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Sample records for cells turn activated

  1. Turn, turn, turn: Predicting turning points in economic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Del Negro

    2001-01-01

    Policy and investment decisions are made with an eye toward future economic conditions, and an econometric model that can correctly forecast directional changes in the business cycle would be a boon to policymakers, the business community, and the general public. This article provides some evidence on econometric models' ability to predict these directional changes, also known as turning points, in an effort to answer the question, How good is the state of the art in turning point forecasting...

  2. Epithelial Stem Cells: Turning over New Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Blanpain, Cédric; Horsley, Valerie; Fuchs, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    Most epithelial tissues self-renew throughout adult life due to the presence of multipotent stem cells and/or unipotent progenitor cells. Epithelial stem cells are specified during development and are controlled by epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Despite morphological and functional differences among epithelia, common signaling pathways appear to control epithelial stem cell maintenance, activation, lineage determination, and differentiation. Additionally, deregulation of these pathways ...

  3. Turning Stem Cells into Mesenchymal Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Tiziano Barberi; Willis, Lucy M.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Lorenz Studer

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells provide access to the earliest stages of human development and may serve as a source of specialized cells for regenerative medicine. Thus, it becomes crucial to develop protocols for the directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells into tissue-restricted precursors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we present culture conditions for the derivation of unlimited numbers of pure mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells and demonstrate multilinea...

  4. Turning One Cell Type into Another.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Jonathan M W

    2016-01-01

    The nature of cells in early embryos may be respecified simply by exposure to inducing factors. In later stage embryos, determined cell populations do not respond to inducing factors but may be respecified by other stimuli, especially the introduction of specific transcription factors. Fully differentiated cell types are hard to respecify by any method, but some degree of success can be achieved using selected combinations of transcription factors, and this may have clinical significance in the future. PMID:26969988

  5. Turning Perspective in Photoelectrocatalytic Cells for Solar Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-02-19

    The development of new devices for the use and storage of solar energy is a key step to enable a new sustainable energy scenario. The route for direct solar-to-chemical energy transformation, especially to produce liquid fuels, represents a necessary element to realize transition from the actual energy infrastructure. Photoelectrocatalytic (PECa) devices for the production of solar fuels are a key element to enable this sustainable scenario. The development of PECa devices and related materials is of increasing scientific and applied interest. This concept paper introduces the need to turn the viewpoint of research in terms of PECa cell design and related materials with respect to mainstream activities in the field of artificial photosynthesis and leaves. As an example of a new possible direction, the concept of electrolyte-less cell design for PECa cells to produce solar fuels by reduction of CO2 is presented. The fundamental and applied development of new materials and electrodes for these cells should proceed fully integrated with PECa cell design and systematic analysis. A new possible approach to develop semiconductors with improved performances by using visible light is also shortly presented. PMID:26663767

  6. Mixing signals: Molecular turn ons and turn offs for innate γδ Τ cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios eBekiaris

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytes of the gamma delta (γδ T cell lineage are evolutionary conserved and although they express rearranged antigen-specific receptors a large proportion respond as innate effectors. γδ T cells are poised to combat infection by responding rapidly to cytokine stimuli similar to innate lymphoid cells. This potential to initiate strong inflammatory responses necessitates inhibitory signals are balanced with activation signals. Here, we discuss some of the key mechanisms that regulate the development, activation and inhibition of innate γδ T cells in light of recent evidence that the inhibitory Ig-superfamily member B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA restricts their differentiation and effector function.

  7. Can a Cancer Cell Turn into a Normal Cell?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranan Gülhan Aktas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available HepG2 cells, a human liver cancer cell line (hepatocellular carcinoma, are being considered as a future model for bioartificial liver studies. They have the ability to differentiate and demonstrate some features of normal liver cells. Our previous studies focused on examination of the morphological and functional properties of these cells under different extracellular environmental conditions. We have created a culture model that these cells demonstrate remarkable changes after 30 days. These changes include an increase in the cytoplasmic organelles, formation of bile canaliculi, occurrence of junctional complexes between the adjacent cells, existence of microvilli on the apical surfaces, accumulation of glycogen particles in the cytoplasm, an increase at the density of albumin labeled areas and a rise at the Na-K ATPase level on cellular membranes.

  8. Active Control of Chatter in Turning : The Origine of Chatter

    OpenAIRE

    Håkansson, Lars; Claesson, Ingvar; Sturesson, Per-Olof; Lagö, Thomas L

    1999-01-01

    In the turning operation chatter or vibration is a frequent problem, which affects the result of the machining, and, in particular, the surface finish. Tool life is also influenced by vibration. Severe acoustic noise in the working environment frequently occurs as a result of dynamic motion between the cutting tool and the workpiece. By proper machine design, e.g. improved stiffness of the machine structure, the problem of relative dynamic motion between cutting tool and workpiece may be part...

  9. Rapid Bioorthogonal Chemistry Turn-on through Enzymatic or Long Wavelength Photocatalytic Activation of Tetrazine Ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Trout, William S; Liu, Shuang; Andrade, Gabriel A; Hudson, Devin A; Scinto, Samuel L; Dicker, Kevin T; Li, Yi; Lazouski, Nikifar; Rosenthal, Joel; Thorpe, Colin; Jia, Xinqiao; Fox, Joseph M

    2016-05-11

    Rapid bioorthogonal reactivity can be induced by controllable, catalytic stimuli using air as the oxidant. Methylene blue (4 μM) irradiated with red light (660 nm) catalyzes the rapid oxidation of a dihydrotetrazine to a tetrazine thereby turning on reactivity toward trans-cyclooctene dienophiles. Alternately, the aerial oxidation of dihydrotetrazines can be efficiently catalyzed by nanomolar levels of horseradish peroxidase under peroxide-free conditions. Selection of dihydrotetrazine/tetrazine pairs of sufficient kinetic stability in aerobic aqueous solutions is key to the success of these approaches. In this work, polymer fibers carrying latent dihydrotetrazines were catalytically activated and covalently modified by trans-cyclooctene conjugates of small molecules, peptides, and proteins. In addition to visualization with fluorophores, fibers conjugated to a cell adhesive peptide exhibited a dramatically increased ability to mediate contact guidance of cells. PMID:27078610

  10. A New Avenue to Cure Cancer by Turning Adaptive Immune T Cells to Innate Immune NK Cells via Reprogramming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Ming Su; Ramakrishna Vankayalapati

    2010-01-01

    Thymocytes after T-lineage commitment develop in the T-cell pathway. However, in a recent study, Li et al. (2010) demonstrated that inducing to delete Bcl11b gene in these thymocytes, even in mature T cells turns these cells into natural killer (NK) cells during the culture. They called this conversion 'reprogramming', and the reprogrammed killer cells 'ITNK cells'.

  11. Crawling and turning in a minimal reaction-diffusion cell motility model: coupling cell shape and biochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Camley, Brian A; Li, Bo; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2016-01-01

    We study a minimal model of a crawling eukaryotic cell with a chemical polarity controlled by a reaction-diffusion mechanism describing Rho GTPase dynamics. The size, shape, and speed of the cell emerge from the combination of the chemical polarity, which controls the locations where actin polymerization occurs, and the physical properties of the cell, including its membrane tension. We find in our model both highly persistent trajectories, in which the cell crawls in a straight line, and turning trajectories, where the cell transitions from crawling in a line to crawling in a circle. We discuss the controlling variables for this turning instability, and argue that turning arises from a coupling between the reaction-diffusion mechanism and the shape of the cell. This emphasizes the surprising features that can arise from simple links between cell mechanics and biochemistry. Our results suggest that similar instabilities may be present in a broad class of biochemical descriptions of cell polarity.

  12. Active Vibration Isolation System for Sub-microultra-precision Turning Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Now vibration isolation of ultra-precision machine tool is usually achieved through air-springs systems. As far as HCM-I sub-micro turning machine developed by HIT, an active vibration isolation system that consists of air-springs and electro-magnetic actuators was presented. The primary function of air-springs is to support the turning machine and to isolate the high-frequency vibration. The electro-magnetic actuators controlled by fuzzy-neural networks isolate the low-frequency vibration. The experiment indicates that active vibration isolation system isolates base-vibration effectively in all the frequency range. So the vibration of the machine bed is controlled under 10-6g and the surface roughness is improved.

  13. Actin disassembly 'clock' and membrane tension determine cell shape and turning: a mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motile cells regulate their shape and movements largely by remodeling the actin cytoskeleton. Principles of this regulation are becoming clear for simple-shaped steadily crawling cells, such as fish keratocytes. In particular, the shape of the leading edge and sides of the lamellipodium-cell motile appendage-is determined by graded actin distribution at the cell boundary, so that the denser actin network at the front grows, while sparser actin filaments at the sides are stalled by membrane tension. Shaping of the cell rear is less understood. Here we theoretically examine the hypothesis that the cell rear is shaped by the disassembly clock: the front-to-rear lamellipodial width is defined by the time needed for the actin-adhesion network to disassemble to the point at which the membrane tension can crush this network. We demonstrate that the theory predicts the observed cell shapes. Furthermore, turning of the cells can be explained by biases in the actin distribution. We discuss experimental implications of this hypothesis.

  14. Highly selective fluorescence turn-on sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A displacement method of detecting hydrogen sulfide in aqueous media based on complex L–Cu ensemble is developed. Once combined with Cu2+, complex L–Cu displayed high specificity for sulfide anion. Among the various anions, only sulfide anion induce the revival of fluoresecence of compound L, which is quenched by Cu2+, resulting in turn-on type sensing sulfide anion. Complex L–Cu exhibits a highly sensitive fluorescent response toward S2− by releasing compound L to give a remarkable change with 20-fold fluorescence intensity enhancement under 2 equivalent of S2− added in Tris–HCl/ DMF (20 mM, 6/4, v/v), and also exhibits a dynamic response range for S2− from 5×10−7 to 5×10−6 M, with a detection limit of 0.18 μM. In addition, the turn-on fluorescent change upon the addition of S2− is also applied in cell imaging. -- Highlights: ► We have developed a displacement method with sensing hydrogen sulfide based on a complex L–Cu. ► It exhibits high selectivity, high sensitivity with a 20-fold fluorescence enhancement. ► It exhibited a low detection limit of 0.18 μM. ► It is applied in vitro imaging of S2− in the living cells

  15. Mechanism for activation of the growth factor-activated AGC kinases by turn motif phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, Camilla; Antal, Torben L; Hirschberg, Daniel; Doehn, Ulrik; Thorup, Katrine; Idrissova, Leila; Hansen, Klaus; Jensen, Ole N; Jørgensen, Thomas J; Biondi, Ricardo M; Frödin, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The growth factor/insulin-stimulated AGC kinases share an activation mechanism based on three phosphorylation sites. Of these, only the role of the activation loop phosphate in the kinase domain and the hydrophobic motif (HM) phosphate in a C-terminal tail region are well characterized. We invest...

  16. Highly selective fluorescence turn-on sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiaoliang [College of Chemistry and Environment Engineering, Hunan City University, Yiyang, Hunan 413000 (China); Long, Liping, E-mail: llping401@163.com [College of Chemistry and Environment Engineering, Hunan City University, Yiyang, Hunan 413000 (China); Xie, Dan; Zhan, Youwen [College of Chemistry and Environment Engineering, Hunan City University, Yiyang, Hunan 413000 (China)

    2013-07-15

    A displacement method of detecting hydrogen sulfide in aqueous media based on complex L–Cu ensemble is developed. Once combined with Cu{sup 2+}, complex L–Cu displayed high specificity for sulfide anion. Among the various anions, only sulfide anion induce the revival of fluoresecence of compound L, which is quenched by Cu{sup 2+}, resulting in turn-on type sensing sulfide anion. Complex L–Cu exhibits a highly sensitive fluorescent response toward S{sup 2−} by releasing compound L to give a remarkable change with 20-fold fluorescence intensity enhancement under 2 equivalent of S{sup 2−} added in Tris–HCl/ DMF (20 mM, 6/4, v/v), and also exhibits a dynamic response range for S{sup 2−} from 5×10{sup −7} to 5×10{sup −6} M, with a detection limit of 0.18 μM. In addition, the turn-on fluorescent change upon the addition of S{sup 2−} is also applied in cell imaging. -- Highlights: ► We have developed a displacement method with sensing hydrogen sulfide based on a complex L–Cu. ► It exhibits high selectivity, high sensitivity with a 20-fold fluorescence enhancement. ► It exhibited a low detection limit of 0.18 μM. ► It is applied in vitro imaging of S{sup 2−} in the living cells.

  17. Effects of F/G-actin ratio and actin turn-over rate on NADPH oxidase activity in microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen Izabela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most in vivo studies that have addressed the role of actin dynamics in NADPH oxidase function in phagocytes have used toxins to modulate the polymerization state of actin and mostly effects on actin has been evaluated by end point measurements of filamentous actin, which says little about actin dynamics, and without consideration for the subcellular distribution of the perturbed actin cytoskeleton. Results Here, we in addition to toxins use conditional expression of the major actin regulatory protein LIM kinase-1 (LIMK1, and shRNA knock-down of cofilin to modulate the cellular F/G-actin ratio in the Ra2 microglia cell line, and we use Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP in β-actin-YFP-transduced cells to obtain a dynamic measure of actin recovery rates (actin turn-over rates in different F/G-actin states of the actin cytoskeleton. Our data demonstrate that stimulated NADPH oxidase function was severely impaired only at extreme actin recovery rates and F/G-actin ratios, and surprisingly, that any moderate changes of these parameters of the actin cytoskeleton invariably resulted in an increased NADPH oxidase activity. Conclusion moderate actin polymerization and depolymerization both increase the FMLP and PMA-stimulated NADPH oxidase activity of microglia, which is directly correlated with neither actin recovery rate nor F/G- actin ratio. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase functions in an enhanced state of activity in stimulated phagocytes despite widely different states of the actin cytoskeleton.

  18. Thymic epithelial cells use macroautophagy to turn their inside out for CD4 T cell tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chunyan; Aichinger, Martin; Nedjic, Jelena; Klein, Ludger

    2013-01-01

    During development in the thymus, each T lymphocyte is equipped with one, essentially unique, T cell receptor (TCR)-specificity. Due to its random nature, this process inevitably also leads to the emergence of potentially dangerous T lymphocytes that may recognize ‘self.’ Nevertheless, autoimmune tissue destruction, the cause of diseases such as multiple sclerosis and diabetes, is the exception rather than the rule. This state of immunological self-tolerance is to a large degree based upon a ...

  19. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2-12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells "foamy DCs" and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  20. ORALLY ACTIVE CARBAMATE PRODRUGS OF THE SELECTIVE DOPAMINE AGONIST N-0437 - INVIVO ACTIVITIES IN THE 6-OHDA TURNING MODEL AND INVITRO ACTIVITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENDAAS, [No Value; DEBOER, P; TEPPER, PG; ROLLEMA, H; HORN, AS

    1991-01-01

    The in-vivo activities of eight carbamate prodrugs of the D2-agonist N-0437 were determined by examining the effects of the prodrugs, after their oral administration in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesions of the striatum. The resulting contralateral turning was used as an index of the activity of th

  1. A coming-of-age story: activation-induced cytidine deaminase turns 10

    OpenAIRE

    Delker, Rebecca K; Fugmann, Sebastian D.; Papavasiliou, F. Nina

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and characterization of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) 10 years ago provided the basis for a mechanistic understanding of secondary antibody diversification and the subsequent generation and maintenance of cellular memory in B lymphocytes, which signified a major advance in the field of B cell immunology. Here we celebrate and review the triumphs in the mission to understand the mechanisms through which AID influences antibody diversification, as well as the implica...

  2. RNA molecular turn-over in Tobacco cell cultures. II. Intramolecular and intermolecular differential turn-over of tRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobacco cells, exponentially growing in a shaken liquid medium were labeled by addition of [32P]-phosphate during 30 minutes or 4 hours. The tRNA of these cells were extracted and fractionated by reversed phase chromatography (RPC5). The different fractions had the same specific radioactivity after a 4 hours labeling period. When the 32P pulse was shortened to 30 minutes the specific radioactivity of the tail fractions eluted from the RPC5 column chromatography was about two fold that of the head fractions. The fractions eluted from the RPC5 column all belonged to the tRNA population. Their electrophoretic behavior on polyacrylamide gels supplemented with formamide was that of tRNA; the enzymatic acylation of the total tRNA extract and of each fraction were satisfactory; moreover the more heavily labeled fractions were more acylated. Only mature tRNA are responsible for the observed differences between the specific radioactivities of the various tRNA fractions. These differences could not be assigned to the nucleotides of the vCvCvA-OH oligonucleotides 3'-end but were assigned to the transcribed part of the tRNA molecules. These results may be understood according to the hypotheses that either the precursor nucleotide pools of the tRNA incorporated [32P]-phosphate at different rates in different cell compartments, or that some tRNA species, tightly bound to the RPC5 solid phase of the columns, are more rapidly turned over. These explanations do not exclude each other

  3. The effect of beta-turn structure on the permeation of peptides across monolayers of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Steenberg, B; Knipp, G T; Wang, W; Steffansen, B; Frokjaer, S; Borchardt, R T

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of the beta-turn structure of a peptide on its permeation via the paracellular and transcellular routes across cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cell (BBMEC) monolayers, an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). METHODS: The effective perm...

  4. A "turn-on" silver nanocluster based fluorescent sensor for folate receptor detection and cancer cell imaging under visual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Xu, Gang; Sun, Yimin; Zheng, Weiwei; Zhu, Xiangxiang; Wang, Baojuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Guangfeng

    2015-07-28

    A novel terminal protection based label-free and "turn-on" fluorescent sensor for detection of folate receptors (FRs) and HeLa cells is developed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). Multilevel visual analysis (m(2)VA) was firstly proposed and applied in optimizing the experimental parameters. PMID:26108636

  5. Dendritic cells: The warriors upfront-turned defunct in chronic hepatitis C infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meenakshi; Sachdeva; Yogesh; K; Chawla; Sunil; K; Arora

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection causes tremendousmorbidity and mortality with over 170 million people infected worldwide. HCV gives rise to a sustained, chronic disease in the majority of infected individuals owing to a failure of the host immune system to clear the virus. In general, an adequate immune response is elicited by an efficient antigen presentation by dendritic cells(DCs), the cells that connect innate and adaptive immune system to generate a specific immune response against a pathogen. However, HCV seems to dysregulate the activity of DCs, making them less proficient antigen presenting cells for the optimal stimulation of virusspecific T cells, hence interfering with an optimal antiviral immune response. There are discordant reports on the functional status of DCs in chronic HCV infection(CHC), from no phenotypic or functional defects to abnormal functions of DCs. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms behind the impairment of DC function are even so not completely elucidated during CHC. Understanding the mechanisms of immune dysfunction would help in devising strategies for better management of the disease at the immunological level and help to predict the prognosis of the disease in the patients receiving antiviral therapy. In this review, we have discussed the outcomes of the interaction of DCs with HCV and the mechanisms of DC impairment during HCV infection with its adverse effects on the immune response in the infected host.

  6. Slow Turning Lateral Vessel Bioreactor Improves Embryoid Body Formation and Cardiogenic Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the ability to form aggregates, which are called embryoid bodies (EBs). EBs mimic early embryonic development and are commonly produced for cardiomyogenesis. Here, we describe a method of EB formation in hydrodynamic conditions using a slow-turning lateral vessel (STLV) bioreactor and the subsequent differentiation of EBs into cardiomyocytes. EBs formed in the STLV were compared with conventional techniques, such as hanging drop (HD) or static suspension cell ...

  7. A coming-of-age story: activation-induced cytidine deaminase turns 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delker, Rebecca K; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2009-11-01

    The discovery and characterization of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) 10 years ago provided the basis for a mechanistic understanding of secondary antibody diversification and the subsequent generation and maintenance of cellular memory in B lymphocytes, which signified a major advance in the field of B cell immunology. Here we celebrate and review the triumphs in the mission to understand the mechanisms through which AID influences antibody diversification, as well as the implications of AID function on human physiology. We also take time to point out important ongoing controversies and outstanding questions in the field and highlight key experiments and techniques that hold the potential to elucidate the remaining mysteries surrounding this vital protein. PMID:19841648

  8. Role of turn-over in active stress generation in a filament network

    CERN Document Server

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of turnover of cross linkers, motors and filaments on the generation of a contractile stress in a network of filaments connected by passive crosslinkers and subjected to the forces exerted by molecular motors. We perform numerical simulations where filaments are treated as rigid rods and molecular motors move fast compared to the timescale of exchange of crosslinkers. We show that molecular motors create a contractile stress above a critical number of crosslinkers. When passive crosslinkers are allowed to turn over, the stress exerted by the network vanishes, due to the formation of clusters. When both filaments and passive crosslinkers turn over, clustering is prevented and the network reaches a dynamic contractile steady-state. A maximum stress is reached for an optimum ratio of the filament and crosslinker turnover rates.

  9. A novel fluorescent "turn-on" chemosensor for nanomolar detection of Fe(III) from aqueous solution and its application in living cells imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandre, Jitendra; Patil, Samadhan; Patil, Vijay; Yu, Fabiao; Chen, Lingxin; Sahoo, Suban; Prior, Timothy; Redshaw, Carl; Mahulikar, Pramod; Patil, Umesh

    2014-11-15

    An electronically active and spectral sensitive fluorescent "turn-on" chemosensor (BTP-1) based on the benzo-thiazolo-pyrimidine unit was designed and synthesized for the highly selective and sensitive detection of Fe(3+) from aqueous medium. With Fe(3+), the sensor BTP-1 showed a remarkable fluorescence enhancement at 554 nm (λex = 314 nm) due to the inhibition of photo-induced electron transfer. The sensor formed a host-guest complex in 1:1 stoichiometry with the detection limit down to 0.74 nM. Further, the sensor was successfully utilized for the qualitative and quantitative intracellular detection of Fe(3+) in two liver cell lines i.e., HepG2 cells (human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line) and HL-7701 cells (human normal liver cell line) by a confocal imaging technique. PMID:24967750

  10. Turning Point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Moves from the United States and North Korea give new impetus to nuclear disablement and U.S.-North Korea ties The tense situation surrounding denu-clearization on the Korean Peninsula has reached a turning point. On

  11. Fraudsters operate and officialdom turns a blind eye: a proposal for controlling stem cell therapy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Dong, Bing He

    2016-09-01

    Stem cell tourism-the flow of patients from home countries to destination countries to obtain stem cell treatment-is a growing business in China. Many concerns have been raised regarding fraudsters that operate unsafe stem cell therapies and an officialdom that turns a blind eye to the questionable technology. The Chinese regulatory approach to stem cell research is based on Guidelines and Administrative Measures, rather than legislation, and may have no binding force on certain institutions, such as military hospitals. There is no liability and traceability system and no visible set of penalties for non-compliance in the stem cell legal framework. In addition to the lack of safety and efficacy systems in the regulations, no specific expert authority has been established to monitor stem cell therapy to date. Recognizing the global nature of stem cell tourism, this article argues that resolving stem cell tourism issues may require not only the Chinese government but also an international mechanism for transparency and ethical oversight. A stringent set of international regulations that govern stem cell therapies can encourage China to improve stem cell regulation and enforcement to fulfill its obligations. Through an international consensus, a minimum standard for clinical stem cell research and a central enforcement system will be provided. As a result, rogue clinics that conduct unauthorized stem cell therapies can be penalized, and countries that are reluctant to implement the reconciled regulations should be sanctioned. PMID:26906907

  12. T Cells and Gene Regulation: The Switching On and Turning Up of Genes after T Cell Receptor Stimulation in CD8 T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, James M.; Gallagher, Michael P.; Berg, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Signaling downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) is directly regulated by the dose and affinity of peptide antigen. The strength of TCR signaling drives a multitude of T cell functions from development to differentiation. CD8 T cells differentiate into a diverse pool of effector and memory cells after activation, a process that is critical for pathogen clearance and is highly regulated by TCR signal strength. T cells rapidly alter their gene expression upon activation. Multiple signaling pathways downstream of the TCR activate transcription factors, which are critical for this process. The dynamics between proximal TCR signaling, transcription factor activation and CD8 T cell function are discussed here. We propose that inducible T cell kinase (ITK) acts as a rheostat for gene expression. This unique regulation of TCR signaling by ITK provides a possible signaling mechanism for the promotion of a diverse T cell repertoire in response to pathogen. PMID:26973653

  13. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  14. Taking Turns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Two people take turns selecting from an even number of items. Their relative preferences over the items can be described as a permutation, then tools from algebraic combinatorics can be used to answer various questions. We describe each person's optimal selection strategies including how each could make use of knowing the other's preferences. We…

  15. Turn-on fluorogenic and chromogenic detection of Fe(III) and its application in living cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, Gandhi; Sathiyaraja, Vijayaraj; Chellappa, Duraisamy, E-mail: dcmku123@gmail.com

    2014-01-15

    Two rhodamine-based sensors RDI-1, RDI-2 was designed and synthesized by incorporation of the rhodamine 6G fluorophore and 2-formyl imidazole as the recognizing unit via the imine linkages. RDI-1, RDI-2 exhibits very high selectivity and an excellent sensitivity towards Fe(III) ions in aqueous buffer solution on compared with other probes. The color change from colorless to pink and turn-on fluorescence after binding with iron (III) was observed. Based on jobs plot and ESI-MS studies, the 1:1 binding mode was proposed. Live cell imaging experiments with each probe showed that these probes widely applicable to detect Fe{sup 3+} in living cells. -- Highlights: • Two rhodamine based probes was synthesized and used to recognize iron (III). • The chemosensors can be applied to detect iron(III) ions by color and turn-on fluorescent changes. • The very low detection limit was reported. • The applicability of these probes for live cell fluorescence imaging was studied.

  16. Turning Marrow into Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ In unexpected testimony2 to the versatility3 of the body's cells,researchers have found they can make bone marrow cells turn into muscle, causing mice with muscular dystrophy4 to produce correctly working muscle cells. The experiment suggests that a form of bone marrow transplant- - a well established surgical procedure5- - could in principle treat patients with a variety of diseases.

  17. A dual-mode turn-on fluorescent BODIPY-based probe for visualization of mercury ions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Pan, Fuchao; Zhang, Yuanlin; Peng, Fangfang; Huang, Zhentao; Zhang, Weijuan; Zhao, Weili

    2016-08-01

    A novel turn-on fluorescent 8-amino BODIPY-based probe carrying a thiourea unit as the mercury ion recognition unit has been developed. Due to the cascade reaction processes, consecutive color changes reflecting the electronic absorption and emission responses were observed upon addition of increased concentrations of mercury(ii) ions. The likely sensing mechanism was proposed as mercury ion-promoted cyclization and subsequent hydrolysis. The probe displayed a selective response to mercury ions over other metal ions. Additionally, experiments with living Human Hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells to visualize intracellular mercury ions in biological systems were carried out with the probe. PMID:27251011

  18. When action turns into words. Activation of motor-based knowledge during categorization of manipulable objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Law, Ian; Paulson, Olaf B

    2002-01-01

    utilization (action knowledge). Here we show that the left ventral premotor cortex is activated during categorization of "both" fruit/vegetables and articles of clothing, relative to animals and nonmanipulable man-made objects. This observation suggests that action knowledge may not be important for the...... processing of man-made objects per se, but rather for the processing of manipulable objects in general, whether natural or man-made. These findings both support psycholinguistic theories suggesting that certain lexical categories may evolve from, and the act of categorization rely upon, motor-based knowledge...... of action equivalency, and have important implications for theories of category specificity. Thus, the finding that the processing of vegetables/fruit and articles of clothing give rise to similar activation is difficult to account for should knowledge representations in the brain be truly...

  19. Bring-Your-Own-Device: Turning Cell Phones into Forces for Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazeki, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, classroom response systems (or "clickers") have become increasingly common. Although most systems require students to use a standalone handheld device, bring-your-own-device (BYOD) systems allow students to use devices they already own (e.g., a cell phone, tablet or laptop) to submit responses via text message or…

  20. Real-time fluorometric turn-on assay for protease activity and inhibitor screening with a benzoperylene probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuibei; Li, Wenying; Chen, Jian; Yang, Meiding; Li, Yang; Zhu, Jintao; Yu, Cong

    2014-03-01

    A real-time fluorescence turn-on strategy for protease activity and inhibitor screening has been developed. A negatively charged benzo[ghi]perylene derivative (probe 1) was employed. Protamine is a cationic protein which can induce aggregation of probe 1 via strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The fluorescence of probe 1 was efficiently quenched. In the presence of a protease, protamine was enzymatically hydrolyzed and probe 1 de-aggregated. The recovery of the probe 1 monomer fluorescence could be detected. The protease activity could be monitored in real-time. In addition, upon addition of a protease inhibitor, the protease-catalyzed hydrolysis was inhibited, which led to a decreased fluorescence recovery. The fluorometric assay thus could also be employed for screening protease inhibitors. PMID:24427771

  1. A turn-key Concept for active cancellation of Global Positioning System L3 Signal

    CERN Document Server

    Nigra, Lou; Edgar, Clyde; Perillat, Phil; Quintero, Luis; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Gallagher, J S

    2010-01-01

    We present a concept, developed at the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center (NAIC) at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, for active suppression of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals in the 305 m dish radio receiver path prior to backend processing. The subsystem does not require an auxiliary antenna and is intended for easy integration with radio telescope systems with a goal of being a turnkey addition to virtually any facility. Working with actual sampled signal data, we have focused on the detection and cancellation of the GPS L3 signal at 1381.05 MHz which, during periodic test modes and particularly during system-wide tests, interfere with observations of objects in a range of redshifts that includes the Coma supercluster, for example. This signal can dynamically change modulation modes and our scheme is capable of detecting these changes and applying cancellation or sending a blanking signal, as appropriate. The subsystem can also be adapted to GPS L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2C (1227.6 MHz), and others. A follow-up...

  2. Vital signs: price, activity cycle showing strong evidence of turning up again

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic conditions in the oil and gas industry in the first quarter of 2002 are discussed. The general conclusion is that the ride is every bit as bumpy as it was during the fourth quarter of 2001. New signs, however, point to improvement in the second half of the year, confirming predictions of recovery. The North American economy is emerging quickly from the recession, and OPEC countries seem willing to restrain production sufficiently to keep oil prices in the US$23-$25 per barrel range. As a result, North American natural gas prices will be around the US$3.00 per MMBtu level this year, benchmark West Texas Intermediate oil will average US$22.50 per barrel, up from the initial forecast of US$2.80 and US$21.50, respectively. Canadian heavy crude output in the first quarter of 2002 was down about 30,000 barrels per day from fourth quarter 2001 and about 60,000 barrel per day lower than a year ago. Natural gas prices have been firm since the New Year; Canadian natural gas storage levels stood at a record 251 billion cubic feet, while US levels stood at 1.4 trillion cubic feet, the highest since 1992, without the slightest dent in the remarkable gas price rally of February and March. Gas receipt in Western Canada at the end of March were running 508 million cubic feet per day below the July 2001 peak. No production increases for Canada are likely in 2002 in light of slower drilling activity. As far as 2003 is concerned, higher prices should encourage more drilling, but any gains will merely make up for the decline in 2002

  3. Slow turning lateral vessel bioreactor improves embryoid body formation and cardiogenic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungarunlert, Sasitorn; Klincumhom, Nuttha; Tharasanit, Theerawat; Techakumphu, Mongkol; Pirity, Melinda K; Dinnyes, Andras

    2013-10-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the ability to form aggregates, which are called embryoid bodies (EBs). EBs mimic early embryonic development and are commonly produced for cardiomyogenesis. Here, we describe a method of EB formation in hydrodynamic conditions using a slow-turning lateral vessel (STLV) bioreactor and the subsequent differentiation of EBs into cardiomyocytes. EBs formed in the STLV were compared with conventional techniques, such as hanging drop (HD) or static suspension cell culture (SSC), for homogeneity of EB size, shape, proliferation, apoptosis, and in vitro cardiac differentiation. After 3 days of culture, a four-fold improvement in the yield of EB formation/mL, a six-fold enhancement in total yield of EB/mL, and a nearly 10-fold reduction of cells that failed to incorporate into EBs were achieved in STLV versus SSC. During cardiac differentiation, a 1.5- to 4.2-fold increase in the area of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) per single EB in STLV versus SSC and HD was achieved. These results demonstrate that the STLV method improves the quality and quantity of ES cells to form EBs and enhances the efficiency of cardiac differentiation. We have demonstrated that the mechanical method of cell differentiation creates different microenvironments for the cells and thus influences their lineage commitments, even when genetic origin and the culture medium are the same. Ascorbic acid (ASC) improved further cardiac commitment in differentiation assays. Hence, this culture system is suitable for the production of large numbers of cells for clinical cell replacement therapies and industrial drug testing applications. PMID:24020697

  4. A "turn-on" fluorescent chemosensor for aluminum ion and cell imaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ailing; Zhu, Ruitao; Ren, Yuehong; Dong, Jinlong; Feng, Liheng

    2016-01-01

    A simple and efficient fluorescent chemosensor for Al3 + is reported in the paper. The chemosensor is obtained by dehydration reaction of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and 2-aminophenol. The chemosensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for Al3 + and displays fluorescence "off-on" switch signal. The detection limit of the chemosensor for Al3 + can reach 1.0 × 10- 7 M in DMSO/H2O (1:9, v/v) solution. The mass spectra and Job's plot analysis confirm the 1:1 stoichiometry between chemosensor and Al3 +. Potential utilization of the probe as an intracellular sensor of Al3 + in human cancer (HiSa) cells is also examined by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  5. Easily Accessible and Highly Selective "Turn-on" Fluorescent Sensor for Imaging Cadmium in Living Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; ZHANG Ying-mu; LI Yao-xian; ZHAO Qing

    2013-01-01

    A new schiff base of phenothiazine derivative was designed for ratiometric sensing of Cd2+ selectively.Upon the addition of Cd2+ to the solution of phenothiazine derivative,the fluorescence intensity of it was enhanced in a linear fashion and the maximum fluorescence peak exhibited a blue shift from 575 nm to 525 nm.This ratiometric fluorescent sensor displays a very high sensitivity(detection limits were 0.34 and 1.0 μmol/L of Cd2+ using the visual fluorescence changes and UV-Vis changes,respectively),a rapid response time(<10 s) and high selectivity for Cd2+ over other transition metal ions.Moreover,the living cells image experiments also demonstrate the value of the sensor in fluorescent visualization of Cd2+ in the environmental and biological systems.

  6. To turn or not to turn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beta, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria typically swim in straight runs, interruped by sudden turning events. In particular, some species are limited to a reversal in the swimming direction as the only turning maneuver at their disposal. In a recent article, Großmann et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043009) introduce a theoretical framework to analyze the diffusive properties of active particles following this type of run-and-reverse pattern. Based on a stochastic clock model to mimic the regulatory pathway that triggers reversal events, they show that a run-and-reverse swimmer can optimize its diffusive spreading by tuning the reversal rate according to the level of rotational noise. With their approach, they open up promising new perspectives of how to incorporate the dynamics of intracellular signaling into coarse-grained active particle descriptions.

  7. Azobenzene-caged sulforhodamine dyes: a novel class of ‘turn-on’ reactive probes for hypoxic tumor cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Piao, Wen; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    New sulforhodamine-based fluorescent ‘turn-on’ probes have been developed for the direct imaging of cellular hypoxia. Rapid access to this novel class of water-soluble ‘azobenzene-caged’ fluorophores was made possible through an easily-implementable azo-coupling reaction between a fluorescent primary arylamine derived from a sulforhodamine 101 scaffold (named SR101-NaphtNH 2 ) and a tertiary aniline whose N-substituents are neutral, cationic, or zwitterionic. The detection mechanism is based on the bioreductive cleavage of the azo bond that restores strong far-red fluorescence (emission maximum at 625 nm) by regenerating the original sulforhodamine SR101-NaphtNH 2 . This valuable fluorogenic response was obtained for the three ‘smart’ probes studied in this work, as shown by an in vitro assay using rat liver microsomes placed under aerobic and then under hypoxic conditions. Most importantly, the probe namely SR101-NaphtNH 2 -Hyp-diMe was successfully applied for imaging the hypoxic status of tumor cells (A549 cells).

  8. Fluorescence turn-on for the highly selective detection of nitric oxide in vitro and in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaomei; Liu, Shuang; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-04-21

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the first ubiquitous signaling molecule in the human body. The selective and sensitive detection of NO in vitro and in vivo is of high importance but remains challenging. Previous fluorescent probes for NO detection either are of poor water solubility or lack selectivity over intracellular biomolecules. Herein, we rationally designed a water-soluble, biocompatible, small molecular probe o-phenylenediamine-Phe-Phe-OH (1) for the highly selective and sensitive detection of NO in vitro and in living cells. 1 can react with NO and turn on the fluorescence emission at 367 nm via an ICT mechanism. In vitro tests indicated that 1 showed high selectivity for NO detection without interference from common anions, ROS/RNS, and intracellular biomolecules DHA, AA, or MGO. In PBS buffer, 1 was applied for detecting NO within the range of 0-12 μM with a LOD of 6 nM. Moreover, 1 was successfully applied to sense intracellularly generated NO in living cells. We anticipate that 1 could be potentially employed for studying the toxicity and bioactivity of NO in the near future. PMID:27041064

  9. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  10. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle modulated turn-on fluorescent probes for histidine detection and its imaging in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Tingbi; Nie, Zhou; Miao, Zhuang; Liu, Yang; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which presented great potential in the bio-labeling assay and clinical diagnostic applications.In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which

  11. A two-photon fluorescent turn-on probe for imaging of SO2 derivatives in living cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Longming; Liu, Hong-Wen; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Peng, Rui-Zi; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2016-09-21

    SO2 and its derivatives (bisulfite/sulfite) play crucial roles in several physiological processes. Therefore, development of reliable analytical methods for monitoring SO2 and its derivatives in biological systems is very significant. In this paper, a FRET-based two-photon fluorescent turn-on probe, A-HCy, was proposed for specific detection of SO2 derivatives through the bisulfite/sulfite-promoted Michael addition reaction. In this FRET system, an acedan (2-acetyl-6-dialkylaminonaphthalene) moiety was selected as a two-photon donor and a hemicyanine derivative served as both the quencher and the recognition unit for bisulfite/sulfite. A-HCy exhibited excellent selectivity and rapid response to HSO3(-) with a detection limit of 0.24 μM. More importantly, probe A-HCy was first successfully applied in two-photon fluorescence imaging of biological SO2 derivatives in living cells and tissues, suggesting its great potential for practical application in biological systems. PMID:27590555

  12. Exosomes released from Mycoplasma infected tumor cells activate inhibitory B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Yang

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas cause numerous human diseases and are common opportunistic pathogens in cancer patients and immunocompromised individuals. Mycoplasma infection elicits various host immune responses. Here we demonstrate that mycoplasma-infected tumor cells release exosomes (myco+ exosomes that specifically activate splenic B cells and induce splenocytes cytokine production. Induction of cytokines, including the proinflammatory IFN-γ and the anti-inflammatory IL-10, was largely dependent on the presence of B cells. B cells were the major IL-10 producers. In splenocytes from B cell deficient μMT mice, induction of IFN-γ+ T cells by myco+ exosomes was greatly increased compared with wild type splenocytes. In addition, anti-CD3-stimulated T cell proliferation was greatly inhibited in the presence of myco+ exosome-treated B cells. Also, anti-CD3-stimulated T cell signaling was impaired by myco+ exosome treatment. Proteomic analysis identified mycoplasma proteins in exosomes that potentially contribute to the effects. Our results demonstrate that mycoplasma-infected tumor cells release exosomes carrying mycoplasma components that preferentially activate B cells, which in turn, are able to inhibit T cell activity. These results suggest that mycoplasmas infecting tumor cells can exploit the exosome pathway to disseminate their own components and modulate the activity of immune cells, in particular, activate B cells with inhibitory activity.

  13. A novel “Turn-On” fluorescent probe for F{sup −} detection in aqueous solution and its application in live-cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jian [Key Laboratory of Chemistry of Northwestern Plant Resources and Key Laboratory for Natural Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Sun, Shaobo [Institute of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, Gansu University of Chinese Medicine, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Qian; Yue, Ying [Key Laboratory of Chemistry of Northwestern Plant Resources and Key Laboratory for Natural Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Yingdong [Institute of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, Gansu University of Chinese Medicine, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Shao, Shijun, E-mail: sjshao@licp.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemistry of Northwestern Plant Resources and Key Laboratory for Natural Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • A novel BODIPY-based “Turn-On” fluorescent probe was synthesized. • Highly selective detection of fluoride ions in 100% aqueous solution. • Study of sensing mechanism using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. • Fluorescent bioimaging of F{sup −} ion in A549 and ATII cells. - Abstract: A novel probe incorporating quaternized 4-pyridinium group into a BODIPY molecule was synthesized and studied for the selective detection of fluoride ions (F{sup −}) in aqueous solution. The design was based on a fluoride-specific desilylation reaction and the “Turn-On” fluorescent response of probe 1 to F{sup −} was ascribed to the inhibition of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process. The probe displayed many desired properties such as high specificity, appreciable solubility, desirable response time and low toxicity to mammalian cells. There was a good linearity between the fluorescence intensity and the concentrations of F{sup −} in the range of 0.1–1 mM with a detection limit of 0.02 mM. The sensing mechanism was confirmed by the NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrum, optical spectroscopy and the mechanism of “Turn-On” fluorescent response was also determinated by a density functional theory (DFT) calculation using Gaussian 03 program. Moreover, the probe was successfully applied for the fluorescence imaging of F{sup −} in human epithelial lung cancer (A549) cells and alveolar type II (ATII) cells under physiological conditions.

  14. A novel “Turn-On” fluorescent probe for F− detection in aqueous solution and its application in live-cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel BODIPY-based “Turn-On” fluorescent probe was synthesized. • Highly selective detection of fluoride ions in 100% aqueous solution. • Study of sensing mechanism using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. • Fluorescent bioimaging of F− ion in A549 and ATII cells. - Abstract: A novel probe incorporating quaternized 4-pyridinium group into a BODIPY molecule was synthesized and studied for the selective detection of fluoride ions (F−) in aqueous solution. The design was based on a fluoride-specific desilylation reaction and the “Turn-On” fluorescent response of probe 1 to F− was ascribed to the inhibition of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process. The probe displayed many desired properties such as high specificity, appreciable solubility, desirable response time and low toxicity to mammalian cells. There was a good linearity between the fluorescence intensity and the concentrations of F− in the range of 0.1–1 mM with a detection limit of 0.02 mM. The sensing mechanism was confirmed by the NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrum, optical spectroscopy and the mechanism of “Turn-On” fluorescent response was also determinated by a density functional theory (DFT) calculation using Gaussian 03 program. Moreover, the probe was successfully applied for the fluorescence imaging of F− in human epithelial lung cancer (A549) cells and alveolar type II (ATII) cells under physiological conditions

  15. Fabrication of folic acid-sensitive gold nanoclusters for turn-on fluorescent imaging of overexpression of folate receptor in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongchang; Cheng, Yuqing; Liu, Yong; Chen, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Based on the fluorescence quenching of folic acid-sensitive bovine serum albumin-directed gold nanoclusters (BSA-AuNCs) via folic acid-induced the change of environment around BSA-AuNCs, we have constructed a turn on fluorescence imaging of folate receptor overexpressed tumor cells. In this paper, the primary fluorescence intensity of BSA-AuNCs was quenched via self-assembly of folic acid onto BSA-AuNCs to produce negligible fluorescence background, the linear range of the method was 0.1-100μg/mL with the limit of detection (LOD) of 30ng/mL (S/N=3); In the presence of overexpression of folate receptor on the surface of tumor cells, the primary fluorescence intensity of BSA-AuNCs turned on by folic acid desorbing from BSA-AuNCs, the linear range of method was 0.12-2μg/mL with the LOD of 20ng/mL (S/N=3). Additionally, due to specific and high affinity of folic acid and folate receptor, the probe had high selectivity for folate receptor, other interferences hardly changed the fluorescence intensity of the probe. Moreover, the text for cytotoxicity implied that the probe had no toxicity for tumor cells. Consequently, using the fluorescence probe, satisfactory results for the turn on imaging of folate receptor overexpressed tumor cells were obtained. A novel turn-on and red fluorescent probe for folate receptor overexpressed tumor cells was developed based on the recovery of fluorescence intensity of folic acid-sensitive BSA-AuNCs. PMID:27343585

  16. Turning towards History: Turning towards Utopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Moir, John

    2004-01-01

    Turning towards history--to be contrasted with turning away from history--captures the Marxian sense of education. Marx worked out the elements of a theory of political education in relation to history by equating education with the coincidence of the changing of circumstances and people. This theory received its most comprehensive yet succinct…

  17. Around the ß-Turn: An Activity to Improve the Communication and Listening Skills of Biochemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorf, Isaac; Cox, James R.

    2013-01-01

    An active-learning activity has been designed to improve communication and listening skills of students in an upper-level biochemistry course. The activity was modeled after "Around the Horn", a popular television show that features a moderator asking questions to various sports reporters and assessing their answers in scored sessions.…

  18. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase regulates mast cell ion channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Rebecca S; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Sobiesiak, Malgorzata; Lang, Camelia; Felder, Edward; Dietl, Paul; Huber, Stephan M; Lang, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Stimulation of the mast cell IgE-receptor (FcepsilonRI) by antigen leads to stimulation of Ca(2+) entry with subsequent mast cell degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. Ca(2+) further activates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, which in turn provide the electrical driving force for Ca(2+) entry. Since phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3-kinase has previously been shown to be required for mast cell activation and degranulation, we explored, whether mast cell Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels may be sensitive to PI3-kinase activity. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments and Fura-2 fluorescence measurements for determination of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration were performed in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells either treated or untreated with the PI3-kinase inhibitors LY-294002 (10 muM) and wortmannin (100 nM). Antigen-stimulated Ca(2+) entry but not Ca(2+) release from the intracellular stores was dramatically reduced upon PI3-kinase inhibition. Ca(2+) entry was further inhibited by TRPV blocker ruthenium red (10 muM). Ca(2+) entry following readdition after Ca(+)-store depletion with thapsigargin was again decreased by LY-294002, pointing to inhibition of store-operated channels (SOCs). Moreover, inhibition of PI3-kinase abrogated IgE-stimulated, but not ionomycin-induced stimulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These observations disclose PI3-kinase-dependent regulation of Ca(2+) entry and Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-channels, which in turn participate in triggering mast cell degranulation. PMID:18769043

  19. pH-Sensitive polymer assisted self-aggregation of bis(pyrene) in living cells in situ with turn-on fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhongyu; Gao, Yu-Juan; Qiao, Zeng-Ying; Qiao, Shenglin; Wang, Yongmei; Hou, Chunyuan; Wang, Lei; Wang, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Supramolecular self-assemblies with various nanostructures in organic and aqueous solutions have been prepared with desired functions. However, in situ construction of self-assembled superstructures in physiological conditions to achieve expected biological functions remains a challenge. Here, we report a supramolecular system to realize the in situ formation of nanoaggregates in living cells. The bis(pyrene) monomers were dispersed inside of hydrophobic domains of pH-sensitive polymeric micelles and delivered to the lysosomes of cells. In the acidic lysosomes, the bis(pyrene) monomers were released and self-aggregated with turn-on fluorescence. We envision this strategy for in situ construction of supramolecular nanostructures in living cells will pave the way for molecular diagnostics in the future.

  20. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  1. Aggregation-Induced Emission Active Metal-Free Chemosensing Platform for Highly Selective Turn-On Sensing and Bioimaging of Pyrophosphate Anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Abhijit; Mukherjee, Sandipan; Ramesh, Aiyagari; Das, Gopal

    2015-07-01

    We report the synthesis of a metal-free chemosensor for highly selective sensing of pyrophosphate (PPi) anion in physiological medium. The novel phenylbenzimidazole functionalized imine containing chemosensor (L; [2,6-bis(((4-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenyl)imino) methyl)-4 methyl phenol]) could sense PPi anion through "turn-on" colorimetric and fluorimetric responses in a very competitive environment. The overall sensing mechanism is based on the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) phenomenon. Moreover, a real time in-field device application was demonstrated by sensing PPi in paper strips coated with L. Interestingly, detection of intracellular PPi ions in model human cells could also be possible by fluorescence microscopic studies without any toxicity to these cells. PMID:26059015

  2. A Simple and Convenient G-quadruplex-Based Turn-On Fluorescence Assay for 3′ → 5′ Exonuclease Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Chung-Hang; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Man, Bradley Yat-Wah; Wang, Chuan-Jen; Lam, Wing; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Fong, Wang-Fun; Hsiao, Wendy Wen-Luan; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2010-01-01

    A selective, oligonucleotide-based, label-free, turn-on fluorescence detection method for 3′ → 5′ exonuclease activity has been developed using crystal violet as a G-quadruplex-binding probe. The assay is highly simple and rapid, does not require the use of gel-based equipment or radioisotopic labeling, and is amenable to high-throughput and real-time detection. A proof-of-concept of this assay has been demonstrated for prokaryotic ExoIII and human TREX1.

  3. Targeting CD13 (aminopeptidase-N) in turn downregulates ADAM17 by internalization in acute myeloid leukaemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchet, Sandrine; TANG, RUOPING; Fava, Fanny; Legrand, Ollivier; Bauvois, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Secreted matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 and membrane-anchored aminopeptidase-N/CD13 are abnormally expressed in human acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We previously showed that CD13 ligation by anti-CD13 monoclonal antibodies can induce apoptosis in AML cells. Here, we assessed ADAM17 expression in primary blood blasts CD13+CD33+ from patients with AML. Primary AML cells expressed ADAM17 transcript and its surface expression was higher in subtype M4 (myelomonocytic) and M5 (monocyt...

  4. Turning Waste into Value: Nanosized Natural Plant Materials of Solanum incanum L. and Pterocarpus erinaceus Poir with Promising Antimicrobial Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Sharoon; Tittikpina, Nassifatou Koko; Al-Marby, Adel; Alkhayer, Reem; Denezhkin, Polina; Witek, Karolina; Gbogbo, Koffi Apeti; Batawila, Komlan; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Awadh-Ali, Nasser A; Kirsch, Gilbert; Chaimbault, Patrick; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Keck, Cornelia M; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Jacob, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Numerous plants are known to exhibit considerable biological activities in the fields of medicine and agriculture, yet access to their active ingredients is often complicated, cumbersome and expensive. As a consequence, many plants harbouring potential drugs or green phyto-protectants go largely unnoticed, especially in poorer countries which, at the same time, are in desperate need of antimicrobial agents. As in the case of plants such as the Jericho tomato, Solanum incanum, and the common African tree Pterocarpus erinaceus, nanosizing of original plant materials may provide an interesting alternative to extensive extraction and isolation procedures. Indeed, it is straightforward to obtain considerable amounts of such common, often weed-like plants, and to mill the dried material to more or less uniform particles of microscopic and nanoscopic size. These particles exhibit activity against Steinernema feltiae or Escherichia coli, which is comparable to the ones seen for processed extracts of the same, respective plants. As S. feltiae is used as a model nematode indicative of possible phyto-protective uses in the agricultural arena, these findings also showcase the potential of nanosizing of crude "waste" plant materials for specific practical applications, especially-but not exclusively-in developing countries lacking a more sophisticated industrial infrastructure. PMID:27104554

  5. The Translator's Turn: in the Cultural Turn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐玮玮

    2003-01-01

    @@ Introduction: Douglas Robinson rose to the defense of the " atheoretical" American literary translator in The Translator's Turn (1991). Here, I borrowed the title from him, but I will write my paper in the thought of the translator's role in translating. In his book, Robinson argued that the literary translator embodies an integration of feeling and thought, of intuition and systematization. In analyzing the " turn" that the translator take from the source text to the target text, Robinson offered a " dialogical" model, that is the translator's dialogical engagement with the source language and with the ethic of the target language. Robinson allows for the translator to intervene, subvert, divert, even entertain, emphasizing the creative aspect of literary translation. The translation linguists, scientists, and philosophers have had their chance at translation theory; now it is time, he argued, for the literary translators to have their " turn".

  6. IFN priming is necessary but not sufficient to turn on a migratory dendritic cell program in lupus monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Pla, Alicia; Patel, Pinakeen; Maecker, Holden T; Rossello-Urgell, Jose; Baldwin, Nicole; Bennett, Lynda; Cantrell, Victoria; Baisch, Jeanine; Punaro, Marilynn; Gotte, Alisa; Nassi, Lorien; Wright, Tracey; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-06-15

    Blood monocytes from children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) behave similar to dendritic cells (DCs), and SLE serum induces healthy monocytes to differentiate into DCs in a type I IFN-dependent manner. In this study, we found that these monocytes display significant transcriptional changes, including a prominent IFN signature, compared with healthy controls. Few of those changes, however, explain DC function. Exposure to allogeneic T cells in vitro reprograms SLE monocytes to acquire DC phenotype and function, and this correlates with both IFN-inducible (IP10) and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β and IL6) expression. Furthermore, we found that both IFN and SLE serum induce the upregulation of CCR7 transcription in these cells. CCR7 protein expression, however, requires a second signal provided by TLR agonists such as LPS. Thus, SLE serum "primes" a subset of monocytes to readily (<24 h) respond to TLR agonists and acquire migratory DC properties. Our findings might explain how microbial infections exacerbate lupus. PMID:24829414

  7. New turn-on fluorescent and colorimetric probe for cyanide detection based on BODIPY-salicylaldehyde and its application in cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukato, Rangsarit; Sangpetch, Nuanphan; Palaga, Tanapat; Jantra, Suthikorn; Vchirawongkwin, Viwat; Jongwohan, Chanantida; Sukwattanasinitt, Mongkol; Wacharasindhu, Sumrit

    2016-08-15

    Development of cyanide sensor is important as the anion is harmful to human health and the environment. Herein, a new colorimetric and fluorescent probe GSB based on boron dipyrrole-methene (BODIPY) containing salicylaldehyde group for cyanide detection has been reported. GSB undergoes exclusive colorimetric change from orange to colorless and exhibits selective fluorescence turn-on at 504nm upon the addition of cyanide. Other 13 anions give almost no interference under physiological condition. Detection limit of the new cyanide-sensing GSB is 0.88μM, which is below World Health Organization (WHO) recommended level in drinking water. A calculation by density functional theory (DFT) shows suppression of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism along with the interruption of π-conjugation between salicylaldehyde and BODIPY core by cyanide anion. Cell imaging studies demonstrated that GSB is compatible and capable of sensing cyanide anion in living cells. PMID:27136733

  8. Turn-On Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for Selective Discrimination of Cr(3+) from Fe(3+) in Aqueous Media for Living Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Lubna; Yousuf, Muhammad; Youn, Il Seung; Yoon, Taeseung; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Seo, Young-Kyo; Shi, Genggongwo; Saleh, Muhammad; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Kim, Kwang S

    2015-11-01

    Pyrene-based turn-on ratiometric fluorescent probe 1 demonstrates high sensitivity and exceptional selectivity toward Cr(3+) in the presence of other metals, including Fe(3+) in aqueous media. Interaction of Cr(3+) with probe 1 brings pyrene moieties close enough to have better aligned π-π stacking, thus enhancing the excimer peak many fold. On the other hand, the interaction of Fe(3+) with probe 1 brings forth a negligible difference in stacking, resulting in an insignificant change in fluorescence intensity. Exceptional selectivity of probe 1 with Cr(3+) over Fe(3+) and other metals has been confirmed by theoretical studies in addition to experimental results. Imaging of HeLa cells observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy reveals that probe 1 can be used to monitor Cr(3+) in live cells to map its subcellular distribution. PMID:26418848

  9. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  10. Label-free and turn-on aptamer strategy for cancer cells detection based on a DNA-silver nanocluster fluorescence upon recognition-induced hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinjin; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; Shi, Hui

    2013-12-17

    We present here a label-free and turn-on aptamer strategy for cancer cell detection based on the recognition-induced conformation alteration of aptamer and hybridization-induced fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA-silver nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs) in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequences. In this strategy, two tailored DNA probes were involved. One is designed as a hairpin-shaped structure consisting of a target specific aptamer sequence at the 3'-end, a guanine-rich DNA sequence, and an arm segment at the 5'-end (denote as recognition probe). The other, serving as a signal probe, contains a sequence for Ag NCs templated synthesis and a link sequence complementary to the arm segment of the recognition probe. Recognizing and binding of the aptamer to cancer cells enforces the recognition probe to undergo a conformational alteration and then initiates hybridization between the arm segment of the recognition probe and the link sequence of the signal probe. The Ag NCs are then close to the guanine-rich DNA, leading to an enhanced fluorescence readout. As proof-of-concept, the CCRF-CEM cancer cell detection were performed by using the specific aptamer, sgc8c. It was demonstrated that this strategy could specially image the CCRF-CEM cells. Determination by flow cytometry allowed for detection of as low as 150 CCRF-CEM cells in 200 μL binding buffer. The general applicability of the strategy is also achieved in the successful detection of Ramos cells. These results implied that this strategy holds considerable potential for simple, sensitive, universal, and specific cancer cell detection with no required washing and separation steps. PMID:24266455

  11. A new fluorescence turn-on probe for biothiols based on photoinduced electron transfer and its application in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxi; Zhou, Cheng; Zhang, Jianjian; Zhu, Xinyue; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-09-01

    A new biothiol-selective fluorescent probe 1 based on photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism was designed and synthesized. The UV-Vis absorption and fluorescent emission properties of probe 1 towards various analytes were studied in detail. The probe exhibited a large stokes shift (~200nm) after reacted with biothiols and could selectively detect cysteine (Cys) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/H2O solution (9:1, v/v, 10mM phosphate buffer saline, pH3.5) over glutathione (GSH), homocysteine (Hcy) and other analytes with a detection limit of 0.117μM. In addition, probe 1 responded well to GSH, Hcy and Cys in the same above solution with pH5.5 and got the detection limits of 0.151μM, 0.128μM and 0.037μM, respectively. Probe 1 was of very low cytotoxicity and successfully applied for imaging of thiols in living cells. PMID:27203232

  12. Anthracene excimer-based "turn on" fluorescent sensor for Cr(3+) and Fe(3+) ions: Its application to living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Serkan; Kocyigit, Ozcan

    2016-09-01

    A novel anthracene based fluorescent probe containing benzothiazole group (BFA) was designed and synthesized. The cation binding properties of BFA were studied in the presence of various cations. Both UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopic studies indicated that BFA was highly sensitive and selective toward trivalent cations (Cr(3+) and Fe(3+)), while there was no response to monovalent, divalent cations and also Al(3+) ion. The interaction of BFA with Cr(3+) and Fe(3+) caused a significant enhancement in emission intensity due to the combination of a unique anthracenyl static excimer formation, the restricted C=N isomerization and the suppression of highly efficient photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process. The detection limits of BFA for Cr(3+) and Fe(3+) were 0.46 and 0.45µM, which presented a pronounced sensitivity toward Cr(3+) and Fe(3+), respectively. Also, possible utilization of BFA as bio-imaging fluorescent probe to detect Cr(3+) and Fe(3+) in human prostate cancer cell lines was observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27343579

  13. A new fluorescence turn-on probe for biothiols based on photoinduced electron transfer and its application in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxi; Zhou, Cheng; Zhang, Jianjian; Zhu, Xinyue; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-09-01

    A new biothiol-selective fluorescent probe 1 based on photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism was designed and synthesized. The UV-Vis absorption and fluorescent emission properties of probe 1 towards various analytes were studied in detail. The probe exhibited a large stokes shift (~ 200 nm) after reacted with biothiols and could selectively detect cysteine (Cys) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/H2O solution (9:1, v/v, 10 mM phosphate buffer saline, pH 3.5) over glutathione (GSH), homocysteine (Hcy) and other analytes with a detection limit of 0.117 μM. In addition, probe 1 responded well to GSH, Hcy and Cys in the same above solution with pH 5.5 and got the detection limits of 0.151 μM, 0.128 μM and 0.037 μM, respectively. Probe 1 was of very low cytotoxicity and successfully applied for imaging of thiols in living cells.

  14. A turn-on fluorescent chemosensor for Zn2+ ion: X-ray structure and application in cell imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Koushik; Dey, Sudipto; Halder, Shibashis; Bhattacharjee, Aradhita; Rizzoli, Corrado; Roy, Partha

    2016-08-01

    The selective fluorescence zinc(II) sensing properties of a Schiff-base compound, 2-methoxy-6-(2-morpholinoethyliminomethyl)phenol (HL) have been explored. The emission intensity of HL in the presence of one equivalent of Zn2+ ion increases by about 25 times. Several other metal ions, except Cd2+ and Ni2+, have not been able to increase the emission intensity of HL significantly. The quantum yield and life-time of HL have also been increased in the presence of Zn2+ ions. The enhancement in fluorescence intensity of HL is mainly due to the restriction of ESIPT, CHEF and PET on complex formation. HL forms a complex with Zn2+ in 1:1 ratio as evidenced by Job's plot analysis and X-ray single crystal structure determination. Some theoretical calculations have been performed to get a better view on the nature of the observed electronic transitions. The probe has been applied for imaging of DLD-1, human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell.

  15. A fluorescence turn-on method for real-time monitoring of protease activity based on the electron transfer between a fluorophore labeled oligonucleotide and cytochrome c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Dongli [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130022 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Li, Yongxin; Chen, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130022 (China); Yu, Cong, E-mail: congyu@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130022 (China)

    2013-06-19

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Rapid detection of protease activity with fairly good sensitivity and selectivity. •A turn-on fluorescence assay reduces the likelihood of false positive signals. •Cytochrome c efficiently quench the fluorescence of the FAM single stranded DNA. •The enzymatic reaction could be monitored in real-time. •The assay could be used for the screening of potential protease inhibitors. -- Abstract: A new continuous fluorescence turn-on assay for protease activity and inhibitor screening has been developed. A fluorophore labeled single stranded DNA (FAM-DNA) and cytochrome c (cyt c) were employed. The fluorescence of the FAM-DNA was efficiently quenched when binding to cyt c, through the electron transfer between the FAM fluorophore and the heme cofactor of cyt c. In the presence of a protease, such as trypsin, cyt c was digested into small peptide fragments. The FAM-DNA was released, which resulted in the recovery of the FAM fluorescence. The rate of the cyt c digestion could be reduced via the addition of an inhibitor. As a result, reduced degree of the fluorescence recovery was obtained. The limit of detection of our assay is 1 nM trypsin and the IC{sub 50} values are 3.23 μg mL{sup −1} and 0.303 μg mL{sup −1} for the inhibitor from egg white and the inhibitor from soybean, respectively. Our method could be used for the sensing of protease activity for various biochemical applications, and for the screening of protease inhibitors as drugs for the treatment of various related diseases.

  16. A fluorescence turn-on method for real-time monitoring of protease activity based on the electron transfer between a fluorophore labeled oligonucleotide and cytochrome c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Rapid detection of protease activity with fairly good sensitivity and selectivity. •A turn-on fluorescence assay reduces the likelihood of false positive signals. •Cytochrome c efficiently quench the fluorescence of the FAM single stranded DNA. •The enzymatic reaction could be monitored in real-time. •The assay could be used for the screening of potential protease inhibitors. -- Abstract: A new continuous fluorescence turn-on assay for protease activity and inhibitor screening has been developed. A fluorophore labeled single stranded DNA (FAM-DNA) and cytochrome c (cyt c) were employed. The fluorescence of the FAM-DNA was efficiently quenched when binding to cyt c, through the electron transfer between the FAM fluorophore and the heme cofactor of cyt c. In the presence of a protease, such as trypsin, cyt c was digested into small peptide fragments. The FAM-DNA was released, which resulted in the recovery of the FAM fluorescence. The rate of the cyt c digestion could be reduced via the addition of an inhibitor. As a result, reduced degree of the fluorescence recovery was obtained. The limit of detection of our assay is 1 nM trypsin and the IC50 values are 3.23 μg mL−1 and 0.303 μg mL−1 for the inhibitor from egg white and the inhibitor from soybean, respectively. Our method could be used for the sensing of protease activity for various biochemical applications, and for the screening of protease inhibitors as drugs for the treatment of various related diseases

  17. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...

  18. A novel graphene-based label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor for selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species in biological samples and living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yaotang; Garg, Bhaskar; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2016-02-01

    A novel label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti4+-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti4+) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions between phosphate groups and Ti4+. The as-prepared rGO@PDA-Ti4+-FMNs (nanosensor), fluoresce only weakly due to the ineffective Förster resonance energy transfer between the FMNs and rGO@PDA-Ti4+. The experimental findings revealed that the microwave-assisted interaction of the nanosensor with α-, β-casein, ovalbumin, human serum, non-fat milk, egg white, and living cells (all containing Ps) releases FMNs (due to the high formation constant between phosphate groups and Ti4+), leading to an excellent fluorescence `turn-on' response. The fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal microscopy, and MALDI-TOF MS spectrometry were used to detect Ps both qualitatively and quantitatively. Under the optimized conditions, the nanosensor showed a detection limit of ca. 118.5, 28.9, and 54.8 nM for the tryptic digests of α-, β-casein and ovalbumin, respectively. Furthermore, the standard addition method was used as a bench-mark proof for phosphopeptide quantification in egg white samples. We postulate that the present quantitative assay for Ps holds tremendous potential and may pave the way to disease diagnostics in the near future.A novel label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti4+-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti4+) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions

  19. A novel graphene-based label-free fluorescence 'turn-on' nanosensor for selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species in biological samples and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yaotang; Garg, Bhaskar; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2016-02-18

    A novel label-free fluorescence 'turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti(4+)-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti(4+)) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions between phosphate groups and Ti(4+). The as-prepared rGO@PDA-Ti(4+)-FMNs (nanosensor), fluoresce only weakly due to the ineffective Förster resonance energy transfer between the FMNs and rGO@PDA-Ti(4+). The experimental findings revealed that the microwave-assisted interaction of the nanosensor with α-, β-casein, ovalbumin, human serum, non-fat milk, egg white, and living cells (all containing Ps) releases FMNs (due to the high formation constant between phosphate groups and Ti(4+)), leading to an excellent fluorescence 'turn-on' response. The fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal microscopy, and MALDI-TOF MS spectrometry were used to detect Ps both qualitatively and quantitatively. Under the optimized conditions, the nanosensor showed a detection limit of ca. 118.5, 28.9, and 54.8 nM for the tryptic digests of α-, β-casein and ovalbumin, respectively. Furthermore, the standard addition method was used as a bench-mark proof for phosphopeptide quantification in egg white samples. We postulate that the present quantitative assay for Ps holds tremendous potential and may pave the way to disease diagnostics in the near future. PMID:26758942

  20. Differentiation of immortal cells inhibits telomerase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, H W; Sokoloski, J A; Perez, J.R.; Maltese, J Y; Sartorelli, A C; Stein, C A; Nichols, G; Khaled, Z.; Telang, N T; Narayanan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleic acid-protein complex, adds hexameric repeats of 5'-TTAGGG-3' to the ends of mammalian chromosomal DNA (telomeres) to compensate for the progressive loss that occurs with successive rounds of DNA replication. Although somatic cells do not express telomerase, germ cells and immortalized cells, including neoplastic cells, express this activity. To determine whether the phenotypic differentiation of immortalized cells is linked to the regulation of telomerase activity, t...

  1. Turning Coal Into Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    China's coal liquefaction industry is developing rapidly, but still needs improvement In its effort to become more self-sufficient in energy, China is turning to other countries, notably South Africa, to establish joint ventures in turning coal into oil. To China's Shenhua Group Corp. Ltd., one of the world's largest coal-producing companies, the government's 11th Five-Year

  2. Telomerase activity in plasma cell dyscrasias

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, D; Zheng, C.; Bergenbrant, S; Holm, G; Björkholm, M.; Yi, Q; Gruber, A

    2001-01-01

    Activation of telomerase is essential for in vitro cellular immortalization and tumorigenesis. In the present study, we investigated telomerase activation and its implications in plasma cell dyscrasias including monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), multiple myeloma (MM) and plasma cell leukaemia (PCL). All 5 patients with MGUS exhibited normal levels of telomerase activity in their plasma cells. Elevated telomerase activity was found in the samples from 21/27 patients wi...

  3. Cell division activity during apical hook development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, V.; Koornneef, M.

    2001-01-01

    Growth during plant development is predominantly governed by the combined activities of cell division and cell elongation. The relative contribution of both activities controls the growth of a tissue. A fast change in growth is exhibited at the apical hypocotyl of etiolated seedlings where cells gro

  4. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  5. Efficient Two-Photon Fluorescence Nanoprobe for Turn-On Detection and Imaging of Ascorbic Acid in Living Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hong-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Yang, Chan; Kuai, Hailan; Mao, Guo-Jiang; Gong, Liang; Zhang, Wenhan; Feng, Suling; Chang, Junbiao

    2016-06-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) serves as a key coenzyme in many metabolic pathways, and its abnormal level is found to be associated with several diseases. Therefore, monitoring AA level in living systems is of great biomedical significance. In comparison with one-photon excited fluorescent probes, two-photon (TP) excited probes are more suitable for bioimaging, as they could afford higher imaging resolution with deeper imaging depth. Here, we report for the first time an efficient TP fluorescence probe for turn-on detection and imaging of AA in living cells and tissues. In this nanosystem, the negatively charged two-photon nanoparticles (TPNPs), which were prepared by modifying the silica nanoparticles with a two-photon dye, could adsorb cobalt oxyhydroxide (CoOOH) nanoflakes which carried positive charge by electrostatic force, leading to a remarkable decrease in their fluorescence intensity. However, the introduction of AA could induce the fluorescence recovery of the nanoprobe because it could reduce CoOOH into Co(2+) and result in the destruction of the CoOOH nanoflakes. The nanosystem exhibits a high sensitivity toward AA, with a LOD of 170 nM observed. It also shows high selectivity toward AA over common potential interfering species. The nanoprobe possessed both the advantages of TP imaging and excellent membrane-permeability and good biocompatibility of the silica nanoparticles and was successfully applied in TP-excited imaging of AA in living cells and tissues. PMID:27161421

  6. Turn right at Orion

    CERN Document Server

    Begelman, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    ""Turn Right at Orion is the account of an epic astronomical journey, discovered sixty million years in Earth's future-the product of one man's amazing, revelatory, and occasionally perilous space odys""

  7. Natural killer cell activity during measles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, D E; Ward, B J; Jauregui, E; Johnson, R T; Vaisberg, A

    1990-01-01

    Natural killer cells are postulated to play an important role in host anti-viral defences. We measured natural killer cell activity in 30 individuals with acute measles (73 +/- 21 lytic units (LU)/10(7) cells) and 16 individuals with other infectious diseases (149 +/- 95 LU) and found it reduced compared with values for adults (375 +/- 70 LU; P less than 0.001) or children (300 +/- 73 LU, P less than 0.01) without infection. Reduced natural killer cell activity was found in measles patients with (84 +/- 30 LU) and without (55 +/- 18 LU) complications and was present for at least 3 weeks after the onset of the rash. Activity was increased by in vitro exposure of cells to interleukin-2. Depressed natural killer cell activity parallels in time the suppression of other parameters of cell-mediated immunity that occurs during measles. PMID:1696863

  8. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2015-12-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  9. A PEGylated fluorescent turn-on sensor for detecting fluoride ions in totally aqueous media and its imaging in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fangyuan; Zeng, Fang; Yu, Changmin; Hou, Xianfeng; Wu, Shuizhu

    2013-01-14

    Owing to the considerable significance of fluoride anions for health and environmental issues, it is of great importance to develop methods that can rapidly, sensitively and selectively detect the fluoride anion in aqueous media and biological samples. Herein, we demonstrate a robust fluorescent turn-on sensor for detecting the fluoride ion in a totally aqueous solution. In this study, a biocompatible hydrophilic polymer poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is incorporated into the sensing system to ensure water solubility and to enhance biocompatibility. tert-Butyldiphenylsilyl (TBDPS) groups were then covalently introduced onto the fluorescein moiety, which effectively quenched the fluorescence of the sensor. Upon addition of fluoride ion, the selective fluoride-mediated cleavage of the Si-O bond leads to the recovery of the fluorescein moiety, resulting in a dramatic increase in fluorescence intensity under visible light excitation. The sensor is responsive and highly selective for the fluoride anion over other common anions; it also exhibits a very low detection limit of 19 ppb. In addition, this sensor is operative in some real samples such as running water, urine, and serum and can accurately detect fluoride ions in these samples. The cytotoxicity of the sensor was determined to be Grade I toxicity according to United States Pharmacopoeia and ISO 10993-5, suggesting the very low cytotoxicity of the sensor. Moreover, it was found that the senor could be readily internalized by both HeLa and L929 cells and the sensor could be utilized to track fluoride level changes inside the cells. PMID:23197478

  10. Turning lead into gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø

    For years the field of entrepreneurship has been blinded by the alchemical promise of turning lead into gold, of finding the ones most likely to become the next Branson, Zuckerberg or Gates. The promise has been created in the midst of political and scientific agendas where certain individuals, the...

  11. Turning to alcohol?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil is examining whether turning to alcohol could solve its problems. The fuel alcohol producers are lobbying hard for the government to increase the use of alcohol to fuel the country's cars. Not only does using alcohol reduce CO2, runs the argument, but the Kyoto agreement might just attract international financing for the project. (author)

  12. Flip Turns with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queeney, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Kate Queeney, a professor of chemistry at Smith College, turned to a former student to receive one-on-one instruction in swimming. The student, who had been unsure and scared in chemistry class, seemed like an entirely different person when teaching the teacher. This article describes how the author learned that there is something undeniably…

  13. The postdramatic turn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogt, Jan Mikael Alstrup; Fogh, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Copenhagen. Finally it is argued with additional reference to Lawrence Grossberg’s (1992) forms of authentic inauthenticity that drama and theatre pedagogy must turn postdramatic in its curricular basis in order to stay relevant for future generations of young people and other target groups....

  14. Turn key contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this summary is to point out some specific areas which have to be covered in a turn-key contract and which are of primarily interest to the buyer of a nuclear plant. It will be assumed that the buyer is utility company in a developing country and a plant supplier a company in an industrial country. (orig./FW)

  15. Activated protein C modulates the proinflammatory activity of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto T

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Matsumoto,1,2* Yuki Matsushima,1* Masaaki Toda,1 Ziaurahman Roeen,1 Corina N D'Alessandro-Gabazza,1,5 Josephine A Hinneh,1 Etsuko Harada,1,3 Taro Yasuma,4 Yutaka Yano,4 Masahito Urawa,1,5 Tetsu Kobayashi,5 Osamu Taguchi,5 Esteban C Gabazza1 1Department of Immunology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, 2BONAC Corporation, BIO Factory 4F, Fukuoka, 3Iwade Research Institute of Mycology, 4Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial activity of activated protein C in allergic diseases including bronchial asthma and rhinitis. However, the exact mechanism of action of activated protein C in allergies is unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that pharmacological doses of activated protein C can modulate allergic inflammation by inhibiting dendritic cells. Materials and methods: Dendritic cells were prepared using murine bone marrow progenitor cells and human peripheral monocytes. Bronchial asthma was induced in mice that received intratracheal instillation of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. Results: Activated protein C significantly increased the differentiation of tolerogenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells and the secretion of type I interferons, but it significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-mediated maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in myeloid dendritic cells. Activated protein C also inhibited maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Activated protein C-treated dendritic cells were less effective when differentiating naïve CD4 T-cells from Th1 or Th2 cells, and the cellular effect of activated protein C was mediated by its receptors. Mice that received adoptive transfer of activated protein C

  16. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in immobilized yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed and the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase of the immobilized cells was determined. The treatment of the yeast cells with 1 % toluene followed by irradiation with acrylamide and bisacrylamide resulted in a high activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in the immobilized cells. The enzyme of the immobilized cells was stable in the pH range of 7.5 - 8.0 and the optimum pH opposed to be 8.5. Although the immobilized cells showed a rather low level of thermostability, it is suggested that they could be used for a long period of time at a temperature of 27 deg C. The immobilized cells did not exhibit any loss in the enzyme activity when stored at 4 deg C or -20 deg C. (author)

  17. Active Gel Model of Amoeboid Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Callan-Jones, A C

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-susbstrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  18. A procedure for diamond turning KDP crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montesanti, R.C.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-07-07

    A procedure and the equipment necessary for single-point diamond flycutting (loosely referred to as diamond turning) potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are described. It is based on current KDP diamond turning activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), drawing upon knowledge from the Nova crystal finishing development during the 1980`s and incorporating refinements from our efforts during 1995. In addition to describing a step-by-step process for diamond turning KDP, specific discussions are included on the necessary diamond tool geometry and edge sharpness, cutting fluid, and crystal preparation, handling, cleaning, and inspection. The authors presuppose that the reader is already familiar with diamond turning practices.

  19. Hungary's U-Turn

    OpenAIRE

    Kornai, János

    2015-01-01

    For two decades Hungary, like the other Eastern European countries, followed a general policy of establishing and strengthening the institutions of democracy, rule of law, and a market economy based on private property. However, since the elections of 2010, when Viktor Orbán's Fidesz party came to power, Hungary has made a dramatic U-turn. This article investigates the different spheres of society: political institutions, the rule of law, and the influence of state and market on one another, ...

  20. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  1. Activity driven fluctuations in living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, É; Gov, N S; Visco, P; Weitz, D A; van Wijland, F

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model for the dynamics of a probe embedded in a living cell, where both thermal fluctuations and nonequilibrium activity coexist. The model is based on a confining harmonic potential describing the elastic cytoskeletal matrix, which undergoes random active hops as a result of the nonequilibrium rearrangements within the cell. We describe the probe's statistics and we bring forth quantities affected by the nonequilibrium activity. We find an excellent agreement between the predictions of our model and experimental results for tracers inside living cells. Finally, we exploit our model to arrive at quantitative predictions for the parameters characterizing nonequilibrium activity, such as the typical time scale of the activity and the amplitude of the active fluctuations.

  2. Measuring enzyme activity in single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kovarik, Michelle L.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Seemingly identical cells can differ in their biochemical state, function and fate, and this variability plays an increasingly recognized role in organism-level outcomes. Cellular heterogeneity arises in part from variation in enzyme activity, which results from interplay between biological noise and multiple cellular processes. As a result, single-cell assays of enzyme activity, particularly those that measure product formation directly, are crucial. Recent innovations have yielded a range o...

  3. High Efficiency Interleaved Active Clamped Dc-Dc Converter with Fuel Cell for High Voltage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona P

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A high efficiency interleaved ZVS active clamped current fed dc-dc converter is proposed in this paper specially used for fuel cell applications. As the fuel cell output is very low we are in need of a step up dc-dc converter. Here a current fed dc-dc converter is used. Two current fed dc-dc converters are interleaved by connecting their inputs in parallel and outputs in series. With this proposed methodology input current ripples in the fuel cell stacks can be reduced and a regulated output voltage ripples can be obtained. The active clamping circuit used in this model absorbs the turn off voltage spikes hence low voltage devices with low on state resistance can be used.Voltage doubler circuits will give double the output voltage than normal with smaller transformer turns ratio and flexibility. The proposed method is simulated in MATLAB for verifying the accuracy of the proposed design.

  4. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  5. Lipolytic activity in adipocyte cell fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschry, Y; Shapiro, B

    1980-05-28

    Adipocytes release only negligible amounts of free fatty acids unless stimulated, but reveal considerable lipolytic activity when homogenized. Epinephrine treatment of the cells caused only a 20-40% increase in the activity of infranatants of homogenates while raising the activity associated with the fat layer up to 10-fold. Full activity (i.e. that of intact-activated cells) could be revealed by epinephrine treatment of the homogenate as well as by sonication of the fat layer in buffer. The combination of both treatments did not yield higher activities. The fat cake contains the bulk of the potential activities which are only realized when dispersed in the aqueous phase by sonication, or upon hormone activation of the whole homogenate. Increase in activity could also be obtained by removal of most of the lipid from the fat layer by extraction with petroleum ether. Re-introduction of extracted lipid inhibited lipolysis. The active enzyme could be separated by flotation at 1.12 specific gravity. The data suggest that the lack of activity in the intact non-stimulated cell may be due to the lack of availability of the aqueous phase to the enzyme. PMID:7378439

  6. The Affective Turn

    OpenAIRE

    Alí Lara; Giazú Enciso

    2013-01-01

    En la última década los estudios del afecto y las emociones han cobrado relevancia en las ciencias sociales. Esto no es simplemente una directriz de moda, es un indicador simultáneo de las modificaciones en la vida pública y de la experiencia subjetiva; a partir del cual se está transformando la producción de conocimiento. Tal tendencia ha sido conocida en la academia sajona como The Affective Turn, aquí traducido como “El giro afectivo” y que hasta el momento no ha incursionado como tal en l...

  7. Turning the Tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Karen; Schroeder, Doris

    2016-04-01

    In bioethics, the concept of vulnerability is applied almost exclusively to research participants and patients. We turn the tables and apply the concept to nurses caring for anorexia nervosa (AN) sufferers. In doing so, and using results from a qualitative research study undertaken in the UK, we show that AN nurses face a significant probability of incurring identifiable harms (inauthentic relationships and nonreciprocal relationships). Some recommendations on how these harms can be avoided or mitigated are given, but further research is needed. PMID:26957447

  8. Turn down genes for WAT? Activation of anti-apoptosis pathways protects white adipose tissue in metabolically depressed thirteen-lined ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Samantha M; Luu, Bryan E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-05-01

    During hibernation, the metabolic rate of thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) can drop to inhibitors x-IAP and c-IAP. Changes in the relative protein levels and/or phosphorylation levels were also observed for various regulators of apoptosis (p-JAKs, p-STATs, SOCS, and PIAS). Mcl-1 and x-IAP protein levels increased whereas Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and c-IAP protein/phosphorylation levels decreased signifying important roles for certain Bcl-2 family members in cell survival over the torpor-arousal cycle. Importantly, the relative phosphorylation of selected STAT proteins increased, suggesting a mechanism for Bcl-2 family activation. These results suggest that an increase in WAT cytoprotective mechanisms supports survival efforts during hibernation. PMID:27032768

  9. Polystyrene nanoparticles activate ion transport in human airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available J McCarthy1, X Gong2, D Nahirney2, M Duszyk2, MW Radomski11School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Panoz Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 2Department of Physiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaBackground: Over the last decade, nanotechnology has provided researchers with new nanometer materials, such as nanoparticles, which have the potential to provide new therapies for many lung diseases. In this study, we investigated the acute effects of polystyrene nanoparticles on epithelial ion channel function.Methods: Human submucosal Calu-3 cells that express cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and baby hamster kidney cells engineered to express the wild-type CFTR gene were used to investigate the actions of negatively charged 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles on short-circuit current in Calu-3 cells by Ussing chamber and single CFTR Cl- channels alone and in the presence of known CFTR channel activators by using baby hamster kidney cell patches.Results: Polystyrene nanoparticles caused sustained, repeatable, and concentration-dependent increases in short-circuit current. In turn, these short-circuit current responses were found to be biphasic in nature, ie, an initial peak followed by a plateau. EC50 values for peak and plateau short-circuit current responses were 1457 and 315.5 ng/mL, respectively. Short-circuit current was inhibited by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a CFTR Cl- channel blocker. Polystyrene nanoparticles activated basolateral K+ channels and affected Cl- and HCO3- secretion. The mechanism of short-circuit current activation by polystyrene nanoparticles was found to be largely dependent on calcium-dependent and cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphorylation of CFTR Cl- channels. Recordings from isolated inside-out patches using baby hamster kidney cells confirmed the direct activation of CFTR Cl- channels by the nanoparticles.Conclusion: This is the first study to identify

  10. >Effect of progesterone hormon on cell viability and stem cell activation in dental pulp cells

    OpenAIRE

    Segah Altuntaş; Muhammed Ali Kara; Deniz Selin Aksoy; Zehra Dilşad Çoban; Şefik Güran

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The dental pulp is the part in the center of a tooth made up of living connective tissue and cells called odontoblasts. The vitality of the dentin structure, both during health and after injury, depends on pulp cell activity and the signaling processes that regulate the cell’s behavior. Dental pulp tissue has condensed stem cell activity. Dental pulp stem cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into a variety of cell types. Several publications hav...

  11. Nongenotoxic p53 activation protects cells against S-phase-specific chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kranz, Dominique; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 represent the most frequent genetic difference between tumor cells and normal cells. Here, we have attempted to turn this difference into an advantage for normal cells during therapy. Using the Mdm2 antagonist nutlin-3, we first activated p53 in U2OS and...... HCT116 cells to induce cell cycle arrest. These arrested cells were found to be resistant to subsequent transient treatment with the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine, as revealed by clonogenic assays following drug removal. In contrast, isogenic cells lacking functional p53 continued to enter S phase...... regardless of nutlin-3 pretreatment and remained highly susceptible to gemcitabine-mediated cytotoxicity. The sequential treatment with nutlin-3 alone, followed by transient exposure to nutlin-3 plus gemcitabine, efficiently compromised the clonogenicity of tumor cells with deletions or mutations of p53 but...

  12. Antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies isolated from B cells expressing constitutively active STAT5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc A Scheeren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against specific pathogens have a high therapeutic potential, but are difficult to generate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Memory B cells were immortalized by expressing an inducible active mutant of the transcription factor Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5. Active STAT5 inhibits the differentiation of B cells while increasing their replicative life span. We obtained cloned B cell lines, which produced antibodies in the presence of interleukin 21 after turning off STAT5. We used this method to obtain monoclonal antibodies against the model antigen tetanus toxin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we describe a novel and relatively simple method of immortalizing antigen-specific human B cells for isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. These results show that STAT5 overexpression can be employed to isolate antigen specific antibodies from human memory B cells.

  13. Virtual turning points

    CERN Document Server

    Honda, Naofumi; Takei, Yoshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a virtual turning point truly is a breakthrough in WKB analysis of higher order differential equations. This monograph expounds the core part of its theory together with its application to the analysis of higher order Painlevé equations of the Noumi–Yamada type and to the analysis of non-adiabatic transition probability problems in three levels. As M.V. Fedoryuk once lamented, global asymptotic analysis of higher order differential equations had been thought to be impossible to construct. In 1982, however, H.L. Berk, W.M. Nevins, and K.V. Roberts published a remarkable paper in the Journal of Mathematical Physics indicating that the traditional Stokes geometry cannot globally describe the Stokes phenomena of solutions of higher order equations; a new Stokes curve is necessary.

  14. The Affective Turn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alí Lara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade studies on affect and emotions have become relevant in the social sciences. This is not just a fad guideline, but instead a simultaneous reader of public life changes and subjective experience, from which it is also being transformed the knowledge production. Such a trend has been known as ‘The Affective Turn’ within the Anglophone Academy. Here we will translate it as ‘El Giro Afectivo’. This turn, so far, has not dabbled in the social science literature that is written in Spanish. This paper draws on a singular panorama of discussions about contemporary social studies of affect and emotion, and it’s vertebrate by some of its expressions in the contemporary academy.

  15. Rational Tuning of the Electrocatalytic Nanobiointerface for a "Turn-Off" Biofuel-Cell-Based Self-Powered Biosensor for p53 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yajing; Chabu, Johnny Muya; Hu, Shengqiang; Deng, Liu; Liu, You-Nian; Guo, Shaojun

    2015-09-01

    Herein, a novel tunable electrocatalytic nanobiointerface for the construction of a high-sensitivity and high-selectivity biofuel-cell (BFC)-based self-powered biosensor for the detection of transcription factor protein p53 is reported, in which bilirubin oxidase (BOD)/DNA supramolecular modified graphene/platinum nanoparticles hybrid nanosheet (GPNHN) works as a new enhanced material of biocathode to control the attachment of target, and thus tune the electron-transfer process of oxygen reduction for transducing signaling magnification. It is found that in the presence of p53, the strong interaction between the wild-type p53 and its consensus DNA sequence on the electrode surface can block the electron transfer from the BOD to the electrode, thus providing a good opportunity for reducing the electrocatalytic activity of oxygen reduction in the biocathode. This in combination with the glucose oxidation at the carbon nanotube/Meldola's blue/glucose dehydrogenase bioanode can result in a current/or power decrease of BFC in the presence of wild-type p53. The specially designed BFC-based self-powered p53 sensor shows a wide linear range from 1 pM to 1 μM with a detection limit of 1 pM for analyzing wild-type p53. Most importantly, our BFC-based self-powered sensors can detect the concentrations of wild-type p53 in normal and cancer cell lysates without any extensive sample pretreatment/separation or specialized instruments. The present BFC-based self-powered sensor can provide a simple, economical, sensitive, and rapid way for analyzing p53 protein in normal and cancer cells at clinical level, which shows great potential for creating the treatment modalities that capitalize on the concentration variation of the wild-type p53. PMID:26211519

  16. Chemokines: a new dendritic cell signal for T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Thaiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the main inducers and regulators of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against viruses and tumors. One checkpoint to avoid misguided CTL activation, which might damage healthy cells of the body, is the necessity for multiple activation signals, involving both antigenic as well as additional signals that reflect the presence of pathogens. DCs provide both signals when activated by ligands of pattern recognition receptors and licensed by helper lymphocytes. Recently, it has been established that such T cell licensing can be facilitated by CD4+ T helper cells (classical licensing or by NKT cells (alternative licensing. Licensing regulates the DC/CTL cross-talk at multiple layers. Direct recruitment of CTLs through chemokines released by licensed DCs has recently emerged as a common theme and has a crucial impact on the efficiency of CTL responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of DC licensing for cross-priming and implications for the temporal and spatial regulation underlying this process. Future vaccination strategies will benefit from a deeper insight into the mechanisms that govern CTL activation.

  17. Entangled active matter: From cells to ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, D. L.; Phonekeo, S.; Altshuler, E.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    2016-07-01

    Both cells and ants belong to the broad field of active matter, a novel class of non-equilibrium materials composed of many interacting units that individually consume energy and collectively generate motion or mechanical stresses. However cells and ants differ from fish and birds in that they can support static loads. This is because cells and ants can be entangled, so that individual units are bound by transient links. Entanglement gives cells and ants a set of remarkable properties usually not found together, such as the ability to flow like a fluid, spring back like an elastic solid, and self-heal. In this review, we present the biology, mechanics and dynamics of both entangled cells and ants. We apply concepts from soft matter physics and wetting to characterize these systems as well as to point out their differences, which arise from their differences in size. We hope that our viewpoints will spur further investigations into cells and ants as active materials, and inspire the fabrication of synthetic active matter.

  18. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L; Burlock, Laura J; Gooding, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed. PMID:27500377

  19. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  20. Electrodynamic activity of healthy and cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jiří

    Vol. 329. Bristol : IOP, 2011 - (Cifra, M.; Pokorny, J.; Kučera, O.), 012007 ISSN 1742-6588. [9th International Frohlich's Symposium on Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells - Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics. Praha (CZ), 01.07.2011-03.07.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/0649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Boundary elements * Cancer cells * Electric dipole Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  1. Macrophages enhance the radiosensitizing activity of lipid A: A novel role for immune cells in tumor cell radioresponse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study examines whether activated macrophages may radiosensitize tumor cells through the release of proinflammatory mediators. Methods and materials: RAW 264.7 macrophages were activated by lipid A, and the conditioned medium (CM) was analyzed for the secretion of cytokines and the production of nitric oxide (NO) through inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). EMT-6 tumor cells were exposed to CM and analyzed for hypoxic cell radiosensitivity. The role of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the transcriptional activation of iNOS was examined by luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: Clinical immunomodulator lipid A, at a plasma-relevant concentration of 3 μg/mL, stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages to release NO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and other cytokines. This in turn activated iNOS-mediated NO production in EMT-6 tumor cells and drastically enhanced their radiosensitivity. Radiosensitization was abrogated by the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine but not by a neutralizing anti-TNF-α antibody. The mechanism of iNOS induction was linked to NF-κB but not to JAK/STAT signaling. Interferon-γ further increased the NO production by macrophages to a level that caused radiosensitization of EMT-6 cells through the bystanding effect of diffused NO. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that activated macrophages may radiosensitize tumor cells through the induction of NO synthesis, which occurs in both tumor and immune cells

  2. Swainsonine promotes apoptosis in human oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo through activation of mitochondrial pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhaocai Li; Yong Huang; Feng Dong; Wei Li; Li Ding; Gaoshui Yu; Dan Xu; Yuanyuan Yang; Xingang Xu; Dewen Tong

    2012-12-01

    Swainsonine, a natural indolizidine alkaloid, has been reported to have antitumour effects, and can induce apoptosis in human gastric and lung cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated the antitumour effects of swainsonine on several oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells and investigated relative molecular mechanisms. Swainsonine treatment inhibited the growth of Eca-109, TE-1 and TE-10 cells in a concentration-dependent manner as measured by MTT assay. Morphological observation, DNA laddering detection and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that swainsonine treatment induced Eca-109 cell apoptosis in vitro. Further results showed that swainsonine treatment up-regulated Bax, down-regulated Bcl-2 expression, triggered Bax translocation to mitochondria, destructed mitochondria integrity and activated mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, followed by the release of cytochrome c, which in turn activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, promoted the cleavage of PARP, resulting in Eca-109 cell apoptosis. Moreover, swainsonine treatment inhibited Bcl-2 expression, promoted Bax translocation, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation in xenograft tumour cells, resulting in a significant decrease of tumour volume and tumour weight in the swainsonine-treated xenograft mice groups compared with that in the control group. Taken together, this study demonstrated that swainsonine inhibited Eca-109 cells growth through activation of mitochondria-mediated caspase-dependent pathway.

  3. Turn by Turn Measurements at the KEK-ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Renier, Y; Tomas, R; Wendt, M; Eddy, N; Kubo, K; Kuroda, S; Naito, T; Okugi, T; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J

    2013-01-01

    The ATF damping ring has been upgraded with new read-out electronics for the beam position monitors (BPM), capable to acquire the beam orbits on a turn-by-turn basis, as well as in a high resolution averaging mode. The new BPM system allows to improve optic corrections and to achieve an even smaller vertical emittance (<2pm). Experimental results are presented based on turn-by-turn beam orbit measurements in the ring, for estimating the β functions and dispersion along the lattice. A fast method to measure spectral line amplitude in a few turns is also presented, including the evaluation of chromaticity.

  4. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  5. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in beryllium-induced dendritic cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Huang, Z.; Gillespie, M.; Mroz, P.M.; Maier, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a role in the regulation of immune responses to haptens, which in turn impact DC maturation. Whether beryllium (Be) is able to induce DC maturation and if this occurs via the MAPK pathway is not known. Primary monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) models were generated from Be non-exposed healthy volunteers as a non-sensitized cell model, while PBMCs from BeS (Be sensitized) and CBD (chronic beryllium disease) were used as disease models. The response of these cells to Be was evaluated. The expression of CD40 was increased significantly (pBeS and CBD subjects, SB203580 downregulated Be-stimulated proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased Be-stimulated TNF-α and IFNγ cytokine production. Taken together, this study suggests that Be-induces non-sensitized Glu69+ DCs maturation, and that p38MAPK signaling is important in the Be-stimulated DCs activation as well as subsequent T cell proliferation and cytokine production in BeS and CBD. In total, the MAPK pathway may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human granulomatous lung diseases. PMID:25454621

  6. Globular adiponectin activates motility and regenerative traits of muscle satellite cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Fiaschi

    Full Text Available Regeneration of adult injured skeletal muscle is due to activation of satellite cells, a population of stem cells resident beneath the basal lamina. Thus, information on soluble factors affecting satellite cell activation, as well as migration towards injury and fusion into new myofibers are essential. Here, we show that globular adiponectin (gAd, positively affects several features of muscle satellite cells. gAd activates satellite cells to exit quiescence and increases their recruitment towards myotubes. gAd elicits in satellite cells a specific motility program, involving activation of the small GTPase Rac1, as well as expression of Snail and Twist transcription factors driving a proteolytic motility, useful to reach the site of injury. We show that satellite cells produce autocrine full length adiponectin (fAd, which is converted to gAd by activated macrophages. In turns, gAd concurs to attract to the site of injury both satellite cells and macrophages and induces myogenesis in muscle satellite cells. Thus, these findings add a further role for gAd in skeletal muscle, including the hormone among factors participating in muscle regeneration.

  7. Low-dose photon irradiation alters cell differentiation via activation of hIK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Bastian; Gibhardt, Christine S; Becker, Patrick; Gebhardt, Manuela; Knoop, Jan; Fournier, Claudia; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    To understand the impact of ionizing irradiation from diagnostics and radiotherapy on cells, we examined K(+) channel activity before and immediately after exposing cells to X-rays. Already, low dose in the cGy range caused in adenocarcinoma A549 cells within minutes a hyperpolarization following activation of the human intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (hIK). The response was specific for cells, which functionally expressed hIK channels and in which hIK activity was low before irradiation. HEK293 cells, which do not respond to X-ray irradiation, accordingly develop a sensitivity to this stress after heterologous expression of hIK channels. The data suggest that hIK activation involves a Ca(2+)-mediated signaling cascade because channel activation is suppressed by a strong cytosolic Ca(2+) buffer. The finding that an elevation of H2O2 causes an increase in the concentration of cytosolic Ca(2+) suggests that radicals, which emerge early in response to irradiation, trigger this Ca(2+) signaling cascade. Inhibition of hIK channels by specific blockers clotrimazole and TRAM-34 slowed cell proliferation and migration in "wound" scratch assays; ionizing irradiation, in turn, stimulated the latter process presumably via its activation of the hIK channels. These data stress an indirect radiosensitivity of hIK channels with an impact on cell differentiation. PMID:25277267

  8. Turning nuclear communications inside out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to debates on the security of energy supply in the European Union, the international efforts on the implementation of Kyoto protocol and the forthcoming liberalization of the electrical energy market the attention of Hungarian decision-makers was focused on energy related problems. Discussions started on the future role of nuclear power and anti-nuclear environmentalists became more active in their criticism. Changes were needed in the approach and practice of communication on nuclear energy. Previous practice turned to be inefficient in dialogue with different social and influential groups. Public information could not be considered any more as an activity explaining measures to cope with incidents and accidents or giving technical answers to mostly superficial statements on allegedly unsafe features and solutions in nuclear industry. It was time to change the paradigm and to turn the communication into a powerful tool to put forward the arguments, to show the achievements and facts and to explain the efforts in addressing public concerns. The new paradigm turned the previous outside-in approach to a new inside-out type of behavior. Instead of reacting to the attacks coming from outside the new approach means first of all commitment to be open and pro-active in communication and to act in close cooperation with all interested organizations and institutions. The three pillars of the new paradigm, commitment, communication and co-operation are applicable not only for the nuclear industry, but also for the governmental agencies (regulatory bodies, health and emergency authorities etc.) and for the wide range of technical, scientific and civil organizations. Public information should be turned from a burden to a challenge for open, technically valid and honest dialogue. This active communication approach is illustrated by some new initiatives in public information in Hungary. Following the successful Nuclear Academy for Journalists formed new Section of Nuclear

  9. Activation-Induced Cell Death in T Cells and Autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianZhang; XuemeiXu; YongLiu

    2004-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD), which results from the interaction between Fas and Fas ligand, is responsible for maintaining tolerance to self-antigen. A defect in AICD may lead to development of autoimmunity. During the last several years, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism(s) of AICD and its potential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the most recent progress on the regulation of the susceptibility of T cells to AICD and its possible involvement in autoimmune diseases.

  10. Maternal immune activation evoked by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid does not evoke microglial cell activation in the embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eSmolders

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that inflammation during pregnancy increases the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in the offspring. Morphological brain abnormalities combined with deviations in the inflammatory status of the brain can be observed in patients of both autism and schizophrenia. It was shown that acute infection can induce changes in maternal cytokine levels which in turn are suggested to affect fetal brain development and increase the risk on the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in the offspring. Animal models of maternal immune activation reproduce the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In this study the poly (I:C model was used to mimic viral immune activation in pregnant mice in order to assess the activation status of fetal microglia in these developmental disorders. Because microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain they were expected to be activated due to the inflammatory stimulus.Microglial cell density and activation level in the fetal cortex and hippocampus were determined. Despite the presence of a systemic inflammation in the pregnant mice, there was no significant difference in fetal microglial cell density or immunohistochemically determined activation level between the control and inflammation group. These data indicate that activation of the fetal microglial cells is not likely to be responsible for the inflammation induced deficits in the offspring in this model.

  11. Texas turns on lignite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the author's involvement with the Texas Mining and Reclamation Association (TMRA) and some of its activities. The mission of TMRA is to solidify the needs and opinions of the various mining sectors into one voice which can be heard on the vital matters of balance between mineral production, environmental protection, economic strength and public welfare. To make this voice effective, TMRA will present the mining industry - and its value to the Texas economy and lifestyle - to the public, educators and students, regulatory officials, legislators and to the media to enhance their understanding. TMRA will promote the active participation of its members in association affairs and strive for integrity, clarity and vision throughout all its operations and activities

  12. Regulation of polymorphonuclear cell activation by thrombopoietin.

    OpenAIRE

    Brizzi, M F; Battaglia, E.; Rosso, A.; Strippoli, P; Montrucchio, G; Camussi, G.; Pegoraro, L

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates early and late stages of platelet formation as well as platelet activation. TPO exerts its effects by binding to the receptor, encoded by the protooncogene c-mpl, that is expressed in a large number of cells of hematopoietic origin. In this study, we evaluated the expression of c-Mpl and the effects of TPO on human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). We demonstrate that PMN express the TPO receptor c-Mpl and that TPO induces STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the for...

  13. Decidual cell polyploidization necessitates mitochondrial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghong Ma

    Full Text Available Cellular polyploidy has been widely reported in nature, yet its developmental mechanism and function remain poorly understood. In the present study, to better define the aspects of decidual cell polyploidy, we isolated pure polyploid and non-polyploid decidual cell populations from the in vivo decidual bed. Three independent RNA pools prepared for each population were then subjected to the Affymetrix gene chip analysis for the whole mouse genome transcripts. Our data revealed up-regulation of 1015 genes and down-regulation of 1207 genes in the polyploid populations, as compared to the non-polyploid group. Comparative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization results indeed confirmed differential expressional regulation of several genes between the two populations. Based on functional enrichment analyses, up-regulated polyploidy genes appeared to implicate several functions, which primarily include cell/nuclear division, ATP binding, metabolic process, and mitochondrial activity, whereas that of down-regulated genes primarily included apoptosis and immune processes. Further analyses of genes that are related to mitochondria and bi-nucleation showed differential and regional expression within the decidual bed, consistent with the pattern of polyploidy. Consistently, studies revealed a marked induction of mitochondrial mass and ATP production in polyploid cells. The inhibition of mitochondrial activity by various pharmacological inhibitors, as well as by gene-specific targeting using siRNA-mediated technology showed a dramatic attenuation of polyploidy and bi-nucleation development during in vitro stromal cell decidualization, suggesting mitochondria play a major role in positive regulation of decidual cell polyploidization. Collectively, analyses of unique polyploidy markers and molecular signaling networks may be useful to further characterize functional aspects of decidual cell polyploidy at the site of implantation.

  14. Progress of turn-by-turn system for HLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the PhaseII project of NSRL, a turn by turn system is proposed for storage ring diagnostics which engages log-ratio electronics circuit to measure machine properties of the HLS storage ring. The log-ratio processor works at 408MHz which is 2* RF of HLS. A injection kicker and the stripline resonant exciting methods are used to excite beam for nonlinear beam dynamics studies and phase space of stored beam. Up to 2 seconds data acquisition is ensured. In this paper we present the performance of each components and preliminary test results of the turn-by-turn BPM system

  15. Electrodynamic activity of healthy and cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microtubules in the cell form a structure capable of generating electrodynamic field and mitochondria form their supporting system for physical processes including energy supply. Mitochondria transfer protons from their matrix space into cytosol, create strong static field around them that causes ordering of water and altering it into quasi-elastic medium with reduced viscous damping. Microtubules are composed of heterodimers that are electric dipoles. Microtubule oscillations generate an electrodynamic field. The greatest energy supply may be provided by liberation of non-utilized energy from mitochondria. Microtubules and mitochondria form a unique cooperating system in the cell. Mitochondria form a boundary element whose function depends on chemical-genetic control but their output is essential for physical processes in the cell. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer cells results in diminished intensity of the static electric field, disturbed water ordering, increased damping of microtubule oscillations and their shift towards linear region, and decreased energy supply. Power and coherence of oscillations and generated electrodynamic field is weakened. Malignant properties of cancer cell, in particular local invasion and metastasis, may depend on disturbed electrodynamic field. Nanotechnology is promising for investigation of electrodynamic activity in living cells.

  16. Muscle cells challenged with saturated fatty acids mount an autonomous inflammatory response that activates macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillon Nicolas J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Within adipose tissue of mice fed a high fat diet, resident and infiltrating macrophages assume a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by the production of cytokines which in turn impact on the surrounding tissue. However, inflammation is not restricted to adipose tissue and high fat-feeding is responsible for a significant increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in muscle. Although skeletal muscle is the major disposer of dietary glucose and a major determinant of glycemia, the origin and consequence of muscle inflammation in the development of insulin resistance are poorly understood. We used a cell culture approach to investigate the vectorial crosstalk between muscle cells and macrophages upon exposure to physiological, low levels of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Inflammatory pathway activation and cytokine expression were analyzed in L6 muscle cells expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (L6GLUT4myc exposed to 0.2 mM palmitate or palmitoleate. Conditioned media thereof, free of fatty acids, were then tested for their ability to activate RAW264.7 macrophages. Palmitate -but not palmitoleate- induced IL-6, TNFα and CCL2 expression in muscle cells, through activation of the NF-κB pathway. Palmitate (0.2 mM alone did not induce insulin resistance in muscle cells, yet conditioned media from palmitate-challenged muscle cells selectively activated macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. These results demonstrate that low concentrations of palmitate activate autonomous inflammation in muscle cells to release factors that turn macrophages pro-inflammatory. We hypothesize that saturated fat-induced, low-grade muscle cell inflammation may trigger resident skeletal muscle macrophage polarization, possibly contributing to insulin resistance in vivo.

  17. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified as an

  18. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Mu-Yun [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yuh-Chiang [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chien-Hsing [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shu-Yi [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tsing-Fen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Peng, Yu-Ta [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Che, E-mail: chia_che@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified

  19. Sandstone Turning by Abrasive Waterjet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Petr; Cárach, J.; Hloch, Sergej; Vasilko, K.; Klichová, Dagmar; Klich, Jiří; Lehocká, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2015), s. 2489-2493. ISSN 0723-2632 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : turning away from the jet * conventional turning towards the jet * sandstone * abrasive water jet Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 2.420, year: 2014 http://www.springerprofessional.de/sandstone-turning-by-abrasive-waterjet/6038028.html

  20. Asynchronous combinatorial action of four regulatory factors activates Bcl11b for T cell commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueh, Hao Yuan; Yui, Mary A; Ng, Kenneth K H; Pease, Shirley S; Zhang, Jingli A; Damle, Sagar S; Freedman, George; Siu, Sharmayne; Bernstein, Irwin D; Elowitz, Michael B; Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-08-01

    During T cell development, multipotent progenitors relinquish competence for other fates and commit to the T cell lineage by turning on Bcl11b, which encodes a transcription factor. To clarify lineage commitment mechanisms, we followed developing T cells at the single-cell level using Bcl11b knock-in fluorescent reporter mice. Notch signaling and Notch-activated transcription factors collaborate to activate Bcl11b expression irrespectively of Notch-dependent proliferation. These inputs work via three distinct, asynchronous mechanisms: an early locus 'poising' function dependent on TCF-1 and GATA-3, a stochastic-permissivity function dependent on Notch signaling, and a separate amplitude-control function dependent on Runx1, a factor already present in multipotent progenitors. Despite their necessity for Bcl11b expression, these inputs act in a stage-specific manner, providing a multitiered mechanism for developmental gene regulation. PMID:27376470

  1. Receptor channel TRPC6 orchestrate the activation of human hepatic stellate cell under hypoxia condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a specialized stromal cytotype have a great impact on the biological behaviors of liver diseases. Despite this fact, the underlying mechanism that regulates HSC still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to understand the role of TRPC6 signaling in regulating the molecular mechanism of HSCs in response to hypoxia. In the present study we showed that under hypoxia condition, the upregulated Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) increases NICD activation, which in turn induces the expression of transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) in HSC line lx-2. TRPC6 causes a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium which is coupled with the activation of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) pathway which activates the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. TRPC6 also activates SMAD2/3 dependent TGF-β signaling in facilitating upregulated expression of αSMA and collagen. As activated HSCs may be a suitable target for HCC therapy and targeting these cells rather than the HCC cells may result in a greater response. Collectively, our studies indicate for the first time the detailed mechanism of activation of HSC through TRPC6 signaling and thus being a promising therapeutic target. - Highlights: • HIF1α increases NICD, induces TRPC6 in lx2 cells. • TRPC6 a novel regulator in the activation of HSC. • HSCs as target for HCC therapy

  2. Receptor channel TRPC6 orchestrate the activation of human hepatic stellate cell under hypoxia condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Soumya C, E-mail: chidambaram.soumya@gmail.com [Unit of Biochemistry, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Kannan, Anbarasu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Gopal, Ashidha [Unit of Biochemistry, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Devaraj, Niranjali [Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Halagowder, Devaraj [Unit of Biochemistry, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a specialized stromal cytotype have a great impact on the biological behaviors of liver diseases. Despite this fact, the underlying mechanism that regulates HSC still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to understand the role of TRPC6 signaling in regulating the molecular mechanism of HSCs in response to hypoxia. In the present study we showed that under hypoxia condition, the upregulated Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) increases NICD activation, which in turn induces the expression of transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) in HSC line lx-2. TRPC6 causes a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium which is coupled with the activation of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) pathway which activates the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. TRPC6 also activates SMAD2/3 dependent TGF-β signaling in facilitating upregulated expression of αSMA and collagen. As activated HSCs may be a suitable target for HCC therapy and targeting these cells rather than the HCC cells may result in a greater response. Collectively, our studies indicate for the first time the detailed mechanism of activation of HSC through TRPC6 signaling and thus being a promising therapeutic target. - Highlights: • HIF1α increases NICD, induces TRPC6 in lx2 cells. • TRPC6 a novel regulator in the activation of HSC. • HSCs as target for HCC therapy.

  3. Myostatin negatively regulates satellite cell activation and self-renewal

    OpenAIRE

    McCroskery, Seumas; Thomas, Mark; Maxwell, Linda; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi

    2003-01-01

    Satellite cells are quiescent muscle stem cells that promote postnatal muscle growth and repair. Here we show that myostatin, a TGF-β member, signals satellite cell quiescence and also negatively regulates satellite cell self-renewal. BrdU labeling in vivo revealed that, among the Myostatin-deficient satellite cells, higher numbers of satellite cells are activated as compared with wild type. In contrast, addition of Myostatin to myofiber explant cultures inhibits satellite cell activation. Ce...

  4. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  5. A highly selective fluorescent 'turn-on' chemosensor for Zn(2+) based on a benzothiazole conjugate: their applicability in live cell imaging and use of the resultant complex as a secondary sensor of CN(-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Nilesh; Tayade, Kundan; Sahoo, Suban K; Bondhopadhyay, Banashree; Basu, Anupam; Singh, Jasminder; Singh, Narinder; Gite, Vikas; Kuwar, Anil

    2015-02-01

    A benzothiazole derivative linked "off-on" multi-responsive and selective chemosensor has been synthesized and evaluated for cation recognition properties. The receptor shows a high sensitivity and selectivity for Zn(2+) through a 'turn-on' fluorescence response over the other tested cations with a detection limit as low as 0.67 μM. The receptor was successfully applied for the detection of Zn(2+) in live HeLa cells. Then, the Zn(2+) complex of receptor was also used for cyanide detection and recognition. PMID:25482915

  6. Turning in a Bipedal Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jau-Ching Lu; Jing-Yi Chen; Pei-Chun Lin

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of turning behavior on a child-size bipedal robot that addresses two common scenarios:turning in place and simultaneous walking and turning.About turning in place,three strategies are investigated and compared,including body-first,leg-first,and body/leg-simultaneous.These three strategies are used for three actions,respectively:when walking follows turning immediately,when space behind the robot is very tight,and when a large turning angle is desired.Concerning simultaneous walking and turning,the linear inverted pendulum is used as the motion model in the single-leg support phase,and the polynomial-based trajectory is used as the motion model in the double-leg support phase and for smooth motion connectivity to motions in a priori and a posteriori single-leg support phases.Compared to the trajectory generation of ordinary walking,that of simultaneous walking and turning introduces only two extra parameters:one for determining new heading direction and the other for smoothing the Center of Mass (COM) trajectory.The trajectory design methodology is validated in both simulation and experimental environments,and successful robot behavior confirms the effectiveness of the strategy.

  7. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Li [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); College of Life Sciences, Hainan Normal University, Haikou, Hainan 571158 (China); Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Tong, Dewen, E-mail: dwtong@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence.

  8. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions. PMID:26714690

  9. Liver Fatty acid binding protein (L-Fabp) modulates murine stellate cell activation and diet induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Anping; Tang, Youcai; Davis, Victoria; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Kennedy, Susan M; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Newberry, Elizabeth P.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is crucial to the development of fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Quiescent HSCs contain lipid droplets (LDs), whose depletion upon activation induces a fibrogenic gene program. Here we show that liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-Fabp), an abundant cytosolic protein that modulates fatty acid (FA) metabolism in enterocytes and hepatocytes also modulates HSC FA utilization and in turn regulates the fibrogenic program. L-Fabp expression ...

  10. Styrylpyridine salts-based red emissive two-photon turn-on probe for imaging the plasma membrane in living cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lifang; Zhang, Ruoyao; Sun, Yuming; Tian, Minggang; Zhang, Ge; Feng, Ruiqing; Li, Xuechen; Yu, Xiaoqiang; He, Xiuquan

    2016-05-23

    Based on styrylpyridine salts, a small-molecule red emitting membrane probe with large two-photon absorption cross-section has been synthesized. As a molecular rotor, it enables exclusive lighting up of the plasma membrane in live cells and particular tissues. This probe has the potential to be a powerful tool for bioimaging. PMID:27160329

  11. Antitumor Immunity Produced by the Liver Kupffer Cells, NK Cells, NKT Cells, and CD8+ CD122+ T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shuhji Seki; Hiroyuki Nakashima; Masahiro Nakashima; Manabu Kinoshita

    2011-01-01

    Mouse and human livers contain innate immune leukocytes, NK cells, NKT cells, and macrophage-lineage Kupffer cells. Various bacterial components, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and an NKT cell ligand ( α -galactocylceramide), activate liver Kupffer cells, which produce IL-1, IL-6, IL-12, and TNF. IL-12 activates hepatic NK cells and NKT cells to produce IFN- γ , which further activates hepatic T cells, in turn activating phagocytosis and cytokine production by Kupffer cells in a p...

  12. Sertoli cells maintain Leydig cell number and peritubular myoid cell activity in the adult mouse testis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Rebourcet

    Full Text Available The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health.

  13. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells regulate autoreactive B cell activation via soluble factors and in a cell-to-cell contact manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chuanlin; Cai, Yihua; Marroquin, Jose; Ildstad, Suzanne T; Yan, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are specialized type I IFN producers, which play an important role in pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. Dysregulated autoreactive B cell activation is a hallmark in most autoimmune diseases. This study was undertaken to investigate interactions between pDCs and autoreactive B cells. After coculture of autoreactive B cells that recognize self-Ag small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles with activated pDCs, we found that pDCs significantly enhance autoreactive B cell proliferation, autoantibody production, and survival in response to TLR and BCR stimulation. Neutralization of IFN-alpha/beta and IL-6 abrogated partially pDC-mediated enhancement of autoreactive B cell activation. Transwell studies demonstrated that pDCs could provide activation signals to autoreactive B cells via a cell-to-cell contact manner. The involvement of the ICAM-1-LFA-1 pathway was revealed as contributing to this effect. This in vitro enhancement effect was further demonstrated by an in vivo B cell adoptive transfer experiment, which showed that autoreactive B cell proliferation and activation were significantly decreased in MyD88-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. These data suggest the dynamic interplay between pDCs and B cells is required for full activation of autoreactive B cells upon TLR or BCR stimulation. PMID:19890051

  14. Khat (Catha edulis) generates reactive oxygen species and promotes hepatic cell apoptosis via MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Morad Dirhem Naji; Chen, Juan; Xiang, Min; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Xiaoping; Gong, Feili

    2013-08-01

    A number of studies have suggested an association between khat (Catha edulis) chewing and acute liver lesions or chronic liver disease. However, little is known about the effects of khat on hepatic cells. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism behind khat-induced apoptosis in the L02 human hepatic cell line. We used cell growth inhibition assay, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining to measure hepatocyte apoptosis induced by khat. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression levels of caspase-8 and -9, as well as those of Bax and Bcl-2. We also measured reactive oxygen species production. The results indicated that khat induced significant hepatocyte apoptosis in L02 cells. We found that khat activated caspase-8 and -9, upregulated Bax protein expression and downregulated Bcl-2 expression levels, which resulted in the coordination of apoptotic signals. Khat-induced hepatocyte apoptosis is primarily regulated through the sustained activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and only partially via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Furthermore, the khat-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the activation of the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), attenuated the khat-induced activation of JNK and ERK. Our results demonstrate that khat triggers the generation of intracellular ROS and sequentially induces the sustainable activation of JNK, which in turn results in a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cell apoptosis. PMID:23708648

  15. Cyclodextrin-Based Metal-Organic Nanotube as Fluorescent Probe for Selective Turn-On Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Living Cells Based on H2S-Involved Coordination Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xuelian; Wang, Jingxin; Gong, Chuanfang; Xu, Hai; Wang, Rongming; Ji, Shijie; Dong, Hanxiao; Meng, Qingguo; Zhang, Liangliang; Dai, Fangna; Sun, Daofeng

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been considered as the third biologically gaseous messenger (gasotransmitter) after nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Fluorescent detection of H2S in living cells is very important to human health because it has been found that the abnormal levels of H2S in human body can cause Alzheimer’s disease, cancers and diabetes. Herein, we develop a cyclodextrin-based metal-organic nanotube, CD-MONT-2, possessing a {Pb14} metallamacrocycle for efficient detection of H2S. CD-MONT-2′ (the guest-free form of CD-MONT-2) exhibits turn-on detection of H2S with high selectivity and moderate sensitivity when the material was dissolved in DMSO solution. Significantly, CD-MONT-2′ can act as a fluorescent turn-on probe for highly selective detection of H2S in living cells. The sensing mechanism in the present work is based on the coordination of H2S as the auxochromic group to the central Pb(II) ion to enhance the fluorescence intensity, which is studied for the first time. PMID:26911657

  16. Cyclodextrin-Based Metal-Organic Nanotube as Fluorescent Probe for Selective Turn-On Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Living Cells Based on H2S-Involved Coordination Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xuelian; Wang, Jingxin; Gong, Chuanfang; Xu, Hai; Wang, Rongming; Ji, Shijie; Dong, Hanxiao; Meng, Qingguo; Zhang, Liangliang; Dai, Fangna; Sun, Daofeng

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been considered as the third biologically gaseous messenger (gasotransmitter) after nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Fluorescent detection of H2S in living cells is very important to human health because it has been found that the abnormal levels of H2S in human body can cause Alzheimer’s disease, cancers and diabetes. Herein, we develop a cyclodextrin-based metal-organic nanotube, CD-MONT-2, possessing a {Pb14} metallamacrocycle for efficient detection of H2S. CD-MONT-2‧ (the guest-free form of CD-MONT-2) exhibits turn-on detection of H2S with high selectivity and moderate sensitivity when the material was dissolved in DMSO solution. Significantly, CD-MONT-2‧ can act as a fluorescent turn-on probe for highly selective detection of H2S in living cells. The sensing mechanism in the present work is based on the coordination of H2S as the auxochromic group to the central Pb(II) ion to enhance the fluorescence intensity, which is studied for the first time.

  17. Borbeni zaokret aviona / Combat turn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljko Popović

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available U radu su prikazane jednačine kretanja težišta aviona u borbenom zaokretu i analiza uticaja koeficijenta opterećenja i ugla naginjanja na karakteristike borbenog zaokreta, kao što su: brzina, promena ugla nagiba putanje, prirast visine i vreme trajanja zaokreta. / The paper presents equations of motion of the aircraft center of mass in combat turn and effects of load factor and the bank angle on the characteristic of combat turn, such as: velocity, the flight path angle increment of altitude and the time combat turn.

  18. Autophagy activation and enhanced mitophagy characterize the Purkinje cells of pcd mice prior to neuronal death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrabarti Lisa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purkinje cells are a class of specialized neurons in the cerebellum, and are among the most metabolically active of all neurons, as they receive immense synaptic stimulation, and provide the only efferent output from the cerebellum. Degeneration of Purkinje cells is a common feature of inherited ataxias in humans and mice. To understand Purkinje neuron degeneration, investigators have turned to naturally occurring Purkinje cell degeneration phenotypes in mice to identify key regulatory proteins and cellular pathways. The Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd mouse is a recessive mutant characterized by complete and dramatic post-natal, cell autonomous Purkinje neuron degeneration and death. As the basis of Purkinje cell death in pcd is unresolved, and contradictory data has emerged for the role of autophagy in Purkinje cell degeneration, we studied the mechanism of Purkinje cell death in pcd mice. BAX null status did not suppress Purkinje neuron death in pcd mice, indicating that classic apoptosis is not responsible for Purkinje cell loss. Interestingly, LC3 Western blot analysis and GFP-LC3 immunostaining of degenerating pcd cerebellum revealed activation of the autophagy pathway. Ultrastructural studies confirmed increased autophagy pathway activity in Purkinje cells, and yielded evidence for mitophagy, in agreement with LC3 immunoblotting of cerebellar fractions. As p62 levels were decreased in pcd cerebellum, our findings suggest that pcd Purkinje cell neurons can execute effective autophagy. However, our results support a role for dysregulated autophagy activation in pcd, and suggest that increased or aberrant mitophagy contributes to the Purkinje cell degeneration in pcd mice.

  19. Turning around Newton's Second Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, John Eric

    2004-01-01

    Conceptual and quantitative difficulties surrounding Newton's second law often arise among introductory physics students. Simply turning around how one expresses Newton's second law may assist students in their understanding of a deceptively simple-looking equation.

  20. Turning patients over in bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This helps the skin stay healthy and prevents bedsores. Turning a patient is a good time to ... M, et al. Risk assessment and prevention of pressure ulcers: a clinical practice guideline from the American College ...

  1. Natural killer cell activity during premedication, anaesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, E; Mickley, H; Grunnet, N

    1983-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured against K-562 target cells in a 51Cr release assay in eight patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery. Eight consecutive blood samples were taken from each patient. A significant increase of NK cell...... days. The findings of this study indicate that premedication, anaesthesia and surgery cause a rapid and transient increase in NK cell activity, followed by a decline in activity postoperatively. The transient increase in activity may be explained by mobilization of natural killer cells from extravasal...

  2. Enhanced casein kinase II activity in human tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowald, K; Fischer, H; Issinger, O G

    1984-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) activity is enhanced as much as 2-3 fold in established and 4-5-fold in transformed human cell lines when compared to that of fibroblasts and primary human tumour cell cultures where CKII activity never exceeded a basic level. The high activity of CKII in transformed cells...... and in established cell lines was reduced to about the same basic level after treatment with heparin, a highly specific inhibitor of CKII activity. The activity of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase was virtually the same in fibroblasts and various human tumour cell lines investigated....

  3. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and IL2R expression of activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Jørgensen, Annette; Nielsen, Mette;

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on activated T cells. Activated T cells were cocultured with adult and foetal human RPE cells whereafter apoptosis and proliferation were determined by flow cytometry and (3)H...... addition to use of TCR negative T cell lines. The expression of IL2R-alpha -beta and -gamma chains of activated T cells was analysed by flow cytometry after incubation of T cells alone or with RPE cells. Human RPE cells were found to inhibit the proliferation of activated T cells by a cell contact......-dependent mechanism. The RPE cells inhibitory abilities were not affected by blocking of any of the tested surface molecules. The inhibition of the T cells' proliferation correlates with a decreased expression of IL2R-beta and -gamma chains. The T cells regain their ability to proliferate and increase their IL2R...

  4. Recombinant Nox4 cytosolic domain produced by a cell or cell-free base systems exhibits constitutive diaphorase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong, E-mail: mvchuong@yahoo.fr [GREPI AGIM FRE 3405 CNRS-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Zhang, Leilei [GREPI AGIM FRE 3405 CNRS-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Lhomme, Stanislas; Mouz, Nicolas [PX' Therapeutics, MINATEC/Batiment de Haute Technologie, Grenoble (France); Lenormand, Jean-Luc [HumProTher Laboratory, TheReX/TIMC-IMAG UMR 5525 CNRS UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, UFR de Medecine, Domaine de la Merci, 38706 La Tronche (France); Lardy, Bernard; Morel, Francoise [GREPI AGIM FRE 3405 CNRS-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A comparison of two bacterial cell and cell-free protein expression systems is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins are produced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nox4 has a constitutive diaphorase activity which is independent of cytosolic factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isoform Nox4B is unable to initiate the first electronic transfer step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of Nox4 oxidase activity. -- Abstract: The membrane protein NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase Nox4 constitutively generates reactive oxygen species differing from other NADPH oxidases activity, particularly in Nox2 which needs a stimulus to be active. Although the precise mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species by Nox2 is well characterized, the electronic transfer throughout Nox4 remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the initial electronic transfer step (diaphorase activity) of the cytosolic tail of Nox4. For this purpose, we developed two different approaches to produce soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins. We synthesized soluble recombinant proteins either by in vitro translation or by bacteria induction. While proteins obtained by bacteria induction demonstrate an activity of 4.4 {+-} 1.7 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 20.5 {+-} 2.8 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c, the soluble proteins produced by cell-free expression system exhibit a diaphorase activity with a turn-over of 26 {+-} 2.6 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 48 {+-} 20.2 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c. Furthermore, the activity of the soluble proteins is constitutive and does not need any stimulus. We also show that the cytosolic tail of the isoform Nox4B lacking the first NADPH binding site is unable to demonstrate any diaphorase activity pointing out the

  5. Recombinant Nox4 cytosolic domain produced by a cell or cell-free base systems exhibits constitutive diaphorase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A comparison of two bacterial cell and cell-free protein expression systems is presented. ► Soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins are produced. ► Nox4 has a constitutive diaphorase activity which is independent of cytosolic factors. ► Isoform Nox4B is unable to initiate the first electronic transfer step. ► Findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of Nox4 oxidase activity. -- Abstract: The membrane protein NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase Nox4 constitutively generates reactive oxygen species differing from other NADPH oxidases activity, particularly in Nox2 which needs a stimulus to be active. Although the precise mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species by Nox2 is well characterized, the electronic transfer throughout Nox4 remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the initial electronic transfer step (diaphorase activity) of the cytosolic tail of Nox4. For this purpose, we developed two different approaches to produce soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins. We synthesized soluble recombinant proteins either by in vitro translation or by bacteria induction. While proteins obtained by bacteria induction demonstrate an activity of 4.4 ± 1.7 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 20.5 ± 2.8 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c, the soluble proteins produced by cell-free expression system exhibit a diaphorase activity with a turn-over of 26 ± 2.6 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 48 ± 20.2 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c. Furthermore, the activity of the soluble proteins is constitutive and does not need any stimulus. We also show that the cytosolic tail of the isoform Nox4B lacking the first NADPH binding site is unable to demonstrate any diaphorase activity pointing out the importance of this domain.

  6. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do, E-mail: ydjung@chonnam.ac.kr

    2012-03-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells

  7. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H2O2 increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells treated with nicotine

  8. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  9. >Effect of progesterone hormon on cell viability and stem cell activation in dental pulp cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segah Altuntaş

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The dental pulp is the part in the center of a tooth made up of living connective tissue and cells called odontoblasts. The vitality of the dentin structure, both during health and after injury, depends on pulp cell activity and the signaling processes that regulate the cell’s behavior. Dental pulp tissue has condensed stem cell activity. Dental pulp stem cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into a variety of cell types. Several publications have stressed the importance of the expression of pluripotentiality associated markers: the transcription factors Nanog, Sox2, Oct3/4, SSEA4, CD13, Stro1 are indispensable for the stem cells to divide indefinitely without affecting their differentiation potential (self renewal capacity. Progesterone is a steroid hormone leading to menstrual cycle and gestation. There is a widespread rumor among people that pregnancy causes toothy loss. Method: So, progesterone was applied in different concentrations on human dental pulp cells in cell culture. Cell viability assay was applied 24th hour later with trypan blue. RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis and Real Time PCR analysis were applied on selected transcription factors (Nanog and Oct4 (POU5F1 genes which have role on steamness of stem cells. Gene expression analyses results were correlated with the cell viability assay results. Results: Cell viability assay results were 80% viable in control, 82% viable in 7 ml progesterone application, 81% viable in 14 ml progesterone application, 83% viable in 21 ml progesterone application. Due to our findings, progesterone in different concentrations did not chance the cell viability in dental pulpa cells. On gene expression analyses, preliminary results supported that high concentrations of progesterone enhance the gene expressions of steamness genes (Nanog, and Oct4 in dental pulp cells. Conclusions: So, progesterone did not change cell viability in high concentrations. We

  10. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M;

    1998-01-01

    apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction of...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  11. Depressed natural killer cell activity in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, K; Pedersen, B K; Theander, T G;

    1987-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity against K562 target cells was measured in patients within 24 h of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and regularly thereafter for 6 weeks. NK cell activity was suppressed on days 1, 3, and 7 (P less than 0.01), day 14 (P less than 0.05) and at 6 weeks (P = 0...

  12. Single cell multiplexed assay for proteolytic activity using droplet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-15

    Cellular enzymes interact in a post-translationally regulated fashion to govern individual cell behaviors, yet current platform technologies are limited in their ability to measure multiple enzyme activities simultaneously in single cells. Here, we developed multi-color Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based enzymatic substrates and use them in a microfluidics platform to simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities from water-in-oil droplets that contain single cells. By integrating the microfluidic platform with a computational analytical method, Proteolytic Activity Matrix Analysis (PrAMA), we are able to infer six different protease activity signals from individual cells in a high throughput manner (~100 cells/experimental run). We characterized protease activity profiles at single cell resolution for several cancer cell lines including breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, lung cancer cell line PC-9, and leukemia cell line K-562 using both live-cell and in-situ cell lysis assay formats, with special focus on metalloproteinases important in metastasis. The ability to measure multiple proteases secreted from or expressed in individual cells allows us to characterize cell heterogeneity and has potential applications including systems biology, pharmacology, cancer diagnosis and stem cell biology. PMID:26995287

  13. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    OpenAIRE

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Richard K Assoian; Rader, Daniel J; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD4...

  14. Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells Inhibit T Cell Activation by Depleting Cystine and Cysteine

    OpenAIRE

    Minu K Srivastava; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K.; Rodriguez, Paulo; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are present in most cancer patients and are potent inhibitors of T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Their inhibitory activity is attributed to production of arginase, reactive oxygen species, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and IL-10. We now report that MDSC also block T cell activation by sequestering cystine and limiting the availability of cysteine. Cysteine is an essential amino acid for T cell activation because T cells lack cystathionase, which...

  15. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  16. Interleukin 4 (B cell stimulatory factor 1) can mediate the induction of lymphokine-activated killer cell activity directed against fresh tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) expresses multiple biologic activities, including B cell, mast cell, and T cell stimulation. We showed that the incubation of resting splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice solely in purified native or recombinant mouse IL-4 results in the generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activity directed against fresh, syngeneic sarcoma cells. The precursor activated by IL-4 expresses surface asialo-GM1. In addition, IL-4 is capable of amplifying the splenic LAK activity induced b...

  17. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic 75selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by 51Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances

  18. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  19. Active unjamming of confluent cell layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. Motivated by these observations, we have studied a model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers. In this model, referred to as self-propelled Voronoi (SPV), cells are described as polygons in a Voronoi tessellation with directed noisy cell motility and interactions governed by a shape energy that incorporates the effects of cell volume incompressibility, contractility and cell-cell adhesion. Using this model, we have demonstrated a new density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell-shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. We have also used the SPV model to test a new method developed by our group to determine cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces, hence providing the spatio-temporal distribution of stresses in motile dense tissues. This work was done with Dapeng Bi, Lisa Manning and Xingbo Yang. MCM was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184 and by the Simons Foundation.

  20. Tolerogenicity of resting and activated B cells

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Antigen presentation by resting splenic B cells has been shown previously to induce T helper 1 cell (Th1) anergy. In contrast to expectations, it was found here that B cells treated with F(ab')2 goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (IgM) for 24 or 48 h also presented antigen (Ag) to Th1 cells in a manner that induced dramatic Ag-specific proliferative inactivation. The tolerogenicity of the anti-Ig-treated B cells was consistent with the observation that these B cells were only slightly more effici...

  1. Professional Employees Turn to Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamot, Dennis

    1976-01-01

    White-collar and professional employees are increasingly turning to unions to combat their loss of independence as employees of large organizations. Managers should realize that they and professional employees have different viewpoints about job situations and that the current trend toward white-collar unionism is apt to continue. (JG)

  2. The Philosophy of Turning Points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces and discusses the concept of turning points from the ontological, epistemological, and methodological perspectives, applying it to the de-internationalization phenomenon to exemplify its deployment. As a concept that adds to the variance and complexity of the international b...

  3. Turn the Resolutions into Reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Can you remember each New Year's resolutions you made at the beginning of a year? Did you make good on them or did you forget about them by June? Here are 6 tips that will help you turn those resolutions into reality.

  4. Lactobacilli Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from...... buffy coats by negative isolation using non-NK lineage specific antibodies and magnetic beads. NK cells were incubated with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated bacteria for four days. Proliferation was assessed by incorporation of radioactive thymidine into NK cell DNA and cytokine concentrations were...... determined by ELISA. Co-incubation of NK cells and a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain caused increased proliferation of the NK cells and induced IFN-gamma production. The proliferative response was further enhanced in the presence of autologous monocytes, probably because cytokines, secreted by monocytes...

  5. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states. PMID:26967308

  6. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  7. Invasive Glioblastoma Cells Acquire Stemness and Increased Akt Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Molina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most aggressive brain tumor in adults. The dismal prognosis is due to postsurgery recurrences arising from escaped invasive tumor cells. The signaling pathways activated in invasive cells are under investigation, and models are currently designed in search for therapeutic targets. We developed here an in vivo model of human invasive GBM in mouse brain from a GBM cell line with moderate tumorigenicity that allowed simultaneous primary tumor growth and dispersal of tumor cells in the brain parenchyma. This strategy allowed for the first time the isolation and characterization of matched sets of tumor mass (Core and invasive (Inv cells. Both cell populations, but more markedly Inv cells, acquired stem cell markers, neurosphere renewal ability, and resistance to rapamycin-induced apoptosis relative to parental cells. The comparative phenotypic analysis between Inv and Core cells showed significantly increased tumorigenicity in vivo and increased invasion with decreased proliferation in vitro for Inv cells. Examination of a large array of signaling pathways revealed extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk down-modulation and Akt activation in Inv cells and an opposite profile in Core cells. Akt activation correlated with the increased tumorigenicity, stemness, and invasiveness, whereas Erk activation correlated with the proliferation of the cells. These results underscore complementary roles of the Erk and Akt pathways for GBM proliferation and dispersal and raise important implications for a concurrent inhibitory therapy.

  8. IL-2 induces STAT4 activation in primary NK cells and NK cell lines, but not in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K S; Ritz, J; Frank, D A

    1999-01-01

    IL-2 exerts potent but distinct functional effects on two critical cell populations of the immune system, T cells and NK cells. Whereas IL-2 leads to proliferation in both cell types, it enhances cytotoxicity primarily in NK cells. In both T cells and NK cells, IL-2 induces the activation of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5. Given this similarity in intracellular signaling, the mechanism underlying the distinct response to IL-2 in T cells and NK cells is not clear. In this study, we show that in primary NK cells and NK cell lines, in addition to the activation of STAT1 and STAT5, IL-2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT4, a STAT previously reported to be activated only in response to IL-12 and IFN-alpha. This activation of STAT4 in response to IL-2 is not due to the autocrine production of IL-12 or IFN-alpha. STAT4 activated in response to IL-2 is able to bind to a STAT-binding DNA sequence, suggesting that in NK cells IL-2 is capable of activating target genes through phosphorylation of STAT4. IL-2 induces the activation of Jak2 uniquely in NK cells, which may underlie the ability of IL-2 to activate STAT4 only in these cells. Although the activation of STAT4 in response to IL-2 occurs in primary resting and activated NK cells, it does not occur in primary resting T cells or mitogen-activated T cells. The unique activation of the STAT4-signaling pathway in NK cells may underlie the distinct functional effect of IL-2 on this cell population. PMID:9886399

  9. Menthol increases human glioblastoma intracellular Ca2+, BK channel activity and cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartley Jeremy W

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study examined the effect of menthol, an agonist for transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8 ion channels, to increase intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, in human glioblastoma cells (DBTRG cells, which resulted in activation of the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ membrane ion channels (BK channels. Voltage ramps applied over 300 ms from -100 to 100 mV resulted in membrane currents with marked inwardly- and outwardly-rectifying components. Paxilline (2 μM abolished the outwardly-rectifying current. Outwardly-rectifying on-cell patch currents were increased markedly by menthol (100 μM added to the bath. The estimated on-cell conductance of these channels was 253 pS. Kinetic analysis showed that added menthol increased channel open probability and mean open frequency after 5 min. In a similar time course menthol increased [Ca2+]i, and this increase was abolished either by added paxilline, tetraethylammonium ion or by Ca2+-free external solution. Finally, menthol stimulated the rate of DBTRG cell migration into scratch wounds made in confluent cells, and this also was inhibited by paxilline or by tetraethylammonium ion. We conclude that menthol, a TRPM8 agonist, increases DBTRG cell [Ca2+]i that in turn activates membrane BK ion channels. Inhibition of BK channels by paxilline reverses menthol-stimulated increase of [Ca2+]i and of cell migration. Thus, BK channels function to maintain elevations in [Ca2+]i needed to sustain increases in DBTRG cell migration.

  10. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  11. Activated Notch Causes Deafness by Promoting a Supporting Cell Phenotype in Developing Auditory Hair Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Savoy-Burke; Felicia A Gilels; Wei Pan; Diana Pratt; Jianwen Que; Lin Gan; White, Patricia M.; Kiernan, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether activated Notch can promote a supporting cell fate during sensory cell differentiation in the inner ear. Methods An activated form of the Notch1 receptor (NICD) was expressed in early differentiating hair cells using a Gfi1-Cre mouse allele. To determine the effects of activated Notch on developing hair cells, Gfi1-NICD animals and their littermate controls were assessed at 5 weeks for hearing by measuring auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and distortion product...

  12. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  13. Turning points in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems

  14. Right turn on red (RTOR)

    OpenAIRE

    Vovk, Žiga

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is introducing the principle of law permitting right turn on red (in further RTOR) and seeking procedures for better level of service in traffic intersections. In the first part, the work talks about history and usage of the RTOR around the world. Afterwards it focuses on research data from and about traffic accidents, benefits and disadvantages, and dangerous situations occurred because of the RTOR. Thesis concludes with principles of RTOR adjusted for Slovenia inc...

  15. Turning points in reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems.

  16. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  17. Activation of Natural Killer cells during microbial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eHorowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are large granular lymphocytes that express a diverse array of germline encoded inhibitory and activating receptors for MHC Class I and Class I-like molecules, classical co-stimulatory ligands and cytokines. The ability of NK cells to be very rapidly activated by inflammatory cytokines, to secrete effector cytokines and to kill infected or stressed host cells, suggests that they may be among the very early responders during infection. Recent studies have also identified a small number of pathogen-derived ligands that can bind to NK cell surface receptors and directly induce their activation. Here we review recent studies that have begun to elucidate the various pathways by which viral, bacterial and parasite pathogens activate NK cells. We also consider two emerging themes of NK cell-pathogen interactions, namely their contribution to adaptive immune responses and their potential to take on regulatory and immunomodulatory functions.

  18. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  19. Microwave-induced thermogenetic activation of single cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to a microwave field is shown to enable thermogenetic activation of individual cells in a culture of cell expressing thermosensitive ion channels. Integration of a microwave transmission line with an optical fiber and a diamond quantum thermometer has been shown to allow thermogenetic single-cell activation to be combined with accurate local online temperature measurements based on an optical detection of electron spin resonance in nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond

  20. Microwave-induced thermogenetic activation of single cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, N. A. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Fedotov, I. V. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 143025 (Russian Federation); Ermakova, Yu. G.; Matlashov, M. E.; Belousov, V. V. [M.M. Shemyakin and Yu.A. Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 143025 (Russian Federation); Zheltikov, A. M. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 143025 (Russian Federation); Kurchatov Institute National Research Center, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-20

    Exposure to a microwave field is shown to enable thermogenetic activation of individual cells in a culture of cell expressing thermosensitive ion channels. Integration of a microwave transmission line with an optical fiber and a diamond quantum thermometer has been shown to allow thermogenetic single-cell activation to be combined with accurate local online temperature measurements based on an optical detection of electron spin resonance in nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond.

  1. Telomere elongation in immortal human cells without detectable telomerase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, T M; Englezou, A; J Gupta; Bacchetti, S; Reddel, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    Immortalization of human cells is often associated with reactivation of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds TTAGGG repeats onto telomeres and compensates for their shortening. We examined whether telomerase activation is necessary for immortalization. All normal human fibroblasts tested were negative for telomerase activity. Thirteen out of 13 DNA tumor virus-transformed cell cultures were also negative in the pre-crisis (i.e. non-immortalized) stage. Of 35 immortalized cell line...

  2. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  3. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  4. Origin of correlated activity between parasol retinal ganglion cells

    OpenAIRE

    Khuc-Trong, Philipp; Rieke, Fred

    2008-01-01

    Cells throughout the central nervous system exhibit synchronous activity patterns - i.e. a cell’s probability of generating an action potential depends both on its firing rate and on the occurrence of action potentials in surrounding cells. The mechanisms producing synchronous or correlated activity are poorly understood despite its prevalence and potential impact on neural coding. We find that neighboring parasol retinal ganglion cells receive strongly correlated synaptic input in the absenc...

  5. Autobiographical turning points: Remembering and forgetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sheringham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The autobiographical process involves not just reporting on past events, reconstructing one’s life history, but replaying events in different voices and modes. It may be that the autobiographer is motivated by the desire to impose one version of her or his life and to scotch the others. Even then, however, other versions, the ones under erasure, often show through the fabric – the fabrication – and we detect their traces in the turns of the rhetoric. Thus, in autobiography, the real agenda is often underneath, either because a less official motive lurks behind the manifest ones or because what really drives the project of selfscrutiny is something only progressively revealed in the process of writing. This issue takes into consideration the structuring implications of turning points in the account of a life and the roles of the converse forces of forgetting and subjective destabilisation. There are two ways of looking at turning points: either as causative agents of order and coherence or as metaphors – as provisional, semi-fictional, forensic, cognitive instruments. In the latter case, they belong to an active, performative, conjectural, self-revising process, and they complement a version of autobiographical memory that involves a constant interplay of remembering and forgetting.

  6. Phorbol ester and vasopressin activate phospholipase D in Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study evidence is provided for the existence of phospholipase D (PLD) activity in rat Leydig cells. Leydig cells were cultured and labelled with [H]myristic acid. In the presence of ethanol, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated the formation of [H]phosphatidylethanol ([...... support the notion that activation of PLD by PMA is dependent on PKC. Arginine vasopressin (AVP) caused a rapid stimulation of PLD activity in the cells. This activation was inhibited after downregulation of PKC, indicating that the agonist acts by a mechanism similar to that of PMA....

  7. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity

  8. Mitogen-activated Tasmanian devil blood mononuclear cells kill devil facial tumour disease cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gabriella K; Tovar, Cesar; Cooray, Anne A; Kreiss, Alexandre; Darby, Jocelyn; Murphy, James M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Bettiol, Silvana S; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer that has brought the host species, the Tasmanian devil, to the brink of extinction. The cancer cells avoid allogeneic immune recognition by downregulating cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I expression. This should prevent CD8(+) T cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxicity. The reason why NK cells, normally reactive to MHC-negative cells, are not activated to kill DFTD cells has not been determined. The immune response of wild devils to DFTD, if it occurs, is uncharacterised. To investigate this, we tested 12 wild devils with DFTD, and found suggestive evidence of low levels of antibodies against DFTD cells in one devil. Eight of these devils were also analysed for cytotoxicity, however, none showed evidence for cytotoxicity against cultured DFTD cells. To establish whether mimicking activation of antitumour responses could induce cytotoxic activity against DFTD, Tasmanian devil peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with either the mitogen Concanavalin A, the Toll-like receptor agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or recombinant Tasmanian devil IL-2. All induced the PBMC cells to kill cultured DFTD cells, suggesting that activation does not occur after encounter with DFTD cells in vivo, but can be induced. The identification of agents that activate cytotoxicity against DFTD target cells is critical for developing strategies to protect against DFTD. Such agents could function as adjuvants to induce functional immune responses capable of targeting DFTD cells and tumours in vivo. PMID:27089941

  9. BMP2 Transfer to Neighboring Cells and Activation of Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborzinia, Hamed; Shaikhkarami, Marjan; Hortschansky, Peter; Wölfl, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Morphogen gradients and concentration are critical features during early embryonic development and cellular differentiation. Previously we reported the preparation of biologically active, fluorescently labeled BMP2 and quantitatively analyzed their binding to the cell surface and followed BMP2 endocytosis over time on the level of single endosomes. Here we show that this internalized BMP2 can be transferred to neighboring cells and, moreover, also activates downstream BMP signaling in adjacent cells, indicated by Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and activation of the downstream target gene id1. Using a 3D matrix to modulate cell-cell contacts in culture we could show that direct cell-cell contact significantly increased BMP2 transfer. Using inhibitors of vesicular transport, transfer was strongly inhibited. Interestingly, cotreatment with the physiological BMP inhibitor Noggin increased BMP2 uptake and transfer, albeit activation of Smad signaling in neighboring cells was completely suppressed. Our findings present a novel and interesting mechanism by which morphogens such as BMP2 can be transferred between cells and how this is modulated by BMP antagonists such as Noggin, and how this influences activation of Smad signaling by BMP2 in neighboring cells. PMID:27306974

  10. KLF2--a negative regulator of pre-B cell clonal expansion and B cell activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Winkelmann

    Full Text Available Maturation as well as antigen-dependent activation of B cells is accompanied by alternating phases of proliferation and quiescence. We and others have previously shown that Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2, a regulator of T cell quiescence and migration, is upregulated in small resting precursor (pre-B cells after assembly of the immature pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR and is downregulated upon antigen-induced proliferation of mature B cells. These findings suggest that KLF2, besides its function in maintaining follicular B cell identity, peripheral B cell homeostasis and homing of antigen-specific plasma cells to the bone marrow, also controls clonal expansion phases in the B cell lineage. Here, we demonstrate that enforced expression of KLF2 in primary pre-B cells results in a severe block of pre-BCR-induced proliferation, upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27 and downregulation of c-myc. Furthermore, retroviral KLF2 transduction of primary B cells impairs LPS-induced activation, favors apoptosis and results in reduced abundance of factors, such as AID, IRF4 and BLIMP1, that control the antigen-dependent phase of B cell activation and plasma cell differentiation. Hence, we conclude that KLF2 is not only a key player in terminating pre-B cell clonal expansion but also a potent suppressor of B cell activation.

  11. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Yueh Ho Chiu; Hungwen Chen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular ...

  12. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell demonstration activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veyo, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    The development of a viable fuel cell driven electrical power generation system involves not only the development of cell and stack technology, but also the development of the overall system concept, the strategy for control, and the ancillary subsystems. The design requirements used to guide system development must reflect a customer focus in order to evolve a commercial product. In order to obtain useful customer feedback, Westinghouse has practiced the deployment with customers of fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. These field units have served to demonstrate to customers first hand the beneficial attributes of the SOFC, to expose deficiencies through experience in order to guide continued development, and to garner real world feedback and data concerning not only cell and stack parameters, but also transportation, installation, permitting and licensing, start-up and shutdown, system alarming, fault detection, fault response, and operator interaction.

  13. The affective turn in ethnomusicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofman Ana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The affective turn, which has already questioned dominant paradigms in many disciplinary fields including cultural studies, philosophy, political theory, anthropology, psychology and neuroscience, has started to attract more attention in the field of ethnomusicology, becoming a particularly vibrant stream of thought. Drawing on the voices that call for the historicisation of and critical deliberation on the field of affect studies, the article strives to show how theories of affect might expand dominant paradigms in ethnomusicology and also points to their limitations.

  14. SKIN DENDRITIC CELLS: ACTIVATION, MATURATION AND MIGRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans’ cells (LC) are the dendritic cells (DC) of the epidermis and, as sentinels of the immune system, act as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune responses. When LC, and other DC, recognise an antigen or pathogen they mature and are stimulated to migrate to the lymph nodes, where they orchestrate immune responses. Pathogen derived toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, and chemical allergens, are recognised as being potentially harmful and stimulate LC to mobilise and mature. Cyt...

  15. Telomerase activity in germline and embryonic cells of Xenopus.

    OpenAIRE

    Mantell, L L; Greider, C W

    1994-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein which synthesizes telomere repeats onto chromosome ends. Telomerase activity is involved in telomere length maintenance. We used Xenopus laevis as a model system to study the expression of telomerase activity in germline cells and during early development. We identified a non-processive telomerase activity in manually dissected nuclei of Xenopus stage VI oocytes. Telomerase activity was detected throughout oogenesis and embryogenesis. Telomerase was active in...

  16. Activation of Transmembrane Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 Modulates Pancreatic Islet α Cells to Promote Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Divya P; Asgharpour, Amon; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Park, So Hyun; Liu, Sichen; Imai, Yumi; Nadler, Jerry L; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S; Sanyal, Arun J

    2016-03-25

    The physiological role of the TGR5 receptor in the pancreas is not fully understood. We previously showed that activation of TGR5 in pancreatic β cells by bile acids induces insulin secretion. Glucagon released from pancreatic α cells and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) released from intestinal L cells regulate insulin secretion. Both glucagon and GLP-1 are derived from alternate splicing of a common precursor, proglucagon by PC2 and PC1, respectively. We investigated whether TGR5 activation in pancreatic α cells enhances hyperglycemia-induced PC1 expression thereby releasing GLP-1, which in turn increases β cell mass and function in a paracrine manner. TGR5 activation augmented a hyperglycemia-induced switch from glucagon to GLP-1 synthesis in human and mouse islet α cells by GS/cAMP/PKA/cAMP-response element-binding protein-dependent activation of PC1. Furthermore, TGR5-induced GLP-1 release from α cells was via an Epac-mediated PKA-independent mechanism. Administration of the TGR5 agonist, INT-777, to db/db mice attenuated the increase in body weight and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. INT-777 augmented PC1 expression in α cells and stimulated GLP-1 release from islets of db/db mice compared with control. INT-777 also increased pancreatic β cell proliferation and insulin synthesis. The effect of TGR5-mediated GLP-1 from α cells on insulin release from islets could be blocked by GLP-1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that TGR5 activation mediates cross-talk between α and β cells by switching from glucagon to GLP-1 to restore β cell mass and function under hyperglycemic conditions. Thus, INT-777-mediated TGR5 activation could be leveraged as a novel way to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26757816

  17. Origin of correlated activity between parasol retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trong, Philipp Khuc; Rieke, Fred

    2008-11-01

    Cells throughout the CNS have synchronous activity patterns; that is, a cell's probability of generating an action potential depends both on its firing rate and on the occurrence of action potentials in surrounding cells. The mechanisms producing synchronous or correlated activity are poorly understood despite its prevalence and potential effect on neural coding. We found that neighboring parasol ganglion cells in primate retina received strongly correlated synaptic input in the absence of modulated light stimuli. This correlated variability appeared to arise through the same circuits that provide uncorrelated synaptic input. In addition, ON, but not OFF, parasol cells were coupled electrically. Correlated variability in synaptic input, however, dominated correlations in the parasol spike outputs and shared variability in the timing of action potentials generated by neighboring cells. These results provide a mechanistic picture of how correlated activity is produced in a population of neurons that are critical for visual perception. PMID:18820692

  18. MMP-9、CD44、TGF-β1在脑星形细胞瘤中应用研究%The Brain Star Polygon Cell Lump Immunity Set Turns a Clinical Application Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王连军; 汪刚; 张发顺; 王丽华; 刘燕伟; 梁辉; 李惠翔

    2009-01-01

    Objective MMP-9 and CD44 together position in the cell surface,and this kind of together positions to help the CD44 vto settle anchor roans MMP-9s to also decline a solution to the gum original IV at the cell surface and promote tumor cell gradually. Stopping the empress of the function of CD44 with the dissolubility CD44 can immediately make it lose the function that the anchor man series MMP-9. But is settle by the CD44 anchor manses superficial at the cell of the MMP-9 can also make TGF-β1 of have no activity-TGF-β1 ex- bodies activate and activate of TGF-β1 new-born blood vessel growth is the essential growth factor. This text passes the MMP-9 and TGF-β1 which settles to the CD44 anchor manses-TGF-β1 the expression circumstance carries on analysis in the brain star polygon ceil lump,as to it's express meaning to carry on a research,to the CD44,MMP-9,TGF-β1 gradually transfer amedium function to carry on a first step study in the brain star polygon cell lump,in the meantime to the CD44,MMP-9,TGF-β1 relativities carry on an analytical research. Methods Totally collect 2006 subsidiary hospital of Zheng4 Zhou's university first and Xu3 Chang hospital surgical operation in the city center excision of the brain star polygon coil lump the specimen be 98 and apply an immunity set to turn the SP method examination tumor the CD44,MMP-9,TGF-β1 in the organization-TGF-β1 expression,analytical CD44, MMP-9,TGF-β1 with and CD44, MMP-9,TGF-β1 of the brain star polygon cell lump ratings-TGF- 131. The relation of one its. Results (1)CD44 the expression rote is 77.55%(76/98) in the star polygon cell lump organization and show Zhao Gao to organize 0 at the normal brain (P<0.05). Pass the related examination of the Spearman grade,different Class CD44 expression r=0.95,P=0.046, have covariance to learn meaning,the of the star polygon ceil lump Class and the CD44 male degree-present just related. Use the Fishers precision examination method to carry on an examination to

  19. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims at...... describing strain-dependent effects of lactic acid bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactic acid bacteria affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon...... bacterial stimulation. Methods: CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from buffy coats by negative isolation using a lineage specific antibody cocktail and magnetic beads binding the labelling antibodies on non-NK cells. NK cells were incubated either with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated lactic acid bacteria or 10...

  20. Turning skin into dopamine neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malin Parmar; Johan Jakobsson

    2011-01-01

    The possibility to generate neurons from fibroblasts became a reality with the development of iPS technology a few years ago.By reprogramming somatic cells using transcription factor (TF) overexpression,it is possible to generate pluripotent stem cells that then can be differentiated into any somatic cell type including various subtypes of neurons.This raises the possibility of using donor-matched or even patientspecific cells for cell therapy of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD),Huntington's disease and stroke.Supporting this idea,dopamine neurons,which are the cells dying in PD,derived from human iPS cells have been demonstrated to survive transplantation and reverse motor symptoms in animal models of PD [1].

  1. Activation of ion transport systems during cell volume regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review discusses the activation of transport pathways during volume regulation, including their characteristics, the possible biochemical pathways that may mediate the activation of transport pathways, and the relations between volume regulation and transepithelial transport in renal cells. Many cells regulate their volume when exposed to an anisotonic medium. The changes in cell volume are caused by activation of ion transport pathways, plus the accompanying osmotically driven water movement such that cell volume returns toward normal levels. The swelling of hypertonically shrunken cells is termed regulatory volume increase (RVI) and involves an influx of NaCl into the cell via either activation of Na-Cl, Na-K-2Cl cotransport systems, or Na+-H+ and Cl--HCO3- exchangers. The reshrinking of hypotonically swollen cells is termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and involves an efflux of KCl and water from the cell by activation of either separate K+ and Cl- conductances, a K-Cl cotransport system, or parallel K+-H+ and Cl--HCO3- exchangers. The biochemical mechanisms involved in the activation of transport systems are largely unknown, however, the phosphoinositide pathway may be implicated in RVI; phorbol esters, cGMP, and Ca2+ affect the process of volume regulation. Renal tubular cells, as well as the blood cells that transverse the medulla, are subjected to increasing osmotic gradients from the corticomedullary junction to the papillary tip, as well as changing interstitial and tubule fluid osmolarity, depending on the diuretic state of the animal. Medullary cells from the loop of Henle and the papilla can volume regulate by activating Na-K-2Cl cotransport or Na+-H+ and Cl--HCO3- exchange systems

  2. EFFECT OF NICKEL AND MANGANESE ON NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A single intramuscular injection of NiCl2 causes a suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity, while a single injection of MnCl2 enhances NK activity. When injected together Mn preempts the suppressive effect of Ni on NK activity.

  3. NMDA modulates oligodendrocyte differentiation of subventricular zone cells through PKC activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eCavaliere

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent cells from the juvenile subventricular zone (SVZ possess the ability to differentiate into new neural cells. Depending on local signals, SVZ can generate new neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. We previously demonstrated that activation of NMDA receptors in SVZ progenitors increases the rate of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Here we investigated the mechanisms involved in NMDA receptor-dependent differentiation. Using functional studies performed with the reporter gene luciferase we found that activation of NMDA receptor stimulates PKC. In turn, stimulation of PKC precedes the activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX as demonstrated by translocation of the p67phox subunit to the cellular membrane. We propose that NOX2 is involved in the transduction of the signal from NMDA receptors through PKC activation as the inhibitor gp91 reduced their pro-differentiation effect. In addition, our data and that from other groups suggest that signaling through the NMDA receptor/PKC/NOX2 cascade generates ROS that activate the PI3/mTOR pathway and finally leads to the generation of new oligodendrocytes.

  4. Determination of telomerase activity in stem cells and non-stem cells of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi; HE Yanli; ZHANG Jiahua; ZHANG Jinghui; HUANG Tao

    2007-01-01

    Although all normal tissue cells,including stem cells,are genetically homologous,variation in gene expression patterns has already determined the distinct roles for individual cells in the physiological process due to the occurrence of epigenetic modification.This is of special importance for the existenee of tissue stem cells because they are exclusively immortal within the body,capable of selfreplicating and differentiating by which tissues renew and repair itself and the total tissue cell population maintains a steady-state.Impairment of tissue stem cells is usually accompanied by a reduction in cell number,slows down the repair process and causes hypofunction.For instance,chemotherapy usually leads to depression of bone marrow and hair loss.Cellular aging is closely associated with the continuous erosion of the telomere while activation of telomerase repairs and maintains telomeres,thus slowing the aging process and prolonging cell life.In normal adults,telomerase activation mainly presents in tissue stem cells and progenitor cells giving them unlimited growth potential.Despite the extensive demonstration of telomerase activation in malignancy(>80%),scientists found that heterogeneity also exists among the tumor cells and only minorities of cells,designated as cancer stem cells,andergo processes analogous to the self-renewal and differentiation of normal stem ceils while the rest have limited lifespans.In this study,telomerase activity was measured and compared in breast cancer stem cells and non-stem cells that were phenotypically sorted by examining surface marker expression.The results indicated that cancer stem cells show a higher level of enzyme activity than non-stem cells.In addition,associated with the repair of cancer tissue(or relapse)after chemotherapy,telomerase activity in stem cells was markedly increased.

  5. Innate response activator B cells: origins and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chousterman, Benjamin G; Swirski, Filip K

    2015-10-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells are a subset of B-1a derived B cells that produce the growth factors granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor and IL-3. In mouse models of sepsis and pneumonia, B-1a B cells residing in serosal sites recognize bacteria, migrate to the spleen or lung, and differentiate to IRA B cells that then contribute to the host response by amplifying inflammation and producing polyreactive IgM. In atherosclerosis, IRA B cells accumulate in the spleen, where they promote extramedullary hematopoiesis and activate classical dendritic cells. In this review, we focus on the ontogeny and function of IRA B cells in acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:25957266

  6. Inhibition of Leukemic Cell Telomerase Activity by Antisense Phosphorothioate Oligodeoxynucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEDongmei; ZHANGYuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT) gene antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASON) on telomerase activity in K562 cells.Methods Telomerase activity was detemined by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunoassay (PCR-ELISA) in K562 cells treated with ASODN and hTERTmRNA expression was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The hTERTmRNA level was decreased,and telomerase activity was significantly inhibited when the K562 cells were treated with ASODN for 48 h. Conclusion It is suggested that hTETR ASODN might specifically inhibit telomrase activity of K562 cells at translation level,and it is further proved that hTERT gene has significant correlation with telopmerase activity.

  7. Cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer cells on U251 glioma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meng; Wu, Tingting; Wan, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to observe the cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells on U251 glioma cells and to investigate their mechanism of action to establish an effective treatment strategy for neuroglioma. Cell survival curves, colony formation assays and karyotype analysis were performed to investigate the characteristics of U251 glioma cells. The present study demonstrated that natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D)‑major histocompatibility complex class I‑related chain A/B (MICA/B) interactions contributed to the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on K562 and U251 cells. In antibody‑blocking assays to inhibit NKG2D ligands, the cytotoxic activity was not completely attenuated, which suggested that other signaling pathways contribute to the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on tumor cells in addition to the NKG2D‑mediated activity. The present study identified that the expression levels of NKG2D ligands on the surface of target cells influenced the strength of the NK cell immune response. Furthermore, allogeneic NK cells were observed to kill glioma cells in vitro, and this anticancer activity is associated with the rate of NKG2D expression on the surface of glioma cells. PMID:27175912

  8. p53 regulation and activity in mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Solozobova, Valeriya

    2010-01-01

    P53 is a tumour development p53. The aim of this work was to study the regulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells and its activation in response to DNA damage. p53 was found that p53 becomes transcriptionally active in ES cells after DNA damage. Embryonic stem cells contain a relatively high amount of p53 protein and p53 RNA. After differentiation p53 level is rapidly downregulated. The high abundance of p53 in undifferentiated ES cells is a result of enhanced translation.

  9. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  10. Anticancer Activities of Trichostatin A on Maligant Lymphoid Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Chunyan; LIU Xinyue; CHEN Yan; LIU Fang

    2006-01-01

    The anticancer activity of trichostain A (TSA) on human B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and its mechanism were explored. The effect of TSA on the growth of Raji cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (NPBMNC) was studied by MTT assay. The effect of TSA on the apoptosis of Raji cells and NPBMNC was studied by flow cytometry and TDT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). The effect of TSA on the cell cycle of Raji cells was studied by propidium iodide method. The results showed that TSA potently inhibited proliferation of Raji cells at microgram concentrations and induced apoptosis of Raji cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner.Treatment with TSA induced accumulation of cells in G0/G1 or G2/M and a concomitant decrease of cell population in S phase. However, NPBMNC was less sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of TSA than Raji cells. It was concluded that TSA may inhibit the proliferation of Raji cells by regulating the cell cycle and inducing the cell apoptosis. Moreover, TSA demonstrates low toxicity in NPBMNC but selectively induces apoptosis of Raji cells.

  11. Natural Killer Cells Are Activated by Lactic Acid Bacteria-Matured Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. Human peripheral blood NK...... encounter of NK cells with lactic acid bacteria will affect NK cell activation. Such activation of NK cells may potentially skew an on-going or subsequent immune response towards a Th1 response.......Natural killer (NK) cells are cells of the non-specific immune system lysing altered self-cells. A non-cytolytic subset of NK cells may serve a regulatory role by secreting cytokines. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cells, as consumption...

  12. Tim-3: An activation marker and activation limiter of innate immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gencheng eHan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tim-3 was initially identified on activated Th1, Th17, and Tc1 cells and induces T cell death or exhaustion after binding to its ligand, Gal-9. The observed relationship between dysregulated Tim-3 expression on T cells and the progression of many clinical diseases has identified this molecule as an important target for intervention in adaptive immunity. Recent data have shown that it also plays critical roles in regulating the activities of macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, mast cells, natural killer cells, and endothelial cells. Although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, dysregulation of Tim-3 expression on these innate immune cells leads to an excessive or inhibited inflammatory response and subsequent autoimmune damage or viral or tumor evasion. In this review, we focus on the expression and function of Tim-3 on innate immune cells and discuss 1 how Tim-3 is expressed and regulated on different innate immune cells; 2 how it affects the activity of different innate immune cells; and 3 how dysregulated Tim-3 expression on innate immune cells affects adaptive immunity and disease progression. Tim-3 is involved in the optimal activation of innate immune cells through its varied expression. A better understanding of the physiopathological role of the Tim-3 pathway in innate immunity will shed new light on the pathogenesis of clinical diseases, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic viral infections, and cancer, and suggest new approaches to intervention.

  13. Hsp60 is actively secreted by human tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Merendino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hsp60, a Group I mitochondrial chaperonin, is classically considered an intracellular chaperone with residence in the mitochondria; nonetheless, in the last few years it has been found extracellularly as well as in the cell membrane. Important questions remain pertaining to extracellular Hsp60 such as how generalized is its occurrence outside cells, what are its extracellular functions and the translocation mechanisms that transport the chaperone outside of the cell. These questions are particularly relevant for cancer biology since it is believed that extracellular chaperones, like Hsp70, may play an active role in tumor growth and dissemination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Since cancer cells may undergo necrosis and apoptosis, it could be possible that extracellular Hsps are chiefly the result of cell destruction but not the product of an active, physiological process. In this work, we studied three tumor cells lines and found that they all release Hsp60 into the culture media by an active mechanism independently of cell death. Biochemical analyses of one of the cell lines revealed that Hsp60 secretion was significantly reduced, by inhibitors of exosomes and lipid rafts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that Hsp60 release is the result of an active secretion mechanism and, since extracellular release of the chaperone was demonstrated in all tumor cell lines investigated, our observations most likely reflect a general physiological phenomenon, occurring in many tumors.

  14. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Neil H; Lee, Gloria; Sherer, Nicholas A; Martini, K Michael; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Kuhlman, Thomas E

    2016-06-28

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE's orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  15. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gloria; Martini, K. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE’s orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  16. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen; Zuhayra, Maaz; Schütze, Stefan; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha; Recarti, Chiara; Namsolleck, Pawel; Unger, Thomas; Culman, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    -peptide AT2 receptor agonist, Compound 21 (C21) penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT2 receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped from the cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial...... apoptotic pathway, i. e. down-regulation of the Bcl-2 protein, induction of the Bax protein and activation of caspase-3. All quiescent SK-UT-1 cells died within 5 days after treatment with a single dose of C21. C21 was devoid of cytotoxic effects in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells and in quiescent HutSMC. Our...

  17. Store-Operated Ca2+ Release-Activated Ca2+ Channels Regulate PAR2-Activated Ca2+ Signaling and Cytokine Production in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairaman, Amit; Yamashita, Megumi; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2015-09-01

    The G-protein-coupled protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and auto-immune disorders. In airway epithelial cells (AECs), stimulation of PAR2 by allergens and proteases triggers the release of a host of inflammatory mediators to regulate bronchomotor tone and immune cell recruitment. Activation of PAR2 turns on several cell signaling pathways of which the mobilization of cytosolic Ca(2+) is likely a critical but poorly understood event. In this study, we show that Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by stromal interaction molecule 1 and Orai1 are a major route of Ca(2+) entry in primary human AECs and drive the Ca(2+) elevations seen in response to PAR2 activation. Activation of CRAC channels induces the production of several key inflammatory mediators from AECs including thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-6, and PGE2, in part through stimulation of gene expression via nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Furthermore, PAR2 stimulation induces the production of many key inflammatory mediators including PGE2, IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF in a CRAC channel-dependent manner. These findings indicate that CRAC channels are the primary mechanism for Ca(2+) influx in AECs and a vital checkpoint for the induction of PAR2-induced proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26238490

  18. Activation of cell divisions in legume nodulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadzieja, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    organogenesis. Coordination of these two interdependent processes results in formation of nodules - bacterial accommodating structures where fixation of atmospheric nitrogen takes place. Plant hormones such as auxin and cytokinin play important roles in nodulation. In some legumes the infection process...... was shown to require auxin signalling. Cytokinin, in contrast, exert a negative regulation of bacterial entry into the root. During organogenesis, auxin and cytokinin maxima are known to accompany nodule primordia development and together regulate progression through the cell cycle. Moreover, application...... of auxin transport inhibitors or cytokinin alone was shown to induce cortical cell divisions in the absence of rhizobia in certain legume species. While the roles of auxin and cytokinin in nodulation have been studied extensively, the precise timing, location and means of molecular crosstalk between...

  19. CD4 T cell activation and disease activity at onset of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J; Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Fenst, C; Nicolaisen, M. S.; Roed, H. G.; Christensen, M; Sellebjerg, F

    We studied CD4 T cell activation in patients with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) suggesting an initial attack of multiple sclerosis. The percentage of blood CD26+ CD4 T cells was increased in these patients, and correlated with magnetic resonance imaging disease activity and clinical disease...

  20. Why Does Hair Turn Gray?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sun . The dark or light color of someone's hair depends on how much melanin each hair contains. As we get older, the pigment cells ... cells in a hair follicle, that strand of hair will no longer contain as much melanin and will become a more transparent color — like ...

  1. Video Surveillance: Activities in a Cell Area

    OpenAIRE

    Thummanapalli, Shashidhar Rao; Kotla, Savarkar

    2015-01-01

    Considering todays growing society and developing technologies which are co-influential between each other, there is a larger scope of security concerns, traffic congestion due to improper planning and hence a greater need of more intelligent video surveillance. In this thesis, we have worked on developing such intelligent video surveillance system which mainly focusses on cell area such as parking spaces. The system operates on outdoor environment with a stationary camera; the main objective...

  2. Inhibition of Cell Growth and Telomerase Activity in Osteosarcoma Cells by DN-hTERT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tao; RAO Yaojian; ZHU Wentao; GUO Fengjin

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the effects of dominant negative human telomerase reverse transcriptase (DN-hTERT) on cell growth and telomerase activity in osteosarcoma cell line MG63, MG63 cells were transfected with DN-hTERT-IRES2-EGFP9 (DN) or IRES2-EGF (I, blank vector) with lipofectamine 2000. The stably transfected cells were selected with G-418. Cell growth properties were examined under a fluorescence microscope. The hTERT mRNA expression was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Telomerase activities were measured by TRAP-ELISE. The tumorigenicity was studied with tumor xenografts by subcutaneous injection of cancer cells into nude mice. The results showed that cell growth was suppressed in MG63 cells transfected with DN-hTERT. The hTERT mRNA was increased in N-hTERT transfected-MG63 cells (MG63/DN). The telomerase activity was 2.45±0.11 in MG63/DN cells, while 3.40±0.12 in the cells transfected with blank vector (MG63/I), (P<0.05); DN-hTERT-expressing clones did not form tumors in 2 weeks, but the ratio of tumorigenesis was 30 % in nude mice bearing MG63/I (P<0.01). It was concluded that DN-hTERT could specifically inhibit the cell growth and telomerase activity in MG63 cells.

  3. Microbial solar cells: applying photosynthetic and electrochemically active organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Timmers, R.A.; Helder, M.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial solar cells (MSCs) are recently developed technologies that utilize solar energy to produce electricity or chemicals. MSCs use photoautotrophic microorganisms or higher plants to harvest solar energy, and use electrochemically active microorganisms in the bioelectrochemical system to gener

  4. Activation of human tonsil and skin mast cells by agonists of proteinase activated receptor-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-heng HE; Hua XIE; Yi-ling FU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of the agonists of proteinase activated receptor (PAR)-2,and histamine on degranulation of human mast cells. Methods: Human mast cells were enzymatically dispersed from tonsil and skin tissues. The dis persed cells were then cultured with various stimuli, and tryptase and histamine levels in cell supernatants collected from challenge tubes were measured. Results:PAR-2 agonist peptide SLIGKV provoked a dose-dependent release of histamine from skin mast cells. It also induced tryptase release from tonsil mast cells, tcLIGRLO appeared less potent than SLIGKV in induction of release of histamine and tryptase. Trypsin was able to induce a "bell" shape increase in tryptase release from tonsil mast cells. It was also able to induce a dose-dependent release of histamine from both tonsil and skin mast cells. The actions of trypsin on mast cells were inhibited by soy bean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) or α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT).Time course study revealed that both stimulated tryptase or histamine release initiated within 10 s and reached their peak release between 4 and 6 min. Pretreatment of cells with metabolic inhibitors or pertussis toxin reduced the ability of mast cells to release tryptase or histamine. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that the in vitro tryptase release properties of human tonsil and skin mast cells suggested a novel type of mast cell heterogeneity. The activation of mast cells by PAR-2 agonists indicated a self-amplification mechanism of mast cell degranulation.

  5. Echovirus 30 induced neuronal cell death through TRIO-RhoA signaling activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June-Woo Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Echovirus 30 (Echo30 is one of the most frequently identified human enteroviruses (EVs causing aseptic meningitis and encephalitis. However the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of Echo30 infection with significant clinical outcomes is not completely understood. The aim of this investigation is to illustrate molecular pathologic alteration in neuronal cells induced by Echo30 infection using clinical isolate from young patient with neurologic involvement. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To characterize the neuronal cellular response to Echo30 infection, we performed a proteomic analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass Spectrophotometric (MS analysis. We identified significant alteration of several protein expression levels in Echo30-infected SK-N-SH cells. Among these proteins, we focused on an outstanding up-regulation of Triple functional domain (TRIO in Echo30-infected SK-N-SH cells. Generally, TRIO acts as a key component in the regulation of axon guidance and cell migration. In this study, we determined that TRIO plays a role in the novel pathways in Echo30 induced neuronal cell death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our finding shows that TRIO plays a critical role in neuronal cell death by Echo30 infection. Echo30 infection activates TRIO-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF domains (GEFD2 and RhoA signaling in turn. These results suggest that Echo30 infection induced neuronal cell death by activation of the TRIO-RhoA signaling. We expect the regulation of TRIO-RhoA signaling may represent a new therapeutic approach in treating aseptic meningitis and encephalitis induced by Echo30.

  6. Functional Implications of Plasma Membrane Condensation for T Cell Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Rentero, Carles; Zech, Tobias; Quinn, Carmel M.; Engelhardt, Karin; Williamson, David; Grewal, Thomas; Jessup, Wendy; Harder, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The T lymphocyte plasma membrane condenses at the site of activation but the functional significance of this receptor-mediated membrane reorganization is not yet known. Here we demonstrate that membrane condensation at the T cell activation sites can be inhibited by incorporation of the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC), which is known to prevent the formation of raft-like liquid-ordered domains in model membranes. We enriched T cells with 7KC, or cholesterol as control, to assess the importa...

  7. Resident macrophages influence stem cell activity in the mammary gland

    OpenAIRE

    Gyorki, D.E.; Asselin-Labat, M.L.; Rooijen, van, J.; Lindeman, G J; Visvader, J E

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages in the mammary gland are essential for morphogenesis of the ductal epithelial tree and have been implicated in promoting breast tumor metastasis. Although it is well established that macrophages influence normal mammopoiesis, the mammary cell types that these accessory cells influence have not been determined. Here we have explored a role for macrophages in regulating mammary stem cell (MaSC) activity, by assessing the ability of MaSCs to reconstitute a mammary gland ...

  8. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  9. Epigenetic regulation of satellite cell activation during muscle regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Blais, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Satellite cells are a population of adult muscle stem cells that play a key role in mediating muscle regeneration. Activation of these quiescent stem cells in response to muscle injury involves modulating expression of multiple developmentally regulated genes, including mediators of the muscle-specific transcription program: Pax7, Myf5, MyoD and myogenin. Here we present evidence suggesting an essential role for the antagonistic Polycomb group and Trithorax group proteins in the epigenetic ma...

  10. Process cells dismantling of EUREX pant: previous activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the '98-'99 period some process cells of the EUREX pant will be dismantled, in order to place there the liquid wastes conditioning plant 'CORA'. This report resumes the previous activities (plant rinsing campaigns and inactive Cell 014 dismantling), run in the past three years and the drawn experience

  11. DMPD: Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1492121 Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting DNA elements ...html) (.csml) Show Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting ...DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. PubmedID 1492121 Title Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role

  12. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs. Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs, which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+ and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-, which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+ is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell

  13. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+)) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+) is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our

  14. Cellular localization of BARF1 oncoprotein and its cell stimulating activity in human epithelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Emna; Zur Hausen, Axel; Houali, Karim; Liu, Haying; Fiorini, Sylvie; Ooka, Tadamasa

    2013-06-01

    BARF1 gene encoded by Epstein-Barr virus is capable of immortalizing the primary monkey epithelial cells and of inducing malignant transformation in human EBV-negative B cell lines as well as rodent fibroblast. This oncoprotein is a secreted protein capable of acting as a powerful mitogen. We have studied the effect of BARF1 protein in transfected or BARF1 protein treated human HaCaT epithelial cells. In BARF1-transfected cells, cell growth was activated and its protein was found both in culture medium and cellular compartment (membrane, cytoplasm and nuclei). When purified BARF1 protein was exogenously added in the cell culture medium of HaCaT cells in absence of fetal calf serum led to its entrance into cells and its intracellular localization in cytoplasm, nuclear periphery and nuclei at 14h treatment, determined by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy. Cell fractionation confirmed its nuclear localization. Nuclear localization was observed in both systems. More interestingly, purified BARF1 protein p29 exogenously added in the cell culture medium activated cell passage of G1 to S phase. S phase activation by its autocrine activity and its tumorigenic activity would be associated with the development of EBV-associated carcinomas. PMID:23458996

  15. Cellular, Molecular Consequences of Peroxisome Proliferator- Activated Receptor-δ Activation in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Vignati

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPAR-δ is a ligand-activated transcription factor. In addition to its canonical role in lipid, glucose metabolism, PPAR-δ controls cell proliferation, death, differentiation in several tissues. Here we have examined the expression of PPAR-δ in ovarian tumors, the cellular, molecular consequences of its activation in ovarian cancer cells. PPAR-δ was expressed in a large number of epithelial ovarian tumors, cell lines. The PPAR-δ lig, ciglitazone inhibited the growth, clonogenic survival of ovarian cancer cells, inducing cell cycle arrest, cell death. Growth inhibition by ciglitazone was reversed by the PPAR-δ antagonist GW9662, indicating the involvement of PPAR-δ- dependent mechanisms. Microarray-based gene profiling revealed complex changes in the transcriptional program of ovarian cancer cells on treatment with ciglitazone, identified multiple pathways that may contribute to PPAR-δ ligands' antitumor activity. Genes upregulated by ciglitazone were predominantly associated with metabolic, differentiation, tumorsuppressor pathways, whereas downregulated genes were involved in cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell organization, steroid biosynthesis. Collectively, our data indicate that PPAR-δ activation by selective agonists is a valid strategy for ovarian cancer therapy, prevention, should be tested alone, in combination with other anticancer drugs.

  16. The intersection of cell death and inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vince, James E; Silke, John

    2016-06-01

    Inflammasomes sense cellular danger to activate the cysteine-aspartic protease caspase-1, which processes precursor interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 into their mature bioactive fragments. In addition, activated caspase-1 or the related inflammatory caspase, caspase-11, can cleave gasdermin D to induce a lytic cell death, termed pyroptosis. The intertwining of IL-1β activation and cell death is further highlighted by research showing that the extrinsic apoptotic caspase, caspase-8, may, like caspase-1, directly process IL-1β, activate the NLRP3 inflammasome itself, or bind to inflammasome complexes to induce apoptotic cell death. Similarly, RIPK3- and MLKL-dependent necroptotic signaling can activate the NLRP3 inflammasome to drive IL-1β inflammatory responses in vivo. Here, we review the mechanisms by which cell death signaling activates inflammasomes to initiate IL-1β-driven inflammation, and highlight the clinical relevance of these findings to heritable autoinflammatory diseases. We also discuss whether the act of cell death can be separated from IL-1β secretion and evaluate studies suggesting that several cell death regulatory proteins can directly interact with, and modulate the function of, inflammasome and IL-1β containing protein complexes. PMID:27066895

  17. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Cell Death in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Repressing mTOR via AMPK Activation and PI3K/Akt Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayeong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer properties and mechanism of action of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFAs have been demonstrated in several cancers; however, the mechanism in lung cancer remains unclear. Here, we show that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, a ω3-PUFA, induced apoptosis and autophagy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. DHA-induced cell death was accompanied by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation and inactivated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling. Knocking down AMPK and overexpressing Akt increased mTOR activity and attenuated DHA-induced cell death, suggesting that DHA induces cell death via AMPK- and Akt-regulated mTOR inactivation. This was confirmed in Fat-1 transgenic mice, which produce ω3-PUFAs. Lewis lung cancer (LLC tumor cells implanted into Fat-1 mice showed slower growth, lower phospho-Akt levels, and higher levels of apoptosis and autophagy than cells implanted into wild-type mice. Taken together, these data suggest that DHA-induced apoptosis and autophagy in NSCLC cells are associated with AMPK activation and PI3K/Akt inhibition, which in turn lead to suppression of mTOR; thus ω3-PUFAs may be utilized as potential therapeutic agents for NSCLC treatment.

  18. H pylori stimulates proliferation of gastric cancer cells through activating mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Chang Chen; Ying Wang; Jing-Yan Li; Wen-Rong Xu; You-Li Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the mechanism by which H pylori causes activation of gastric epithelial cells.METHODS: A VacA (+) and CagA (+) standard Hpyloriline NCTC 11637 and a human gastric adenocarcinoma derived gastric epithelial cell line BGC-823 were applied in the study. MTT assay and 3H-TdR incorporation test were used to detect the proliferation of BGC-823 cells and Western blotting was used to detect the activity and existence of related proteins.RESULTS: Incubation with Hpylori extract increased the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells, reflected by both live cell number and DNA synthesis rate. The activity of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signal transduction cascade increased within 20 min after incubation with Hpylori extract and appeared to be a sustained event. MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059abolished the action of H pylori extract on both ERK activity and cell proliferation. Incubation with H pyloriextract increased c-Fos expression and SRE-dependentgene expression. H pylori extract caused phosphorylation of several proteins including a protein with molecular size of 97.4 kDa and tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibited the activation of ERK and the proliferation of cells caused by H pylori extract.CONCLUSION: Biologically active elements in H pylori extract cause proliferation of gastric epithelial cells through activating tyrosine kinase and ERK signal transduction cascade.

  19. Programmed Cell-to-Cell Variability in Ras Activity Triggers Emergent Behaviors during Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Variability in signaling pathway activation between neighboring epithelial cells can arise from local differences in the microenvironment, noisy gene expression, or acquired genetic changes. To investigate the consequences of this cell-to-cell variability in signaling pathway activation on coordinated multicellular processes such as morphogenesis, we use DNA-programmed assembly to construct three-dimensional MCF10A microtissues that are mosaic for low-level expression of activated H-Ras. We find two emergent behaviors in mosaic microtissues: cells with activated H-Ras are basally extruded or lead motile multicellular protrusions that direct the collective motility of their wild-type neighbors. Remarkably, these behaviors are not observed in homogeneous microtissues in which all cells express the activated Ras protein, indicating that heterogeneity in Ras activity, rather than the total amount of Ras activity, is critical for these processes. Our results directly demonstrate that cell-to-cell variability in pathway activation within local populations of epithelial cells can drive emergent behaviors during epithelial morphogenesis.

  20. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Live Versus Dead Bacterial Cells and Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, James N.; LaDuc, Myron T.; Diamond, Rochelle; Verceles, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a coupled fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescent staining technology for purifying (removing cells from sampling matrices), separating (based on size, density, morphology, and live versus dead), and concentrating cells (spores, prokaryotic, eukaryotic) from an environmental sample.

  1. Cell-surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells after inhibition of HDAC activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Andresen, Lars; Hansen, Karen Aagaard; Skov, Søren

    2009-01-01

    We show that inhibition of HDAC activity leads to surface expression of Hsp70 on various hematopoietic cancer cells, an occurance that was not observed on naïve or activated peripheral blood cells. HDAC inhibitor-mediated Hsp70 surface expression was confined to the apoptotic Annexin V...... activity selectively induces surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells and that this may increase immunorecognition of these cells.......-positive cells and blocked by inhibition of apoptosis. Other chemotherapeutic inducers of apoptosis such as etoposide and camptothecin also led to a robust induction of Hsp70 surface expression. Hsp70 expression was, however, not caused by induction of apoptosis per se, as activated CD4 T cells remained Hsp70...

  2. Sleep-active cells in the cerebral cortex and their role in slow-wave activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gerashchenko, Dmitry; Wisor, Jonathan P.; Kilduff, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified neurons in the cerebral cortex that become activated during sleep episodes with high slow-wave activity (SWA). The distinctive properties of these neurons are the ability to produce nitric oxide and their long-range projections within the cortex. In this review, we discuss how these characteristics of sleep-active cells could be relevant to SWA production in the cortex. We also discuss possible models of the role of nNOS cells in SWA production.

  3. Energy-Based Analysis of Ultrasonically Assisted Turning

    OpenAIRE

    G.A. Volkov; Bratov, V. A.; Gruzdkov, A.A.; Babitsky, V.I.; Petrov, Y. V.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    The process of ultrasonically-assisted turning (UAT) is a superposition of vibration of a cutting tool on its standard movement in conventional turning (CT). The former technique has several advantages compared with the latter, one of the main being a significant decrease in the level of cutting forces. In this paper the effects observed in UAT are analysed employing ideas of dynamic fracture mechanics. The active stage of loading duration depends heavily on ultrasonic frequency and the cutti...

  4. Review on Macro-and Micro-turns in Ttranslation Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ai-qin

    2013-01-01

    Translation is a significant communicative activity with a long history. Translation study is developing into two turns-macro and micro turn. Edwin Gentzler researched these two turns deeply in his thesis Macro-and Micro-turns in translation studies. The study in the circumstance of America can provide our Chinese translation study with some new aspects. Translation is more a frequent activity in the inner circunstance in China.

  5. Minimal model for spontaneous cell polarization and edge activity in oscillating, rotating and migrating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Franck; Ambühl, Mark E.; Gabella, Chiara; Bornert, Alicia; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2016-04-01

    How cells break symmetry and organize activity at their edges to move directionally is a fundamental question in cell biology. Physical models of cell motility commonly incorporate gradients of regulatory proteins and/or feedback from the motion itself to describe the polarization of this edge activity. These approaches, however, fail to explain cell behaviour before the onset of polarization. We use polarizing and moving fish epidermal cells as a model system to bridge the gap between cell behaviours before and after polarization. Our analysis suggests a novel and simple principle of self-organizing cell activity, in which local cell-edge dynamics depends on the distance from the cell centre, but not on the orientation with respect to the front-back axis. We validate this principle with a stochastic model that faithfully reproduces a range of cell-migration behaviours. Our findings indicate that spontaneous polarization, persistent motion and cell shape are emergent properties of the local cell-edge dynamics controlled by the distance from the cell centre.

  6. Notes on the Spatial Turn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stipe Grgas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of ever-mounting evidence, amongst which is the “zone” problematic of the Zadar conference that occassioned these notes, it can be concluded that the spatial turn has insinuated itself as an all-pervading heuristic tool throughout the humanities and the social sciences. The extent to which space and spatiality have usurped the central stage in the various branches of reasearch can be gauged by admonishments that what we are witnessing is a new fundamentalism that has simply inverted the terms of the dualism of time and space (May and Thrift 2001: “Introduction”. According to Michael Dear the sway of space is manifested in multifold ways: in the ubiquity of spatial analysis in social theories and practices; in the explosion of publications devoted to the exploration of the interface of the social and the spatial; in the reintegration of human geography into various domains of knowledge; in the focus given to difference and the consequent diversification of theoretical and empirical practices; in a theoretically informed exploration of the relation between geographical knowledge and social action; and, finally, in the unprecedented proliferation of research agendas and publications pertaining to these isuuses (Dear 2001: 24. Two recent collections of papers are indicative of the ubiquity of spatial issues in scholarly work.

  7. Volume Changes During Active Shape Fluctuations in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Taloni, Alessandro; Kardash, Elena; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid-mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together, our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  8. Volume changes during active shape fluctuations in cells

    CERN Document Server

    Taloni, Alessandro; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A M

    2015-01-01

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  9. Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in human leukemic T cells

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Using the patch-clamp technique, we have identified two types of Ca(2+)- activated K+ (K(Ca)) channels in the human leukemic T cell line. Jurkat. Substances that elevate the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), such as ionomycin or the mitogenic lectin phytohemagglutinin (PHA), as well as whole-cell dialysis with pipette solutions containing elevated [Ca2+]i, activate a voltage-independent K+ conductance. Unlike the voltage-gated (type n) K+ channels in these cells, the majority of K(C...

  10. The calcium-activated potassium channels of turtle hair cells

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    A major factor determining the electrical resonant frequency of turtle cochlear hair cells is the time course of the Ca-activated K current (Art, J. J., and R. Fettiplace. 1987. Journal of Physiology. 385:207- 242). We have examined the notion that this time course is dictated by the K channel kinetics by recording single Ca-activated K channels in inside-out patches from isolated cells. A hair cell's resonant frequency was estimated from its known correlation with the dimensions of the hair ...

  11. Lymphokine-activated killer cell phenomenon. III. Evidence that IL-2 is sufficient for direct activation of peripheral blood lymphocytes into lymphokine-activated killer cells

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Purified interleukin 2 (IL-2) was found to be sufficient for direct activation of peripheral blood lymphocytes into lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. The LAK activation factor was directly and consistently associated with IL-2 activity using classic protein purification techniques, adsorption to IL-2-dependent cell lines, and inhibition with anti-Tac antibody. As yet, no other cytokines have been found that perform the same role.

  12. Cell proliferation in vitro modulates fibroblast collagenase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collagenase enzyme activity is regulated by numerous control mechanisms which prevent excessive release and activation of this protease. A primary mechanism for regulating enzyme extracellular activity may be linked to cell division, therefore they have examined the release of collagenase by fibroblasts in vitro in response to cellular proliferation. Studies were performed using fibroblasts derived from adult rat dermis maintained in DMEM containing 10% newborn calf serum, 25 mM tricine buffer, and antibiotics. Cells between subculture 10 and 19 were used with enzyme activity determined with a 14C-labelled soluble Type I collagen substrate with and without trypsin activation. Fibroblasts, trypsinized and plated at low density secreted 8.5 fold more enzyme than those cells at confluence (975 vs. 115 dpm/μg DNA). This diminution occurred gradually as the cells went from logrithmic growth towards confluence. Confluent fibroblast monolayers were scraped in a grid arrangement, stimulating the remaining cells to divide, without exposure to trypsin. Within 24-48 hr postscraping enzyme levels had increased 260-400%, accompanied by enhanced incorporation of 3H-thymidine and 3H-uridine into cell macromolecules. The burst of enzyme release began to subside 12 hr later. These results support a close relationship between fibroblast proliferation and collagenase secretion

  13. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyuan Ren

    Full Text Available A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  14. NK-cell activity in immunotoxicity drug evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NK-cell activity as a tool for detection of immunotoxic effects of new human drugs has gained further attention when the recent European note for guidance CPMP/SWP/1042/99 was adopted. The inclusion of NK-cell activity plus distribution of lymphocyte subsets were suggested as an alternative to the primary antibody response to a T-cell dependent antigen. Either of the two test alternatives should be included as a routine parameter in at least one repeated dose-toxicity study, rats or mice being the species of choice. The standard procedure for measuring NK-cell activity is the 51Cr-release assay. However, a new flow-cytometric assay, adapted for rat peripheral blood, does not require dedicated groups of animals, offers the possibility of repeated testing, and shows at least as sensitive as the conventional 51Cr-release assay

  15. Protease activation involved in resistance of human cells to x-ray cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little is known of proteases that play roles in the early steps of X-ray irradiation response. In the present study, we first searched for proteases whose activity is induced in human RSa-R cells after X-ray irradiation. The activity was identified as fibrinolytic, using 125I-labeled fibrin as a substrate. Protease samples were prepared by lysation of cells with a buffer containing MEGA-8. RSa-R cells showed an increased level of protease activity 10 min after X-ray (up to 3 Gy) irradiation. We next examined whether this protease inducibility is causally related with the X-ray susceptibility of cells. Leupeptin, a serine-cysteine protease inhibitor, inhibited the protease activity in samples obtained from X-ray-irradiated RSa-R cells. Treatment of RSa-R cells with the inhibitor before and after X-ray irradiation resulted in an increased susceptibility of the cells to X-ray cell killing. However, the treatment of cells with other inhibitors tested did not modulate the X-ray susceptibility. These results suggest that leupeptin-sensitive proteases are involved in the resistance of human cells to X-ray cell killing. (author)

  16. Selective Antitumor Activity of Ibrutinib in EGFR-Mutant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Wen; Wang, Michael; Wang, Li; Lu, Haibo; Wu, Shuhong; Dai, Bingbing; Ou, Zhishuo; Zhang, Liang; Heymach, John V.; Gold, Kathryn A.; Minna, John ,; Roth, Jack A.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Fang, Bingliang

    2014-01-01

    Ibrutinib, which irreversibly inhibits Bruton tyrosine kinase, was evaluated for antitumor activity in a panel of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and found to selectively inhibit growth of NSCLC cells carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, including T790M mutant and erlotinib-resistant H1975 cells. Ibrutinib induced dose-dependent inhibition of phosphor-EGFR at both Y1068 and Y1173 sites, suggesting ibrutinib functions as an EGFR inhibitor. Survi...

  17. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klier Ulrike

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. Methods We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. Results The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4+, activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested could be observed. Conclusion Cellular fusions of MSI+ carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These

  18. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4+, activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested) could be observed. Cellular fusions of MSI+ carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These hybrid cells may have great potential for cellular immunotherapy and

  19. Capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourt, Shanna; Mesquita, Fernanda; Basso, Bruno; Schmid, Júlia; Ferreira, Gabriela; Rizzo, Lucas; Bauer, Moises; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis; Mannaerts, Inge; van Grunsven, Leo Adrianus; Oliveira, Jarbas

    2014-03-01

    Capsaicin, the active component of chili pepper, has been reported to have antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects on a variety of cell lines. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effects of capsaicin during HSC activation and maintenance. Activated and freshly isolated HSCs were treated with capsaicin. Proliferation was measured by incorporation of EdU. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated using flow cytometry. The migratory response to chemotactic stimuli was evaluated by a modified Boyden chamber assay. Activation markers and inflammatory cytokines were determined by qPCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry. Our results show that capsaicin reduces HSC proliferation, migration, and expression of profibrogenic markers of activated and primary mouse HSCs. In conclusion, the present study shows that capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of HSC in vitro. PMID:23955514

  20. Thymic epithelial cells. I. Expression of strong suppressive (veto) activity in mouse thymic epithelial cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Ropke, C

    1990-01-01

    We show that thymic epithelial cells grown under serum-free conditions in a chemically defined culture medium can act as veto cells in vitro. The veto activity of thymic epithelial cells results in inactivation of specific alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell precursors at the clonal level. It is...... concluded that the epithelial stromal cells of the thymus, by acting as veto cells, may be responsible for the negative intrathymic selection of self-reactive thymocytes leading to elimination of the vast majority of immature thymic lymphocytes....

  1. A Recombinant Bispecific CD20×CD95 Antibody With Superior Activity Against Normal and Malignant B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalivaiko, Kristina; Hofmann, Martin; Kober, Karina; Teichweyde, Nadine; Krammer, Peter H; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram

    2016-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to the B-cell-specific CD20-antigen are successfully used for the treatment of lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare the anti-B-cell activity of three different antibodies directed to CD20: (i) a chimeric, monospecific antibody, (ii) an Fc-optimized variant thereof, and (iii) a bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody in a newly developed recombinant format, termed Fabsc. The bispecific antibody specifically triggers the CD95 death receptor on malignant, as well as activated, normal B-cells. We found that the capability of this antibody to suppress the growth of malignant B-cells in vitro and in vivo and to specifically deplete normal, activated B-cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures was superior to that of the Fc-optimized monospecific antibody. This antibody in turn was more effective than its nonoptimized variant. Moreover, the bispecific antibody was the only reagent capable of significantly suppressing antibody production in vitro. Our findings imply that the bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody might become a new, prototypical reagent for the treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. PMID:26581163

  2. Nonthermal Fluctuations and Mechanics of the Active Cell Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, K; Byrd, H; MacKintosh, F C; Kilfoil, M L

    2013-01-01

    We present direct measurements of fluctuations in the nucleus of yeast cells. While prior work has shown these fluctuations to be active and non-thermal in character, their origin and time dependence are not understood. We show that nuclear fluctuations can be quantitatively understood by uncorrelated, active force fluctuations driving a nuclear medium that is dominated by an uncondensed DNA solution, for which we perform rheological measurements on an in vitro model system under similar conditions to what is expected in the nucleus. We conclude that the eukaryotic nucleus of living cells is a nonequilibrium soft material whose fluctuations are actively driven, and are far from thermal in their time dependence.

  3. SIRT1 activating compounds reduce oxidative stress and prevent cell death in neuronal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Reas S.; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Callinan, Catherine; Zuo, Ling; Sachdeva, Mira M.; Shindler, Kenneth S

    2012-01-01

    Activation of SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, prevents retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss in optic neuritis, an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve disease. While SIRT1 deacetylates numerous protein targets, downstream mechanisms of SIRT1 activation mediating this neuroprotective effect are unknown. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress in muscle and other cells, and oxidative stress occurs in neuronal degeneration. We examined whether SIRT1 activators red...

  4. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  5. Human breast cancer cell-mediated bone collagen degradation requires plasminogen activation and matrix metalloproteinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Peter A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer cells frequently metastasize to the skeleton and induce extensive bone destruction. Cancer cells produce proteinases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and the plasminogen activator system (PAS which promote invasion of extracellular matrices, but whether these proteinases degrade bone matrix is unclear. To characterize the role that breast cancer cell proteinases play in bone degradation we compared the effects of three human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231, ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 with those of a normal breast epithelial cell line, HME. The cell lines were cultured atop radiolabelled matrices of either mineralized or non-mineralized bone or type I collagen, the principal organic constituent of bone. Results The 3 breast cancer cell lines all produced significant degradation of the 3 collagenous extracellular matrices (ECMs whilst the normal breast cell line was without effect. Breast cancer cells displayed an absolute requirement for serum to dissolve collagen. Degradation of collagen was abolished in plasminogen-depleted serum and could be restored by the addition of exogenous plasminogen. Localization of plasmin activity to the cell surface was critical for the degradation process as aprotinin, but not α2 antiplasmin, prevented collagen dissolution. During ECM degradation breast cancer cell lines expressed urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA and uPA receptor, and MMPs-1, -3, -9,-13, and -14. The normal breast epithelial cell line expressed low levels of MMPs-1, and -3, uPA and uPA receptor. Inhibitors of both the PAS (aprotinin and PA inhibitor-1 and MMPs (CT1166 and tisue inhibitor of metalloproteinase blocked collagen degradation, demonstrating the requirement of both plasminogen activation and MMP activity for degradation. The activation of MMP-13 in human breast cancer cells was prevented by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 but not by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, suggesting

  6. Inhibitory Activity of (+-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action.

  7. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnink, Stephen M; Kerk, Samuel A; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Alabi, Ola D; Kuipers, David P; Praamsma, Riemer C; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2014-04-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  8. Turning Bacteria Suspensions into Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Héctor Matías; Gachelin, Jérémie; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidence for a low-shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semidilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension displays a "superfluidlike" transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that, macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  9. Expression of Telomerase Activity in Gastric Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between telomerase activity and biological behavior in human gastric cells and appraise the clinical significance of detecting telomerase activity. Methods The telomerase activity in 47 gastric cancer tissue samples,their matched nomal tissues,7 gastric ulcer and 2 gastric cancer cell lines was detected using a PCR-based non-radioisotopic telomeric repeat amplification protocol(TRAP) assay. Results None of the 47 samples from normal gastric tissues expressed telomerase activity.The 41 of 47 cases of gastric cancer presented telomerase activity with an 87.2% positive rate (P<0.001). 2/2 gastric cancer cell lines and 0/7 gastric ulcer line were also positive for telmerase activity.The activity of telomerase was associated with the pathological differentiation of gastric cancer. Conclusion Telomerase activity may be related to the biological behavior of gastric cancer and can help in assessing the malignant poten-tial of gastric cancer.Telomerase activity will be a good diagnostic marker for the detection of gastric cancer.

  10. Cell swelling activates separate taurine and chloride channels in Ehrlich mouse ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, Ian Henry; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    1994-01-01

    The taurine efflux from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells is stimulated by hypotonic cell swelling. The swelling-activated taurine efflux is unaffected by substitution of gluconate for extracellular Cl– but inhibited by addition of MK196 (anion channel blocker) and 4,4 -diisothiocyanostilbene-2......,2 -disulfonic acid (DIDS; anion channel and anion exchange blocker) and by depolarization of the cell membrane. This is taken to indicate that taurine does not leave the osmotically swollen Ehrlich cells in exchange for extracellular Cl–, i.e., via the anion exchanger but via a MK196- and DIDS-sensitive channel...... that is potential dependent. An additional stimulation of the swelling-activated taurine efflux is seen after addition of arachidonic acid and oleic acid. Cell swelling also activates a Mini Cl– channel. The Cl– efflux via this Cl– channel, in contrast to the swelling-activated taurine efflux, is...

  11. Preferential killing of cancer cells and activated human T cells using ZnO nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being recognized for their potential utility in biological applications including nanomedicine. Here we examine the response of normal human cells to ZnO nanoparticles under different signaling environments and compare it to the response of cancerous cells. ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a strong preferential ability to kill cancerous T cells (∼28-35 x) compared to normal cells. Interestingly, the activation state of the cell contributes toward nanoparticle toxicity, as resting T cells display a relative resistance while cells stimulated through the T cell receptor and CD28 costimulatory pathway show greater toxicity in direct relation to the level of activation. Mechanisms of toxicity appear to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with cancerous T cells producing higher inducible levels than normal T cells. In addition, nanoparticles were found to induce apoptosis and the inhibition of reactive oxygen species was found to be protective against nanoparticle induced cell death. The novel findings of cell selective toxicity, towards potential disease causing cells, indicate a potential utility of ZnO nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer and/or autoimmunity

  12. Preferential killing of cancer cells and activated human T cells using ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanley, Cory; Layne, Janet; Feris, Kevin; Wingett, Denise [Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Punnoose, Alex; Reddy, K M; Coombs, Isaac; Coombs, Andrew [Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States)], E-mail: denisewingett@boisestate.edu

    2008-07-23

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being recognized for their potential utility in biological applications including nanomedicine. Here we examine the response of normal human cells to ZnO nanoparticles under different signaling environments and compare it to the response of cancerous cells. ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a strong preferential ability to kill cancerous T cells ({approx}28-35 x) compared to normal cells. Interestingly, the activation state of the cell contributes toward nanoparticle toxicity, as resting T cells display a relative resistance while cells stimulated through the T cell receptor and CD28 costimulatory pathway show greater toxicity in direct relation to the level of activation. Mechanisms of toxicity appear to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with cancerous T cells producing higher inducible levels than normal T cells. In addition, nanoparticles were found to induce apoptosis and the inhibition of reactive oxygen species was found to be protective against nanoparticle induced cell death. The novel findings of cell selective toxicity, towards potential disease causing cells, indicate a potential utility of ZnO nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer and/or autoimmunity.

  13. ARSENIC TRIOXIDE DOWNREGULATES TELOMERASE ACTIVITY IN HL-60 CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何冬梅; 张洹

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether arsenic trioxide (AS2O3) could downregulate human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene expression and telomerase activity during induction of apoptosis of HL-60 cells. Methods: Apoptosis was detected by morphological observation and flow cytomertric cell cycle analysis. The expression of hTERT at mRNA and protein levels was analyzed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence using fluoresce isothiocyanate (FITC) label, respectively. Telomerase activity was determined by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunoassay (PCR-ELISA). Results: Treatment of 2 μmol/L at As2O3 could induce apoptosis of HL-60 cells. hTERT was decreased at both mRNA and protein levels during apoptosis of HL-60 cells. Telomerase activity of HL-60 cells was significantly inhibited. Conclusion:It is suggested that telomerase activity of HL-60 cells might be specifically inhibited by AS2O3 through the downregulation of hTERT gene expression.

  14. Electrode activation and passivation of solid oxide fuel cell electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Søren; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Hendriksen, P.V.;

    2006-01-01

    The performance of anode-supported cells with a composite LSM-YSZ cathode and an LSM current collector was investigated. Over the first 48 hours, after the application of a constant current, the cell voltage was observed to increase by up to 20%. When the current was switched off, the cell resist...... than at open circuit conditions. This frequency range of the spectrum was also sensitive to the oxygen partial pressure at the cathode side, indicating that it is the cathode that activates and passivates....... resistance increased significantly over the next four days at open circuit conditions. Apparently, at OCV conditions cell passivation occurs. The cell gradually reactivates, once the current is switched on again. Part of this activation/passivation process is fast enough to influence the resistance of the...... impedance above approximately 100 Hz were not influenced by the activation/passivation process. The part of the polarisation impedance between I and 100 Hz was highly influenced by the activation/passivation process and during cell polarisation this part of the polarisation impedance was up to 40% lower...

  15. CD83 Modulates B Cell Activation and Germinal Center Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzak, Lena; Seitz, Christine; Urbat, Anne; Hutzler, Stefan; Ostalecki, Christian; Gläsner, Joachim; Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André; Winkler, Thomas H; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Nitschke, Lars

    2016-05-01

    CD83 is a maturation marker for dendritic cells. In the B cell lineage, CD83 is expressed especially on activated B cells and on light zone B cells during the germinal center (GC) reaction. The function of CD83 during GC responses is unclear. CD83(-/-) mice have a strong reduction of CD4(+) T cells, which makes it difficult to analyze a functional role of CD83 on B cells during GC responses. Therefore, in the present study we generated a B cell-specific CD83 conditional knockout (CD83 B-cKO) model. CD83 B-cKO B cells show defective upregulation of MHC class II and CD86 expression and impaired proliferation after different stimuli. Analyses of GC responses after immunization with various Ags revealed a characteristic shift in dark zone and light zone B cell numbers, with an increase of B cells in the dark zone of CD83 B-cKO mice. This effect was not accompanied by alterations in the level of IgG immune responses or by major differences in affinity maturation. However, an enhanced IgE response was observed in CD83 B-cKO mice. Additionally, we observed a strong competitive disadvantage of CD83-cKO B cells in GC responses in mixed bone marrow chimeras. Furthermore, infection of mice with Borrelia burgdorferi revealed a defect in bacterial clearance of CD83 B-cKO mice with a shift toward a Th2 response, indicated by a strong increase in IgE titers. Taken together, our results show that CD83 is important for B cell activation and modulates GC composition and IgE Ab responses in vivo. PMID:26983787

  16. The Role of Myeloma Cells to Osteoclast Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahare Sadeghi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multiple myeloma (MM is a hematological malignancy characterized by osteolyticbone disease which is associated with severe bone pain and pathological bonefractures. The receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK and receptor activator ofnuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL system has an important role in regulation of boneremodeling process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of the RANK/RANKL molecules by the myeloma cells derived from patients and myeloma cell lineU-266.Materials and Methods: Myeloma cells derived from 7 myeloma patients and plasma cellleukemia were included into this study to evaluate the expression of the RANK/RANKLmolecules by the reverse transcriptions-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR method atthe mRNA level. As well as human myeloma cell line U266, U937, RPMI-8866 and Helawere used as control groups.Results: In this study we show the expression of RANK and its ligand at the mRNA levelin U-266 (myeloma cell line and plasma cells derived from patients by the RT-PCR technique.Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that expression of RANK and RANKL by plasmacells can contribute to induction of osteoclasts and plasma cell activation which elevatesbone resorption in myeloma patients.

  17. LPS induces pulp progenitor cell recruitment via complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmilewsky, F; Jeanneau, C; Laurent, P; About, I

    2015-01-01

    Complement system, a major component of the natural immunity, has been recently identified as an important mediator of the dentin-pulp regeneration process through STRO-1 pulp cell recruitment by the C5a active fragment. Moreover, it has been shown recently that under stimulation with lipoteichoic acid, a complex component of the Gram-positive bacteria cell wall, human pulp fibroblasts are able to synthesize all proteins required for complement activation. However, Gram-negative bacteria, which are also involved in tooth decay, are known as powerful activators of complement system and inflammation. Here, we investigated the role of Gram-negative bacteria-induced complement activation on the pulp progenitor cell recruitment using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of all Gram-negative bacteria. Our results show that incubating pulp fibroblasts with LPS induced membrane attack complex formation and C5a release in serum-free fibroblast cultures. The produced C5a binds to the pulp progenitor cells' membrane and induces their migration toward the LPS stimulation chamber, as revealed by the dynamic transwell migration assays. The inhibition of this migration by the C5aR-specific antagonist W54011 indicates that the pulp progenitor migration is mediated by the interaction between C5a and C5aR. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a direct interaction between the recruitment of progenitor pulp cells and the activation of complement system generated by pulp fibroblast stimulation with LPS. PMID:25359783

  18. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Spatially Controls Activation and Misregulation of Host Cell Rac1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pseudotuberculosis binds host cells and modulates the mammalian Rac1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase at two levels. Activation of Rac1 results from integrin receptor engagement, while misregulation is promoted by translocation of YopE and YopT proteins into target cells. Little is known regarding how these various factors interplay to control Rac1 dynamics. To investigate these competing processes, the localization of Rac1 activation was imaged microscopically using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. In the absence of translocated effectors, bacteria induced activation of the GTPase at the site of bacterial binding. In contrast, the entire cellular pool of Rac1 was inactivated shortly after translocation of YopE RhoGAP. Inactivation required membrane localization of Rac1. The translocated protease YopT had very different effects on Rac1. This protein, which removes the membrane localization site of Rac1, did not inactivate Rac1, but promoted entry of cleaved activated Rac1 molecules into the host cell nucleus, allowing Rac1 to localize with nuclear guanosine nucleotide exchange factors. As was true for YopE, membrane-associated Rac1 was the target for YopT, indicating that the two translocated effectors may compete for the same pool of target protein. Consistent with the observation that YopE inactivation requires membrane localization of Rac1, the presence of YopT in the cell interfered with the action of the YopE RhoGAP. As a result, interaction of target cells with a strain that produces both YopT and YopE resulted in two spatially distinct pools of Rac1: an inactive cytoplasmic pool and an activated nuclear pool. These studies demonstrate that competition between bacterial virulence factors for access to host substrates is controlled by the spatial arrangement of a target protein. In turn, the combined effects of translocated bacterial proteins are to generate pools of a single signaling molecule with distinct localization and

  19. Dendritic cell, monocyte and T cell activation and response to glatiramer acetate in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Hesse, D; Limborg, S;

    2012-01-01

    patients, the latter followed prospectively for one year. Gd-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were conducted in all patients. Disease activity was assessed as relapses. Results: The median percentage of DCs expressing CD40 was 10% in untreated MS patients and 5.9% in GA-treated patients...... associated with regulatory, naïve or central memory T cell populations, but CD4+ T cell activation was not related with relapse risk. Conclusions: MS patients treated with GA show prominent changes in circulating antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T cells. Expression of CD40 on DCs is significantly lower and...

  20. Virulent Treponema pallidum activates human vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, B S; Oppenheimer-Marks, N; Hansen, E J; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1992-03-01

    Perivascular lymphocytic infiltration, fibrin deposition, and endothelial cell abnormalities consistent with cellular activation are prominent histopathologic features of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum. Because activated endothelial cells play important roles in lymphocyte homing and hemostasis, the ability of virulent T. pallidum to activate cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was investigated. T. pallidum induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and procoagulant activity on the surface of HUVEC. Electron microscopy of T. pallidum-stimulated HUVEC revealed extensive networks of fibrin strands not observed in cultures without treponemes. ICAM-1 expression in HUVEC also was promoted by a 47-kDa integral membrane lipoprotein purified from T. pallidum, implicating a role for spirochete membrane lipoproteins in endothelial cell activation. The combined findings are consistent with the pathology of syphilis and provide the first evidence that a pathogenic spirochetal bacterium such as T. pallidum or its constituent integral membrane lipoprotein(s) can activate directly host vascular endothelium. PMID:1347056

  1. Effects of activated fibroblasts on phenotype modulation, EGFR signalling and cell cycle regulation in OSCC cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosstalk between carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells is suggested to mediate phenotype transition of cancer cells as a prerequisite for tumour progression, to predict patients’ outcome, and to influence the efficacy of EGFR inhibitor therapies. Here we investigate the influence of activated fibroblasts as a model for CAFs on phenotype and EGFR signalling in OSCC cells in vitro. For this, immortalised hTERT-BJ1 fibroblasts were activated with TGFβ1 and PDGFAB to generate a myofibroblast or proliferative phenotype, respectively. Conditioned media (FCMTGF, FCMPDGF) were used to stimulate PE/CA-PJ15 OSCC cells. Results were compared to the effect of conditioned media of non-stimulated fibroblasts (FCMB). FCMTGF stimulation leads to an up-regulation of vimentin in the OSCC cells and an enhancement of invasive behaviour, indicating EMT-like effects. Similarly, FCMTGF≫FCMPDGF induced up-regulation of EGFR, but not of ErbB2/ErbB3. In addition, we detected an increase in basal activities of ERK, PI3K/Akt and Stat3 (FCMTGF>FCMPDGF) accompanied by protein interaction of vimentin with pERK. These effects are correlated with an increased proliferation. In summary, our results suggest that the activated myofibroblast phenotype provides soluble factors which are able to induce EMT-like phenomena and to increase EGFR signalling as well as cell proliferation in OSCC cells. Our results indicate a possible influence of activated myofibroblasts on EGFR-inhibitor therapy. Therefore, CAFs may serve as promising novel targets for combined therapy strategies. - Highlights: • A cell culture model for cancer associated fibroblasts is described. • The mutual interaction with OSCC cells leads to up-regulation of EGFR in tumour cells. • mCAF induces EGFR downstream signalling with increased proliferation in OSCC. • Erk activation is associated with protein interaction with vimentin as sign of EMT. • Results qualify CAF as

  2. [An electrochemical method for measuring metabolic activity and counting cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, B a; Khlupova, M e; Shleev, S V; Kaprel'iants, A S; Iaropolov, A I

    2006-01-01

    An express electrochemical method for determining the metabolic activity of live cells based on the possibility of an electron exchange between an electrode and elements of the biological electron transfer chain in the presence of a mediator is proposed. This method is useful for studying any live cells (animal, plant, and microbial), including anaerobic, dormant, and spore cells. The sample preparation and measurement itself does not take more than 30 min. The detection limit in a volume of 15 ml amounts to 10-5 cells/ml. The applicability of the assessment method of the metabolic activity level during the transition of the bacteria Mycobacterium smegmatis into an uncultivable dormant state was demonstrated. This method is of special value for medicine and environmental control, detecting latent forms of pathogens. An optimal combination of the methods for the express analysis of latent pathogens is proposed. PMID:17066962

  3. Activated vascular endothelia regulate invasion of glioma cells through expression of fibronectin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhi-xiong; YANG Li-juan; HUANG Qiang; FU Jin

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous researches have indicated that glioma invasion may occur within a tumor-host microecology, and that fibronectin may be involved in glioma invasion as an important component of the extracellular matrix. However, how the interaction between tumor cells and vascular endothelial cells affects glioma invasion is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the interaction between tumor cells and vascular endothelial cells on glioma invasion, and the relationship of this interaction to fibronectin.Methods The localization of fibronectin in different brain astrocytoma tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry. Then, vascular endothelial cells and glioma cells were co-cultured in a Transwell co-culturing system. Fibronectin expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunocytochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, the influence of the interaction between tumor cells and vascular endothelial cells on glioma cell invasion was determined by an in vitro rapid invasion test.Results In brain astrocytoma tissues, fibronectin was present on the endothelial cells, in the extracellular matrix. Fibronectin expression was greater in higher grade tumors than in lower grade tumors. The interaction of glioma cells and vascular endothelial cells in vitro induced fibronectin release from vascular endothelial cells, which in turn stimulated glioma cell migration. This effect was inhibited by fibronectin blocking antibody.Conclusion Glioma cells may induce vascular epithelial cells to express fibronectin, and in turn fibronectin could promote glioma cell invasion.

  4. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Stefania Bruno; Cristina Grange; Marta Tapparo; Chiara Pasquino; Renato Romagnoli; Ennia Dametto; Antonio Amoroso; Ciro Tetta; Giovanni Camussi

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell co...

  5. Turn Your Boys into Readers!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allyn, Pam

    2011-01-01

    Girls outscore boys in reading proficiency levels; the gender gap is startling and concerning. The myth that boys won't read or that it's not "cool" for boys to love reading plays a big part in how these low levels come to be. Low expectations from teachers, and an assumption that boys prefer physical activity, mean that boys often don't find…

  6. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Chen; Megan E Schrementi; Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; Luisa A DiPietro

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally...

  7. Modulation of insulin degrading enzyme activity and liver cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Pivovarova, Olga; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Ilkavets, Iryna; Sticht, Carsten; Zhuk, Sergei; Murahovschi, Veronica; Lukowski, Sonja; Döcke, Stephanie; Kriebel, Jennifer; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna; Lock, Johan F; Stockmann, Martin; Grallert, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), insulin therapy, and hyperinsulinemia are independent risk factors of liver cancer. Recently, the use of a novel inhibitor of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) was proposed as a new therapeutic strategy in T2DM. However, IDE inhibition might stimulate liver cell proliferation via increased intracellular insulin concentration. The aim of this study was to characterize effects of inhibition of IDE activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells and to analyze liver specific expre...

  8. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibi...

  9. Femtosecond laser fabricated microfluorescence-activated cell sorter for single cell recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragheri, F.; Paiè, P.; Nava, G.; Yang, T.; Minzioni, P.; Martinez Vazquez, R.; Bellini, N.; Ramponi, R.; Cristiani, I.; Osellame, R.

    2014-03-01

    Manipulation, sorting and recovering of specific live cells from samples containing less than a few thousand cells is becoming a major hurdle in rare cell exploration such as stem cell research or cell based diagnostics. Moreover the possibility of recovering single specific cells for culturing and further analysis would be of great impact in many biological fields ranging from regenerative medicine to cancer therapy. In recent years considerable effort has been devoted to the development of integrated and low-cost optofluidic devices able to handle single cells, which usually rely on microfluidic circuits that guarantee a controlled flow of the cells. Among the different microfabrication technologies, femtosecond laser micromachining (FLM) is ideally suited for this purpose as it provides the integration of both microfluidic and optical functions on the same glass chip leading to monolithic, robust and portable devices. Here a new optofluidic device is presented, which is capable of sorting and recovering of single cells, through optical forces, on the basis of their fluorescence and. Both fluorescence detection and single cell sorting functions are integrated in the microfluidic chip by FLM. The device, which is specifically designed to operate with a limited amount of cells but with a very high selectivity, is fabricated by a two-step process that includes femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. The capability of the device to act as a micro fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been tested on polystyrene beads and on tumor cells and the results on the single live cell recovery are reported.

  10. Cell lysis and superoxide dismutase activities of highly radioresistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The highly radioresistant bacterium, Arthrobacter radiotolerans, has been isolated from the radioactive hot spring of Misasa, and it does not sporulate, it is Gram-positive, and its color is pink to red. This bacterium shows the highest resistance to gamma-ray among Gram-positive resistants, but the lytic enzyme capable of lysing the cells of strong radioresistants and the surface structure of the cells are little known except those about Micrococcus radiodurans. The cells of the M. radiodurans can be lysed by Achramobacter lyticus enzyme, and electron microscopic observation and chemical analysis revealed the mutilayered surface structure of the cells consisting of an inner membrane, a mucopeptide wall layer and a very outer layer. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was studied, and the relatively high SOD activity of the M. radiodurans was found. The SOD function acts against the threat posed by the reactive superoxide radical being generated biologically, photochemically and radiochemically in the presence of molecular oxygen. In this paper, it is reported that the lytic enzyme No.2 obtained from Cytophaga sp., containing N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, peptidase and endopeptidase, and showing broad lytic spectra, was able to lyse the cells of A. radiotolerans and four radioresistant micrococci, and the radioresistant bacteria showed relatively high SOD activity except M. sp. 248. It is well known that superoxide anions are generated by aerobic irradiation, and are toxic to microbial cells. (Kako, I.)

  11. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific. PMID:27226576

  12. Activation of cells using femtosecond laser beam (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Study of communication in cellular systems requires precise activation of targeted cell(s) in the network. In contrast to chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical stimulation, optical stimulation is non-invasive and is better suited for stimulation of targeted cells. As compared to visible lasers, the near infrared (NIR) microsecond/nanosecond pulsed laser beams are being used as preferred stimulation tool as they provide higher penetration depth in tissues. Femotosecond (FS) laser beams in NIR are also being used for direct and indirect (i.e. via two-photon optogenetics) stimulation of cells. Here, we present a comparative evaluation of efficacy of NIR FS laser beam for direct (no optogenetic sensitization) and 2ph optogenetic stimulation of cells. Further, for the first time, we demonstrate the use of blue (~450 nm, obtained by second harmonic generation) FS laser beam for stimulation of cells with and without Channelrhodopisn-2 (ChR2) expression. Comparative analysis of photocurrent generated by blue FS laser beam and continuous wave blue light for optogenetics stimulation of ChR2 transfected HEK cells will be presented. The use of ultrafast laser micro-beam for focal, non-contact, and repeated stimulation of single cells in a cellular circuitry allowed us to study the communication between different cell types.

  13. Studies on Activity of NK Cells in Preeclampsia Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张展; 龚非力; 贾莉婷; 常彩红; 侯磊; 杨如镜; 郑芳

    2004-01-01

    The activity of the NK cells in patients with preeclampsia was studied to investigate the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. By using MTT and 51Cr releasing technique, the proliferation and killing ability of the NK cells in maternal and umbilical blood from preeclampsia patients (n= 18)and normal third trimester pregnant women (n= 18) were detected. The NK-92 cell line was as the positive control. The results showed that the NK cell counts of umbilical blood in preeclampsia patients and normal third trimester pregnant women were significantly greater than those of maternal blood (both P<0.05). Compared with that in normal third trimester pregnant women, the proliferative ability of the NK cells in preeclampsia patients was apparently increased (P<0.05). Compared with that in maternal blood, the proliferative ability of the NK cells in umbilical blood from both preeclampsia patients and normal third trimester pregnant women was dramatically increased.The killing ability of the NK cells in preeclampsia patients was significantly higher than that in normal third trimester pregnant women (P <0.05). It was suggested that both number and function of the NK cells in preeclampsia women were increased, and that in umbilical blood was greater than that in maternal blood, speculating that the function of the NK cells may affect the maintenance of the maternal and fetal immune tolerance during pregnancy.

  14. Pattern matching based active optical sorting of colloids/cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report active optical sorting of colloids/cells by employing a cross correlation based pattern matching technique for selection of the desired objects and thereafter sorting using dynamically controllable holographic optical traps. The problem of possible collision between the different sets of objects during sorting was avoided by raising one set of particles to a different plane. We also present the results obtained on using this approach for some representative applications such as sorting of silica particles of two different sizes, of closely packed colloids and of white blood cells and red blood cells from a mixture of the two. (paper)

  15. Regulation of Taurine transporter activity in cultured rat retinal ganglion cells and rat retinal Muller Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes. The amino acid taurine is believed to play an antioxidant protective role in diabetic retinopathy through the scavenging of the reactive species. It is not well established whether taurine uptake is altered in retina cells during diabetic conditions. Thus, the present study was designed to investigate the changes in taurine transport in cultures of rat retinal Muller cells and rat retinal ganglion cells under conditions associated with diabetes. Taurine was abundantly taken up by retinal Muller cells and rat retinal ganglion cells under normal glycemic condition. Taurine was actively transported to rat Muller cells and rat retinal ganglion cells in a Na and Cl dependant manner. Taurine uptake further significantly elevated in both type of cells after the incubation with high glucose concentration. This effect could be attributed to the increase in osmolarity. Because Nitric Oxide (NO) is a molecule implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, we also determined the activity of taurine transporter in cultured rat retinal Muller cells and rat retinal ganglion cells in the presence of the NO donors, SIN-1 and SNAP. Taurine uptake was elevated above control value after 24-h incubation with low concentration of NO donors. We finally investigated the ability of neurotoxic glutamate to change taurine transporter activity in both types of cells. Uptake of taurine was significantly increased in rat retinal ganglion cells when only incubated with high concentration of glutamate. Our data provide evidence that taurine transporter is present in cultured rat retinal ganglion and Muller cells and is regulated by hyperosmolarity. The data are relevant to disease such as diabetes and neuronal degeneration where retinal cell volume may dramatically change. (author)

  16. Benfotiamine upregulates antioxidative system in activated BV-2 microglia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Stevanovic

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic microglial activation and resulting sustained neuroinflammatory reaction are generally associated with neurodegeneration. Activated microglia acquires proinflammatory cellular profile that generates oxidative burst. Their persistent activation exacerbates inflammation, which damages healthy neurons via cytotoxic mediators, such as superoxide radical anion and nitric oxide. In our recent study, we have shown that benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate possesses anti-inflammatory effects. Here, the effects of benfotiamine on the pro-oxidative component of activity of LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells were investigated. The activation of microglia was accompanied by upregulation of intracellular antioxidative defense, which was further promoted in the presence of benfotiamine. Namely, activated microglia exposed to non-cytotoxic doses of benfotiamine showed increased levels and activities of hydrogen peroxide- and superoxide-removing enzymes – catalase and glutathione system, and superoxide dismutase. In addition, benfotiamine showed the capacity to directly scavenge superoxide radical anion. As a consequence, benfotiamine suppressed the activation of microglia and provoked a decrease in NO and •O2- production and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, benfotiamine might silence pro-oxidative activity of microglia to alleviate/prevent oxidative damage of neighboring CNS cells.

  17. Benfotiamine upregulates antioxidative system in activated BV-2 microglia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Ivana; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic microglial activation and resulting sustained neuroinflammatory reaction are generally associated with neurodegeneration. Activated microglia acquires proinflammatory cellular profile that generates oxidative burst. Their persistent activation exacerbates inflammation, which damages healthy neurons via cytotoxic mediators, such as superoxide radical anion and nitric oxide. In our recent study, we have shown that benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate) possesses anti-inflammatory effects. Here, the effects of benfotiamine on the pro-oxidative component of activity of LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells were investigated. The activation of microglia was accompanied by upregulation of intracellular antioxidative defense, which was further promoted in the presence of benfotiamine. Namely, activated microglia exposed to non-cytotoxic doses of benfotiamine showed increased levels and activities of hydrogen peroxide- and superoxide-removing enzymes—catalase and glutathione system, and superoxide dismutase. In addition, benfotiamine showed the capacity to directly scavenge superoxide radical anion. As a consequence, benfotiamine suppressed the activation of microglia and provoked a decrease in NO and ·O−2 production and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, benfotiamine might silence pro-oxidative activity of microglia to alleviate/prevent oxidative damage of neighboring CNS cells. PMID:26388737

  18. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates hepatocellular carcinoma cell adhesion stimulated by adipokine resistin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistin, adipocyte-secreting adipokine, may play critical role in modulating cancer pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistin on HCC adhesion to the endothelium, and the mechanism underlying these resistin effects. Human SK-Hep1 cells were used to study the effect of resistin on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressions as well as NF-κB activation, and hence cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR), an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, was used to determine the regulatory role of AMPK on HCC adhesion to the endothelium in regard to the resistin effects. Treatment with resistin increased the adhesion of SK-Hep1 cells to HUVECs and concomitantly induced NF-κB activation, as well as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions in SK-Hep1 cells. Using specific blocking antibodies and siRNAs, we found that resistin-induced SK-Hep1 cell adhesion to HUVECs was through NF-κB-regulated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions. Moreover, treatment with AICAR demonstrated that AMPK activation in SK-Hep1 cells significantly attenuates the resistin effect on SK-Hep1 cell adhesion to HUVECs. These results clarify the role of resistin in inducing HCC adhesion to the endothelium and demonstrate the inhibitory effect of AMPK activation under the resistin stimulation. Our findings provide a notion that resistin play an important role to promote HCC metastasis and implicate AMPK may be a therapeutic target to against HCC metastasis

  19. Novel yeast cell dehydrogenase activity assay in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berłowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Klimek, Leszek; Orzeszyna, Bartosz; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a suitable method of succinate dehydrogenase activity assay in situ for different industrial yeast strains. For this purpose different compounds: EDTA, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, digitonin, nystatin and beta-mercaptoethanol were used. The permeabilization process was controlled microscopically by primuline staining. Enzyme assay was conducted in whole yeast cells with Na-succinate as substrate, phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as electron carrier and in the presence one of two different tetrazolium salts: tetrazolium blue chloride (BT) or cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) reduced during the assay. In comparabile studies of yeast vitality the amount of intracellular ATP was determined according to luciferin/luciferase method. During the succinate dehydrogenase assay in intact yeast cells without permeabilization, BT formazans were partially visualized in the cells, but CTC formazans appeared to be totally extracellular or associated with the plasma membrane. Under these conditions there was no linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell density. From all chemical compounds tested, only digitonin was effective in membrane permeabilization without negative influence on cell morphology. Furthermore, with digitonin-treated cells a linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell number was noticed. Significant decreasing of succinate dehydrogenase activity and ATP content were observed during aging of the tested yeast strains. PMID:17419290

  20. Xanthine oxidase activity regulates human embryonic brain cells growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevorkian G. A.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Involvement of Xanthine Oxidase (XO; EC1.1.3.22 in cellular proliferation and differentiation has been suggested by the numerous investigations. We have proposed that XO might have undoubtedly important role during the development, maturation as well as the death of human embryos brain cells. Methods. Human abortion material was utilized for the cultivation of brain cells (E90. XO activity was measured by the formation of uric acid in tissue. Cell death was detected by the utility of Trypan Blue dye. Results. Allopurinol suppressed the XO activity in the brain tissue (0.12 ± 0.02; 0.20 ± 0.03 resp., p < 0.05. On day 12th the number of cells in the culture treated with the Allopurinol at the early stage of development was higher in comparison with the Control (2350.1 ± 199.0 vs 2123 ± 96 and higher in comparison with the late period of treatment (1479.6 ± 103.8, p < < 0.05. In all groups, the number of the dead cells was less than in Control, indicating the protective nature of Allopurinol as an inhibitor of XO. Conclusions. Allopurinol initiates cells proliferation in case of the early treatment of the human brain derived cell culture whereas at the late stages it has an opposite effect.

  1. Single-cell transcriptome analyses reveal signals to activate dormant neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuping; Coskun, Volkan; Liang, Aibing; Yu, Juehua; Cheng, Liming; Ge, Weihong; Shi, Zhanping; Zhang, Kunshan; Li, Chun; Cui, Yaru; Lin, Haijun; Luo, Dandan; Wang, Junbang; Lin, Connie; Dai, Zachary; Zhu, Hongwen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hailiang; deVellis, Jean; Horvath, Steve; Sun, Yi Eve; Li, Siguang

    2015-05-21

    The scarcity of tissue-specific stem cells and the complexity of their surrounding environment have made molecular characterization of these cells particularly challenging. Through single-cell transcriptome and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA), we uncovered molecular properties of CD133(+)/GFAP(-) ependymal (E) cells in the adult mouse forebrain neurogenic zone. Surprisingly, prominent hub genes of the gene network unique to ependymal CD133(+)/GFAP(-) quiescent cells were enriched for immune-responsive genes, as well as genes encoding receptors for angiogenic factors. Administration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) activated CD133(+) ependymal neural stem cells (NSCs), lining not only the lateral but also the fourth ventricles and, together with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), elicited subsequent neural lineage differentiation and migration. This study revealed the existence of dormant ependymal NSCs throughout the ventricular surface of the CNS, as well as signals abundant after injury for their activation. PMID:26000486

  2. Cost of turning it off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cost of nuclear power must include the as-yet-uncalculated cost of dismantling a commercial power plant. New calculations show that hazardous levels of radioactive nickel will continue for as much as a million years after a power plant ceases to operate. Attention has been concentrated on waste disposal, overlooking disposal of the activation products such as steel and concrete structures. So far only eight small plants have been shut down, but these show considerable variation in the buildup of activation products depending on the number of megawatt-years the reactor was exposed. Commercial reactors with greater amounts of stainless steel and core structure can be expected to develop larger proportions of activation products. Three methods are proposed for shutting down reactors, all of which require removing radioactive wastes: (1) mothballing, which would make the total facility inoperable and would require expensive security measures; (2) entombment, which would remove all external parts to a federal respository or place them inside the vessel, would require minimal security; and (3) dismantling, the only safe method, would be dangerous and expensive, but would shift all radioactive materials to permanent and appropriate burial sites. 6 references

  3. Tomato waste: Carotenoids content, antioxidant and cell growth activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajčić, Sladjana; Ćetković, Gordana; Čanadanović-Brunet, Jasna; Djilas, Sonja; Mandić, Anamarija; Četojević-Simin, Dragana

    2015-04-01

    The carotenoid content, antioxidant and cell growth activities of tomato waste extracts, obtained from five different tomato genotypes, was investigated. High performance liquid chromatography was used to identify and quantify the main carotenoids present in tomato waste extracts. The antioxidant activity of tomato waste extracts was tested using spectrophotometric methods, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity and reducing power assay. The highest DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.057 mg/ml) was obtained for Bačka extract. The Knjaz extract showed the best reducing power (IC50 = 2.12 mg/ml). Cell growth effects were determined in HeLa, MCF7 and MRC-5 cell lines by sulforhodamine B test. Anti-proliferative effects were observed in all cell lines at higher concentrations (⩾ 0.125 mg/ml). The carotenoid contents exhibited a strong correlation with antioxidant and anti-proliferation activity. The results obtained indicated that tomato waste should be regarded as potential nutraceutic resource and may be used as a functional food ingredient. PMID:25442547

  4. Expression of Bcl-2 in cells with different telomerase activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Both telomerase and Bcl-2 are important genes in controlling apoptosis. The activation of telomerase and the abnormal regulation of Bcl-2 are also closely related to carcinogenesis. However, little is known about the linkage between telomerase and Bcl-2. The effect of activated telomerase on the expression of Bcl-2 has been investigated. It is demonstrated that in tumor and transformed cells with higher telomerase activity, Bcl-2 expression is significantly lower than that in telomerase negative or less telomerose activity cells. Further study showed that in the telomerase gene-transformed 2BS-fibroblasts, Bcl-2 expression is inhibited significantly while the exogenous telomerase catalytic subunit gene is re-expressed in fibroblasts. Results indicated that there might be a certain linkage between the expression of telomerase and Bcl-2, and overexpression of exogenous telomerase gene might down regulate the expression of Bcl-2.

  5. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule expression predicts lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, M. van den; Takes, R.P.; Blokpoel-deRuyter, M.; Slootweg, P.J.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is important for prognosis and clinical decision making concerning the treatment of the neck but may be difficult to detect. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), has been shown to correlate with prognosis or tumor grade in dif

  6. Realistic page-turning of electronic books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chaoran; Li, Haisheng; Bai, Yannan

    2014-01-01

    The booming electronic books (e-books), as an extension to the paper book, are popular with readers. Recently, many efforts are put into the realistic page-turning simulation o f e-book to improve its reading experience. This paper presents a new 3D page-turning simulation approach, which employs piecewise time-dependent cylindrical surfaces to describe the turning page and constructs smooth transition method between time-dependent cylinders. The page-turning animation is produced by sequentially mapping the turning page into the cylinders with different radii and positions. Compared to the previous approaches, our method is able to imitate various effects efficiently and obtains more natural animation of turning page.

  7. XIAP reverses various functional activities of FRNK in endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► FRNK domain is recruited into focal adhesion (FA), controlling endothelial cell adhesion. ► XIAP binds the FRNK domain of FAK. ► XIAP inhibits recruitment of FRNK into Fas and FRNK-promoted cell adhesion. ► XIAP plays a key role in vascular functions of FRNK or FRNK domain-mediated vascular functions of FAK. -- Abstract: In endothelial cells, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, and shear-stimulated activation of MAPK. We recently found that FAK is recruited into focal adhesion (FA) sites through interactions with XIAP (X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) and activated by Src kinase in response to shear stress. In this study, we examined which domain(s) of FAK is(are) important for various vascular functions such as FA recruiting, XIAP-binding and shear stress-stimulated ERK activation. Through a series of experiments, we determined that the FRNK domain is recruited into FA sites and promotes endothelial cell adhesion. Interestingly, XIAP knockdown was shown to reduce FA recruitment of FRNK and the cell adhesive effect of FRNK. In addition, we found that XIAP interacts with FRNK, suggesting cross-talk between XIAP and FRNK. We also demonstrated that FRNK inhibits endothelial cell migration and shear-stimulated ERK activation. These inhibitory effects of FRNK were reversed by XIAP knockdown. Taken together, we can conclude that XIAP plays a key role in vascular functions of FRNK or FRNK domain-mediated vascular functions of FAK.

  8. New thiazolidinediones affect endothelial cell activation and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, Martina; Tripodi, Gustavo L; Ferrer, Renila; Boscá, Lisardo; Pitta, Marina G R; Pitta, Ivan R; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P

    2016-07-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists used in treating type 2 diabetes that may exhibit beneficial pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of three new TZDs [GQ-32 (3-biphenyl-4-ylmethyl-5-(4-nitro-benzylidene)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione), GQ-169 (5-(4-chloro-benzylidene)-3-(2,6-dichloro-benzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione), and LYSO-7 (5-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-ylmethylene)-3-(4-chlorobenzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione)] on endothelial cells. The effects of the new TZDs were evaluated on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell migration, tube formation and the gene expression of adhesion molecules and angiogenic mediators in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). PPARγ activation by new TZDs was addressed with a reporter gene assay. The three new TZDs activated PPARγ and suppressed the tumor necrosis factor α-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. GQ-169 and LYSO-7 also inhibited the glucose-induced ROS production. Although NO production assessed with 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein-FM probe indicated that all tested TZDs enhanced intracellular levels of NO, only LYSO-7 treatment significantly increased the release of NO from HUVEC measured by chemiluminescence analysis of culture media. Additionally, GQ-32 and GQ-169 induced endothelial cell migration and tube formation by the up-regulation of angiogenic molecules expression, such as vascular endothelial growth factor A and interleukin 8. GQ-169 also increased the mRNA levels of basic fibroblast growth factor, and GQ-32 enhanced transforming growth factor-β expression. Together, the results of this study reveal that these new TZDs act as partial agonists of PPARγ and modulate endothelial cell activation and endothelial dysfunction besides to stimulate migration and tube formation. PMID:27108791

  9. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  10. Synergistic activity of letrozole and sorafenib on breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bonelli, Mara A.; Fumarola, Claudia; Alfieri, Roberta R.; Monica, Silvia; Cavazzoni, Andrea; Galetti, Maricla; Gatti, Rita; Belletti, Silvana; Harris, Adrian L.; Fox, Stephen B.; Evans, Dean B.; Dowsett, Mitch; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Bottini, Alberto; Generali, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Estrogens induce breast tumor cell proliferation by directly regulating gene expression via the estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional activity and by affecting growth factor signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin Complex1 (mTORC1) cascades. In this study we demonstrated the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of combining the aromatase inhibitor letrozole with the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib in aromatase-...

  11. Signals involved in T cell activation. II. Distinct roles of intact accessory cells, phorbol esters, and interleukin 1 in activation and cell cycle progression of resting T lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1986-05-15

    The signals involved in the initiation of mitogen-induced activation of resting guinea pig T cells were examined. The combination of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated DNA synthesis by accessory cell (AC)-depleted T cells cultured at high density, but the use of low density cultures indicated that intact AC were absolutely necessary for PHA-stimulated T cell DNA synthesis even in the presence of PMA, interleukin 1 (IL 1), or interleukin 2 (IL 2). In contrast, AC-depleted T cells were able to respond to the combination of the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, and PMA regardless of the cell density at which they were cultured. Results of cell cycle analysis support the conclusion that intact AC, IL 1, and a PMA-like signal play distinct roles in the progression of mitogen stimulated T cells through the first round of the cell cycle.

  12. Aminobisphosphonates Synergize with Human Cytomegalovirus To Activate the Antiviral Activity of Vγ9Vδ2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daguzan, Charline; Moulin, Morgane; Kulyk-Barbier, Hanna; Davrinche, Christian; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Champagne, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are activated through their TCR by neighboring cells producing phosphoantigens. Zoledronate (ZOL) treatment induces intracellular accumulation of the phosphoantigens isopentenyl pyrophosphate and ApppI. Few attempts have been made to use immunomanipulation of Vγ9Vδ2 lymphocytes in chronic viral infections. Although Vγ9Vδ2 T cells seem to ignore human CMV (HCMV)-infected cells, we examined whether they can sense HCMV when a TCR stimulus is provided with ZOL. Fibroblasts treated with ZOL activate Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to produce IFN-γ but not TNF. Following the same treatment, HCMV-infected fibroblasts stimulate TNF secretion and an increased production of IFN-γ, indicating that Vγ9Vδ2 cells can sense HCMV infection. Increased lymphokine production was observed with most clinical isolates and laboratory HCMV strains, HCMV-permissive astrocytoma, or dendritic cells, as well as "naive" and activated Vγ9Vδ2 cells. Quantification of intracellular isopentenyl pyrophosphate/ApppI following ZOL treatment showed that HCMV infection boosts their accumulation. This was explained by an increased capture of ZOL and by upregulation of HMG-CoA synthase and reductase transcription. Using an experimental setting where infected fibroblasts were cocultured with γδ cells in submicromolar concentrations of ZOL, we show that Vγ9Vδ2 cells suppressed substantially the release of infectious particles while preserving uninfected cells. Vγ9Vδ2 cytotoxicity was decreased by HCMV infection of targets whereas anti-IFN-γ and anti-TNF Abs significantly blocked the antiviral effect. Our experiments indicate that cytokines produced by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells have an antiviral potential in HCMV infection. This should lead to in vivo studies to explore the possible antiviral effect of immunostimulation with ZOL in this context. PMID:26819204

  13. Adventures with Cell Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Teachers are finding creative ways to turn the basic cell phone from a digital distraction into a versatile learning tool. In this article, the author explains why cell phones are important in learning and suggests rather than banning them that they be integrated into learning. She presents activities that can be done on a basic cell phone with a…

  14. Initial activation of EpCAM cleavage via cell-to-cell contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule EpCAM is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is frequently over-expressed in simple epithelia, progenitors, embryonic and tissue stem cells, carcinoma and cancer-initiating cells. Besides functioning as a homophilic adhesion protein, EpCAM is an oncogenic receptor that requires regulated intramembrane proteolysis for activation of its signal transduction capacity. Upon cleavage, the extracellular domain EpEX is released as a soluble ligand while the intracellular domain EpICD translocates into the cytoplasm and eventually into the nucleus in combination with four-and-a-half LIM domains protein 2 (FHL2) and β-catenin, and drives cell proliferation. EpCAM cleavage, induction of the target genes, and transmission of proliferation signals were investigated under varying density conditions using confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunoblotting, cell counting, and conditional cell systems. EpCAM cleavage, induction of the target genes, and transmission of proliferation signals were dependent on adequate cell-to-cell contact. If cell-to-cell contact was prohibited EpCAM did not provide growth advantages. If cells were allowed to undergo contact to each other, EpCAM transmitted proliferation signals based on signal transduction-related cleavage processes. Accordingly, the pre-cleaved version EpICD was not dependent on cell-to-cell contact in order to induce c-myc and cell proliferation, but necessitated nuclear translocation. For the case of contact-inhibited cells, although cleavage of EpCAM occurred, nuclear translocation of EpICD was reduced, as were EpCAM effects. Activation of EpCAM's cleavage and oncogenic capacity is dependent on cellular interaction (juxtacrine) to provide for initial signals of regulated intramembrane proteolysis, which then support signalling via soluble EpEX (paracrine)

  15. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  16. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  17. HIV-1 latency in actively dividing human T cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout Ben

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual cannot be achieved by current drug regimens. Viral reservoirs established early during the infection remain unaffected by anti-retroviral therapy and are able to replenish systemic infection upon interruption of the treatment. Therapeutic targeting of viral latency will require a better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the establishment and long-term maintenance of HIV-1 in resting memory CD4 T cells, the most prominent reservoir of transcriptional silent provirus. However, the molecular mechanisms that permit long-term transcriptional control of proviral gene expression in these cells are still not well understood. Exploring the molecular details of viral latency will provide new insights for eventual future therapeutics that aim at viral eradication. Results We set out to develop a new in vitro HIV-1 latency model system using the doxycycline (dox-inducible HIV-rtTA variant. Stable cell clones were generated with a silent HIV-1 provirus, which can subsequently be activated by dox-addition. Surprisingly, only a minority of the cells was able to induce viral gene expression and a spreading infection, eventhough these experiments were performed with the actively dividing SupT1 T cell line. These latent proviruses are responsive to TNFα treatment and alteration of the DNA methylation status with 5-Azacytidine or genistein, but not responsive to the regular T cell activators PMA and IL2. Follow-up experiments in several T cell lines and with wild-type HIV-1 support these findings. Conclusion We describe the development of a new in vitro model for HIV-1 latency and discuss the advantages of this system. The data suggest that HIV-1 proviral latency is not restricted to resting T cells, but rather an intrinsic property of the virus.

  18. Turn emergency generators into dollars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of distributed, dispatchable power generation is essentially the reverse of interruptible service. It can be understood by regarding both power and money as vectors: when the direction of the power flow switches, so does the direction of the money flow. At a signal given by the utility, a factory activates its emergency generating system and briefly becomes an independent power producer (IPP), feeding power into a local region of the grid. Upon receipt of another signal, it retires from that role. It may, however, continue to generate power for its own use

  19. Legal screw turns on Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legal action against British Nuclear Fuel Limited is summarised. The cases result from the effects of BNFL's activities at its Sellafield site. The three types of cases currently being pursued are outlined. The first concerns lowered value for property because high levels of radioactivity were found in the houses. The second concern cases of high rates of leukemia found near Sellafield. Over 30 families with affected children are suing BNFL. The third set relates to local farmers who have difficulty in selling their farms because of high levels of radioactivity found in the area and who are claiming for economic loss. (author)

  20. Photodynamic activation as a molecular switch to promote osteoblast cell differentiation via AP-1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tu, Yupeng; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), cells are impregnated with a photosensitizing agent that is activated by light irradiation, thereby photochemically generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amounts of ROS produced depends on the PDT dose and the nature of the photosensitizer. Although high levels of ROS are cytotoxic, at physiological levels they play a key role as second messengers in cellular signaling pathways, pluripotency, and differentiation of stem cells. To investigate further the use of photochemically triggered manipulation of such pathways, we exposed mouse osteoblast precursor cells and rat primary mesenchymal stromal cells to low-dose PDT. Our results demonstrate that low-dose PDT can promote osteoblast differentiation via the activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1). Although PDT has been used primarily as an anti-cancer therapy, the use of light as a photochemical "molecular switch" to promote differentiation should expand the utility of this method in basic research and clinical applications. PMID:26279470

  1. ZIP4 Regulates Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth by Activating IL-6/STAT3 Pathway via Zinc Finger Transcription Factor CREB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Logsdon, Craig D.; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies indicate a strong correlation of zinc transporter ZIP4 and pancreatic cancer progression; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We have recently found that ZIP4 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway through which ZIP4 regulates pancreatic cancer growth. Experimental Design The expression of cyclin D1, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer xenografts and cells were examined by real time PCR, Bio-Plex cytokine assay, and Western blot, respectively. The activity of CREB is examined by a promoter activity assay. Results Cyclin D1 was significantly increased in the ZIP4 overexpressing MIA PaCa-2 cells (MIA-ZIP4)-injected orthotopic xenografts and was downregulated in the ZIP4 silenced ASPC-1 (ASPC-shZIP4) group. The phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an upstream activator of cyclin D1, was increased in MIA-ZIP4 cells, and decreased in ASPC-shZIP4 cells. IL-6, a known upstream activator for STAT3, was also found to be significantly increased in the MIA-ZIP4 cells and xenografts, and decreased in the ASPC-shZIP4 group. Overexpression of ZIP4 led to a 75% increase of IL-6 promoter activity, and caused increased phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Conclusions Our study suggest that ZIP4 overexpression causes increased IL-6 transcription via CREB, which in turn activates STAT3, and leads to increased cyclin D1 expression, resulting in increased cell proliferation and tumor progression in pancreatic cancer. These results elucidated a novel pathway in ZIP4-mediated pancreatic cancer growth, and suggest new therapeutic targets including ZIP4, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:20160059

  2. A Micro Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter for Astrobiology Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Donald W.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    A micro-scale Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter (microFACS) for astrobiology applications is under development. This device is designed to have a footprint of 7 cm x 7 cm x 4 cm and allow live-dead counts and sorting of cells that have fluorescent characteristics from staining. The FACS system takes advantage of microfluidics to create a cell sorter that can fit in the palm of the hand. A micron-scale channel allows cells to pass by a blue diode which causes emission of marker-expressed cells which are detected by a filtered photodetector. A small microcontroller then counts cells and operates high speed valves to select which chamber the cell is collected in (a collection chamber or a waste chamber). Cells with the expressed characteristic will be collected in the collection chamber. This system has been built and is currently being tested. We are also designing a system with integrated MEMS-based pumps and valves for a small and compact unit to fly on small satellite-based biology experiments.

  3. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Regulate Autoreactive B Cell Activation via Soluble Factors and in a Cell-to-Cell Contact Manner1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chuanlin; Cai, Yihua; Marroquin, Jose; Ildstad, Suzanne T.; Yan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are specialized type I IFN producers, which play an important role in pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. Dysregulated autoreactive B cell activation is a hallmark in most autoimmune diseases. This study was undertaken to investigate interactions between pDCs and autoreactive B cells. After co-culture of autoreactive B cells that recognize self-Ag small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles with activated pDCs, we found that pDCs significantly enhance autoreactive B cell proliferation, autoAb production, and survival in response to toll-like receptor (TLR) and BCR stimulation. Neutralization of IFN-α/β and IL-6 abrogated partially pDC-mediated enhancement of autoreactive B cell activation. Transwell studies demonstrated that pDCs could provide activation signals to autoreactive B cells via cell-to-cell contact manner. The involvement of the ICAM-1-LFA-1 pathway was revealed as contributing to this effect. This in vitro enhancement effect was further demonstrated by an in vivo B cell adoptive transfer experiment, which showed that autoreactive B cell proliferation and activation were significantly decreased in MyD-88-deficient mice compared to WT mice. These data suggest the dynamic interplay between pDCs and B cells is required for full activation of autoreactive B cells upon TLR or BCR stimulation. PMID:19890051

  4. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Germanium Active Layer for Top Cell of a Multi Junction Cell Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaehyun; Iftiquar, S M; Kim, Minbum; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Kim, Jiwoong; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy is generally used in the bottom cell because of its low band gap. The a-SiGe:H has a higher photo conductivity in comparison to the a-Si:H; thus, it is expected that the a-SiGe:H can show better short circuit current density than that of the a-Si:H based solar cell. Therefore, we optimized a-SiGe:H active layer that can be a suitable choice for the front cell of a multi junction.solar cell. Furthermore, we carried out a comparative study of the solar cells that have a-SiGe:H and a-Si:H as respective active layers. The a-SiGe:H based solar cells show higher short circuit current density, while the a-Si:H based cells show higheropen circuit voltage. The current-voltage characteristics of these cells are as follows: (a) V(oc) = 770 mV, J(sc) = 15.0 mA/cm2, FF = 64.5%, and η = 7.47% for a-SiGe:H based cell; and (b) V(oc) = 826 mV, J(sc) = 13.63 mA/cm2, FF = 72.0%, and η = 8.1% for a-Si:H based cell. PMID:27483837

  5. Spectral perspective on the electromagnetic activity of cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Ondřej; Červinková, Kateřina; Nerudová, Michaela; Cifra, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 6 (2015), s. 513-522. ISSN 1568-0266 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29294S Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Electromagnetic activity of cells * Bioelectromagnetism * Molecular vibrations Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.402, year: 2014

  6. Dextromethorphan inhibits activations and functions in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN- γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF- κ B translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  7. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Yuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM, a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases.

  8. Prodigiosin Induces Autolysins in Actively Grown Bacillus subtilis Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danevčič, Tjaša; Borić Vezjak, Maja; Tabor, Maja; Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Prodigiosin produced by marine bacterium Vibrio ruber DSM 14379 exhibits a potent antimicrobial activity against a broad range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The mechanism of prodigiosin antimicrobial action, however, is not known. In this work, the effect of prodigiosin on Bacillus subtilis growth, cell membrane leakage, and induction of autolysins was studied. Treating B. subtilis with prodigiosin resulted in rapid decline of optical density and increased cell membrane leakage measured by β-galactosidase activity. Cell lysis was initiated immediately after treatment with prodigiosin in the middle exponential phase and was completed within 2 h. Lytic activity of prodigiosin in mutant strains with impaired autolysin genes lytABCD decreased for 80% compared to the wild type strain, while in lytABCDEF mutant strain prodigiosin had no bacteriolytic but only bacteriostatic effect. Fast prodigiosin lytic activity on individual B. subtilis cells was confirmed by a modified comet assay. The results indicate that prodigiosin autolysin induction in B. subtilis is growth phase dependent. PMID:26858704

  9. Active cells for redundant and configurable articulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed research effort explores the development of active cells—simple contractile electro-mechanical units that can be used as the material basis for larger articulable structures. Each cell, which might be considered a ‘muscle unit,’ consists of a contractile Nitinol Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) core with conductive terminals. Large numbers of these cells might be combined and externally powered to change phase, contracting to either articulate with a large strain or increase the stiffness of the ensemble, depending on the cell design. Unlike traditional work in modular robotics, the approach presented here focuses on cells that have a simplistic design and function, are inexpensive to fabricate, and are eventually scalable to sub-millimeter sizes, working toward our vision of articulated and robotic structures that can be custom-fabricated from large numbers of general cell units, similar to biological structures. In this paper, we present the design of the active cells and demonstrate their usage with three articulated structures built with them. (paper)

  10. Diatom-derived polyunsaturated aldehydes activate cell death in human cancer cell lines but not normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementina Sansone

    Full Text Available Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs that induce abortions or malformations in the offspring of invertebrates exposed to them during gestation. Here we compare the effects of the PUAs 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal (DD, 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal (OD and 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal (HD on the adenocarcinoma cell lines lung A549 and colon COLO 205, and the normal lung/brunch epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Using the viability MTT/Trypan blue assays, we show that PUAs have a toxic effect on both A549 and COLO 205 tumor cells but not BEAS-2B normal cells. DD was the strongest of the three PUAs tested, at all time-intervals considered, but HD was as strong as DD after 48 h. OD was the least active of the three PUAs. The effect of the three PUAs was somewhat stronger for A549 cells. We therefore studied the death signaling pathway activated in A549 showing that cells treated with DD activated Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1 and Fas Associated Death Domain (FADD leading to necroptosis via caspase-3 without activating the survival pathway Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP. The TNFR1/FADD/caspase pathway was also observed with OD, but only after 48 h. This was the only PUA that activated RIP, consistent with the finding that OD causes less damage to the cell compared to DD and HD. In contrast, cells treated with HD activated the Fas/FADD/caspase pathway. This is the first report that PUAs activate an extrinsic apoptotic machinery in contrast to other anticancer drugs that promote an intrinsic death pathway, without affecting the viability of normal cells from the same tissue type. These findings have interesting implications also from the ecological viewpoint considering that HD is one of the most common PUAs produced by diatoms.

  11. Sickle Cell Disease Activates Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Induce Cathepsins K and V Activity in Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Platt, Manu O.; Sindhuja Surapaneni; Keegan, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic disease that increases systemic inflammation as well as the risk of pediatric strokes, but links between sickle-induced inflammation and arterial remodeling are not clear. Cathepsins are powerful elastases and collagenases secreted by endothelial cells and monocyte-derived macrophages in atherosclerosis, but their involvement in sickle cell disease has not been studied. Here, we investigated how tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα) and circulating mononuclear cell adhe...

  12. PROTEN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY IN RAT ASCITES HEPATOMA CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Saadat

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases regulate tyrosine phosphorylation of target proteins involved in several aspects of cellular functions. Enzyme activities of the PTPases in cytosolic and particulate fractions of rat ascites hepatoma cell lines were determined and compared with those of normal rat liver. Our present data revealed that although there was no neoplatic-specific alteration of the PTPase activity in examined hepatomas, the activity in particulate fractions of island type of hepatomas was remarkably decreased compared with either rat liver or free type hepatomas.

  13. Extraction of Active Enzymes from "Hard-to-Break-Cells"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottaviani, Alessio; Tesauro, Cinzia; Fjelstrup, S;

    We present the utilization of a rolling circle amplification (RCA) based assay to investigate the extraction efficiency of active enzymes from a class of “hard-to-break” cells, yeast Saccaramyces cerevisiae. Current analyses of microorganisms, such as pathogenic bacteria, parasites or particular...... life stages of microorganisms (e.g. spores from bacteria or fungi) is hampered by the lack of efficient lysis protocols that preserve the activity and integrity of the cellular content. Presented herein is a flexible scheme to screen lysis protocols for active enzyme extraction. We also report a gentle...

  14. T-Cell Tumor Elimination as a Result of T-Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Longo, Dan L.; Bridges, Sandra H.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been shown that activation of murine T-cell hybridomas with antigen inhibits their growth in vitro. The ``suicide'' of these neoplastic T cells upon stimulation with antigen suggested the possibility that activation via the antigen-specific receptor could also inhibit the growth of neoplastic T cells in vivo. To test this, mice were subcutaneously inoculated with antigen-specific T-cell hybridomas and then treated intraperitoneally with antigen. Administration of the appropriate antigen immediately after inoculation with the T-cell hybridoma abrogated tumor formation; antigen administered after tumors had become established decreased the tumor burden and, in a substantial fraction of animals, led to long-term survival. The efficacy of antigen therapy was due to both a direct inhibitory effect on tumor growth and the induction of host immunity. These studies demonstrate the utility of cellular activation as a means of inhibiting neoplastic T-cell growth in vivo and provide a rationale for studying the use of less selective reagents that can mimic the activating properties of antigen, such as monoclonal antibodies, in the treatment of T-cell neoplasms of unknown antigen specificity.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-activated microglial-induced neuroglial cell differentiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoguang Luo; Chunlin Ge; Yan Ren; Hongmei Yu; Zhe Wu; Qiushuang Wang; Chaodong Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microglia are very sensitive to environmental changes, often becoming activated by pathological conditions. Activated microglia can exert a dual role in injury and repair in various diseases of the central nervous system, including cerebral ischemia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. OBJECTIVE: An immortal microglial cell line, BV2, was treated with varying concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce a pathological situation. Supernatant was harvested and incubated with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and, concomitantly, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation was observed. DESIGN: A controlled observation, in vitro experiment. SETTING: Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University. MATERIALS: Five male 2-3-week-old Sprague Dawley rats were purchased from Animal Laboratory Center of China Medical University and included in this study. The protocol was performed in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals. The microglial cell line BV2 was produced by Cell Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Sciences. LPS was produced by Sigma Company, USA. METHODS: This study was performed in the Central Laboratory of China Medical University from September 2006 to March 2007. Rat femoral and tibial bone marrow was collected for separation and primary culture of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell cultures were divided into 5 groups: control group, non-activated group, as well as low-, medium-, and high-dose LPS groups. In the control group, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) supplemented with fetal bovine serum (volume fraction 0.1). In the non-activated group, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were incubated with non-activated BV2 supernatant. In the low-, medium-, and high-dose LPS groups, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were incubated with LPS (0.01, 0.1 and 1

  16. The possible roles of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide channels in regulating pacemaker activity in colonic interstitial cells of Cajal

    OpenAIRE

    Shahi, Pawan Kumar; Choi, Seok; Zuo, Dong Chuan; Kim, Man Yoo; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Jun; Park, Kyu Joo; So, Insuk; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN) channels are pacemaker channels that regulate heart rate and neuronal rhythm in spontaneously active cardiac and neuronal cells. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are also spontaneously active pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we investigated the existence of HCN channel and its role on pacemaker activity in colonic ICCs. Methods We performed whole-cell patch clamp, RT-PCR, and Ca2+-imaging in cultured ICCs fro...

  17. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-{alpha} and PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozio, Margaret S; Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to

  18. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Assoian, Richard K.; Rader, Daniel J.; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD44 to atherosclerosis, we bred CD44-null mice to atherosclerosis-prone apoE-deficient mice. We found a 50–70% reduction in aortic lesions in CD44-null mice compared with CD44 heterozygote and wild-type littermates. We demonstrate that CD44 promotes the recruitment of macrophages to atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CD44 is required for phenotypic dedifferentiation of medial smooth muscle cells to the “synthetic” state as measured by expression of VCAM-1. Finally, we demonstrate that hyaluronan, the principal ligand for CD44, is upregulated in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE-deficient mice and that the low-molecular-weight proinflammatory forms of hyaluronan stimulate VCAM-1 expression and proliferation of cultured primary aortic smooth muscle cells, whereas high-molecular-weight forms of hyaluronan inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation. We conclude that CD44 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms. PMID:11581304

  19. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak, Martin; Schjerling, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  20. Constitutive activation of BMP signalling abrogates experimental metastasis of OVCA429 cells via reduced cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Trevor G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP4 signalling in human ovarian cancer cells induces a number of phenotypic changes in vitro, including altered cell morphology, adhesion, motility and invasion, relative to normal human ovarian surface epithelial cells. From these in vitro analyses, we had hypothesized that active BMP signalling promotes the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer. Methods To test this directly, we engineered OVCA429 human ovarian cancer cells possessing doxycycline-inducible expression of a constitutively-active mutant BMP receptor, ALK3QD, and administered these cells to immunocompromised mice. Further characterization was performed in vitro to address the role of activated BMP signalling on the EOC phenotype, with particular emphasis on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and cell adhesion. Results Unexpectedly, doxycycline-induced ALK3QD expression in OVCA429 cells reduced tumour implantation on peritoneal surfaces and ascites formation when xenografted into immunocompromised mice by intraperitoneal injection. To determine the potential mechanisms controlling this in vivo observation, we followed with several cell culture experiments. Doxycycline-induced ALK3QD expression enhanced the refractile, spindle-shaped morphology of cultured OVCA429 cells eliciting an EMT-like response. Using in vitro wound healing assays, we observed that ALK3QD-expressing cells migrated with long, cytoplasmic projections extending into the wound space. The phenotypic alterations of ALK3QD-expressing cells correlated with changes in specific gene expression patterns of EMT, including increased Snail and Slug and reduced E-cadherin mRNA expression. In addition, ALK3QD signalling reduced β1- and β3-integrin expression, critical molecules involved in ovarian cancer cell adhesion. The combination of reduced E-cadherin and β-integrin expression correlates directly with the reduced EOC cell cohesion in spheroids and

  1. Cell cooperation in coelomocyte cytotoxic activity of Paracentrotus lividus coelomocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizza, Vincenzo; Giaramita, Francesca Tiziana; Parrinello, Daniela; Cammarata, Matteo; Parrinello, Nicolò

    2007-06-01

    The coelomic fluid from the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus contains several coelomocyte types including amoebocytes and uncoloured spherulocytes involved in immune defences. In the present paper, we show a Ca(2+)-dependent cytotoxic activity for the unfractionated coelomocytes assayed in vitro, with rabbit erythrocytes and the K562 tumour cell line. In a plaque-forming assay, whole coelomocyte preparations as well as density gradient separated coelomocyte populations revealed that cell populations enriched in uncoloured spherulocytes, exerted high cytotoxic activity by releasing lysins in the presence of amoebocytes. This cooperative effect could be dependent on soluble factors released by amoebocytes. With regard to this, we show that an enhanced cytotoxic activity was found by adding the supernatant from sonicated amoebocytes or hemocyte culture medium into spherulocyte preparations. PMID:17329136

  2. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Co-Activator-1α Cooperate to Protect Cells from DNA Damage and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Vascular Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2015-10-01

    Reduced telomere length with increasing age in dividing cells has been implicated in contributing to the pathologies of human aging, which include cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, through induction of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening results from the absence of telomerase, an enzyme required to maintain telomere length. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the protein subunit of telomerase, is expressed only transiently in a subset of adult somatic cells, which include stem cells and smooth muscle cells. A recent report from Xiong and colleagues demonstrates a pivotal role for the transcription co-factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (PGC-1α) in maintaining TERT expression and preventing vascular senescence and atherosclerosis in mice. Ablation of PGC-1α reduced TERT expression and increased DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in shortened telomeres and vascular senescence. In the ApoE(-/-) mouse model of atherosclerosis, forced expression of PGC-1α increased expression of TERT, extended telomeres, and reversed genomic DNA damage, vascular senescence, and the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Alpha lipoic acid (ALA) stimulated expression of PGC-1α and TERT and reversed DNA damage, vascular senescence, and atherosclerosis, similarly to ectopic expression of PGC-1α. ALA stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling, which in turn activated the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a co-factor for PGC-1α expression. The possibility that ALA might induce TERT to extend telomeres in human cells suggests that ALA may be useful in treating atherosclerosis and other aging-related diseases. However, further investigation is needed to identify whether ALA induces TERT in human cells, which cell types are susceptible, and whether such changes have clinical significance. PMID:26414604

  3. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a protease essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation.

  4. Antiproliferative and cell apoptosis-inducing activities of compounds from Buddleja davidii in Mgc-803 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Jian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Buddleja davidii is widely distributed in the southwestern region of China. We have undertaken a systematic analysis of B. davidii as a Chinese traditional medicine with anticancer activity by isolating natural products for their activity against the human gastric cancer cell line Mgc-803 and the human breast cancer cell line Bcap-37. Results Ten compounds were extracted and isolated from B. davidii, among which colchicine was identified in B. davidii for the first time. The inhibitory activities of these compounds were investigated in Mgc-803, Bcap-37 cells in vitro by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, and the results showed that luteolin and colchicine had potent inhibitory activities against the growth of Mgc-803 cells. Subsequent fluorescence staining and flow cytometry analysis indicated that these two compounds could induce apoptosis in Mgc-803 cells. The results also showed that the percentages of early apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-, where PI is propidium iodide and late apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI+ increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After 36 h of incubation with luteolin at 20 μM, the percentages of cells were approximately 15.4% in early apoptosis and 43.7% in late apoptosis; after 36 h of incubation with colchicine at 20 μM, the corresponding values were 7.7% and 35.2%, respectively. Conclusions Colchicine and luteolin from B. davidii have potential applications as adjuvant therapies for treating human carcinoma cells. These compounds could also induce apoptosis in tumor cells.

  5. Chibby drives β catenin cytoplasmic accumulation leading to activation of the unfolded protein response in BCR-ABL1+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Manuela; Leo, Elisa; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Campi, Virginia; Borsi, Enrica; Castagnetti, Fausto; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Santucci, Maria Alessandra; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease caused by the constitutive tyrosine kinase (TK) activity of the BCR-ABL fusion protein. However, the phenotype of leukemic stem cells (LSC) is sustained by β catenin rather than by the BCR-ABL TK. β catenin activity in CML is contingent upon its stabilization proceeding from the BCR-ABL-induced phosphorylation at critical residues for interaction with the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/Axin/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) destruction complex or GSK3 inactivating mutations. Here we studied the impact of β catenin antagonist Chibby (CBY) on β catenin signaling in BCR-ABL1+ cells. CBY is a small conserved protein which interacts with β catenin and impairs β catenin-mediated transcriptional activation through two distinct molecular mechanisms: 1) competition with T cell factor (TCF) or lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) for β catenin binding; and 2) nuclear export of β catenin via interaction with 14-3-3. We found that its enforced expression in K562 cell line promoted β catenin cytoplasmic translocation resulting in inhibition of target gene transcription. Moreover, cytoplasmic accumulation of β catenin activated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated pathway known as unfolded protein response (UPR). CBY-driven cytoplasmic accumulation of β catenin is also a component of BCR-ABL1+ cell response to the TK inhibitor Imatinib (IM). It evoked the UPR activation leading to the induction of BCL2-interacting mediator of cell death (BIM) by UPR sensors. BIM, in turn, contributed to the execution phase of apoptosis in the activation of ER resident caspase 12 and mobilization of Ca(2+) stores. PMID:23707389

  6. Stem cell cytoskeleton is slaved to active motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeldt, Florian; Brown, Andre; Engler, Adam; Discher, Dennis

    2007-03-01

    Cells feel their physical microenvironment through their adhesion and respond to it in various ways. Indeed, matrix elasticity can even guide the differentiation of human adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) [Engler et al. Cell 2006]. Sparse cultures of MSCs on elastic collagen--coated substrates that are respectively soft, stiff, or extremely stiff were shown to induce neurogenesis, myogenesis, and osteogenesis. Lineage commitment was evaluated by morphological analysis, protein expression profiles, and transcription microarrays. Differentiation could be completely blocked with a specific non-muscle myosin II (NMM II) inhibitor, suggesting that contractile motor activity is essential for the cells to sense matrix elasticity. Current studies by AFM and near-field fluorescence imaging show that NMM II inhibition in stem cells on rigid glass surfaces promotes actin-rich dendritic outgrowth resembling neurite extension. Dynamic cell studies have been conducted to elucidate the complex molecular interplay of the contractile apparatus in response to selected physical and biochemical stimuli. Additional insight is being gained by using AFM to investigate the local elasticity of the cell's cytoskeletal force sensing machinery.

  7. Isolation of biologically active nanomaterial (inclusion bodies from bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peternel Špela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs were recognised as highly pure deposits of active proteins inside bacterial cells. Such active nanoparticles are very interesting for further downstream protein isolation, as well as for many other applications in nanomedicine, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry. To prepare large quantities of a high quality product, the whole bioprocess has to be optimised. This includes not only the cultivation of the bacterial culture, but also the isolation step itself, which can be of critical importance for the production process. To determine the most appropriate method for the isolation of biologically active nanoparticles, three methods for bacterial cell disruption were analyzed. Results In this study, enzymatic lysis and two mechanical methods, high-pressure homogenization and sonication, were compared. During enzymatic lysis the enzyme lysozyme was found to attach to the surface of IBs, and it could not be removed by simple washing. As this represents an additional impurity in the engineered nanoparticles, we concluded that enzymatic lysis is not the most suitable method for IBs isolation. During sonication proteins are released (lost from the surface of IBs and thus the surface of IBs appears more porous when compared to the other two methods. We also found that the acoustic output power needed to isolate the IBs from bacterial cells actually damages proteins structures, thereby causing a reduction in biological activity. High-pressure homogenization also caused some damage to IBs, however the protein loss from the IBs was negligible. Furthermore, homogenization had no side-effects on protein biological activity. Conclusions The study shows that among the three methods tested, homogenization is the most appropriate method for the isolation of active nanoparticles from bacterial cells.

  8. 32 CFR 636.23 - Turning movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL... movements. (a) U-turns are prohibited on all streets in the cantonment area. (b) Right-turns will be made from a position as close to the right edge or right curb of the roadway as possible. (c)...

  9. Persistent Polyclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis B Cells Can Be Activated through CD40-CD154 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Dugas-Bourdages

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis (PPBL is a rare disorder, diagnosed primarily in adult female smokers and characterized by an expansion of CD19+CD27+IgM+ memory B cells, by the presence of binucleated lymphocytes, and by a moderate elevation of serum IgM. The clinical course is usually benign, but it is not known whether or not PPBL might be part of a process leading to the emergence of a malignant proliferative disorder. In this study we sought to investigate the functional response of B cells from patients with PPBL by use of an optimal memory B cell culture model based on the CD40-CD154 interaction. We found that the proliferation of PPBL B cells was almost as important as that of B cells from normal controls, resulting in high immunoglobulin secretion with in vitro isotypic switching. We conclude that the CD40-CD154 activation pathway is functional in the memory B cell population of PPBL patients, suggesting that the disorder may be due to either a dysfunction of other cells in the microenvironment or a possible defect in another B cell activation pathway.

  10. Mechanisms of Innate Lymphoid Cell and Natural Killer T Cell Activation during Mucosal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Nau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal surfaces in the airways and the gastrointestinal tract are critical for the interactions of the host with its environment. Due to their abundance at mucosal tissue sites and their powerful immunomodulatory capacities, the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs and natural killer T (NKT cells in the maintenance of mucosal tolerance has recently moved into the focus of attention. While NKT cells as well as ILCs utilize distinct transcription factors for their development and lineage diversification, both cell populations can be further divided into three polarized subpopulations reflecting the distinction into Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells in the adaptive immune system. While bystander activation through cytokines mediates the induction of ILC and NKT cell responses, NKT cells become activated also through the engagement of their canonical T cell receptors (TCRs by (glycolipid antigens (cognate recognition presented by the atypical MHC I like molecule CD1d on antigen presenting cells (APCs. As both innate lymphocyte populations influence inflammatory responses due to the explosive release of copious amounts of different cytokines, they might represent interesting targets for clinical intervention. Thus, we will provide an outlook on pathways that might be interesting to evaluate in this context.

  11. Turn customer input into innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulwick, Anthony W

    2002-01-01

    It's difficult to find a company these days that doesn't strive to be customer-driven. Too bad, then, that most companies go about the process of listening to customers all wrong--so wrong, in fact, that they undermine innovation and, ultimately, the bottom line. What usually happens is this: Companies ask their customers what they want. Customers offer solutions in the form of products or services. Companies then deliver these tangibles, and customers just don't buy. The reason is simple--customers aren't expert or informed enough to come up with solutions. That's what your R&D team is for. Rather, customers should be asked only for outcomes--what they want a new product or service to do for them. The form the solutions take should be up to you, and you alone. Using Cordis Corporation as an example, this article describes, in fine detail, a series of effective steps for capturing, analyzing, and utilizing customer input. First come indepth interviews, in which a moderator works with customers to deconstruct a process or activity in order to unearth "desired outcomes." Addressing participants' comments one at a time, the moderator rephrases them to be both unambiguous and measurable. Once the interviews are complete, researchers then compile a comprehensive list of outcomes that participants rank in order of importance and degree to which they are satisfied by existing products. Finally, using a simple mathematical formula called the "opportunity calculation," researchers can learn the relative attractiveness of key opportunity areas. These data can be used to uncover opportunities for product development, to properly segment markets, and to conduct competitive analysis. PMID:12964470

  12. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase in human cells by the mycotoxin patulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin produced by certain species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, is often detectable in moldy fruits and their derivative products. PAT led to a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Exposure of HEK293 cells to concentrations above 5 μM PAT for 30 min induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation; activation of ERK1/2 was also observed after 24 h incubation with 0.05 μM of PAT. Treatment of human PBMCs for 30 min with 30 μM PAT dramatically increased the phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels. Both MEK1/2 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suppressed ERK1/2 activation in either HEK293 or MDCK cells. In HEK293 cells, U0126-mediated inhibition of PAT-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation resulted in a significant decrease in levels of DNA damage, expressed as tail moment values, in the single cell gel electrophoresis assay. Conversely, U0126 did not affect cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, and the DNA synthesis rate in PAT-treated cultures. Exposure of HEK293 cells for 90 min to 15 μM PAT elevated the levels of early growth response gene-1 (egr-1) mRNA, but not of c-fos, fosB, and junB mRNAs. These results indicate that in human cells, PAT causes a rapid and persistent activation of ERK1/2 and this signaling pathway plays an important role in mediating PAT-induced DNA damage and egr-1 gene expression

  13. T cell activation. II. Activation of human T lymphoma cells by cross-linking of their MHC class I antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, S; Geisler, C; Rubin, B; Plesner, T; Claesson, M H

    1990-01-01

    The present work demonstrates that antibody-induced cross-linking of MHC class I antigens on Jurkat T lymphoma cells leads to a rise in intracellular calcium (Cai2+) and, in the presence of phorbol ester (PMA), to IL-2 production and IL-2 receptor expression. The rise in Cai2+ exhibited a profile...... very different from that obtained after anti-CD3 antibody-induced activation suggesting that activation signals are transduced differently after binding of anti-CD3 antibody and class I cross-linking, respectively. However, when Cai2+ was examined in individual Jurkat cells by means of a digital image...... the T cell receptor complex and MHC class I molecules....

  14. Turning carbon dioxide into fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z; Xiao, T; Kuznetsov, V L; Edwards, P P

    2010-07-28

    Our present dependence on fossil fuels means that, as our demand for energy inevitably increases, so do emissions of greenhouse gases, most notably carbon dioxide (CO2). To avoid the obvious consequences on climate change, the concentration of such greenhouse gases in the atmosphere must be stabilized. But, as populations grow and economies develop, future demands now ensure that energy will be one of the defining issues of this century. This unique set of (coupled) challenges also means that science and engineering have a unique opportunity-and a burgeoning challenge-to apply their understanding to provide sustainable energy solutions. Integrated carbon capture and subsequent sequestration is generally advanced as the most promising option to tackle greenhouse gases in the short to medium term. Here, we provide a brief overview of an alternative mid- to long-term option, namely, the capture and conversion of CO2, to produce sustainable, synthetic hydrocarbon or carbonaceous fuels, most notably for transportation purposes. Basically, the approach centres on the concept of the large-scale re-use of CO2 released by human activity to produce synthetic fuels, and how this challenging approach could assume an important role in tackling the issue of global CO2 emissions. We highlight three possible strategies involving CO2 conversion by physico-chemical approaches: sustainable (or renewable) synthetic methanol, syngas production derived from flue gases from coal-, gas- or oil-fired electric power stations, and photochemical production of synthetic fuels. The use of CO2 to synthesize commodity chemicals is covered elsewhere (Arakawa et al. 2001 Chem. Rev. 101, 953-996); this review is focused on the possibilities for the conversion of CO2 to fuels. Although these three prototypical areas differ in their ultimate applications, the underpinning thermodynamic considerations centre on the conversion-and hence the utilization-of CO2. Here, we hope to illustrate that advances

  15. Turning around Low-Performing Schools in Chicago: Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Marisa; Allensworth, Elaine; Jagesic, Sanja; Sebastian, James; Salmonowicz, Michael; Meyers, Coby; Gerdeman, R. Dean

    2013-01-01

    Specific strategies for "turning around" chronically low-performing schools have become prominent, with the U.S. Department of Education enacting policies to promote four school improvement models that include "fundamental, comprehensive changes in leadership, staffing, and governance." Despite the attention and activity surrounding these types of…

  16. Danish participation in the IEA solar cell activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 12-month period 01.05.93 - 30.04.94 the Danish activities in the IEA 'Solar Cell Agreement' consisted in: participation in the Executive Committee (ExCo) and participation in Task 1 'Exchange and Dissemination of Information on PV Power Systems'. ExCo has meetings every half-year and is a coordinating organ for the Agreement. Work on the Task 1 is organized in 4 subtasks: (1) mapping of solar cell activities in the OECD countries and preparation of an IEA handbook on solar cell technology; (2) publishing of a semiannual newsletter about the agreement; (3) an 'executive conference' on solar cell technology and its uses with participation of the decision-makers in respective power industries; (4) information dissemination whenever required. Demonstration projects, like a photovoltaic roof-integrated system connected to the grid. have been implemented. Three larger solar cell projects, subsidized by the EU means, comprehend 'real time monitoring' by a solar system, WHO project 'Solar Energy Applications for Primary Health Care Clinics for Remote Rural Areas' (SAPHIR) and a grid-connected photovoltaic system in a suburb residential settlement. (EG)

  17. Familial occurrence of systemic mast cell activation disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard J Molderings

    Full Text Available Systemic mast cell activation disease (MCAD comprises disorders characterized by an enhanced release of mast cell mediators accompanied by accumulation of dysfunctional mast cells. Demonstration of familial clustering would be an important step towards defining the genetic contribution to the risk of systemic MCAD. The present study aimed to quantify familial aggregation for MCAD and to investigate the variability of clinical and molecular findings (e.g. somatic mutations in KIT among affected family members in three selected pedigrees. Our data suggest that systemic MCAD pedigrees include more systemic MCAD cases than would be expected by chance, i.e., compared with the prevalence of MCAD in the general population. The prevalence of MCAD suspected by symptom self-report in first-degree relatives of patients with MCAD amounted to approximately 46%, compared to prevalence in the general German population of about 17% (p<0.0001. In three families with a high familial loading of MCAD, the subtype of MCAD and the severity of mediator-related symptoms varied between family members. In addition, genetic alterations detected in KIT were variable, and included mutations at position 816 of the amino acid sequence. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for common familial occurrence of MCAD. Our findings observed in the three pedigrees together with recent reports in the literature suggest that, in familial cases (i.e., in the majority of MCAD, mutated disease-related operator and/or regulator genes could be responsible for the development of somatic mutations in KIT and other proteins important for the regulation of mast cell activity. Accordingly, the immunohistochemically different subtypes of MCAD (i.e. mast cell activation syndrome and systemic mastocytosis should be more accurately regarded as varying presentations of a common generic root process of mast cell dysfunction, than as distinct diseases.

  18. Sunitinib activates Axl signaling in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mijn, Johannes C; Broxterman, Henk J; Knol, Jaco C; Piersma, Sander R; De Haas, Richard R; Dekker, Henk; Pham, Thang V; Van Beusechem, Victor W; Halmos, Balazs; Mier, James W; Jiménez, Connie R; Verheul, Henk M W

    2016-06-15

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics provides a unique unbiased approach to evaluate signaling network in cancer cells. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib is registered as treatment for patients with renal cell cancer (RCC). We investigated the effect of sunitinib on tyrosine phosphorylation in RCC tumor cells to get more insight in its mechanism of action and thereby to find potential leads for combination treatment strategies. Sunitinib inhibitory concentrations of proliferation (IC50) of 786-O, 769-p and A498 RCC cells were determined by MTT-assays. Global tyrosine phosphorylation was measured by LC-MS/MS after immunoprecipitation with the antiphosphotyrosine antibody p-TYR-100. Phosphoproteomic profiling of 786-O cells yielded 1519 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 675 unique proteins including 57 different phosphorylated protein kinases. Compared to control, incubation with sunitinib at its IC50 of 2 µM resulted in downregulation of 86 phosphopeptides including CDK5, DYRK3, DYRK4, G6PD, PKM and LDH-A, while 94 phosphopeptides including Axl, FAK, EPHA2 and p38α were upregulated. Axl- (y702), FAK- (y576) and p38α (y182) upregulation was confirmed by Western Blot in 786-O and A498 cells. Subsequent proliferation assays revealed that inhibition of Axl with a small molecule inhibitor (R428) sensitized 786-O RCC cells and immortalized endothelial cells to sunitinib up to 3 fold. In conclusion, incubation with sunitinib of RCC cells causes significant upregulation of multiple phosphopeptides including Axl. Simultaneous inhibition of Axl improves the antitumor activity of sunitinib. We envision that evaluation of phosphoproteomic changes by TKI treatment enables identification of new targets for combination treatment strategies. PMID:26815723

  19. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, David T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S; Hardy, Ian R; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S

    2016-01-26

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR-T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  20. Effects of active bufadienolide compounds on human cancer cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in mitogen-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; He, Jing; Kisoh, Keishi; Hayashi, Hideki; Tanaka, Sachiko; Si, Nan; Zhao, Hai-Yu; Hirano, Toshihiko; Bian, Baolin; Takagi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The growth inhibitory effects of bufadienolide compounds were investigated in two intractable cancer cells, a human glioblastoma cell line U-87 and a pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. Among four bufadienolide compounds, a dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in these cancer cells after treatment with gamabufotalin and arenobufagin. The IC50 values of the two compounds were 3-5 times higher in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) than these values for both cancer cell lines. However, similar phenomena were not observed for two other bufadienolide compounds, telocinobufagin and bufalin. These results thus suggest that gamabufotalin and arenobufagin possess selective cytotoxic activity against tumor cells rather than normal cells. Moreover, a clear dose-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, a well-known hallmark of necrosis, was observed in both cancer cells treated with gamabufotalin, suggesting that gamabufotalin-mediated cell death is predominantly associated with a necrosis-like phenotype. Of most importance, treatment with as little as 8 ng/ml of gamabufotalin, even an almost non-toxic concentration to PBMCs, efficiently downregulated the percentages of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulator T (Treg) cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs. Given that Treg cells play a critical role in tumor immunotolerance by suppressing antitumor immunity, these results suggest that gamabufotalin may serve as a promising candidate, as an adjuvant therapeutic agent by manipulating Treg cells to enhance the efficacy of conventional anticancer drugs and lessen their side-effects. These findings provide insights into the clinical application of gamabufotalin for cancer patients with glioblastoma/pancreatic cancer based on its cytocidal effect against tumor cells as well as its depletion of Treg cells. PMID:27431260

  1. Post herpetic neuralgia, schwann cell activation and vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Jim

    2009-12-01

    While the underlying pathophysiology of herpes zoster infection has been well characterised, many of the mechanisms relating to the subsequent development of post herpetic neuralgia (PHN) remain uncertain. The dorsal horn atrophy and reduction in skin innervation seen in PHN patients does not adequately explain many clinical features or the efficacy of a number of topical treatments. In the central nervous system the glia, their receptors and their secreted signalling factors are now known to have a major influence on neural function. In the peripheral nervous system, schwann cell activation in response to infection and trauma releases a number of neuroexcitatory substances. Activation of the nervi nervorum in the peripheral nervous system also leads to the release of calcitonin gene related peptide, substance P and nitric oxide. Schwann cell and/or nervi nervorum activation could be an additional mechanism of pain generation in PHN. Such a paradigm shift would mean that drugs useful in the treatment of glial cell activation such as naloxone, naltrexone, minocycline, pentoxifyllline, propentofylline, AV411 (ibudilast) and interleukin 10 could be useful in PHN. These drugs could be used systemically or even topically. High dose topical vitamin D would appear to offer particular promise because vitamin D has the ability to both reduce glial inflammation and reduce nitric oxide production. PMID:19635651

  2. Superoxide radical and iron modulate aconitase activity in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, P R; Raineri, I; Epstein, L B; White, C W

    1995-06-01

    Aconitase is a member of a family of iron-sulfur-containing (de)hydratases whose activities are modulated in bacteria by superoxide radical (O2-.)-mediated inactivation and iron-dependent reactivation. The inactivation-reactivation of aconitase(s) in cultured mammalian cells was explored since these reactions may impact important and diverse aconitase functions in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Conditions which increase O2-. production including exposure to the redox-cycling agent phenazine methosulfate (PMS), inhibitors of mitochondrial ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, or hyperoxia inactivated aconitase in mammalian cells. Overproduction of mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase protected aconitase from inactivation by PMS or inhibitors of ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, but not from normobaric hyperoxia. Aconitase activity was reactivated (t1/2 of 12 +/- 3 min) upon removal of PMS. The iron chelator deferoxamine impaired reactivation and increased net inactivation of aconitase by O2-.. The ability of ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase-generated O2-. to inactivate aconitase in several cell types correlated with the fraction of the aconitase activity localized in mitochondria. Extracellular O2-. generated with xanthine oxidase did not affect aconitase activity nor did exogenous superoxide dismutase decrease aconitase inactivation by PMS. The results demonstrate a dynamic and cyclical O2-.-mediated inactivation and iron-dependent reactivation of the mammalian [4Fe-4S] aconitases under normal and stress conditions and provide further evidence for the membrane compartmentalization of O2-.. PMID:7768942

  3. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Chien-Chih [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Su, Chun-Li [Department of Human Development and Family Studies, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kwun-Min [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fang, Kang, E-mail: kangfang@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  4. Leukemia-associated activating mutation of Flt3 expands dendritic cells and alters T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Colleen M; Nish, Simone A; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Reiner, Steven L; Reizis, Boris

    2016-03-01

    A common genetic alteration in acute myeloid leukemia is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) in FLT3, the receptor for cytokine FLT3 ligand (FLT3L). Constitutively active FLT3-ITD promotes the expansion of transformed progenitors, but also has pleiotropic effects on hematopoiesis. We analyzed the effect of FLT3-ITD on dendritic cells (DCs), which express FLT3 and can be expanded by FLT3L administration. Pre-leukemic mice with the Flt3(ITD) knock-in allele manifested an expansion of classical DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs. The expansion originated in DC progenitors, was cell intrinsic, and was further enhanced in Flt3(ITD/ITD) mice. The mutation caused the down-regulation of Flt3 on the surface of DCs and reduced their responsiveness to Flt3L. Both canonical Batf3-dependent CD8(+) cDCs and noncanonical CD8(+) cDCs were expanded and showed specific alterations in their expression profiles. Flt3(ITD) mice showed enhanced capacity to support T cell proliferation, including a cell-extrinsic expansion of regulatory T (T reg) cells. Accordingly, these mice restricted alloreactive T cell responses during graft-versus-host reaction, but failed to control autoimmunity without T reg cells. Thus, the FLT3-ITD mutation directly affects DC development, indirectly modulating T cell homeostasis and supporting T reg cell expansion. We hypothesize that this effect of FLT3-ITD might subvert immunosurveillance and promote leukemogenesis in a cell-extrinsic manner. PMID:26903243

  5. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment

  6. Spatial turn and animation practices inspired by cultural anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Wieszaczewska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial turn is one of the cultural turns, which have recently occurred in the humanities. It stresses the importance of issues such as space and place and can be successfully used as a theoretical perspective gaining use in thought over issues such as globalisation, transnationality, mapping but also education. In the discourses of pedagogical science space and place are considered through their multidimensional impact on education and learning. As significant concepts rooting pedagogy or pedagogy of borderland. The pedagogical reflection on space could be also used in the field of animation practices, especially in activities, which are related to place somehow colonised.

  7. T Cell Epitope Immunotherapy Induces a CD4+ T Cell Population with Regulatory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoef Adrienne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Synthetic peptides, representing CD4+ T cell epitopes, derived from the primary sequence of allergen molecules have been used to down-regulate allergic inflammation in sensitised individuals. Treatment of allergic diseases with peptides may offer substantial advantages over treatment with native allergen molecules because of the reduced potential for cross-linking IgE bound to the surface of mast cells and basophils. Methods and Findings In this study we address the mechanism of action of peptide immunotherapy (PIT in cat-allergic, asthmatic patients. Cell-division-tracking dyes, cell-mixing experiments, surface phenotyping, and cytokine measurements were used to investigate immunomodulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs after therapy. Proliferative responses of PBMCs to allergen extract were significantly reduced after PIT. This was associated with modified cytokine profiles generally characterised by an increase in interleukin-10 and a decrease in interleukin-5 production. CD4+ cells isolated after PIT were able to actively suppress allergen-specific proliferative responses of pretreatment CD4neg PBMCs in co-culture experiments. PIT was associated with a significant increase in surface expression of CD5 on both CD4+ and CD8+ PBMCs. Conclusion This study provides evidence for the induction of a population of CD4+ T cells with suppressor/regulatory activity following PIT. Furthermore, up-regulation of cell surface levels of CD5 may contribute to reduced reactivity to allergen.

  8. Rupture force of cell adhesion ligand tethers modulates biological activities of a cell-laden hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Park, Jooyeon; Wang, Xuefeng; Roein-Peikar, Mehdi; Ko, Eunkyung; Qin, Ellen; Lee, Jonghwi; Ha, Taekjip; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2016-04-01

    Recent efforts to design a synthetic extracellular matrix for cell culture, engineering, and therapies greatly contributed to addressing biological roles of types and spatial organization of cell adhesion ligands. It is often suggested that ligand-matrix bond strength is another path to regulate cell adhesion and activities; however tools are lacking. To this end, this study demonstrates that a hydrogel coupled with integrin-binding deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) tethers with pre-defined rupture forces can modulate cell adhesion, differentiation, and secretion activities due to the changes in the number and, likely, force of cells adhered to a gel. The rupture force of DNA tethers was tuned by altering the spatial arrangement of matrix-binding biotin groups. The DNA tethers were immobilized on a hydrogel of alginate grafted with biotin using avidin. Mesenchymal stem cells showed enhanced adhesion, neural differentiation, and paracrine secretion when cultured on the gel coupled with DNA tethers with higher rupture forces. Such innovative cell-matrix interface engineering would be broadly useful for a series of materials used for fundamental and applied studies on biological cells. PMID:26912186

  9. The Dendritic Cell Synapse: A Life Dedicated to T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Federica

    2016-01-01

    T-cell activation within immunological synapses is a complex process whereby different types of signals are transmitted from antigen-presenting cells to T cells. The molecular strategies developed by T cells to interpret and integrate these signals have been systematically dissected in recent years and are now in large part understood. On the other side of the immune synapse, dendritic cells (DCs) participate actively in synapse formation and maintenance by remodeling of membrane receptors and intracellular content. However, the details of such changes have been only partially characterized. The DCs actin cytoskeleton has been one of the first systems to be identified as playing an important role in T-cell priming and some of the underlying mechanisms have been elucidated. Similarly, the DCs microtubule cytoskeleton undergoes major spatial changes during synapse formation that favor polarization of the DCs subcellular space toward the interacting T cell. Recently, we have begun to investigate the trafficking machinery that controls polarized delivery of endosomal vesicles at the DC-T immune synapse with the aim of understanding the functional relevance of polarized secretion of soluble factors during T-cell priming. Here, we will review the current knowledge of events occurring in DCs during synapse formation and discuss the open questions that still remain unanswered. PMID:27014259

  10. Refeeding alters superoxide dismutase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors previously showed superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity is increased in heat shocked Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and ovarian carcinoma (OvCa) cells during the time period when thermotolerance (TT) is observed (Ca Res 45,3029). SOD is also increased in OvCa cells following transient exposure to ethanol, carbonyl cyanide-N-chlorophenyl-hydrazone, or hypoxia; all treatments which induce TT (1986 Rad Res Abstr Co-2). As these experiments involved refeeding of cell cultures, the authors examined the effect of refeeding on SOD in CHO cells. Refeeding confluent CHO cells with fresh McCoy's 5A medium containing 10% FCS decreased SOD 0 to 6 hours after refeeding, which was due to loss of the mitochondrial or Mn SOD. Addition of glucose to the medium at the concentration originally found in the medium caused a similar decline in SOD. At 6-24 hours after refeeding or the addition of glucose an increase in Mn SOD was observed. These results suggest metabolic status can affect Mn SOD in the cell. The possible role of metabolic regulation of SOD in heat sensitivity is being investigated

  11. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  12. Endocytic activity of Sertoli cells grown in bicameral culture chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immature rat Sertoli cells were cultured for 7 to 14 days on Millipore filters impregnated with a reconstituted basement membrane extract in dual-environment (bicameral) culture chambers. Electron microscopy of the cultured cells revealed the presence of rod-shaped mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and Sertoli-Sertoli tight junctions, typical of these cells in vivo. The endocytic activity of both the apical and basal surfaces of the Sertoli cells was examined by either adding alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2-M) conjugated to 20 nm gold particles to the apical chamber or by adding 125I labeled alpha 2-M to the basal chamber. During endocytosis from the apical surface of Sertoli cells, the alpha 2-M-gold particles were bound initially to coated pits and then internalized into coated vesicles within 5 minutes. After 10 minutes, the alpha 2-M-gold was found in multi-vesicular bodies (MVBs) and by 30 minutes it was present in the lysosomes. The proportion of alpha 2-M-gold found within endocytic cell organelles after 1 hour of uptake was used to estimate the approximate time that this ligand spent in each type of organelle. The alpha 2-M-gold was present in coated pits, coated vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and lysosomes for approximately 3, 11, 22, and 24 minutes, respectively. This indicates that the initial stages of endocytosis are rapid, whereas MVBs and lysosomes are relatively long-lived

  13. Effects of activated fibroblasts on phenotype modulation, EGFR signalling and cell cycle regulation in OSCC cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.berndt@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Büttner, Robert, E-mail: Robert-Buettner@gmx.net [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07740 Jena (Germany); Gühne, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie_guehne@gmx.net [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Gleinig, Anna, E-mail: annagleinig@yahoo.com [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Richter, Petra, E-mail: P.Richter@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Chen, Yuan, E-mail: Yuan.Chen@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Franz, Marcus, E-mail: Marcus.Franz@med.uni-jena.de [Clinic of Internal Medicine I, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Liebmann, Claus, E-mail: Claus.Liebmann@uni-jena.de [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07740 Jena (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Crosstalk between carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells is suggested to mediate phenotype transition of cancer cells as a prerequisite for tumour progression, to predict patients’ outcome, and to influence the efficacy of EGFR inhibitor therapies. Here we investigate the influence of activated fibroblasts as a model for CAFs on phenotype and EGFR signalling in OSCC cells in vitro. For this, immortalised hTERT-BJ1 fibroblasts were activated with TGFβ1 and PDGFAB to generate a myofibroblast or proliferative phenotype, respectively. Conditioned media (FCM{sub TGF}, FCM{sub PDGF}) were used to stimulate PE/CA-PJ15 OSCC cells. Results were compared to the effect of conditioned media of non-stimulated fibroblasts (FCM{sub B}). FCM{sub TGF} stimulation leads to an up-regulation of vimentin in the OSCC cells and an enhancement of invasive behaviour, indicating EMT-like effects. Similarly, FCM{sub TGF}≫FCM{sub PDGF} induced up-regulation of EGFR, but not of ErbB2/ErbB3. In addition, we detected an increase in basal activities of ERK, PI3K/Akt and Stat3 (FCM{sub TGF}>FCM{sub PDGF}) accompanied by protein interaction of vimentin with pERK. These effects are correlated with an increased proliferation. In summary, our results suggest that the activated myofibroblast phenotype provides soluble factors which are able to induce EMT-like phenomena and to increase EGFR signalling as well as cell proliferation in OSCC cells. Our results indicate a possible influence of activated myofibroblasts on EGFR-inhibitor therapy. Therefore, CAFs may serve as promising novel targets for combined therapy strategies. - Highlights: • A cell culture model for cancer associated fibroblasts is described. • The mutual interaction with OSCC cells leads to up-regulation of EGFR in tumour cells. • mCAF induces EGFR downstream signalling with increased proliferation in OSCC. • Erk activation is associated with protein interaction with vimentin

  14. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates hepatocellular carcinoma cell adhesion stimulated by adipokine resistin

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chen-Chieh; Chang, Shun-Fu; Chao, Jian-Kang; Lai, Yi-Liang; Chang, Wei-En; Hsu, Wen-Hsiu; Kuo, Wu-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistin, adipocyte-secreting adipokine, may play critical role in modulating cancer pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistin on HCC adhesion to the endothelium, and the mechanism underlying these resistin effects. Methods Human SK-Hep1 cells were used to study the effect of resistin on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressions as well as NF-κB activation, and hence cell adhesion to hu...

  15. Thiopurine methyltransferase activity in red blood cells of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Linda Benjamin; Salavaggione, Oreste E; Szumlanski, Carol L; Miller, Jackie L; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Trepanier, Lauren

    2004-01-01

    Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) is an important enzyme in the metabolism of thiopurine medications such as azathioprine. In humans, activity varies widely among individuals, primarily because of genetic polymorphisms. Low TPMT activity increases the risk of myelosuppression from azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine, whereas high TPMT activity is associated with poor drug efficacy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dogs also show a wide range of TPMT activity. Heparinized blood samples were obtained from 177 dogs associated with a veterinary teaching hospital. Red blood cell (RBC) TPMT activity was measured by means of a modification of a radiochemical method as established for use in people. TPMT activity varied across a 9-fold range (7.9-71.8 U of RBC per milliliter; median, 21.7). Variation in TPMT activity was not associated with age, sex, or neutering status. Giant Schnauzers had much lower TPMT activity (7.9-20 U of RBC per milliliter; median, 13.1; P dogs could affect thiopurine drug toxicity and efficacy in canine patients. PMID:15058773

  16. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, B A; Lau, B; Jackson, S E; Wills, M R; Sinclair, J H; Poole, E

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens. PMID:27091512

  17. Tetramethylpyrazine potentiates arsenic trioxide activity against HL-60 cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) in combination with arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on the proliferation and differentiation of HL-60 cells. The HL-60 cells were treated with 300 µg/mL TMP, 0.5 µM As2O3, and 300 µg/mL TMP combined with 0.5 µM As2O3, respectively. The proliferative inhibition rates were determined with MTT. Differentiation was detected by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction test, Wright's staining and the distribution of CD11b and CD14. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle distribution. RT-PCR and Western blot assays were employed to detect the expressions of c-myc, p27, CDK2, and cyclin E1. Combination treatment had synergistic effects on the proliferative inhibition rates. The rates were increased gradually after the combination treatment, much higher than those treated with the corresponding concentration of As2O3 alone. The cells exhibited characteristics of mature granulocytes and a higher NBT-reducing ability, being a 2.6-fold increase in the rate of NBT-positive ratio of HL-60 cells within the As2O3 treatment versus almost a 13-fold increase in the TMP + As2O3 group. Cells treated with both TMP and As2O3 expressed far more CD11b antigens, almost 2-fold compared with the control group. Small doses of TMP potentiate As2O3-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells, possibly by regulating the expression and activity of G0/G1 phase-arresting molecules. Combination treatment of TMP with As2O3 has significant synergistic effects on the proliferative inhibition of HL-60 cells

  18. Snake venoms components with antitumor activity in murine melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the constant advances in the treatment of cancer, this disease remains one of the main causes of mortality worldwide. So, the development of new treatment modalities is imperative. Snake venom causes a variety of biological effects because they constitute a complex mixture of substances as disintegrins, proteases (serine and metalo), phospholipases A2, L-amino acid oxidases and others. The goal of the present work is to evaluate a anti-tumor activity of some snake venoms fractions. There are several studies of components derived from snake venoms with this kind of activity. After fractionation of snake venoms of the families Viperidae and Elapidae, the fractions were assayed towards murine melanoma cell line B16-F10 and fibroblasts L929. The results showed that the fractions of venom of the snake Notechis ater niger had higher specificity and potential antitumor activity on B16-F10 cell line than the other studied venoms. Since the components of this venom are not explored yet coupled with the potential activity showed in this work, we decided to choose this venom to develop further studies. The cytotoxic fractions were evaluated to identify and characterize the components that showed antitumoral activity. Western blot assays and zymography suggests that these proteins do not belong to the class of metallo and serine proteinases. (author)

  19. CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-01

    Targeted modulation of transcription is necessary for understanding complex gene networks and has great potential for medical and industrial applications. CRISPR is emerging as a powerful system for targeted genome activation and repression, in addition to its use in genome editing. This protocol describes how to design, construct, and experimentally validate the function of sequence-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for sequence-specific repression (CRISPRi) or activation (CRISPRa) of transcription in mammalian cells. In this technology, the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is catalytically deactivated (dCas9) to provide a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting of any locus in the genome. Fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in mammalian cells. Delivery of multiple sgRNAs further enables activation or repression of multiple genes. By using scaffold RNAs (scRNAs), different effectors can be recruited to different genes for simultaneous activation of some and repression of others. The CRISPRi and CRISPRa methods provide powerful tools for sequence-specific control of gene expression on a genome-wide scale to aid understanding gene functions and for engineering genetic regulatory systems. PMID:26729910

  20. Regulators of floral fragrance production and their target genes in petunia are not exclusively active in the epidermal cells of petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Moerkercke, Alex; Galván-Ampudia, Carlos S; Verdonk, Julian C; Haring, Michel A; Schuurink, Robert C

    2012-05-01

    In which cells of the flower volatile biosynthesis takes place is unclear. In rose and snapdragon, some enzymes of the volatile phenylpropanoid/benzenoid pathway have been shown to be present in the epidermal cells of petals. It is therefore generally believed that the production of these compounds occurs in these cells. However, whether the entire pathway is active in these cells and whether it is exclusively active in these cells remains to be proven. Cell-specific transcription factors activating these genes will determine in which cells they are expressed. In petunia, the transcription factor EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS II (EOBII) activates the ODORANT1 (ODO1) promoter and the promoter of the biosynthetic gene isoeugenol synthase (IGS). The regulator ODO1 in turn activates the promoter of the shikimate gene 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Here the identification of a new target gene of ODO1, encoding an ABC transporter localized on the plasma membrane, PhABCG1, which is co-expressed with ODO1, is described. PhABCG1 expression is up-regulated in petals overexpressing ODO1 through activation of the PhABCG1 promoter. Interestingly, the ODO1, PhABCG1, and IGS promoters were active in petunia protoplasts originating from both epidermal and mesophyll cell layers of the petal, suggesting that the volatile phenylpropanoid/benzenoid pathway in petunia is active in these different cell types. Since volatile release occurs from epidermal cells, trafficking of (volatile) compounds between cell layers must be involved, but the exact function of PhABCG1 remains to be resolved. PMID:22345641

  1. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina [Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Tilghman, Syreeta L. [Division of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Williams, LaKeisha G. [Division of Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Winfield, Leyte L., E-mail: lwinfield@spelman.edu [Department of Chemistry, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  2. Activation of regulatory T cells during inflammatory response is not an exclusive property of stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Hendrik Gosemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sepsis and systemic-inflammatory-response-syndrome (SIRS remain major causes for fatalities on intensive care units despite up-to-date therapy. It is well accepted that stem cells have immunomodulatory properties during inflammation and sepsis, including the activation of regulatory T cells and the attenuation of distant organ damage. Evidence from recent work suggests that these properties may not be exclusively attributed to stem cells. This study was designed to evaluate the immunomodulatory potency of cellular treatment during acute inflammation in a model of sublethal endotoxemia and to investigate the hypothesis that immunomodulations by cellular treatment during inflammatory response is not stem cell specific. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Endotoxemia was induced via intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in wild type mice (C3H/HeN. Mice were treated with either vital or homogenized amniotic fluid stem cells (AFS and sacrificed for specimen collection 24 h after LPS injection. Endpoints were plasma cytokine levels (BD™ Cytometric Bead Arrays, T cell subpopulations (flow-cytometry and pulmonary neutrophil influx (immunohistochemistry. To define stem cell specific effects, treatment with either vital or homogenized human-embryonic-kidney-cells (HEK was investigated in a second subset of experiments. Mice treated with homogenized AFS cells showed significantly increased percentages of regulatory T cells and Interleukin-2 as well as decreased amounts of pulmonary neutrophils compared to saline-treated controls. These results could be reproduced in mice treated with vital HEK cells. No further differences were observed between plasma cytokine levels of endotoxemic mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results revealed that both AFS and HEK cells modulate cellular immune response and distant organ damage during sublethal endotoxemia. The observed effects support the hypothesis, that immunomodulations are not

  3. Characterization of Rat Hair Follicle Stem Cells Selected by Vario Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, α6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of α6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by α6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34bri cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34dim cells. CD34bri cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34dim cells. Furthermore, CD34bri cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS

  4. Vibration of workpieces during aggressive turning operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, X; Wang, M [School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Ouyang, H, E-mail: h.ouyang@liverpool.ac.u [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    Turning is a widely used metal cutting operation. Because of the dynamic interaction between the cutter and the workpiece, vibration is excited during turning operations. If the vibration is severe, there will be degradation of surface quality of the workpiece, excessive wear and breakage of the cutter. Chatter can also take place. This paper presents a dynamic model for aggressive turning operations and considers the influence on vibration of the time-dependent reduction of workpiece diameter. The workpiece is modelled as a beam rotating about its longitudinal axis and the cutter provides a moving load. Simulated numerical examples are presented.

  5. Resveratrol Induces Glioma Cell Apoptosis through Activation of Tristetraprolin

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Jinhyun; Yoon, Nal Ae; Seong, Hyemin; Jeong, Joo Yeon; Kang, Seokmin; Park, Nammi; Choi, Jungil; Lee, Dong Hoon; Roh, Gu Seob; Kim, Hyun Joon; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Park, Jae-Yong; Park, Jeong Woo; Kang, Sang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an AU-rich elements (AREs)-binding protein, which regulates the decay of AREs-containing mRNAs such as proto-oncogenes, anti-apoptotic genes and immune regulatory genes. Despite the low expression of TTP in various human cancers, the mechanism involving suppressed expression of TTP is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxystilbene, Res), a naturally occurring compound, induces glioma cell apoptosis through activation of tristetr...

  6. Exosomes from myeloid derived suppressor cells carry biologically active proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Meghan; Choksawangkarn, Waeowalee; Edwards, Nathan; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Fenselau, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are present in most cancer patients where they inhibit natural anti-tumor immunity and are an obstacle to anti-cancer immunotherapies. They mediate immune suppression through their production of proteins and soluble mediators that prevent the activation of tumor-reactive T lymphyocytes, polarize macrophages towards a tumor-promoting phenotype, and facilitate angiogenesis. The accumulation and suppressive potency of MDSC is regulated by inflammation with...

  7. Activation of a suppressor T-cell pathway by interferon.

    OpenAIRE

    Aune, T M; Pierce, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    In addition to antiviral activities, murine fibroblast (type I) interferon (IFN-beta) suppresses immune responses. The mechanism(s) by which IFN-beta suppresses antibody responses by murine spleen cells to sheep erythrocytes in vitro has been investigated. IFN-beta-mediated suppression is partially or completely prevented by catalase, 2-mercaptoethanol, and certain peroxidase substrates (ascorbic acid, potassium iodide, and tyrosine). These same reagents also block suppression by mediators fr...

  8. Refining the Neuberger Model: uracil processing by activated B cells

    OpenAIRE

    Maul, Robert W.; Gearhart, Patricia J.

    2014-01-01

    During the immune response, B cells undergo a programmed mutagenic cascade to promote increased affinity and expanded antibody function. The two processes, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), are initiated by the protein activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytosine to uracil in the immunoglobulin loci. The presence of uracil in DNA promotes DNA mutagenesis though a subset of DNA repair proteins. Two distinct mechanisms have been proposed to control...

  9. Cdk Activity Couples Epigenetic Centromere Inheritance to Cell Cycle Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Mariana C.C.; Bodor, Dani L.; Stellfox, Madison E.; Martins, Nuno M.C.; Hochegger, Helfrid; Foltz, Daniel R.; Jansen, Lars E.T.

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres form the site of chromosome attachment to microtubules during mitosis. Identity of these loci is maintained epigenetically by nucleosomes containing the histone H3 variant CENP-A. Propagation of CENP-A chromatin is uncoupled from DNA replication initiating only during mitotic exit. We now demonstrate that inhibition of Cdk1 and Cdk2 activities is sufficient to trigger CENP-A assembly throughout the cell cycle in a manner dependent on the canonical CENP-A assembly machinery. We fur...

  10. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-01-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitore...

  11. 4-hydroxy-2, 3-nonenal activates activator protein-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in rat pancreatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhiro Kikuta; Atsushi Masamune; Masahiro Satoh; Noriaki Suzuki; Tooru Shimosegawa

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis,where oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. 4-hydroxy2,3-nonenal (HNE) is generated endogenously during the process of lipid peroxidation, and has been accepted as a mediator of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of HNE on the activation of signal transduction pathways and cellular functions in PSCs.METHODS: PSCs were isolated from the pancreas of male Wistar rats after perfusion with collagenase P, and used in their culture-activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype unless otherwise stated. PSCs were treated with physiologically relevant and non-cytotoxic concentrations (up to 5 μmol/L)of HNE. Activation of transcription factors was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase assay.Activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases was assessed by Western blotting using anti-phosphospecific antibodies. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. Production of type Ⅰ collagen and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.The effect of HNE on the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs in culture was also assessed.RESULTS: HNE activated activator protein-1, but not nuclear factor κB. In addition, HNE activated three classes of MAP kinases: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAP kinase. HNE increased type Ⅰ collagen production through the activation of p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. HNE did not alter the proliferation,or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. HNE did not initiate the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs to myofibroblast-like phenotype.CONCLUSION: Specific activation of these signal transduction pathways and altered cell functions such as collagen production by HNE may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic

  12. Plant Cell Cultures as Source of Cosmetic Active Ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Barbulova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The last decades witnessed a great demand of natural remedies. As a result, medicinal plants have been increasingly cultivated on a commercial scale, but the yield, the productive quality and the safety have not always been satisfactory. Plant cell cultures provide useful alternatives for the production of active ingredients for biomedical and cosmetic uses, since they represent standardized, contaminant-free and biosustainable systems, which allow the production of desired compounds on an industrial scale. Moreover, thanks to their totipotency, plant cells grown as liquid suspension cultures can be used as “biofactories” for the production of commercially interesting secondary metabolites, which are in many cases synthesized in low amounts in plant tissues and differentially distributed in the plant organs, such as roots, leaves, flowers or fruits. Although it is very widespread in the pharmaceutical industry, plant cell culture technology is not yet very common in the cosmetic field. The aim of the present review is to focus on the successful research accomplishments in the development of plant cell cultures for the production of active ingredients for cosmetic applications.

  13. Endothelial Cells Promote Pigmentation through Endothelin Receptor B Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzetti, Claire; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Ghorbel, Houda Hammami; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Ambrosetti, Damien; Bahadoran, Philippe; Chignon-Sicard, Bérengère; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Ballotti, Robert; Mahns, Andre; Passeron, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Findings of increased vascularization in melasma lesions and hyperpigmentation in acquired bilateral telangiectatic macules suggested a link between pigmentation and vascularization. Using high-magnification digital epiluminescence dermatoscopy, laser confocal microscopy, and histological examination, we showed that benign vascular lesions of the skin have restricted but significant hyperpigmentation compared with the surrounding skin. We then studied the role of microvascular endothelial cells in regulating skin pigmentation using an in vitro co-culture model using endothelial cells and melanocytes. These experiments showed that endothelin 1 released by microvascular endothelial cells induces increased melanogenesis signaling, characterized by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor phosphorylation, and increased tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase levels. Immunostaining for endothelin 1 in vascular lesions confirmed the increased expression on the basal layer of the epidermis above small vessels compared with perilesional skin. Endothelin acts through the activation of endothelin receptor B and the mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and p38, to induce melanogenesis. Finally, culturing of reconstructed skin with microvascular endothelial cells led to increased skin pigmentation that could be prevented by inhibiting EDNRB. Taken together these results demonstrated the role of underlying microvascularization in skin pigmentation, a finding that could open new fields of research for regulating physiological pigmentation and for treating pigmentation disorders such as melasma. PMID:26308584

  14. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  15. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth;

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous...... cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  16. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of living cells: different redox activities of nonmetastatic and metastatic human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Rotenberg, S A; Mirkin, M V

    2000-08-29

    Electrochemical methods have been widely used to monitor physiologically important molecules in biological systems. This report describes the first application of the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) to probe the redox activity of individual living cells. The possibilities of measuring the rate and investigating the pathway of transmembrane charge transfer are demonstrated. By this approach, significant differences are detected in the redox responses given by nonmotile, nontransformed human breast epithelial cells, breast cells with a high level of motility (engendered by overexpression of protein kinase Calpha), and highly metastatic breast cancer cells. SECM analysis of the three cell lines reveals reproducible differences with respect to the kinetics of charge transfer by several redox mediators. PMID:10963658

  17. Cell Swelling Activates Phospholipase A2 in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoroed, S.M.; Lauritzen, L.; Lambert, I.H.;

    1997-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites tumor cells! loaded with H-labeled arachidonic acid and C-labeled stearic acid for two hours, were washed and transferred to either isotonic or hypotonic media containing BSA to scavenge the labeled fatty acids released from the cells. During the first two minutes of hypo......-osmotic exposure the rate of H-labeled arachidonic acid release is 3.3 times higher than that observed at normal osmolality. Cell swelling also causes an increase in the production of C-stearic acid-labeled lysophosphatidylcholine. This indicates that a phospholipase A is activated by cell swelling in the Ehrlich...... cells. Within the same time frame there is no swelling-induced increase in C-labeled stearic acid release nor in the synthesis of phosphatidyl C-butanol in the presence of C-butanol. Furthermore, U7312, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, does not affect the swelling induced release of C...

  18. Metastable primordial germ cell-like state induced from mouse embryonic stem cells by Akt activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specification to primordial germ cells (PGCs) is mediated by mesoderm-induction signals during gastrulation. We found that Akt activation during in vitro mesodermal differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated self-renewing spheres with differentiation states between those of ESCs and PGCs. Essential regulators for PGC specification and their downstream germ cell-specific genes were expressed in the spheres, indicating that the sphere cells had commenced differentiation to the germ lineage. However, the spheres did not proceed to spermatogenesis after transplantation into testes. Sphere cell transfer to the original feeder-free ESC cultures resulted in chaotic differentiation. In contrast, when the spheres were cultured on mouse embryonic fibroblasts or in the presence of ERK-cascade and GSK3 inhibitors, reversion to the ESC-like state was observed. These results indicate that Akt signaling promotes a novel metastable and pluripotent state that is intermediate to those of ESCs and PGCs.

  19. Isolation of Cells Specialized in Anticancer Alkaloid Metabolism by Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carqueijeiro, Inês; Guimarães, Ana Luísa; Bettencourt, Sara; Martínez-Cortés, Teresa; Guedes, Joana G; Gardner, Rui; Lopes, Telma; Andrade, Cláudia; Bispo, Cláudia; Martins, Nuno Pimpão; Andrade, Paula; Valentão, Patrícia; Valente, Inês M; Rodrigues, José A; Duarte, Patrícia; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2016-08-01

    Plant specialized metabolism often presents a complex cell-specific compartmentation essential to accomplish the biosynthesis of valuable plant natural products. Hence, the disclosure and potential manipulation of such pathways may depend on the capacity to isolate and characterize specific cell types. Catharanthus roseus is the source of several medicinal terpenoid indole alkaloids, including the low-level anticancer vinblastine and vincristine, for which the late biosynthetic steps occur in specialized mesophyll cells called idioblasts. Here, the optical, fluorescence, and alkaloid-accumulating properties of C. roseus leaf idioblasts are characterized, and a methodology for the isolation of idioblast protoplasts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting is established, taking advantage of the distinctive autofluorescence of these cells. This achievement represents a crucial step for the development of differential omic strategies leading to the identification of candidate genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis, pathway regulation, and transmembrane transport leading to the anticancer alkaloids from C. roseus. PMID:27356972

  20. Langerhans cells in Langerhans cell granulomatosis are not actively proliferating cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Brabencova, E.; Tazi, A.; Lorenzato, M; Bonay, M; Kambouchner, M.; Emile, J. F.; Hance, A J; Soler, P

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell granulomatosis (LCG), also called histiocytosis X, is a disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of destructive granulomas containing numerous Langerhans cells (LCs). The process may be localized or multifocal, and it remains unclear whether the same pathogenic mechanism is involved in all forms of the disease. It is often assumed that the massive accumulation of LCs at the sites of the lesions results from the abnormal proliferation of these cells,...

  1. PKC activation induces inflammatory response and cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunhee Kim

    Full Text Available A variety of airborne pathogens can induce inflammatory responses in airway epithelial cells, which is a crucial component of host defence. However, excessive inflammatory responses and chronic inflammation also contribute to different diseases of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC is one of the essential mechanisms of inflammatory response in airway epithelial cells. In the present study, we stimulated human bronchial lung epithelial (BEAS-2B cells with the phorbol ester Phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu, and examined gene expression profile using microarrays. Microarray analysis suggests that PKC activation induced dramatic changes in gene expression related to multiple cellular functions. The top two interaction networks generated from these changes were centered on NFκB and TNF-α, which are two commonly known pathways for cell death and inflammation. Subsequent tests confirmed the decrease in cell viability and an increase in the production of various cytokines. Interestingly, each of the increased cytokines was differentially regulated at mRNA and/or protein levels by different sub-classes of PKC isozymes. We conclude that pathological cell death and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells in various situations may be mediated through PKC related signaling pathways. These findings suggest that PKCs can be new targets for treatment of lung diseases.

  2. Train turn restrictions and line plan performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burggraeve, Sofie; Bull, Simon Henry; Lusby, Richard Martin;

    In this paper we study the impact of the `turn conditions' in end stations on the performance of a line plan. If trains have to turn on their platform in an end station, the yoccupy the platform for several minutes. A more preferred option, from a timetabling point of view, would be that a train...... disappears from the platform in its end station after dwelling and only appears again when departing for a subsequent trip. In this case, the train will not interfere with other trains that dwell on the platform during the time between these events. However, this option is only possible if the train can stay...... in a exible and large enough shunt. Starting from a given line plan, we compare two timetables, one where trains have to turn on their platform and one where trains can turn in a shunt. We evaluate the impact on the performance of the line plan by its feasibility for timetabling,the minimum overall...

  3. Turning points the nature of creativity

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chaomei

    2012-01-01

    This book focuses on a critical concept of intellectual turning points in the context of critical thinking, scientific discovery, and problem solving. The author presents a novel analytical and experimental system that applies to both past and future data.

  4. Increased prevalence of late stage T cell activation antigen (VLA-1) in active juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Platz, P; Hofmann, B; Ryder, L P; Heilmann, C; Pedersen, F K; Nielsen, L P; Friis, J; Svejgaard, A

    1987-01-01

    the various HLA class II antigens was observed between the groups. Similarly, no significant differences in stimulatory capability in secondary mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) were seen. The distribution of T helper/inducer (CD4+), T suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8+), and NK cells was similar in active JCA...

  5. Notch1 regulated autophagy controls survival and suppressor activity of activated murine T-regulatory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Nimi; Sarin, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Cell survival is one of several processes regulated by the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. Here we report functional outcomes of non-nuclear Notch signaling to activate autophagy, a conserved cellular response to nutrient stress, regulating survival in murine natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), an immune subset controlling tolerance and inflammation. Induction of autophagy required ligand-dependent, Notch intracellular domain (NIC) activity, which controlled mitochondrial organization and survival of activated Tregs. Consistently, NIC immune-precipitated Beclin and Atg14, constituents of the autophagy initiation complex. Further, ectopic expression of an effector of autophagy (Atg3) or recombinant NIC tagged to a nuclear export signal (NIC-NES), restored autophagy and suppressor function in Notch1-/- Tregs. Furthermore, Notch1 deficiency in the Treg lineage resulted in immune hyperactivity, implicating Notch activity in Treg homeostasis. Notch1 integration with autophagy, revealed in these experiments, holds implications for Notch regulated cell-fate decisions governing differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14023.001 PMID:27267497

  6. Teamwork [Activities]: Corporate Connection; The Stomp Heard 'Round the World; Frantic Times; The Bird's Nest; It's a What? This Is Life...This Is a Distraction; The Turnstile; World Map; Turn Over a New Leaf; Simply Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Steve; Patton, Rob; Schusser, Eric; Harrington, Charlie; Crawford, Bartholomew; Frank, Laurie; Proudman, Bill; Evans, Faith; Dobkin, Craig H.

    1998-01-01

    Describes nine group activities used to build cooperation and teamwork in adventure-, challenge-, and experiential-education settings. Includes target group, group size, time and space requirements, activity level, props needed, instructions, ideas for post-activity group processing and reflection, and facilitator tips. Target groups include…

  7. Derrida’s Turn to Franciscan Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Zlomislic

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary French philosophers such as Levinas, Bataille, and Derrida, along with the existentialists Kierkegaard and Nietzsche have all made use of Franciscan insights in order to safeguard the ipseity that cannot be reduced or totalized. In keeping with the taste that concerns me, this paper will examine Derrida’s turn to the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins and how such a turn may place Derrida within a catholic and Franciscan tradition.

  8. DsRNA as a stimulator of cell pacemaker activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors study the action of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) on the characteristics of neuron pacemaker activity which permits prediction of the character of action of dsRNA on the pacemaker activity of cells and organs, and takes the investigators closer to an understanding of the membrane mechanisms underlying the action of dsRNA on the cell. The methods for isolating and fractionating dsRNA from yeasts and the intracellular recording of the electrical activity of the snail giant neuron have been described by the authors earlier. The authors determined the dependence of Ca2+ entry upon dsRNA concentration using the isotope 45Ca. Preweighed ganglia were incubated five each for an hour in 2 ml Ringer's solution containing dsRNA and 5 microliters 45CaCl2 of 12.5 mCi activity. After incubation, the ganglia were rinsed three times for 8 min each time in normal Ringers solution. The washed ganglia were dissolved for one day in KOH. The amount of isotope entering was counted using Brav's scintillator and an RGT counter tuned to the 45Ca isotope. The physiological saline used for the isolated ganglion contained 85 mmole NaCl, 4 mmole KCl, 8 mmole CaCl2, 10 mmole MgCl2, 10 mmole Tris-HCl, and 5 mmole glucose

  9. Garcinielliptone FC: antiparasitic activity without cytotoxicity to mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana P; Silva, Marcos P; Oliveira, Cristiano G; Monteiro, Daniela C; Pinto, Pedro L; Mendonça, Ronaldo Z; Costa Júnior, Joaquim S; Freitas, Rivelilson M; de Moraes, Josué

    2015-06-01

    Garcinielliptone FC (GFC) is a natural prenylated benzophenone found in the seeds of Platonia insignis Mart. (Clusiaceae), a native Brazilian plant. It has been chemically characterized and it is known that GFC has several biological activities such as antioxidant and vasorelaxant properties. In this study, we report the in vitro effect of GFC against the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, the parasite responsible for schistosomiasis mansoni. The anti-S. mansoni activity and cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells were determined for the compound. GFC⩾6.25 μM showed antischistosomal activity and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrated several morphological alterations on the tegument of worms, and a correlation between viability and tegumental damage was observed. In addition, at sub-lethal concentrations of GFC (⩽3.125 μM), the number of S. mansoni eggs was reduced. More importantly, GFC exhibited no activity toward mammalian cells and, therefore, there is an appreciable selectivity of this compound against the helminths. In conclusion, these findings indicate the potential of GFC as an antiparasitic agent. PMID:25553916

  10. TGF-β and IL-21 cooperatively stimulate activated CD8(+) T cells to differentiate into Tc17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Wei; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Yao, Tsung-You; Hsieh, Chia-Ling; Chen, I-Hua; Liu, Shin-Jen

    2016-06-01

    TGF-β together with IL-21 or IL-6 can drive the differentiation of naïve CD8(+) T cells into IL-17-producing CD8(+) T cells. These IL-17-producing CD8(+) T cells are termed Tc17 cells. Tc17 cells preserve plasticity under various conditions in vitro and in vivo. IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells are termed Tc1 cells. However, Tc1 cells are considered relatively stable. In the present study, we show that the combination of TGF-β plus IL-21, but not IL-6, converts Tc1 cells into Tc17 cells; this conversion is associated with elevated RORα, RORγt, and Batf mRNA levels. These results indicate that Tc1 cells are skewed to the Tc17 cell phenotype under TGF-β plus IL-21-polarizing conditions. Furthermore, IL-6R is expressed on naïve, but not activated, CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, IL-21R is expressed on both naïve and activated CD8(+) T cells. Thus, differential expression profiles of IL-6R and IL-21R on naïve and activated CD8(+) T cells may be one mechanism by which TGF-β plus IL-21, but not IL-6, can drive activated CD8(+) T cells to differentiate into IL-17-producing cells. Taken together, these results provide a novel viewpoint for the plasticity of Tc1 cells. PMID:27085379

  11. Bcl-2 Knockdown Accelerates T Cell Receptor-Triggered Activation-Induced Cell Death in Jurkat T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Won, Tae Joon; Hyung, Kyeong Eun; Lee, Mi Ji; Moon, Young-hye; Lee, Ik Hee; Go, Byung Sung; Hwang, Kwang Woo

    2014-01-01

    Cell death and survival are tightly controlled through the highly coordinated activation/inhibition of diverse signal transduction pathways to insure normal development and physiology. Imbalance between cell death and survival often leads to autoimmune diseases and cancer. Death receptors sense extracellular signals to induce caspase-mediated apoptosis. Acting upstream of CED-3 family proteases, such as caspase-3, Bcl-2 prevents apoptosis. Using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), we suppressed Bcl-...

  12. Glucose activates prenyltransferases in pancreatic islet {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goalstone, Marc [Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, VA Medical Center, Denver, CO 80220 (United States); Kamath, Vasudeva [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wayne State University, VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Kowluru, Anjaneyulu, E-mail: akowluru@med.wayne.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wayne State University, VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates small G-proteins [e.g., Cdc42 and Rac1] in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] in the islet {beta}-cell. These signaling proteins undergo post-translational modifications [e.g., prenylation] at their C-terminal cysteine residue and appear to be essential for the transport and fusion of insulin-containing secretory granules with the plasma membrane and the exocytotic secretion of insulin. However, potential regulation of the prenylating enzymes by physiological insulin secretogues [e.g., glucose] has not been investigated thus far. Herein, we report immunological localization, sub-cellular distribution and regulation of farnesyltransferases [FTases] and geranylgeranyltransferase [GGTase] by glucose in insulin-secreting INS 832/13 {beta}-cells and normal rat islets. Our findings suggest that an insulinotropic concentration of glucose [20 mM] markedly stimulated the expression of the {alpha}-subunits of FTase/GGTase-1, but not the {beta}-subunits of FTase or GGTase-1 without significantly affecting the predominantly cytosolic distribution of these holoenzymes in INS 832/13 cells and rodent islets. Under these conditions, glucose significantly stimulated [2.5- to 4.0-fold over basal] the activities of both FTase and GGTase-1 in both cell types. Together, these findings provide the first evidence to suggest that GSIS involves activation of the endogenous islet prenyltransferases by glucose, culminating in the activation of their respective G-protein substrates, which is necessary for cytoskeletal rearrangement, vesicular transport, fusion and secretion of insulin.

  13. Glucose activates prenyltransferases in pancreatic islet β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A growing body of evidence implicates small G-proteins [e.g., Cdc42 and Rac1] in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] in the islet β-cell. These signaling proteins undergo post-translational modifications [e.g., prenylation] at their C-terminal cysteine residue and appear to be essential for the transport and fusion of insulin-containing secretory granules with the plasma membrane and the exocytotic secretion of insulin. However, potential regulation of the prenylating enzymes by physiological insulin secretogues [e.g., glucose] has not been investigated thus far. Herein, we report immunological localization, sub-cellular distribution and regulation of farnesyltransferases [FTases] and geranylgeranyltransferase [GGTase] by glucose in insulin-secreting INS 832/13 β-cells and normal rat islets. Our findings suggest that an insulinotropic concentration of glucose [20 mM] markedly stimulated the expression of the α-subunits of FTase/GGTase-1, but not the β-subunits of FTase or GGTase-1 without significantly affecting the predominantly cytosolic distribution of these holoenzymes in INS 832/13 cells and rodent islets. Under these conditions, glucose significantly stimulated [2.5- to 4.0-fold over basal] the activities of both FTase and GGTase-1 in both cell types. Together, these findings provide the first evidence to suggest that GSIS involves activation of the endogenous islet prenyltransferases by glucose, culminating in the activation of their respective G-protein substrates, which is necessary for cytoskeletal rearrangement, vesicular transport, fusion and secretion of insulin.

  14. Human tumor-released microvesicles promote the differentiation of myeloid cells with transforming growth factor-beta-mediated suppressive activity on T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Roberta; Huber, Veronica; Filipazzi, Paola; Pilla, Lorenzo; Sovena, Gloria; Villa, Antonello; Corbelli, Alessandro; Fais, Stefano; Parmiani, Giorgio; Rivoltini, Licia

    2006-09-15

    Human tumors constitutively release endosome-derived microvesicles, transporting a broad array of biologically active molecules with potential modulatory effects on different immune cells. Here, we report the first evidence that tumor-released microvesicles alter myeloid cell function by impairing monocyte differentiation into dendritic cells and promoting the generation of a myeloid immunosuppressive cell subset. CD14+ monocytes isolated from healthy donors and differentiated with interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the presence of tumor-derived microvesicles turned into HLA-DR(-/low) cells, retaining CD14 expression and failing to up-regulate costimulatory molecules, such as CD80 and CD86. These phenotypic changes were paralleled by a significant release of different cytokines, including IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and a dose-dependent suppressive activity on activated T-cell-proliferation and cytolytic functions, which could be reversed by anti-TGF-beta-neutralizing antibodies. Microvesicles isolated from plasma of advanced melanoma patients, but not from healthy donors, mediated comparable effects on CD14+ monocytes, skewing their differentiation toward CD14+HLA-DR-/low cells with TGF-beta-mediated suppressive activity on T-cell-functions. Interestingly, a subset of TGF-beta-secreting CD14+HLA-DR- cells mediating suppressive activity on T lymphocytes was found to be significantly expanded in peripheral blood of melanoma patients compared with healthy donors. These data suggest the development in cancer patients of an immunosuppressive circuit by which tumors promote the generation of suppressive myeloid cells through the release of circulating microvesicles and without the need for cell-to-cell contact. Therapeutic interventions on the crucial steps of this pathway may contribute to restore tumor/immune system interactions favoring T-cell-mediated control of tumor

  15. Evidence for local dendritic cell activation in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge Bregje

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease characterized by a seemingly exaggerated immune response against a difficult to discern antigen. Dendritic cells (DCs are pivotal antigen presenting cells thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis. Paradoxically, decreased DC immune reactivity was reported in blood samples from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients. However, functional data on lung DCs in sarcoidosis are lacking. We hypothesized that at the site of disease DCs are mature, immunocompetent and involved in granuloma formation. Methods We analyzed myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL and blood from newly diagnosed, untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and healthy controls using 9-color flowcytometry. DCs, isolated from BAL using flowcytometric sorting (mDCs or cultured from monocytes (mo-DCs, were functionally assessed in a mixed leukocyte reaction with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Using Immunohistochemistry, location and activation status of CD11c+DCs was assessed in mucosal airway biopsies. Results mDCs in BAL, but not in blood, from sarcoidosis patients were increased in number when compared with mDCs from healthy controls. mDCs purified from BAL of sarcoidosis patients induced T cell proliferation and differentiation and did not show diminished immune reactivity. Mo-DCs from patients induced increased TNFα release in co-cultures with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses revealed increased numbers of mature CD86+ DCs in granuloma-containing airway mucosal biopsies from sarcoidosis patients. Conclusion Taken together, these finding implicate increased local DC activation in granuloma formation or maintenance in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  16. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  17. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  18. IL-2 activated NK cell immunotherapy of three children after haploidentical stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, Ulrike; Sörensen, Jan; Esser, Ruth; Zimmermann, Stefanie; Grüttner, Hans Peter; Tonn, Torsten; Seidl, Christian; Seifried, Erhard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Schwabe, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are thought to be of benefit in HLA-mismatched hematopoietic transplantation (H-SCT). Therefore, we developed a protocol for clinical-use expansion of highly enriched and IL-2-stimulated NK cells. Purification of unstimulated leukaphereses by a two-step T cell depletion with a final CD56 enrichment procedure leads to a mean purity of 95% CD56(+)CD3- NK cells with a four- to five-log depletion of T cells. So far, three pediatric patients with multiply relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were treated with repeated transfusions post-H-SCT. Directed killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) mismatches were demonstrated in all three cases. Although all patients showed blast persistence at the time of transplant, they reached complete remission and complete donor chimerism within 1 month post-H-SCT. NK cell therapy was tolerated well without graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) induction or other adverse events. The AML patient died of early relapse on day +80, while the ALL patients died of thrombotic-thrombocytopenic purpura and atypical viral pneumonia on days +45 and +152, respectively. This initial trial showed the feasibility of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant NK cell isolation and expansion for clinical applications. We now launch a clinical phase I trial with activated NK cells post-H-SCT. PMID:15528141

  19. Tissue distribution of adoptively transferred adherent lymphokine-activated killer cells assessed by different cell labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, P; Herberman, R B; Hokland, M;

    1992-01-01

    alternative direct visual methods for identification of the injected cells, such as fluorescent dyes (rhodamine and H33342) or immunohistochemical staining of asialo-GM1-positive cells. The number of i.v. injected A-LAK cells found in the liver by all visual methods ranged from 1% to 5% of the injected dose...... staining of asialo-GM1-positive cells appear to be reliable and essentially equivalent methods for investigations of the fate of adoptively transferred A-LAK cells. Using these methods, we found that only few A-LAK cells redistribute to the liver upon i.v., i.e. systemic, injection, whereas 40%-50% of......Assessment of the tissue distribution of adoptively transferred adherent lymphokine-activated killer A-LAK) cells by use of 51Cr indicated that these effector cells, after an initial phase in the lungs, distributed in high numbers to liver and spleen (30% and 10% of injected dose, respectively...

  20. Intraluminal acid activates esophageal nodose C fibers after mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shizhong; Liu, Zhenyu; Heldsinger, Andrea; Owyang, Chung; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-02-01

    Acid reflux in the esophagus can induce esophageal painful sensations such as heartburn and noncardiac chest pain. The mechanisms underlying acid-induced esophageal nociception are not clearly understood. In our previous studies, we characterized esophageal vagal nociceptive afferents and defined their responses to noxious mechanical and chemical stimulation. In the present study, we aim to determine their responses to intraluminal acid infusion. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose ganglion neurons with intact nerve endings in the esophagus using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal intraluminal acid perfusion were compared in naive and ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged animals, followed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the expression of tight junction proteins (zona occludens-1 and occludin). In naive guinea pigs, intraluminal infusion with either acid (pH = 2-3) or capsaicin did not evoke an action potential discharge in esophageal nodose C fibers. In OVA-sensitized animals, following esophageal mast cell activation by in vivo OVA inhalation, intraluminal acid infusion for about 20 min started to evoke action potential discharges. This effect is further confirmed by selective mast cell activation using in vitro tissue OVA challenge in esophageal-vagal preparations. OVA inhalation leads to decreased TEER and zona occludens-1 expression, suggesting an impaired esophageal epithelial barrier function after mast cell activation. These data for the first time provide direct evidence of intraluminal acid-induced activation of esophageal nociceptive C fibers and suggest that mast cell activation may make esophageal epithelium more permeable to acid, which subsequently may increase esophageal vagal nociceptive C fiber activation. PMID:24264049

  1. Hepatocellular proliferation in response to agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha: a role for kupffer cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsarra Ibrahim A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that PPARα agonists stimulate Kupffer cells in rodents which in turn, release mitogenic factors leading to hepatic hyperplasia, and eventually cancer. However, Kupffer cells do not express PPARα receptors, and PPARα agonists stimulate hepatocellular proliferation in both TNFα- and TNFα receptor-null mice, casting doubt on the involvement of Kupffer cells in the mitogenic response to PPARα agonists. This study was therefore designed to investigate whether the PPARα agonist PFOA and the Kupffer cell inhibitor methylpalmitate produce opposing effects on hepatocellular proliferation and Kupffer cell activity in vivo, in a manner that would implicate these cells in the mitogenic effects of PPARα agonists. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated intravenously via the tail vein with methylpalmitate 24 hrs prior to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, and were sacrificed 24 hrs later, one hr after an intraperitoneal injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. Sera were analyzed for TNFα and IL-1β. Liver sections were stained immunohistochemically and quantified for BrdU incorporated into DNA. Results Data show that PFOA remarkably stimulated hepatocellular proliferation in the absence of significant changes in the serum levels of either TNFα or IL-1β. In addition, methylpalmitate did not alter the levels of these mitogens in PFOA-treated animals, despite the fact that it significantly blocked the hepatocellular proliferative effect of PFOA. Correlation between hepatocellular proliferation and serum levels of TNFα or IL-1β was extremely poor. Conclusion It is unlikely that mechanisms involving Kupffer cells play an eminent role in the hepatic hyperplasia, and consequently hepatocarcinogenicity attributed to PPARα agonists. This conclusion is based on the above mentioned published data and the current findings showing animals treated with PFOA alone or in combination with methylpalmitate to have similar

  2. In vivo ultraviolet-exposed human epidermal cells activate T suppressor cell pathways that involve CD4+CD45RA+ suppressor-inducer T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo UV exposure of human epidermis abrogates the function of CD1+DR+ Langerhans cells and induces the appearance of CD1-DR+ Ag-presenting macrophages. Epidermal cells from UV-exposed skin, in contrast to epidermal cells from normal skin, potently activate autologous CD4+ T cells, and, in particular, the CD45RA+ (2H4+) (suppressor-inducer) subset. We therefore determined whether UV-exposure in humans leads to a T cell response in which suppression dominates. Autologous blood T cells were incubated with epidermal cell suspensions from in vivo UV-irradiated skin. After activation, repurified T cells were transferred in graded numbers to autologous mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated with PWM and the resultant IgG production analyzed by ELISA. Relative to T cells activated by unirradiated control epidermal cells, T cells activated by UV-exposed epidermal cells demonstrated enhanced capacity to suppress IgG production (n = 6; p less than or equal to 0.03). Within the T cell population, CD8+ cells stimulated by UV-exposed epidermal cells could be directly activated to suppress PWM-stimulated MNC Ig production if IL-2 was provided in the reaction mixture. The suppressive activity was also transferable with purified CD4+ T cells stimulated by UV-exposed epidermal cells (n = 10; p less than or equal to 0.01), and was radiosensitive. Suppression was decreased when PWM-stimulated MNC were depleted of CD8+ T cells before mixing with CD4+ T cells activated by UV-exposed epidermal cells, suggesting indirect induction of CD8+ Ts cells contained within the responding MNC populations. Indeed, physical depletion of CD45RA+ cells resulted in total abrogation of the suppressor function contained in the CD4+ T cells. Activation of suppressor function was critically dependent on DR+ APC contained in UV-exposed epidermis

  3. Malignant T cells express lymphotoxin alpha and drive endothelial activation in cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Britt; Christensen, Louise; Ralfkiaer, Ulrik;

    2015-01-01

    internal organs and blood. Yet, little is known about the mechanism of the CTCL dissemination. Here, we show that CTCL cells express LTα in situ and that LTα expression is driven by aberrantly activated JAK3/STAT5 pathway. Importantly, via TNF receptor 2, LTα functions as an autocrine factor by stimulating...

  4. Serum Amyloid A Induces Inflammation, Proliferation and Cell Death in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Sören V; Schlosser, Monika; Schildberg, Frank A; Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kuntzen, Christian; Knolle, Percy A; Strassburg, Christian P; Schwabe, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an evolutionary highly conserved acute phase protein that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes. However, its role in liver injury and fibrogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In this study, we determined the effects of SAA on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type of the liver. Serum amyloid A potently activated IκB kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Erk and Akt and enhanced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity in primary human and rat HSCs. Serum amyloid A induced the transcription of MCP-1, RANTES and MMP9 in an NF-κB- and JNK-dependent manner. Blockade of NF-κB revealed cytotoxic effects of SAA in primary HSCs with signs of apoptosis such as caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Serum amyloid A induced HSC proliferation, which depended on JNK, Erk and Akt activity. In primary hepatocytes, SAA also activated MAP kinases, but did not induce relevant cell death after NF-κB inhibition. In two models of hepatic fibrogenesis, CCl4 treatment and bile duct ligation, hepatic mRNA levels of SAA1 and SAA3 were strongly increased. In conclusion, SAA may modulate fibrogenic responses in the liver in a positive and negative fashion by inducing inflammation, proliferation and cell death in HSCs. PMID:26937641

  5. Endogenous retinoic acid activity in principal cells and intercalated cells of mouse collecting duct system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Fei Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoic acid is the bioactive derivative of vitamin A, which plays an indispensible role in kidney development by activating retinoic acid receptors. Although the location, concentration and roles of endogenous retinoic acid in post-natal kidneys are poorly defined, there is accumulating evidence linking post-natal vitamin A deficiency to impaired renal concentrating and acidifying capacity associated with increased susceptibility to urolithiasis, renal inflammation and scarring. The aim of this study is to examine the presence and the detailed localization of endogenous retinoic acid activity in neonatal, young and adult mouse kidneys, to establish a fundamental ground for further research into potential target genes, as well as physiological and pathophysiological roles of endogenous retinoic acid in the post-natal kidneys. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RARE-hsp68-lacZ transgenic mice were employed as a reporter for endogenous retinoic acid activity that was determined by X-gal assay and immunostaining of the reporter gene product, β-galactosidase. Double immunostaining was performed for β-galactosidase and markers of kidney tubules to localize retinoic acid activity. Distinct pattern of retinoic acid activity was observed in kidneys, which is higher in neonatal and 1- to 3-week-old mice than that in 5- and 8-week-old mice. The activity was present specifically in the principal cells and the intercalated cells of the collecting duct system in all age groups, but was absent from the glomeruli, proximal tubules, thin limbs of Henle's loop and distal tubules. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous retinoic acid activity exists in principal cells and intercalated cells of the mouse collecting duct system after birth and persists into adulthood. This observation provides novel insights into potential roles for endogenous retinoic acid beyond nephrogenesis and warrants further studies to investigate target genes and functions of

  6. Impact of MAPK pathway activation in BRAFV600 melanoma on T cell and Dendritic Cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Alexander Ott

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive upregulation of the MAPK pathway by a BRAFV600 mutation occurs in about half of melanomas. This leads to increased oncogenic properties such as tumor cell invasion, metastatic potential, and resistance to apoptosis. Blockade of the MAPK pathway with highly specific kinase inhibitors induces unprecedented tumor response rates in patients with advanced BRAFV600 mutant melanoma. Immune checkpoint blockade with monoclonal antibodies targeting CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 has also demonstrated striking anti-tumor activity in patients with advanced melanoma. Tumor responses are likely limited by multiple additional layers of immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. There is emerging preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting that MAPK inhibition has a beneficial effect on the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, providing a strong rationale for combined immunotherapy and MAPK pathway inhibition in melanoma. The T cell response has been the main focus in the studies reported to date. Since dendritic cells (DCs are important in the induction of tumor-specific T cell responses, the impact of MAPK pathway activation in melanoma on DC function is critical for the melanoma directed immune response. BRAFV600E melanoma cells modulate DC through the MAPK pathway because its blockade in melanoma cells can reverse suppression of DC function. As both MEK/BRAF inhibition and immune checkpoint blockade have recently taken center stage in the treatment of melanoma, a deeper understanding of how MAPK pathway inhibition affects the tumor immune response is needed.

  7. Activation-induced and damage-induced cell death in aging human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Ewa

    2015-11-01

    In multicellular organisms the proper system functionality is ensured by the balance between cell division, differentiation, senescence and death. This balance is changed during aging. Immunosenescence plays a crucial role in aging and leads to the shrinkage of T cell repertoire and the propensity to apoptosis. The elimination of expanded T cells at the end of immune response is crucial to maintain homeostasis and avoid any uncontrolled inflammation. Resting mature T lymphocytes, when activated via their antigen-specific receptor (TCR) and CD28 co-receptor, start to proliferate and then undergo the so called activation induced cell death (AICD), which mechanistically is triggered by the death receptor and leads to apoptosis. T lymphocytes, like other cells, are also exposed to damage, which can trigger the so called damage-induced cell death (DICD). It was hypothesized that oxidative stress and chronic antigenic load increasing with age reduced lymphocyte susceptibility to DICD and enhanced a proinflamatory status leading to increased AICD. However, data collected so far are inconsistent and does not support this assumption. Systematic and comprehensive studies are still needed for conclusive elucidation of the role of AICD and DICD in human immunosenescence, including the role of autophagy and necroptosis in the processes. PMID:25843236

  8. Microbial activity in a deep underground HLW disposal cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research program conducted by IRSN on microbial activity in the context of deep underground radioactive waste disposal is focused on the potential impact of bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel materials involved in the design of high level waste (HLW) disposal cells developed in France by Andra. This program combines two different approaches: firstly, the evaluation of biodiversity of argillite, from undisturbed and disturbed (gallery wall, excavation damaged zone, presence of metallic platelets..) samples and secondly, the development of a conceptual model for development of microbial activity in a HLW disposal cell based on mass and energy balances. At this stage, it is worth noting that the effects of high radiation have not been taken into account. The characterization of biodiversity of the Toarcian argillite of Tournemire (experimental tunnel operated to develop IRSN skills in earth sciences) has shown that even if the argillite probably acts as a natural selective substratum for bacterial colonization, exogenous microorganisms may develop within disturbed areas. Indeed, the observed bacterial diversity tends to depend on the different oxygen and humidity conditions, and also probably on space availability. This characterization also highlighted the presence of a sulphate-reducing and iron-reducing bacterium capable to resist to high temperatures in a sample collected by scratching a steel platelet. Besides, the preliminary conceptual model of bacterial development has shown that iron-reducing and sulphate-reducing bacteria may be able to grow in the environment of HLW disposal cell. (orig.)

  9. ERas protein is overexpressed and binds to the activated platelet-derived growth factor β receptor in bovine urothelial tumour cells associated with papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Valeria; Roperto, Franco; Esposito, Iolanda; Ceccarelli, Dora Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Leonardi, Leonardo; Capparelli, Rosanna; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Roperto, Sante

    2016-06-01

    Embryonic stem cell-expressed Ras (ERas) encodes a constitutively active form of guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that binds to and activates phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), which in turn phosphorylates and activates downstream targets such as Akt. The current study evaluated ERas regulation and expression in papillomavirus-associated urothelial tumours in cattle grazing on lands rich in bracken fern. ERas was found upregulated and overexpressed by PCR, real time PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, protein overexpression was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry. ERas was found to interact physically and colocalise with the activated platelet derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) by coimmunoprecipitation and laser scanning confocal investigations. Phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream effector both of ERas and PDGFβR, appeared to be increased in urothelial tumour cells. Altogether, these data indicate that ERas/PDGFβR complex could play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine papillomavirus-associated bladder neoplasia. PMID:27256024

  10. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC...

  11. Cell-surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells after inhibition of HDAC activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle

    frequently express Hsp70 on their cell surface, whereas the corresponding normal tissues do not. In addition, several clinically applied reagents, such as alkyl-lysophospholipides, chemotherapeutic agents, and anti-inflammatory reagents, have been found to enhance Hsp70 cell surface expression on cancer...... cells. We have found that inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity leads to surface expression of Hsp70 on various hematopoietic cancer cells, an occurance that was not observed on naïve or activated peripheral blood cells. HDAC-inhibitor mediated Hsp70 cell surface expression was confined to...... transport and cell surface binding of Hsp70 after HDAC-inhibitor treatment remains elusive. Our data suggest that inhibition of HDAC activity selectively induces cell surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells, and this may increase the immunorecognition of these cells. It could be envisaged...

  12. Role of Calcium Signaling in B Cell Activation and Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yoshihiro; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Increase in intracellular levels of calcium ions (Ca2+) is one of the key triggering signals for the development of B cell response to the antigen. The diverse Ca2+ signals finely controlled by multiple factors participate in the regulation of gene expression, B cell development, and effector functions. B cell receptor (BCR)-initiated Ca2+ mobilization is sourced from two pathways: one is the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and other is the prolonged influx of extracellular Ca2+ induced by depleting the stores via store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The identification of stromal interaction molecule 1(STIM1), the ER Ca2+ sensor, and Orai1, a key subunit of the CRAC channel pore, has now provided the tools to understand the mode of Ca2+ influx regulation and physiological relevance. Herein, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying BCR-triggered Ca2+ signaling as well as its contribution to the B cell biological processes and diseases. PMID:26369772

  13. The immune privilege of the eye: human retinal pigment epithelial cells selectively modulate T-cell activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Lovato, Paola; Ødum, Niels;

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the effect of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activation of T cells. METHODS: Resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were stimulated with PHA with or without the presence of gamma-irradiated RPE cells. Proliferation and the cell...... cell culture supernatant was measured by ELISA. RESULTS: Human RPE cells were found to suppress PHA-induced proliferation, cyclin A, IL-2R-alpha and -gamma, and CD71 expression and decrease the production of IL-2; but RPE cells do not inhibit the PHA-induced expression of early activation markers CD69...

  14. Early phenotypic activation of circulating helper memory T cells in scleroderma: correlation with disease activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Fiocco, U; Rosada, M; L. Cozzi; Ortolani, C; Silvestro, G.; A. Ruffatti; Cozzi, E; Gallo, C; S. Todesco

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--The differential expression of several accessory/activation molecules (CD26, CD29, CD45RA, CD25, MLR4, HLA-DR) on peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in patients with scleroderma was compared with that in controls and patients with other connective systemic diseases to look for evidence of the involvement of T cells in the disease process of scleroderma. METHODS--The two colour expression of surface molecules by circulating T cells was analysed with a panel of monoclonal ...

  15. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive 125I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface

  16. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Teng, E-mail: tengyu33@yahoo.com [Department of Dermatology, Shandong Ji-ning No. 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province 272011 (China); Ji, Jiang [Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital Affiliated of Soochow University, SuZhou, Jiangsu Province 215000 (China); Guo, Yong-li [Department of Oncology, Shandong Ji-ning No. 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province 272011 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells.

  17. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

  18. Metabolic reprogramming of alloantigen-activated T cells after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Haarberg, Kelley M K; Wu, Yongxia; Bastian, David; Heinrichs, Jessica; Fu, Jianing; Daenthanasanmak, Anusara; Schutt, Steven; Shrestha, Sharad; Liu, Chen; Wang, Honglin; Chi, Hongbo; Mehrotra, Shikhar; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Alloreactive donor T cells are the driving force in the induction of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), yet little is known about T cell metabolism in response to alloantigens after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Here, we have demonstrated that donor T cells undergo metabolic reprograming after allogeneic HCT. Specifically, we employed a murine allogeneic BM transplant model and determined that T cells switch from fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) and pyruvate oxidation via the tricarboxylic (TCA) cycle to aerobic glycolysis, thereby increasing dependence upon glutaminolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway. Glycolysis was required for optimal function of alloantigen-activated T cells and induction of GVHD, as inhibition of glycolysis by targeting mTORC1 or 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3) ameliorated GVHD mortality and morbidity. Together, our results indicate that donor T cells use glycolysis as the predominant metabolic process after allogeneic HCT and suggest that glycolysis has potential as a therapeutic target for the control of GVHD. PMID:26950421

  19. Bacteria turn on surfaces by oversteering with Type IV pili

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fan; Conrad, Jacinta C.; Gibiansky, Maxsim L.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2011-03-01

    Type-IV pili (TFP) are linear nano-actuators that enable bacteria to crawl on surfaces. Analysis of TFP-mediated crawling in P. aeruginosa reveals that it always alternates between two types of distinct movements: a linear translation of constant velocity is followed by a combined translation-rotation that is ~ 10 x faster in instantaneous velocity. The latter process can turn the cell body by over-steering so that the rear of the cell loses traction with the surface. Orientational distributions of these movements suggest that the former is due to pulling by multiple TFP, whereas the latter is mostly due to release by single TFP.

  20. Anticancer activity of cryptotanshinone on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Klauck, Sabine M; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Cryptotanshinone, a well-known diterpene quinone from a widely used traditional Chinese herb named Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been reported for its therapeutical potentials on diverse activities. In this study, pharmacological effects of cryptotanshinone on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells were investigated. IC50 values of 5.0 and 4.8 were obtained in CEM/ADR5000 and CCRF-CEM. Microarray-based mRNA expression revealed that cryptotanshinone regulated genes associated with cell cycle, DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), NFκB signaling and cellular movement. The involvement of these pathways in the mode of action of cryptotanshinone was subsequently validated by additional independent in vitro studies. Cryptotanshinone stimulated ROS generation and induced DNA damage. It arrested cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle and induced apoptosis as measured by annexin V-FITC-conjugating fluorescence. The induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway by cryptotanshinone was proved by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cleavage of caspase 3/7, caspase 9 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). DNA-binding motif analysis of the microarray-retrieved deregulated genes in the promoter region revealed NFκB as potential transcription factor involved in cryptotanshinone's mode of action. Molecular docking and Western blotting provided supportive evidence, suggesting that cryptotanshinone binds to IKK-β and inhibits the translocation of p65 from the cytosol to the nucleus. In addition, cryptotanshinone inhibited cellular movement as shown by a fibronectin-based cellular adhesion assay, indicating that this compound exerts anti-invasive features. In conclusion, cryptotanshinone exerts profound cytotoxicity, which is caused by multispecific modes of actions, including G2/M arrest, apoptosis and inhibition of cellular movement. The inhibitory activities of this compound may be explained by inhibition of NFκB, which orchestrates all these mechanisms. PMID

  1. Reconceptualizing Autonomy: A Relational Turn in Bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    History's judgment on the success of bioethics will not depend solely on the conceptual creativity and innovation in the field at the level of ethical and political theory, but this intellectual work is not insignificant. One important new development is what I shall refer to as the relational turn in bioethics. This development represents a renewed emphasis on the ideographic approach, which interprets the meaning of right and wrong in human actions as they are inscribed in social and cultural practices and in structures of lived meaning and interdependence; in an ideographic approach, the task of bioethics is to bring practice into theory, not the other way around. The relational turn in bioethics may profoundly affect the critical questions that the field asks and the ethical guidance it offers society, politics, and policy. The relational turn provides a way of correcting the excessive atomism of many individualistic perspectives that have been, and continue to be, influential in bioethics. Nonetheless, I would argue that most of the work reflecting the relational turn remains distinctively liberal in its respect for the ethical significance of the human individual. It moves away from individualism, but not from the value of individuality.In this review essay, I shall focus on how the relational turn has manifested itself in work on core concepts in bioethics, especially liberty and autonomy. Following a general review, I conclude with a brief consideration of two important recent books in this area: Jennifer Nedelsky's Law's Relations and Rachel Haliburton's Autonomy and the Situated Self. PMID:26847836

  2. Activated Alveolar Epithelial Cells Initiate Fibrosis through Secretion of Mesenchymal Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jibing; Wheeler, Sarah E.; Velikoff, Miranda; Kleaveland, Kathryn R.; LaFemina, Michael J.; Frank, James A.; Chapman, Harold A.; Christensen, Paul J; Kim, Kevin K.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is characterized by accumulation of activated fibroblasts and pathological deposition of fibrillar collagens. Activated fibroblasts overexpress matrix proteins and release factors that promote further recruitment of activated fibroblasts, leading to progressive fibrosis. The contribution of epithelial cells to this process remains unknown. Epithelium-directed injury may lead to activation of epithelial cells with phenotypes and functions similar to activated fibroblasts. Prior report...

  3. Tetramethylpyrazine potentiates arsenic trioxide activity against HL-60 cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuni; Xu, Youhua; Shen, Yali; Wang, Cuicui; Guo, Gaili; Hu, Tiantian [Key Laboratory of Developmental Diseases in Childhood, Chongqing (China); Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Chongqing (China); Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing (China)

    2012-02-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) in combination with arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on the proliferation and differentiation of HL-60 cells. The HL-60 cells were treated with 300 µg/mL TMP, 0.5 µM As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 300 µg/mL TMP combined with 0.5 µM As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, respectively. The proliferative inhibition rates were determined with MTT. Differentiation was detected by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction test, Wright's staining and the distribution of CD11b and CD14. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle distribution. RT-PCR and Western blot assays were employed to detect the expressions of c-myc, p27, CDK2, and cyclin E1. Combination treatment had synergistic effects on the proliferative inhibition rates. The rates were increased gradually after the combination treatment, much higher than those treated with the corresponding concentration of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} alone. The cells exhibited characteristics of mature granulocytes and a higher NBT-reducing ability, being a 2.6-fold increase in the rate of NBT-positive ratio of HL-60 cells within the As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment versus almost a 13-fold increase in the TMP + As{sub 2}O{sub 3} group. Cells treated with both TMP and As{sub 2}O{sub 3} expressed far more CD11b antigens, almost 2-fold compared with the control group. Small doses of TMP potentiate As{sub 2}O{sub 3}-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells, possibly by regulating the expression and activity of G0/G1 phase-arresting molecules. Combination treatment of TMP with As{sub 2}O{sub 3} has significant synergistic effects on the proliferative inhibition of HL-60 cells.

  4. Equol increases cerebral blood flow in rats via activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Song, Zheng; Zhao, Li-Mei; Li, Gui-Rong; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of equol on cerebral blood flow and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The regional cerebral blood flow in parietal lobe of rats was measured by using a laser Doppler flowmetry. Isolated cerebral basilar artery and mesenteric artery rings from rats were used for vascular reactivity measurement with a multi wire myography system. Outward K(+) current in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery, large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel current in BK-HEK 293 cells stably expressing both human α (hSlo)- and β1-subunits, and hSlo channel current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells expressing only the α-subunit of BK channels were recorded with whole cell patch-clamp technique. The results showed that equol significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in rats, and produced a concentration-dependent but endothelium-independent relaxation in rat cerebral basilar arteries. Both paxilline and iberiotoxin, two selective BK channel blockers, significantly inhibited equol-induced vasodilation in cerebral arteries. Outward K(+) currents in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery were increased by equol and fully reversed by washout or blockade of BK channels with iberiotoxin. Equol remarkably enhanced human BK current in BK-HEK 293 cells, but not hSlo current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells, and the increase was completely abolished by co-application of paxilline. Our findings provide the first information that equol selectively stimulates BK channel current by acting on its β1 subunit, which may in turn contribute to the equol-mediated vasodilation and cerebral blood flow increase. PMID:26995303

  5. Cytotoxic activity of marine algae against cancerous cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élica A. C. Guedes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on the cytotoxic activity in human tumor cell from dichloromethane, chloroform, methanol, ethanol, water extracts, and hexane and chloroform fractions from green, brown and red algae collected at Riacho Doce Beach, north coast of Alagoas, Brazil, against the cancer cells K562 (chronic myelocytic leukemia, HEp-2 (laryngeal epidermoid carcinoma and NCI-H292 (human lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma through the MTT colorimetric method. The dichloromethane extract and chloroform fraction of Hypnea musciformis showed the best cytotoxic activity against K562 (3.8±0.2 µg.mL-1 and 6.4±0.4 µg.mL-1, respectively. Dichloromethane extracts of Dictyota dichotoma (16.3±0.3 µg.mL-1 and the chloroform fraction of H. musciformis (6.0±0.03 µg.mL-1 and chloroform fraction of P. gymnospora (8.2±0.4 were more active against HEp-2 as well as ethanol extracts of P. gymnospora (15.9±2.8 µg.mL-1 and chloroform fraction of H. musciformis (15.0±1.3 µg.mL-1 against the cell NCI-H292. The constituents with higher anticancer action are present in the extracts of dichloromethane and chloroform and in the chloroform fraction of H. musciformis, Digenea simplex, P. gymnospora, and D.dichotoma. In the case of the seaweed S. vulgare, the anticancer constituents are present in the aqueous extract.

  6. Pharmacological Intervention in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Hepatic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Bartneck, Matthias; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Nattermann, Jacob; Lammers, Twan; Tacke, Frank; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The activation and transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into contractile, matrix-producing myofibroblasts (MFBs) are central events in hepatic fibrogenesis. These processes are driven by autocrine- and paracrine-acting soluble factors (i.e., cytokines and chemokines). Proof-of-concept studies of the last decades have shown that both the deactivation and removal of hepatic MFBs as well as antagonizing profibrogenic factors are in principle suitable to attenuate ongoing hepatic fibrosis. Although several drugs show potent antifibrotic activities in experimental models of hepatic fibrosis, there is presently no effective pharmaceutical intervention specifically approved for the treatment of liver fibrosis. Pharmaceutical interventions are generally hampered by insufficient supply of drugs to the diseased liver tissue and/or by adverse effects as a result of affecting non-target cells. Therefore, targeted delivery systems that bind specifically to receptors solely expressed on activated HSCs or transdifferentiated MFBs and delivery systems that can improve drug distribution to the liver in general are urgently needed. In this review, we summarize current strategies for targeted delivery of drugs to the liver and in particular to pro-fibrogenic liver cells. The applicability and efficacy of sequestering molecules, selective protein carriers, lipid-based drug vehicles, viral vectors, transcriptional targeting approaches, therapeutic liver- and HSC-specific nanoparticles, and miRNA-based strategies are discussed. Some of these delivery systems that had already been successfully tested in experimental animal models of ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis are expected to translate into clinically useful therapeutics specifically targeting HSCs. PMID:26941644

  7. The topology of plasminogen binding and activation on the surface of human breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Andronicos, N M; Ranson, M.

    2001-01-01

    The urokinase-dependent activation of plasminogen by breast cancer cells plays an important role in metastasis. We have previously shown that the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 over-expresses urokinase and binds and efficiently activates plasminogen at the cell surface compared to non-metastatic cells. The aim of this study was to further characterise plasminogen binding and determine the topology of cell surface-bound plasminogen in terms of its potential for activation. The l...

  8. H2 and Fuel cell annual activity report - France 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report aims making better known the hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in France and their main actors (large groups, small and medium-sized enterprises, start-ups, research centres). After a presentation of the French energy context, it presents the national programme and strategic actions, and local programmes and initiatives. The next chapter presents the main results and events for the different fields of application: leading edge markets, transports, decentralized or residential stationary applications, hydrogen and renewable energies, portable applications, transverse domains. The annual activity and main results of the different actors are then presented: research and development, small or medium sized enterprises and start-ups, large groups

  9. Monitoring G protein activation in cells with BRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuho, Ikuo; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Lambert, Nevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Live-cell assays based on fluorescence and luminescence are now indispensable tools for the study of G protein signaling. Assays based on fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and BRET) have been particularly valuable for monitoring changes in second messengers, protein-protein interactions, and protein conformation. Here we describe a BRET assay that monitors the release of free Gβγ dimers after activation of heterotrimers containing Gα subunits from all four G protein subfamilies. This assay provides useful kinetic and pharmacological information with reasonably high throughput using standard laboratory equipment. PMID:26260597

  10. Cross-talk between human mast cells and bronchial epithelial cells in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 production via transforming growth factor-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong H; Lee, Sun H; Kato, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Kulka, Marianna; Shin, Soon C; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports suggest that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promotes airway remodeling and that human and mouse mast cells (MCs) are an important source of PAI-1. In the present study we investigated MC-epithelial cell (EC) interactions in the production of PAI-1. We stimulated the human MC line LAD2 with IgE-receptor cross-linking and collected the supernatants. We incubated the human bronchial EC line BEAS-2B with the LAD2 supernatants and measured the level of PAI-1. When the supernatants from IgE-stimulated LAD2 were added to BEAS-2B, there was a significant enhancement of PAI-1 production by BEAS-2B. When we treated the MC supernatants with a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 neutralizing antibody, the MC-derived induction of PAI-1 from BEAS-2B was completely abrogated. Although TGF-β1 mRNA was constitutively expressed in resting LAD2, it was not highly induced by IgE-mediated stimulation. Nonetheless, active TGF-β1 protein was significantly increased in LAD2 after IgE-mediated stimulation. Active TGF-β1 produced by primary cultured human MCs was significantly reduced in the presence of a chymase inhibitor, suggesting a role of MC chymase as an activator of latent TGF-β1. This study indicates that stimulation of human MCs by IgE receptor cross-linking triggers activation of TGF-β1, at least in part via chymase, which in turn induces the production of PAI-1 by bronchial ECs. Our data suggest that human MCs may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma as a direct source of PAI-1 and by activating bronchial ECs to produce further PAI-1 via a TGF-β1-mediated activation pathway. PMID:24987792

  11. Conditioned medium from activated spleen cells supports the survival of rat retinal cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sholl-Franco

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of molecules that have been associated with several functions in the nervous system, such as survival and differentiation of neuronal and glial cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that conditioned medium from spleen cells activated with concanavalin A increased neuritogenesis and survival of retinal cells, as measured by biochemical and morphological criteria. Our data showed that conditioned medium induced a five-fold increase in the amount of protein after 120 h in vitro. This effect was not inhibited by the blockade of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels with 5.0 µM nifedipine. However, the use of an intracellular calcium chelator (15.0 µM BAPTA-AM inhibited this effect. Our results support the idea that factors secreted by activated lymphocytes, such as cytokines, can modulate the maintenance and the differentiation of rat retinal cells in vitro, indicating a possible role of these molecules in the development of retinal cells, as well as in its protection against pathological conditions

  12. RIP kinase-mediated ROS production triggers XAF1 expression through activation of TAp73 in casticin-treated bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoon Hee; Kim, Daejin

    2016-08-01

    The p53 family protein p73 plays an important role in apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic drugs. Transcriptionally active (TA) p73 (TAp73) substitutes for p53 in the response to stress. XIAP associated factor 1 (XAF1) is a novel predictive and prognostic factor in patients with bladder cancer, but the association between TAp73 and XAF1 expression in bladder cancer cells is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the status of TAp73 and XAF1 in T24 bladder cancer cells to identify molecular mechanisms in casticin‑exposed T24 cells. Casticin induced activation of JNK/p38 MAPK that preceded activation of the caspase cascade and disruption of the mitochondria membrane potential (∆ψm). Expression of XAF1 and TAp73 was also upregulated in casticin-treated T24 cells. Casticin treatment of T24 cells induced receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase expression and increased intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Casticin-mediated ROS induced an increase in phosphorylated JNK/p38 MAPK, resulting in progressive upregulation of TAp73, which in turn led to XAF1 expression. Our data suggest that the apoptotic activity of casticin in T24 cells is mediated by activation of the TAp73-XAF1 signaling pathway through RIP kinase-mediated ROS production. PMID:27349281

  13. Lithium Iron Phosphate Cell Performance Evaluations for Lunar Extravehicular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha

    2007-01-01

    Lithium-ion battery cells are being evaluated for their ability to provide primary power and energy storage for NASA s future Exploration missions. These missions include the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, the Ares Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage, Extravehicular Activities (EVA, the advanced space suit), the Lunar Surface Ascent Module (LSAM), and the Lunar Precursor and Robotic Program (LPRP), among others. Each of these missions will have different battery requirements. Some missions may require high specific energy and high energy density, while others may require high specific power, wide operating temperature ranges, or a combination of several of these attributes. EVA is one type of mission that presents particular challenges for today s existing power sources. The Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for the advanced Lunar surface suit will be carried on an astronaut s back during eight hour long sorties, requiring a lightweight power source. Lunar sorties are also expected to occur during varying environmental conditions, requiring a power source that can operate over a wide range of temperatures. Concepts for Lunar EVAs include a primary power source for the PLSS that can recharge rapidly. A power source that can charge quickly could enable a lighter weight system that can be recharged while an astronaut is taking a short break. Preliminary results of Al23 Ml 26650 lithium iron phosphate cell performance evaluations for an advanced Lunar surface space suit application are discussed in this paper. These cells exhibit excellent recharge rate capability, however, their specific energy and energy density is lower than typical lithium-ion cell chemistries. The cells were evaluated for their ability to provide primary power in a lightweight battery system while operating at multiple temperatures.

  14. HDAC6-mediated EGFR stabilization and activation restrict cell response to sorafenib in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihao; Hu, Pengchao; Tang, Fang; Xie, Conghua

    2016-05-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor and has been the subject of extensive clinical research in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, sorafenib fails to improve overall survival of patients with advanced NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms that account for this phenomenon are unclear. Here we show that sorafenib treatment stabilizes epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and activates EGFR pathway. Moreover, this is partly mediated by stabilization of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which has been shown to regulate EGFR endocytic trafficking and degradation. Overexpression of HDAC6 confers resistance to sorafenib in NSCLC cells. Inhibition of HDAC6 with selective inhibitors synergizes with sorafenib to kill NSCLC cells via inhibition of sorafenib-mediated EGFR pathway activation. Taken together, our findings might partly explain the failure of Phase III trial of sorafenib in improving overall survival of advanced NSCLC patients and bear possible implications for the improvement on the efficacy of sorafenib in treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27090797

  15. TELOMERASE ACTIVITY OF FIBROBRONCHOSCOPIC BRUSHING CELLS IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓红; 应可净; 张行

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical significance of telomerase activity particularly in terms of prognostic impact in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The exfoliated cells from fibrobronchoscopic brushing were studied using polymerase chain reaction based on a telomerase repeat amplification protocal assay. Samples were taken from 60 NSCLC and 20 pulmonary infection cases. Results: Telomerase activity was detected in 53 of 60(88.3%) NSCLC specimens from the lesion side and in 5 of 25(20.0%) from the contralateral side but only in 2 of 20 pulmonary infection samples (P<0.05). The telomerase activity levels in NSCLC (medium 0.109) were significantly higher than those in pulmonary infection (medium 0.018, U=4.95, P<0.05). The telomerase activity levels in tumor staged IIIb-IV (medium 0.173) were higher than those in staged I-IIIa (medium 0.132, U=1.899, P<0.05). Conclusion: Telomerase activity is one of the most important marker in patients with NSCLC. Telomerase activity increases with the advance of tumor stage and can be used as a prognostic indicator of advanced NSCLC.

  16. Adaptation of TURN protocol to SIP protocol

    CERN Document Server

    Guezouri, Mustapha; Keche, Mokhtar

    2010-01-01

    Today, SIP is a protocol par Excellence in the field of communication over Internet. But, the fact that it belongs to the application layer constitutes a weakness vis-a-vis the NAT traversal. This weakness is due to the way in which the server replies to the requests of clients on the one hand. On the other, it is caused by the dynamic allocation of UDP ports for emission and reception of packets RTP/RTCP. The TURN Protocol may face this weakness. However, its use requires a certain number of exchanges between the clients and a TURN server before establishing the multimedia sessions and this increase the latent time. In this article, we propose to adapt TURN protocol for applications based on SIP protocol such as telephony over Internet, conference video, etc. This adaptation optimises the establishment of multimedia sessions by integrating a manager of TCP connections and multimedia flow controller into SIP Proxy server.

  17. Market turning points forecasting using wavelet analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Limiao; Yan, Sen; Zheng, Xiaolian; Chen, Ben M.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the system adaptation framework we previously proposed, a frequency domain based model is developed in this paper to forecast the major turning points of stock markets. This system adaptation framework has its internal model and adaptive filter to capture the slow and fast dynamics of the market, respectively. The residue of the internal model is found to contain rich information about the market cycles. In order to extract and restore its informative frequency components, we use wavelet multi-resolution analysis with time-varying parameters to decompose this internal residue. An empirical index is then proposed based on the recovered signals to forecast the market turning points. This index is successfully applied to US, UK and China markets, where all major turning points are well forecasted.

  18. Research on an Intelligent Automatic Turning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lichong Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Equipment manufacturing industry is the strategic industries of a country. And its core part is the CNC machine tool. Therefore, enhancing the independent research of relevant technology of CNC machine, especially the open CNC system, is of great significance. This paper presented some key techniques of an Intelligent Automatic Turning System and gave a viable solution for system integration. First of all, the integrated system architecture and the flexible and efficient workflow for perfoming the intelligent automatic turning process is illustrated. Secondly, the innovated methods of the workpiece feature recognition and expression and process planning of the NC machining are put forward. Thirdly, the cutting tool auto-selection and the cutting parameter optimization solution are generated with a integrated inference of rule-based reasoning and case-based reasoning. Finally, the actual machining case based on the developed intelligent automatic turning system proved the presented solutions are valid, practical and efficient.

  19. Turning points in the history of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, Hardy

    2015-01-01

    This book explores some of the major turning points in the history of mathematics, ranging from ancient Greece to the present, demonstrating the drama that has often been a part of its evolution. Studying these breakthroughs, transitions, and revolutions, their stumbling-blocks and their triumphs, can help illuminate the importance of the history of mathematics for its teaching, learning, and appreciation. Some of the turning points considered are the rise of the axiomatic method (most famously in Euclid), and the subsequent major changes in it (for example, by David Hilbert); the “wedding,” via analytic geometry, of algebra and geometry; the “taming” of the infinitely small and the infinitely large; the passages from algebra to algebras, from geometry to geometries, and from arithmetic to arithmetics; and the revolutions in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that resulted from Georg Cantor’s creation of transfinite set theory. The origin of each turning point is discussed, along with...

  20. Characterization of pancreatic stem cells derived from adult human pancreas ducts by fluorescence activated cell sorting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Tso Lin; Shih-Hwa Chiou; Chung-Lan Kao; Yi-Ming Shyr; Chien-Jen Hsu; Yih-Wen Tarng; Larry L-T Ho; Ching-Fai Kwok; Hung-Hai Ku

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To isolate putative pancreatic stem cells (PSCs)from human adult tissues of pancreas duct using serumfree, conditioned medium. The characterization of surface phenotype of these PSCs was analyzed by flow cytometry. The potential for pancreatic lineage and the capability of β-cell differentiation in these PSCs were evaluated as well.METHODS: By using serum-free medium supplemented with essential growth factors, we attempted to isolate the putative PSCs which has been reported to express nestin and pdx-1. The MatrigelTM was employed to evaluate the differential capacity of isolated cells. Dithizone staining, insulin content/secretion measurement, and immunohistochemistry staining were used to monitor the differentiation. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)was used to detect the phenotypic markers of putative PSCs.RESULTS: A monolayer of spindle-like cells was cultivated. The putative PSCs expressed pdx-1 and nestin.They were also able to differentiate into insulin-, glucagon-, and somatostatin-positive cells. The spectrum of phenotypic markers in PSCs was investigated; a similarity was revealed when using human bone marrow-derived stem cells as the comparative experiment, such as CD29,CD44, CD49, CD50, CD51, CD62E, PDGFR-α, CD73 (SH2),CD81, CD105(SH3).CONCLUSION: In this study, we successfully isolated PSCs from adult human pancreatic duct by using serumfree medium. These PSCs not only expressed nestin and pdx-1 but also exhibited markers attributable to mesenchymal stem cells. Although work is needed to elucidate the role of these cells, the application of these PSCs might be therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus.

  1. Surface markers of cloned human T cells with various cytolytic activities

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    Human T cells stimulated in secondary allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) were cloned under limiting conditions in microculture systems using T cell growth factor and irradiated allogeneic cells. Clones with lytic activity against either phytohemagglutinin-induced blast cells bearing the stimulating alloantigen(s) (cytotoxic T lymphocyte [CTL] activity), L1210 mouse lymphoma cells coated with rabbit antibody (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity [ADCC]), or K562 human target ce...

  2. Activated Human T Cells Secrete Exosomes That Participate in IL-2 Mediated Immune Response Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlgren, Jessica; Tanya De L Karlson; Glader, Pernilla; Telemo, Esbjörn; Valadi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    It has previously been shown that nano-meter sized vesicles (30–100 nm), exosomes, secreted by antigen presenting cells can induce T cell responses thus showing the potential of exosomes to be used as immunological tools. Additionally, activated CD3+ T cells can secrete exosomes that have the ability to modulate different immunological responses. Here, we investigated what effects exosomes originating from activated CD3+ T cells have on resting CD3+ T cells by studying T cell proliferation, c...

  3. High aldehyde dehydrogenase activity identifies cancer stem cells in human cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shu-Yan; Zheng, Peng-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    High aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity characterizes a subpopulation of cells with cancer stem cell (CSC) properties in several malignancies. To clarify whether ALDH can be used as a marker of cervical cancer stem cells (CCSCs), ALDHhigh and ALDHlow cells were sorted from 4 cervical cancer cell lines and 5 primary tumor xenografts and examined for CSC characteristics. Here, we demonstrate that cervical cancer cells with high ALDH activity fulfill the functional criteria for CSCs: (1) ALD...

  4. NAC selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity: A higher redox homeostasis threshold exists in cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pengying Li; Meilin Wu; Jing Wang; Yilun Sui; Shanlin Liu; Dongyun Shi

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase activity controls telomere length, and this plays an important role in stem cells, aging and tumors. Antioxidant was shown to protect telomerase activity in normal cells but inhibit that in cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism is elusive. Here we found that 7721 hepatoma cells held a higher redox homeostasis threshold than L02 normal liver cells which caused 7721 cells to have a higher demand for ROS; MnSOD over-expression in 7721 decreased endogenous reactive oxygen species ...

  5. Imaging and Analysis of OT1 T Cell Activation on Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Peter Beemiller, Jordan Jacobelli & Matthew Krummel ### Abstract Supported lipid bilayers are frequently used to study cell membrane protein dynamics during immune synapse formation by T cells. Here we describe methods for the imaging and analysis of OT1+ T cell activation and T-cell receptor (TCR) dynamics on lipid bilayers. ### Introduction T cells are activated at immune synapses when TCRs bind agonist ligands on antigen presenting cells (APCs). Glass cover...

  6. Human odontoblast-like cells produce nitric oxide with antibacterial activity upon TLR2 activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe FARGES

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The penetration of cariogenic oral bacteria into enamel and dentin during the caries process triggers an immune/inflammatory response in the underlying pulp tissue, the reduction of which is considered a prerequisite to dentinogenesis-based pulp regeneration. If the role of odontoblasts in dentin formation is well known, their involvement in the antibacterial response of the dental pulp to cariogenic microorganisms has yet to be elucidated. Our aim here was to determine if odontoblasts produce nitric oxide (NO with antibacterial activity upon activation of Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2, a cell membrane receptor involved in the recognition of cariogenic Gram-positive bacteria. Human odontoblast-like cells differentiated from dental pulp explants were stimulated with the TLR2 synthetic agonist Pam2CSK4. We found that NOS1, NOS2 and NOS3 gene expression was increased in Pam2CSK4-stimulated odontoblast-like cells compared to unstimulated ones. NOS2 was the most up-regulated gene. NOS1 and NOS3 proteins were not detected in Pam2CSK4-stimulated or control cultures. NOS2 protein synthesis, NOS activity and NO extracellular release were all augmented in stimulated samples. Pam2CSK4-stimulated cell supernatants reduced Streptococcus mutans growth, an effect counteracted by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME. In vivo, the NOS2 gene was up-regulated in the inflamed pulp of carious teeth compared with healthy ones. NOS2 protein was immunolocalized in odontoblasts situated beneath the caries lesion but not in pulp cells from healthy teeth. These results suggest that odontoblasts may participate to the antimicrobial pulp response to dentin-invading Gram-positive bacteria through NOS2-mediated NO production. They might in this manner pave the way for accurate dental pulp healing and regeneration.

  7. Floor Holder Detection and End of Speaker Turn Prediction in Meetings

    OpenAIRE

    Dielmann, Alfred; Garau, Giulia; Bourlard, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel fully automatic framework to detect which meeting participant is currently holding the conversational floor and when the current speaker turn is going to finish. Two sets of experiments were conducted on a large collection of multiparty conversations: the AMI meeting corpus. Unsupervised speaker turn detection was performed by post-processing the speaker diarization and the speech activity detection outputs. A supervised end-of-speaker-turn prediction framework, based on Dy...

  8. PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells release signal substances that influence the migratory activity of cells in the tumor's microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zänker Kurt S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor cells interact with the cells of the microenvironment not only by cell-cell-contacts but also by the release of signal substances. These substances are known to induce tumor vascularization, especially under hypoxic conditions, but are also supposed to provoke other processes such as tumor innervation and inflammatory conditions. Inflammation is mediated by two organ systems, the neuroendocrine system and the immune system. Therefore, we investigated the influence of substances released by PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells as well as neutrophil granulocytes and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, especially with regard to their migratory activity. Results PC-3 cells express several cytokines and growth factors including vascular endothelial growth factors, fibroblast growth factors, interleukins and neurotrophic factors. SH-SY5Y cells are impaired in their migratory activity by PC-3 cell culture supernatant, but orientate chemotactically towards the source. Neutrophil granulocytes increase their locomotory activity only in response to cell culture supernantant of hypoxic but not of normoxic PC-3 cells. In contrast, cytotoxic T lymphocytes do not change their migratory activity in response to either culture supernatant, but increase their cytotoxicity, whereas supernatant of normoxic PC-3 cells leads to a stronger increase than that of hypoxic PC-3 cells. Conclusions PC-3 cells release several signal substances that influence the behavior of the cells in the tumor's microenvironment, whereas no clear pattern towards proinflammatory or immunosuppressive conditions can be seen.

  9. Historic Turning Points in Real Estate

    OpenAIRE

    Shiller, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper looks for markers of ends of real estate booms or busts. The changes in market psychology and related indicators that occurred at real estate market turning points in the United States since the 1980s are compared with changes at turning points in the more distant past. In all these episodes, changes in an atmosphere of optimism about the future course of home prices, changes in public interpretation of the boom, as well as evidence of supply response to the high prices of a boom a...

  10. Turning Around along the Cosmic Web

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jounghun; Yepes, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    A bound-violation designates a case that the turn-around radius of a bound object exceeds the upper limit put by the spherical collapse model based on the standard $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm. Given that the turn-around radius of a bound object is a stochastic quantity and that the spherical model overly simplifies the true gravitational collapse which actually proceeds anisotropically along the cosmic web, the rarity of the occurrence of a bound violation may depend on the web environment. Assumin...

  11. Cell swelling activates ATP-dependent voltage-gated chloride channels in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct cells

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    In the present study we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to investigate swelling-activated Cl-currents (ICl-swell) in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. Hypotonic cell swelling reversibly increased the whole-cell Cl- conductance by about 30-fold. The I-V relationship was outwardly-rectifying and ICl-swell displayed a characteristic voltage-dependence with relatively fast inactivation upon large depolarizing and slow activation upon hyperpolarizing voltage steps. Reversal po...

  12. Novel β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors possessing a turn mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yoshio; Miyamoto, Naoko; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid β peptide, the main component of senile plaques found in the brain of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, is a molecular target for AD therapeutic intervention. A number of potential AD therapeutics have been reported, including inhibitors of β-secretase, γ-secretase, and Aβ aggregation, and anti-amyloid agents, such as neprilysin, insulin degrading enzyme (IDE), and Aβ antibodies. Recently, we reported potent small-sized β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors, which could serve as anti-AD drugs. However AD is a progressive disorder, where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over several decades, and therefore may require many years to get cured. One possible way to achieve a greater therapeutic effect is through simultaneous administration of multiple drugs, similar to those used in Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) used to treat AIDS. In order to overcome AD, we took a drug discovery approach to evaluate, novel β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors. Previously, we reported that a tong-type compound possessing a turn mimic as the inhibitor of HIV-1 protease dimerization. Oligomerized amyloid β peptides contain a turn structure within the molecule. Here, we designed and synthesized novel β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors with a turn-mimic template, based on the turn conformer of the oligomerized amyloid β peptides. PMID:25736996

  13. Bradykinin antagonists modified with dipeptide mimetic beta-turn inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaro, Maria C; Vinci, Valerio; D'Ursi, Anna M; Scrima, Mario; Chelli, Mario; Giuliani, Sandro; Meini, Stefania; Di Giacomo, Marcello; Colombo, Lino; Papini, Anna Maria

    2006-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is involved in a wide variety of pathophysiological processes. Potent BK peptide antagonists can be developed introducing constrained unnatural amino acids, necessary to force the secondary structure of the molecule. In this paper, we report a structure-activity relationship study of two peptide analogues of the potent B2 antagonist HOE 140 by replacing the D-Tic-Oic dipeptide with conformationally constrained dipeptide mimetic beta-turn inducers. PMID:16504505

  14. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Hong-yun; MA Li; MENG Min-jie; YAO Xin-sheng; LIN Ying; WU Zhen-qiang; HE Xiao-wei; WANG Ju-fang; WANG Xiao-ning

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether the receptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkat human T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of T cell receptor (TCR) gene recombination.Methods TCR Dβ-Jβ signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVβ chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVβ chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique.Results RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dβ2-Jβ2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dβ25' and Dβ 23' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVβ chain did not change during cell proliferation.Conclusions RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire. However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  15. Helquat dye for staining dead cells, fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and cell cycle analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Joshi, Vishwas; Kužmová, Erika; Kozák, Jaroslav; Bednárová, Lucie; Císařová, I.; Hájek, Miroslav; Teplý, Filip

    Praha: Czech Chemical Society, 2015. s. 86. [Liblice 2015. Advances in Organic , Bioorganic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry /50./. 06.11.2015-08.11.2015, Olomouc] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19213S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : helquat dye * FACS * cell cycle analysis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. Activated iNKT cells promote memory CD8+ T cell differentiation during viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C Reilly

    Full Text Available α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer is the prototypical lipid ligand for invariant NKT cells. Recent studies have proposed that α-GalCer is an effective adjuvant in vaccination against a range of immune challenges, however its mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated. A variety of delivery methods have been examined including pulsing dendritic cells with α-GalCer to optimize the potential of α-GalCer. These methods are currently being used in a variety of clinical trials in patients with advanced cancer but cannot be used in the context of vaccine development against pathogens due to their complexity. Using a simple delivery method, we evaluated α-GalCer adjuvant properties, using the mouse model for cytomegalovirus (MCMV. We measured several key parameters of the immune response to MCMV, including inflammation, effector, and central memory CD8(+ T cell responses. We found that α-GalCer injection at the time of the infection decreases viral titers, alters the kinetics of the inflammatory response, and promotes both increased frequencies and numbers of virus-specific memory CD8(+ T cells. Overall, our data suggest that iNKT cell activation by α-GalCer promotes the development of long-term protective immunity through increased fitness of central memory CD8(+ T cells, as a consequence of reduced inflammation.

  17. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  18. Microbial fuel cells with highly active aerobic biocathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Edward M.; Popescu, Dorin; Curtis, Tom; Head, Ian M.; Scott, Keith; Yu, Eileen H.

    2016-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which convert organic waste to electricity, could be used to make the wastewater infrastructure more energy efficient and sustainable. However, platinum and other non-platinum chemical catalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode of MFCs are unsustainable due to their high cost and long-term degradation. Aerobic biocathodes, which use microorganisms as the biocatalysts for cathode ORR, are a good alternative to chemical catalysts. In the current work, high-performing aerobic biocathodes with an onset potential for the ORR of +0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl were enriched from activated sludge in electrochemical half-cells poised at -0.1 and + 0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Gammaproteobacteria, distantly related to any known cultivated gammaproteobacterial lineage, were identified as dominant in these working electrode biofilms (23.3-44.3% of reads in 16S rRNA gene Ion Torrent libraries), and were in very low abundance in non-polarised control working electrode biofilms (0.5-0.7%). These Gammaproteobacteria were therefore most likely responsible for the high activity of biologically catalysed ORR. In MFC tests, a high-performing aerobic biocathode increased peak power 9-fold from 7 to 62 μW cm-2 in comparison to an unmodified carbon cathode, which was similar to peak power with a platinum-doped cathode at 70 μW cm-2.

  19. Pharmacological treatment options for mast cell activation disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molderings, Gerhard J; Haenisch, Britta; Brettner, Stefan; Homann, Jürgen; Menzen, Markus; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig; Panse, Jens; Butterfield, Joseph; Afrin, Lawrence B

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by aberrant release of variable subsets of mast cell (MC) mediators together with accumulation of either morphologically altered and immunohistochemically identifiable mutated MCs due to MC proliferation (systemic mastocytosis [SM] and MC leukemia [MCL]) or morphologically ordinary MCs due to decreased apoptosis (MC activation syndrome [MCAS] and well-differentiated SM). Clinical signs and symptoms in MCAD vary depending on disease subtype and result from excessive mediator release by MCs and, in aggressive forms, from organ failure related to MC infiltration. In most cases, treatment of MCAD is directed primarily at controlling the symptoms associated with MC mediator release. In advanced forms, such as aggressive SM and MCL, agents targeting MC proliferation such as kinase inhibitors may be provided. Targeted therapies aimed at blocking mutant protein variants and/or downstream signaling pathways are currently being developed. Other targets, such as specific surface antigens expressed on neoplastic MCs, might be considered for the development of future therapies. Since clinicians are often underprepared to evaluate, diagnose, and effectively treat this clinically heterogeneous disease, we seek to familiarize clinicians with MCAD and review current and future treatment approaches. PMID:27132234

  20. Electrocatalytic activity of ordered intermetallic phases for fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Rivera, Emerilis; Volpe, David J; Alden, Laif; Lind, Cora; Downie, Craig; Vázquez-Alvarez, Terannie; Angelo, Antonio C D; DiSalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2004-03-31

    The electrocatalytic activities of a wide range of ordered intermetallic phases toward a variety of potential fuels have been studied, and results have been compared to those of a pure polycrystalline platinum (Pt(pc)) electrode. A significant number of the ordered intermetallic phases exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity when compared to that of Pt, in terms of both oxidation onset potential and current density. The PtBi, PtIn, and PtPb ordered intermetallic phases appeared to be the most promising electrocatalysts tested thus far for fuel cell applications. PtPb, in particular, showed an onset potential that was 100 mV less positive and a peak current density approximately 40 times higher than those observed for Pt in the case of methanol oxidation. The ability to control the geometric and electronic structures of the electrocatalytic material by using ordered intermetallic phases has been shown to be a promising direction of inquiry in the search for superior electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. PMID:15038758