overcome the defective host tissue interaction. This belief still has to be verified by high quality randomised clinical trials, which are still lacking in literature.

  9. Extracellular Vesicles from Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Downregulate Senescence Features in Osteoarthritic Osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Tofiño-Vian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA affects all articular tissues leading to pain and disability. The dysregulation of bone metabolism may contribute to the progression of this condition. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC are attractive candidates in the search of novel strategies for OA treatment and exert anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects on cartilage. Chronic inflammation in OA is a relevant factor in the development of cellular senescence and joint degradation. In this study, we extend our previous observations of ASC paracrine effects to study the influence of conditioned medium and extracellular vesicles from ASC on senescence induced by inflammatory stress in OA osteoblasts. Our results in cells stimulated with interleukin- (IL- 1β indicate that conditioned medium, microvesicles, and exosomes from ASC downregulate senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and the accumulation of γH2AX foci. In addition, they reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, with the highest effect on IL-6 and prostaglandin E2. The control of mitochondrial membrane alterations and oxidative stress may provide a mechanism for the protective effects of ASC in OA osteoblasts. We have also shown that microvesicles and exosomes mediate the paracrine effects of ASC. Our study suggests that correction of abnormal osteoblast metabolism by ASC products may contribute to their protective effects.

  10. Raman spectroscopy uncovers biochemical tissue-related features of extracellular vesicles from mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualerzi, Alice; Niada, Stefania; Giannasi, Chiara; Picciolini, Silvia; Morasso, Carlo; Vanna, Renzo; Rossella, Valeria; Masserini, Massimo; Bedoni, Marzia; Ciceri, Fabio; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Brini, Anna Teresa; Gramatica, Furio

    2017-08-29

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are emerging as valuable therapeutic agents for tissue regeneration and immunomodulation, but their clinical applications have so far been limited by the technical restraints of current isolation and characterisation procedures. This study shows for the first time the successful application of Raman spectroscopy as label-free, sensitive and reproducible means of carrying out the routine bulk characterisation of MSC-derived vesicles before their use in vitro or in vivo, thus promoting the translation of EV research to clinical practice. The Raman spectra of the EVs of bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSCs were compared with human dermal fibroblast EVs in order to demonstrate the ability of the method to distinguish the vesicles of the three cytotypes automatically with an accuracy of 93.7%. Our data attribute a Raman fingerprint to EVs from undifferentiated and differentiated cells of diverse tissue origin, and provide insights into the biochemical characteristics of EVs from different sources and into the differential contribution of sphingomyelin, gangliosides and phosphatidilcholine to the Raman spectra themselves.

  11. Combined effects of extracellular matrix and growth factors on NBT-II rat bladder carcinoma cell dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, G C; Boyer, B; Valles, A M; Thiery, J P

    1991-10-01

    Using the rat bladder carcinoma cell line NBT-II we showed that collagens but not laminin and fibronectin were able to induce cell scattering. Acidic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor alpha also promoted NBT-II cell dispersion on glass or tissue culture plastic. We have now further analysed the scatter response to these two growth factors in the presence of extracellular matrix molecules. In the presence of growth factors, no peripheral single-cell dispersion occurred on fibronectin and laminin, although time-lapse video analyses revealed intense cell mingling and motility inside the monolayer forming around NBT-II aggregates. Patterns of strings or files of cells protruding from the monolayer were often observed. The presence of a scattering activity in the complex acellular extracellular matrix deposited by NBT-II cells themselves strongly suggested that substratum conditioning was responsible for this effect. On the other hand, the two growth factors accelerated collagen-mediated NBT-II individual cell dispersion and locomotion in a reversible way. As a marker of cell dissociation, we studied desmosome distribution in aggregate cultures: desmosomes were present in aggregates formed in suspension even in the presence of growth factors, whereas internalization occurred after cell-to-substratum contact. On laminin or fibronectin and in the presence of growth factors, peripheral cells inside the halo of NBT-II aggregates did not exhibit desmosome linkages. These observations suggest that scatter effects per se are dependent on the composition of the extracellular matrix. In particular, on a substratum nonpermissive for direct cell translocation, individual cell dispersion can be replaced by en bloc patterns of migration following substratum conditioning by the cells.

  12. Ornamenting 3D printed scaffolds with cell-laid extracellular matrix for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Song, Tae-Ha; Rijal, Girdhari; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    3D printing technique is the most sophisticated technique to produce scaffolds with tailorable physical properties. But, these scaffolds often suffer from limited biological functionality as they are typically made from synthetic materials. Cell-laid mineralized ECM was shown to be potential for improving the cellular responses and drive osteogenesis of stem cells. Here, we intend to improve the biological functionality of 3D-printed synthetic scaffolds by ornamenting them with cell-laid mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) that mimics a bony microenvironment. We developed bone graft substitutes by using 3D printed scaffolds made from a composite of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and mineralized ECM laid by human nasal inferior turbinate tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs). A rotary flask bioreactor was used to culture hTMSCs on the scaffolds to foster formation of mineralized ECM. A freeze/thaw cycle in hypotonic buffer was used to efficiently decellularize (97% DNA reduction) the ECM-ornamented scaffolds while preserving its main organic and inorganic components. The ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds supported osteoblastic differentiation of newly-seeded hTMSCs by upregulating four typical osteoblastic genes (4-fold higher RUNX2; 3-fold higher ALP; 4-fold higher osteocalcin; and 4-fold higher osteopontin) and increasing calcium deposition compared to bare 3D printed scaffolds. In vivo, in ectopic and orthotopic models in rats, ECM-ornamented scaffolds induced greater bone formation than that of bare scaffolds. These results suggest a valuable method to produce ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds as off-the-shelf bone graft substitutes that combine tunable physical properties with physiological presentation of biological signals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Extracellular matrix-induced gene expression in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garamszegi, Nandor; Garamszegi, Susanna P; Shehadeh, Lina A; Scully, Sean P

    2009-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules modify gene expression through attachment-dependent (focal adhesion-related) integrin receptor signaling. It was previously unknown whether the same molecules acting as soluble peptides could generate signal cascades without the associated mechanical anchoring, a condition that may be encountered during matrix remodeling and degradation and relevant to invasion and metastatic processes. In the current study, the role of ECM ligand-regulated gene expression through this attachment-independent process was examined. It was observed that fibronectin, laminin, and collagen type I and II induce Smad2 activation in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cells. This activation is not caused by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta ligand contamination or autocrine TGF involvement and is 3- to 5-fold less robust than the TGF-beta1 ligand. The resulting nuclear translocation of Smad4 in response to ECM ligand indicates downstream transcriptional responses occurring. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments determined that collagen type II and laminin act through interaction with integrin alpha(2)beta(1) receptor complex. The ECM ligand-induced Smad activation (termed signaling crosstalk) resulted in cell type and ligand-specific transcriptional changes, which are distinct from the TGF-beta ligand-induced responses. These findings show that cell-matrix communication is more complex than previously thought. Soluble ECM peptides drive transcriptional regulation through corresponding adhesion and non-attachment-related processes. The resultant gene expressional patterns correlate with pathway activity and not by the extent of Smad activation. These results extend the complexity and the existing paradigms of ECM-cell communication to ECM ligand regulation without the necessity of mechanical coupling.

  14. Effects of extracellular pH on UV-induced K+ efflux from cultured rose cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, A.J.; Murphy, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light causes a specific leakage of K + from cultured rose cells (Rosa damascena). During K + efflux, there is also an increase in extracellular HCO 3 - and acidification of the cell interior. We hypothesized that the HCO 3 - originated from intracellular hydration of respiratory CO 2 and served as a charge balancing mechanism during K + efflux, the K + and HCO 3 - being co transported out of the cell through specific channels. An alternative hypothesis which would yield similar results would be the counter transport of K + and H + . To test these hypotheses, we studied the effect of a range of external pH values (pH 5-9), regulated by various methods (pH-stat, 100 millimolar Tris-Mes buffer, or CO 2 partial pressure), on the UV-induced K + efflux. Both UV-C (less than 290 nanometers) and UV-B (290-310 nanometers) induced K + efflux with a minimum at about pH 6 to 7, and greater efflux at pH values of 5, 8, and 9. Since pH values of 8 and 9 increased instead of reduced the efflux of K + , these data are not consistent with notion that the efflux of K + is dependent on an influx of H + , a process that would be sensitive to external H + concentration. We suggest that the effect of pH on K + efflux may be mediated through the titration of specific K + -transporting proteins or channels in the plasma membrane. Since we could not detect the presence of carbonic anhydrase activity in cell extracts, we could not use the location of this enzyme to aid in our interpretation regarding the site of hydration of CO 2 . (author)

  15. The external face of Candida albicans: A proteomic view of the cell surface and the extracellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Amador-García, Ahinara; Gil, Concha; Monteoliva, Lucia

    2017-12-06

    The cell surface and secreted proteins are the initial points of contact between Candida albicans and the host. Improvements in protein extraction approaches and mass spectrometers have allowed researchers to obtain a comprehensive knowledge of these external subproteomes. In this paper, we review the published proteomic studies that have examined C. albicans extracellular proteins, including the cell surface proteins or surfome and the secreted proteins or secretome. The use of different approaches to isolate cell wall and cell surface proteins, such as fractionation approaches or cell shaving, have resulted in different outcomes. Proteins with N-terminal signal peptide, known as classically secreted proteins, and those that lack the signal peptide, known as unconventionally secreted proteins, have been consistently identified. Existing studies on C. albicans extracellular vesicles reveal that they are relevant as an unconventional pathway of protein secretion and can help explain the presence of proteins without a signal peptide, including some moonlighting proteins, in the cell wall and the extracellular environment. According to the global view presented in this review, cell wall proteins, virulence factors such as adhesins or hydrolytic enzymes, metabolic enzymes and stress related-proteins are important groups of proteins in C. albicans surfome and secretome. Candida albicans extracellular proteins are involved in biofilm formation, cell nutrient acquisition and cell wall integrity maintenance. Furthermore, these proteins include virulence factors and immunogenic proteins. This review is of outstanding interest, not only because it extends knowledge of the C. albicans surface and extracellular proteins that could be related with pathogenesis, but also because it presents insights that may facilitate the future development of new antifungal drugs and vaccines and contributes to efforts to identify new biomarkers that can be employed to diagnose candidiasis

  16. Action potentials in retinal ganglion cells are initiated at the site of maximal curvature of the extracellular potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickenscheidt, Max; Zeck, Günther

    2014-06-01

    The initiation of an action potential by extracellular stimulation occurs after local depolarization of the neuronal membrane above threshold. Although the technique shows remarkable clinical success, the site of action and the relevant stimulation parameters are not completely understood. Here we identify the site of action potential initiation in rabbit retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) interfaced to an array of extracellular capacitive stimulation electrodes. We determine which feature of the extracellular potential governs action potential initiation by simultaneous stimulation and recording RGCs interfaced in epiretinal configuration. Stimulation electrodes were combined to areas of different size and were presented at different positions with respect to the RGC. Based on stimulation by electrodes beneath the RGC soma and simultaneous sub-millisecond latency measurement we infer axonal initiation at the site of maximal curvature of the extracellular potential. Stimulation by electrodes at different positions along the axon reveals a nearly constant threshold current density except for a narrow region close to the cell soma. These findings are explained by the concept of the activating function modified to consider a region of lower excitability close to the cell soma. We present a framework how to estimate the site of action potential initiation and the stimulus required to cross threshold in neurons tightly interfaced to capacitive stimulation electrodes. Our results underscore the necessity of rigorous electrical characterization of the stimulation electrodes and of the interfaced neural tissue.

  17. Action potentials in retinal ganglion cells are initiated at the site of maximal curvature of the extracellular potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickenscheidt, Max; Zeck, Günther

    2014-06-01

    Objective. The initiation of an action potential by extracellular stimulation occurs after local depolarization of the neuronal membrane above threshold. Although the technique shows remarkable clinical success, the site of action and the relevant stimulation parameters are not completely understood. Approach. Here we identify the site of action potential initiation in rabbit retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) interfaced to an array of extracellular capacitive stimulation electrodes. We determine which feature of the extracellular potential governs action potential initiation by simultaneous stimulation and recording RGCs interfaced in epiretinal configuration. Stimulation electrodes were combined to areas of different size and were presented at different positions with respect to the RGC. Main results. Based on stimulation by electrodes beneath the RGC soma and simultaneous sub-millisecond latency measurement we infer axonal initiation at the site of maximal curvature of the extracellular potential. Stimulation by electrodes at different positions along the axon reveals a nearly constant threshold current density except for a narrow region close to the cell soma. These findings are explained by the concept of the activating function modified to consider a region of lower excitability close to the cell soma. Significance. We present a framework how to estimate the site of action potential initiation and the stimulus required to cross threshold in neurons tightly interfaced to capacitive stimulation electrodes. Our results underscore the necessity of rigorous electrical characterization of the stimulation electrodes and of the interfaced neural tissue.

  18. Induction of aldose reductase and sorbitol in renal inner medullary cells by elevated extracellular NaCl.

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnasco, S M; Uchida, S; Balaban, R S; Kador, P F; Burg, M B

    1987-01-01

    Aldose reductase [aldehyde reductase 2; alditol:NAD(P)+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.21] catalyzes conversion of glucose to sorbitol. Although its activity is implicated in the progression of ocular and neurological complications of diabetes, the normal function of the enzyme in most cells is unknown. Both aldose reductase activity and substantial levels of sorbitol were previously reported in renal inner medullary cells. In this tissue, the extracellular NaCl concentration normally is high and...

  19. SU-F-SPS-08: Measuring the Interaction Of DDR Cell Receptors and Extracellular Matrix Collagen in Prostate Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J; Sarkar, A; Hoffmann, P [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Suhail, A; Fridman, R [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Discoidin domain receptors (DDR) have recently been recognized as important players in cancer progression. DDRs are cell receptors that interact with collagen, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. However the detailed mechanism of their interaction is unclear. Here we attempted to examine their interaction in terms of structural (surface topography), mechanical (rupture force), and kinetic (binding probability) information on the single molecular scale with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: The Quantitative Nano-mechanical property Mapping (QNM) mode of AFM allowed to assess the cells in liquid growth media at their optimal physiological while being viable. Human benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line was genetically regulated to suppress DDR expression (DDR- cells) and was compared with naturally DDR expressing cells (DDR+). Results: Binding force measurements (n = 1000) were obtained before and after the two groups were treated with fibronectin (FN), an integrin-inhibiting antibody to block the binding of integrin. The quantification indicates that cells containing DDR bind with collagen at a most probable force of 80.3–83.0 ±7.6 pN. The probability of them binding is 0.167 when other interactions (mainly due to integrin-collagen binding) are minimized. Conclusion: Together with further force measurements at different pulling speeds will determine dissociation rate, binding distance and activation barrier. These parameters in benign cells provides some groundwork in understanding DDR’s behavior in various cell microenvironments such as in malignant tumor cells. Funding supported by Richard Barber Interdisciplinary Research Program of Wayne State University.

  20. CD18-mediated adhesion is required for the induction of a proinflammatory phenotype in lung epithelial cells by mononuclear cell-derived extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Tommaso; Scalise, Valentina; Passalacqua, Ilaria; Giusti, Ilaria; Lombardi, Stefania; Balia, Cristina; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Berrettini, Stefano; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Dolo, Vincenza; Celi, Alessandro

    2018-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles are submicron vesicles that upregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators by lung epithelial cells. We investigated whether these structures adhere to lung epithelial cells, and whether adhesion is a prerequisite for their proinflammatory activity. Extracellular vesicles were generated by stimulation of normal human mononuclear cells with the calcium ionophore A23187, and labelled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester. Adhesion of vesicles to monolayers of immortalized bronchial epithelial (16HBE) and alveolar (A549) cells was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. The role of candidate adhesion receptors was evaluated with inhibitory monoclonal antibodies and soluble peptides. The synthesis of proinflammatory mediators was assessed by ELISA. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the generation of closed vesicles with an approximate size range between 50 and 600 nm. Adhesion of extracellular vesicles to epithelial cells was upregulated upon stimulation of the latter with tumor necrosis factor-α. Adhesion was blocked by an anti-CD18 antibody, by peptides containing the sequence RGD and, to a lesser extent, by an antibody to ICAM-1. The same molecules also blocked the upregulation of the synthesis of interleukin-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 induced by extracellular vesicles. CD18-mediated adhesion of extracellular vesicles is a prerequisite for their proinflammatory activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of a Cell-Culturing System for the Study of Contact-Independent Extracellular Vesicle Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Louise Schacht Revenfeld

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate and well-documented in vitro cell-culturing systems are necessary to study the activity and biological function of extracellular vesicles (EVs. The aim of this study was to describe an experimental system, in which dynamic, vesicle-based cell communication can be investigated. A commercially available cell-culturing system was applied to study contact-independent cell communication, which separated two cell populations using a membrane with a pore size of 0.4 μm. The EV exchange characteristics between the two compartments in the culture set-up was preliminarily investigated in a cell-free set-up, and analysed using the Extracellular Vesicle (EV Array and Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis. The application of the cell-culturing set-up was demonstrated using co-cultures of human primary cells. The effects of the relative placement of the two cell populations on the phenotype of EVs found in the cell supernatant were investigated. The results indicate that this placement can be important for the biological hypothesis that is being investigated. These observations are relevant for short (<24h as well as long (several days studies of vesicle-based cell communication. Moreover, the introduced cell-culturing set-up and analytical strategy can be used to study contact-independent vesicle communication in a reproducible manner.

  2. Extracellular vesicles as modulators of cell-to-cell communication in the healthy and diseased brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pegtel, D.M.; Peferoen, L.; Amor, S.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis relies heavily on effective cell-to-cell communication. In the central nervous system (CNS), probably more so than in other organs, such communication is crucial to support and protect neurons especially during ageing, as well as to control inflammation, remove debris and infectious

  3. Deciphering Cell-to-Cell Communication in Acquisition of Cancer Traits: Extracellular Membrane Vesicles Are Regulators of Tissue Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Deep; Wijesinghe, Philip; Oenarto, Vici; Lu, Jamie F; Sampson, David D; Kennedy, Brendan F; Wallace, Vincent P; Bebawy, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Deciphering the role of cell-to-cell communication in acquisition of cancer traits such as metastasis is one of the key challenges of integrative biology and clinical oncology. In this context, extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important vectors in cell-to-cell communication and serve as conduits in the transfer of cellular constituents required for cell function and for the establishment of cellular phenotypes. In the case of malignancy, they have been shown to support the acquisition of common traits defined as constituting the hallmarks of cancer. Cellular biophysics has contributed to our understanding of some of these central traits with changes in tissue biomechanics reflective of cell state. Indeed, much is known about stiffness of the tissue scaffold in the context of cell invasion and migration. This article advances this knowledge frontier by showing for the first time that EVs are mediators of tissue biomechanical properties and, importantly, demonstrates a link between the acquisition of cancer multidrug resistance and increased tissue stiffness of the malignant mass. The methodology used in the study employed optical coherence elastography and atomic force microscopy on breast cancer cell monolayers and tumor spheroids. Specifically, we show here that the acquired changes in tissue stiffness can be attributed to the intracellular transfer of a protein complex comprising ezrin, radixin, moesin, CD44, and P-glycoprotein. This has important implications in facilitating mechano-transduced signaling cascades that regulate the acquisition of cancer traits, such as invasion and metastasis. Finally, this study also introduces novel targets and strategies for diagnostic and therapeutic innovation in oncology, with a view to prevention of metastatic spread and personalized medicine in cancer treatment.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles ameliorate inflammation-induced preterm brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drommelschmidt, Karla; Serdar, Meray; Bendix, Ivo; Herz, Josephine; Bertling, Frederik; Prager, Sebastian; Keller, Matthias; Ludwig, Anna-Kristin; Duhan, Vikas; Radtke, Stefan; de Miroschedji, Kyra; Horn, Peter A; van de Looij, Yohan; Giebel, Bernd; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula

    2017-02-01

    Preterm brain injury is a major cause of disability in later life, and may result in motor, cognitive and behavioural impairment for which no treatment is currently available. The aetiology is considered as multifactorial, and one underlying key player is inflammation leading to white and grey matter injury. Extracellular vesicles secreted by mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC-EVs) have shown therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine. Here, we investigated the effects of MSC-EV treatment on brain microstructure and maturation, inflammatory processes and long-time outcome in a rodent model of inflammation-induced brain injury. 3-Day-old Wistar rats (P3) were intraperitoneally injected with 0.25mg/kg lipopolysaccharide or saline and treated with two repetitive doses of 1×10 8 cell equivalents of MSC-EVs per kg bodyweight. Cellular degeneration and reactive gliosis at P5 and myelination at P11 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Long-term cognitive and motor function was assessed by behavioural testing. Diffusion tensor imaging at P125 evaluated long-term microstructural white matter alterations. MSC-EV treatment significantly ameliorated inflammation-induced neuronal cellular degeneration reduced microgliosis and prevented reactive astrogliosis. Short-term myelination deficits and long-term microstructural abnormalities of the white matter were restored by MSC-EV administration. Morphological effects of MSC-EV treatment resulted in improved long-lasting cognitive functions INTERPRETATION: MSC-EVs ameliorate inflammation-induced cellular damage in a rat model of preterm brain injury. MSC-EVs may serve as a novel therapeutic option by prevention of neuronal cell death, restoration of white matter microstructure, reduction of gliosis and long-term functional improvement. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Extracellular calcium and CaSR drive osteoinduction in mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vázquez, Arlyng; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth

    2014-06-01

    Bone is the main store of calcium and progenitor cells in the body. During the resorption process, the local calcium concentration reaches 8-40mM, and the surrounding cells are exposed to these fluctuations in calcium. This stimulus is a signal that is detected through the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), which modulates chemotactic and proliferative G protein-dependent signaling pathways. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the roles of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) and the CaSR in osteoinduction. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (rBMSCs) were stimulated with 10mM of Ca(2+). Several experiments were conducted to demonstrate the effect of [Ca(2+)]o on chemotaxis, proliferation and differentiation on the osteoblastic lineage. It was found that [Ca(2+)]o induces rBMSCs to migrate and proliferate in a concentration-dependent manner. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence also revealed that 10mM Ca(2+) stimulates overexpression of osteogenic markers in rBMSCs, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein, collagen Ia1 and osteocalcin. Functional assays determining ALP activity and mineralization tests both corroborate the increased expression of these markers in rBMSCs stimulated with Ca(2+). Moreover, CaSR blockage inhibited the cellular response to stimulation with high concentrations of [Ca(2+)]o, revealing that the CaSR is a key modulator of these cellular responses. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of human mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into chondrocytes in extracellular matrix-based hydrogel scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mingchun; Liang, Hui; Mou, Chenchen; Li, Xiaoran; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu

    2014-02-01

    To induce human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments, we developed porous hydrogel scaffolds using the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) components of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and collagen (COL). The turbidity and viscosity experiments indicated hydrogel could form through pH-triggered co-precipitation when pH=2-3. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed the hydrogel scaffolds could controllably release growth factors as envisaged. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was released to stimulate hMSCs differentiation into chondrocytes; and then collagen binding domain-basic fibroblast growth factor (CBD-bFGF) was released to improve the differentiation and preserve the chondrocyte phenotype. In in vitro cell culture experiments, the differentiation processes were compared in different microenvironments: 2D culture in culture plate as control, 3D culture in the fabricated scaffolds without growth factors (CC), the samples with CBD-bFGF (CC-C), the samples with TGF-β (CC-T), the samples with CBD-bFGF/TGF-β (CC-CT). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed the hMSC marker genes of CD44 and CD105 decreased; at the same time the chondrocyte marker genes of collagen type II and aggrecan increased, especially in the CC-CT sample. Immunostaining results further confirmed the hMSC marker protein of CD 44 disappeared and the chondrocyte marker protein of collagen type II emerged over time in the CC-CT sample. These results imply the ECM-based hydrogel scaffolds with growth factors can supply suitable 3D cell niches for hMSCs differentiation into chondrocytes and the differentiation process can be regulated by the controllably released growth factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Polymer-based precipitation preserves biological activities of extracellular vesicles from an endometrial cell line.

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    Ziru Niu

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are membrane-bound vesicles released by cells and act as media for transfer of proteins, small RNAs and mRNAs to distant sites. They can be isolated by different methods. However, the biological activities of the purified EVs have seldom been studied. In this study, we compared the use of ultracentrifugation (UC, ultra-filtration (UF, polymer-based precipitation (PBP, and PBP with size-based purification (PBP+SP for isolation of EVs from human endometrial cells and mouse uterine luminal fluid (ULF. Electron microscopy revealed that the diameters of the isolated EVs were similar among the tested methods. UF recovered the highest number of EVs followed by PBP, while UC and PBP+SP were significantly less efficient (P<0.05. Based on the number of EVs-to-protein ratios, PBP had the least protein contamination, significantly better than the other methods (P<0.05. All the isolated EVs expressed exosome-enriched proteins CD63, TSG101 and HSP70. Incubation of the trophoblast JEG-3 cells with an equal amount of the fluorescence-labelled EVs isolated by the studied methods showed that many of the PBP-EVs treated cells were fluorescence positive but only a few cells were labelled in the UC- and UF-EVs treated groups. Moreover, the PBP-EVs could transfer significantly more miRNA to the recipient cells than the other 3 methods (P<0.05. The PBP method could isolate EVs from mouse ULF; the diameter of the isolated EVs was 62±19 nm and expressed CD63, TSG101 and HSP70 proteins. In conclusion, PBP could best preserve the activities of the isolated EVs among the 4 methods studied and was able to isolate EVs from a small volume of sample. The simple setup and low equipment demands makes PBP the most suitable method for rapid EV assessment and isolation of EVs in clinical and basic research settings.

  8. Ubiquitin Conjugation Probed by Inflammation in Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Katherine R; Chauhan, Sitara; Patel, Divya B; Clements, Virginia K; Wang, Yan; Jay, Steven M; Edwards, Nathan J; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Fenselau, Catherine

    2018-01-05

    Ubiquitinated proteins carried by the extracellular vesicles (EV) released by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been investigated using proteomic strategies to examine the effect of tumor-associated inflammation. EV were collected from MDSC directly following isolation from tumor-bearing mice with low and high inflammation. Among the 1092 proteins (high inflammation) and 925 proteins (low inflammation) identified, more than 50% were observed as ubiquitinated proteoforms. More than three ubiquitin-attachment sites were characterized per ubiquitinated protein, on average. Multiple ubiquitination sites were identified in the pro-inflammatory proteins S100 A8 and S100 A9, characteristic of MDSC and in histones and transcription regulators among other proteins. Spectral counting and pathway analysis suggest that ubiquitination occurs independently of inflammation. Some ubiquitinated proteins were shown to cause the migration of MDSC, which has been previously connected with immune suppression and tumor progression. Finally, MDSC EV are found collectively to carry all the enzymes required to catalyze ubiquitination, and the hypothesis is presented that a portion of the ubiquitinated proteins are produced in situ.

  9. Inhibition of extracellular matrix production and remodeling by doxycycline in smooth muscle cells

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    Rogelio Palomino-Morales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the extracellular matrix (ECM production and remodeling of smooth muscle cells (SMCs have been implicated in processes related to the differentiation in atherosclerosis. Due to the anti-atherosclerotic properties of the tetracyclines, we aimed to investigate whether cholesterol supplementation changes the effect of doxycycline over the ECM proteins synthesis and whether isoprenylated proteins and Rho A protein activation are affected. SMC primary culture isolated from chicks exposed to atherogenic factors in vivo (a cholesterol-rich diet, SMC-Ch, comparing it with control cultures isolated after a standard diet (SMC-C. After treatment with 20 nM doxycycline, [H3]-proline and [H3]-mevalonate incorporation were used to measure the synthesis of collagen and isoprenylated proteins, respectively. Real-time PCR was assessed to determine col1a2, col2a1, col3a1, fibronectin, and mmp2 gene expression and the pull-down technique was applied to determine the Rho A activation state. A higher synthesis of collagens and isoprenylated proteins in SMC-Ch than in SMC-C was determined showing that doxycycline inhibits ECM production and remodeling in both SMC types of cultures. Moreover, preliminary results about the effect of doxycycline on protein isoprenylation and Rho A protein activation led us to discuss the possibility that membrane G-protein activation pathways could mediate the molecular mechanism.

  10. Inhibition of extracellular matrix production and remodeling by doxycycline in smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Torres, Carolina; Perales, Sonia; Linares, Ana; Alejandre, Maria Jose

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) production and remodeling of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have been implicated in processes related to the differentiation in atherosclerosis. Due to the anti-atherosclerotic properties of the tetracyclines, we aimed to investigate whether cholesterol supplementation changes the effect of doxycycline over the ECM proteins synthesis and whether isoprenylated proteins and Rho A protein activation are affected. SMC primary culture isolated from chicks exposed to atherogenic factors in vivo (a cholesterol-rich diet, SMC-Ch), comparing it with control cultures isolated after a standard diet (SMC-C). After treatment with 20 nM doxycycline, [H 3 ]-proline and [H 3 ]-mevalonate incorporation were used to measure the synthesis of collagen and isoprenylated proteins, respectively. Real-time PCR was assessed to determine col1a2, col2a1, col3a1, fibronectin, and mmp2 gene expression and the pull-down technique was applied to determine the Rho A activation state. A higher synthesis of collagens and isoprenylated proteins in SMC-Ch than in SMC-C was determined showing that doxycycline inhibits ECM production and remodeling in both SMC types of cultures. Moreover, preliminary results about the effect of doxycycline on protein isoprenylation and Rho A protein activation led us to discuss the possibility that membrane G-protein activation pathways could mediate the molecular mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interleukin-13 conjugated quantum dots for identification of glioma initiating cells and their extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhankumar, A B; Mrowczynski, Oliver D; Patel, Suhag R; Weston, Cody L; Zacharia, Brad E; Glantz, Michael J; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Xu, Li-Chong; Connor, James R

    2017-08-01

    cells and tissues. In this study we designed a cytokine (interleukin-13) functionalized quantum dot to detect a cancer associated receptor expressed in cancer stem cells and the extracellular vesicles (exosomes) secreted by the cancer cells themselves. The binding pattern of these cytokine modified quantum dots to the cancer stem cells and exosomes alters the physical properties of the complex in the fixed and suspended form. This altered binding pattern can be monitored by a variety of techniques, including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and flow cytometry, and subsequent characterization of this quantum dot binding profile provides useful data that can be utilized as a fingerprint to detect cancer disease progression. This type of functionalized quantum dot fingerprint is especially useful for invasive cancers including brain and other metastatic cancers and may allow for earlier detection of disease progression or recurrence, thus saving the lives of patients suffering from this devastating disease. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dextran sulphate crowding and sodium deoxycholate lysis of primary breast fibroblast cells achieve extracellular matrix deposition and decellularization for breast cancer stem cell culture

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    Aroem Naruni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Lingkungan mikro yaitu sel stromal dam matriks ekstraseluler saat ini dinyatakansebagai kontributor dalam perkembangan tumor. Beberapa penelitian telah mengembangkan matriksekstraseluler yang mendukung perkembangan sel in vitro. Matriks ekstraseluler adalah suatu komplekssusunan supramolekuler dari berbagai macam glycoprotein dan proteoglycan. Matriks ekstraselulermenyediakan integritas jaringan, bertindak sebagai scaffold alami tempat sel melekat dan berinteraksiserta berperan sebagai reservoir pertumbuhan sel. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendapatkan deposisidan deselularisasi yang optimal pada matriks ekstraseluler.Metode: Dalam penelitian ini, kami mengembangkan cells crowder untuk meningkatkan deposit matriksekstraseluler dari kultur sel primer fibroblast payudara yang diperoleh dari spesimen hasil operasimammoplasty. Dextran 500 kDa ditambahkan dalam media kultur DMEM lengkap yang telah ditambahkan0.5% FBS dan 100μM L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate. Setelah tujuh hari, sel dilisis dengan menggunakanSodium Deoxycolate (DOC.Hasil: Deposisi matriks ekstraseluler dan proses deselulerisasi dari sel primer fibroblas payudara dapatterdeteksi dengan menggunakan antibodi Rabbit anti human fibronectin yang selanjutnya ditambahkandengan anti rabbit IgG yang telah dikonjugasi dengan Alexa Fluor 488.Kesimpulan: Penambahan dextran sulfat dan prosesing lysis dengan sodium deoxycolate dapatmeningkatkan deposisi dan menghasilkan deselularisasi matriks ekstraseluler. (Health Science Journalof Indonesia 2015;6:43-7Kata kunci: matriks ekstra selular, kanker mammae, stem cell, sel fibroblast AbstractBackground: The microenvironment including stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM is now consideredan active contributor to tumor progression. Certain studies have developed ECM which supports a suitable cellulargrowth in vitro. The ECM is a complex supramolecular assembly of a variety of glycoproteins and proteoglycans.Extracellular

  13. Extracellular vesicles secreted from cancer cell lines stimulate secretion of MMP-9, IL-6, TGF-β1 and EMMPRIN.

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    Jasmina S Redzic

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are key contributors to cancer where they play an integral role in cell-cell communication and transfer pro-oncogenic molecules to recipient cells thereby conferring a cancerous phenotype. Here, we purified EVs using straightforward biochemical approaches from multiple cancer cell lines and subsequently characterized these EVs via multiple biochemical and biophysical methods. In addition, we used fluorescence microscopy to directly show internalization of EVs into the recipient cells within a few minutes upon addition of EVs to recipient cells. We confirmed that the transmembrane protein EMMPRIN, postulated to be a marker of EVs, was indeed secreted from all cell lines studied here. We evaluated the response to EV stimulation in several different types of recipient cells lines and measured the ability of these purified EVs to induce secretion of several factors highly upregulated in human cancers. Our data indicate that purified EVs preferentially stimulate secretion of several proteins implicated in driving cancer in monocytic cells but only harbor limited activity in epithelial cells. Specifically, we show that EVs are potent stimulators of MMP-9, IL-6, TGF-β1 and induce the secretion of extracellular EMMPRIN, which all play a role in driving immune evasion, invasion and inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, by using a comprehensive approach that includes biochemical, biological, and spectroscopic methods, we have begun to elucidate the stimulatory roles.

  14. Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration: From Cell-Based Therapies to Decellularised Engineered Extracellular Matrices

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    James N. Fisher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, autologous bone grafting represents the clinical gold standard in orthopaedic surgery. In certain cases, however, alternative techniques are required. The clinical utility of stem and stromal cells has been demonstrated for the repair and regeneration of craniomaxillofacial and long bone defects although clinical adoption of bone tissue engineering protocols has been very limited. Initial tissue engineering studies focused on the bone marrow as a source of cells for bone regeneration, and while a number of promising results continue to emerge, limitations to this technique have prompted the exploration of alternative cell sources, including adipose and muscle tissue. In this review paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cell sources with a focus on adipose tissue and the bone marrow. Additionally, we highlight the relatively recent paradigm of developmental engineering, which promotes the recapitulation of naturally occurring developmental processes to allow the implant to optimally respond to endogenous cues. Finally we examine efforts to apply lessons from studies into different cell sources and developmental approaches to stimulate bone growth by use of decellularised hypertrophic cartilage templates.

  15. Mesenchymal Stromal/stem Cell-derived Extracellular Vesicles Promote Human Cartilage RegenerationIn Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Lucienne A; van Dooremalen, Sanne F J; Liv, Nalan; Klumperman, Judith; Coffer, Paul J; Saris, Daniël B F; Lorenowicz, Magdalena J

    2018-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a rheumatic disease leading to chronic pain and disability with no effective treatment available. Recently, allogeneic human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) entered clinical trials as a novel therapy for OA. Increasing evidence suggests that therapeutic efficacy of MSC depends on paracrine signalling. Here we investigated the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted by human bone marrow derived MSC (BMMSC) in human OA cartilage repair. To test the effect of BMMSC-EVs on OA cartilage inflammation, TNF-alpha-stimulated OA chondrocyte monolayer cultures were treated with BMMSC-EVs and pro-inflammatory gene expression was measured by qRT-PCR after 48 h. To assess the impact of BMMSC-EVs on cartilage regeneration, BMMSC-EVs were added to the regeneration cultures of human OA chondrocytes, which were analyzed after 4 weeks for glycosaminoglycan content by 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay. Furthermore, paraffin sections of the regenerated tissue were stained for proteoglycans (safranin-O) and type II collagen (immunostaining). We show that BMMSC-EVs inhibit the adverse effects of inflammatory mediators on cartilage homeostasis. When co-cultured with OA chondrocytes, BMMSC-EVs abrogated the TNF-alpha-mediated upregulation of COX2 and pro-inflammatory interleukins and inhibited TNF-alpha-induced collagenase activity. BMMSC-EVs also promoted cartilage regeneration in vitro . Addition of BMMSC-EVs to cultures of chondrocytes isolated from OA patients stimulated production of proteoglycans and type II collagen by these cells. Our data demonstrate that BMMSC-EVs can be important mediators of cartilage repair and hold great promise as a novel therapeutic for cartilage regeneration and osteoarthritis.

  16. Morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of extracellular matrix changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma

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    Usha Agrawal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, including its progression from dysplasia to carcinoma, "field effects", genetic changes in tumor associated mucosa (TAM and effect of matrix metalloproteinases in breaking down of matrix proteins to facilitate invasion, has been well documented. However, what remains to be done is to extrapolate this knowledge to improve patient care. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the extracellular matrix (ECM changes with the routine histochemical stains available to most histopathologists. Materials and Methods: The study includes 72 cases of OSCC in which the tumor and adjacent normal appearing areas were sampled to study the ECM changes with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E and Verhoeff′s-Van Gieson elastic stain (VVG. Results: Basophilic fragmentation of collagen (H and E and clumped short elastic fibers (VVG were seen in 12 (16.7% cases. Of the remaining cases, 18 (25% had a dense lymphocytic infiltrate and had no demonstrable elastic fibers. Those cases with H and E changes were further studied and compared with normal mucosa for ultrastructural changes. The ultrastructural study demonstrated an increase in oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibers and decrease in collagen fibers with some transformation changes associated with OSCCs and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: Changes in transformation of collagen to elastic fibers and also the loss of both the fibers in areas of lymphocytic infiltration possibly indicate degradation of ECM fibers by factors released from the lymphocytes or tumor cells and the limiting effect on the tumor by ECM remodeling.

  17. Dynamic Regulation of Cell Volume and Extracellular ATP of Human Erythrocytes.

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    M Florencia Leal Denis

    Full Text Available The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7 triggered in human erythrocytes (rbcs the release of ATP and swelling. Since swelling is a well-known inducer of ATP release, and extracellular (ATPe, interacting with P (purinergic receptors, can affect cell volume (Vr, we explored the dynamic regulation between Vr and ATPe.We made a quantitative assessment of MST7-dependent kinetics of Vr and of [ATPe], both in the absence and presence of blockers of ATP efflux, swelling and P receptors.In rbcs 10 μM MST7 promoted acute, strongly correlated changes in [ATPe] and Vr. Whereas MST7 induced increases of 10% in Vr and 190 nM in [ATPe], blocking swelling in a hyperosmotic medium + MST7 reduced [ATPe] by 40%. Pre-incubation of rbcs with 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two inhibitors of the ATP conduit pannexin 1, reduced [ATPe] by 40-50% and swelling by 40-60%, while in the presence of 80 U/mL apyrase, an ATPe scavenger, cell swelling was prevented. While exposure to 10 μM NF110, a blocker of ATP-P2X receptors mediating sodium influx, reduced [ATPe] by 48%, and swelling by 80%, incubation of cells in sodium free medium reduced swelling by 92%.Results were analyzed by means of a mathematical model where ATPe kinetics and Vr kinetics were mutually regulated. Model dependent fit to experimental data showed that, upon MST7 exposure, ATP efflux required a fast 1960-fold increase of ATP permeability, mediated by two kinetically different conduits, both of which were activated by swelling and inactivated by time. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that, following MST7 exposure, ATP is released via two conduits, one of which is mediated by pannexin 1. The accumulated ATPe activates P2X receptors, followed by sodium influx, resulting in cell swelling, which in turn further activates ATP release. Thus swelling and P2X receptors constitute essential components of a positive feedback loop underlying ATP-induced ATP release of rbcs.

  18. Influence of cartilage extracellular matrix molecules on cell phenotype and neocartilage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Shawn P; Chen, Xian; Sovani, Sujata; Taniguchi, Noboru; Colwell, Clifford W; Lotz, Martin K; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for maintaining the cartilage's role as a low-friction and load-bearing tissue. In this study, we examined the influence of cartilage zone-specific ECM on human articular chondrocytes (HAC) in two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) environments. Two culture systems were used. SYSTEM 1: HAC were cultured on cell-culture plates that had been precoated with the following ECM molecules for 7 days: decorin, biglycan, tenascin C (superficial zone), collagen type II, hyaluronan (HA) (middle and deep zones), and osteopontin (deep zone). Uncoated standard culture plates were used as controls. Expanded cells were examined for phenotypic changes using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, expanded cells were placed into high-density pellet cultures for 14 days. Neocartilage formation was assessed via gene expression and histology evaluations. SYSTEM 2: HAC that were cultured on untreated plates and encapsulated in a 3D alginate scaffold were mixed with one of the zone-specific ECM molecules. Cell viability, gene expression, and histology assessments were conducted on 14-day-old tissues. In HAC monolayer culture, exposure to decorin, HA, and osteopontin increased COL2A1 and aggrecan messenger RNA (mRNA) levels compared with controls. Biglycan up-regulated aggrecan without a significant impact on COL2A1 expression; Tenascin C reduced COL2A1 expression. Neocartilage formed after preculture on tenascin C and collagen type II expressed higher COL2A1 mRNA compared with control pellets. Preculture of HAC on HA decreased both COL2A1 and aggrecan expression levels compared with controls, which was consistent with histology. Reduced proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) mRNA levels were observed in HAC pellets that had been precultured with biglycan and collagen type II. Exposing HAC to HA directly in 3D-alginate culture most effectively induced neocartilage formation, showing increased COL2A1

  19. T Follicular Helper Cells Promote a Beneficial Gut Ecosystem for Host Metabolic Homeostasis by Sensing Microbiota-Derived Extracellular ATP

    OpenAIRE

    Perruzza, Lisa; Gargari, Giorgio; Proietti, Michele; Fosso, Bruno; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Faliti, Caterina Elisa; Rezzonico-Jost, Tanja; Scribano, Daniela; Mauri, Laura; Colombo, Diego; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Moregola, Annalisa; Mooser, Catherine; Pesole, Graziano; Nicoletti, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Summary The ATP-gated ionotropic P2X7 receptor regulates T?follicular helper (Tfh) cell abundance in the Peyer?s patches (PPs) of the small intestine; deletion of P2rx7, encoding for P2X7, in Tfh cells results in enhanced IgA secretion and binding to commensal bacteria. Here, we show that Tfh cell activity is important for generating a diverse bacterial community in the gut and that sensing of microbiota-derived extracellular ATP via P2X7 promotes the generation of a proficient gut ecosystem ...

  20. Chinese yellow wine inhibits production of homocysteine-induced extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hangyuan; Wang, Ping; You, Binquan; Xing, Yangbo; Lee, Jong-Dae

    2007-06-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of Chinese yellow wine is associated with a reduced risk of coronary disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that participate in extracellular matrix degradation have been involved in atherosclerotic plaque growth and instability. The present research aimed to study the effects of Chinese yellow wine on the production of homocysteine (Hcy)-induced extracellular MMP-2 in cultured rats vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). We examined the effects of different Hcy levels (0-1000 micromol/l) on MMP-2 production, and the effects of Chinese yellow wine with low alcohol concentrations (12-19%) on Hcy-induced MMP-2 in cultured rat (VSMCs) using gelatin zymography and western blotting. We further compared the changes of MMP-2 under various treatments for 12, 24 and 48 h. Hcy (50-1000 micromol/l) increased the production of MMP-2 significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Increased production of MMP-2 induced by Hcy was reduced by extracellularly added Chinese yellow wine. Production of MMP-2 under various treatments for 48 h increased more than 12 and 24 h. Extracellularly added Chinese yellow wine decreased Hcy-induced MMP-2 secretion. The inhibitory effect of yellow wine on the activation of MMP-2 might contribute to their beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system.

  1. In vitro regulation of human breast cancer cell adhesion and invasion via integrin receptors to the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, G P; Puddefoot, J R; Vinson, G P; Wells, C A; Carpenter, R

    1995-09-01

    The extracellular matrix consists of the interstitium and the basement membrane. Cellular interaction with fibronectin, laminin and collagen provides a possible mechanism by which cancer cells adhere, invade and metastasize. The integrins are a major family of adhesion molecules that recognize epitopes on the extracellular matrix as ligands. These include the alpha 2 beta 1, alpha 3 beta 1, alpha v beta 1 and alpha v beta 5 integrins, most of which were found to be expressed on MCF-7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, ZR75-1 and Hs578T breast cancer cell lines. Each cell line adhered to the matrix proteins in a dose-dependent manner and was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies against relevant integrins. Only Hs578T was significantly invasive through fibronectin but both Hs578T and MDA-MB-231 invaded through laminin and type IV collagen in an in vitro assay. The invasive potential of these cell lines could be inhibited by integrin antibodies added to cells before incubation, but the addition of antibodies after cells were allowed to adhere to the matrix failed to inhibit invasion. Inhibition of cellular adhesion to the matrix reduced the invasive potential of breast cancer cell lines. As integrin antibodies inhibit cell invasion in vitro, the integrins may be of potential value as antitumour therapeutic agents.

  2. Cooperative Degradation of Chitin by Extracellular and Cell Surface-Expressed Chitinases from Paenibacillus sp. Strain FPU-7

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Takafumi; Hibi, Takao; Fujii, Yutaka; Sugimoto, Ikumi; Fujiwara, Akihiro; Suzuki, Fumiko; Iwasaki, Yukimoto; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Taketo, Akira; Kimoto, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    Chitin, a major component of fungal cell walls and invertebrate cuticles, is an exceedingly abundant polysaccharide, ranking next to cellulose. Industrial demand for chitin and its degradation products as raw materials for fine chemical products is increasing. A bacterium with high chitin-decomposing activity, Paenibacillus sp. strain FPU-7, was isolated from soil by using a screening medium containing α-chitin powder. Although FPU-7 secreted several extracellular chitinases and thoroughly di...

  3. Cavin-1/PTRF alters prostate cancer cell-derived extracellular vesicle content and internalization to attenuate extracellular vesicle-mediated osteoclastogenesis and osteoblast proliferation

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    Kerry L. Inder

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumour-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs play a role in tumour progression; however, the spectrum of molecular mechanisms regulating EV secretion and cargo selection remain to be fully elucidated. We have reported that cavin-1 expression in prostate cancer PC3 cells reduced the abundance of a subset of EV proteins, concomitant with reduced xenograft tumour growth and metastasis. Methods: We examined the functional outcomes and mechanisms of cavin-1 expression on PC3-derived EVs (PC3-EVs. Results: PC3-EVs were internalized by osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells and primary human osteoblasts (hOBs in vitro, stimulating osteoclastogenesis 37-fold and hOB proliferation 1.5-fold, respectively. Strikingly, EVs derived from cavin-1-expressing PC3 cells (cavin-1-PC3-EVs failed to induce multinucleate osteoblasts or hOB proliferation. Cavin-1 was not detected in EVs, indicating an indirect mechanism of action. EV morphology, size and quantity were also not affected by cavin-1 expression, suggesting that cavin-1 modulated EV cargo recruitment rather than release. While cavin-1-EVs had no osteoclastogenic function, they were internalized by RAW264.7 cells but at a reduced efficiency compared to control EVs. EV surface proteins are required for internalization of PC3-EVs by RAW264.7 cells, as proteinase K treatment abolished uptake of both control and cavin-1-PC3-EVs. Removal of sialic acid modifications by neuraminidase treatment increased the amount of control PC3-EVs internalized by RAW264.7 cells, without affecting cavin-1-PC3-EVs. This suggests that cavin-1 expression altered the glycosylation modifications on PC3-EV surface. Finally, cavin-1 expression did not affect EV in vivo tissue targeting as both control and cavin-1-PC3-EVs were predominantly retained in the lung and bone 24 hours after injection into mice. Discussion: Taken together, our results reveal a novel pathway for EV cargo sorting, and highlight the potential of utilizing

  4. Optimization of Liver Decellularization Maintains Extracellular Matrix Micro-Architecture and Composition Predisposing to Effective Cell Seeding.

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    Panagiotis Maghsoudlou

    Full Text Available Hepatic tissue engineering using decellularized scaffolds is a potential therapeutic alternative to conventional transplantation. However, scaffolds are usually obtained using decellularization protocols that destroy the extracellular matrix (ECM and hamper clinical translation. We aim to develop a decellularization technique that reliably maintains hepatic microarchitecture and ECM components. Isolated rat livers were decellularized by detergent-enzymatic technique with (EDTA-DET or without EDTA (DET. Histology, DNA quantification and proteomics confirmed decellularization with further DNA reduction with the addition of EDTA. Quantification, histology, immunostaining, and proteomics demonstrated preservation of extracellular matrix components in both scaffolds with a higher amount of collagen and glycosaminoglycans in the EDTA-DET scaffold. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray phase contrast imaging showed microarchitecture preservation, with EDTA-DET scaffolds more tightly packed. DET scaffold seeding with a hepatocellular cell line demonstrated complete repopulation in 14 days, with cells proliferating at that time. Decellularization using DET preserves microarchitecture and extracellular matrix components whilst allowing for cell growth for up to 14 days. Addition of EDTA creates a denser, more compact matrix. Transplantation of the scaffolds and scaling up of the methodology are the next steps for successful hepatic tissue engineering.

  5. Schwann Cells Metabolize Extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    The 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway (3′,5′-cAMP→5′-AMP→adenosine) and the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway (2′,3′-cAMP→2′-AMP/3′-AMP→adenosine) are active in the brain. Oligodendrocytes participate in the brain 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway via their robust expression of 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase; converts 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP). Because Schwann cells also express CNPase, it is conceivable that the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway exists in the peripheral nervous system. To test this and to compare the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway to the 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway in Schwann cells, we examined the metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, 3′,5′-cAMP, and 5′-AMP in primary rat Schwann cells in culture. Addition of 2′,3′-cAMP (3, 10, and 30 µM) to Schwann cells increased levels of 2′-AMP in the medium from 0.006 ± 0.002 to 21 ± 2, 70 ± 3, and 187 ± 10 nM/µg protein, respectively; in contrast, Schwann cells had little ability to convert 2′,3′-cAMP to 3′-AMP or 3′,5′-cAMP to either 3′-AMP or 5′-AMP. Although Schwann cells slightly converted 2′,3′-cAMP and 2′-AMP to adenosine, they did so at very modest rates (e.g., 5- and 3-fold, respectively, more slowly compared with our previously reported studies in oligodendrocytes). Using transected myelinated rat sciatic nerves in culture medium, we observed a time-related increase in endogenous intracellular 2′,3′-cAMP and extracellular 2′-AMP. These findings indicate that Schwann cells do not have a robust 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway but do have a 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway; however, because the pathway mostly involves 2′-AMP formation rather than 3′-AMP, and because the conversion of 2′-AMP to adenosine is slow, metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP mostly results in the accumulation of 2′-AMP. Accumulation of 2′-AMP in peripheral nerves postinjury could have

  6. Biochemical constitution of extracellular medium is critical for control of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huiyan; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2008-05-01

    Although voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) activity, upregulated significantly in strongly metastatic human breast cancer cells, has been found to potentiate a variety of in vitro metastatic cell behaviors, the mechanism(s) regulating channel expression/activity is not clear. As a step toward identifying possible serum factors that might be responsible for this, we tested whether medium in which fetal bovine serum (FBS) was substituted with a commercial serum replacement agent (SR-2), comprising insulin and bovine serum albumin, would influence the VGSC-dependent in vitro metastatic cell behaviors. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were used as a model. Measurements of lateral motility, transverse migration and adhesion showed consistently that the channel's involvement in metastatic cell behaviors depended on the extracellular biochemical conditions. In normal medium (5% FBS), tetrodotoxin (TTX), a highly specific blocker of VGSCs, suppressed these cellular behaviors, as reported before. In contrast, in SR-2 medium, TTX had opposite effects. However, blocking endogenous insulin/insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling with AG1024 eliminated or reversed the anomalous effects of TTX. Insulin added to serum-free medium increased migration, and TTX increased it further. In conclusion, (1) the biochemical constitution of the extracellular medium had a significant impact upon breast cancer cells' in vitro metastatic behaviors and (2) insulin, in particular, controlled the mode of the functional association between cells' VGSC activity and metastatic machinery.

  7. Extracellular concentration of homocysteine in human cell lines is influenced by specific inhibitors of cyst(e)ine transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultberg, Björn

    2004-04-01

    Despite the growing evidence that plasma homocysteine is a cardiovascular risk factor, the mechanism behind the vascular injuries is still unknown. Studies of the cellular uptake systems for homocysteine are scarce, but membrane transporters of cyst(e)ine seem to be involved. In the present study the cellular uptake of extracellular homocysteine in HeLa and hepatoma cell lines is investigated by using several different transport inhibitors for cellular uptake of cyst(e)ine. It is shown that systems A and Xc- are the main transport systems for homocysteine uptake in HeLa cells. It is also confirmed that the magnitude of homocysteine uptake in hepatoma cells is lower than in HeLa cells. However, in the presence of high amounts of extracellular homocysteine both cell types exhibited a high elimination of homocysteine, which was inhibited by the presence of inhibitors of systems A or Xc-. It is possible that there is normally a high turnover of homocysteine in cell cultures, which is not detected by occasional determinations of homocysteine concentrations. The complex pattern of homocysteine production, release, uptake and distribution between different cells in the body is important to examine further in order to possibly be able to modulate the elimination of homocysteine from circulation and thereby lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase predisposes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines to CD40-mediated cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, C Annette; Owens, Trevor; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2006-01-01

    , including LCK and VAV. In addition, CD40-sensitive DLBCL cell lines also displayed constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and failed to undergo apoptosis when ERK phosphorylation was inhibited. In contrast, CD40-resistant lines showed no constitutive activation of ERK......CD40 promotes survival, proliferation, and differentiation of normal B cells but can cause activation-induced cell death in malignant B lymphocytes. CD40 ligand and anti-CD40 antibodies have been used successfully to induce apoptosis in lymphoma lines both in vitro and in xenograft tumor models....... Although this makes CD40 an attractive target for antitumor therapies, the response of malignant B cells to CD40 signaling is variable, and CD40 stimulation can enhance proliferation and can increase chemoresistance in some cell lines. It would therefore be useful to identify markers that predict whether...

  9. Evidence of eosinophil extracellular trap cell death in COPD: does it represent the trigger that switches on the disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe Echevarría, Loli; Leimgruber, Carolina; García González, Jorge; Nevado, Alberto; Álvarez, Ruth; García, Luciana N; Quintar, Amado A; Maldonado, Cristina A

    2017-01-01

    In spite of the numerous studies on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the cellular and molecular basis of the disease’s development remain unclear. Neutrophils and eosinophils are known to be key players in COPD. Recently, neutrophil extracellular trap cell death (NETosis), a mechanism due to decondensation and extrusion of chromatin to form extracellular traps, has been demonstrated in COPD. However, there is limited knowledge about eosinophil extracellular trap cell death (EETosis) and its role in the pathogenesis of COPD. The aim of this study was to evaluate EETosis in stable COPD. Induced sputum obtained from healthy smokers and low exacerbation risk COPD A or B group patients or high exacerbation risk COPD C or D group patients were included. Samples were examined using electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. Healthy smokers (n=10) and COPD A (n=19) group exhibited neutrophilic or paucigranulocytic phenotypes, with NETosis being absent in these patients. In contrast, COPD B (n=29), with eosinophilic or mixed phenotypes, showed EETosis and incipient NETosis. COPD C (n=18) and COPD D groups (n=13) were differentiated from low exacerbation rate-COPD group by the abundant cellular debris, with COPD C group having an eosinophilic pattern and numerous cells undergoing EETosis. A hallmark of this group was the abundant released membranes that often appeared phagocytosed by neutrophils, which coincidentally exhibited early NETosis changes. The COPD D group included patients with a neutrophilic or mixed pattern, with abundant neutrophil extracellular trap-derived material. This study is the first to demonstrate EETosis at different stages of stable COPD. The results suggest a role for eosinophils in COPD pathophysiology, especially at the beginning and during the persistence of the disease, regardless of whether the patient quit smoking, with EETosis debris probably triggering uncontrolled NETosis. The main target of these findings should be young

  10. Herpes simplex virus gE/gI extracellular domains promote axonal transport and spread from neurons to epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Paul W; Wright, Catherine C; Howard, Tiffani; Johnson, David C

    2014-10-01

    Following reactivation from latency, there are two distinct steps in the spread of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from infected neurons to epithelial cells: (i) anterograde axonal transport of virus particles from neuron bodies to axon tips and (ii) exocytosis and spread of extracellular virions across cell junctions into adjacent epithelial cells. The HSV heterodimeric glycoprotein gE/gI is important for anterograde axonal transport, and gE/gI cytoplasmic domains play important roles in sorting of virus particles into axons. However, the roles of the large (∼400-residue) gE/gI extracellular (ET) domains in both axonal transport and neuron-to-epithelial cell spread have not been characterized. Two gE mutants, gE-277 and gE-348, contain small insertions in the gE ET domain, fold normally, form gE/gI heterodimers, and are incorporated into virions. Both gE-277 and gE-348 did not function in anterograde axonal transport; there were markedly reduced numbers of viral capsids and glycoproteins compared with wild-type HSV. The defects in axonal transport were manifest in neuronal cell bodies, involving missorting of HSV capsids before entry into proximal axons. Although there were diminished numbers of mutant gE-348 capsids and glycoproteins in distal axons, there was efficient spread to adjacent epithelial cells, similar to wild-type HSV. In contrast, virus particles produced by HSV gE-277 spread poorly to epithelial cells, despite numbers of virus particles similar to those for HSV gE-348. These results genetically separate the two steps in HSV spread from neurons to epithelial cells and demonstrate that the gE/gI ET domains function in both processes. An essential phase of the life cycle of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other alphaherpesviruses is the capacity to reactivate from latency and then spread from infected neurons to epithelial tissues. This spread involves at least two steps: (i) anterograde transport to axon tips followed by (ii) exocytosis and extracellular

  11. Extracellular conformational changes in the capsid of human papillomaviruses contribute to asynchronous uptake into host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Miriam; Greune, Lilo; Schmidt, M Alexander; Schelhaas, Mario

    2018-03-28

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is the leading cause of cervical cancer. For initial infection, HPV16 utilizes a novel endocytic pathway for host cell entry. Unique amongst viruses, uptake occurs asynchronously over a protracted period of time with half-times between 9-12 h. To trigger endocytic uptake, the virus particles need to undergo a series of structural modifications after initial binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). These changes involve proteolytic cleavage of the major capsid protein L1 by kallikrein-8 (KLK8), exposure of the N-terminus of the minor capsid protein L2 by cyclophilins, and cleavage of this N-terminus by furin. Overall, the structural changes are thought to facilitate the engagement of an elusive secondary receptor for internalization. Here, we addressed whether structural changes are the rate-limiting steps during infectious internalization of HPV16 by using structurally-primed HPV16 particles. Our findings indicate that the structural modifications mediated by cyclophilins and furin, which lead to exposure and cleavage of the L2 N-terminus, respectively, contribute to the slow and asynchronous internalization kinetics, whereas conformational changes elicited by HSPG binding and KLK8 cleavage did not. However, these structural modifications only accounted for 30-50% of the delay in internalization. Therefore, we propose that limited internalization receptor availability for engagement of HPV16 causes slow and asynchronous internalization in addition to rate-limiting structural changes in the viral capsid. IMPORTANCE HPVs are the main cause for anogenital cancers. Their unique biology is linked to the differentiation program of skin or mucosa. Here, we analyzed another unique aspect of HPV infections using the prototype HPV16. After initial cell binding, HPVs display an unusually protracted residence time on the plasma membrane prior to asynchronous uptake. As viruses typically do not expose themselves to host immune

  12. Degenerative disc disease of herniated intervertebral discs is associated with extracellular matrix remodeling, vimentin-positive cells and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreto, Carla; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castorina, Alessandro; Loreto, Corrado; Martinez, Giuseppa

    2011-03-01

    We studied patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) to demonstrate that i) remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the intervertebral disc (IVD), particularly the elastic fiber system, of subjects with herniated discs is dysregulated and that ii) it is accompanied by accelerated elastin degradation due to increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9). Moreover we wanted to obtain a deeper insight into the pathogenesis of DDD through the study of ECM calcification, DNA fragmentation using TUNEL analysis, BAX, bcl-2 and vimentin immunopositive cells. We studied herniated discs from patients of three age groups (group 1=30-40 years; group 2=40-50 years; and group 3=50-65 years) to evaluate the oxytalan fiber systemMMP-9, apoptosis and vimentin immunopositive cells. The results demonstrated the presence of oxytalan fibers in the annulus fibrosus (AF) and the nucleus pulposus (NP) of herniated discs. In the AF oxytalan fibers replaced disrupted mature elastic fibers in calcified areas, while in the NP they were mostly found in nests at the periphery of chondrocytes. MMP-9 was prevalently observed in NP nests above all in group 1 and group 3 discs while group 2 exhibited a lower MMP-9 immunostaining. Activation of the apoptotic process was demonstrated by upregulated BAX expression in group 3. BAX immunopositivity was inversely mirrored by a significant decrease in bcl-2 expression. Intermediate filament protein vimentin was strongly expressed only in group 1 samples. A large number of apoptotic TUNEL+ cells was observed in group 3 specimens. The presence of oxytalan fibers may be the result of a process of incomplete elastogenesis, or a response to mechanical stress trying to functionally replace the lack of elastic fibers. MMP-9 expression seems to relate to disc damage, while chondrocyte BAX upregulation and TUNEL+ cell staining revealed apoptosis activation regardless of patient age. Vimentin immunopositivity was clearly detected in group 1

  13. Hsp90 Binds Directly to Fibronectin (FN) and Inhibition Reduces the Extracellular Fibronectin Matrix in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Amy; Dhanani, Karim C. H.; Prinsloo, Earl; Edkins, Adrienne L.

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been identified in the extracellular space and has been shown to chaperone a finite number of extracellular proteins involved in cell migration and invasion. We used chemical cross-linking and immunoprecipitation followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to isolate a complex containing Hsp90 and the matrix protein fibronectin (FN) from breast cancer cells. Further analysis showed direct binding of Hsp90 to FN using an in vitro co-immunoprecipitation assay, a solid phase binding assay and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Confocal microscopy showed regions of co-localisation of Hsp90 and FN in breast cancer cell lines. Exogenous Hsp90β was shown to increase the formation of extracellular FN matrix in the Hs578T cell line, whilst knockdown or inhibition of Hsp90 led to a reduction in the levels of both soluble and insoluble FN and could be partially rescued by addition of exogenous Hsp90β. Treatment of cells with novobiocin led to internalization of FN into vesicles that were positive for the presence of the lysosomal marker, LAMP-1. Taken together, the direct interaction between FN and Hsp90, as well as the decreased levels of both soluble and insoluble FN upon Hsp90 inhibition or knockdown, suggested that FN may be a new client protein for Hsp90 and that Hsp90 was involved in FN matrix assembly and/or stability. The identification of FN as a putative client protein of Hsp90 suggests a role for Hsp90 in FN matrix stability, which is important for a number of fundamental cellular processes including embryogenesis, wound healing, cell migration and metastasis. PMID:24466266

  14. Extracellular vesicles from parasitic helminths contain specific excretory/secretory proteins and are internalized in intestinal host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marcilla

    Full Text Available The study of host-parasite interactions has increased considerably in the last decades, with many studies focusing on the identification of parasite molecules (i.e. surface or excretory/secretory proteins (ESP as potential targets for new specific treatments and/or diagnostic tools. In parallel, in the last few years there have been significant advances in the field of extracellular vesicles research. Among these vesicles, exosomes of endocytic origin, with a characteristic size ranging from 30-100 nm, carry several atypical secreted proteins in different organisms, including parasitic protozoa. Here, we present experimental evidence for the existence of exosome-like vesicles in parasitic helminths, specifically the trematodes Echinostoma caproni and Fasciola hepatica. These microvesicles are actively released by the parasites and are taken up by host cells. Trematode extracellular vesicles contain most of the proteins previously identified as components of ESP, as confirmed by proteomic, immunogold labeling and electron microscopy studies. In addition to parasitic proteins, we also identify host proteins in these structures. The existence of extracellular vesicles explains the secretion of atypical proteins in trematodes, and the demonstration of their uptake by host cells suggests an important role for these structures in host-parasite communication, as described for other infectious agents.

  15. RAGE Expression and NF-κB Activation Attenuated by Extracellular Domain of RAGE in Human Salivary Gland Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Chuong, Christopher; Katz, Joseph; Pauley, Kaleb M.; Bulosan, Marievic; Cha, Seunghee

    2009-01-01

    The receptor for advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE) has been implicated as a pro-inflammatory factor in chronic inflammatory conditions such as diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of the soluble-RAGE (sRAGE), the extracellular domain of RAGE, on RAGE expression and NF-κB translocation in human-salivary gland-cell-lines (HSG). Cells were stimulated with agonist S100A4, fusion protein of RAGE encompassing the extracellul...

  16. Light induces Fos expression via extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 in melanopsin-expressing PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldrup, Marie-Louise Bülow; Georg, Birgitte; Falktoft, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    and the cells respond to light by a membrane depolarization and induction of the immediate early response gene Fos. Previous studies showed that the light activated melanopsin-induced signaling, the phototransduction, leading to depolarization of the membrane resembles the invertebrate opsins, which involves...... a Galpha(q/11) coupled phospholipase C activation. However, the signaling proteins mediating melanopsin-induced Fos expression are unresolved. In this study, we examined the phototransduction leading to Fos expression in melanopsin-transfected PC12 cells. A pivotal role of the extracellular signal...

  17. Molecular constituents of the extracellular matrix in rat liver mounting a hepatic progenitor cell response for tissue repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig; Jelnes, Peter; Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundTissue repair in the adult mammalian liver occurs in two distinct processes, referred to as the first and second tiers of defense. We undertook to characterize the changes in molecular constituents of the extracellular matrix when hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) respond in a second tier...... and compared the transcriptional signatures in untreated rat liver (control) with those from livers of day 1, day 5 and day 9 post hepatectomy in both protocols. Numerous transcripts encoding specific subunits of collagens, laminins, integrins, and various other extracellular matrix structural components were...... strong correlation with Krt1- 19, a well-established marker of a ductular/HPC reaction. Furthermore, a significant up-modulation and very strong correlation between the transcriptional profiles of Krt1-19 and St14 encoding matriptase, a component of a novel protease system, was found in the second tier...

  18. Fractones: extracellular matrix niche controlling stem cell fate and growth factor activity in the brain in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    The stem cell niche refers to a specific microenvironment where stem cells proliferate and differentiate to produce new specialized cells throughout an organism's adulthood. Growth factors are crucial signaling molecules that diffuse through the extracellular space, reach the stem cell niche, and ultimately promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation. However, it is not well known how multiple growth factors, often with antagonistic activities, work together in the stem cell niche to select target stem cell populations and determine stem cell fate. There is accumulating evidence suggesting that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules play an important role in promoting growth factor access and activity in the stem cell niche. In the adult brain neurogenic zone, where neural stem cells (NSCs) reside, there exist specialized ECM structures, which we have named fractones. The processes of NSC allow them to come into contact with fractones and interact with its individual components, which include heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and laminins. We have demonstrated that fractone-associated HSPGs bind growth factors and regulate NSC proliferation in the neurogenic zone. Moreover, emerging results show that fractones are structurally altered in animal models with autism and adult hydrocephalus, as demonstrated by changes in fractone size, quantity, or HSPG content. Interestingly, ECM structures similar to fractones have been found throughout β-amyloid plaques in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Pathological fractones may cause imbalances in growth factor activity and impair neurogenesis, leading to inflammation and disorder. Generally speaking, these stem cell niche structures play a potentially vital role in controlling growth factor activity during both health and disease.

  19. T Follicular Helper Cells Promote a Beneficial Gut Ecosystem for Host Metabolic Homeostasis by Sensing Microbiota-Derived Extracellular ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruzza, Lisa; Gargari, Giorgio; Proietti, Michele; Fosso, Bruno; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Faliti, Caterina Elisa; Rezzonico-Jost, Tanja; Scribano, Daniela; Mauri, Laura; Colombo, Diego; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Moregola, Annalisa; Mooser, Catherine; Pesole, Graziano; Nicoletti, Mauro; Norata, Giuseppe Danilo; Geuking, Markus B; McCoy, Kathy D; Guglielmetti, Simone; Grassi, Fabio

    2017-03-14

    The ATP-gated ionotropic P2X7 receptor regulates T follicular helper (Tfh) cell abundance in the Peyer's patches (PPs) of the small intestine; deletion of P2rx7, encoding for P2X7, in Tfh cells results in enhanced IgA secretion and binding to commensal bacteria. Here, we show that Tfh cell activity is important for generating a diverse bacterial community in the gut and that sensing of microbiota-derived extracellular ATP via P2X7 promotes the generation of a proficient gut ecosystem for metabolic homeostasis. The results of this study indicate that Tfh cells play a role in host-microbiota mutualism beyond protecting the intestinal mucosa by induction of affinity-matured IgA and suggest that extracellular ATP constitutes an inter-kingdom signaling molecule important for selecting a beneficial microbial community for the host via P2X7-mediated regulation of B cell help. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. T Follicular Helper Cells Promote a Beneficial Gut Ecosystem for Host Metabolic Homeostasis by Sensing Microbiota-Derived Extracellular ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Perruzza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-gated ionotropic P2X7 receptor regulates T follicular helper (Tfh cell abundance in the Peyer’s patches (PPs of the small intestine; deletion of P2rx7, encoding for P2X7, in Tfh cells results in enhanced IgA secretion and binding to commensal bacteria. Here, we show that Tfh cell activity is important for generating a diverse bacterial community in the gut and that sensing of microbiota-derived extracellular ATP via P2X7 promotes the generation of a proficient gut ecosystem for metabolic homeostasis. The results of this study indicate that Tfh cells play a role in host-microbiota mutualism beyond protecting the intestinal mucosa by induction of affinity-matured IgA and suggest that extracellular ATP constitutes an inter-kingdom signaling molecule important for selecting a beneficial microbial community for the host via P2X7-mediated regulation of B cell help.

  1. Bacillus globigii cell size is influenced by variants of the quorum sensing peptide extracellular death factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Sijbrandij (T.); W.E. Kaman (Wendy); A.J.M. Ligtenberg (A. J M); K. Nazmi (Kamran); E.C.I. Veerman (Enno); F.J. Bikker (Floris)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractToxin-antitoxin modules are necessary for the mode of action of several antibiotics. One of the most studied toxin-antitoxin modules is the quorum sensing - dependent MazEF system in Escherichia coli. The quorum sensing factor in this system is called the extracellular death factor

  2. Bacillus globigii cell size is influenced by variants of the quorum sensing peptide extracellular death factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandij, T.; Kaman, W.E.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Bikker, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin modules are necessary for the mode of action of several antibiotics. One of the most studied toxin-antitoxin modules is the quorum sensing—dependent MazEF system in Escherichia coli. The quorum sensing factor in this system is called the extracellular death factor (EDF), a linear

  3. Bacillus globigii cell size is influenced by variants of the quorum sensing peptide extracellular death factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandij, T.; Kaman, W.E.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Bikker, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin modules are necessary for the mode of action of several antibiotics. One of the most studied toxin-antitoxin modules is the quorum sensing - dependent MazEF system in Escherichia coli. The quorum sensing factor in this system is called the extracellular death factor (EDF), a linear

  4. Selective secretion of microRNAs from lung cancer cells via extracellular vesicles promotes CAMK1D-mediated tube formation in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James; Dickman, Christopher; MacLellan, Sara; Towle, Rebecca; Jabalee, James; Lam, Stephen; Garnis, Cathie

    2017-10-13

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are key signaling mediators between cancer cells and their supporting stroma, and regulate critical processes such as invasion, metastases, and angiogenesis. We have identified a subset of miRNAs (miR-142-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-145-5p, miR-150-5p, miR-223-3p, miR-451a, miR-486-5p, miR-605-5p) that are enriched in lung adenocarcinoma extracellular vesicles compared to the donor cells from which they were derived. Two well-known tumor suppressors, miR-143-3p and miR-145-5p, were also enriched in serum samples collected during surgery from blood vessels draining directly from lung adenocarcinoma tumor beds. Recently, both miRNAs were found to promote neoangiogenesis in endothelial cells in mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma through targeting of CAMK1D, an inhibitory kinase that can impair angiogenesis when over-expressed. We show that the transfer of miR-143-3p and miR-145-5p within extracellular vesicles from lung adenocarcinoma cells to endothelial cells reduces the levels of CAMK1D and increases tube formation by endothelial cells. This finding suggests that transfer of miRNAs within extracellular vesicles is a method of communication between cancer and endothelial cells which promotes angiogenesis while simultaneously removing tumor suppressive miRNAs within the tumor cells, thus driving tumorigenesis.

  5. Salivary extracellular vesicle-associated miRNAs as potential biomarkers in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Chiara; Camussi, Francesco; Broccoletti, Roberto; Gambino, Alessio; Cabras, Marco; Molinaro, Luca; Carossa, Stefano; Camussi, Giovanni; Arduino, Paolo G

    2018-04-18

    Several studies in the past have investigated the expression of micro RNAs (miRNAs) in saliva as potential biomarkers. Since miRNAs associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs) are known to be protected from enzymatic degradation, we evaluated whether salivary EVs from patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) were enriched with specific subsets of miRNAs. OSCC patients and controls were matched with regards to age, gender and risk factors. Total RNA was extracted from salivary EVs and the differential expression of miRNAs was evaluated by qRT-PCR array and qRT-PCR. The discrimination power of up-regulated miRNAs as biomarkers in OSCC patients versus controls was evaluated by the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves. A preliminary qRT-PCR array was performed on samples from 5 OSCC patients and 5 healthy controls whereby a subset of miRNAs were identified that were differentially expressed. On the basis of these results, a cohort of additional 16 patients and 6 controls were analyzed to further confirm the miRNAs that were up-regulated or selectively expressed in the previous pilot study. The following miRNAs: miR-302b-3p and miR-517b-3p were expressed only in EVs from OSCC patients and miR-512-3p and miR-412-3p were up-regulated in salivary EVs from OSCC patients compared to controls with the ROC curve showing a good discrimination power for OSCC diagnosis. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Gene and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis suggested the possible involvement of the miRNAs identified in pathways activated in OSCC. In this work, we suggest that salivary EVs isolated by a simple charge-based precipitation technique can be exploited as a non-invasive source of miRNAs for OSCC diagnosis. Moreover, we have identified a subset of miRNAs selectively enriched in EVs of OSCC patients that could be potential biomarkers.

  6. Extracellular Vesicles Derived from Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate the Phenotype of Smooth Muscle Cells to Limit Intimal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Shen, Hong; Ma, Jian; Sun, Leiqing; Wei, Meng

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play important roles in the reduction of inflammation in multiple disease models. However, their role in vein graft (VG) remodeling is undefined. We aimed to investigate the effect of EVs from adipose MSCs (ADMSC-EVs) on VG intimal hyperplasia and to explore the possible mechanisms. After generation and characterization of control-EVs and ADMSC-EVs in vitro, we investigated their effect on the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Next, we established a mouse model of VG transplantation. Mice underwent surgery and received control-EVs or ADMSC-EVs by intraperitoneal injection every other day for 20 days. VG remodeling was evaluated after 4 weeks. We also assessed the effect of ADMSC-EVs on macrophage migration and inflammatory cytokine expression. Significant inhibitory effects of ADMSC-EVs on in vitro VSMC proliferation (p < 0.05) and migration (p < 0.05) were observed compared with control-EVs. The extent of intimal hyperplasia was significantly decreased in ADMSC-EV-treated mice compared with control-EV-treated mice (26 ± 8.4 vs. 45 ± 9.0 μm, p < 0.05). A reduced presence of macrophages was observed in ADMSC-EV-treated mice (p < 0.05). Significantly decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) was also found in the ADMSC-EV-treated group (both p < 0.05). In addition, phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2, and p38 in VGs was decreased in the ADMSC-EV-treated group. We demonstrated that ADMSC-EVs exert an inhibitory effect on VG neointima formation by regulating VSMC proliferation and migration, macrophage migration, inflammatory cytokine expression, and the related signaling pathways.

  7. PDGF-BB Carried by Endothelial Cell-derived Extracellular Vesicles Reduces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togliatto, Gabriele; Dentelli, Patrizia; Rosso, Arturo; Lombardo, Giusy; Gili, Maddalena; Gallo, Sara; Gai, Chiara; Solini, Anna; Camussi, Giovanni; Brizzi, Maria Felice

    2018-01-31

    Endothelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles (CD31EVs) are a new entity for therapeutic/prognostic purposes. The roles of CD31EVs as mediators of smooth muscle cell (VSMC) dysfunction in type 2 diabetes (T2D) is investigated herein.We demonstrated that, unlike non-diabetic, diabetic serum-derived-EVs (D-CD31EVs) boosted apoptosis resistance of VSMCs cultured in hyperglycaemic condition. Biochemical analysis revealed that this effect relies on changes in the balance between anti-apoptotic/pro-apoptotic signals: increase of bcl-2 and decrease of bak/bax. D-CD31EV cargo analysis demonstrated that D-CD31EVs are enriched in membrane-bound-platelet-derived-growth-factor-BB (mbPDGF-BB). Thus, we postulated that mbPDGF-BB transfer by D-CD31EVs could account for VSMC resistance to apoptosis. By depleting CD31EVs of PDGF-BB or blocking the PDGF-BB-receptorβ on VSMCs, we demonstrated that mbPDGF-BB contributes to D-CD31EV-mediated bak/bax and bcl-2 levels. Moreover, we found that bak expression is under the control of PDGF-BB-mediated miR-296-5p expression. In fact, while PDGF-BB-treatment recapitulated D-CD31EV-mediated anti-apoptotic program and VSMC resistance to apoptosis, PDGF-BB-depleted CD31EVs failed. D-CD31EVs also increased VSMC migration and recruitment to neovessels, by means of PDGF-BB. Finally, we found that VSMCs, from human atherosclerotic arteries of T2D individuals, express low bak/bax and high bcl-2 and miR-296-5p levels.This study identifies the mbPDGF-BB in D-CD31EVs as a relevant mediator of diabetes-associated VSMC resistance to apoptosis. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  8. Properties of internalization factors contributing to the uptake of extracellular DNA into tumor-initiating stem cells of mouse Krebs-2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, Evgeniya V; Potter, Ekaterina A; Proskurina, Anastasiya S; Minkevich, Alexandra M; Chernych, Elena R; Ostanin, Alexandr A; Efremov, Yaroslav R; Bayborodin, Sergey I; Nikolin, Valeriy P; Popova, Nelly A; Kolchanov, Nikolay A; Bogachev, Sergey S

    2016-05-25

    Previously, we demonstrated that poorly differentiated cells of various origins, including tumor-initiating stem cells present in the ascites form of mouse cancer cell line Krebs-2, are capable of naturally internalizing both linear double-stranded DNA and circular plasmid DNA. The method of co-incubating Krebs-2 cells with extracellular plasmid DNA (pUC19) or TAMRA-5'-dUTP-labeled polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product was used. It was found that internalized plasmid DNA isolated from Krebs-2 can be transformed into competent Escherichia coli cells. Thus, the internalization processes taking place in the Krebs-2 cell subpopulation have been analyzed and compared, as assayed by E. coli colony formation assay (plasmid DNA) and cytofluorescence (TAMRA-DNA). We showed that extracellular DNA both in the form of plasmid DNA and a PCR product is internalized by the same subpopulation of Krebs-2 cells. We found that the saturation threshold for Krebs-2 ascites cells is 0.5 μg DNA/10(6) cells. Supercoiled plasmid DNA, human high-molecular weight DNA, and 500 bp PCR fragments are internalized into the Krebs-2 tumor-initiating stem cells via distinct, non-competing internalization pathways. Under our experimental conditions, each cell may harbor 340-2600 copies of intact plasmid material, or up to 3.097 ± 0.044×10(6) plasmid copies (intact or not), as detected by quantitative PCR. The internalization dynamics of extracellular DNA, copy number of the plasmids taken up by the cells, and competition between different types of double-stranded DNA upon internalization into tumor-initiating stem cells of mouse ascites Krebs-2 have been comprehensively analyzed. Investigation of the extracellular DNA internalization into tumor-initiating stem cells is an important part of understanding their properties and possible destruction mechanisms. For example, a TAMRA-labeled DNA probe may serve as an instrument to develop a target for the therapy of cancer, aiming at elimination of

  9. VANGL2 interacts with integrin αv to regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity and cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Tammy N; Jessen, Jason R

    2017-12-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins are implicated in a variety of morphogenetic processes including embryonic cell migration and potentially cancer progression. During zebrafish gastrulation, the transmembrane protein Vang-like 2 (VANGL2) is required for PCP and directed cell migration. These cell behaviors occur in the context of a fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM). While it is thought that interactions with the ECM regulate cell migration, it is unclear how PCP proteins such as VANGL2 influence these events. Using an in vitro cell culture model system, we previously showed that human VANGL2 negatively regulates membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14) and activation of secreted matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). Here, we investigated the functional relationship between VANGL2, integrin αvβ3, and MMP2 activation. We provide evidence that VANGL2 regulates cell surface integrin αvβ3 expression and adhesion to fibronectin, laminin, and vitronectin. Inhibition of MMP14/MMP2 activity suppressed the cell adhesion defect in VANGL2 knockdown cells. Furthermore, our data show that MMP14 and integrin αv are required for increased proteolysis by VANGL2 knockdown cells. Lastly, we have identified integrin αvβ3 as a novel VANGL2 binding partner. Together, these findings begin to dissect the molecular underpinnings of how VANGL2 regulates MMP activity and cell adhesion to the ECM. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification. PMID:26347154

  11. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Styrczewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD, phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  12. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  13. Characterization of rat primary trigeminal satellite glial cells and associated extracellular vesicles under normal and inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinterhøj, Hye Sook Han; Stensballe, Allan; Duroux, Meg; Gazerani, Parisa

    2018-03-23

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic pain, potentially through mediating extracellular or paracrine signaling. Recently, extracellular vesicles (EVs) in the form of exosomes have been found to play an important role in cell-cell communication. However, their release from SGCs and extent in modulating pain remain unknown. An in vitro cell platform using fresh primary SGCs was used to characterize the shed vesicles by size and proteomic profiling following activation of SGCs by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), simulating neurogenic inflammation in vivo. Results demonstrated that SGCs shed vesicles in the size range of exosomes (>150 nm) but with altered protein expression upon LPS-activation. Proteomic profiling of SGCs-shed EVs showed that a number of proteins were differentially regulated upon LPS stimulation such as junction plakoglobin and myosin 9 that are proposed as novel biomarkers of SGCs activation under inflammatory conditions. Findings from this study highlight the utility of using fresh primary SGC cultures as a model to further investigate EVs under normal and inflammatory conditions. This study demonstrated that. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Light induces Fos expression via extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 in melanopsin-expressing PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldrup, Marie-Louise Bülow; Georg, Birgitte; Falktoft, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    a Galpha(q/11) coupled phospholipase C activation. However, the signaling proteins mediating melanopsin-induced Fos expression are unresolved. In this study, we examined the phototransduction leading to Fos expression in melanopsin-transfected PC12 cells. A pivotal role of the extracellular signal......254890 attenuated these intracellular light responses. Our data strongly indicate that Galpha(q/11)-mediated ERK1/2 activation is essential for expression of Fos upon illumination of melanopsin-expressing PC12 cells.......The photopigment melanopsin is expressed in a subtype of mammalian ganglion cells in the retina that project to the circadian clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus to mediate non-visual light information. Melanopsin renders these retinal ganglion cells intrinsically photosensitive...

  15. Light induces Fos expression via extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 in melanopsin-expressing PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldrup, Marie-Louise Bülow; Georg, Birgitte; Falktoft, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    a Galpha(q/11) coupled phospholipase C activation. However, the signaling proteins mediating melanopsin-induced Fos expression are unresolved. In this study, we examined the phototransduction leading to Fos expression in melanopsin-transfected PC12 cells. A pivotal role of the extracellular signal...... and the cells respond to light by a membrane depolarization and induction of the immediate early response gene Fos. Previous studies showed that the light activated melanopsin-induced signaling, the phototransduction, leading to depolarization of the membrane resembles the invertebrate opsins, which involves......The photopigment melanopsin is expressed in a subtype of mammalian ganglion cells in the retina that project to the circadian clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus to mediate non-visual light information. Melanopsin renders these retinal ganglion cells intrinsically photosensitive...

  16. The effect of extracellular alkalinization on lactate metabolism of breast cancer stem cells: Overview of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1 and MCT4 gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neolaka, G. M. G.; Yustisia, I.; Sadikin, M.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Changes in the metabolic status of cancer cells are presumed to be correlated with the adjustment of these cells to extracellular changes. Cell glycolysis increases the production of intracellular lactate catalyzed by the lactate dehydrogenases, both LDH-A and LDH-B. An increase in intracellular lactate can affect extracellular pH balance through monocarboxylate transporters, particularly MCT1 and MCT4. This study aimed to analyze the effects of extracellular alkalinization on the lactate metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). In this study, human primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were treated with 100 mM sodium bicarbonate for 0.5, 24, and 48 h in DMEM F12/HEPES. After incubation, extracellular pH was measured and cells were harvested to extract the total RNA and protein. The expression of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1, and MCT4 mRNA genes were analyzed using qRT-PCR method. Our study shows that administration of sodium bicarbonate in the BCSC culture medium could increase extracellular pH. To balance the increase of extracellular pH, BCSCs regulated the expression of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1, and MCT4 genes. As the extracellular pH increases, the expression of LDH-A that converts pyruvate to lactate increased along with the increase of MCT 4 and MCT 1 expression, which act as lactate transporters. As the incubation time increases, the pH decreases, leading to the suppression of LDH-A and increase of LDH-B expression that converts lactate into pyruvate. Therefore, we suggest that the extracellular alkalinization by sodium bicarbonate in BCSCs affected the genes that regulate lactate metabolism.

  17. Effect of apoptosis and response of extracellular matrix proteins after chemotherapy application on human breast cancer cell spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktem, G; Vatansever, S; Ayla, S; Uysal, A; Aktas, S; Karabulut, B; Bilir, A

    2006-02-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) represents a three-dimensional structural form of tumors in laboratory conditions, and it has the characteristics of avascular micrometastases or intervascular spaces of big tumors. Recent studies indicate that extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins play a critical role in tumor metastasis, therefore normal and cancer cells require an ECM for survival, proliferation and differentiation. Doxorubicin and Docetaxel are widely used in the therapy of breast cancer, as well as in in vivo and in vitro studies. In this study, we examined the effect of apoptosis and proliferation of cells on the human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, by using p53, bcl-2 and Ki67 gene expression, and the tendency to metastasis with extracellular matrix proteins, laminin and type IV collagen after chemotherapy in the spheroid model. The apoptotic cell death in situ was detected by TUNEL method. TUNEL-positive cells and positive immunoreactivities of laminin, type IV collagen, p53 and, bcl-2 were detected in the control group. There was no laminin and type IV collagen immunoreactivities in spheroids of drug groups. While TUNEL-positive cells and p53 immunoreactivity were detected in Docetaxel, Doxorubicin and Docetaxel/Doxorubicin groups, p53 immunoreactivity was not observed in the Docetaxel group. There was no bcl-2 immunoreactivity in either drug group. In addition, we did not detect Ki67 immunoreactivity in both control and drug treatment groups. However, the absence of Ki67 protein in MCF-7 breast multicellular tumor spheroids is possibly related to the cells in G0 or S phase. These chemotherapeutic agents may affect the presence of ECM proteins in this in vitro model of micrometastasis of spheroids. These findings suggest that the possible mechanism of cell death in Doxorubicin and Docetaxel/Doxorubicin treatment groups is related to apoptosis through the p53 pathway. However, we considered the possibility that there is another control mechanism for the

  18. Interaction of Munc18c and syntaxin4 facilitates invadopodium formation and extracellular matrix invasion of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasher, Megan I; Martynowicz, David M; Grafinger, Olivia R; Hucik, Andrea; Shanks-Skinner, Emma; Uniacke, James; Coppolino, Marc G

    2017-09-29

    Tumor cell invasion involves targeted localization of proteins required for interactions with the extracellular matrix and for proteolysis. The localization of many proteins during these cell-extracellular matrix interactions relies on membrane trafficking mediated in part by SNAREs. The SNARE protein syntaxin4 (Stx4) is involved in the formation of invasive structures called invadopodia; however, it is unclear how Stx4 function is regulated during tumor cell invasion. Munc18c is known to regulate Stx4 activity, and here we show that Munc18c is required for Stx4-mediated invadopodium formation and cell invasion. Biochemical and microscopic analyses revealed a physical association between Munc18c and Stx4, which was enhanced during invadopodium formation, and that a reduction in Munc18c expression decreases invadopodium formation. We also found that an N-terminal Stx4-derived peptide associates with Munc18c and inhibits endogenous interactions of Stx4 with synaptosome-associated protein 23 (SNAP23) and vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2). Furthermore, expression of the Stx4 N-terminal peptide decreased invadopodium formation and cell invasion in vitro Of note, cells expressing the Stx4 N-terminal peptide exhibited impaired trafficking of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and EGF receptor (EGFR) to the cell surface during invadopodium formation. Our findings implicate Munc18c as a regulator of Stx4-mediated trafficking of MT1-MMP and EGFR, advancing our understanding of the role of SNARE function in the localization of proteins that drive tumor cell invasion. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Diabetic impairment of C-kit bone marrow stem cells involves the disorders of inflammatory factors, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Sheng Li

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stem cells from diabetes mellitus patients exhibit functional impairment, but the relative molecular mechanisms responsible for this impairment are poorly understood. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for diabetes-related functional impairment of bone marrow stem cells by extensively screening the expression levels of inflammatory factors, cell cycle regulating molecules, extracellular matrix molecules and adhesion molecules. Bone marrow cells were collected from type 2 diabetic (db/db and healthy control (db/m+ mice, and c-kit+ stem cells were purified (purity>85% for experiments. Compared with the healthy control mice, diabetic mice had significantly fewer c-kit+ stem cells, and these cells had a lower potency of endothelial differentiation; however, the production of the angiogenic growth factor VEGF did not differ between groups. A pathway-focused array showed that the c-kit+ stem cells from diabetic mice had up-regulated expression levels of many inflammatory factors, including Tlr4, Cxcl9, Il9, Tgfb1, Il4, and Tnfsf5, but no obvious change in the expression levels of cell cycle molecules. Interestingly, diabetes-related alterations of the extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules were varied; Pecam, Mmp10, Lamc1, Itgb7, Mmp9, and Timp4 were up-regulated, but Col11a1, Fn1, Admts2, and Itgav were down-regulated. Some of these changes were also confirmed at the protein level by flow cytometry analysis. In conclusion, c-kit+ bone marrow stem cells from diabetic mice exhibited an extensive enhancement of inflammatory factors and disorders of the extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules. Further intervention studies are required to determine the precise role of each molecule in the diabetes-related functional impairment of c-kit+ bone marrow stem cells.

  20. Tumour cell–derived extracellular vesicles interact with mesenchymal stem cells to modulate the microenvironment and enhance cholangiocarcinoma growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Haga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contributions of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to tumour growth and stroma formation are poorly understood. Tumour cells can transfer genetic information and modulate cell signalling in other cells through the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs. We examined the contribution of EV-mediated inter-cellular signalling between bone marrow MSCs and tumour cells in human cholangiocarcinoma, highly desmoplastic cancers that are characterized by tumour cells closely intertwined within a dense fibrous stroma. Exposure of MSCs to tumour cell–derived EVs enhanced MSC migratory capability and expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin mRNA, in addition to mRNA expression and release of CXCL-1, CCL2 and IL-6. Conditioned media from MSCs exposed to tumour cell–derived EVs increased STAT-3 phosphorylation and proliferation in tumour cells. These effects were completely blocked by anti-IL-6R antibody. In conclusion, tumour cell–derived EVs can contribute to the generation of tumour stroma through fibroblastic differentiation of MSCs, and can also selectively modulate the cellular release of soluble factors such as IL-6 by MSCs that can, in turn, alter tumour cell proliferation. Thus, malignant cells can “educate” MSCs to induce local microenvironmental changes that enhance tumour cell growth.

  1. Effects of cell-attachment and extracellular matrix on bone formation in vivo in collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max M Villa

    Full Text Available Cell-based tissue engineering can be used to replace missing or damaged bone, but the optimal methods for delivering therapeutic cells to a bony defect have not yet been established. Using transgenic reporter cells as a donor source, two different collagen-hydroxyapatite (HA scaffolds, and a critical-size calvarial defect model, we investigated the effect of a cell-attachment period prior to implantation, with or without an extracellular matrix-based seeding suspension, on cell engraftment and osteogenesis. When quantitatively compared, the in-house scaffold implanted immediately had a higher mean radiopacity than in-house scaffolds incubated overnight. Both scaffold types implanted immediately had significantly higher area fractions of donor cells, while the in-house collagen-HA scaffolds implanted immediately had higher area fractions of the mineralization label compared with groups incubated overnight. When the cell loading was compared in vitro for each delivery method using the in-house scaffold, immediate loading led to higher numbers of delivered cells. Immediate loading may be preferable in order to ensure robust bone formation in vivo. The use of a secondary ECM carrier improved the distribution of donor cells only when a pre-attachment period was applied. These results have improved our understanding of cell delivery to bony defects in the context of in vivo outcomes.

  2. Extracellular gentamicin reduces the activity of connexin hemichannels and interferes with purinergic Ca2+ signaling in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Vania A.; Retamal, Mauricio A.; Cea, Luis A.; Salas, José D.; Vargas, Aníbal A.; Verdugo, Christian A.; Jara, Oscar; Martínez, Agustín D.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction channels (GJCs) and hemichannels (HCs) are composed of protein subunits termed connexins (Cxs) and are permeable to ions and small molecules. In most organs, GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of adjacent cells, while HCs communicate the intra and extracellular compartments. In this way, both channel types coordinate physiological responses of cell communities. Cx mutations explain several genetic diseases, including about 50% of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. However, the possible involvement of Cxs in the etiology of acquired hearing loss remains virtually unknown. Factors that induce post-lingual hearing loss are diverse, exposure to gentamicin an aminoglycoside antibiotic, being the most common. Gentamicin has been proposed to block GJCs, but its effect on HCs remains unknown. In this work, the effect of gentamicin on the functional state of HCs was studied and its effect on GJCs was reevaluated in HeLa cells stably transfected with Cxs. We focused on Cx26 because it is the main Cx expressed in the cochlea of mammals where it participates in purinergic signaling pathways. We found that gentamicin applied extracellularly reduces the activity of HCs, while dye transfer across GJCs was not affected. HCs were also blocked by streptomycin, another aminoglycoside antibiotic. Gentamicin also reduced the adenosine triphosphate release and the HC-dependent oscillations of cytosolic free-Ca2+ signal. Moreover, gentamicin drastically reduced the Cx26 HC-mediated membrane currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Therefore, the extracellular gentamicin-induced inhibition of Cx HCs may adversely affect autocrine and paracrine signaling, including the purinergic one, which might partially explain its ototoxic effects. PMID:25237294

  3. Unexpected features of exponentially growing Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cell suspension culture in relation to excreted extracellular polysaccharides and cell wall composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issawi, Mohammad; Muhieddine, Mohammad; Girard, Celine; Sol, Vincent; Riou, Catherine

    2017-10-01

    This article presents a new insight about TBY-2 cells; from extracellular polysaccharides secretion to cell wall composition during cell suspension culture. In the medium of cells taken 2 days after dilution (end of lag phase), a two unit pH decrease from 5.38 to 3.45 was observed and linked to a high uronic acid (UA) amount secretion (47.8%) while, in 4 and 7 day-old spent media, pH increased and UA amounts decreased 35.6 and 42.3% UA, respectively. To attain deeper knowledge of the putative link between extracellular polysaccharide excretion and cell wall composition, we determined cell wall UA and neutral sugar composition of cells from D2 to D12 cultures. While cell walls from D2 and D3 cells contained a large amount of uronic acid (twice as much as the other analysed cell walls), similar amounts of neutral sugar were detected in cells from lag to end of exponential phase cells suggesting an enriched pectin network in young cultures. Indeed, monosaccharide composition analysis leads to an estimated percentage of pectins of 56% for D3 cell wall against 45% D7 cell walls indicating that the cells at the mid-exponential growth phase re-organized their cell wall linked to a decrease in secreted UA that finally led to a stabilization of the spent medium pH to 5.4. In conclusion, TBY-2 cell suspension from lag to stationary phase showed cell wall remodeling that could be of interest in drug interaction and internalization study.

  4. Cell-specific extracellular phosphatase activity of dinoflagellate populations in acidified mountain lakes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, J.; Nedbalová, Linda; Kopáček, Jiří; Vrba, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2010), s. 635-644 ISSN 0022-3646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600170602; GA ČR GA206/07/1200 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516; CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : extracellular phosphatases * acidified lakes * dinoflagellates Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.239, year: 2010

  5. Na+ -K+ pump activity in rat peritoneal mast cells: inhibition by extracellular calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben; Johansen, Torben

    1989-01-01

    of an enzyme, and it is mediated by the Na+ -K+ pump located in the plasma membrane. It is demonstrated that the activity of the Na+ -K+ pump mechanism is inhibited by low concentrations of extracellular calcium (0.1-1.2 mmol l-1). The possibility is discussed that calcium-deprivation may increase the pump...... activity by increasing the permeability of the plasma membrane for Na+....

  6. Ouabain enhancement of compound 48/80 induced histamine secretion from rat peritoneal mast cells: dependence on extracellular sodium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Johansen, Torben

    1992-01-01

    a measure of the Na(+)-K+ pump activity of the cells. Ouabain caused an immediate inhibition of the pump activity and a time-dependent increase in histamine secretion in the absence of extracellular calcium. No effect on the secretion was observed in the presence of calcium. The effect of ouabain......-free medium, the pump activity was inhibited and the enhancement by ouabain of the secretion of histamine was blocked. A less marked inhibition of the pump was found in a calcium-free medium containing magnesium. The inhibition exerted by magnesium was concentration-dependent (0-5 mM) as was the counteraction...

  7. Identification of curcumin-inhibited extracellular matrix receptors in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiping; Wu, Hongjin; Zhang, Hongfang; Li, Ying; Li, Shuang; Hou, Qiang; Wu, Shixiu; Yang, Shuan-Ying

    2017-06-01

    Curcumin is a potent anti-cancer drug in several types of human cancers. Despite of several preclinical and clinical studies of curcumin, the precise mechanism of curcumin in cancer prevention has remained unclear. In our study, we for the first time investigated whole transcriptome alteration in A549 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines after treatment with curcumin using RNA sequencing. We found that lots of genes and signaling pathways were significantly altered after curcumin treatment in A549 cells. With bioinformatics approaches (gene ontology, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and STRING), we found that those curcumin altered genes were not only the genes that induce cell death but also those extracellular matrix receptors and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway genes which regulate cell migration and proliferation. Among those significantly altered genes, eight genes ( COL1A1, COL4A1, COL5A1, LAMA5, ITGA3, ITGA2B, DDIT3, and DUSP1) were further examined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis in four non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. Both in cell lines and in mouse model, the extracellular matrix receptors including the integrin ( ITGA3 and ITGA2B), collagen ( COL5A1), and laminin ( LAMA5) were significantly inhibited by curcumin at messenger RNA and protein levels. Functional studies confirmed that curcumin not only induced A549 cell death but also repressed cell proliferation and migration by regulating extracellular matrix receptors. Collectively, our study suggests that curcumin may be used as a promising drug candidate for intervening lung cancer in future studies.

  8. Transfer of Mammary Gland-forming Ability Between Mammary Basal Epithelial Cells and Mammary Luminal Cells via Extracellular Vesicles/Exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Chieh; Chen, Shih-Yin; He, Pei-Lin; Luo, Wen-Ting; Li, Hua-Jung

    2017-06-03

    Cells can communicate via exosomes, ~100-nm extracellular vesicles (EVs) that contain proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Non-adherent/mesenchymal mammary epithelial cell (NAMEC)-derived extracellular vesicles can be isolated from NAMEC medium via differential ultracentrifugation. Based on their density, EVs can be purified via ultracentrifugation at 110,000 x g. The EV preparation from ultracentrifugation can be further separated using a continuous density gradient to prevent contamination with soluble proteins. The purified EVs can then be further evaluated using nanoparticle-tracking analysis, which measures the size and number of vesicles in the preparation. The extracellular vesicles with a size ranging from 50 to 150 nm are exosomes. The NAMEC-derived EVs/exosomes can be ingested by mammary epithelial cells, which can be measured by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Some mammary stem cell properties (e.g., mammary gland-forming ability) can be transferred from the stem-like NAMECs to mammary epithelial cells via the NAMEC-derived EVs/exosomes. Isolated primary EpCAM hi /CD49f lo luminal mammary epithelial cells cannot form mammary glands after being transplanted into mouse fat pads, while EpCAM lo /CD49f hi basal mammary epithelial cells form mammary glands after transplantation. Uptake of NAMEC-derived EVs/exosomes by EpCAM hi /CD49f lo luminal mammary epithelial cells allows them to generate mammary glands after being transplanted into fat pads. The EVs/exosomes derived from stem-like mammary epithelial cells transfer mammary gland-forming ability to EpCAM hi /CD49f lo luminal mammary epithelial cells.

  9. Electrochemical noise and impedance of Au electrode/electrolyte interfaces enabling extracellular detection of glioma cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Paulo R F; Schlett, Paul; Kintzel, Ulrike; Mailänder, Volker; Vandamme, Lode K J; Zeck, Gunther; Gomes, Henrique L; Biscarini, Fabio; de Leeuw, Dago M

    2016-10-06

    Microelectrode arrays (MEA) record extracellular local field potentials of cells adhered to the electrodes. A disadvantage is the limited signal-to-noise ratio. The state-of-the-art background noise level is about 10 μVpp. Furthermore, in MEAs low frequency events are filtered out. Here, we quantitatively analyze Au electrode/electrolyte interfaces with impedance spectroscopy and noise measurements. The equivalent circuit is the charge transfer resistance in parallel with a constant phase element that describes the double layer capacitance, in series with a spreading resistance. This equivalent circuit leads to a Maxwell-Wagner relaxation frequency, the value of which is determined as a function of electrode area and molarity of an aqueous KCl electrolyte solution. The electrochemical voltage and current noise is measured as a function of electrode area and frequency and follow unambiguously from the measured impedance. By using large area electrodes the noise floor can be as low as 0.3 μVpp. The resulting high sensitivity is demonstrated by the extracellular detection of C6 glioma cell populations. Their minute electrical activity can be clearly detected at a frequency below about 10 Hz, which shows that the methodology can be used to monitor slow cooperative biological signals in cell populations.

  10. Effect of SLC34A2 gene mutation on extracellular phosphorus transport in PAM alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tiangang; Qu, Danhua; Yan, Bingdi; Zhang, Qinghua; Ren, Jin; Hu, Yanbing

    2018-01-01

    A mutation in the IIb sodium phosphate transporter SLC34A2 gene has recently been described in pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) patients. Experiments in this study were aimed at confirming the role of the gene product in PAM by comparing phosphorylated products in extracellular fluid of alveolar epithelial cells overexpressing the SLC34A2 gene or its mutated version. Eukaryotic expression vectors were constructed and transfected into A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. There were three groups of cells including those transfected with empty vector plasmid pcDNA3.1(+) (plasmid control group), those transfected with normal SLC34A2 gene expressed from pcDNA3.1 (normal control group), and those transfected with a version of the PAM SLC34A2 gene linked to the pcDNA3.1(+) (PAM group). Transfection efficiencies were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). At 48 h after transfection, the concentration of inorganic phosphorus in the culture medium was detected using an automatic biochemical analyzer. Our results showed the concentration of inorganic phosphorus in the supernatant of the normal control group was significantly lower than that in the plasmid control and PAM groups (PPAM group was significantly lower than that in the plasmid control group (PPAM patients, given that the function of the phosphate transporter seems to be affected and it is conceivable that it would lead to extracellular fluid alterations in vivo .

  11. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of extracellular modules of the neural cell-adhesion molecules NCAM and L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Kasper, Christina; Gajhede, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant proteins consisting of either the four or five amino-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) modules of the rat neural cell-adhesion molecule NCAM or the whole extracellular part [six Ig and five fibronectin type III (F3) modules] of mouse L1 have been expressed in Drosophila S2 cells. The prote......Recombinant proteins consisting of either the four or five amino-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) modules of the rat neural cell-adhesion molecule NCAM or the whole extracellular part [six Ig and five fibronectin type III (F3) modules] of mouse L1 have been expressed in Drosophila S2 cells...

  12. Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide-modified extracellular vesicles for active macropinocytosis induction and efficient intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Noguchi, Kosuke; Aoki, Ayako; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Fujii, Ikuo; Futaki, Shiroh

    2017-05-16

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) including exosomes have been shown to play crucial roles in cell-to-cell communication because of their ability to carry biofunctional molecules (e.g., microRNAs and enzymes). EVs also have pharmaceutical advantages and are highly anticipated to be a next-generation intracellular delivery tool. Here, we demonstrate an experimental technique that uses arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-modified EVs to induce active macropinocytosis for effective cellular EV uptake. Modification of arginine-rich CPPs on the EV membrane resulted in the activation of the macropinocytosis pathway, and the number of arginine residues in the peptide sequences affected the cellular EV uptake efficiency. Consequently, the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin-encapsulated EVs modified with hexadeca-arginine (R16) peptide effectively attained anti-cancer activity.

  13. The Effects of Extracellular Serum Concentration on APP Processing in Npc1-Deficient APP-Overexpressing N2a Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulik, M; Vergote, D; Phukan, G; Chung, J; Thinakaran, G; Kar, S

    2017-10-19

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is cleaved by a set of proteases including α-/β-/γ- and recently identified η-secretases, generating C-terminal fragments (CTFs) of varying lengths and amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which are considered to play a pivotal role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Cellular cholesterol content/distribution can regulate the production/clearance of APP metabolites and hence modify AD pathology. To determine the functional relation between endosomal-lysosomal (EL) cholesterol sequestration and APP metabolism, we used our recently developed mouse N2a-ANPC cells that overexpress Swedish mutant human APP in the absence of cholesterol-trafficking Niemann-Pick type C1 (Npc1) protein. Here, we report that neither increased levels nor EL cholesterol sequestration altered APP holoprotein levels but caused the intracellular accumulation of APP α-/β-/η-CTFs and Aβ 1-40/42 peptides. The levels of APP-cleaved products increased as a function of extracellular serum concentration in N2a-ANPC cells, which are more vulnerable to death than the control cells. Additionally, we show that pH of the lysosomal vesicles in N2a-ANPC cells shifted to a less acidic range with increasing serum concentrations, thus making them less efficient functionally. Interestingly, the addition of cholesterol to the culture media not only increased the levels of cellular cholesterol and APP-cleaved products but also rendered the cells more vulnerable to toxicity. Collectively, our results suggest that extracellular cholesterol concentration in serum under conditions of Npc1 deficiency can influence intracellular cholesterol content/distribution and lysosomal efficacy, triggering the accumulation of toxic APP-cleaved products, eventually leading to cell death.

  14. Evidence of eosinophil extracellular trap cell death in COPD: does it represent the trigger that switches on the disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe Echevarría L

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Loli Uribe Echevarría,1 Carolina Leimgruber,2 Jorge García González,1 Alberto Nevado,1 Ruth Álvarez,3 Luciana N García,2 Amado A Quintar,2 Cristina A Maldonado2 1Pneumonology Service, Sanatorio Allende (Nueva Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina; 2Electronic Microscopy Center, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina; 3Smoking Cessation Cente, Nuevo Hospital San Roque of Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina Abstract: In spite of the numerous studies on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the cellular and molecular basis of the disease’s development remain unclear. Neutrophils and eosinophils are known to be key players in COPD. Recently, neutrophil extracellular trap cell death (NETosis, a mechanism due to decondensation and extrusion of chromatin to form extracellular traps, has been demonstrated in COPD. However, there is limited knowledge about eosinophil extracellular trap cell death (EETosis and its role in the pathogenesis of COPD. The aim of this study was to evaluate EETosis in stable COPD. Induced sputum obtained from healthy smokers and low exacerbation risk COPD A or B group patients or high exacerbation risk COPD C or D group patients were included. Samples were examined using electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. Healthy smokers (n=10 and COPD A (n=19 group exhibited neutrophilic or paucigranulocytic phenotypes, with NETosis being absent in these patients. In contrast, COPD B (n=29, with eosinophilic or mixed phenotypes, showed EETosis and incipient NETosis. COPD C (n=18 and COPD D groups (n=13 were differentiated from low exacerbation rate-COPD group by the abundant cellular debris, with COPD C group having an eosinophilic pattern and numerous cells undergoing EETosis. A hallmark of this group was the abundant released membranes that often appeared phagocytosed by neutrophils, which coincidentally exhibited

  15. Mesenchymal Transition of High-Grade Breast Carcinomas Depends on Extracellular Matrix Control of Myeloid Suppressor Cell Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangaletti, Sabina; Tripodo, Claudio; Santangelo, Alessandra; Castioni, Nadia; Portararo, Paola; Gulino, Alessandro; Botti, Laura; Parenza, Mariella; Cappetti, Barbara; Orlandi, Rosaria; Tagliabue, Elda; Chiodoni, Claudia; Colombo, Mario P

    2016-09-27

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to the biological and clinical heterogeneity of breast cancer, and different prognostic groups can be identified according to specific ECM signatures. In high-grade, but not low-grade, tumors, an ECM signature characterized by high SPARC expression (ECM3) identifies tumors with increased epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), reduced treatment response, and poor prognosis. To better understand how this ECM3 signature is contributing to tumorigenesis, we expressed SPARC in isogenic cell lines and found that SPARC overexpression in tumor cells reduces their growth rate and induces EMT. SPARC expression also results in the formation of a highly immunosuppressive microenvironment, composed by infiltrating T regulatory cells, mast cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The ability of SPARC to induce EMT depended on the localization and suppressive function of myeloid cells, and inhibition of the suppressive function MDSCs by administration of aminobisphosphonates could revert EMT, rendering SPARC-overexpressing tumor cells sensitive to Doxil. We conclude that that SPARC is regulating the interplay between MDSCs and the ECM to drive the induction of EMT in tumor cells. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CD81 Receptor Regions outside the Large Extracellular Loop Determine Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Hepatoma Cells

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    Pia Banse

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes using four essential entry factors, one of which is human CD81 (hCD81. The tetraspanin hCD81 contains a large extracellular loop (LEL, which interacts with the E2 glycoprotein of HCV. The role of the non-LEL regions of hCD81 (intracellular tails, four transmembrane domains, small extracellular loop and intracellular loop is poorly understood. Here, we studied the contribution of these domains to HCV susceptibility of hepatoma cells by generating chimeras of related tetraspanins with the hCD81 LEL. Our results show that non-LEL regions in addition to the LEL determine susceptibility of cells to HCV. While closely related tetraspanins (X. tropicalis CD81 and D. rerio CD81 functionally complement hCD81 non-LEL regions, distantly related tetraspanins (C. elegans TSP9 amd D. melanogaster TSP96F do not and tetraspanins with intermediate homology (hCD9 show an intermediate phenotype. Tetraspanin homology and susceptibility to HCV correlate positively. For some chimeras, infectivity correlates with surface expression. In contrast, the hCD9 chimera is fully surface expressed, binds HCV E2 glycoprotein but is impaired in HCV receptor function. We demonstrate that a cholesterol-coordinating glutamate residue in CD81, which hCD9 lacks, promotes HCV infection. This work highlights the hCD81 non-LEL regions as additional HCV susceptibility-determining factors.

  17. A Carbohydrate Moiety of Secreted Stage-Specific Glycoprotein 4 Participates in Host Cell Invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi Extracellular Amastigotes

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    Pilar T. V. Florentino

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas’ disease. It is known that amastigotes derived from trypomastigotes in the extracellular milieu are infective in vitro and in vivo. Extracellular amastigotes (EAs have a stage-specific surface antigen called Ssp-4, a GPI-anchored glycoprotein that is secreted by the parasites. By immunoprecipitation with the Ssp-4-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb 2C2 and 1D9, we isolated the glycoprotein from EAs. By mass spectrometry, we identified the core protein of Ssp-4 and evaluated mRNA expression and the presence of Ssp-4 carbohydrate epitopes recognized by mAb1D9. We demonstrated that the carbohydrate epitope recognized by mAb1D9 could promote host cell invasion by EAs. Although infectious EAs express lower amounts of Ssp-4 compared with less-infectious EAs (at the mRNA and protein levels, it is the glycosylation of Ssp-4 (identified by mAb1D9 staining only in infectious strains and recognized by galectin-3 on host cells that is the determinant of EA invasion of host cells. Furthermore, Ssp-4 is secreted by EAs, either free or associated with parasite vesicles, and can participate in host-cell interactions. The results presented here describe the possible role of a carbohydrate moiety of T. cruzi surface glycoproteins in host cell invasion by EA forms, highlighting the potential of these moieties as therapeutic and vaccine targets for the treatment of Chagas’ disease.

  18. Peroxidases bound to the growing lignin polymer produce natural like extracellular lignin in a cell culture of Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Warinowski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin, an important component of plant cell walls, is a polymer of monolignols derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Monolignols are oxidized in the cell wall by oxidative enzymes (peroxidases and/or laccases to radicals, which then couple with the growing lignin polymer. We have investigated the characteristics of the polymerization reaction by producing lignin polymers in vitro using different oxidative enzymes and analyzing the structures formed with NMR. The ability of the enzymes to oxidize a high-molecular-weight compounds was tested using cytochrome c as a substrate. The results support an idea that lignin structure is largely determined by the concentration ratios of the monolignol (coniferyl alcohol and polymer radicals involved in the coupling reaction. High rate of the lignin polymer oxidation compared to monolignol oxidation leads to a natural-like structure. The high relative rate can be achieved by an open active site of the oxidative enzyme, close proximity of the enzyme with the polymeric substrate or simply by high enzymatic activity that consumes monolignols rapidly. Monolignols, which are oxidized efficiently, can be seen as competitive inhibitors of polymer oxidation. Our results indicate that, at least in a Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst. cell culture, a group of apoplastic, polymer-oxidizing peroxidases bind to the lignin polymer and are responsible for production of natural-like lignin in cell suspension cultures in vivo, and also in vitro. The peroxidases bound to the extracellular lignin had the highest ability to bind to various cell wall polymers in vitro. Extracellular lignin contains pectin-type sugars, making them possible attachment points for these cationic peroxidases.

  19. Peroxidases Bound to the Growing Lignin Polymer Produce Natural Like Extracellular Lignin in a Cell Culture of Norway Spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warinowski, Tino; Koutaniemi, Sanna; Kärkönen, Anna; Sundberg, Ilari; Toikka, Merja; Simola, Liisa Kaarina; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Teeri, Teemu H

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an important component of plant cell walls, is a polymer of monolignols derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Monolignols are oxidized in the cell wall by oxidative enzymes (peroxidases and/or laccases) to radicals, which then couple with the growing lignin polymer. We have investigated the characteristics of the polymerization reaction by producing lignin polymers in vitro using different oxidative enzymes and analyzing the structures formed with NMR. The ability of the enzymes to oxidize high-molecular-weight compounds was tested using cytochrome c as a substrate. The results support an idea that lignin structure is largely determined by the concentration ratios of the monolignol (coniferyl alcohol) and polymer radicals involved in the coupling reaction. High rate of the lignin polymer oxidation compared to monolignol oxidation leads to a natural-like structure. The high relative rate can be achieved by an open active site of the oxidative enzyme, close proximity of the enzyme with the polymeric substrate or simply by high enzymatic activity that consumes monolignols rapidly. Monolignols, which are oxidized efficiently, can be seen as competitive inhibitors of polymer oxidation. Our results indicate that, at least in a Norway spruce ( Picea abies L. Karst.) cell culture, a group of apoplastic, polymer-oxidizing peroxidases bind to the lignin polymer and are responsible for production of natural-like lignin in cell suspension cultures in vivo , and also in vitro . The peroxidases bound to the extracellular lignin had the highest ability to bind to various cell wall polymers in vitro . Extracellular lignin contains pectin-type sugars, making them possible attachment points for these cationic peroxidases.

  20. Nano-shape varied cerium oxide nanomaterials rescue human dental stem cells from oxidative insult through intracellular or extracellular actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Singh, Rajendra K; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Jung, Jieun; Hyun, Jung Keun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2017-03-01

    Cerium oxide nanomaterials (CeNMs), due to their excellent scavenging properties of reactive oxygen species (ROS), have gained great promise for therapeutic applications. A high level of ROS often degrades the potential of stem cells in terms of survivability, maintenance and lineage differentiation. Here we hypothesize the CeNMs may play an important role in protecting the capacity of stem cells against the oxidative insult, and the suppression mechanism of ROS level may depend on the internalization of CeNMs. We synthesized CeNMs with different directional shapes (aspect ratios) by a pH-controlled hydrothermal method, and treated them to stem cells derived from human dental pulp at various doses. The short CeNMs (nanoparticles and nanorods) were internalized rapidly to cells whereas long CeNMs (nanowires) were slowly internalized, which led to different distributions of CeNMs and suppressed the ROS levels either intracellularly or extracellularly under the H 2 O 2 -exposed conditions. Resultantly, the stem cells, when dosed with the CeNMs, were rescued to have excellent cell survivability; the damages in intracellular components including DNA fragmentation, lipid rupture and protein degradation were significantly alleviated. The findings imply that the ROS-scavenging events of CeNMs need special consideration of aspect ratio-dependent cellular internalization, and also suggest the promising use of CeNMs to protect stem cells from the ROS-insult environments, which can ultimately improve the stem cell potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine uses. Oxidative stress governs many stem cell functions like self-renewal and lineage differentiation, and the biological conditions involving tissue repair and disease cure where stem cell therapy is often needed. Here we demonstrate the unique role of cerium oxide nanomaterials (CeNMs) in rescuing stem cell survivability, migration ability, and intracellular components from oxidative stress. In particular

  1. Improved proliferation and differentiation capacity of human mesenchymal stromal cells cultured with basement-membrane extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Ulrich; Kramer, Jan; Behrends, Jochen; Driller, Birgit; Wendler, Nils-Ole; Boehrnsen, Florian; Rohwedel, Jürgen; Schlenke, Peter

    2010-12-01

    In vitro cultured mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are characterized by a short proliferative lifespan, an increasing loss of proliferation capacity and progressive reduction of differentiation potential. Laminin-1, laminin-5, collagen IV and fibronectin are important constituents of the basement membrane extracellular matrix (ECM) that are involved in a variety of cellular activities, including cell attachment and motility. The in vitro proliferation capacity of MSC was significantly improved when the cells were incubated in the presence of basement membrane ECM proteins. For example, a mixture of proteins improved proliferation capacity 250-fold in comparison with standard conditions after five passages. Furthermore, in colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assays colony numbers and size were significantly extended. Blocking specific integrin cell-surface receptors, positive effects on the proliferation capacity of MSC were inhibited. Additionally, when MSC were co-cultivated with ECM proteins, cells maintained their multipotential differentiation capacity throughout many culture passages in comparison with cells cultivated on plastic. However, expansion of MSC on laminin-5 suppressed any subsequent chondrogenic differentiation. Our results suggest that expansion of bone marrow-derived MSC in the presence of ECM proteins is a powerful approach for generating large numbers of MSC, showing a prolonged capacity to differentiate into mesodermal cell lineages, with the exception of the lack of chondrogenesis by using laminin-5 coating.

  2. Transfer of multidrug resistance among acute myeloid leukemia cells via extracellular vesicles and their microRNA cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvy, Céline; Wannez, Adeline; Laloy, Julie; Chatelain, Christian; Dogné, Jean-Michel

    2017-11-01

    The treatment of acute leukemia is still challenging due in part to the development of resistance and relapse. This chemotherapeutics resistance is established by clonal selection of resistant variants of the cancer cells. Recently, a horizontal transfer of chemo-resistance among cancer cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs) has been suggested. The aim of this research was to investigate the role of EVs in chemo-resistance in acute myeloid leukemia. For this purpose, the sensitive strain of the promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cell line was studied along with its multi-resistant strain, HL60/AR that overexpresses the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1). A chemo-resistance transfer between the two strains was established by treating HL60 cells with EVs generated by HL60/AR. This study reveals that EVs from HL60/AR can interact with HL60 cells and transfer at least partially, their chemo-resistance. EVs-treated cells begin to express MRP-1 probably due to a direct transfer of MRP-1 and nucleic acids transported by EVs. In this context, two microRNAs were highlighted for their high differential expression in EVs related to sensitive or chemo-resistant cells: miR-19b and miR-20a. Because circulating microRNAs are found in all biological fluids, these results bring out their potential clinical use as chemo-resistance biomarkers in acute myeloid leukemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative Secretomic Analysis Identifies Extracellular Protein Factors That Modulate the Metastatic Phenotype of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rongkuan; Huffman, Kenneth E; Chu, Michael; Zhang, Yajie; Minna, John D; Yu, Yonghao

    2016-02-05

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths for men and women in the United States, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) representing 85% of all diagnoses. Late stage detection, metastatic disease and lack of actionable biomarkers contribute to the high mortality rate. Proteins in the extracellular space are known to be critically involved in regulating every stage of the pathogenesis of lung cancer. To investigate the mechanism by which secreted proteins contribute to the pathogenesis of NSCLC, we performed quantitative secretomic analysis of two isogenic NSCLC cell lines (NCI-H1993 and NCI-H2073) and an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (HBEC3-KT) as control. H1993 was derived from a chemo-naïve metastatic tumor, while H2073 was derived from the primary tumor after etoposide/cisplatin therapy. From the conditioned media of these three cell lines, we identified and quantified 2713 proteins, including a series of proteins involved in regulating inflammatory response, programmed cell death and cell motion. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis indicates that a number of proteins overexpressed in H1993 media are involved in biological processes related to cancer metastasis, including cell motion, cell-cell adhesion and cell migration. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knock down of a number of these proteins, including SULT2B1, CEACAM5, SPRR3, AGR2, S100P, and S100A14, leads to dramatically reduced migration of these cells. In addition, meta-analysis of survival data indicates NSCLC patients whose tumors express higher levels of several of these secreted proteins, including SULT2B1, CEACAM5, SPRR3, S100P, and S100A14, have a worse prognosis. Collectively, our results provide a potential molecular link between deregulated secretome and NSCLC cell migration/metastasis. In addition, the identification of these aberrantly secreted proteins might facilitate the development of biomarkers for early detection of this devastating disease.

  4. Extracellular diffusion quantified by magnetic resonance imaging during rat C6 glioma cell progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Song

    Full Text Available Solution reflux and edema hamper the convection-enhanced delivery of the standard treatment for glioma. Therefore, a real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI method was developed to monitor the dosing process, but a quantitative analysis of local diffusion and clearance parameters has not been assessed. The objective of this study was to compare diffusion into the extracellular space (ECS at different stages of rat C6 gliomas, and analyze the effects of the extracellular matrix (ECM on the diffusion process. At 10 and 20 days, after successful glioma modeling, gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA was introduced into the ECS of rat C6 gliomas. Diffusion parameters and half-life of the reagent were then detected using MRI, and quantified according to the mathematical model of diffusion. The main ECM components [chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs, collagen IV, and tenascin C] were detected by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. In 20-day gliomas, Gd-DTPA diffused more slowly and derived higher tortuosity, with lower clearance rate and longer half-life compared to 10-day gliomas. The increased glioma ECM was associated with different diffusion and clearance parameters in 20-day rat gliomas compared to 10-day gliomas. ECS parameters were altered with C6 glioma progression from increased ECM content. Our study might help better understand the glioma microenvironment and provide benefits for interstitial drug delivery to treat brain gliomas.

  5. Simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell cultures and in sub-regions of guinea pig brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie Voigt; Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe a validated chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell culture and in sub-regions of the guinea pig brain. Electrochemical...... of intracellular and extracellular amounts of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in guinea pig frontal cortex and hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures. Noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin were found to be in a range from 0.31 to 1.7 pmol per 2 million cells intracellularly, but only...

  6. Cloning from purified high endothelial venule cells of hevin, a close relative of the antiadhesive extracellular matrix protein SPARC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J P; Springer, T A

    1995-01-01

    High endothelial venules (HEV) in lymphoid tissues support high levels of lymphocyte extravasion from the blood. We purified high endothelial cells from human tonsils by immunomagnetic selection with MECA-79 MAb to construct an HEV cDNA library. Differential screening of this library using cDNA probes from HEV (plus) or flat-walled vessel (minus) endothelial cells allowed us to characterize a novel human cDNA expressed to high levels in HEV. The cDNA encodes a secreted acidic calcium-binding glycoprotein of 664 aa residues, designated hevin, exhibiting 62% identity with the antiadhesive extracellular matrix protein SPARC, over a region of 232 aa spanning more than four fifths of the SPARC coding sequence. The primary structure and sequence of hevin and similar to SPARC-like proteins from rat and quail, called SC1 or QR1. Hevin could contribute to the induction or maintenance of features of the HEV endothelium that facilitate lymphocyte migration.

  7. Recapitulation of Extracellular LAMININ Environment Maintains Stemness of Satellite Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Ishii

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Satellite cells function as precursor cells in mature skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration. In healthy tissue, these cells are maintained in a state of quiescence by a microenvironment formed by myofibers and basement membrane in which LAMININs (LMs form a major component. In the present study, we evaluated the satellite cell microenvironment in vivo and found that these cells are encapsulated by LMα2–5. We sought to recapitulate this satellite cell niche in vitro by culturing satellite cells in the presence of recombinant LM-E8 fragments. We show that treatment with LM-E8 promotes proliferation of satellite cells in an undifferentiated state, through reduced phosphorylation of JNK and p38. On transplantation into injured muscle tissue, satellite cells cultured with LM-E8 promoted the regeneration of skeletal muscle. These findings represent an efficient method of culturing satellite cells for use in transplantation through the recapitulation of the satellite cell niche using recombinant LM-E8 fragments. : In this study, examination of the satellite cell microenvironment in vivo revealed that these cells are encapsulated by LMα2–5. We find that reconstitution of the satellite cell niche with recombinant LM-E8 fragments promotes the proliferation and maintains satellite cells in an undifferentiated state. Keywords: Laminin, muscle stem cell, cell transplantation therapy, regeneration, muscle satellite cell, LM-E8

  8. Extracellular α-synuclein leads to microtubule destabilization via GSK-3β-dependent Tau phosphorylation in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Gąssowska

    Full Text Available α-Synuclein (ASN plays an important role in pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Novel and most interesting data showed elevated tauopathy in PD and suggested relationship between ASN and Tau protein. However, the mechanism of ASN-evoked Tau protein modification is not fully elucidated. In this study we investigated the role of extracellular ASN in Tau hyperphosphorylation in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells and the involvement of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5 in ASN-dependent Tau modification. Our results indicated that exogenously added ASN increases Tau phosphorylation at Ser396. Accordingly, the GSK-3β inhibitor (SB-216763 prevented ASN-evoked Tau hyperphosphorylation, but the CDK5 inhibitor had no effect. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that ASN affected GSK-3β via increasing of protein level and activation of this enzyme. GSK-3β activity evaluated by its phosphorylation status assay showed that ASN significantly increased the phosphorylation of this enzyme at Tyr216 with parallel decrease in phosphorylation at Ser9, indicative of stimulation of GSK-3β activity. Moreover, the effect of ASN on microtubule (MT destabilization and cell death with simultaneous the involvement of GSK-3β in these processes were analyzed. ASN treatment increased the amount of free tubulin and concomitantly reduced the amount of polymerized tubulin and SB-216763 suppressed these ASN-induced changes in tubulin, indicating that GSK-3β is involved in ASN-evoked MT destabilization. ASN-induced apoptotic processes lead to decrease in PC12 cells viability and SB-216763 protected those cells against ASN-evoked cytotoxicity. Concluding, extracellular ASN is involved in GSK-3β-dependent Tau hyperphosphorylation, which leads to microtubule destabilization. GSK-3β inhibition may be an effective strategy for protecting against ASN-induced cytotoxicity.

  9. Cooperative degradation of chitin by extracellular and cell surface-expressed chitinases from Paenibacillus sp. strain FPU-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takafumi; Hibi, Takao; Fujii, Yutaka; Sugimoto, Ikumi; Fujiwara, Akihiro; Suzuki, Fumiko; Iwasaki, Yukimoto; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Taketo, Akira; Kimoto, Hisashi

    2013-12-01

    Chitin, a major component of fungal cell walls and invertebrate cuticles, is an exceedingly abundant polysaccharide, ranking next to cellulose. Industrial demand for chitin and its degradation products as raw materials for fine chemical products is increasing. A bacterium with high chitin-decomposing activity, Paenibacillus sp. strain FPU-7, was isolated from soil by using a screening medium containing α-chitin powder. Although FPU-7 secreted several extracellular chitinases and thoroughly digested the powder, the extracellular fluid alone broke them down incompletely. Based on expression cloning and phylogenetic analysis, at least seven family 18 chitinase genes were found in the FPU-7 genome. Interestingly, the product of only one gene (chiW) was identified as possessing three S-layer homology (SLH) domains and two glycosyl hydrolase family 18 catalytic domains. Since SLH domains are known to function as anchors to the Gram-positive bacterial cell surface, ChiW was suggested to be a novel multimodular surface-expressed enzyme and to play an important role in the complete degradation of chitin. Indeed, the ChiW protein was localized on the cell surface. Each of the seven chitinase genes (chiA to chiF and chiW) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells for biochemical characterization of their products. In particular, ChiE and ChiW showed high activity for insoluble chitin. The high chitinolytic activity of strain FPU-7 and the chitinases may be useful for environmentally friendly processing of chitin in the manufacture of food and/or medicine.

  10. Calcium Influx of Mast Cells Is Inhibited by Aptamers Targeting the First Extracellular Domain of Orai1.

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    Renshan Sun

    Full Text Available Using the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX method, we identified oligonucleotides that bind to the first extracellular domain of the Orai1 protein with high affinities and high specificities. These ligands were isolated from a random single-strand DNA (ssDNA library with 40 randomized sequence positions, using synthesized peptides with amino acid sequences identical to the first extracellular domain of the Orai1 protein as the targets for SELEX selection. Seven aptamers were obtained after 12 rounds of SELEX. An enzyme-linked oligonucleotide assay (ELONA was performed to determine the affinities of the aptamers. Aptamer Y1 had the highest affinity (Kd = 1.72×10-8 mol/L and was selected for functional experiments in mast cells. Using LAD2 cells with the human high-affinity IgE receptor and Ca2+ release activation channel (CRAC, we demonstrated that Aptamer Y1 blocked IgE-mediated β-hexosaminidase release from cells triggered by biotin-IgE and streptavidin. A specific binding assay showed that Aptamer Y1 not only bound the Orai1 peptide specifically but also that the Orai1 peptide did not bind significantly to other random oligonucleotide molecules. Furthermore, Aptamer Y1 regulation of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization was investigated by probing intracellular Ca2+ with a Fluo-4-AM fluorescent probe. We found that Aptamer Y1 inhibits Ca2+ influx into antigen-activated mast cells. These results indicate that the target of Aptamer Y1 in the degranulation pathway is upstream of Ca2+ influx. Therefore, these oligonucleotide agents represent a novel class of CRAC inhibitors that may be useful in the fight against allergic diseases.

  11. Extracellular talaporfin sodium-induced photosensitization reaction with various albumin animal species on myocardial cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2017-02-01

    It is reported that the albumin has different structure among animal species. We have proposed a new methodology of cardiac ablation using talaporfin sodium-induced photosensitization reaction with short drug-light interval to realize immediate and permanent therapeutic effect by singlet oxygen production mainly in the interstitial space. The photosensitization reaction efficacy with different animal species should be investing to consider the optimal animal therapeutic model to evaluate the therapeutic effect of new cardiac ablation methodology. We studied the cell-killing efficacy of extracellular talaporfin sodium-induced photosensitization reaction using talaporfin sodium on myocardial cells in vitro with different albumin animal species: human, canine, bovine, and porcine serum albumin. We obtained that the albumin concentration tendency on the binding ratio and cell lethality was different among the animal species but there was no correlation between binding ratio and cell lethality. We found that the cell lethality dependence on albumin concentration showed 2 different groups, human-canine and bovine-porcine. We think that the canine might be useful as a therapeutic animal model since the cytotoxicity tendency on albumin concentration was similar with that of human albumin. These cell lethality tendency difference would be suggested to explain by the existence of the diazepam site that talaporfin sodium binds mainly.

  12. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell-cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells.

  13. Multi-tasking Sulf1/Sulf2 enzymes do not only facilitate extracellular cell signalling but also participate in cell cycle related nuclear events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Kavithanjali; Chakravorty, Ishani; Foy, Wendy; Allen, Steve; Justo, Tiago; Mukherjee, Abir; Dhoot, Gurtej K

    2018-03-01

    This study demonstrates highly dynamic spatial and temporal pattern of SULF1/SULF2 expression in a number of neuronal cell types growing in normal culture medium that included their transient nuclear mobilisation. Their nuclear translocation became particularly apparent during cell proliferation as both SULF1/SULF2 demonstrated not only cell membrane associated expression, their known site of function but also transient nuclear mobilisation during nuclear cell division. Nuclear localisation was apparent not only by immunocytochemical staining but also confirmed by immunoblotting staining of isolated nuclear fractions of C6, U87 and N2A cells. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated rapid nuclear exit of both SULF1/SULF2 following cell division that was slightly delayed but not blocked in a fraction of the polyploid cells observed in C6 cells. The overexpression of both Sulf1 and Sulf2 genes in C6 and U87 cells markedly promoted in vitro growth of these cells accompanied by nuclear mobilisation while inhibition of both these genes inhibited cell proliferation with little or no nuclear SULF1/SULF2 mobilisation. SULF1/SULF2 activity in these cells thus demonstrated a clear co-ordination of extracellular cell signalling with nuclear events related to cell proliferation. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Layers and Multilayers of Self-Assembled Polymers: Tunable Engineered Extracellular Matrix Coatings for Neural Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michael J; Rollet, Frédéric-Guillaume; Kennedy, Timothy E; Barrett, Christopher J

    2018-03-12

    Growing primary cells and tissue in long-term cultures, such as primary neural cell culture, presents many challenges. A critical component of any environment that supports neural cell growth in vivo is an appropriate 2-D surface or 3-D scaffold, typically in the form of a thin polymer layer that coats an underlying plastic or glass substrate and aims to mimic critical aspects of the extracellular matrix. A fundamental challenge to mimicking a hydrophilic, soft natural cell environment is that materials with these properties are typically fragile and are difficult to adhere to and stabilize on an underlying plastic or glass cell culture substrate. In this review, we highlight the current state of the art and overview recent developments of new artificial extracellular matrix (ECM) surfaces for in vitro neural cell culture. Notably, these materials aim to strike a balance between being hydrophilic and soft while also being thick, stable, robust, and bound well to the underlying surface to provide an effective surface to support long-term cell growth. We focus on improved surface and scaffold coating systems that can mimic the natural physicochemical properties that enhance neuronal survival and growth, applied as soft hydrophilic polymer coatings for both in vitro cell culture and for implantable neural probes and 3-D matrixes that aim to enhance stability and longevity to promote neural biocompatibility in vivo. With respect to future developments, we outline four emerging principles that serve to guide the development of polymer assemblies that function well as artificial ECMs: (a) design inspired by biological systems and (b) the employment of principles of aqueous soft bonding and self-assembly to achieve (c) a high-water-content gel-like coating that is stable over time in a biological environment and possesses (d) a low modulus to more closely mimic soft, compliant real biological tissue. We then highlight two emerging classes of thick material coatings that

  15. Collagen directly stimulates bladder smooth muscle cell growth in vitro: regulation by extracellular regulated mitogen activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Daniel B; Aitken, Karen; Bagli, Darius J

    2003-11-01

    Bladders clinically subjected to excessive pressure or distention demonstrate an altered extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. We determined how an altered collagen substratum might affect bladder smooth muscle cell (bSMC) growth in vitro and probed the mechanism of this response. Primary culture rat bSMCs were seeded onto culture plates pre-coated with normal type I collagen (NC) or heat denatured type I collagen (DNC) under standard culture conditions. In separate experiments bSMCs from the 2 substrates were enzymatically released and changed to growth on normal collagen (NC-->NC or DNC-->NC) or denatured collagen (DNC-->DNC or NC-->DNC). At 24 hours proliferation was assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Statistical significance in triplicate wells was determined by ANOVA. The proliferation of bSMCs on DNC was 5-fold greater than on NC (p DNC-->DNC) showed 2-fold further augmentation in proliferation (p DNC-->NC) (p NC) generated a 33% decrease in the already low proliferation rate (p DNC) (p DNC. However, mitogenicity is only partially reversible by re-introducing NC. These results demonstrate striking bSMC responsiveness to ECM conformation. Signaling through the extracellular regulated kinase mitogen activated protein kinase pathway supports bSMC-ECM interaction. We speculate that remodeling the ECM in vivo may regulate bSMC growth.

  16. Extraction and Characterization of Extracellular Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications from Arabidopsis thaliana Suspension Cell Cultures and Seedlings: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Ghahremani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted by plant cells into the extracellular space, consisting of the cell wall, apoplastic fluid, and rhizosphere, play crucial roles during development, nutrient acquisition, and stress acclimation. However, isolating the full range of secreted proteins has proven difficult, and new strategies are constantly evolving to increase the number of proteins that can be detected and identified. In addition, the dynamic nature of the extracellular proteome presents the further challenge of identifying and characterizing the post-translational modifications (PTMs of secreted proteins, particularly glycosylation and phosphorylation. Such PTMs are common and important regulatory modifications of proteins, playing a key role in many biological processes. This review explores the most recent methods in isolating and characterizing the plant extracellular proteome with a focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, highlighting the current challenges yet to be overcome. Moreover, the crucial role of protein PTMs in cell wall signalling, development, and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress is discussed.

  17. Pre-assembly of the extracellular domains of CD40 is not necessary for rescue of mouse B cells from anti-immunoglobulin M-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellmark, Peter; Furebring, Christina; Borrebaeck, Carl A K

    2003-04-01

    CD40 is a tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family member of central importance for the adaptive immune system. To elucidate the functional role of the different extracellular domains of CD40, we have created a set of truncated CD40 molecules where domains, or parts of domains, have been removed. These CD40 proteins, which contain a peptide tag in the N-terminal end, have been expressed in a murine B-cell line, WEHI 231. It was found that ligation of these engineered CD40 proteins via the peptide tag, was sufficient to rescue as well as to promote proliferation of apoptotic WEHI 231 cells, even when all the extracellular domains of CD40 were absent. Our results suggest that pre association of CD40 in the cell membrane plays no critical role for the CD40 signalling pathway. Furthermore, our data imply that conformational changes initiated in the extracellular domains of CD40 are not essential for signal transduction.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus-derived extracellular vesicles induce neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation via both Th1 and Th17 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M-R; Hong, S-W; Choi, E-B; Lee, W-H; Kim, Y-S; Jeon, S G; Jang, M H; Gho, Y S; Kim, Y-K

    2012-10-01

    Recent evidence indicates that Staphylococcus aureus, one of the most important human pathogens, secretes vesicles into the extracellular milieu. To evaluate whether inhalation of S. aureus-derived extracellular vesicles (EV) is causally related to the pathogenesis of inflammatory pulmonary diseases. Staphylococcus aureus EV were prepared by sequential ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. The innate immune response was evaluated in vitro after the application of EV to airway epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. In vivo innate and adaptive immune responses were evaluated after airway exposure to EV. Adjuvant effects of EV on the development of hypersensitivity to inhaled allergens were also evaluated after airway sensitization with S. aureus EV and ovalbumin (OVA). Staphylococcus aureus and S. aureus EV were detected in house dust. Alveolar macrophages produced both tumor necrosis α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) after in vitro stimulation with S. aureus EV, whereas airway epithelial cells produced only IL-6. Repeated airway exposure to S. aureus EV induced both Th1 and Th17 cell responses and neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation, mainly via a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent mechanism. In terms of adjuvant effects, airway sensitization with S. aureus EV and OVA resulted in neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation after OVA challenge alone. This phenotype was partly reversed by the absence of interferon γ (IFN-γ) or IL-17. Staphylococcus aureus EV can induce Th1 and Th17 neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation, mainly in a TLR2-dependent manner. Additionally, S. aureus EV enhance the development of airway hypersensitivity to inhaled allergens. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the expression of extracellular matrix genes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Emanuel Ramos de Carvalho

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous senile degenerative diseases including retinal disorders. The aim of this study was to assess whether there is a link between proteasome regulation and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE-mediated expression of extracellular matrix genes. For this purpose, human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 were treated with different concentrations of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, interferon-γ (IFNγ and the irreversible proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin. First, cytotoxicity and proliferation assays were carried out. The expression of proteasome-related genes and proteins was assessed and proteasome activity was determined. Then, expression of fibrosis-associated factors fibronectin (FN, fibronectin EDA domain (FN EDA, metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1 and peroxisome proliferator-associated receptor-γ (PPARγ was assessed. The proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin strongly arrested cell cycle progression and down-regulated TGFβ gene expression, which in turn was shown to induce expression of pro-fibrogenic genes in ARPE-19 cells. Furthermore, epoxomicin induced a directional shift in the balance between MMP-2 and TIMP-1 and was associated with down-regulation of transcription of extracellular matrix genes FN and FN-EDA and up-regulation of the anti-fibrogenic factor PPARγ. In addition, both CTGF and TGFβ were shown to affect expression of proteasome-associated mRNA and protein levels. Our results suggest a link between proteasome activity and pro-fibrogenic mechanisms in the RPE, which could imply a role for proteasome-modulating agents in the treatment of retinal disorders characterized by RPE-mediated fibrogenic responses.

  20. The impact of extracellular matrix coatings on the performance of human renal cells applied in bioartificial kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huishi; Tasnim, Farah; Ying, Jackie Y; Zink, Daniele

    2009-05-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) coatings have been used to improve cell performance in bioartificial kidneys (BAKs). However, their effects on primary human renal proximal tubule cells (HPTCs), which is the most important cell type with regard to clinical applications, have not been tested systematically. Also, the effects of ECM coatings on cell performance during extended time periods have not been addressed. Studying such effects is important for the development of long-term applications. Herein we analyzed for the first time systematically the effects of ECM coatings on proliferation and differentiation of human renal cells and we addressed, in particular, formation and long-term maintenance of differentiated epithelia. Our study focused on HPTCs. ECM coatings were tested alone or in combination with the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein-7 and other additives. The best results were obtained with ECMs consisting of the basal lamina components, laminin or collagen IV, and differentiated epithelia could be maintained up to three weeks on these ECMs. These results provide for the first time clear evidence which kinds of ECM coatings are most appropriate for BAKs. The results also showed that alpha-SMA-expressing myofibroblasts played a key role in the final disruption of differentiated epithelia. This suggests that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related processes might be the major obstacle in long-term applications and such processes should be carefully addressed in future BAK-related research.

  1. Anti-Donor Immune Responses Elicited by Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Extracellular Vesicles: Are We Still Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Lohan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC have been used to treat a broad range of disease indications such as acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, autoimmune diseases, and transplant rejection due to their potent immunosuppressive/anti-inflammatory properties. The breadth of their usage is due in no small part to the vast quantity of published studies showing their ability to modulate multiple immune cell types of both the innate and adaptive immune response. While patient-derived (autologous MSC may be the safer choice in terms of avoiding unwanted immune responses, factors including donor comorbidities may preclude these cells from use. In these situations, allogeneic MSC derived from genetically unrelated individuals must be used. While allogeneic MSC were initially believed to be immune-privileged, substantial evidence now exists to prove otherwise with multiple studies documenting specific cellular and humoral immune responses against donor antigens following administration of these cells. In this article, we will review recent published studies using non-manipulated, inflammatory molecule-activated (licensed and differentiated allogeneic MSC, as well as MSC extracellular vesicles focusing on the immune responses to these cells and whether or not such responses have an impact on allogeneic MSC-mediated safety and efficacy.

  2. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Mediates Nicotine-Induced Actin Cytoskeletal Remodeling and Extracellular Matrix Degradation by Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhizhan; Fonseca, Vera; Hai, Chi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a significant risk factor for atherosclerosis, which involves the invasion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from the media to intima. A hallmark of many invasive cells is actin cytoskeletal remodeling in the form of podosomes, accompanied by extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. A7r5 VSMCs form podosomes in response to PKC activation. In this study, we found that cigarette smoke extract, nicotine, and the cholinergic agonist, carbachol, were similarly effective in inducing the formation of podosome rosettes in A7r5 VSMCs. α-Bungarotoxin and atropine experiments confirmed the involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Western blotting and immunofluorescence experiments revealed the aggregation of nAChRs at podosome rosettes. Cycloheximide experiments and media exchange experiments suggested that autocrine factor(s) and intracellular phenotypic modulation are putative mechanisms. In situ zymography experiments indicated that, in response to PKC activation, nicotine-treated cells degraded ECM near podosome rosettes, and possibly endocytose ECM fragments to intracellular compartments. Invasion assay of human aortic smooth muscle cells indicated that nicotine and PKC activation individually and synergistically enhanced cell invasion through ECM. Results from this study suggest that nicotine enhances the ability of VSMCs to degrade and invade ECM. nAChR activation, actin cytoskeletal remodeling and phenotypic modulation are possible mechanisms. PMID:22940282

  3. Induction of interleukin-8 by Naegleria fowleri lysates requires activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in human astroglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Daeho; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba which causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in humans and experimental animals. To investigate the mechanisms of such inflammatory diseases, potential chemokine gene activation in human astroglial cells was investigated following treatment with N. fowleri lysates. We demonstrated that N. fowleri are potent inducers for the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) genes in human astroglial cells which was preceded by activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In addition, N. fowleri lysates induces the DNA binding activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1), an important transcription factor for IL-8 induction. The specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK inhibitor, U0126, blocks N. fowleri-mediated AP-1 activation and subsequent IL-8 induction. N. fowleri-induced IL-8 expression requires activation of ERK in human astroglial cells. These findings indicate that treatment of N. fowleri on human astroglial cells leads to the activation of AP-1 and subsequent expression of IL-8 which are dependent on ERK activation. These results may help understand the N. fowleri-mediated upregulation of chemokine and cytokine expression in the astroglial cells.

  4. Extracellular matrix and hormones transcriptionally regulate bovine. beta. -casein 5 prime sequences in stably transfected mouse mammary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidhauser, C. Bissell, M.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Myers, C.A.; Casperson, G.F. (Monsanto Corporate Research, St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1990-12-01

    Milk protein regulation involves synergistic action of lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix (ECM). It is well established that substratum has a dramatic effect on morphology and function of mammary cells. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the ECM- and hormone-dependent gene expression, however, have not been resolved. To address this question, a subpopulation (designated CID 9) of the mouse mammary epithelial cell strain COMMA-2D has been developed in which more than 35% of the cells express {beta}-casein, form alveoli-like structures when plated onto a reconstituted basement membrane, and secrete {beta}-casein undirectionally into a lumen. These cells were stably transfected with a series of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) fusion genes to study transcriptional regulation of the bovine {beta}-casein gene. The expression of CAT in these lines demonstrated a striking matrix and hormone dependency. This regulation occurered primarily at the transcriptional level and was dependent on the length of the 5{prime} flanking region of the {beta}-casein promotor. Both matrix and hormonal control of transcription occurred within at least the first 1790 base pairs upstream and/or 42 base pairs downstream of the transcriptional initiation site. The ECM effect was independent of glucocorticoid stimulation. However, prolactin was essential and hydrocortisone further increased CAT expression. Endogenous {beta}-casein expression in these lines was similar to that of the parent CID 9 cells. Our data indicate the existence of matrix-dependent elements that regulate transcription.

  5. Skip Regulates TGF-β1-Induced Extracellular Matrix Degrading Proteases Expression in Human PC-3 Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Villar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether Ski-interacting protein (SKIP regulates TGF-β1-stimulated expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and uPA Inhibitor (PAI-1 in the androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell model. Materials and Methods. PC-3 prostate cancer cell line was used. The role of SKIP was evaluated using synthetic small interference RNA (siRNA compounds. The expression of uPA, MMP-9, and PAI-1 was evaluated by zymography assays, RT-PCR, and promoter transactivation analysis. Results. In PC-3 cells TGF-β1 treatment stimulated uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 expressions. The knockdown of SKIP in PC-3 cells enhanced the basal level of uPA, and TGF-β1 treatment inhibited uPA production. Both PAI-1 and MMP-9 production levels were increased in response to TGF-β1. The ectopic expression of SKIP inhibited both TGF-β1-induced uPA and MMP-9 promoter transactivation, while PAI-1 promoter response to the factor was unaffected. Conclusions. SKIP regulates the expression of uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 stimulated by TGF-β1 in PC-3 cells. Thus, SKIP is implicated in the regulation of extracellular matrix degradation and can therefore be suggested as a novel therapeutic target in prostate cancer treatment.

  6. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Kirby, Brian J; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell–cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells. (paper)

  7. An In Vitro Potency Assay for Monitoring the Immunomodulatory Potential of Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Pachler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The regenerative and immunomodulatory activity of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs is partially mediated by secreted vesicular factors. Extracellular vesicles (EVs exocytosed by MSCs are gaining increased attention as prospective non-cellular therapeutics for a variety of diseases. However, the lack of suitable in vitro assays to monitor the therapeutic potential of EVs currently restricts their application in clinical studies. We have evaluated a dual in vitro immunomodulation potency assay that reproducibly reports the inhibitory effect of MSCs on induced T-cell proliferation and the alloantigen-driven mixed leukocyte reaction of pooled peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a dose-dependent manner. Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T-cell proliferation was inhibited by MSC-derived EVs in a dose-dependent manner comparable to MSCs. In contrast, inhibition of alloantigen-driven mixed leukocyte reaction was only observed for MSCs, but not for EVs. Our results support the application of a cell-based in vitro potency assay for reproducibly determining the immunomodulatory potential of EVs. Validation of this assay can help establish reliable release criteria for EVs for future clinical studies.

  8. Addition of Ascorbic Acid to the Extracellular Environment Activates Lipoplexes of a Ferrocenyl Lipid and Promotes Cell Transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytar, Burcu S.; Muller, John P. E.; Golan, Sharon; Hata, Shinichi; Takahashi, Hiro; Kondo, Yukishige; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Lynn, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The level of cell transfection mediated by lipoplexes formed using the ferrocenyl lipid bis(11-ferrocenylundecyl)dimethylammonium bromide (BFDMA) depends strongly on the oxidation state of the two ferrocenyl groups of the lipid (reduced BFDMA generally mediates high levels of transfection, but oxidized BFDMA mediates very low levels of transfection). Here, we report that it is possible to chemically transform inactive lipoplexes (formed using oxidized BFMDA) to “active” lipoplexes that mediate high levels of transfection by treatment with the small-molecule reducing agent ascorbic acid (vitamin C). Our results demonstrate that this transformation can be conducted in cell culture media and in the presence of cells by addition of ascorbic acid to lipoplex-containing media in which cells are growing. Treatment of lipoplexes of oxidized BFDMA with ascorbic acid resulted in lipoplexes composed of reduced BFDMA, as characterized by UV/vis spectrophotometry, and lead to activated lipoplexes that mediated high levels of transgene expression in the COS-7, HEK 293T/17, HeLa, and NIH 3T3 cell lines. Characterization of internalization of DNA by confocal microscopy and measurements of the zeta potentials of lipoplexes suggested that these large differences in cell transfection result from (i) differences in the extents to which these lipoplexes are internalized by cells and (ii) changes in the oxidation state of BFDMA that occur in the extracellular environment (i.e., prior to internalization of lipoplexes by cells). Characterization of lipoplexes by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) revealed changes in the nanostructures of lipoplexes upon the addition of ascorbic acid, from aggregates that were generally amorphous, to aggregates with a more extensive multilamellar nanostructure. The results of this study provide guidance for the design of redox-active lipids that could lead to methods that enable spatial

  9. Monkeypox Virus Host Factor Screen Using Haploid Cells Identifies Essential Role of GARP Complex in Extracellular Virus Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realegeno, Susan; Puschnik, Andreas S; Kumar, Amrita; Goldsmith, Cynthia; Burgado, Jillybeth; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Olson, Victoria A; Carroll, Darin; Damon, Inger; Hirata, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Taroh; Carette, Jan E; Satheshkumar, Panayampalli Subbian

    2017-06-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is a human pathogen that is a member of the Orthopoxvirus genus, which includes Vaccinia virus and Variola virus (the causative agent of smallpox). Human monkeypox is considered an emerging zoonotic infectious disease. To identify host factors required for MPXV infection, we performed a genome-wide insertional mutagenesis screen in human haploid cells. The screen revealed several candidate genes, including those involved in Golgi trafficking, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor biosynthesis. We validated the role of a set of vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) genes during infection, VPS51 to VPS54 (VPS51-54), which comprise the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex. The GARP complex is a tethering complex involved in retrograde transport of endosomes to the trans -Golgi apparatus. Our data demonstrate that VPS52 and VPS54 were dispensable for mature virion (MV) production but were required for extracellular virus (EV) formation. For comparison, a known antiviral compound, ST-246, was used in our experiments, demonstrating that EV titers in VPS52 and VPS54 knockout (KO) cells were comparable to levels exhibited by ST-246-treated wild-type cells. Confocal microscopy was used to examine actin tail formation, one of the viral egress mechanisms for cell-to-cell dissemination, and revealed an absence of actin tails in VPS52KO- or VPS54KO-infected cells. Further evaluation of these cells by electron microscopy demonstrated a decrease in levels of wrapped viruses (WVs) compared to those seen with the wild-type control. Collectively, our data demonstrate the role of GARP complex genes in double-membrane wrapping of MVs necessary for EV formation, implicating the host endosomal trafficking pathway in orthopoxvirus infection. IMPORTANCE Human monkeypox is an emerging zoonotic infectious disease caused by Monkeypox virus (MPXV). Of the two MPXV clades, the Congo Basin strain is associated with severe

  10. Anatomical region-dependent enhancement of 3-dimensional chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells by soluble meniscus extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Shimomura, Kazunori; Gottardi, Riccardo; Alexander, Peter G; Tuan, Rocky S

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from decellularized tissues has been found to promote tissue neogenesis, most likely mediated by specific biochemical and physical signaling motifs that promote tissue-specific differentiation of progenitor cells. Decellularized ECM has been suggested to be efficacious for the repair of tissue injuries. However, decellularized meniscus contains a dense collagenous structure, which impedes cell seeding and infiltration and is not readily applicable for meniscus repair. In addition, the meniscus consists of two distinct anatomical regions that differ in vascularity and cellular phenotype. The purpose of this study was to explore the region-specific bioactivity of solubilized ECM derived from the inner and outer meniscal regions as determined in 2D and 3D cultures of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). When added as a medium supplement to 2D cultures of MSCs, urea-extracted fractions of the inner (imECM) and outer meniscal ECM (omECM) enhanced cell proliferation while imECM most strongly upregulated fibrochondrogenic differentiation on the basis of gene expression profiles. When added to 3D cultures of MSCs seeded in photocrosslinked methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels, both ECM fractions upregulated chondrogenic differentiation as determined by gene expression and protein analyses, as well as elevated sulfated glycosaminoglycan sGAG content, compared to ECM-free controls. The chondrogenic effect at day 21 was most pronounced with imECM supplementation, but equivalent between ECM groups by day 42. Despite increased cartilage matrix, imECM and omECM constructs possessed compressive moduli similar to controls. In conclusion, soluble meniscal ECM may be considered for use as a tissue-specific reagent to enhance chondrogenesis for MSC-based 3D cartilage tissue engineering. The inner region of the knee meniscus is frequently injured and possesses a poor intrinsic healing capacity. Solubilized extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from

  11. [Prolonged exposure to crystalline silica Min-U-Sil-5 influences apoptosis or extracellular matrix genes expression in human bronchial epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambelunghe, A; Antognelli, C; Murgia, N; dell'Omo, M; Talesa, V N; Muzi, G

    2011-01-01

    Crystalline silica (Min-U-Sil-5) induces oxidative stress in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B), through the intracellular accumulation of ROS that cause oxidative damage leading to the degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and to the loss of cell adhesion molecules inducing apoptosis and genotoxic damage. This paper briefly summarizes some of the recent findings from our laboratories with emphasis on the molecular events by which the cronic and cumulative exposure to crystalline silica can induce cellular damage that promotes changes in extracellular matrix and in apoptosis gene expression.

  12. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells : Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, J.B.; Wahl, A.S.; Freund, S.; Genzel, Y.; Reichl, U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus

  13. Comparison of four decontamination treatments on porcine renal decellularized extracellular matrix structure, composition, and support of human renal cortical tubular epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornejad, Nafiseh; Nielsen, Jeffery J; Morris, Ryan J; Gassman, Jason R; Reynolds, Paul R; Roeder, Beverly L; Cook, Alonzo D

    2016-03-01

    Engineering whole organs from porcine decellularized extracellular matrix and human cells may lead to a plentiful source of implantable organs. Decontaminating the porcine decellularized extracellular matrix scaffolds is an essential step prior to introducing human cells. However, decontamination of whole porcine kidneys is a major challenge because the decontamination agent or irradiation needs to diffuse deep into the structure to eliminate all microbial contamination while minimizing damage to the structure and composition of the decellularized extracellular matrix. In this study, we compared four decontamination treatments that could be applicable to whole porcine kidneys: 70% ethanol, 0.2% peracetic acid in 1 M NaCl, 0.2% peracetic acid in 4% ethanol, and gamma (γ)-irradiation. Porcine kidneys were decellularized by perfusion of 0.5% (w/v) aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate and the four decontamination treatments were optimized using segments (n = 60) of renal tissue to ensure a consistent comparison. Although all four methods were successful in decontamination, γ-irradiation was very damaging to collagen fibers and glycosaminoglycans, leading to less proliferation of human renal cortical tubular epithelium cells within the porcine decellularized extracellular matrix. The effectiveness of the other three optimized solution treatments were then all confirmed using whole decellularized porcine kidneys (n = 3). An aqueous solution of 0.2% peracetic acid in 1 M NaCl was determined to be the best method for decontamination of porcine decellularized extracellular matrix. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Tenascin-C in the extracellular matrix promotes the selection of highly proliferative and tubulogenesis-defective endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Tercia Rodrigues [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Laboratorio de Biologia da Celula Endotelial e da Angiogenese (LabAngio), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Carvalho da Fonseca, Anna Carolina [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nunes, Sara Santana; Oliveira da Silva, Aline [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Laboratorio de Biologia da Celula Endotelial e da Angiogenese (LabAngio), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Dubois, Luiz Gustavo Feijo; Faria, Jane; Kahn, Suzana Assad [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Viana, Nathan Bessa [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Laboratorio de Pincas Oticas, Coordenacao de Programas de Estudos Avancados, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Marcondes, Jorge [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Servico de Neurocirurgia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Legrand, Chantal [Institut Universitaire d' Hematologie, Universite Paris-Diderot, Paris 7, INSERM U553, Paris (France); Moura-Neto, Vivaldo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); and others

    2011-09-10

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contains important cues for tissue homeostasis and morphogenesis. The matricellular protein tenascin-C (TN-C) is overexpressed in remodeling tissues and cancer. In the present work, we studied the effect of different ECM-which exhibited a significant diversity in their TN-C content-in endothelial survival, proliferation and tubulogenic differentiation: autologous (endothelial) ECM devoid of TN-C, but bearing large amounts of FN; fibroblast ECM, bearing both high TN-C and FN contents; and finally, glioma-derived matrices, usually poor in FN, but very rich in TN-C. HUVECs initially adhered to the immobilized matrix produced by U373 MG glioma cells, but significantly detached and died by anoikis (50 to 80%) after 24 h, as compared with cells incubated with endothelial and fibroblast matrices. Surviving endothelial cells (20 to 50%) became up to 6-fold more proliferative and formed 74-97% less tube-like structures in vitro than cells grown on non-tumoral matrices. An antibody against the EGF-like repeats of tenascin-C (TN-C) partially rescued cells from the tubulogenic defect, indicating that this molecule is responsible for the selection of highly proliferative and tubulogenic defective endothelial cells. Interestingly, by using defined substrata, in conditions that mimic glioma and normal cell ECM composition, we observed that fibronectin (FN) modulates the TN-C-induced selection of endothelial cells. Our data show that TN-C is able to modulate endothelial branching morphogenesis in vitro and, since it is prevalent in matrices of injured and tumor tissues, also suggest a role for this protein in vascular morphogenesis, in these physiological contexts.

  15. Cross-Talk Between Human Tenocytes and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Potentiates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwueme, Emmanuel C.; Shah, Jay V.; Mohiuddin, Mahir; Ghebes, Corina A.; Crispim, João F.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Fernandes, Hugo A.M.; Freeman, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon and ligament (T/L) pathologies account for a significant portion of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Tissue engineering has emerged as a promising solution in the regeneration of both tissues. Specifically, the use of multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) has shown great promise to serve as both a suitable cell source for tenogenic regeneration and a source of trophic factors to induce tenogenesis. Using four donor sets, we investigated the bidirectional paracrine tenogenic response between human hamstring tenocytes (hHT) and bone marrow-derived hMSC. Cell metabolic assays showed that only one hHT donor experienced sustained notable increases in cell metabolic activity during co-culture. Histological staining confirmed that co-culture induced elevated collagen protein levels in both cell types at varying time-points in two of four donor sets assessed. Gene expression analysis using qPCR showed the varied up-regulation of anabolic and catabolic markers involved in extracellular matrix maintenance for hMSC and hHT. Furthermore, analysis of hMSC/hHT co-culture secretome using a reporter cell line for TGF-β, a potent inducer of tenogenesis, revealed a trend of higher TGF-β bioactivity in hMSC secretome compared to hHT. Finally, hHT cytoskeletal immunostaining confirmed that both cell types released soluble factors capable of inducing favorable tenogenic morphology, comparable to control levels of soluble TGF-β1. These results suggest a potential for TGF-β-mediated signaling mechanism that is involved during the paracrine interplay between the two cell types that is reminiscent of T/L matrix remodeling/ turnover. These findings have significant implications in the clinical use of hMSC for common T/L pathologies. PMID:26308651

  16. Functional expression of the extracellular-Ca2+-sensing receptor in mouse taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrova, Marina F; Romanov, Roman A; Rogachevskaja, Olga A; Churbanov, Gleb D; Kolesnikov, Stanislav S

    2010-03-15

    Three types of morphologically and functionally distinct taste cells operate in the mammalian taste bud. We demonstrate here the expression of two G-protein-coupled receptors from the family C, CASR and GPRC6A, in the taste tissue and identify transcripts for both receptors in type I cells, no transcripts in type II cells and only CASR transcripts in type III cells, by using the SMART-PCR RNA amplification method at the level of individual taste cells. Type I taste cells responded to calcimimetic NPS R-568, a stereoselective CASR probe, with Ca(2+) transients, whereas type I and type II cells were not specifically responsive. Consistent with these findings, certain amino acids stimulated PLC-dependent Ca(2+) signaling in type III cells, but not in type I and type II cells, showing the following order of efficacies: Phe~Glu>Arg. Thus, CASR is coupled to Ca(2+) mobilization solely in type III cells. CASR was cloned from the circumvallate papilla into a pIRES2-EGFP plasmid and heterologously expressed in HEK-293 cells. The transfection with CASR enabled HEK-293 cells to generate Ca(2+) transients in response to the amino acids, of which, Phe was most potent. This observation and some other facts favor CASR as the predominant receptor subtype endowing type III cells with the ability to detect amino acids. Altogether, our results indicate that type III cells can serve a novel chemosensory function by expressing the polymodal receptor CASR. A role for CASR and GPRC6A in physiology of taste cells of the type I remains to be unveiled.

  17. Extracellular vesicles from MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells stimulated with linoleic acid promote an EMT-like process in MCF10A cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Hernandez, Octavio; Serna-Marquez, Nathalia; Castillo-Sanchez, Rocio; Salazar, Eduardo Perez

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-limited vesicles secreted by normal and malignant cells and their function is dependent on the cargo they carry and the cell type from which they originate. Moreover, EVs mediate many stages of tumor progression including angiogenesis, escape from immune surveillance and extracellular matrix degradation. Linoleic acid (LA) is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid that induces expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, proliferation, migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. However the role of secreted EVs from MDA-MB-231 cells stimulated with LA like mediator of the epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) process in mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells MCF10A remains to be studied. In the present study, we demonstrate that treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells for 48 h with 90 µM LA does not induce an increase in the number of secreted EVs. In addition, EVs isolated from supernatants of MDA-MB-231 stimulated for 48 h with 90 µM LA induce a transient down-regulation of E-cadherin expression, and an increase of Snail1 and 2, Twist1 and 2, Sip1, vimentin and N-cadherin expression in MCF10A cells. EVs also promote an increase of MMP-2 and -9 secretions, an increase of NFκB-DNA binding activity, migration and invasion in MCF10A cells. In summary, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that EVs isolated from supernatants of MDA-MB-231 stimulated for 48 h with 90 µM LA induce an EMT-like process in MCF10A cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recapitulation of Extracellular LAMININ Environment Maintains Stemness of Satellite Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kana; Sakurai, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2018-02-13

    Satellite cells function as precursor cells in mature skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration. In healthy tissue, these cells are maintained in a state of quiescence by a microenvironment formed by myofibers and basement membrane in which LAMININs (LMs) form a major component. In the present study, we evaluated the satellite cell microenvironment in vivo and found that these cells are encapsulated by LMα2-5. We sought to recapitulate this satellite cell niche in vitro by culturing satellite cells in the presence of recombinant LM-E8 fragments. We show that treatment with LM-E8 promotes proliferation of satellite cells in an undifferentiated state, through reduced phosphorylation of JNK and p38. On transplantation into injured muscle tissue, satellite cells cultured with LM-E8 promoted the regeneration of skeletal muscle. These findings represent an efficient method of culturing satellite cells for use in transplantation through the recapitulation of the satellite cell niche using recombinant LM-E8 fragments. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-linear elasticity of extracellular matrices enables contractile cells to communicate local position and orientation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamine P Winer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Most tissue cells grown in sparse cultures on linearly elastic substrates typically display a small, round phenotype on soft substrates and become increasingly spread as the modulus of the substrate increases until their spread area reaches a maximum value. As cell density increases, individual cells retain the same stiffness-dependent differences unless they are very close or in molecular contact. On nonlinear strain-stiffening fibrin gels, the same cell types become maximally spread even when the low strain elastic modulus would predict a round morphology, and cells are influenced by the presence of neighbors hundreds of microns away. Time lapse microscopy reveals that fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells on fibrin deform the substrate by several microns up to five cell lengths away from their plasma membrane through a force limited mechanism. Atomic force microscopy and rheology confirm that these strains locally and globally stiffen the gel, depending on cell density, and this effect leads to long distance cell-cell communication and alignment. Thus cells are acutely responsive to the nonlinear elasticity of their substrates and can manipulate this rheological property to induce patterning.

  20. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-07-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes. The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear. Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton. Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions, including different nutrient, light, and temperature conditions, to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change. The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS productionin M. aeruginosa. There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M. aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L, 1.98 mg N/L, 0.65 mg P/L, light intensity: 100 μmol/(m2 · s)). These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  1. Gravity loading induces adenosine triphosphate release and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mai; Arakawa, Toshiya; Okayama, Miki; Shitara, Akiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru; Takuma, Taishin

    2014-11-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) receives mechanical stress (MS) from dental occlusion or orthodontic tooth movement. Mechanical stress is thought to be a trigger for remodeling of the PDL and alveolar bone, although its signaling mechanism is still unclear. So we investigated the effect of MS on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation in PDL cells. Mechanical stress was applied to human PDL cells as centrifugation-mediated gravity loading. Apyrase, Ca(2+)-free medium and purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists were utilized to analyze the contribution of purinergic receptors to ERK phosphorylation. Gravity loading and ATP increased ERK phosphorylation by 5 and 2.5 times, respectively. Gravity loading induced ATP release from PDL cells by tenfold. Apyrase and suramin diminished ERK phosphorylation induced by both gravity loading and ATP. Under Ca(2+)-free conditions the phosphorylation by gravity loading was partially decreased, whereas ATP-induced phosphorylation was unaffected. Receptors P2Y4 and P2Y6 were prominently expressed in the PDL cells. Gravity loading induced ATP release and ERK phosphorylation in PDL fibroblasts, and ATP signaling via P2Y receptors was partially involved in this phosphorylation, which in turn would enhance gene expression for the remodeling of PDL tissue during orthodontic tooth movement. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Cathepsin B is up-regulated and mediates extracellular matrix degradation in trabecular meshwork cells following phagocytic challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Porter

    Full Text Available Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, a tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic activity in TM cells is thought to play an important role in outflow pathway physiology. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are unknown. Here we investigated the effects of chronic phagocytic stress on lysosomal function using different phagocytic ligands (E. coli, carboxylated beads, collagen I-coated beads, and pigment. Lysotracker red co-localization and electron micrographs showed the maturation of E. coli- and collagen I-coated beads-containing phagosomes into phagolysosomes. Maturation of phagosomes into phagolysosomes was not observed with carboxylated beads or pigment particles. In addition, phagocytosis of E. coli and collagen I-coated beads led to increased lysosomal mass, and the specific up-regulation and activity of cathepsin B (CTSB. Higher levels of membrane-bound and secreted CTSB were also detected. Moreover, in vivo zymography showed the intralysosomal degradation of ECM components associated with active CTSB, as well as an overall increased gelatinolytic activity in phagocytically challenged TM cells. This increased gelatinolytic activity with phagocytosis was partially blocked with an intracellular CTSB inhibitor. Altogether, these results suggest a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  3. The inhibitory impacts of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived extracellular vesicles on the growth of hepatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Elham; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial extracellular vesicles (EVs) have come forth into notice as possible important agent to mediate host-pathogen interactions. In this scientific research, the authors have tried to find out the effect of EVs derived from Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LDEVs) on the apoptosis induction in HepG2 cell line. The EVs were purified from the conditioned medium of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG using ultrafiltration and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The HepG2 cells were treated with different concentrations of purified LDEVs and the cytotoxicity and their effects on the expression of bcl-2 and bax genes were assessed by the MTT assay and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. The MTT assay showed that only 100 μg/ml of LDEVs had a significant cytotoxic effect on cancer cells (p < 0.05). The apoptotic index (bax/bcl2 expression ratio) was significantly increased after treating with 50 and 100 μg/ml LDEVs (p < 0.05). Increased bax/bcl-2 ratio was led to cancer cell death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Ishizuka, Tamotsu, E-mail: tamotsui@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Komachi, Mayumi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Dobashi, Kunio [Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Mori, Masatomo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  5. PGF2alpha induced differential expression of genes involved in turnover of extracellular matrix in rat decidual cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callegari Eduardo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the rat, the decidual tissue is an important component for maternal recognition of pregnancy. Decidualization can be induced by either the implantation of the blastocyst or by artificial stimuli. The process of decidua formation or decidualization, is characterized by growth and differentiation of endometrial stromal cells. Prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2α has been shown to be involved in inhibition of implantation, alteration of embryo development, induction of luteal regression, and the mediation of pregnancy loss induced by microorganism infections. In order to establish a direct role for PGF2α in decidual function, we have evaluated its effects on the expression of an extensive array of genes using primary decidual cell culture. Upon treatment with PGF2α sixty genes were significantly down-regulated whereas only six genes were up-regulated (from a total of 1176 genes studied. Interestingly, the majority of the genes inhibited by PGF2α are either directly or indirectly involved in the turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Genes such as gelatinase A (MMP2, cathepsin L, tissue inhibitor metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP2 and 3 (TIMP3, plasminogen activator inhibitor1 (PAI1, tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA, urokinase plasminogen activator (tPA, endothelin 1, calponin, carboxypeptidase D and calponin acidic were down regulated. The opposite effect was observed for prostromelysin 53 kDa (proMMP3, plasma proteinase I alpha and alpha 1 antiproteinase, all of which were significantly up-regulated by PGF2α. The results strongly suggest that the abortificient role of elevated levels of PGF2α after implantation is due, in large part, to inhibition of genes involved in the normal turnover of the extracellular matrix necessary for decidual formation.

  6. Effect of chondrocyte-derived early extracellular matrix on chondrogenesis of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Beom; Seo, Sinji; Kim, Jin-A; Heo, Jin-Chul; Lim, Young-Cheol; Ha, Chul-Won

    2015-06-24

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding cells contains a variety of proteins that provide structural support and regulate cellular functions. Previous studies have shown that decellularized ECM isolated from tissues or cultured cells can be used to improve cell differentiation in tissue engineering applications. In this study we evaluated the effect of decellularized chondrocyte-derived ECM (CDECM) on the chondrogenesis of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPDMSCs) in a pellet culture system. After incubation with or without chondrocyte-derived ECM in chondrogenic medium for 1 or 3 weeks, the sizes and wet masses of the cell pellets were compared with untreated controls (hPDMSCs incubated in chondrogenic medium without chondrocyte-derived ECM). In addition, histologic analysis of the cell pellets (Safranin O and collagen type II staining) and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of chondrogenic markers (aggrecan, collagen type II, and SOX9) were carried out. Our results showed that the sizes and masses of hPDMSC pellets incubated with chondrocyte-derived ECM were significantly higher than those of untreated controls. Differentiation of hPDMSCs (both with and without chondrocyte-derived ECM) was confirmed by Safranin O and collagen type II staining. Chondrogenic marker expression and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels were significantly higher in hPDMSC pellets incubated with chondrocyte-derived ECM compared with untreated controls, especially in cells precultured with chondrocyte-derived ECM for 7 d. Taken together, these results demonstrate that chondrocyte-derived ECM enhances the chondrogenesis of hPDMSCs, and this effect is further increased by preculture with chondrocyte-derived ECM. This preculture method for hPDMSC chondrogenesis represents a promising approach for cartilage tissue engineering.

  7. An Impermeant Ganetespib Analog Inhibits Extracellular Hsp90-Mediated Cancer Cell Migration that Involves Lysyl Oxidase 2-like Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCready, Jessica; Wong, Daniel S.; Burlison, Joseph A.; Ying, Weiwen; Jay, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) activates a number of client proteins outside of cancer cells required for migration and invasion. Therefore, eHsp90 may serve as a novel target for anti-metastatic drugs as its inhibition using impermeant Hsp90 inhibitors would not affect the numerous vital intracellular Hsp90 functions in normal cells. While some eHsp90 clients are known, it is important to establish other proteins that act outside the cell to validate eHsp90 as a drug target to limit cancer spread. Using mass spectrometry we identified two precursor proteins Galectin 3 binding protein (G3BP) and Lysyl oxidase 2-like protein (LOXL2) that associate with eHsp90 in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell conditioned media and confirmed that LOXL2 binds to eHsp90 in immunoprecipitates. We introduce a novel impermeant Hsp90 inhibitor STA-12-7191 derived from ganetespib and show that it is markedly less toxic to cells and can inhibit cancer cell migration in a dose dependent manner. We used STA-12-7191 to test if LOXL2 and G3BP are potential eHsp90 clients. We showed that while LOXL2 can increase wound healing and compensate for STA-12-7191-mediated inhibition of wound closure, addition of G3BP had no affect on this assay. These findings support of role for LOXL2 in eHsp90 stimulated cancer cell migration and provide preliminary evidence for the use of STA-12-7191 to inhibit eHsp90 to limit cancer invasion

  8. Effect of extracellular matrix on bovine spermatogonial stem cells and gene expression of niche factors regulating their development in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarinejad, V; Tajik, P; Movahedin, M; Youssefi, R; Shafiei, S; Mazaheri, Z

    2015-06-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) could influence cells function through providing structural and functional networks facilitating the cellular interactions. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of culture on ECM versus plastic on bovine spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and growth factors regulating their development. Following isolation, bovine testicular cells were cultured on ECM-coated or uncoated (control) plates for 12 days. The colonization of SSCs was assessed by inverted microscope and the gene expression was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR. The colonization rate was greater in ECM than the control group (P<0.05). The expression of markers of undifferentiated spermatogonia increased in response to conventional culture (P<0.05). Conversely, the expression of ckit as a marker for differentiated spermatogonia was reduced following culture in the control and ECM groups (P<0.05), but this decrease was less in ECM group (P<0.05). Accordingly, while cells cultured on uncoated plates had greater expression of markers of undifferentiated spermatogonia (P<0.05), cells cultured on ECM-coated plates showed higher expression of ckit (P<0.05). Moreover, culture on ECM resulted in higher expression of kit ligand (Kitlg; P<0.05), whereas culture on plastic led to greater expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf; P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study revealed that the permissive effect of ECM on bovine SSCs differentiation in vitro, which was probably mediated through upregulation of KITLG expression. Moreover, the results imply that GDNF might contribute to germ cells self-renewal during conventional culture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An Impermeant Ganetespib Analog Inhibits Extracellular Hsp90-Mediated Cancer Cell Migration that Involves Lysyl Oxidase 2-like Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCready, Jessica [Department of Natural Sciences, Assumption College, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Wong, Daniel S. [Department of Developmental Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Cell and Molecular Physiology Program, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Burlison, Joseph A.; Ying, Weiwen [Synta Pharmaceuticals, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States); Jay, Daniel G., E-mail: daniel.jay@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Cell and Molecular Physiology Program, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) activates a number of client proteins outside of cancer cells required for migration and invasion. Therefore, eHsp90 may serve as a novel target for anti-metastatic drugs as its inhibition using impermeant Hsp90 inhibitors would not affect the numerous vital intracellular Hsp90 functions in normal cells. While some eHsp90 clients are known, it is important to establish other proteins that act outside the cell to validate eHsp90 as a drug target to limit cancer spread. Using mass spectrometry we identified two precursor proteins Galectin 3 binding protein (G3BP) and Lysyl oxidase 2-like protein (LOXL2) that associate with eHsp90 in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell conditioned media and confirmed that LOXL2 binds to eHsp90 in immunoprecipitates. We introduce a novel impermeant Hsp90 inhibitor STA-12-7191 derived from ganetespib and show that it is markedly less toxic to cells and can inhibit cancer cell migration in a dose dependent manner. We used STA-12-7191 to test if LOXL2 and G3BP are potential eHsp90 clients. We showed that while LOXL2 can increase wound healing and compensate for STA-12-7191-mediated inhibition of wound closure, addition of G3BP had no affect on this assay. These findings support of role for LOXL2 in eHsp90 stimulated cancer cell migration and provide preliminary evidence for the use of STA-12-7191 to inhibit eHsp90 to limit cancer invasion.

  10. Extra! Extracellular Effector Delivery into Host Cells via the Type 3 Secretion System

    OpenAIRE

    Kendall, Melissa M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type three secretion system (T3SS) is critical for the virulence of diverse bacterial pathogens. Pathogens use the T3SS to deliver effector proteins into host cells and manipulate host signaling pathways. The prevailing mechanism is that effectors translocate from inside the T3SS directly into the host cell. Recent studies reveal an alternative mechanism of effector translocation, in which an effector protein located outside the bacterial cell relies on the T3SS for delivery into...

  11. Defining a turnover index for the correlation of biomaterial degradation and cell based extracellular matrix synthesis using fluorescent tagging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardsley, Katie; Wimpenny, Ian; Wechsler, Roni; Shachaf, Yonatan; Yang, Ying; El Haj, Alicia J

    2016-11-01

    Non-destructive protocols which can define a biomaterial's degradation and its associated ability to support proliferation and/or promote extracellular matrix deposition will be an essential in vitro tool. In this study we investigate fluorescently tagged biomaterials, with varying rates of degradation and their ability to support cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Changes in fluorescence of the biomaterials and the release of fluorescent soluble by-products were confirmed as accurate methods to quantify degradation. It was demonstrated that increasing rates of the selected biomaterials' degradation led to a decrease in cell proliferation and concurrently an increase in osteogenic matrix production. A novel turnover index (TI), which directly describes the effect of degradation of a biomaterial on cell behaviour, was calculated. Lower TIs for proliferation and high TIs for osteogenic marker production were observed on faster degrading biomaterials, indicating that these biomaterials supported an upregulation of osteogenic markers. This TI was further validated using an ex vivo chick femur model, where the faster degrading biomaterial, fibrin, led to an increased TI for mineralisation within an epiphyseal defect. This in vitro tool, TI, for monitoring the effect of biomaterial degradation on extracellular matrix production may well act as predictor of the selected biomaterials' performance during in vivo studies. This paper outlines a novel metric, Turnover Index (TI), which can be utilised in tissue-engineering for the comparison of a range of biomaterials. The metric sets out to define the relationship between the rate of degradation of biomaterials with the rate of cell proliferation and ECM synthesis, ultimately allowing us to tailor material for set clinical requirements. We have discovered some novel comparative findings that cells cultured on biomaterials with increased rates of degradation have lower rates of proliferation but alternatively

  12. Evaluation of silk biomaterials in combination with extracellular matrix coatings for bladder tissue engineering with primary and pluripotent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Debra; Gil, Eun Seok; Adam, Rosalyn M; Kaplan, David L; Chung, Yeun Goo; Estrada, Carlos R; Mauney, Joshua R

    2013-01-01

    Silk-based biomaterials in combination with extracellular matrix (ECM) coatings were assessed as templates for cell-seeded bladder tissue engineering approaches. Two structurally diverse groups of silk scaffolds were produced by a gel spinning process and consisted of either smooth, compact multi-laminates (Group 1) or rough, porous lamellar-like sheets (Group 2). Scaffolds alone or coated with collagen types I or IV or fibronectin were assessed independently for their ability to support attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of primary cell lines including human bladder smooth muscle cells (SMC) and urothelial cells as well as pluripotent cell populations, such as murine embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. AlamarBlue evaluations revealed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds promoted the highest degree of primary SMC and urothelial cell attachment in comparison to uncoated Group 2 controls and all Group 1 scaffold variants. Real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses demonstrated that both fibronectin-coated silk groups were permissive for SMC contractile differentiation as determined by significant upregulation of α-actin and SM22α mRNA and protein expression levels following TGFβ1 stimulation. Prominent expression of epithelial differentiation markers, cytokeratins, was observed in urothelial cells cultured on both control and fibronectin-coated groups following IHC analysis. Evaluation of silk matrices for ESC and iPS cell attachment by alamarBlue showed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds promoted the highest levels in comparison to all other scaffold formulations. In addition, real time RT-PCR and IHC analyses showed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds facilitated ESC and iPS cell differentiation toward both urothelial and smooth muscle lineages in response to all trans retinoic acid as assessed by induction of uroplakin and contractile gene and protein expression. These results

  13. Cardiac-Derived Extracellular Matrix Enhances Cardiogenic Properties of Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaetani, Roberto; Yin, Christopher; Srikumar, Neha; Braden, Rebecca; Doevendans, Pieter A; Sluijter, Joost P G; Christman, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The use of biomaterials has been demonstrated as a viable strategy to promote cell survival and cardiac repair. However, limitations on combinational cell-biomaterial therapies exist, as cellular behavior is influenced by the microenvironment and physical characteristics of the material. Among the

  14. Effects of AT1 receptor-mediated endocytosis of extracellular Ang II on activation of nuclear factor-kappa B in proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jia L; Carretero, Oscar A; Li, Xiao C

    2006-12-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) exerts powerful proinflammatory and growth effects on the development of Ang II-induced hypertensive glomerulosclerosis and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. The proinflammatory and growth actions of Ang II are primarily mediated by activation of cell surface type 1 receptors (AT(1)) and the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). However, binding of cell surface receptors by extracellular Ang II also induces receptor-mediated endocytosis of the agonist-receptor complex in renal cells. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether AT(1) receptor-mediated endocytosis of extracellular Ang II is required for Ang II-induced NF-kappaB activation and subsequent proliferation of rabbit renal proximal tubule cells. Expression of AT(1) (primarily AT(1a) or human AT(1)) receptors in these cells was confirmed by Western blot, showing that transfection of a human AT(1) receptor-specific 20-25 nucleotide siRNA knocked down more than 70% of AT(1) receptor protein (P cells by Ang II (1 nM) induced fourfold increases in NF-kappaB activity (P 55%, P cell proliferation and DNA synthesis, and the effect was also attenuated by coadministration of losartan and colchicine (P extracellular Ang II may be required for Ang II-induced NF-kappaB activation and subsequent cell proliferation in renal proximal tubule cells.

  15. Nucleotide receptors stimulation by extracellular ATP controls Hsp90 expression through APE1/Ref-1 in thyroid cancer cells: a novel tumorigenic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alex; Bivi, Nicoletta; Vascotto, Carlo; Romanello, Milena; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Scaloni, Andrea; Damante, Giuseppe; Morisi, Roberta; Filetti, Sebastiano; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Quadrifoglio, Franco; Tell, Gianluca

    2006-10-01

    Nucleotide receptors signaling affects cell proliferation, with possible implications on tumorigenic processes. However, molecular targets and action mechanisms of the extracellular nucleotides are still poorly elucidated. We have previously shown in ARO cells that APE1/Ref-1, a transcriptional coactivator responsible for the maintenance of the cellular proliferative rate, is functionally controlled by P2-mediated signaling. Here, we demonstrate that extracellular ATP has a mitogenic effect on ARO cells, increasing ERK phosphorylation, AP1 activation, and cyclin D1 expression. Using the ATP/ADPase apyrase and the P2 receptor antagonist suramin, we show that the extracellular ATP, physiologically released by ARO cells, exerts mitogenic effects. A differential proteomic approach was used to identify molecular events associated with the ATP-induced cell proliferation. Among other proteins, Hsp90 was found upregulated upon ATP stimulation. Pretreatment with suramin completely blocked the ATP-induced Hsp90 activation, confirming the involvement of cell-surface P2 nucleotide receptors in the ATP-mediated activation of ARO cells. Treatment of proliferating ARO cells with suramin and apyrase significantly reduced the intracellular levels of Hsp90, suggesting an autocrine/paracrine mechanism of control on Hsp90 expression by extracellular ATP. The influence of Hsp90 on ATP-induced cell proliferation was also demonstrated by its specific inhibition with 17-AAG. The molecular pathway by which ATP stimulates cell proliferation was further investigated by siRNA strategies showing that Hsp90 is a target of APE1/Ref-1 functional activation. Stimulation of ARO cells with specific nucleotide receptors agonists evidenced a major involvement of P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors in controlling the Hsp90 activation. Accordingly, these two receptors resulted significantly upregulated in sample biopsies from different thyroid tumors. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Pentoxifylline regulates the cellular adhesion and its allied receptors to extracellular matrix components in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Peeyush N; Gude, Rajiv P

    2014-02-01

    Pentoxifylline (PTX) is a methylxanthine derivative that improves blood flow by decreasing its viscosity. Being an inhibitor of platelet aggregation, it can thus reduce the adhesiveness of cancer cells prolonging their circulation time. This delay in forming secondary tumours makes them more prone to immunological surveillance. Recently, we have evaluated its anti-metastatic efficacy against breast cancer, using MDA-MB-231 model system. In view of this, we had ascertained the effect of PTX on adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells to extracellular matrix components (ECM) and its allied receptors such as the integrins. PTX affected adhesion of breast cancer cells to matrigel, collagen type IV, fibronectin and laminin in a dose dependent manner. Further, PTX showed a differential effect on integrin expression profile. The experimental metastasis model using NOD-SCID mice showed lesser tumour island formation when treated with PTX compared to the control. These findings further substantiate the anti-adhesive potential of PTX in breast cancer and warrant further insights into the functional regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Establishment and characterization of intraperitoneal xenograft models by co-injection of human tumor cells and extracellular matrix gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAO, YUQIN; ZHOU, YONGJUN; SU, XIAOLAN; DAI, LEI; YU, LIN; DENG, HONGXIN; GOU, LANTU; YANG, JINLIANG

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a feasible intraperitoneal (i.p.) xenograft model in nude mice is a good strategy to evaluate the antitumor effect of drugs in vivo. However, the manipulation of human cancer cells in establishing a stable peritoneal carcinomatosis model in nude mice is problematic. In the present study, the ovarian and colorectal peritoneal tumor models were successfully established in nude mice by co-injection of human tumor cells and extracellular matrix gel. In ovarian tumor models, the mean number tumor nodes was significantly higher in the experimental group (intraperitoneal tumor cell co-injection with ECM gel) compared with the PBS control group on the 30th day (21.0±3.0 vs. 3.6±2.5; P<0.05). The same results were observed in the colorectal peritoneal tumor models on the 28th day. The colorectal peritoneal tumor model was further used to evaluate the chemotherapy effect of irinotecan (CPT-11). The mean weight of peritoneal tumor nodes in CPT-11 treatment group was significantly less than that of the control group (0.81±0.16 vs. 2.18±0.21 g; P<0.05). The results confirmed the value of these i.p. xenograft models in nude mice as efficient and feasible tools for preclinical evaluation. PMID:26788149

  18. Raman spectroscopy in biomedicine – non-invasive in vitro analysis of cells and extracellular matrix components in tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchle, Eva; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an established laser-based technology for the quality assurance of pharmaceutical products. Over the past few years, Raman spectroscopy has become a powerful diagnostic tool in the life sciences. Raman spectra allow assessment of the overall molecular constitution of biological samples, based on specific signals from proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates, and inorganic crystals. Measurements are non-invasive and do not require sample processing, making Raman spectroscopy a reliable and robust method with numerous applications in biomedicine. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy allows the highly sensitive discrimination of bacteria. Rama spectra retain information on continuous metabolic processes and kinetics such as lipid storage and recombinant protein production. Raman spectra are specific for each cell type and provide additional information on cell viability, differentiation status, and tumorigenicity. In tissues, Raman spectroscopy can detect major extracellular matrix components and their secondary structures. Furthermore, the non-invasive characterization of healthy and pathological tissues as well as quality control and process monitoring of in vitro-engineered matrix is possible. This review provides comprehensive insight to the current progress in expanding the applicability of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of living cells and tissues, and serves as a good reference point for those starting in the field. PMID:23161832

  19. Combining decellularized human adipose tissue extracellular matrix and adipose-derived stem cells for adipose tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Johnson, Joshua A; Zhang, Qixu; Beahm, Elisabeth K

    2013-11-01

    Repair of soft tissue defects resulting from lumpectomy or mastectomy has become an important rehabilitation process for breast cancer patients. This study aimed to provide an adipose tissue engineering platform for soft tissue defect repair by combining decellularized human adipose tissue extracellular matrix (hDAM) and human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). To derive hDAM incised human adipose tissues underwent a decellularization process. Effective cell removal and lipid removal were proved by immunohistochemical analysis and DNA quantification. Scanning electron microscopic examination showed a three-dimensional nanofibrous architecture in hDAM. The hDAM included collagen, sulfated glycosaminoglycan, and vascular endothelial growth factor, but lacked major histocompatibility complex antigen I. hASC viability and proliferation on hDAM were proven in vitro. hDAM implanted subcutaneously in Fischer rats did not cause an immunogenic response, and it underwent remodeling, as indicated by host cell infiltration, neovascularization, and adipose tissue formation. Fresh fat grafts (Coleman technique) and engineered fat grafts (hDAM combined with hASCs) were implanted subcutaneously in nude rats. The implanted engineered fat grafts maintained their volume for 8 weeks, and the hASCs contributed to adipose tissue formation. In summary, the combination of hDAM and hASCs provides not only a clinically translatable platform for adipose tissue engineering, but also a vehicle for elucidating fat grafting mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A cell wall-bound adenosine nucleosidase is involved in the salvage of extracellular ATP in Solanum tuberosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riewe, David; Grosman, Lukasz; Fernie, Alisdair R; Zauber, Henrik; Wucke, Cornelia; Geigenberger, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) has recently been demonstrated to play a crucial role in plant development and growth. To investigate the fate of eATP within the apoplast, we used intact potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber slices as an experimental system enabling access to the apoplast without interference of cytosolic contamination. (i) Incubation of intact tuber slices with ATP led to the formation of ADP, AMP, adenosine, adenine and ribose, indicating operation of apyrase, 5'-nucleotidase and nucleosidase. (ii) Measurement of apyrase, 5'-nucleotidase and nucleosidase activities in fractionated tuber tissue confirmed the apoplastic localization for apyrase and phosphatase in potato and led to the identification of a novel cell wall-bound adenosine nucleosidase activity. (iii) When intact tuber slices were incubated with saturating concentrations of adenosine, the conversion of adenosine into adenine was much higher than adenosine import into the cell, suggesting a potential bypass of adenosine import. Consistent with this, import of radiolabeled adenine into tuber slices was inhibited when ATP, ADP or AMP were added to the slices. (iv) In wild-type plants, apyrase and adenosine nucleosidase activities were found to be co-regulated, indicating functional linkage of these enzymes in a shared pathway. (v) Moreover, adenosine nucleosidase activity was reduced in transgenic lines with strongly reduced apoplastic apyrase activity. When taken together, these results suggest that a complete ATP salvage pathway is present in the apoplast of plant cells.

  1. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi; Mueller, Claudius; Roberts, Brian; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles; Petricoin, Emanuel; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2014-01-01

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells

  2. Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Is Critical for Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Shuang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs are recognized as candidate progenitor cells for bone regeneration. However, the mechanism of hUCMSC osteogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs signaling is involved in hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Particularly, the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK and p38 signaling pathways maintained a consistent level in hUCMSCs through the entire 21-day osteogenic differentiation period. At the same time, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK signaling significantly increased from day 5, peaked at day 9, and declined thereafter. Moreover, gene profiling of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity measurement, and alizarin red staining demonstrated that the application of U0126, a specific inhibitor for ERK activation, completely prohibited hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation. However, when U0126 was removed from the culture at day 9, ERK activation and osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs were partially recovered. Together, these findings demonstrate that the activation of ERK signaling is essential for hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation, which points out the significance of ERK signaling pathway to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs as an alternative cell source for bone tissue engineering.

  3. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Mueller, Claudius [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Roberts, Brian [Leidos Health Life Sciences, 5202 Presidents Court, Suite 110, Frederick, MD (United States); Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Petricoin, Emanuel [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Narayanan, Aarthi, E-mail: anaraya1@gmu.edu [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells.

  4. Ultrafiltration combined with size exclusion chromatography efficiently isolates extracellular vesicles from cell culture media for compositional and functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikter, Birke J; Bouwman, Freek G; Vajen, Tanja; Heinzmann, Alexandra C A; Grauls, Gert; Mariman, Edwin C; Wouters, Emiel F M; Savelkoul, Paul H; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Koenen, Rory R; Rohde, Gernot G U; Stassen, Frank R M

    2017-11-10

    Appropriate isolation methods are essential for unravelling the relative contribution of extracellular vesicles (EVs) and the EV-free secretome to homeostasis and disease. We hypothesized that ultrafiltration followed by size exclusion chromatography (UF-SEC) provides well-matched concentrates of EVs and free secreted molecules for proteomic and functional studies. Conditioned media of BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells were concentrated on 10 kDa centrifuge filters, followed by separation of EVs and free protein using sepharose CL-4B SEC. Alternatively, EVs were isolated by ultracentrifugation. EV recovery was estimated by bead-coupled flow cytometry and tuneable resistive pulse sensing. The proteomic composition of EV isolates and SEC protein fractions was characterized by nano LC-MS/MS. UF-SEC EVs tended to have a higher yield and EV-to-protein rate of purity than ultracentrifugation EVs. UF-SEC EVs and ultracentrifugation EVs showed similar fold-enrichments for biological pathways that were distinct from those of UF-SEC protein. Treatment of BEAS-2B cells with UF-SEC protein, but not with either type of EV isolate increased the IL-8 concentration in the media whereas EVs, but not protein induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Thus, UF-SEC is a useful alternative for ultracentrifugation and allows comparing the proteomic composition and functional effects of EVs and free secreted molecules.

  5. Biomimetic extracellular matrix mediated somatic stem cell differentiation: applications in dental pulp tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world's population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues.

  6. Biomimetic Extracellular Matrix Mediated Somatic Stem Cell Differentiation: Applications in Dental Pulp Tissue Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram eRavindran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world’s population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues.

  7. Integrin alpha 3 beta 1 participates in the phagocytosis of extracellular matrix molecules by human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopman, P J; Thomas, D M; Gehlsen, K R; Mueller, S C

    1996-11-01

    The mechanisms and receptors involved in phagocytosis by nonhematopoietic cells are not well understood. The involvement of the alpha 3 beta 1 integrin in phagocytosis of the extracellular matrix by human breast cancer cells was studied. The possible role of this integrin was suggested since alpha 3 and beta 1 but not alpha 2 subunits are concentrated at membrane sites where local degradation of fluorescently labeled gelatin occurs. Strikingly, anti-alpha 3 integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) stimulate the phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled gelatin films, gelatin beads, and Matrigel films in a quantitative phagocytosis assay. Stimulation of the gelatin uptake by the anti-alpha 3 mAb is dose responsive, saturable, and time dependent. Antibodies against other integrin subunits have a lower stimulatory effect (anti-beta 1) or no significant effect (anti-alpha 2, -alpha 5, -alpha 6, and -alpha v) on gelatin phagocytosis. The synthetic HGD-6 human laminin peptide that binds specifically the alpha 3 beta 1 integrin, but not the scrambled HSGD-6 control peptide, also markedly stimulates gelatin uptake in a dose-responsive way. Furthermore, the stimulatory effects of the HGD-6 peptide and the anti-alpha 3 mAb are additive, suggesting that they might promote phagocytosis in different ways. Other laminin (YIGSR, IKVAV) and fibronectin (GRGDS) peptides have no effect on gelatin phagocytosis. Immunofluorescence shows that the alpha 3 and the beta 1, but not the alpha 2 integrin subunit, concentrate into patches on the cell surface after treatment with their respective mAbs. And, both gelatin and the alpha 3 beta 1 but not the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin are cointernalized and routed to acidic vesicles such as lysosomes. In conclusion, we demonstrate that human breast cancer cells locally degrade and phagocytose the extracellular matrix and show for the first time that the alpha 3 beta 1 integrin participates in this phagocytosis. We hypothesize that the anti-alpha 3

  8. Extracellular Processing of Molecular Gradients by Eukaryotic Cells Can Improve Gradient Detection Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segota, Igor; Franck, Carl

    2017-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells sense molecular gradients by measuring spatial concentration variation through the difference in the number of occupied receptors to which molecules can bind. They also secrete enzymes that degrade these molecules, and it is presently not well understood how this affects the local gradient perceived by cells. Numerical and analytical results show that these enzymes can substantially increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the receptor difference and allow cells to respond to a much broader range of molecular concentrations and gradients than they would without these enzymes.

  9. Extracellular Processing of Molecular Gradients by Eukaryotic Cells Can Improve Gradient Detection Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segota, Igor; Franck, Carl

    2017-12-15

    Eukaryotic cells sense molecular gradients by measuring spatial concentration variation through the difference in the number of occupied receptors to which molecules can bind. They also secrete enzymes that degrade these molecules, and it is presently not well understood how this affects the local gradient perceived by cells. Numerical and analytical results show that these enzymes can substantially increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the receptor difference and allow cells to respond to a much broader range of molecular concentrations and gradients than they would without these enzymes.

  10. Precise stacking of decellularized extracellular matrix based 3D cell-laden constructs by a 3D cell printing system equipped with heating modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Geunseon; Min, Kyung-Hyun; Kim, Changhwan; Lee, Jeong-Seok; Kang, Donggu; Won, Joo-Yun; Cho, Dong-Woo; Kim, Jun-Young; Jin, Songwan; Yun, Won-Soo; Shim, Jin-Hyung

    2017-08-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell printing systems allow the controlled and precise deposition of multiple cells in 3D constructs. Hydrogel materials have been used extensively as printable bioinks owing to their ability to safely encapsulate living cells. However, hydrogel-based bioinks have drawbacks for cell printing, e.g. inappropriate crosslinking and liquid-like rheological properties, which hinder precise 3D shaping. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the influence of various factors (e.g. bioink concentration, viscosity, and extent of crosslinking) on cell printing and established a new 3D cell printing system equipped with heating modules for the precise stacking of decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM)-based 3D cell-laden constructs. Because the pH-adjusted bioink isolated from native tissue is safely gelled at 37 °C, our heating system facilitated the precise stacking of dECM bioinks by enabling simultaneous gelation during printing. We observed greater printability compared with that of a non-heating system. These results were confirmed by mechanical testing and 3D construct stacking analyses. We also confirmed that our heating system did not elicit negative effects, such as cell death, in the printed cells. Conclusively, these results hold promise for the application of 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering and drug development.

  11. Confocal Raman microscopy to monitor extracellular matrix during dental pulp stem cells differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hamideh; Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.

    2015-07-01

    Regenerative medicine brings promising applications for mesenchymal stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a noninvasive technique, is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800 to 3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and the 960 cm-1 peak (ν1 PO43-) were collected (to image cells and phosphate, respectively), and the ratio of two peaks 1660 over 1690 cm-1 (amide I bands) to measure the collagen cross-linking has been calculated. Raman spectra of DPSCs after 21 days differentiation reveal several phosphate peaks: ν1 (first stretching mode) at 960 cm-1, ν2 at 430 cm-1, and ν4 at 585 cm-1 and collagen cross-linking can also be calculated. Confocal Raman microscopy enables monitoring osteogenic differentiation in vitro and can be a credible tool for clinical stem cell based research.

  12. An electrically resistive sheet of glial cells for amplifying signals of neuronal extracellular recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Niwano, M.; Hirano-Iwata, A.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical signals of neuronal cells can be recorded non-invasively and with a high degree of temporal resolution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs). However, signals that are recorded with these devices are small, usually 0.01%-0.1% of intracellular recordings. Here, we show that the amplitude of neuronal signals recorded with MEA devices can be amplified by covering neuronal networks with an electrically resistive sheet. The resistive sheet used in this study is a monolayer of glial cells, supportive cells in the brain. The glial cells were grown on a collagen-gel film that is permeable to oxygen and other nutrients. The impedance of the glial sheet was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and equivalent circuit simulations were performed to theoretically investigate the effect of covering the neurons with such a resistive sheet. Finally, the effect of the resistive glial sheet was confirmed experimentally, showing a 6-fold increase in neuronal signals. This technique feasibly amplifies signals of MEA recordings.

  13. Troglitazone Induces Extracellular Matrix and Cytoskeleton Remodeling in Mouse Collecting Duct Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Corinaldi, Jaime; Nasrallah, Rania; Clark, Jordan; Paris, Geneviève; Miura, Pedro; Jasmin, Bernard J.; Hébert, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR γ ) has been shown to have a protective role in the nephron through its ability to inhibit a transforming growth factor- (TGF- β ) mediated fibrotic response. In contrast, PPAR γ was also shown to induce a mesenchymal transformation in epithelial intestinal cells. A fibrotic response in the collecting duct has only recently been established; however, the entire collecting duct has not been fully examined. Inner medullary collecting duct cells (...

  14. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindran, Sriram; Huang, Chun-Chieh; George, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world’s population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinica...

  15. Towards optimisation of induced pluripotent cell culture: Extracellular acidification results in growth arrest of iPSC prior to nutrient exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmes, Anja; Rauch, Caroline; Carta, Giada; Kern, Georg; Meier, Florian; Posch, Wilfried; Wilflingseder, Doris; Armstrong, Lyle; Lako, Majlinda; Beilmann, Mario; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Jennings, Paul

    2017-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have the potential to radically reduce the number of animals used in both toxicological science and disease elucidation. One initial obstacle culturing iPSC is that they require daily medium exchange. This study attempts to clarify why and propose some practical solutions. Two iPSC lineages were fed at different intervals in a full growth area (FGA) or a restricted growth area (RGA). The FGA consisted of a well coated with Matrigel™ and the RGA consisted of a coated coverslip placed in a well. Glucose, lactate, extracellular pH and cell cycle phases were quantified. Without daily feeding, FGA cultured iPSC had significantly reduced growth rates by day 2 and began to die by day 3. In contrast, RGA cultured cells grew to confluence over 3days. Surprisingly, glucose was not exhausted under any condition. However, extracellular pH reached 6.8 after 72h in FGA cultures. Artificially reducing medium pH to 6.8 also inhibited glycolysis and initiated an increase in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, while adding an additional 10mM bicarbonate to the medium increased glycolysis rates. This study demonstrates that iPSC are highly sensitive to extracellular acidification, a likely limiting factor in maintenance of proliferative and pluripotent status. Culturing iPSC in RGA prevents rapid extracellular acidification, while still maintaining pluripotency and allowing longer feeding cycles. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Characterization of cell surface and extracellular matrix remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense chemotaxis-like 1 signal transduction pathway mutants by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the regulation of multiple behaviors in response to changes in the environment, including motility patterns, exopolysaccharide production, and cell-to-cell interactions. In Azospirillum brasilense, cell surface properties, including exopolysaccharide production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from A. brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation, suggesting an associated modulation of cell surface properties. Using atomic force microscopy, distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains were detected. Whereas the wild-type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix after 24 h, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition, lectin-binding assays, and comparison of lipopolysaccharides profiles suggest that the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and the cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that disruption of the Che1 pathway is correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix, which likely result from changes in surface polysaccharides structure and/or composition.

  17. Characterization of cell surface and extracellular matrix remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense chemotaxis-like 1 signal transduction pathway mutants by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Amanda Nicole; Siuti, Piro; Bible, Amber N; Alexandre, Gladys; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the regulation of multiple behaviors in response to changes in the environment, including motility patterns, exopolysaccharide production, and cell-to-cell interactions. In Azospirillum brasilense, cell surface properties, including exopolysaccharide production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from A. brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation, suggesting an associated modulation of cell surface properties. Using atomic force microscopy, distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains were detected. Whereas the wild-type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix after 24 h, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition, lectin-binding assays, and comparison of lipopolysaccharides profiles suggest that the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and the cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that disruption of the Che1 pathway is correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix, which likely result from changes in surface polysaccharides structure and/or composition. FEMS Microbiology Letters © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  18. Extracellular S100A4(mts1) stimulates invasive growth of mouse endothelial cells and modulates MMP-13 matrix metalloproteinase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Birgitte; Ornås, Dorte; Grigorian, Mariam

    2004-01-01

    with the transcriptional modulation of genes involved in the proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Treatment of SVEC 4-10 with the S100A4 protein leads to the transcriptional activation of collagenase 3 (MMP-13) mRNA followed by subsequent release of the protein from the cells. Beta-casein zymography...

  19. Extra! Extracellular Effector Delivery into Host Cells via the Type 3 Secretion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Melissa M

    2017-05-02

    The type three secretion system (T3SS) is critical for the virulence of diverse bacterial pathogens. Pathogens use the T3SS to deliver effector proteins into host cells and manipulate host signaling pathways. The prevailing mechanism is that effectors translocate from inside the T3SS directly into the host cell. Recent studies reveal an alternative mechanism of effector translocation, in which an effector protein located outside the bacterial cell relies on the T3SS for delivery into host cells. Tejeda-Dominguez et al. (F. Tejeda-Dominguez, J. Huerta-Cantillo, L. Chavez-Dueñas, and F. Navarro-Garcia, mBio 8:e00184-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00184-17) demonstrate that the EspC effector of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli is translocated by binding to the outside of the T3SS and subsequently gains access to the host cell cytoplasm through the T3SS pore embedded within the host cell membrane. This work reveals a novel mechanism of translocation that is likely relevant for a variety of other pathogens that use the T3SS as part of their virulence arsenal. Copyright © 2017 Kendall.

  20. Intracellular and extracellular adenosine triphosphate in regulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells (β).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunjiong; Geng, Bin; Cui, Qinghua; Guan, Youfei; Yang, Jichun

    2014-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis and release in mitochondria play critical roles in regulating insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction is mainly characterized by a decrease in ATP production, which is a central event in the progression of pancreatic β cell dysfunction and diabetes. ATP has been demonstrated to regulate insulin secretion via several pathways: (i) Intracellular ATP directly closes ATP-sensitive potassium channel to open L-type calcium channel, leading to an increase in free cytosolic calcium levels and exocytosis of insulin granules; (ii) A decrease in ATP production is always associated with an increase in production of reactive oxygen species, which exerts deleterious effects on pancreatic β cell survival and insulin secretion; and (iii) ATP can be co-secreted with insulin from pancreatic β cells, and the released ATP functions as an autocrine signal to modulate insulin secretory process via P2 receptors on the cell membrane. In this review, the recent findings regarding the role and mechanism of ATP synthesis and release in regulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells will be summarized and discussed. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2.) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. PMID:26225731

  3. Culturing on decellularized extracellular matrix enhances antioxidant properties of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaozhen [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhou, Long; Chen, Xi [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Liu, Tao [Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Pan, Guoqing; Cui, Wenguo; Li, Mao; Luo, Zong-Ping [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Pei, Ming [Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Yang, Huilin [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gong, Yihong, E-mail: gongyih@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); He, Fan, E-mail: fanhe@suda.edu.cn [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) have attracted great interest in clinical application because of their regenerative potential and their lack of ethical issues. Our previous studies showed that decellularized cell-deposited extracellular matrix (ECM) provided an in vivo-mimicking microenvironment for MSCs and facilitated in vitro cell expansion. This study was conducted to analyze the cellular response of UC-MSCs when culturing on the ECM, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular antioxidative enzymes, and the resistance to exogenous oxidative stress. After decellularization, the architecture of cell-deposited ECM was characterized as nanofibrous, collagen fibrils and the matrix components were identified as type I and III collagens, fibronectin, and laminin. Compared to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) plates, culturing on ECM yielded a 2-fold increase of UC-MSC proliferation and improved the percentage of cells in the S phase by 2.4-fold. The levels of intracellular ROS and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in ECM-cultured cells were reduced by 41.7% and 82.9%, respectively. More importantly, ECM-cultured UC-MSCs showed enhanced expression and activity of intracellular antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, up-regulated expression of silent information regulator type 1, and suppressed phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Furthermore, a continuous treatment with exogenous 100 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dramatically inhibited osteogenic differentiation of UC-MSCs cultured on TCPS, but culturing on ECM retained the differentiation capacity for matrix mineralization and osteoblast-specific marker gene expression. Collectively, by providing sufficient cell amounts and enhancing antioxidant capacity, decellularized ECM can be a promising cell culture platform for in vitro expansion of UC-MSCs. - Highlights: • Decellularization preserved the architecture and components of cell

  4. Hepatic stellate cell-derived PDGFRα-enriched extracellular vesicles promote liver fibrosis in mice through SHP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostallari, Enis; Hirsova, Petra; Prasnicka, Alena; Verma, Vikas K; Yaqoob, Usman; Wongjarupong, Nicha; Roberts, Lewis R; Shah, Vijay H

    2018-01-23

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the activation and migration of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) followed by matrix deposition. Recently, several studies have shown the importance of extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from liver cells, such as hepatocytes and endothelial cells, in liver pathobiology. While most of the studies describe how liver cells modulate HSC behavior, an important gap exists in the understanding of HSC-derived signals and more specifically HSC-derived EVs in liver fibrosis. Here, we investigated the molecules released through HSC-derived EVs, the mechanism of their release and the role of these EVs in fibrosis. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor α (PDGFRα) was enriched in EVs derived from PDGF-BB-treated HSCs. Moreover, patients with liver fibrosis had increased PDGFRα levels in serum EVs compared to healthy individuals. Mechanistically, in vitro tyrosine720-to-phenylalanine mutation (Y720F) on PDGFRα sequence abolished enrichment of PDGFRα in EVs and redirected the receptor towards degradation. Congruently, the inhibition of Src homology 2 domain tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2), the regulatory binding partner of phosphorylated Y720, also inhibited PDGFRα enrichment in EVs. EVs derived from PDGFRα-overexpressing cells promoted in vitro HSC migration and in vivo liver fibrosis. Finally, administration of SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, to carbon tetrachloride-administered mice inhibited PDGFRα enrichment in serum EVs and reduced liver fibrosis. PDGFRα is enriched in EVs derived from PDGF-BB-treated HSCs in an SHP2-dependent manner and these PDGFRα-enriched EVs participate in development of liver fibrosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  5. Chemical and enzymatic fractionation of cell walls from Fucales: insights into the structure of the extracellular matrix of brown algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniaud-Bouët, Estelle; Kervarec, Nelly; Michel, Gurvan; Tonon, Thierry; Kloareg, Bernard; Hervé, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Brown algae are photosynthetic multicellular marine organisms evolutionarily distant from land plants, with a distinctive cell wall. They feature carbohydrates shared with plants (cellulose), animals (fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides, FCSPs) or bacteria (alginates). How these components are organized into a three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) still remains unclear. Recent molecular analysis of the corresponding biosynthetic routes points toward a complex evolutionary history that shaped the ECM structure in brown algae. Methods Exhaustive sequential extractions and composition analyses of cell wall material from various brown algae of the order Fucales were performed. Dedicated enzymatic degradations were used to release and identify cell wall partners. This approach was complemented by systematic chromatographic analysis to study polymer interlinks further. An additional structural assessment of the sulfated fucan extracted from Himanthalia elongata was made. Key Results The data indicate that FCSPs are tightly associated with proteins and cellulose within the walls. Alginates are associated with most phenolic compounds. The sulfated fucans from H. elongata were shown to have a regular α-(1→3) backbone structure, while an alternating α-(1→3), (1→4) structure has been described in some brown algae from the order Fucales. Conclusions The data provide a global snapshot of the cell wall architecture in brown algae, and contribute to the understanding of the structure–function relationships of the main cell wall components. Enzymatic cross-linking of alginates by phenols may regulate the strengthening of the wall, and sulfated polysaccharides may play a key role in the adaptation to osmotic stress. The emergence and evolution of ECM components is further discussed in relation to the evolution of multicellularity in brown algae. PMID:24875633

  6. The formation of quiescent glomerular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro is strongly dependent on the choice of extracellular matrix coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla, E-mail: kpaj@novonordisk.com [Global Research, Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv (Denmark); Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Nielsen, Malik Nygaard [Global Research, Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv (Denmark); Hansen, Troels Krarup [Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Williams, Julie M. [Global Research, Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv (Denmark)

    2017-04-01

    Background and aims: Nephropathy involves pathophysiological changes to the glomerulus. The primary glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs) have emerged as an important tool for studying glomerulosclerotic mechanisms and in the screening process for drug-candidates. The success of the studies is dependent on the quality of the cell model. Therefore, we set out to establish an easy, reproducible model of the quiescent endothelial monolayer with the use of commercially available extracellular matrices (ECMs). Methods: Primary hGEnCs were seeded on various ECMs. Cell adhesion was monitored by an impedance sensing system. The localization of junctional proteins was assessed by immunofluorescence and the barrier function by passage of fluorescent dextrans and magnitude of VEGF response. Results: All ECM matrices except recombinant human laminin 111 (rhLN111) supported comparable cell proliferation. Culturing hGEnCs on rhLN521, rhLN511 or fibronectin resulted in a physiologically relevant barrier to 70 kDa dextrans which was 82% tighter than that formed on collagen type IV. Furthermore, only hGEnCs cultured on rhLN521 or rhLN511 showed plasma-membrane localized zonula occludens-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin indicative of proper tight and adherens junctions (AJ). Conclusion: We recommend culturing hGEnCs on the mature glomerular basement membrane laminin - rhLN521 – which, as the only commercially available ECM, promotes all of the characteristics of the quiescent hGEnC monolayer: cobblestone morphology, well-defined AJs and physiological perm-selectivity. - Highlights: • rhLN521, rhLN511 and hFN assure physiologically relevant permeability. • rhLN521 and rhLN511 ensure best cell morphology and adherens junction formation. • Collagen IV and I based coating results in disorganized hGEnC monolayer. • Physiologically relevant ECM may lead to down-regulation of self-produced matrices.

  7. The formation of quiescent glomerular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro is strongly dependent on the choice of extracellular matrix coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nielsen, Malik Nygaard; Hansen, Troels Krarup; Williams, Julie M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Nephropathy involves pathophysiological changes to the glomerulus. The primary glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs) have emerged as an important tool for studying glomerulosclerotic mechanisms and in the screening process for drug-candidates. The success of the studies is dependent on the quality of the cell model. Therefore, we set out to establish an easy, reproducible model of the quiescent endothelial monolayer with the use of commercially available extracellular matrices (ECMs). Methods: Primary hGEnCs were seeded on various ECMs. Cell adhesion was monitored by an impedance sensing system. The localization of junctional proteins was assessed by immunofluorescence and the barrier function by passage of fluorescent dextrans and magnitude of VEGF response. Results: All ECM matrices except recombinant human laminin 111 (rhLN111) supported comparable cell proliferation. Culturing hGEnCs on rhLN521, rhLN511 or fibronectin resulted in a physiologically relevant barrier to 70 kDa dextrans which was 82% tighter than that formed on collagen type IV. Furthermore, only hGEnCs cultured on rhLN521 or rhLN511 showed plasma-membrane localized zonula occludens-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin indicative of proper tight and adherens junctions (AJ). Conclusion: We recommend culturing hGEnCs on the mature glomerular basement membrane laminin - rhLN521 – which, as the only commercially available ECM, promotes all of the characteristics of the quiescent hGEnC monolayer: cobblestone morphology, well-defined AJs and physiological perm-selectivity. - Highlights: • rhLN521, rhLN511 and hFN assure physiologically relevant permeability. • rhLN521 and rhLN511 ensure best cell morphology and adherens junction formation. • Collagen IV and I based coating results in disorganized hGEnC monolayer. • Physiologically relevant ECM may lead to down-regulation of self-produced matrices.

  8. Increasing Superoxide Production and the Labile Iron Pool in Tumor Cells May Sensitize Them to Extracellular Ascorbate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Frederick Mccarty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Low millimolar concencentrations of ascorbate are capable of inflicting lethal damage on a high proportion of cancer cells lines, yet leave non-transformed cell lines unscathed; extracellular generation of hydrogen peroxide, reflecting reduction of molecular oxygen by ascorbate, has been shown to mediate this effect. Although some cancer cell lines express low catalase activity, this cannot fully explain the selective sensitivity of cancer cells to hydrogen peroxide. Ranzato and colleagues have presented evidence for a plausible new explanation of this sensitivity - a high proportion of cancers, via NADPH oxidase complexes or dysfunctional mitochondria, produce elevated amounts of superoxide. This superoxide, via a transition metal-catalyzed transfer of an electron to the hydrogen peroxide produced by ascorbate, can generate deadly hydroxyl radical (Haber-Weiss reaction. It thus can be predicted that concurrent measures which somewhat selectively boost superoxide production in cancers will enhance their sensitivity to i.v. ascorbate therapy. One way to achieve this is to increase the provision of substrate to cancer mitochondria. Measures which inhibit the constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 activity in cancers (such as salsalate and mTORC1 inhibitors, or an improvement of tumor oxygenation, or that inhibit the HIF-1-inducible pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (such as dichloroacetate, can be expected to increase pyruvate oxidation. A ketogenic diet should provide more lipid substrate for tumor mitochondria. The cancer-killing activity of 42°C hyperthermia is to some degree contingent on an increase in oxidative stress, likely of mitochondrial origin; reports that hydrogen peroxide synergizes with hyperthermia in killing cancer cells suggest that hyperthermia and i.v. ascorbate could potentiate each other’s efficacy. A concurrent enhancement of tumor oxygenation might improve results by decreasing HIF-1 activity while increasing the

  9. Chemical and enzymatic fractionation of cell walls from Fucales: insights into the structure of the extracellular matrix of brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniaud-Bouët, Estelle; Kervarec, Nelly; Michel, Gurvan; Tonon, Thierry; Kloareg, Bernard; Hervé, Cécile

    2014-10-01

    Brown algae are photosynthetic multicellular marine organisms evolutionarily distant from land plants, with a distinctive cell wall. They feature carbohydrates shared with plants (cellulose), animals (fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides, FCSPs) or bacteria (alginates). How these components are organized into a three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) still remains unclear. Recent molecular analysis of the corresponding biosynthetic routes points toward a complex evolutionary history that shaped the ECM structure in brown algae. Exhaustive sequential extractions and composition analyses of cell wall material from various brown algae of the order Fucales were performed. Dedicated enzymatic degradations were used to release and identify cell wall partners. This approach was complemented by systematic chromatographic analysis to study polymer interlinks further. An additional structural assessment of the sulfated fucan extracted from Himanthalia elongata was made. The data indicate that FCSPs are tightly associated with proteins and cellulose within the walls. Alginates are associated with most phenolic compounds. The sulfated fucans from H. elongata were shown to have a regular α-(1→3) backbone structure, while an alternating α-(1→3), (1→4) structure has been described in some brown algae from the order Fucales. The data provide a global snapshot of the cell wall architecture in brown algae, and contribute to the understanding of the structure-function relationships of the main cell wall components. Enzymatic cross-linking of alginates by phenols may regulate the strengthening of the wall, and sulfated polysaccharides may play a key role in the adaptation to osmotic stress. The emergence and evolution of ECM components is further discussed in relation to the evolution of multicellularity in brown algae. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  10. Treating normal early gestation placentae with preeclamptic sera produces extracellular micro and nano vesicles that activate endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xirong; Xiao, Fengyi; Zhao, Mingzhi; Tong, Mancy; Wise, Michelle R; Stone, Peter R; Chamley, Lawrence W; Chen, Qi

    2017-04-01

    Preeclampsia is characterised by systemic endothelial cell dysfunction thought to be triggered by toxic/dangerous factors from the placenta, including placental extracellular vesicles (EVs). Why placental EVs become toxic is unknown. We previously reported that preeclamptic sera produced toxic/dangerous placental macrovesicles but whether small EVs are also toxic/dangerous in preeclampsia is unknown. First trimester placental explants were treated with 10% preeclamptic or control sera (n=10) for 24h. Micro- and nano-vesicles were harvested by sequential centrifugation. Micro- or nano-vesicles were also exposed to monolayers of endothelial cells in the presence or absence of nifedipine (50μg/ml) or labetalol (0.5μg/ml) which are well-known anti-hypertensives in clinical practices. The number and size of micro- and nano-vesicles were counted. Endothelial cell-surface intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) levels in micro- or nano-vesicles were measured by immunoassays. Neither the amount nor size of both micro- and nano-vesicles was different after treating placental explants with preeclamptic or control sera. The levels of HMGB1 were significantly increased in both micro- and nano-vesicles from preeclamptic sera treated placental explants (pvesicles from preeclamptic sera-treated placental explants induced endothelial activation, but it was reversed by co-incubation with nifedipine (p=0.004) or labetalol (p=0.002). Our data demonstrate that preeclamptic sera produce toxic/dangerous micro- and nano-placental EVs which activated endothelial cells. This effect was reversed by antihypertensives. The increased levels of HMGB1 in EVs may contribute to endothelial cell activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN/CD147) as a novel regulator of myogenic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Mohamed; Mohamed, Attia; Huet, Eric; Eric, Huet; Delbé, Jean; Jean, Delbé; Ledoux, Dominique; Dominique, Ledoux; Menashi, Suzanne; Suzanne, Menashi; Martelly, Isabelle; Isabelle, Martelly

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are thought to play an important role in skeletal muscle cell growth and differentiation. In view of the MMP inducing function of EMMPRIN/CD147, its role in myogenic cell differentiation was investigated. EMMPRIN level increased during differentiation of both rat primary myoblasts derived from satellite cells and mouse C2.7 myogenic cells and was associated with an alteration in its molecular forms. In parallel, expression of pro-MMP-9 gradually decreased and that of pro-MMP-2 and active MMP-2 increased. While small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibition of EMMPRIN expression accelerated cell differentiation, exogenously added recombinant EMMPRIN inhibited differentiation by an MMP-mediated mechanism, as the MMP inhibitor marimastat abrogated EMMPRIN's effect. Our results further suggest that EMMPRIN regulates differentiation through an MMP activation of transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), a known inhibitor of myoblast's differentiation, as the increased activation and signaling of TGFβ by EMMPRIN was attenuated in the presence of marimastat. EMMPRIN inhibition may thus represent a novel strategy in the treatment of muscular degenerative disorders.

  12. Increased extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} lead to adipocyte accumulation in bone marrow stromal cells by different mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Ryota, E-mail: hryota@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Physiology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Katoh, Youichi, E-mail: katoyo@juntendo-urayasu.jp [Juntendo University Faculty of International Liberal Arts, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Department of Cardiology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Miyamoto, Yuki [Juntendo University Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Takasu 2-5-1, Urayasu-shi, Chiba 279-0023 (Japan); Itoh, Seigo; Daida, Hiroyuki [Department of Cardiology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Nakazato, Yuji [Center for Environmental Research, Department of Cardiology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine Urayasu Hospital, Tomioka 2-1-1, Urayasu-shi, Chiba 279-0022 (Japan); Okada, Takao [Department of Physiology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2015-02-20

    Mesenchymal stem cells found in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common progenitors for both adipocyte and osteoblast. An increase in marrow adipogenesis is associated with age-related osteopenia and anemia. Both extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) are versatile signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of cell functions, including proliferation and differentiation. We have recently reported that upon treatment of BMSCs with insulin and dexamethasone, both high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} enhanced adipocyte accumulation, which suggested that increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} caused by bone resorption may accelerate adipocyte accumulation in aging and diabetic patients. In this study, we used primary mouse BMSCs to investigate the mechanisms by which high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} may enhance adipocyte accumulation. In the process of adipocyte accumulation, two important keys are adipocyte differentiation and the proliferation of BMSCs, which have the potential to differentiate into adipocytes. Use of MTT assay and real-time RT-PCR revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (ionomycin)-dependent adipocyte accumulation is caused by enhanced proliferation of BMSCs but not enhanced differentiation into adipocytes. Using fura-2 fluorescence-based approaches, we showed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} (addition of CaCl{sub 2}) leads to increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Flow cytometric methods revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK independently of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The inhibition of ERK by U0126 and PD0325901 enhanced the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes. These data suggest that increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+} provides the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes by the suppression of ERK activity independently of increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, which results in BMSC proliferation. - Highlights:

  13. Gene and miRNA expression signature of Lewis lung carcinoma LLC1 cells in extracellular matrix enriched microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankevicius, Vaidotas; Vasauskas, Gintautas; Bulotiene, Danute; Butkyte, Stase; Jarmalaite, Sonata; Rotomskis, Ricardas; Suziedelis, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM), one of the key components of tumor microenvironment, has a tremendous impact on cancer development and highly influences tumor cell features. ECM affects vital cellular functions such as cell differentiation, migration, survival and proliferation. Gene and protein expression levels are regulated in cell-ECM interaction dependent manner as well. The rate of unsuccessful clinical trials, based on cell culture research models lacking the ECM microenvironment, indicates the need for alternative models and determines the shift to three-dimensional (3D) laminin rich ECM models, better simulating tissue organization. Recognized advantages of 3D models suggest the development of new anticancer treatment strategies. This is among the most promising directions of 3D cell cultures application. However, detailed analysis at the molecular level of 2D/3D cell cultures and tumors in vivo is still needed to elucidate cellular pathways most promising for the development of targeted therapies. In order to elucidate which biological pathways are altered during microenvironmental shift we have analyzed whole genome mRNA and miRNA expression differences in LLC1 cells cultured in 2D or 3D culture conditions. In our study we used DNA microarrays for whole genome analysis of mRNA and miRNA expression differences in LLC1 cells cultivated in 2D or 3D culture conditions. Next, we indicated the most common enriched functional categories using KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. Finally, we validated the microarray data by quantitative PCR in LLC1 cells cultured under 2D or 3D conditions or LLC1 tumors implanted in experimental animals. Microarray gene expression analysis revealed that 1884 genes and 77 miRNAs were significantly altered in LLC1 cells after 48 h cell growth under 2D and ECM based 3D cell growth conditions. Pathway enrichment results indicated metabolic pathway, MAP kinase, cell adhesion and immune response as the most significantly altered

  14. Extracellular matrix mediators of metastatic cell colonization characterized using scaffold mimics of the pre-metastatic niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Brian A; Caffe, Jordan R; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S; Bushnell, Grace G; Azarin, Samira M; Shea, Lonnie D

    2016-03-01

    Metastatic tumor cells colonize the pre-metastatic niche, which is a complex microenvironment consisting partially of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We sought to identify and validate novel contributors to tumor cell colonization using ECM-coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds as mimics of the pre-metastatic niche. Utilizing orthotopic breast cancer mouse models, fibronectin and collagen IV-coated scaffolds implanted in the subcutaneous space captured colonizing tumor cells, showing a greater than 2-fold increase in tumor cell accumulation at the implant site compared to uncoated scaffolds. As a strategy to identify additional ECM colonization contributors, decellularized matrix (DCM) from lungs and livers containing metastatic tumors were characterized. In vitro, metastatic cell adhesion was increased on DCM coatings from diseased organs relative to healthy DCM. Furthermore, in vivo implantations of diseased DCM-coated scaffolds had increased tumor cell colonization relative to healthy DCM coatings. Mass-spectrometry proteomics was performed on healthy and diseased DCM to identify candidates associated with colonization. Myeloperoxidase was identified as abundantly present in diseased organs and validated as a contributor to colonization using myeloperoxidase-coated scaffold implants. This work identified novel ECM proteins associated with colonization using decellularization and proteomics techniques and validated candidates using a scaffold to mimic the pre-metastatic niche. The pre-metastatic niche consists partially of ECM proteins that promote metastatic cell colonization to a target organ. We present a biomaterials-based approach to mimic this niche and identify ECM mediators of colonization. Using murine breast cancer models, we implanted microporous PCL scaffolds to recruit colonizing tumor cells in vivo. As a strategy to modulate colonization, we coated scaffolds with various ECM proteins, including decellularized lung and liver matrix from

  15. Circulating endothelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles mediate the acute phase response and sickness behaviour associated with CNS inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Yvonne; Akbar, Naveed; Roodselaar, Jay; Evans, Matthew C; Gardiner, Chris; Sargent, Ian; Romero, Ignacio A; Bristow, Adrian; Buchan, Alastair M; Haughey, Norman; Anthony, Daniel C

    2017-08-29

    Brain injury elicits a systemic acute-phase response (APR), which is responsible for co-ordinating the peripheral immunological response to injury. To date, the mechanisms responsible for signalling the presence of injury or disease to selectively activate responses in distant organs were unclear. Circulating endogenous extracellular vesicles (EVs) are increased after brain injury and have the potential to carry targeted injury signals around the body. Here, we examined the potential of EVs, isolated from rats after focal inflammatory brain lesions using IL-1β, to activate a systemic APR in recipient naïve rats, as well as the behavioural consequences of EV transfer. Focal brain lesions increased EV release, and, following isolation and transfer, the EVs were sequestered by the liver where they initiated an APR. Transfer of blood-borne EVs from brain-injured animals was also enough to suppress exploratory behaviours in recipient naïve animals. EVs derived from brain endothelial cell cultures treated with IL-1β also activated an APR and altered behaviour in recipient animals. These experiments reveal that inflammation-induced circulating EVs derived from endothelial cells are able to initiate the APR to brain injury and are sufficient to generate the associated sickness behaviours, and are the first demonstration that EVs are capable of modifying behavioural responses.

  16. Comparative adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to human buccal epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rachael P C; Williams, David W; Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are very closely related pathogenic yeast species. Despite their close relationship, C. albicans is a far more successful colonizer and pathogen of humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if the disparity in the virulence of the two species is attributed to differences in their ability to adhere to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) and/or extracellular matrix proteins. When grown overnight at 30°C in yeast extract peptone dextrose, genotype 1 C. dubliniensis isolates were found to be significantly more adherent to human BECs than C. albicans or C. dubliniensis genotypes 2-4 (P albicans to human BECs was observed, and C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans adhered to BECs in significantly greater numbers than the other C. dubliniensis genotypes (P albicans to type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, and proline-rich peptides. These data suggest that C. albicans is not more adherent to epithelial cells or matrix proteins than C. dubliniensis and therefore other factors must contribute to the greater levels of virulence exhibited by C. albicans.

  17. Components, structure, biogenesis and function of the Hydra extracellular matrix in regeneration, pattern formation and cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarras, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    The body wall of Hydra is organized as an epithelial bilayer (ectoderm and endoderm) with an intervening extracellular matrix (ECM), termed mesoglea by early biologists. Morphological studies have determined that Hydra ECM is composed of two basal lamina layers positioned at the base of each epithelial layer with an intervening interstitial matrix. Molecular and biochemical analyses of Hydra ECM have established that it contains components similar to those seen in more complicated vertebrate species. These components include such macromolecules as laminin, type IV collagen, and various fibrillar collagens. These components are synthesized in a complicated manner involving cross-talk between the epithelial bilayer. Any perturbation to ECM biogenesis leads to a blockage in Hydra morphogenesis. Blockage in ECM/cell interactions in the adult polyp also leads to problems in epithelial transdifferentiation processes. In terms of biophysical parameters, Hydra ECM is highly flexible; a property that facilitates continuous movements along the organism's longitudinal and radial axis. This is in contrast to the more rigid matrices often found in vertebrates. The flexible nature of Hydra ECM can in part now be explained by the unique structure of the organism's type IV collagen and fibrillar collagens. This review will focus on Hydra ECM in regard to: 1) its general structure, 2) its molecular composition, 3) the biophysical basis for the flexible nature of Hydra's ECM, 4) the relationship of the biogenesis of Hydra ECM to regeneration of body form, and 5) the functional role of Hydra ECM during pattern formation and cell differentiation.

  18. Fast characterisation of cell-derived extracellular vesicles by nanoparticles tracking analysis, cryo-electron microscopy, and Raman tweezers microspectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irène Tatischeff

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The joint use of 3 complementary techniques, namely, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA, cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM and Raman tweezers microspectroscopy (RTM, is proposed for a rapid characterisation of extracellular vesicles (EVs of various origins. NTA is valuable for studying the size distribution and concentration, Cryo-EM is outstanding for the morphological characterisation, including observation of vesicle heterogeneity, while RTM provides the global chemical composition without using any exogenous label. The capabilities of this approach are evaluated on the example of cell-derived vesicles of Dictyostelium discoideum, a convenient general model for eukaryotic EVs. At least 2 separate species differing in chemical composition (relative amounts of DNA, lipids and proteins, presence of carotenoids were found for each of the 2 physiological states of this non-pathogenic microorganism, that is, cell growth and starvation-induced aggregation. These findings demonstrate the specific potency of RTM. In addition, the first Raman spectra of human urinary exosomes are reported, presumably constituting the primary step towards Raman characterisation of EVs for the purpose of human diseases diagnoses.