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Sample records for cells targeted calcium-mediated

  1. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet. PMID:23008064

  2. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.; Varani, James

    2012-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable ef...

  3. Calcium-mediated agonists activate an inwardly rectified K+ channel in colonic secretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devor, D C; Frizzell, R A

    1993-11-01

    Single-channel recording techniques were used to identify and characterize the K+ channel activated by Ca(2+)-mediated secretory agonists in T84 cells. Carbachol (CCh; 100 microM) and taurodeoxycholate (TDC; 0.75 mM) stimulated oscillatory outward K+ currents. With K gluconate in bath and pipette, cell-attached single-channel K+ currents stimulated by CCh and ionomycin (2 microM) were inwardly rectified and reversed at 0 mV. The single-channel chord conductance was 32 pS at -90 mV and 14 pS at +90 mV. Similar properties were observed in excised inside-out patches in symmetric K+, permitting further characterization of channel properties. Partial substitution of bath or pipette K+ with Na+ gave a K(+)-to-Na+ selectivity ratio of 5.5:1. Channel activity increased with increasing bath Ca2+ concentration in the physiological range of 50-800 nM. Maximal channel activity occurred at intracellular pH 7.2 and decreased at more acidic or alkaline pH values. Extracellular charybdotoxin (CTX; 50 nM) blocked inward but not outward currents. Extracellular tetraethylammonium (TEA; 10 mM) reduced single-channel amplitude at all voltages. No apparent block of the channel was observed with extracellular Ba2+ (1 mM), apamin (1 microM), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 4 mM), quinine (500 microM), or glyburide (10 microM). Cytosolic quinine and 4-AP blocked both inward and outward currents, whereas Ba2+ blocked only outward currents. Apamin, CTX, TEA, and glyburide did not affect channel activity. The agonist activation and pharmacological profile of this inwardly rectified K+ channel indicate that it is responsible for the increase in basolateral K+ conductance stimulated by Ca(2+)-mediated agonists in T84 cells. PMID:7694492

  4. Calcium-mediated transductive systems and functionally active gap junctions in astrocyte-like GL15 cells

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    Steimberg Nathalie

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that GL15, a human cell line derived from glioblastoma multiforme, is a possible astroglial-like cell model, based on the presence of cytoplasmic glial fibrillary acidic protein. Results The aim of this work was to delineate the functional characteristics of GL15 cells using various experimental approaches, including the study of morphology, mechanism of induction of intracellular Ca2+ increase by different physiological agonists, and the presence and permeability of the gap-junction system during cell differentiation. Immunostaining experiments showed the presence and localization of specific glial markers, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100B, and the lack of the neuronal marker S100A. Notably, all the Ca2+ pathways present in astrocytes were detected in GL15 cells. In particular, oscillations in intracellular Ca2+ levels were recorded either spontaneously, or in the presence of ATP or glutamate (but not KCl. Immunolabelling assays and confocal microscopy, substantiated by Western blot analyses, revealed the presence of connexin43, a subunit of astrocyte gap-junction channels. The protein is organised in characteristic spots on the plasma membrane at cell-cell contact regions, and its presence and distribution depends on the differentiative status of the cell. Finally, a microinjection/dye-transfer assay, employed to determine gap-junction functionality, clearly demonstrated that the cells were functionally coupled, albeit to varying degrees, in differentiated and undifferentiated phenotypes. Conclusions In conclusion, results from this study support the use of the GL15 cell line as a suitable in vitro astrocyte model, which provides a valuable guide for studying glial physiological features at various differentiation phases.

  5. Calcium-mediated perception and defense responses activated in plant cells by metabolite mixtures secreted by the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariani Paola

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium is commonly involved as intracellular messenger in the transduction by plants of a wide range of biotic stimuli, including signals from pathogenic and symbiotic fungi. Trichoderma spp. are largely used in the biological control of plant diseases caused by fungal phytopathogens and are able to colonize plant roots. Early molecular events underlying their association with plants are relatively unknown. Results Here, we investigated the effects on plant cells of metabolite complexes secreted by Trichoderma atroviride wild type P1 and a deletion mutant of this strain on the level of cytosolic free Ca2+ and activation of defense responses. Trichoderma culture filtrates were obtained by growing the fungus alone or in direct antagonism with its fungal host, the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea, and then separated in two fractions (>3 and Glycine max L. cell suspension cultures, Trichoderma and Botrytis metabolite mixtures were distinctively perceived and activated transient intracellular Ca2+ elevations with different kinetics, specific patterns of intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species and induction of cell death. Both Ca2+ signature and cellular effects were modified by the culture medium from the knock-out mutant of Trichoderma, defective for the production of the secreted 42 kDa endochitinase. Conclusion New insights are provided into the mechanism of interaction between Trichoderma and plants, indicating that secreted fungal molecules are sensed by plant cells through intracellular Ca2+ changes. Plant cells are able to discriminate signals originating in the single or two-fungal partner interaction and modulate defense responses.

  6. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  7. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cance...

  8. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are...... considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug...... delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC....

  9. Preventive effects of imperatorin on perfluorohexanesulfonate-induced neuronal apoptosis via inhibition of intracellular calcium-mediated ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunkyung; Choi, So-Young; Yang, Jae-Ho; Lee, Youn Ju

    2016-07-01

    Early life neuronal exposure to environmental toxicants has been suggested to be an important etiology of neurodegenerative disease development. Perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), one of the major perfluoroalkyl compounds, is widely distributed environmental contaminants. We have reported that PFHxS induces neuronal apoptosis via ERK-mediated pathway. Imperatorin is a furanocoumarin found in various edible plants and has a wide range of pharmacological effects including neuroprotection. In this study, the effects of imperatorin on PFHxS-induced neuronal apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms are examined using cerebellar granule cells (CGC). CGC were isolated from seven-day old rats and were grown in culture for seven days. Caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining were used to determine neuronal apoptosis. PFHxS-induced apoptosis of CGC was significantly reduced by imperatorin and PD98059, an ERK pathway inhibitor. PFHxS induced a persistent increase in intracellular calcium, which was significantly blocked by imperatorin, NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 and the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers, diltiazem and nifedipine. The activation of caspase-3 by PFHxS was also inhibited by MK801, diltiazem and nifedipine. PFHxS-increased ERK activation was inhibited by imperatorin, MK801, diltiazem and nifedipine. Taken together, imperatorin protects CGC against PFHxS-induced apoptosis via inhibition of NMDA receptor/intracellular calcium-mediated ERK pathway. PMID:27382356

  10. Design of liposomal formulations for cell targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, E.; Gomes, Andreia C.; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes have gained extensive attention as carriers for a wide range of drugs due to being both nontoxic and biodegradable as they are composed of substances naturally occurring in biological membranes. Active targeting for cells has explored specific modification of the liposome surface by functionalizing it with specific targeting ligands in order to increase accumulation and intracellular uptake into target cells. None of the Food and Drug Administration-licensed liposomes or lipid nanop...

  11. Plague Bacteria Target Immune Cells During Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Marketon, Melanie M.; DePaolo, R. William; DeBord, Kristin L.; Jabri, Bana; Schneewind, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    The plague is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Plague bacteria are thought to inject effector Yop proteins into host cells via the type III pathway. The identity of the host cells targeted for injection during plague infection is unknown. We found, using Yop β-lactamase hybrids and fluorescent staining of live cells from plague-infected animals, that Y. pestis selected immune cells for injection. In vivo, dendritic cells, macrophages, and neutrophils were injected most frequently, whe...

  12. Cell survival studies for moving targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 330 patients with static tumors have been treated at GSI with a scanned C-12 beam. For targets that are subject to respiratory motion, treatment is not yet possible because target motion and scanning motion interfere. GSI is developing a motion compensation system to compensate target motion by adaptation of each individual Bragg peak position. Within this project, the GSI treatment planning software TRiP was extended to calculate physical dose distributions in the presence of motion. These motion extensions were experimentally validated. Recently we included the calculation of cell survival for moving targets. To validate the software, a program of experimental studies with biological samples has been started. In a first set of experiments, living cell cultures were placed on a periodically moving table and irradiated with and without motion compensation. Results are compared to reference cell cultures that were static during standard irradiations. Furthermore, measured cell survival distributions are compared to calculated distributions for all irradiation schemes

  13. Targeting bactoprenol-coupled cell envelope precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulm, Hannah; Schneider, Tanja

    2016-09-01

    Targeting the bactoprenol-coupled cell wall precursor lipid II is a validated antibacterial strategy. In this review, selected prototype lipid II-binding antibiotics of different chemical classes are discussed. Although these compounds attack the same molecular target, they trigger nuanced and diverse cellular effects. Consequently, the mechanisms of antibacterial resistance and the likelihood of resistance development may vary substantially. PMID:27495122

  14. Targeting hypoxic tumour cells to overcome metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microenvironment within solid tumours can influence the metastatic dissemination of tumour cells, and recent evidence suggests that poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) cells in primary tumours can also affect the survival and proliferation of metastatic tumour cells in distant organs. Hypoxic tumour cells have been historically targeted during radiation therapy in attempts to improve loco-regional control rates of primary tumours since hypoxic cells are known to be resistant to ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. There are, therefore, a number of therapeutic strategies to directly target hypoxic cells in primary (and metastatic) tumours, and several compounds are becoming available to functionally inhibit hypoxia-induced proteins that are known to promote metastasis. This mini-review summarizes several established and emerging experimental strategies to target hypoxic cells in primary tumours with potential clinical application to the treatment of patients with tumour metastases or patients at high risk of developing metastatic disease. Targeting hypoxic tumour cells to reduce metastatic disease represents an important advance in the way scientists and clinicians view the influence of tumour hypoxia on therapeutic outcome

  15. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization.

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    Vasiliki Tsakraklides

    Full Text Available Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of homologous recombination during transformation. Using hydroxyurea-mediated cell cycle arrest, we obtained improved gene targeting rates in Yarrowia lipolytica, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris demonstrating the broad applicability of the method. Hydroxyurea treatment enriches for S-phase cells that are active in homologous recombination and enables previously unattainable genomic modifications.

  16. Design of targeted B cell killing agents.

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    Alexey V Stepanov

    Full Text Available B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of both systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Autoreactive B cells not only produce autoantibodies, but also are capable to efficiently present specific autoantigens to T cells. Furthermore, B cells can secrete proinflammatory cytokines and amplify the vicious process of self-destruction. B cell-directed therapy is a potentially important approach for treatment of various autoimmune diseases. The depletion of B cells by anti-CD20/19 monoclonal antibody Retuximab® used in autoimmune diseases therapy leads to systemic side effects and should be significantly improved. In this study we designed a repertoire of genetically engineered B cell killers that specifically affected one kind of cells carrying a respective B cell receptor. We constructed immunotoxins (ITs, fused with c-myc epitope as a model targeting sequence, based on barnase, Pseudomonas toxin, Shiga-like toxin E.coli and Fc domain of human antibody IgGγ1. C-MYC hybridoma cell line producing anti-c-myc IgG was chosen as a model for targeted cell depletion. C-myc sequence fused with toxins provided addressed delivery of the toxic agent to the target cells. We demonstrated functional activity of designed ITs in vitro and showed recognition of the fusion molecules by antibodies produced by targeted hybridoma. To study specificity of the proposed B cells killing molecules, we tested a set of created ITs ex vivo, using C-MYC and irrelevant hybridoma cell lines. Pseudomonas-containing IT showed one of the highest cytotoxic effects on the model cells, however, possessed promiscuous specificity. Shiga-like toxin construct demonstrated mild both cytotoxicity and specificity. Barnase and Fc-containing ITs revealed excellent balance between their legibility and toxic properties. Moreover, barnase and Fc molecules fused with c-myc epitope were able to selectively deplete c-myc-specific B cells and decrease production of anti

  17. Targeted destruction of HIV-positive cells

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    Jyoti R Sharma

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV/AIDS is now a global epidemic that has become the leading infectious killer of adults worldwide. Although antiretroviral (ARV therapy has dramatically improved the quality of life and increased the life expectancy of those infected with HIV but frequency of dosing and drug toxicity as well as the development of viral resistance pose additional limitations. The rapidly expanding field of nanotechnology has vast potential to radically advance the treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS. Nanoparticles can provide improved drug delivery, by virtue of their small size, robustness, safety, multimodality or multifunctionality. Aims and objectives: Since HIV primarily infects CD4+ cells; we aim to use CD4 as a selectable target to deliver a pro-apoptotic protein to HIV-infected cells using nanoparticles as carriers. The aim of study was to develop a nanotechnology-based death inducing delivery system for the destruction of CD4+HIV infected cells through the activation of caspase-3. Methodology: A modified caspase-3 protein (Mut-3 was engineered, which is cleavable only by HIV-1 protease. Mut-3 can activate apoptosis in the presence of HIV-1 protease, consequently killing HIV-positive cells. Mut-3 protein was conjugated to gold nanoparticles together with a CD4-targeting peptide. The efficacy of the gold nanoparticles was tested on CHO cells that were genetically engineered to express GFP labelled CD4 and HIV-1 protease. Results: Mut-3 was expressed in bacterial cells and purified. CHO cells that stably over express CD4-GFP and HIV-1 protease were selected using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting. Dose response cell culture experiments showed that gold nanoparticles without Mut-3 and CD4-targeting peptide did not induce cell death in CHO cells, while gold nanoparticles that was conjugated with Mut-3 and the CD4-targeting peptide rapidly induced cell death in CHO cells. Conclusions: Our results suggest that gold nanoparticles conjugated

  18. Small-Molecule Target Engagement in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürmann, Marc; Janning, Petra; Ziegler, Slava; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-04-21

    Monitoring how, when, and where small molecules engage their targets inside living cells is a critical step in chemical biology and pharmacological research, because it enables compound efficacy and confirmation of mode of action to be assessed. In this mini-review we summarize the currently available methodologies to detect and prove direct target engagement in cells and offer a critical view of their key advantages and disadvantages. As the interest of the field shifts toward discovery and validation of high-quality agents, we expect that efforts to develop and refine these types of methodologies will also intensify in the near future. PMID:27049669

  19. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  20. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  1. Cost targets for domestic fuel cell CHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffell, I.; Green, R.; Kendall, K.

    Fuel cells have the potential to reduce domestic energy bills by providing both heat and power at the point of use, generating high value electricity from a low cost fuel. However, the cost of installing the fuel cell must be sufficiently low to be recovered by the savings made over its lifetime. A computer simulation is used to estimate the savings and cost targets for fuel cell CHP systems. Two pitfalls of this kind of simulation are addressed: the selection of representative performance figures for fuel cells, and the range of houses from which energy demand data was taken. A meta-study of the current state of the art is presented, and used with 102 house-years of demand to simulate the range of economic performance expected from four fuel cell technologies within the UK domestic CHP market. Annual savings relative to a condensing boiler are estimated at €170-300 for a 1 kWe fuel cell, giving a target cost of €350-625 kW -1 for any fuel cell technology that can demonstrate a 2.5-year lifetime. Increasing lifetime and reducing fuel cell capacity are identified as routes to accelerated market entry. The importance of energy demand is seen to outweigh both economic and technical performance assumptions, while manufacture cost and system lifetime are highlighted as the only significant differences between the technologies considered. SOFC are considered to have the greatest potential, but uncertainty in the assumptions used precludes any clear-cut judgement.

  2. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  3. Targeted silver nanoparticles for ratiometric cell phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmore, Anne-Mari A.; Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Toome, Kadri; Paiste, Päärn; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mölder, Tarmo; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Braun, Gary B.; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-04-01

    Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The binding and uptake of the peptide-functionalized AgNPs by cultured PPC-1 prostate cancer and M21 melanoma cells was dependent on the cell surface expression of the cognate peptide receptors. Barcoded peptide-functionalized AgNPs were synthesized from silver and palladium isotopes. The cells were incubated with a cocktail of the barcoded nanoparticles [RPARPAR (R), GKRK (K), and control], and cellular binding and internalization of each type of nanoparticle was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results of isotopic analysis were in agreement with data obtained using optical methods. Using ratiometric measurements, we were able to classify the PPC-1 cell line as mainly NRP-1-positive, with 75 +/- 5% R-AgNP uptake, and the M21 cell line as only p32-positive, with 89 +/- 9% K-AgNP uptake. The isotopically barcoded multiplexed AgNPs are useful as an in vitro ratiometric phenotyping tool and have potential uses in functional evaluation of the expression of accessible homing peptide receptors in vivo.Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The

  4. Targeted therapy for squamous cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Rachel G.; Watanabe, Hideo; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) is the second most common subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer and leads to 40,000–50,000 deaths per year in the USA. Management of non-small-cell lung cancer has dramatically changed over the past decade with the introduction of targeted therapeutic agents for genotypically selected individuals with lung adenocarcinoma. These agents lead to improved outcomes, and it has now become the standard of care to perform routine molecular genotyping of lung adenoc...

  5. Generating Cell Targeting Aptamers for Nanotheranostics Using Cell-SELEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yifan; Chen, Guang; Shangguan, Dihua; Zhang, Liqin; Wan, Shuo; Wu, Yuan; Zhang, Hui; Duan, Lian; Liu, Chao; You, Mingxu; Wang, Jie; Tan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and understanding changes in cell conditions on the molecular level is of great importance for the accurate diagnosis and timely therapy of diseases. Cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment), a foundational technology used to generate highly-specific, cell-targeting aptamers, has been increasingly employed in studies of molecular medicine, including biomarker discovery and early diagnosis/targeting therapy of cancer. In this review, we begin with a mechanical description of the cell-SELEX process, covering aptamer selection, identification and identification, and aptamer characterization; following this introduction is a comprehensive discussion of the potential for aptamers as targeting moieties in the construction of various nanotheranostics. Challenges and prospects for cell-SELEX and aptamer-based nanotheranostic are also discussed. PMID:27375791

  6. Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, George H

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are rich in proteases, which are the major proteins of intracellular granules and are released with histamine and heparin by activated cells. Most of these proteases are active in the granule as well as outside of the mast cell when secreted, and can cleave targets near degranulating mast cells and in adjoining tissue compartments. Some proteases released from mast cells reach the bloodstream and may have far-reaching actions. In terms of relative amounts, the major mast cell proteases include the tryptases, chymases, cathepsin G, carboxypeptidase A3, dipeptidylpeptidase I/cathepsin C, and cathepsins L and S. Some mast cells also produce granzyme B, plasminogen activators, and matrix metalloproteinases. Tryptases and chymases are almost entirely mast cell-specific, whereas other proteases, such as cathepsins G, C, and L are expressed by a variety of inflammatory cells. Carboxypeptidase A3 expression is a property shared by basophils and mast cells. Other proteases, such as mastins, are largely basophil-specific, although human basophils are protease-deficient compared with their murine counterparts. The major classes of mast cell proteases have been targeted for development of therapeutic inhibitors. Also, a human β-tryptase has been proposed as a potential drug itself, to inactivate of snake venins. Diseases linked to mast cell proteases include allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and anaphylaxis, but also include non-allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and scarring diseases of lungs and other organs. In some cases, studies performed in mouse models suggest protective or homeostatic roles for specific proteases (or groups of proteases) in infections by bacteria, worms and other parasites, and even in allergic inflammation. At the same time, a clearer picture has emerged of differences in the

  7. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-04-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  8. Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, P H; Chaganti, R.S.K.; Motzer, R J

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has historically been refractory to cytotoxic and hormonal agents; only interleukin 2 and interferon alpha provide response in a minority of patients. We reviewed RCC biology and explored the ways in which this understanding led to development of novel, effective targeted therapies. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and novel agents are all being studied, and phase II studies show promising activity of sunitinib, sorafenib a...

  9. Targeted TFO Delivery to Hepatic Stellate Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ningning; Singh, Saurabh; Mahato, Ram I.

    2011-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent an antigene approach for gene regulation through direct interaction with genomic DNA. While this strategy holds great promise owing to the fact that only two alleles need silencing to impact gene regulation, delivering TFOs to target cells in vivo is still a challenge. Our recent efforts have focused on conjugating TFOs to carrier molecules like cholesterol to enhance their cellular uptake and mannose-6-phosphate-bovine serum albumin (M6P-BSA)...

  10. Targeted therapies in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    LU, HONG-YANG; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Mao, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounted for 12.95% of all lung cancer histological types in 2002. Despite trends toward modest improvement in survival, the outcome remains extremely poor. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment in SCLC. More than two-thirds of patients who succumb to lung cancer in the United States are over 65 years old. Elderly patients tolerate chemotherapy poorly and need novel therapeutic agents. Targeted...

  11. Targeted TFO delivery to hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ningning; Singh, Saurabh; Mahato, Ram I

    2011-10-30

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent an antigene approach for gene regulation through direct interaction with genomic DNA. While this strategy holds great promise owing to the fact that only two alleles need silencing to impact gene regulation, delivering TFOs to target cells in vivo is still a challenge. Our recent efforts have focused on conjugating TFOs to carrier molecules like cholesterol to enhance their cellular uptake and mannose-6-phosphate-bovine serum albumin (M6P-BSA) to target TFO delivery to hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) for treating liver fibrosis. These approaches however are rendered less effective owing to a lack of targeted delivery, as seen with lipid-conjugates, and the potential immune reactions due to repeated dosing with high molecular weight BSA conjugated TFO. In this review, we discuss our latest efforts to enhance the effectiveness of TFO for treating liver fibrosis. We have shown that conjugation of TFOs to M6P-HPMA can enhance TFO delivery to HSCs and has the potential to treat liver fibrosis by inhibiting collagen synthesis. This TFO conjugate shows negligible immunogenicity owing to the use of HPMA, one of the least immunogenic copolymers, thereby making it a suitable and more effective candidate for antifibrotic therapy. PMID:21763370

  12. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  13. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy. PMID:10811469

  14. Stem cells and radiation: effects in targeted and non-targeted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renewing tissues of the body are hierarchically organized and maintained by a small population of self-maintaining stem cells that are important targets for malignant transformation and also for gene therapy and tissue engineering approaches in regenerative medicine. Deleterious effects of toxic insults such as ionizing radiation may be due to stem cell death, with consequent loss of mature functional cells, or to stem cell damage that leads to aberrant responses to regulatory mechanisms. However, because the homeostatic regulation of these tissues is complex (involving intercellular signalling and cellular interactions that control cell proliferation, differentiation and death) radiation effects on stromal cells that perturb the microenvironmental control may also result in deleterious effects on the stem cell compartment. The rapidly developing fields of research investigating radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects also indicate that radiation effects on stem cells can be indirect. Although the non-targeted mechanisms responsible for bystander effects and the induction and maintenance of the inducible instability phenotype are not understood, inter-cellular signalling and free radical-mediated processes may be common features. Inter-cellular signalling and production of free radicals are also features of inflammatory responses; a recently identified indirect consequence of radiation with the potential for both persisting and bystander-mediated damage as well as for conferring a predisposition to malignancy. The production of clastogenic factors and their capacity for indirect cell damage after irradiation, the involvement of stromal cells in malignancy and bystander-mediated genetic instability may all reflect aspects of non-specific inflammatory-type responses to radiation-induced stress and injury. Recent investigations demonstrating that radiation-induced signalling processes are influenced by tissue-specific and genetic factors add

  15. Sialylation: an Avenue to Target Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajaria, Bhairavi N; Patel, Kinjal R; Begum, Rasheedunnisa; Patel, Prabhudas S

    2016-07-01

    Tumorigenesis and metastasis are frequently associated with altered structure and expression of oligosaccharides on cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids. The expression of sialylated glycoconjugates has been shown to change during development, differentiation, disease and oncogenic transformation. Abnormal sialylation in cancer cell is a distinctive feature associated with malignant properties including invasiveness and metastatic potential. The alterations in sialylation is accompanied by changes in sialic acid, sialidase activity, sialyltransferase (ST) activity or sialoproteins. The present review summarizes the reports on alterations of sialic acid, linkage specific STs and sialoproteins, sialidase activity together with different subtypes of ST and sialidases mRNA expressions in various cancers like lung, breast, oral, cervical, ovarian, pancreatic etc. Sialic acids are widely distributed in nature as terminal sugars of oligosaccharides attached to proteins or lipids. The increase shedding of sialic acid observed in malignant tumors may be due to different types of sialidases. The amount of sialic acid is governed by levels of sialidases and STs. Various types of STs are also involved in formation of different types sialylated tumor associated carbohydrate antigens which plays important role in metastasis. The alterations associated with sialylation aids in early diagnosis, prognosis and post treatment monitoring in various cancers. Recently newer drugs targeting different interplays of sialylation have been developed, which might have profound effect in inhibiting sialylation and thus cancer metastasis and infiltration. PMID:26685886

  16. Cell-targeting aptamers act as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Chen, Yeng; Arshad, M K Md; Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Ruslinda, A R; Al-Douri, Yarub; Voon, C H; Hashim, Uda

    2016-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acids or peptides identified from a randomized combinatorial library through specific interaction with the target of interest. Targets can be of any size, from small molecules to whole cells, attesting to the versatility of aptamers for binding a wide range of targets. Aptamers show drug properties that are analogous to antibodies, with high specificity and affinity to their target molecules. Aptamers can penetrate disease-causing microbial and mammalian cells. Generated aptamers that target surface biomarkers act as cell-targeting agents and intracellular delivery vehicles. Within this context, the "cell-internalizing aptamers" are widely investigated via the process of cell uptake with selective binding during in vivo systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) or by cell-internalization SELEX, which targets cell surface antigens to be receptors. These internalizing aptamers are highly preferable for the localization and functional analyses of multiple targets. In this overview, we discuss the ways by which internalizing aptamers are generated and their successful applications. Furthermore, theranostic approaches featuring cell-internalized aptamers are discussed with the purpose of analyzing and diagnosing disease-causing pathogens. PMID:27350620

  17. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Joshua J; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P R; Parton, Robert G; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2016-04-14

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells-an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:27031090

  18. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Joshua J.; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Parton, Robert G.; Kent, Stephen J.; de Rose, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells--an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  19. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  20. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumaker, Karen S [Professor

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  1. Cell Labeling and Targeting with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefft, Brandon J; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J Jonathan; Klabusay, Martin; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cells and therapeutic agents would benefit a wide range of biomedical applications by concentrating the therapeutic effect at the target site while minimizing deleterious effects to off-target sites. Magnetic cell targeting is an efficient, safe, and straightforward delivery technique. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be endocytosed into cells to render them responsive to magnetic fields. The synthesis process involves creating magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles followed by high-speed emulsification to form a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coating. The PLGA-magnetite SPIONs are approximately 120 nm in diameter including the approximately 10 nm diameter magnetite core. When placed in culture medium, SPIONs are naturally endocytosed by cells and stored as small clusters within cytoplasmic endosomes. These particles impart sufficient magnetic mass to the cells to allow for targeting within magnetic fields. Numerous cell sorting and targeting applications are enabled by rendering various cell types responsive to magnetic fields. SPIONs have a variety of other biomedical applications as well including use as a medical imaging contrast agent, targeted drug or gene delivery, diagnostic assays, and generation of local hyperthermia for tumor therapy or tissue soldering. PMID:26554870

  2. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs. Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs, which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+ and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-, which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+ is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell

  3. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+)) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+) is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our

  4. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Blaauwen; J.M. Andreu; O. Monasterio

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of protein

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells targeting the GVHD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; ZHAO Robert ChunHua

    2009-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and is a reaction of donor immune cells against host tissues. About 35% -5% of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients will develop acute GVHD. It is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients who do not respond to primary therapy, which usually consists of glucocorticoids(steroids). Most of the available second-line and third-line treatments for sterold-refractory acute GVHD induce severe immunodeficiency, which is commonly accompanied by lethal infectious complications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to mediate immunomodulatory effects. The recently elucidated immunosuppreseive potential of mesenchymal stem cells has set the stage for their clinical testing as cellular immunosuppressants, MSCs have been used in patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD, and encouraging responses have been obtained in many studies. The utility of MSCs for the treatment of GVHD is becoming clear.

  6. Reassessing target antigens for adoptive T cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Christian S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy can target and kill widespread malignant cells thereby inducing durable clinical responses in melanoma and selected other malignances. However, many commonly targeted tumor antigens are also expressed by healthy tissues, and T cells do not distinguish between benign and malignant tissues if both express the target antigen. As such, autoimmune toxicity from T-cell-mediated destruction of normal tissue has limited the development and adoption of this otherwise promising type of cancer therapy. A review of the unique biology of T-cell therapy and of recent clinical experience compels a reassessment of target antigens that traditionally have been viewed from the perspective of weaker immunotherapeutic modalities. In selecting target antigens for adoptive T-cell therapy, expression by tumors and not by essential healthy tissues is of paramount importance. The risk of autoimmune adverse events can be further mitigated by generating antigen receptors using strategies that reduce the chance of cross-reactivity against epitopes in unintended targets. In general, a circumspect approach to target selection and thoughtful preclinical and clinical studies are pivotal to the ongoing advancement of these promising treatments. PMID:24142051

  7. Identification of novel Notch target genes in T cell leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrander Fiona

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulated Notch signalling is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of T cell leukaemia. At a cellular level, Notch signalling promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL cells. In this study we aimed to identify novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling in the T-ALL cell line, Jurkat. Results RNA was prepared from Jurkat cells retrovirally transduced with an empty vector (GFP-alone or vectors containing constitutively active forms of Notch (N1ΔE or N3ΔE, and used for Affymetrix microarray analysis. A subset of genes found to be regulated by Notch was chosen for real-time PCR validation and in some cases, validation at the protein level, using several Notch-transduced T-ALL and non-T-ALL leukaemic cell lines. As expected, several known transcriptional target of Notch, such as HES1 and Deltex, were found to be overexpressed in Notch-transduced cells, however, many novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling were identified using this approach. These included the T cell costimulatory molecule CD28, the anti-apoptotic protein GIMAP5, and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (1D1. Conclusion The identification of such downstream Notch target genes provides insights into the mechanisms of Notch function in T cell leukaemia, and may help identify novel therapeutic targets in this disease.

  8. Malaria: targeting parasite and host cell kinomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerig, Christian; Abdi, Abdirahman; Bland, Nicholas; Eschenlauer, Sylvain; Dorin-Semblat, Dominique; Fennell, Clare; Halbert, Jean; Holland, Zoe; Nivez, Marie-Paule; Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Sicard, Audrey; Reininger, Luc

    2010-03-01

    Malaria still remains one of the deadliest infectious diseases, and has a tremendous morbidity and mortality impact in the developing world. The propensity of the parasites to develop drug resistance, and the relative reluctance of the pharmaceutical industry to invest massively in the developments of drugs that would offer only limited marketing prospects, are major issues in antimalarial drug discovery. Protein kinases (PKs) have become a major family of targets for drug discovery research in a number of disease contexts, which has generated considerable resources such as kinase-directed libraries and high throughput kinase inhibition assays. The phylogenetic distance between malaria parasites and their human host translates into important divergences in their respective kinomes, and most Plasmodium kinases display atypical properties (as compared to mammalian PKs) that can be exploited towards selective inhibition. Here, we discuss the taxon-specific kinases possessed by malaria parasites, and give an overview of target PKs that have been validated by reverse genetics, either in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum or in the rodent model Plasmodium berghei. We also briefly allude to the possibility of attacking Plasmodium through the inhibition of human PKs that are required for survival of this obligatory intracellular parasite, and which are targets for other human diseases. PMID:19840874

  9. The most promising strategy targeted against cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhi-xiong; YANG Li-juan; ZHEN Shi-ming

    2011-01-01

    To the Editor:We read with great enthusiasm an interesting and exciting review article Targeting glioma stem cells:enough to terminate gliomagenesis? by Dong and Huang,1 who believed that single targeting therapy against glioma stem cells is unsuccessful and ameliorating the local tumor inducing/promoting microenvironment should be a reasonable strategy.Our group is enduringly engaged in the study of glioma,and we also put much concern upon the research of tumor microecosystem (TMES).In fact,the targeting therapy against cancer stem cells (CSCs) involves two aspects.One is the marked molecular target against CSCs.The other is how to deal with CSCs,by cytotoxic against CSCs,or inducing tumor stem cells to differentiate,or others?

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells targeting the GVHD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Robert; ChunHua

    2009-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease(GVHD) occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and is a reaction of donor immune cells against host tissues.About 35%-50% of hematopoietic stem cell transplant(HSCT) recipients will develop acute GVHD.It is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality,particularly in patients who do not respond to primary therapy,which usually consists of glucocorticoids(steroids).Most of the available second-line and third-line treatments for steroid-refractory acute GVHD induce severe immunodeficiency,which is commonly accompanied by lethal infectious complications.Mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) have been shown to mediate immunomodulatory effects.The recently elucidated immunosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stem cells has set the stage for their clinical testing as cellular immunosuppressants,MSCs have been used in patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD,and encouraging responses have been obtained in many studies.The utility of MSCs for the treatment of GVHD is becoming clear.

  11. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W; Latouche, Eduardo L; Sano, Michael B; Rossmeisl, John H; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1 μs) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors. PMID:26596248

  12. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W.; Latouche, Eduardo L.; Sano, Michael B.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-11-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1 μs) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors.

  13. Targeting the bone marrow: applications in stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therapeutic doses of radiation cab be selectively directed to the bone marrow either directly using vectors that bind to myeloid and/or lymphoid specific antigens or indirectly by targeting bone matrix. The combination of an accessible target tissue and relatively radiation sensitive malignant cells favours the use of targeted radiotherapy in the treatment of haematopoietic malignancies. Dose escalation of targeted radiation can increase tumour cell destruction and has led to the use of myelosuppressive and possibly myeloablative doses of targeted radiation. A natural development has been the use of targeted radiation in conditioning prior to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Several groups are actively exploring the use of targeted radiotherapy in the context of HSCT as treatment for haematological malignancies. Although no randomised trials using targeted radiotherapy in HSCT have been published, phase I and II trials have shown very encouraging results stimulating further clinical research in this field. After more than a decade of translational research the optimal combination of therapeutic radioisotope and vector has not been determined. This review summarises the clinical experience of targeted radiotherapy in HSCT and discusses the problems that still need to be solved to maximise the potential of this new treatment modality in HSCT

  14. Aptamer-guided gene targeting in yeast and human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ruff, Patrick; Koh, Kyung Duk; Keskin, Havva; Pai, Rekha B.; Storici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is a genetic technique to modify an endogenous DNA sequence in its genomic location via homologous recombination (HR) and is useful both for functional analysis and gene therapy applications. HR is inefficient in most organisms and cell types, including mammalian cells, often limiting the effectiveness of gene targeting. Therefore, increasing HR efficiency remains a major challenge to DNA editing. Here, we present a new concept for gene correction based on the development of DN...

  15. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ivey, Jill W.; Eduardo L. Latouche; Sano, Michael B.; John H. Rossmeisl; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pu...

  16. Immune targeting of cancer stem cells in gastrointestinal oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Ames, Erik; Murphy, William J

    2016-04-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis postulates that a sub-population of quiescent cells exist within tumors which are resistant to conventional cytotoxic/anti-proliferative therapies. It is these CSCs which then seed tumor relapse, even in cases of apparent complete response to systemic therapy. Therefore, therapies, such as immunotherapy, which add a specific anti-CSC strategy to standard cytoreductive treatments may provide a promising new direction for future cancer therapies. CSCs are an attractive target for immune therapies since, unlike chemotherapy or radiotherapy, immune effector cells do not specifically require target cells to be proliferating in order to effectively kill them. Although recent advances have been made in the development of novel systemic and targeted therapies for advanced gastro-intestinal (GI) malignancies, there remains an unmet need for durable new therapies for these refractory malignancies. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies targeting CSCs are in pre-clinical and clinical development across the spectrum of the immune system, including strategies utilizing adaptive immune cell-based effectors, innate immune effectors, as well as vaccine approaches. Lastly, since important CSC functions are affected by the tumor microenvironment, targeting of both cellular (myeloid derived suppressor cells and tumor-associated macrophages) and sub-cellular (cytokines, chemokines, and PD1/PDL1) components of the tumor microenvironment is under investigation in the immune targeting of CSCs. These efforts are adding to the significant optimism about the potential utility of immunotherapy to overcome cancer resistance mechanisms and cure greater numbers of patients with advanced malignancy. PMID:27034806

  17. Cellular automaton model of cell response to targeted radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that the response of cells to low doses of radiation is not linear and cannot be accurately extrapolated from the high dose response. To investigate possible mechanisms involved in the behaviour of cells under very low doses of radiation, a cellular automaton (CA) model was created. The diffusion and consumption of glucose in the culture dish were computed in parallel to the growth of cells. A new model for calculating survival probability was introduced; the communication between targeted and non-targeted cells was also included. Early results on the response of non-confluent cells to targeted irradiation showed the capability of the model to take account for the non-linear response in the low-dose domain

  18. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease. PMID:26970489

  19. Cancer Stem Cells: Biological Functions and Therapeutically Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Eugen Ciurea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Almost all tumors are composed of a heterogeneous cell population, making them difficult to treat. A small cancer stem cell population with a low proliferation rate and a high tumorigenic potential is thought to be responsible for cancer development, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Stem cells were reported to be involved in both normal development and carcinogenesis, some molecular mechanisms being common in both processes. No less controversial, stem cells are considered to be important in treatment of malignant diseases both as targets and drug carriers. The efforts to understand the role of different signalling in cancer stem cells requires in depth knowledge about the mechanisms that control their self-renewal, differentiation and malignant potential. The aim of this paper is to discuss insights into cancer stem cells historical background and to provide a brief review of the new therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells.

  20. B cells as a target of immune modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawker Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available B cells have recently been identified as an integral component of the immune system; they play a part in autoimmunity through antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and complement activation. Animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS suggest that myelin destruction is partly mediated through B cell activation (and plasmablasts. MS patients with evidence of B cell involvement, as compared to those without, tend to have a worse prognosis. Finally, the significant decrease in new gadolinium-enhancing lesions, new T2 lesions, and relapses in MS patients treated with rituximab (a monoclonal antibody against CD20 on B cells leads us to the conclusion that B cells play an important role in MS and that immune modulation of these cells may ameliorate the disease. This article will explore the role of B cells in MS and the rationale for the development of B cell-targeted therapeutics. MS is an immune-mediated disease that affects over 2 million people worldwide and is the number one cause of disability in young patients. Most therapeutic targets have focused on T cells; however, recently, the focus has shifted to the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS and the potential of B cells as a therapeutic target.

  1. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    MISHRA, LOPA

    2014-01-01

    Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the fun...

  2. Natural Products That Target Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moselhy, Jim; Srinivasan, Sowmyalakshmi; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2015-11-01

    The cancer stem cell model suggests that tumor initiation is governed by a small subset of distinct cells with stem-like character termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs possess properties of self-renewal and intrinsic survival mechanisms that contribute to resistance of tumors to most chemotherapeutic drugs. The failure to eradicate CSCs during the course of therapy is postulated to be the driving force for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Recent studies have focused on understanding the unique phenotypic properties of CSCs from various tumor types, as well as the signaling pathways that underlie self-renewal and drug resistance. Natural products (NPs) such as those derived from botanicals and food sources may modulate vital signaling pathways involved in the maintenance of CSC phenotype. The Wingless/Integrated (WNT), Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways have all been associated with quiescence and self-renewal of CSCs, as well as execution of CSC function including differentiation, multidrug resistance and metastasis. Recent studies evaluating NPs against CSC support the epidemiological evidence linking plant-based diets with reduced malignancy rates. This review covers the key aspects of NPs as modulators of CSC fate. PMID:26503998

  3. Selective Induction of Cancer Cell Death by Targeted Granzyme B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Jabulowsky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential utility of immunotoxins for cancer therapy has convincingly been demonstrated in clinical studies. Nevertheless, the high immunogenicity of their bacterial toxin domain represents a critical limitation, and has prompted the evaluation of cell-death inducing proteins of human origin as a basis for less immunogenic immunotoxin-like molecules. In this review, we focus on the current status and future prospects of targeted fusion proteins for cancer therapy that employ granzyme B (GrB from cytotoxic lymphocytes as a cytotoxic moiety. Naturally, this serine protease plays a critical role in the immune defense by inducing apoptotic target cell death upon cleavage of intracellular substrates. Advances in understanding of the structure and function of GrB enabled the generation of chimeric fusion proteins that carry a heterologous cell binding domain for recognition of tumor-associated cell surface antigens. These hybrid molecules display high selectivity for cancer cells, with cell killing activities similar to that of corresponding recombinant toxins. Recent findings have helped to understand and circumvent intrinsic cell binding of GrB and susceptibility of the enzyme to inhibition by serpins. This now allows the rational design of optimized GrB derivatives that avoid sequestration by binding to non-target tissues, limit off-target effects, and overcome resistance mechanisms in tumor cells.

  4. Radiation responses of stem cells: targeted and non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem cells are fundamental to the development of any tissue or organism via their ability to self-renew, which is aided by their unlimited proliferative capacity and their ability to produce fully differentiated offspring, often from multiple lineages. Stems cells are long lived and have the potential to accumulate mutations, including in response to radiation exposure. It is thought that stem cells have the potential to be induced into a cancer stem cell phenotype and that these may play an important role in resistance to radiotherapy. For radiation-induced carcinogenesis, the role of targeted and non-targeted effects is unclear with tissue or origin being important. Studies of genomic instability and bystander responses have shown consistent effects in haematopoietic models. Several models of radiation have predicted that stem cells play an important role in tumour initiation and that bystander responses could play a role in proliferation and self-renewal. (authors)

  5. The Quest for Targets Executing MYC-Dependent Cell Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Markus

    2016-01-01

    MYC represents a transcription factor with oncogenic potential converting multiple cellular signals into a broad transcriptional response, thereby controlling the expression of numerous protein-coding and non-coding RNAs important for cell proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of MYC leads to neoplastic cell transformation, and deregulated MYC alleles are frequently observed in many human cancer cell types. Multiple approaches have been performed to isolate genes differentially expressed in cells containing aberrantly activated MYC proteins leading to the identification of thousands of putative targets. Functional analyses of genes differentially expressed in MYC-transformed cells had revealed that so far more than 40 upregulated or downregulated MYC targets are actively involved in cell transformation or tumorigenesis. However, further systematic and selective approaches are required for determination of the known or yet unidentified targets responsible for processing the oncogenic MYC program. The search for critical targets in MYC-dependent tumor cells is exacerbated by the fact that during tumor development, cancer cells progressively evolve in a multistep process, thereby acquiring their characteristic features in an additive manner. Functional expression cloning, combinatorial gene expression, and appropriate in vivo tests could represent adequate tools for dissecting the complex scenario of MYC-specified cell transformation. In this context, the central goal is to identify a minimal set of targets that suffices to phenocopy oncogenic MYC. Recently developed genomic editing tools could be employed to confirm the requirement of crucial transformation-associated targets. Knowledge about essential MYC-regulated genes is beneficial to expedite the development of specific inhibitors to interfere with growth and viability of human tumor cells in which MYC is aberrantly activated. Approaches based on the principle of

  6. Targeting dendritic cells in vivo for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina eCaminschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that recognise cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumour immunity elicited using this immunisation strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialisation of DC-subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC-subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumour immunity. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress towards targeting human DC in vivo.

  7. Mitochondria as therapeutic targets for cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In Sung Song; Jeong Yu Jeong; Seung Hun Jeong; Hyoung Kyu Kim; Kyung Soo Ko; Byoung Doo Rhee; Nari Kim; Jin Han

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained by theirsomatic stem cells and are responsible for tumorinitiation, chemoresistance, and metastasis. Evidencefor the CSCs existence has been reported for a numberof human cancers. The CSC mitochondria have beenshown recently to be an important target for cancertreatment, but clinical significance of CSCs and theirmitochondria properties remain unclear. Mitochondriatargetedagents are considerably more effectivecompared to other agents in triggering apoptosis ofCSCs, as well as general cancer cells, via mitochondrialdysfunction. Mitochondrial metabolism is altered incancer cells because of their reliance on glycolyticintermediates, which are normally destined for oxidativephosphorylation. Therefore, inhibiting cancer-specificmodifications in mitochondrial metabolism, increasingreactive oxygen species production, or stimulatingmitochondrial permeabilization transition could bepromising new therapeutic strategies to activate celldeath in CSCs as well, as in general cancer cells. Thisreview analyzed mitochondrial function and its potentialas a therapeutic target to induce cell death in CSCs.Furthermore, combined treatment with mitochondriatargeteddrugs will be a promising strategy for thetreatment of relapsed and refractory cancer.

  8. Non-Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Does the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Represent a Rational Therapeutic Target?

    OpenAIRE

    Albiges, Laurence; Molinie, Vincent; Escudier, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The disparate subtypes of non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the criteria for diagnosis, and the prognoses associated with each subtype, in addition to evaluating the potential use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in treating patients with this type of cancer are reviewed.

  9. Nipah virus infection and glycoprotein targeting in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisner Andrea

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly pathogenic Nipah virus (NiV causes fatal respiratory and brain infections in animals and humans. The major hallmark of the infection is a systemic endothelial infection, predominantly in the CNS. Infection of brain endothelial cells allows the virus to overcome the blood-brain-barrier (BBB and to subsequently infect the brain parenchyma. However, the mechanisms of NiV replication in endothelial cells are poorly elucidated. We have shown recently that the bipolar or basolateral expression of the NiV surface glycoproteins F and G in polarized epithelial cell layers is involved in lateral virus spread via cell-to-cell fusion and that correct sorting depends on tyrosine-dependent targeting signals in the cytoplasmic tails of the glycoproteins. Since endothelial cells share many characteristics with epithelial cells in terms of polarization and protein sorting, we wanted to elucidate the role of the NiV glycoprotein targeting signals in endothelial cells. Results As observed in vivo, NiV infection of endothelial cells induced syncytia formation. The further finding that infection increased the transendothelial permeability supports the idea of spread of infection via cell-to-cell fusion and endothelial cell damage as a mechanism to overcome the BBB. We then revealed that both glycoproteins are expressed at lateral cell junctions (bipolar, not only in NiV-infected primary endothelial cells but also upon stable expression in immortalized endothelial cells. Interestingly, mutation of tyrosines 525 and 542/543 in the cytoplasmic tail of the F protein led to an apical redistribution of the protein in endothelial cells whereas tyrosine mutations in the G protein had no effect at all. This fully contrasts the previous results in epithelial cells where tyrosine 525 in the F, and tyrosines 28/29 in the G protein were required for correct targeting. Conclusion We conclude that the NiV glycoprotein distribution is responsible for

  10. Cell Targeting and Magnetically Induced Hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, Etienne; Hardel, Lucile; Vasseur, Sébastien

    With the recent development of efficient and reproducible methods for synthesis, stable aqueous dispersions of individual particles can be prepared, in which the particle sizes can be accurately adjusted from a few nanometers to a few tens of nanometers [1]. Provided that their physical and chemical surface properties can be suitably adapted, these objects are small enough to circulate within the human body without risk of causing an embolus, since the finest capillaries (those of the lungs) have a minimal internal diameter of 5 μm. They can also escape from the blood compartment by windows of diameter around 100 nm in certain epithelia with permeability defects, such as those located in tumours and centers of infection, whereby they may then accumulate in such tissues. Furthermore, the smallest particles can migrate from the cardiovascular system into the lymph system. Finally, under the right conditions, they can enter cells and their various compartments. They should quickly become indispensable in the field of biological labelling, image contrast enhancement, the delivery of active principles, and the treatment of many different pathologies, by virtue of their novel physical properties [2, 3].

  11. Immunologic targeting of FOXP3 in inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Nair

    Full Text Available The forkhead transcription factor FOXP3 is necessary for induction of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs and their immunosuppressive function. We have previously demonstrated that targeting Tregs by vaccination of mice with murine FOXP3 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells (DCs elicits FOXP3-specific T cell responses and enhances tumor immunity. It is clear that FOXP3 expression is not restricted to T-cell lineage and herein, using RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and western immunoblot we demonstrate for the first time that FOXP3 is expressed in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC cells, SUM149 (triple negative, ErbB1-activated and SUM190 (ErbB2-overexpressing. Importantly, FOXP3-specific T cells generated in vitro using human FOXP3 RNA-transfected DCs as stimulators efficiently lyse SUM149 cells. Interestingly, an isogenic model (rSUM149 derived from SUM149 with an enhanced anti-apoptotic phenotype was resistant to FOXP3-specific T cell mediated lysis. The MHC class I cellular processing mechanism was intact in both cell lines at the protein and transcription levels suggesting that the resistance to cytolysis by rSUM149 cells was not related to MHC class I expression or to the MHC class I antigen processing machinery in these cells. Our data suggest that FOXP3 may be an effective tumor target in IBC cells however increased anti-apoptotic signaling can lead to immune evasion.

  12. Inhibitors targeting on cell wall biosynthesis pathway of MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haihong; Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Wu, Qinghua; Yuan, Zonghui

    2012-11-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), widely known as a type of new superbug, has aroused world-wide concern. Cell wall biosynthesis pathway is an old but good target for the development of antibacterial agents. Peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acids (WTAs) biosynthesis are two main processes of the cell wall biosynthesis pathway (CWBP). Other than penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), some key factors (Mur enzymes, lipid I or II precursor, etc.) in CWBP are becoming attractive molecule targets for the discovery of anti-MRSA compounds. A number of new compounds, with higher affinity for PBPs or with inhibitory activity on such molecule targets in CWBP of MRSA, have been in the pipeline recently. This review concludes recent research achievements and provides a complete picture of CWBP of MRSA, including the peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acids synthesis pathway. The potential inhibitors targeting on CWBP are subsequently presented to improve development of novel therapeutic strategies for MRSA. PMID:22898792

  13. Label-free electronic detection of target cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Javanmard, Mehdi; Harris, James; Davis, Ronald W.

    2014-03-01

    In this manuscript we describe an electronic label-free method for detection of target cells, which has potential applications ranging from pathogen detection for food safety all the way to detection of circulating tumor cells for cancer diagnosis. The nanoelectronic platform consists of a stack of electrodes separated by a 30nm thick insulating layer. Cells binding to the tip of the sensor result in a decrease in the impedance at the sensing tip due to an increase in the fringing capacitance between the electrodes. As a proof of concept we demonstrate the ability to detect Saccharomyces Cerevisae cells with high specificity using a sensor functionalized with Concanavalin A. Ultimately we envision using this sensor in conjunction with a technology for pre-concentration of target cells to develop a fully integrated micro total analysis system.

  14. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  15. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Cores

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models.

  16. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  17. Selection of Phage Display Peptides Targeting Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Progenitor Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignone, Paola A; Krupa, Rachel A; West, Michael D; Larocca, David

    2016-01-01

    The ability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPS) to both self-renew and differentiate into virtually any cell type makes them a promising source of cells for cell-based regenerative therapies. However, stem cell identity, purity, and scalability remain formidable challenges that need to be overcome for translation of pluripotent stem cell research into clinical applications. Directed differentiation from hPS cells is inefficient and residual contamination with pluripotent cells that have the potential to form tumors remains problematic. The derivation of scalable (self-renewing) embryonic progenitor stem cell lines offers a solution because they are well defined and clonally pure. Clonally pure progenitor stem cell lines also provide a means for identifying cell surface targeting reagents that are useful for identification, tracking, and repeated derivation of the corresponding progenitor stem cell types from additional hPS cell sources. Such stem cell targeting reagents can then be applied to the manufacture of genetically diverse banks of human embryonic progenitor cell lines for drug screening, disease modeling, and cell therapy. Here we present methods to identify human embryonic progenitor stem cell targeting peptides by selection of phage display libraries on clonal embryonic progenitor cell lines and demonstrate their use for targeting quantum dots (Qdots) for stem cell labeling. PMID:25410289

  18. Direct targeting of cancer cells: a multiparameter approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Eileen L; Welty, Lily Anne Y; Banner, Lisa R; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2005-01-01

    Lectins have been widely used in cell surface studies and in the development of potential anticancer drugs. Many past studies that have examined lectin toxicity have only evaluated the effects on cancer cells, not their non-cancer counterparts. In addition, few past studies have evaluated the relationship between lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity on both cell types. Here we examine these parameters in one study: lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity with both cancer cells and their normal counterparts. We found that the human colon cancer cell line CCL-220/Colo320DM bound to agarose beads derivatized with Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), while the non-cancer human colon cell line CRL-1459/CCD-18Co did not. When these lectins were tested for their effects on cell viability in culture, both cell lines were affected by the lectins but at 6, 48 and 72 h incubation times, PHA-L was most toxic to the cancer cell line in a concentration dependent manner. At 48 h incubation, WGA was more toxic to the cancer cell line. The results suggest that it may be possible to develop lectin protocols that selectively target cancer cells for death. In any case, examination of both malignant cells and their non-malignant counterparts, analysis of their binding characteristics to immobilized lectins, and examination of the toxicity of free lectins in culture, provides a multiparameter model for obtaining more comprehensive information than from more limited approaches. PMID:16181664

  19. Targeting Mantle Cell Lymphoma with Anti-SYK Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Cely, Ingrid; Yiv, Seang; Yin, Qian; Shahidzadeh, Anoush; Tang, Li; Cheng, Jianjun; Uckun, Fatih M.

    2012-01-01

    The pentapeptide mimic 1,4-bis(9-O-dihydroquinidinyl)phthalazine / hydroquinidine 1,4-phathalazinediyl diether (“compound 61”) (C-61) is the first reported inhibitor targeting the P-site of SYK. Here we report a nanotechnology platform to target C-61 to mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells. Liposomal nanoparticles (NP) loaded with C-61 were prepared using the standard thin film evaporation method. The entrapment of C-61 was obtained using the pH gradient procedure with lactobionic acid (LBA) bein...

  20. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders. PMID:26577605

  1. Selective Cell Targeting with Light-Absorbing Microparticles and Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Pitsillides, Costas M; Joe, Edwin K.; Wei, Xunbin; Anderson, R. Rox; Lin, Charles P.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new method for selective cell targeting based on the use of light-absorbing microparticles and nanoparticles that are heated by short laser pulses to create highly localized cell damage. The method is closely related to chromophore-assisted laser inactivation and photodynamic therapy, but is driven solely by light absorption, without the need for photochemical intermediates (particularly singlet oxygen). The mechanism of light-particle interaction was investigated by nanosecond ...

  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Targeting with Surface-Engineered Lentiviral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Els Verhoeyen and Francois-Loic Cosset Adapted from [*Gene Transfer: Delivery and Expression of DNA and RNA*](http://www.cshlpress.com/link/genetrnp.htm) (eds. Friedmann and Rossi). CSHL Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, 2007. ### INTRODUCTION In the protocol presented here, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are specifically transduced with a vector displaying the HSC-activating polypeptides, stem cell factor (SCF) and thrombopoietin (TPO). Targeted HSC transduction is e...

  3. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene th...

  4. Human muscle satellite cells as targets of Chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ozden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya (CHIK virus is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes in humans an acute infection characterised by fever, polyarthralgia, head-ache, and myalgia. Since 2005, the emergence of CHIK virus was associated with an unprecedented magnitude outbreak of CHIK disease in the Indian Ocean. Clinically, this outbreak was characterized by invalidating poly-arthralgia, with myalgia being reported in 97.7% of cases. Since the cellular targets of CHIK virus in humans are unknown, we studied the pathogenic events and targets of CHIK infection in skeletal muscle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistology on muscle biopsies from two CHIK virus-infected patients with myositic syndrome showed that viral antigens were found exclusively inside skeletal muscle progenitor cells (designed as satelllite cells, and not in muscle fibers. To evaluate the ability of CHIK virus to replicate in human satellite cells, we assessed virus infection on primary human muscle cells; viral growth was observed in CHIK virus-infected satellite cells with a cytopathic effect, whereas myotubes were essentially refractory to infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report provides new insights into CHIK virus pathogenesis, since it is the first to identify a cellular target of CHIK virus in humans and to report a selective infection of muscle satellite cells by a viral agent in humans.

  5. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  6. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J.; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C.; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  7. Porcine circovirus type 2 displays pluripotency in cell targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the causative agent of a multifactorial disease associated with immunocompromisation and co-infections. In vivo, viral DNA and antigens are found in monocytic, epithelial and endothelial cells. Of these, PCV2 replication has only been studied in monocytic cells, in which little or no replication was identified. Accordingly, PCV2 infection was studied in the endothelial cell line PEDSV.15, aortic endothelial cells, gut epithelial cells, fibrocytes and dendritic cells (DC). In all cells except DC PCV2 replication was detectable, with an increase in the levels of capsid and replicase protein. Variations in endocytic activity, virus binding and uptake did not relate to the replication efficiency in a particular cell. Furthermore, replication did not correlate to cell proliferation, although a close association of viral proteins with chromatin in dividing cells was observed. No alteration in the division rate of PCV2-infected cultures was measurable, relating to replicase expression in only a small minority of the cells. In conclusion, the broad cell targeting of PCV2 offers an explanation for its widespread tissue distribution

  8. Simultaneous measurement of NK cell cytotoxicity against two target cell lines labelled with fluorescent lanthanide chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, J; Blomberg, K

    1994-07-12

    We describe a cytotoxicity assay which permits the simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell activity against two different cell lines. The target cell lines are labelled either with a fluorescent europium chelate or with a fluorescent terbium chelate and cell death is quantified by measuring the chelate release. K-562, Molt4 and Daudi cell lines have been used as targets. The release of the two chelates from the target cells can be detected with the help of time resolved fluorometry. As the measurements are made after background fluorescence has decayed no additional steps are needed to correct for the background from the medium. The assay procedure used for measurement of cytotoxicity against two target cell lines is very similar to the widely used 51Cr release assay. PMID:8034979

  9. Target cell specific antibody-based photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Lauren T.; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Kakareka, John W.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), localized monochromatic light is used to activate targeted photosensitizers (PS) to induce cellular damage through the generation of cytotoxic species such as singlet oxygen. While first-generation PS passively targeted malignancies, a variety of targeting mechanisms have since been studied, including specifically activatable agents. Antibody internalization has previously been employed as a fluorescence activation system and could potentially enable similar activation of PS. TAMRA, Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G were conjugated to trastuzumab (brand name Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), to create quenched PS (Tra-TAM, Tra-RhoB, and Tra-Rho6G). Specific PDT with Tra-TAM and Tra-Rho6G, which formed covalently bound H-dimers, was demonstrated in HER2+ cells: Minimal cell death (SDS-PAGE).

  10. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although it...

  11. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Heyden, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  12. Multiple personalities: synaptic target cells as introverts and extroverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzenthaler, S; Chiba, A

    2001-10-01

    The intricate process of wiring a neuronetwork requires a high degree of accuracy in the communication between pre- and post-synaptic cells. While presynaptic cells have been widely recognized for their dynamic role in synaptic matchmaking, post-synaptic cells have historically been overlooked as passive targets. Recent studies in the Drosophila embryonic neuromuscular system provide compelling evidence that post-synaptic cells participate actively in the synaptogenic process. Endocytosis allows them to quickly modify the array of molecular cues they provide on their surfaces and the extension of dynamic filopodia allows post-synaptic cells to engage in direct long-distance communication. By making use of familiar cellular mechanisms such as endocytosis and filopodia formation, post-synaptic cells may be able to communicate more effectively with potential synaptic partners. PMID:11576167

  13. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell cytotoxicity against each of three different target cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, K

    1994-02-10

    A time-resolved fluorometric assay for the simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell activity against three different lanthanide diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (LaDTPA) labelled target cell lines is described. The target cell line K-562 was labelled with SmDTPA, the cell line Molt with TbDTPA and the cell line Raji with EuDTPA. After co-incubation of the three target cell lines with effector cells the fluorescence of the lanthanides released from the lysed target cells was measured in an enhancer solution in which they formed highly fluorescent complexes. It was possible to differentiate the specific release from the three target cell lines because the emission lines of the europium, samarium and terbium complexes formed in the enhancer solution are well separated from each other. The autofluorescence from culture media supplemented with serum was avoided by the use of time-resolved fluorometry. The results show that applying fluorometry based on the combination of spectral and temporal resolution to natural killer cell assays, makes possible the simultaneous determination of lysis in up to three target cell lines in complex culture medium. PMID:8308301

  15. Polylactic Acid Nanoparticles Targeted to Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huafang; HU Yu; SUN Wangqiang; XIE Changsheng

    2005-01-01

    In this work, blank polylactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles with unstained surface were prepared by the nano-deposition method. On the basis of the preparation, the effect of surface modification on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) targeting was examined by in vivo experiments and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that PLA nanoparticles are less toxic than PACA nanoparticles but their BMECs targeting is similar to PACA nanoparticles. The experiments suggest that drugs can be loaded onto the particles and become more stable through adsorption on the surface of PLA nanoparticles with high surface activity. The surface of PLA nanoparticles was obviously modified and the hydrophilicity was increased as well in the presence of non-ionic surfactants on PLA nanoparticles. As a targeting moiety, polysobate 80 (T-80) can facilitate BMECs targeting of PLA nanoparticles.

  16. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements

  17. IFMIF target and test cell - Towards design integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International-Fusion-Material-Irradiation-Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator driven neutron source for irradiation tests of candidate fusion reactor materials. Two 40 MeV deuterium beams of 125 mA each will hit a flowing liquid lithium jet target, producing high energy neutrons up to 55 MeV at a rate of about 1x1017s-1. Those neutrons will penetrate the target back wall made of a thin Eurofer plate. In the attached High Flux Test Module (HFTM), a testing volume of 0.5 litres filled by qualified small scale specimens will be irradiated at displacement rates of 20-50 dpa/fpy in structural materials. The HFTM will also provide helium and hydrogen production to dpa ratios that reflect within the uncertainties the values expected in a DEMO fusion reactor. The Medium Flux Test Module (MFTM) comprises devices for in situ creep-fatigue and tritium release experiments, as well as tungsten spectral shifter or reflector plates. Farther down-stream the low flux region will provide irradiation tubes for additional material irradiation at lower fluence levels. The objective of the present paper is to present the progress achieved in the design integration of the Target and Test Cell of IFMIF. First, work is reported on collecting and harmonizing the CAD designs provided by various international groups involved in the IFMIF Target and Test Cell development. Second, further efforts devoted to the general nuclear layout of the Target and Test Cell are described, taking into account nuclear calculations of responses such as the nuclear heating, the activation inventories, and dose rates based on most advanced nuclear data and calculational procedures. Finally, results of an extensive study are presented on the cooling capabilities of the Target and Test Cell by natural convection. (author)

  18. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan, E-mail: s.bhattacharya@jiit.ac.in

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  19. Bystander responses in cells models; targets, dosimetry and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of microbeam approaches has been a major advance in probing the relevance of bystander responses in cell and tissue models. Our own studies at the Gray Cancer Institute have used both a charged particle microbeam, producing protons and helium ions and a soft X-ray microprobe, delivering focused carbon-K, aluminium-K and titanium-K soft X-rays. Using these techniques we have been able to build up a comprehensive picture of the underlying differences between bystander responses and direct effects in cell and tissue-like models. What is now clear is that bystander dose-response relationships, the underlying mechanisms of action and the targets involved are not the same as those observed for direct irradiation of DNA in the nucleus. Our recent studies have shown bystander responses induced in human or hamster cells even when radiation is deposited away from the nucleus in cytoplasmic targets either after charged particle or soft X-ray exposure. Importantly, the level of bystander effect, measured as cell killing was similar to that observed when the same amount of energy was deposited but targeted to the nucleus. In other studies, we have shown that underlying determination of the level of response is the energy deposited in a single cell rather than the number of cells hit. Also the overall response at low doses may be dominated by bystander signaling. These observations have significance for our understanding of radiation risk at low doses including those of environmental exposures and the applicability of the Linear Non Threshold model. The realization that cell to cell signaling is important for radiation response may also open up new therapeutic opportunities to either improve tumor cell kill or protect normal tissues if the pathways underpinning bystander signaling can be elucidated and controlled

  20. Membrane Targeting of P-type ATPases in Plant Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How membrane proteins are targeted to specific subcellular locations is a very complex and poorly understood area of research. Our long-term goal is to use P-type ATPases (ion pumps), in a model plant system Arabidopsis, as a paradigm to understand how members of a family of closely related membrane proteins can be targeted to different subcellular locations. The research is divided into two specific aims. The first aim is focused on determining the targeting destination of all 10 ACA-type calcium pumps (Arabidopsis Calcium ATPase) in Arabidopsis. ACAs represent a plant specific-subfamily of plasma membrane-type calcium pumps. In contrast to animals, the plant homologs have been found in multiple membrane systems, including the ER (ACA2), tonoplast (ACA4) and plasma membrane (ACA8). Their high degree of similarity provides a unique opportunity to use a comparative approach to delineate the membrane specific targeting information for each pump. One hypothesis to be tested is that an endomembrane located ACA can be re-directed to the plasma membrane by including targeting information from a plasma membrane isoform, ACA8. Our approach is to engineer domain swaps between pumps and monitor the targeting of chimeric proteins in plant cells using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) as a tag. The second aim is to test the hypothesis that heterologous transporters can be engineered into plants and targeted to the plasma membrane by fusing them to a plasma membrane proton pump. As a test case we are evaluating the targeting properties of fusions made between a yeast sodium/proton exchanger (Sod2) and a proton pump (AHA2). This fusion may potentially lead to a new strategy for engineering salt resistant plants. Together these aims are designed to provide fundamental insights into the biogenesis and function of plant cell membrane systems

  1. Telomere Transcripts Target Telomerase in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreilmeier, Theresa; Mejri, Doris; Hauck, Marlene; Kleiter, Miriam; Holzmann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding transcripts from telomeres, called telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), were identified as blocking telomerase activity (TA), a telomere maintenance mechanism (TMM), in tumors. We expressed recombinant TERRA transcripts in tumor cell lines with TA and with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to study effects on TMM and cell growth. Adeno- and lentivirus constructs (AV and LV) were established for transient and stable expression of approximately 130 units of telomere hexanucleotide repeats under control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human RNase P RNA H1 (hH1) promoters with and without polyadenylation, respectively. Six human tumor cell lines either using telomerase or ALT were infected and analyzed for TA levels. Pre-infection cells using telomerase had 1%-3% of the TERRA expression levels of ALT cells. AV and LV expression of recombinant TERRA in telomerase positive cells showed a 1.3-2.6 fold increase in TERRA levels, and a decrease in TA of 25%-58%. Dominant-negative or small hairpin RNA (shRNA) viral expression against human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) results in senescence, not induced by TERRA expression. Population doubling time, cell viability and TL (telomere length) were not impacted by ectopic TERRA expression. Clonal growth was reduced by TERRA expression in TA but not ALT cell lines. ALT cells were not affected by treatments applied. Established cell models and tools may be used to better understand the role of TERRA in the cell, especially for targeting telomerase. PMID:27537914

  2. Novel therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oishi, Xin Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis was first proposed over 40 years ago. Advances in CSC isolation were first achieved in hematological malignancies, with the first CSC demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. However, using similar strategies and technologies, and taking advantage of available surface markers, CSCs have been more recently demonstrated in a growing range of epithelial and other solid organ malignancies, suggesting that the majority of malignancies are dependent on such a compartment.Primary liver cancer consists predominantly of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. It is believed that hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs could be the origin of some HCCs and ICCs. Furthermore, stem cell activators such as Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways also expedite tumorigenesis, and these pathways could serve as molecular targets to assist in designing cancer prevention strategies. Recent studies indicate that additional factors such as EpCAM, Lin28 or miR-181 may also contribute to HCC progression by targeting HCC CSCs. Various therapeutic drugs that directly modulate CSCs have been examined in vivo and in vitro. However, CSCs clearly have a complex pathogenesis, with a considerable crosstalk and redundancy in signaling pathways, and hence targeting single molecules or pathways may have a limited benefit for treatment. Many of the key signaling molecules are shared by both CSCs and normal stem cells, which add further challenges for designing molecularly targeted strategies specific to CSCs but sparing normal stem cells to avoid side effects. In addition to the direct control of CSCs, many other factors that are needed for the maintenance of CSCs, such as angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, invasion and migration, hypoxia, immune evasion, multiple drug resistance, and radioresistance, should be taken into consideration when designing therapeutic strategies for HCC.Here we provide a brief

  3. Targeting Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Improved Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hideki; Klechevsky, Eynav; Schmitt, Nathalie; Ni, Ling; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Zurawski, Sandra; Zurawski, Gerard; Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, SangKon

    2011-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) were discovered in 1973 by Ralph Steinman as a previously undefined cell type in the mouse spleen and are now recognized as a group of related cell populations that induce and regulate adaptive immune responses. Studies of the past decade show that, both in mice and humans, DCs are composed of subsets that differ in their localization, phenotype, and functions. These progresses in our understanding of DC biology provide a new framework for improving human health. In this review, we discuss human DC subsets in the context of their medical applications, with a particular focus on DC targeting. PMID:21277223

  4. Targeting cancer stem cells: emerging role of Nanog transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mong-Lien Wang,1 Shih-Hwa Chiou,2,3 Cheng-Wen Wu1,4–61Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: The involvement of stemness factors in cancer initiation and progression has drawn much attention recently, especially after the finding that introducing four stemness factors in somatic cells is able to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Following accumulating data revealing abnormal elevated expression levels of key stemness factors, like Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, in several types of cancer stem cells; the importance and therapeutic potential of targeting these stemness regulators in cancers has turned to research focus. Nanog determines cell fate in both embryonic and cancer stem cells; activating Nanog at an inappropriate time would result in cancer stem cells rather than normal pluripotent stem cells or differentiated somatic cells. Upregulated Nanog is correlated with poor survival outcome of patients with various types of cancer. The discoveries of downstream regulatory pathways directly or indirectly mediated by Nanog indicate that Nanog regulates several aspects of cancer development such as tumor cell proliferation, self-renewal, motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, immune evasion, and drug-resistance, which are all defined features for cancer stem cells. The current review paper illustrates the central role of Nanog in the regulatory networks of cancer malignant development and stemness acquirement, as well as in the communication between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma. Though a more defined model is needed to test the

  5. Measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity by post-labeling surviving target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 51Cr release assay (CRA) is the commonly accepted technique for measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This assay shows some disadvantages when mononucleated cells of human peripheral blood (MNC) are used as effector and target cells. The uptake of 51Cr by PHA stimulated lymphocytes is low compared to the spontaneous release. In an attempt to develop a cytotoxicity assay suitable for human lymphocytes we used 14C-TdR to label target cells surviving after contact with effector cells. Cytotoxic lymphocytes were generated by incubation of MNC with irradiated allogeneic MNC for 6 days. On day 6 the effector cells are irradiated and cocultured with PHA stimulated target cells. Twenty-four hours later 14C-TdR is added. After an additional 24 h the cultures are harvested and 14C-TdR taken up by target cells is measured. It is shown that the effector cells are still cytotoxic after irradiation. These cells do not take up 14C-TdR. Cell-free supernatants do not influence the uptake of 14C-TdR by target cells. The results obtained with this assay correlate very well those obtained by the CRA, if the spontaneous release does not exceed 30%. (author)

  6. Glial cells as drug targets: What does it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2016-10-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development times of CNS drugs, on average over 12 years, this is not completely surprising. However, there is increasing interest from academia and industry to exploit glial targets to develop drugs for the benefit of patients with currently limited or no therapeutic options. CNS drug development has a high attrition rate and has encountered many challenges. It seems unlikely that developing drugs against glial targets would be any less demanding. However, the knowledge generated in traditional CNS drug discovery teaches valuable lessons, which could enable the glial community to accelerate the cycle time from basic discovery to drug development. In this review we will discuss steps necessary to bring a "glial target idea" to a clinical development program. GLIA 2016;64:1742-1754. PMID:27121701

  7. Carbon nanotubes: an emerging drug carrier for targeting cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Yadav, Pragya; Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Mishra, Arun Kumar; Verma, Navneet; Verma, Anurag; Pandit, Jayanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During recent years carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted by many researchers as a drug delivery carrier. CNTs are the third allotropic form of carbon-fullerenes which were rolled into cylindrical tubes. To be integrated into the biological systems, CNTs can be chemically modified or functionalised with therapeutically active molecules by forming stable covalent bonds or supramolecular assemblies based on noncovalent interactions. Owing to their high carrying capacity, biocompatibility, and specificity to cells, various cancer cells have been explored with CNTs for evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters, cell viability, cytotoxicty, and drug delivery in tumor cells. This review attempts to highlight all aspects of CNTs which render them as an effective anticancer drug carrier and imaging agent. Also the potential application of CNT in targeting metastatic cancer cells by entrapping biomolecules and anticancer drugs has been covered in this review. PMID:24872894

  8. Neuroimmunotherapies Targeting T Cells: From Pathophysiology to Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Stefan; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS) have significantly increased over the last few years. T lymphocytes are considered to play a central role in initiating and perpetuating the pathological immune response. Currently approved therapies for MS target T lymphocytes, either in an unspecific manner or directly by interference with specific T-cell pathways. While the concept of "T-cell-specific therapy" implies specificity and selectivity, currently approved approaches come from a general shaping of the immune system towards anti-inflammatory immune responses by non-T-cell-selective immune suppression or immune modulation (e.g., interferons-immune modulation approach) to a depletion of immune cell populations involving T cells (e.g., anti-CD52, alemtuzumab-immune selective depletion approach), or a selective inhibition of distinct molecular pathways in order to sequester leucocytes (e.g., natalizumab-leukocyte sequestration approach). This review will highlight the rationale and results of different T-cell-directed therapeutic approaches coming from basic animal experiments to clinical trials. We will first discuss the pathophysiological rationale for targeting T lymphocytes in MS leading to currently approved treatments acting on T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we will disuss previous promising concepts that have failed to show efficacy in clinical trials or were halted as a result of unexpected adverse events. Learning from the discrepancies between expectations and failures in practical outcomes helps to optimize future research approaches and clinical study designs. As our current view of MS pathogenesis and patient needs is rapidly evolving, novel therapeutic approaches targeting T lymphocytes will also be discussed, including specific molecular interventions such as cytokine-directed treatments or strategies enhancing immunoregulatory mechanisms. Based on clinical experience and novel pathophysiological approaches, T-cell-based strategies will remain a

  9. Brain tumor stem cells as research and treatment targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant forms of human cancer. Despite intensive treatment, the mean survival of GBM patients remains about 1 year. Recent cancer studies revealed that cancer tissues are pathologically heterogeneous and only a small population of cells has the specific ability to reinitiate cancer. This small cell population is called cancer stem cells (CSCs); in brain tumors these are known as brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs). The identification of BTSCs yielded new insights into chemo- and radioresistance, by which BTSCs can survive selectively and initiate recurrence. Research focused on BTSCs as treatment targets may contribute to the discovery of new therapeutic strategies. Clinical and basic research studies gradually led to improved outcomes in patients with brain tumors. Stupp et al. reported a mean survival of 14.6 months in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with radiotherapy plus temozolomide and 12.1 months in those subjected to radiotherapy alone. Earlier cancer therapies primarily targeted rapidly dividing cells but not minor populations of slowly dividing cells that contain BTSCs. Accumulating evidence suggests that BTSCs may represent an excellent tool for discovering new strategies to treat GBM patients. In this review, we present evidence supporting the CSC model of tumor progression, and discuss difficulties encountered in CSC research and experimental and therapeutic implications. (author)

  10. Mast Cell-Targeted Strategies in Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Luposella, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sarro, Giovambattista De; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mast cells (MCs) are cells that originate in the bone marrow from pluripotent CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Precursors of MCs migrate through the circulation to their target tissues, completing their maturation process into granulated cells under the influence of several microenvironment growth factors. The most important of these factors is the ligand for the c-Kit receptor (c-Kit-R) namely stem cell factor (SCF), secreted mainly by fibroblasts and endothelial cells (ECs). SCF also regulates development, survival and de novo proliferation of MCs. It has already been demonstrated that gain-of-function mutations of gene c-Kit encoding c-Kit-R result in the development of some tumors. Furthermore, MCs are able also to modulate both innate and adaptive immune response and to express the high-affinity IgE receptor following IgE activation. Among the other IgE-independent MC activation mechanisms, a wide variety of other surface receptors for cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulins, and complement are also described. Interestingly, MCs can stimulate angiogenesis by releasing of several pro-angiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. Studies published in the last year suggest that angiogenesis stimulated by MCs may play an important role in tumor growth and progression. Here, we aim to focus several biological features of MCs and to summarize new anti-cancer MC-targeted strategies with potential translation in human clinical trials.

  11. Mast Cell-Targeted Strategies in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Luposella, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sarro, Giovambattista De; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are cells that originate in the bone marrow from pluripotent CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Precursors of MCs migrate through the circulation to their target tissues, completing their maturation process into granulated cells under the influence of several microenvironment growth factors. The most important of these factors is the ligand for the c-Kit receptor (c-Kit-R) namely stem cell factor (SCF), secreted mainly by fibroblasts and endothelial cells (ECs). SCF also regulates development, survival and de novo proliferation of MCs. It has already been demonstrated that gain-of-function mutations of gene c-Kit encoding c-Kit-R result in the development of some tumors. Furthermore, MCs are able also to modulate both innate and adaptive immune response and to express the high-affinity IgE receptor following IgE activation. Among the other IgE-independent MC activation mechanisms, a wide variety of other surface receptors for cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulins, and complement are also described. Interestingly, MCs can stimulate angiogenesis by releasing of several pro-angiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. Studies published in the last year suggest that angiogenesis stimulated by MCs may play an important role in tumor growth and progression. Here, we aim to focus several biological features of MCs and to summarize new anti-cancer MC-targeted strategies with potential translation in human clinical trials. PMID:27330532

  12. Targeting insulin-producing beta cells for regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Adriana; Roscioni, Sara S; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic beta cells differ in terms of glucose responsiveness, insulin secretion and proliferative capacity; however, the molecular pathways that regulate this cellular heterogeneity are unknown. We have identified the Wnt-planar cell polarity (PCP) effector Flattop (FLTP) as a biomarker that identifies mature beta cells in the islets of Langerhans. Interestingly, three-dimensional architecture and Wnt-PCP ligands are sufficient to trigger mouse and human beta cell maturation. These results highlight the fact that novel biomarkers shed light on the long-standing mystery of beta cell heterogeneity and identify the Wnt-PCP pathway as triggering beta cell maturation. Understanding heterogeneity in the islets of Langerhans might allow targeting of beta cell subpopulations for regenerative therapy and provide building principles for stem cell-derived islets. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Can we make a better beta cell?' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Amin Ardestani and Kathrin Maedler, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3892-9 , and by Harry Heimberg and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3879-6 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Shanta Persaud (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3870-2 ). PMID:27412250

  13. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  14. Natural convection cooling of the IFMIF target and test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work summarizes efforts on the simulation of natural convection cooling within the IFMIF target and test cell. The simulations have been performed with the STAR-CD code using the k-ω high-Reynolds number turbulence model. A dedicated thermohydraulic model has been devised including Lithium loop components. Nuclear heat production has been calculated by the Monte-Carlo code McDeLicious for different parts of the target and test cell walls and was used as input for the STAR-CD simulations. Helium atmospheres at several pressures from 0.1 to 10-5 MPa have been investigated. In order to limit the maximum temperature of the concrete walls to 80 deg. C it was necessary to add thermal insulation layers to the hot Lithium loop surfaces and a conceptual system of two cooling layers in different depths of the concrete walls

  15. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens. PMID:23426134

  16. Targeted therapy for renal cell carcinoma: The next lap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Tan, Min-Han

    2014-01-01

    Advances in rationally targeted therapeutics over the last decade have transformed the clinical care of advanced kidney cancer. While oncologists consolidate the gains of the wave of new agents, comprising a panoply of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), there is an increasing sense that a plateau has been reached in the short term. It is sobering that all currently approved targeted therapies have not yielded durable remissions and remain palliative in intent. In the context of recent insights in kidney cancer biology, we review promising ongoing and future approaches for kidney cancer therapeutics aimed toward forging new paths in the systemic management of renal cell carcinoma. Broadly, candidate agents for such innovative strategies include immune check-point inhibitors, anti-cancer stem cell agents, next-generation anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and anti-mTOR agents as well as more investigational agents in the preclinical and early clinical development settings. PMID:24737951

  17. Targeted therapy for renal cell carcinoma: The next lap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindran Kanesvaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in rationally targeted therapeutics over the last decade have transformed the clinical care of advanced kidney cancer. While oncologists consolidate the gains of the wave of new agents, comprising a panoply of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, there is an increasing sense that a plateau has been reached in the short term. It is sobering that all currently approved targeted therapies have not yielded durable remissions and remain palliative in intent. In the context of recent insights in kidney cancer biology, we review promising ongoing and future approaches for kidney cancer therapeutics aimed toward forging new paths in the systemic management of renal cell carcinoma. Broadly, candidate agents for such innovative strategies include immune check-point inhibitors, anti-cancer stem cell agents, next-generation anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and anti-mTOR agents as well as more investigational agents in the preclinical and early clinical development settings.

  18. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.;

    2009-01-01

    DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA......Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  19. Targeting Vault Nanoparticles to Specific Cell Surface Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Han, Muri; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Poderycki, Michael J.; Moniz, Raymond J.; Vaccari, Dana; Silvestry, Mariena; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Kelly, Kathleen A.; Rome, Leonard H.

    2009-01-01

    As a naturally occurring nanocapsule abundantly expressed in nearly all-eukaryotic cells, the barrel-shaped vault particle is perhaps an ideal structure to engineer for targeting to specific cell types. Recombinant vault particles self-assemble from 96 copies of the major vault protein (MVP), have dimensions of 72.5 × 41 nm, and have a hollow interior large enough to encapsulate hundreds of proteins. In this study, three different tags were engineered onto the C-terminus of MVP: an 11 amino a...

  20. Novel HIV-1 Therapeutics through Targeting Altered Host Cell Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Coley, William; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Van Duyne, Rachel; KASHANCHI, FATAH

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) strains presents a challenge for the design of new drugs. Anti-HIV compounds currently in use are the subject of advanced clinical trials using either HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase, viral protease, or integrase inhibitors. Recent studies show an increase in the number of HIV-1 variants resistant to anti-retroviral agents in newly infected individuals. Targeting host cell factors involved in the regulation of HIV-1 repli...

  1. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guocan; Wang, Zhiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Wei, Wenyi

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignant neoplasm in men and the second most frequent cause of cancer death for males in the United States. Recently, emerging evidence suggests that prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) may play a critical role in the development and progression of PCa. Therefore, targeting prostate CSCs for the prevention of tumor progression and treatment of PCa could become a novel strategy for better treatment of patients diagnosed with PCa. In this review article, ...

  2. Fluoxetine targets early progenitor cells in the adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Encinas, Juan M.; Vaahtokari, Anne; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2006-01-01

    Chronic treatment with antidepressants increases neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. This increase in the production of new neurons may be required for the behavioral effects of antidepressants. However, it is not known which class of cells within the neuronal differentiation cascade is targeted by the drugs. We have generated a reporter mouse line, which allows identification and classification of early neuronal progenitors. It also allows accurate quantitation of changes induced by neuro...

  3. Targeting dendritic cells for improved HIV-1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    As dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique capacity to activate antigen-naive T cells they likely play a critical role in eliciting immune responses to vaccines. DCs are therefore being explored as attractive targets for vaccines, but understanding the interaction of DCs and clinically relevant vaccine antigens and adjuvants is a prerequisite. The HIV-1/AIDS epidemic continues to be a significant health problem, and despite intense research efforts over the past 30 years a protective vaccine has not yet been developed. A common challenge in vaccine design is to find a vaccine formulation that best shapes the immune response to protect against and/or control the given pathogen. Here, we discuss the importance of understanding the diversity, anatomical location and function of different human DC subsets in order to identify the optimal target cells for an HIV-1 vaccine. We review human DC interactions with some of the HIV-1 vaccine antigen delivery vehicles and adjuvants currently utilized in preclinical and clinical studies. Specifically, the effects of distinctly different vaccine adjuvants in terms of activation of DCs and improving DC function and vaccine efficacy are discussed. The susceptibility and responses of DCs to recombinant adenovirus vectors are reviewed, as well as the strategy of directly targeting DCs by using DC marker-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to an antigen. PMID:22975879

  4. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  5. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo "epithelial to mesenchymal transition" (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements. PMID:25261721

  6. Telomere Transcripts Target Telomerase in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Kreilmeier

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding transcripts from telomeres, called telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA, were identified as blocking telomerase activity (TA, a telomere maintenance mechanism (TMM, in tumors. We expressed recombinant TERRA transcripts in tumor cell lines with TA and with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT to study effects on TMM and cell growth. Adeno- and lentivirus constructs (AV and LV were established for transient and stable expression of approximately 130 units of telomere hexanucleotide repeats under control of cytomegalovirus (CMV and human RNase P RNA H1 (hH1 promoters with and without polyadenylation, respectively. Six human tumor cell lines either using telomerase or ALT were infected and analyzed for TA levels. Pre-infection cells using telomerase had 1%–3% of the TERRA expression levels of ALT cells. AV and LV expression of recombinant TERRA in telomerase positive cells showed a 1.3–2.6 fold increase in TERRA levels, and a decrease in TA of 25%–58%. Dominant-negative or small hairpin RNA (shRNA viral expression against human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT results in senescence, not induced by TERRA expression. Population doubling time, cell viability and TL (telomere length were not impacted by ectopic TERRA expression. Clonal growth was reduced by TERRA expression in TA but not ALT cell lines. ALT cells were not affected by treatments applied. Established cell models and tools may be used to better understand the role of TERRA in the cell, especially for targeting telomerase.

  7. New small molecules targeting apoptosis and cell viability in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Maugg

    Full Text Available Despite the option of multimodal therapy in the treatment strategies of osteosarcoma (OS, the most common primary malignant bone tumor, the standard therapy has not changed over the last decades and still involves multidrug chemotherapy and radical surgery. Although successfully applied in many patients a large number of patients eventually develop recurrent or metastatic disease in which current therapeutic regimens often lack efficacy. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this study, we performed a phenotypic high-throughput screening campaign using a 25,000 small-molecule diversity library to identify new small molecules selectively targeting osteosarcoma cells. We could identify two new small molecules that specifically reduced cell viability in OS cell lines U2OS and HOS, but affected neither hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 nor primary human osteoblasts (hOB. In addition, the two compounds induced caspase 3 and 7 activity in the U2OS cell line. Compared to conventional drugs generally used in OS treatment such as doxorubicin, we indeed observed a greater sensitivity of OS cell viability to the newly identified compounds compared to doxorubicin and staurosporine. The p53-negative OS cell line Saos-2 almost completely lacked sensitivity to compound treatment that could indicate a role of p53 in the drug response. Taken together, our data show potential implications for designing more efficient therapies in OS.

  8. Targeting Homeostatic T Cell Proliferation to Control Beta-Cell Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignali, Debora; Monti, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Immunomodulation of the autoreactive T cell response is considered a major strategy to control beta-cell autoimmunity, both in the natural history of type 1 diabetes and in islet transplantation, which can be affected by autoimmunity recurrence. So far, these strategies have had modest results, prompting efforts to define novel cellular and molecular targets to control autoreactive T cell expansion and activation. Novel findings highlighted the important role of the homeostatic cytokine interleukin-7 in inducing proliferation and differentiation of autoreactive T cell clones that causes beta-cell autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss recent evidences and novel findings on the role of IL-7 mediated homeostatic T cell proliferation in the process of beta-cell destruction and evidences of how targeting IL-7 and its receptor could be an innovative and effective strategy to control beta-cell autoimmunity. PMID:26983628

  9. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Min Zhu; Li-Hua Yuan; Ke-Feng Pu; Bing Dong; An-Xin Wang; Li-Sha Chen

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell resea...

  10. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  11. Targeting Gallium to Cancer Cells through the Folate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerissa Viola-Villegas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of gallium(III compounds as anti-cancer agents for both treatment and diagnosis is a rapidly developing field of research. Problems remain in exploring the full potential of gallium(III as a safe and successful therapeutic agent or as an imaging agent. One of the major issues is that gallium(III compounds have little tropism for cancer cells. We have combined the targeting properties of folic acid (FA with long chain liquid polymer poly(ethylene glycol (PEG ‘spacers’. This FA-PEG unit has been coupled to the gallium coordination complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-N,N′,N′′,N′′′-tetraacetic acid (DOTA through amide linkages for delivery into target cells overexpressing the folate receptor (FR. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were conducted against a multi-drug resistant ovarian cell line (A2780/AD that overexpresses the FR and contrasted against a FR free Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell line. Results are rationalized taking into account stability studies conducted in RPMI 1640 media and HEPES buffer at pH 7.4.

  12. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti, E-mail: keertijain02@gmail.com; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar, E-mail: neelesh81mph@gmail.com; Jain, N. K., E-mail: dr.jnarendr@gmail.com [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  13. Targeting vault nanoparticles to specific cell surface receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Han, Muri; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Poderycki, Michael J; Moniz, Raymond J; Vaccari, Dana; Silvestry, Mariena; Stewart, Phoebe L; Kelly, Kathleen A; Rome, Leonard H

    2009-01-27

    As a naturally occurring nanocapsule abundantly expressed in nearly all-eukaryotic cells, the barrel-shaped vault particle is perhaps an ideal structure to engineer for targeting to specific cell types. Recombinant vault particles self-assemble from 96 copies of the major vault protein (MVP), have dimensions of 72.5 x 41 nm, and have a hollow interior large enough to encapsulate hundreds of proteins. In this study, three different tags were engineered onto the C-terminus of MVP: an 11 amino acid epitope tag, a 33 amino acid IgG-binding peptide, and the 55 amino acid epidermal growth factor (EGF). These modified vaults were produced using a baculovirus expression system. Our studies demonstrate that recombinant vaults assembled from MVPs containing C-terminal peptide extensions display these tags at the top and bottom of the vault on the outside of the particle and can be used to specifically bind the modified vaults to epithelial cancer cells (A431) via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), either directly (EGF modified vaults) or as mediated by a monoclonal antibody (anti-EGFR) bound to recombinant vaults containing the IgG-binding peptide. The ability to target vaults to specific cells represents an essential advance toward using recombinant vaults as delivery vehicles. PMID:19206245

  14. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although its total molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Therefore, the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of several function and explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting mitochondria in the disease processes. Newly evolving advances in disease diagnostics and therapy will further facilitate future growth in the field of mitochondrian biology, where there is a dire need for sensitive and more affordable diagnostic tools and an urgency to develop effective therapies and identify reliable drug to predict accurately the response to a cancer therapy. These approaches to treat mitochondrial dysfunction rationally could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and various disease states. To avoid mitochondrial liabilities, routine screens need to be positioned within the drug-development process as targets of drug-induced cytotoxicity or cancer promotion, as regulators of apoptosis, as sources of cell signalling through reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial control of specific nuclear responses. However, several novel mitochondrial targets are now emerging, including the potential to manipulate the mitochondrial pool to maintain function via biogenesis and mitophagy. Forthcoming insights into the fine regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis will likely open future perspectives for cancer drug development.

  15. RNA interference targeting raptor inhibits proliferation of gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is dysregulated in gastric cancer. The biologic function of mTORC1 in gastric carcinogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that disruption of mTORC1 function by RNA interference-mediated downregulation of raptor substantially inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through induction of G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest. The anti-proliferative effect was accompanied by concomitant downregulation of activator protein-1 and upregulation of Smad2/3 transcriptional activities. In addition, the expression of cyclin D3 and p21Waf1, which stabilizes cyclin D/cdk4 complex for G1-S transition, was reduced by raptor knockdown. In conclusion, disruption of mTORC1 inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation through multiple pathways. This discovery may have an implication in the application of mTORC1-directed therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  16. Molecular targeting of intracellular compartments specifically in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Hetal; Gibo, Denise M; Debinski, Waldemar

    2010-05-01

    We have implemented a strategy in which a genetically engineered, single-chain protein specifically recognizes cancer cells and is trafficked to a targeted subcellular compartment, such as the nucleus. The recombinant protein termed IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS has a triple functional property: (1) it binds a cancer-associated receptor, interleukin 13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2), using modified IL-13 ligand, IL-13.E13K; (2) it exports its C-terminal portion out of the endosomal compartment using Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) translocation domain (D2); and (3) it travels to and accumulates in the nucleus guided by the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Here, we have demonstrated that this protein is transported into the brain tumor cells' nucleus, using 3 different methods of protein conjugation to dyes for the purpose of direct visualization of the protein's intracellular trafficking. IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS, and not the controls such as IL-13.E13K-D2, IL-13.E13K-NLS, or IL-13.E13K, accumulated in nuclei very efficiently, which increased with the time the cells were exposed to the protein. Also, IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS did not exhibit nuclear transport in cells with low expression levels of IL-13Rα2. Thus, it is possible to recognize cancer cells through their specific receptors and deliver a conjugated protein that travels specifically to the nucleus. Hence, our molecular targeting strategy succeeded in generating a single-chain proteinaceous agent capable of delivering drugs/labels needed to be localized to the cells' nuclei or potentially any other subcellular compartment, for their optimal efficacy or ability to exert their specific action. PMID:20740056

  17. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Cassandra C.; McMichael, Elizabeth L.; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C.; Abrams, Zachary B.; Lee, Robert J.; Carson, William E.

    2016-01-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is over-expressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis, using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and negative control, respectively. FR-positive and negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G (C-IgG) in the presence or absence of cytokines in order to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells enhanced following treatment with F-IgG, as compared to C-IgG at all effector:target (E:T) ratios (p<0.01). This trend was further enhanced by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12). NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) were also significantly increased in response to co-stimulation with IL-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells, as compared to controls (p<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells which can be further enhanced by the addition of cytokines. PMID:27035691

  18. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Departement de Neurologie, CHU de Caen (France); Marteau, Lena [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Bernaudin, Jean-Francois [Service d' Histologie-Biologie Tumorale, ER2UPMC, Universite Paris 6, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Roussel, Simon [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, CHU de Caen (France); Bernaudin, Myriam [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Petit, Edwige, E-mail: epetit@cyceron.fr [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France)

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  19. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  20. Targeting proliferating cell nuclear antigen and its protein interactions induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekka Müller

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM. Thus inhibiting PCNA's protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells' sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment.

  1. Metformin and prostate cancer stem cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M J; Klotz, L H; Venkateswaran, V

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Localized disease can be effectively treated with radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. However, advanced prostate cancer is more difficult to treat and if metastatic, is incurable. There is a need for more effective therapy for advanced prostate cancer. One potential target is the cancer stem cell (CSC). CSCs have been described in several solid tumors, including prostate cancer, and contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Metformin, a common oral biguanide used to treat type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to have anti-neoplastic effects. Specifically, metformin targets CSCs in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma and colon cancer. Metformin acts directly on the mitochondria to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation and reduce mitochondrial ATP production. This forces tumor cells to compensate by increasing the rate of glycolysis. CSCs rely heavily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. The glycolytic switch results in an energy crisis in these cells. Metformin could be used to exploit this metabolic weakness in CSCs. This would increase CSC sensitivity to conventional cancer therapies, circumventing treatment resistance and enhancing treatment efficacy. This review will explore the characteristics of prostate CSCs, their role in tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance and the role of metformin as a potential prostate CSC sensitizer to current anticancer therapies. PMID:26215782

  2. Targeting Mantle Cell Lymphoma with Anti-SYK Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cely, Ingrid; Yiv, Seang; Yin, Qian; Shahidzadeh, Anoush; Tang, Li; Cheng, Jianjun; Uckun, Fatih M

    2012-06-25

    The pentapeptide mimic 1,4-bis(9-O-dihydroquinidinyl)phthalazine / hydroquinidine 1,4-phathalazinediyl diether ("compound 61") (C-61) is the first reported inhibitor targeting the P-site of SYK. Here we report a nanotechnology platform to target C-61 to mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells. Liposomal nanoparticles (NP) loaded with C-61 were prepared using the standard thin film evaporation method. The entrapment of C-61 was obtained using the pH gradient procedure with lactobionic acid (LBA) being used as a low pH buffer inside the NP. Formulation F6A was selected as a lead candidate for further biological testing. The average diameter, zeta potential and C-61 content of the F6A NP was 40 nm, 0.1 mV, and 12.6 mg/ml, respectively. F6A induces apoptosis in SYK(+) but not SYK(-) leukemia/lymphoma cells. We also evaluated the cytotoxic activity of F6A in the context of an in vitro artificial bone marrow assay platform based on a 3D scaffold with inverted colloidal crystal geometry mimicking the structural topology of actual bone marrow matrix. The ability of C-61 to induce apoptosis in ALL-1 cells was not adversely affected by the scaffolds. F6A, but not the drug-free NP formulation F6B, caused apoptosis of MCL cell lines MAVER-1 and MINO within 24h. Further development of rationally designed SYK inhibitors and their nanoscale formulations may provide the foundation for therapeutic innovation against a broad spectrum of lymphoid malignancies, including MCL. PMID:23730399

  3. Medulloblastoma stem cells: Promising targets in medulloblastoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guo-Hao; Xu, Qing-Fu; Cui, You-Hong; Li, Ningning; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Lv, Sheng-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Despite great improvements in the therapeutic regimen, relapse and leptomeningeal dissemination still pose great challenges to the long-term survival of MB patients. Developing more effective strategies has become extremely urgent. In recent years, a number of malignancies, including MB, have been found to contain a subpopulation of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), or tumor initiating/propagating cells. The CSCs are thought to be largely responsible for tumor initiation, maintenance, dissemination, and relapse; therefore, their pivotal roles have revealed them to be promising targets in MB therapy. Our growing understanding of the major medulloblastoma molecular subgroups and the derivation of some of these groups from specific stem or progenitor cells adds additional layers to the CSC knowledge base. Herein we review the current knowledge of MB stem cells, highlight the molecular mechanisms relating to MB relapse and leptomeningeal dissemination, and incorporate these with the need to develop more effective and accurate therapies for MB patients. PMID:27171351

  4. Visualization and targeted disruption of protein interactions in living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Herce, Henry D.; Deng, Wen; Helma, Jonas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are the basis of all processes in living cells, but most studies of these interactions rely on biochemical in vitro assays. Here we present a simple and versatile fluorescent-three-hybrid (F3H) strategy to visualize and target protein–protein interactions. A high-affinity nanobody anchors a GFP-fusion protein of interest at a defined cellular structure and the enrichment of red-labelled interacting proteins is measured at these sites. With this approach, we visual...

  5. Graphene-Based Interfaces Do Not Alter Target Nerve Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Scaini, Denis; León, Verónica; Vázquez, Ester; Cellot, Giada; Privitera, Giulia; Lombardi, Lucia; Torrisi, Felice; Tomarchio, Flavia; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bosi, Susanna; Ferrari, Andrea C; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2016-01-26

    Neural-interfaces rely on the ability of electrodes to transduce stimuli into electrical patterns delivered to the brain. In addition to sensitivity to the stimuli, stability in the operating conditions and efficient charge transfer to neurons, the electrodes should not alter the physiological properties of the target tissue. Graphene is emerging as a promising material for neuro-interfacing applications, given its outstanding physico-chemical properties. Here, we use graphene-based substrates (GBSs) to interface neuronal growth. We test our GBSs on brain cell cultures by measuring functional and synaptic integrity of the emerging neuronal networks. We show that GBSs are permissive interfaces, even when uncoated by cell adhesion layers, retaining unaltered neuronal signaling properties, thus being suitable for carbon-based neural prosthetic devices. PMID:26700626

  6. Mannosylated biodegradable polyethyleneimine for targeted DNA delivery to dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun X

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Xun Sun, Simu Chen, Jianfeng Han, Zhirong ZhangKey Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: To establish a potential gene-delivery system with the ability to deliver plasmid DNA to dendritic cells (DCs more efficiently and specifically, we designed and synthesized a low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine and triethyleneglycol polymer (PEI–TEG and a series of its mannosylated derivatives.Methods: PEI–TEG was synthesized from PEI2000 and PEI600 with TEG as the cross-linker. PEI–TEG was then linked to mannose via a phenylisothiocyanate bridge to obtain man-PEI–TEG conjugates. The DNA conveyance abilities of PEI–TEG, man-PEI–TEG, as well as control PEI25k were evaluated by measuring their zeta potential, particle size, and DNA-binding abilities. The in vitro cytotoxicity, cell uptake, and transfection efficiency of these PEI/DNA complexes were examined on the DC2.4 cell line. Finally, a maturation experiment evaluated the effect of costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86 on murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs using flow cytometry.Results: PEI–TEG and man-PEI–TEG were successfully synthesized and were shown to retain the excellent properties of PEI25k for condensing DNA. Compared with PEI–TEG as well as PEI25k, the man-PEI–TEG had less cytotoxicity and performed better in both cellular uptake and transfection assays in vitro. The results of the maturation experiment showed that all the PEI/DNA complexes induced an adequate upregulation of surface markers for DC maturation.Conclusion: These results demonstrated that man-PEI–TEG can be employed as a DC-targeting gene-delivery system.Keywords: dendritic cells, DCs, mannose, polyethyleneimine, PEI, gene delivery

  7. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  8. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudás, József, E-mail: jozsef.dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullár, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Romani, Angela, E-mail: angela.romani@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pritz, Christian, E-mail: christian.pritz@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Hans Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: volker.schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mathias Sprinzl, Georg, E-mail: georg.sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  9. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells

  10. Cell-targeting antibodies in immunity to Ebola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaljohn, Alan; Lewis, George K

    2016-06-01

    As the 2014-15 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa evolved from emergency to lesson, developers of both vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were left with the puzzlement of what kinds of anti-Ebola antibodies are predictably desirable in treating the afflicted, and what antibodies might account for the specific and lasting protection elicited by the more effective vaccines. The facile answer in virology is that neutralizing antibody (NAb) is desired and required. However, with Ebola and other filoviruses (as with many prior viral examples), there are multiple discordances in which neutralizing antibodies fail to protect animals, and others in which antibody-mediated protection is observed in the absence of measured virus neutralization. Explanation presumably resides in the protective role of antibodies that bind and functionally 'target' virus-infected cells, here called 'cell-targeting antibody', or CTAb. To be clear, many NAbs are also CTAbs, and in the case of Ebola the great majority of NAbs are likely CTAbs. Isotype, glycosylation, and other features of CTAbs are likely crucial in their capacity to mediate protection. Overall, results and analysis invite an increasingly complex view of antibody-mediated immunity to enveloped viruses. PMID:27005312

  11. Dendritic Cells as a Pharmacological Target of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Chen; Lu Yang; O. M. Zack Howard; Joost J. Oppenheim

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a central role in the initiation and regulation of immune responses. There is considerable evidence that DCs can be used as therapeutic targets for pharmacological modulation of immune responses. Traditional Chines emedicine (TCM) has a long-standing history of using herbal medicine in the treatment of variety of human diseases.Many of the clinical effects of TCM have reportedly been attributed to the up- or down-regulation of immune responses. Accumulating evidence indicates that TCM and its components can interfere with immune responses at the earliest stage by targeting key functions of DCs. Here, we review those published studies of TCM with respect to their effects on immunobiological functions of DCs. Investigations based on both chemical entities derived from TCM as well as TCM herbal mixtures are presented. These studies suggest that various TCM herbal medicines have the capacity to inhibit or promote major functions of DCs, such as differentiation, maturation, cytokine production, survival, antigen uptake and presentation as well as trafficking. These studies have revealed novel biological effects of TCM and documented the utility of this approach to discover novel biological modifier of DC functions derived from natural sources.

  12. Visualization and targeted disruption of protein interactions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herce, Henry D; Deng, Wen; Helma, Jonas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are the basis of all processes in living cells, but most studies of these interactions rely on biochemical in vitro assays. Here we present a simple and versatile fluorescent-three-hybrid (F3H) strategy to visualize and target protein-protein interactions. A high-affinity nanobody anchors a GFP-fusion protein of interest at a defined cellular structure and the enrichment of red-labelled interacting proteins is measured at these sites. With this approach, we visualize the p53-HDM2 interaction in living cells and directly monitor the disruption of this interaction by Nutlin 3, a drug developed to boost p53 activity in cancer therapy. We further use this approach to develop a cell-permeable vector that releases a highly specific peptide disrupting the p53 and HDM2 interaction. The availability of multiple anchor sites and the simple optical readout of this nanobody-based capture assay enable systematic and versatile analyses of protein-protein interactions in practically any cell type and species. PMID:24154492

  13. Neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytoreductive nephrectomy as an independent option in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cannot be considered as the only effective method, with rare exception, of a few patients with solitary metastases. Cytoreductive nephrectomy is now part of a multimodal approach encompassing surgical treatment and systemic drug therapy. Many retrospective and two prospective studies have demonstrated that it is expedient to perform cytoreductive nephrectomy. Immunotherapy should not be used as preoperatively in the era of cytokine therapy for mRCC due to that fact that it has no impact on primary tumor. In the current targeted therapy era, many investigators have concentrated attentionon the role of neoadjuvant targeted therapy for the treatment of patients with both localized and locally advanced mRCC. The potential benefits of neoadjuvant therapy for localized and locally advanced RCC include to make surgery easier and to increase the possibility of organsparing treatment, by decreasing the stage of primary tumor and the size of tumors. The possible potential advantages of neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with mRCC include prompt initiation of necessary systemic therapy; identification of patients with primary refractory tumors; and a preoperative reduction in the stage of primary tumor. Numerous retrospective and some prospective phase II studies have shown that neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with localized and locally advanced RCC is possible and tolerable and surgical treatment after neoadjuvant targeted therapy is safe and executable with a low incidence of complications. If neoadjuvant therapy is to be performed, it should be done within 2–4 months before surgery. Sorafenib and sunitinib are now most tested and suitable for neoadjuvant targeted therapy. Sorafenib is a more preferred drug due to its shorter half-life and accordingly to the possibility of discontinuing the drug immediately prior to

  14. Lsd1 restricts the number of germline stem cells by regulating multiple targets in escort cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Eliazer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Specialized microenvironments called niches regulate tissue homeostasis by controlling the balance between stem cell self-renewal and the differentiation of stem cell daughters. However the mechanisms that govern the formation, size and signaling of in vivo niches remain poorly understood. Loss of the highly conserved histone demethylase Lsd1 in Drosophila escort cells results in increased BMP signaling outside the cap cell niche and an expanded germline stem cell (GSC phenotype. Here we present evidence that loss of Lsd1 also results in gradual changes in escort cell morphology and their eventual death. To better characterize the function of Lsd1 in different cell populations within the ovary, we performed Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq. This analysis shows that Lsd1 associates with a surprisingly limited number of sites in escort cells and fewer, and often, different sites in cap cells. These findings indicate that Lsd1 exhibits highly selective binding that depends greatly on specific cellular contexts. Lsd1 does not directly target the dpp locus in escort cells. Instead, Lsd1 regulates engrailed expression and disruption of engrailed and its putative downstream target hedgehog suppress the Lsd1 mutant phenotype. Interestingly, over-expression of engrailed, but not hedgehog, results in an expansion of GSC cells, marked by the expansion of BMP signaling. Knockdown of other potential direct Lsd1 target genes, not obviously linked to BMP signaling, also partially suppresses the Lsd1 mutant phenotype. These results suggest that Lsd1 restricts the number of GSC-like cells by regulating a diverse group of genes and provide further evidence that escort cell function must be carefully controlled during development and adulthood to ensure proper germline differentiation.

  15. Multi-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor cell targeting biological transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared and applied as tumor cell targeting biological transporters. A positive charge was introduced on SWNTs to get high loading efficiency of fluorescein (FAM) labeled short double strands DNA (20 base pairs). The SWNTs were encapsulated with the folic acid modified phospholipids for active targeting into tumor cell. The tumor cell-targeting properties of these multi-functionalized SWNTs were investigated by active targeting into mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells. The experimental results show that these multi-functionalized SWNTs have good tumor cell targeting property

  16. Retinal Targets ALDH Positive Cancer Stem Cell and Alters the Phenotype of Highly Metastatic Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH is a cancer stem cell marker. Retinoic acid has antitumor properties, including the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. Retinal, the precursor of retinoic acid, can be oxidized to retinoic acid by dehydrogenases, including ALDH. We hypothesized that retinal could potentially be transformed to retinoic acid with higher efficiency by cancer stem cells, due to the higher ALDH activity. We previously observed that ALDH activity is greater in highly metastatic K7M2 osteosarcoma (OS cells than in nonmetastatic K12 OS cells. We also demonstrated that ALDH activity correlates with clinical metastases in bone sarcoma patients, suggesting that ALDH may be a therapeutic target specific to cells with high metastatic potential. Our current results demonstrated that retinal preferentially affected the phenotypes of ALDH-high K7M2 cells in contrast to ALDH-low K12 cells, which could be mediated by the more efficient transformation of retinal to retinoic acid by ALDH in K7M2 cells. Retinal treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 cells decreased their proliferation, invasion capacity, and resistance to oxidative stress. Retinal altered the expression of metastasis-related genes. These observations indicate that retinal may be used to specifically target metastatic cancer stem cells in OS.

  17. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies. PMID:26109426

  18. RNA interference targeting raptor inhibits proliferation of gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Lee, Chung Wa [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Cho, Chi Hin [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Francis Ka Leung [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Yu, Jun, E-mail: junyu@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu, E-mail: joesung@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2011-06-10

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is dysregulated in gastric cancer. The biologic function of mTORC1 in gastric carcinogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that disruption of mTORC1 function by RNA interference-mediated downregulation of raptor substantially inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. The anti-proliferative effect was accompanied by concomitant downregulation of activator protein-1 and upregulation of Smad2/3 transcriptional activities. In addition, the expression of cyclin D{sub 3} and p21{sup Waf1}, which stabilizes cyclin D/cdk4 complex for G{sub 1}-S transition, was reduced by raptor knockdown. In conclusion, disruption of mTORC1 inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation through multiple pathways. This discovery may have an implication in the application of mTORC1-directed therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  19. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastrointestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overview of what is known about the mechanisms by which activation of Hedgehog signaling leads to the development of BCCs and will review two recent papers suggesting that agents that modulate sterol levels might influence the Hh pathway. Thus, sterols may be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of BCCs, and readily available agents such as statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) or vitamin D might be helpful in reducing BCC incidence

  20. Targeting CXCR4 in HIV Cell-Entry Inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Schwartz, T W; Rosenkilde, M M

    2010-01-01

    oral bioavailability. The hunt for orally active small-molecule CXCR4 antagonists led to the development of monocyclam-based compounds, and recently to the non-cyclam antagonist AMD070, which is orally active and currently in Phase II clinical trial as anti-HIV treatment. Current review provides an...... overview of the drug discovery within the field of anti-HIV treatment targeting CXCR4 spanning from natural occurring and modified chemokines, to HIV-mimicking peptides and peptoids ending at the non-peptide antagonists.......CXCR4 and CCR5 constitute the two major coreceptors for HIV-1 entry into host cells. In the course of an HIV-infection, a coreceptor switch takes place in approximately half of the patients - from R5 HIV-1 (CCR5 utilizing) strains to X4 HIV-1 (CXCR4 utilizing) strains. Treatment of HIV...

  1. Cornering metastases: therapeutic targeting of circulating tumor cells and stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishoy eFaltas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed an evolution of our understanding of the biology of the metastatic cascade. Recent insights into the metastatic process show that it is complex, dynamic and multi-directional. This process starts at a very early stage in the natural history of solid tumor growth leading to early development of metastases that grow in parallel with the primary tumor. The role of stem cells in perpetuating cancer metastases is increasingly becoming more evident. At the same time, there is a growing recognition of the crucial role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the development of metastases. These insights have laid the biological foundations for therapeutic targeting of CTCs, a promising area of research that aims to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by preventing the development of metastases at a very early stage. The hematogenous transport phase of the metastatic cascade provides critical access to CTCs for therapeutic targeting aiming to interrupt the metastatic process. Recent advances in the fields of nanotechnology and micro-fluidics have led to the development of several devices for in-vivo targeting of CTC during transit in the circulation. Selectin-coated tubes that target cell adhesion molecules, immuno-magnetic separators and in-vivo photoacoustic flow cytometers are currently being developed for this purpose. On the pharmacological front, several pharmacological and immunological agents targeting cancer stem cells are currently being developed. Such agents may ultimately prove to be effective against circulating tumor stem cells (CTSCs. Although still in its infancy, therapeutic targeting of CTCs and CTSCs offers an unprecedented opportunity to prevent the development of metastasis and potentially alter the natural history of cancer. By rendering cancer a local disease, these approaches could lead to major reductions in metastasis-related morbidity and mortality.

  2. Cell-Mediated Delivery of Nanoparticles: Taking Advantage of Circulatory Cells to Target Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Cellular hitchhiking leverages the use of circulatory cells to enhance the biological outcome of nanoparticle drug delivery systems, which often suffer from poor circulation time and limited targeting. Cellular hitchhiking utilizes the natural abilities of circulatory cells to: (i) navigate the vasculature while avoiding immune system clearance, (ii) remain relatively inert until needed and (iii) perform specific functions, including nutrient delivery to tissues, clearance of pathogens, and i...

  3. Free Extracellular miRNA Functionally Targets Cells by Transfecting Exosomes from Their Companion Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Bryniarski

    Full Text Available Lymph node and spleen cells of mice doubly immunized by epicutaneous and intravenous hapten application produce a suppressive component that inhibits the action of the effector T cells that mediate contact sensitivity reactions. We recently re-investigated this phenomenon in an immunological system. CD8+ T lymphocyte-derived exosomes transferred suppressive miR-150 to the effector T cells antigen-specifically due to exosome surface coat of antibody light chains made by B1a lymphocytes. Extracellular RNA (exRNA is protected from plasma RNases by carriage in exosomes or by chaperones. Exosome transfer of functional RNA to target cells is well described, whereas the mechanism of transfer of exRNA free of exosomes remains unclear. In the current study we describe extracellular miR-150, extracted from exosomes, yet still able to mediate antigen-specific suppression. We have determined that this was due to miR-150 association with antibody-coated exosomes produced by B1a cell companions of the effector T cells, which resulted in antigen-specific suppression of their function. Thus functional cell targeting by free exRNA can proceed by transfecting companion cell exosomes that then transfer RNA cargo to the acceptor cells. This contrasts with the classical view on release of RNA-containing exosomes from the multivesicular bodies for subsequent intercellular targeting. This new alternate pathway for transfer of exRNA between cells has distinct biological and immunological significance, and since most human blood exRNA is not in exosomes may be relevant to evaluation and treatment of diseases.

  4. Glioblastoma: Molecular Pathways, Stem Cells and Therapeutic Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO-defined Grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive CNS malignancy. Despite current treatment modalities, the survival time remains dismal. The main cause of mortality in patients with this disease is reoccurrence of the malignancy, which is attributed to treatment-resistant cancer stem cells within and surrounding the primary tumor. Inclusion of novel therapies, such as immuno- and DNA-based therapy, may provide better means of treating GBM. Furthermore, manipulation of recently discovered non-coding microRNAs, some of which regulate tumor growth through the development and maintenance of GBM stem cells, could provide new prospective therapies. Studies conducted by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) also demonstrate the role of molecular pathways, specifically the activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in GBM tumorigenesis. Inhibition of the aforementioned pathway may provide a more direct and targeted method to GBM treatment. The combination of these treatment modalities may provide an innovative therapeutic approach for the management of GBM

  5. Adhesion receptors as therapeutic targets for circulating tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MichaelR.King

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis contributes to >90% of cancer-associated mortality. Though primary tumors can be removed by surgical resection or chemo/radiotherapy, metastatic disease is a great challenge to treatment due to its systemic nature. As metastatic “seeds”, circulating tumor cells (CTCs are believed to be responsible for dissemination from a primary tumor to anatomically distant organs. Despite the possibility of physical trapping of CTCs in microvessels, recent advances have provided insights into the involvement of a variety of adhesion molecules on CTCs. Such adhesion molecules facilitate direct interaction with the endothelium in specific tissues or indirectly through leukocytes. Importantly, significant progress has been made in understanding how these receptors confer enhanced invasion and survival advantage during hematogenous circulation of CTCs through recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, platelets, and other cells. This review highlights the identification of novel adhesion molecules and how blocking their function can compromise successful seeding and colonization of CTCs in new microenvironment. Encouraged by existing diagnostic tools to identify and isolate CTCs, strategic targeting of these adhesion molecules to deliver conventional chemotherapeutics or novel apoptotic signals is discussed for the neutralization of CTCs in the circulation.

  6. Glioblastoma: Molecular Pathways, Stem Cells and Therapeutic Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena, E-mail: meena_jhanwar@nymc.edu; Labagnara, Michael; Friedman, Marissa; Kwasnicki, Amanda; Murali, Raj [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States)

    2015-03-25

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO-defined Grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive CNS malignancy. Despite current treatment modalities, the survival time remains dismal. The main cause of mortality in patients with this disease is reoccurrence of the malignancy, which is attributed to treatment-resistant cancer stem cells within and surrounding the primary tumor. Inclusion of novel therapies, such as immuno- and DNA-based therapy, may provide better means of treating GBM. Furthermore, manipulation of recently discovered non-coding microRNAs, some of which regulate tumor growth through the development and maintenance of GBM stem cells, could provide new prospective therapies. Studies conducted by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) also demonstrate the role of molecular pathways, specifically the activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in GBM tumorigenesis. Inhibition of the aforementioned pathway may provide a more direct and targeted method to GBM treatment. The combination of these treatment modalities may provide an innovative therapeutic approach for the management of GBM.

  7. Mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analogs inhibit breast cancer cell energy metabolism and promote cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research has revealed that targeting mitochondrial bioenergetic metabolism is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy. Key to successful implementation of this chemotherapeutic strategy is the use of new and improved mitochondria-targeted cationic agents that selectively inhibit energy metabolism in breast cancer cells, while exerting little or no long-term cytotoxic effect in normal cells. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and alterations in bioenergetic metabolism induced by mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analog (Mito-chromanol, Mito-ChM) and its acetylated ester analog (Mito-ChMAc). Assays of cell death, colony formation, mitochondrial bioenergetic function, intracellular ATP levels, intracellular and tissue concentrations of tested compounds, and in vivo tumor growth were performed. Both Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc selectively depleted intracellular ATP and caused prolonged inhibition of ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate in breast cancer cells, but not in non-cancerous cells. These effects were significantly augmented by inhibition of glycolysis. Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc exhibited anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in several breast cancer cells with different genetic background. Furthermore, Mito-ChM selectively accumulated in tumor tissue and inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft model of human breast cancer. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted small molecular weight chromanols exhibit selective anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in multiple breast cancer cells, and that esterification of the hydroxyl group in mito-chromanols is not a critical requirement for its anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effect

  8. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1 drug release control experiment; Fig. S2 cell viability assay; video - magnetic manipulation. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02228f

  9. IFMIF target and test cell - design and integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) aims at the qualification of appropriate materials for a Demonstration Fusion Power Plant (DEMO) to a fluence of up to 150 dpa (displacement per atom) at a DEMO typical neutron spectrum. It comprises two accelerators each providing a deuteron beam with 125 mA and 40 MeV. The deuterons strike a lithium target and create via stripping reactions neutrons. The neutrons are mainly forward directed into the High-Flux-Test-Module (HFTM). The Medium Flux-Test-Modules (MFTM) and the Low-Flux-Test-Modules (LFTM) are arranged in beam direction behind. In the HFTM a damage rate in steel of more than 20 dpa/fpy (displacement per atome per full power year) will be provide in a volume of 0.5 litre. The neutron spectrum is prone to produce helium and tritium in steel like in the first wall of a DEMO reactor. The Medium- Flux-Test-Modules are designed for creep fatigues in situ and tritium release test. The test modules are cooled with helium. The target is a lithium jet with a free surface towards the deuteron beams. The jet follows a concave curved so called back wall. Centrifugal forces increase the static pressure, which prevents lithium boiling at the beam tube pressure and the power release of 10 MW due to the deuteron beams. The target and Test Cell (TTC) houses the target and the test modules as well as the lithium supply tubes and a quench tank into which the lithium splashes after the target. The lithium containing components have a temperature of 250 to 350 C. Nuclear reactions mainly in beam direction contribute to heat releases in TTC components. The TTC is filled with a noble gas with almost atmospheric pressure. Natural convection transfers heat to the walls but also mitigates temperature peaks. The Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) has developed or validated tools for: - The extended Monte Carlo Code McDeLicious for calculations of the neutron source term, dpa rates in the material specimens, activation

  10. Sorafenib and sunitinib: novel targeted therapies for renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandinetti, Cheryl A; Goldspiel, Barry R

    2007-08-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is a relatively uncommon malignancy, with 51,190 cases expected to be diagnosed in 2007. Localized disease is curable by surgery; however, locally advanced or metastatic disease is not curable in most cases and, until recently, had a limited response to drug treatment. Historically, biologic response modifiers or immunomodulating agents were tested in clinical trials based on observations that some cases of RCC can spontaneously regress. High-dose aldesleukin is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for advanced RCC; however, the drug is associated with a high frequency of severe adverse effects. Responses have been observed with low-dose aldesleukin and interferon alfa, but with little effect on overall survival. Sorafenib and sunitinib are novel therapies that target growth factor receptors known to be activated by the hypoxia-inducible factor and the Ras-Raf/MEK/ERK pathways. These pathways are important in the pathophysiology of RCC. Sorafenib and sunitinib have shown antitumor activity as first- and second-line therapy in patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic RCC who have clear-cell histology. Although complete responses are not common, both drugs promote disease stabilization and increase progression-free survival. This information suggests that disease stabilization may be an important determinant for response in RCC and possibly other cancers. Sorafenib and sunitinib are generally well tolerated and are considered first- and second-line treatment options for patients with advanced clear cell RCC. In addition, sorafenib and sunitinib have shown promising results in initial clinical trials evaluating antitumor activity in patients who are refractory to other antiangiogenic therapy. The most common toxicities with both sorafenib and sunitinib are hand-foot syndrome, rash, fatigue, hypertension, and diarrhea. Research is directed toward defining the optimal use of these new agents. PMID:17655513

  11. Reiterated Targeting Peptides on the Nanoparticle Surface Significantly Promote Targeted Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene Delivery to Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-14

    Nonviral gene delivery vectors hold great promise for gene therapy due to the safety concerns with viral vectors. However, the application of nonviral vectors is hindered by their low transfection efficiency. Herein, in order to tackle this challenge, we developed a nonviral vector integrating lipids, sleeping beauty transposon system and 8-mer stem cell targeting peptides for safe and efficient gene delivery to hard-to-transfect mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The 8-mer MSC-targeting peptides, when synthetically reiterated in three folds and chemically presented on the surface, significantly promoted the resultant lipid-based nanoparticles (LBNs) to deliver VEGF gene into MSCs with a high transfection efficiency (∼52%) and long-lasting gene expression (for longer than 170 h) when compared to nonreiterated peptides. However, the reiterated stem cell targeting peptides do not enable the highly efficient gene transfer to other control cells. This work suggests that the surface presentation of the reiterated stem cell-targeting peptides on the nonviral vectors is a promising method for improving the efficiency of cell-specific nonviral gene transfection in stem cells. PMID:26588028

  12. Guiding pancreatic beta cells to target electrodes in a whole-cell biosensor for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, Eileen; Karajić, Aleksandar; Raoux, Matthieu; Perrier, Romain; Pirog, Antoine; Lebreton, Fanny; Arbault, Stéphane; Gaitan, Julien; Renaud, Sylvie; Kuhn, Alexander; Lang, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    We are developing a cell-based bioelectronic glucose sensor that exploits the multi-parametric sensing ability of pancreatic islet cells for the treatment of diabetes. These cells sense changes in the concentration of glucose and physiological hormones and immediately react by generating electrical signals. In our sensor, signals from multiple cells are recorded as field potentials by a micro-electrode array (MEA). Thus, cell response to various factors can be assessed rapidly and with high throughput. However, signal quality and consequently overall sensor performance rely critically on close cell-electrode proximity. Therefore, we present here a non-invasive method of further exploiting the electrical properties of these cells to guide them towards multiple micro-electrodes via electrophoresis. Parameters were optimized by measuring the cell's zeta potential and modeling the electric field distribution. Clonal and primary mouse or human β-cells migrated directly to target electrodes during the application of a 1 V potential between MEA electrodes for 3 minutes. The morphology, insulin secretion, and electrophysiological characteristics were not altered compared to controls. Thus, cell manipulation on standard MEAs was achieved without introducing any external components and while maintaining the performance of the biosensor. Since the analysis of the cells' electrical activity was performed in real time via on-chip recording and processing, this work demonstrates that our biosensor is operational from the first step of electrically guiding cells to the final step of automatic recognition. Our favorable results with pancreatic islets, which are highly sensitive and fragile cells, are encouraging for the extension of this technique to other cell types and microarray devices. PMID:26282013

  13. Broad target cell selectivity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion and virion entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular mechanism of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) entry is poorly understood. We tested a broad variety of cell types of diverse species and tissue origin for their ability to function as targets in a quantitative reporter gene assay for KSHV-glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion. Several human, non-human primate, and rabbit cell lines were efficient targets, whereas rodent and all human lymphoblastoid cell lines were weak targets. Parallel findings were obtained with a virion entry assay using a recombinant KSHV encoding a reporter gene. No correlation was observed between target cell activity and surface expression of α3β1 integrin, a proposed KSHV receptor. We hypothesize that target cell permissiveness in both the cell fusion and virion entry assays reflects the presence of a putative KSHV fusion-entry receptor

  14. Involvement of Tspan8 in exosome assembly and target cell selection

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Sanyukta

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are the most important intercellular communicators. Tetraspanins/their complexes are suggested to be important in exosomal target cell selection. I showed: changes in Tetraspanin8 associations created from internalization persist upto exosomes and, differences in tetraspanin-complexes on exosomes allow for target cell selectivity.Based on the tetraspanin-complex on exosomes, predictions on potential target cells might be possible, allowing tailored exosome generation for drug delivery.

  15. RNA Interference Targeting Leptin Gene Effect on Hepatic Stellate Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Xiulan; LIN Jusheng; SONG Yuhu; SUN Xuemei; ZHOU Hejun

    2005-01-01

    To construct the specific siRNA expression vectors and investigate their effect on leptin and collagen I in HSC, which provide a new approach to the prevent and treat hepatic fibrosis. The five siRNAs against leptin gene were transcript synthesized intracellularly by expression templates of plasmid vector psiRNA-hH1neo. The recombinant leptin siRNA plasmid vectors could express in eukaryocyte , and then to evaluate them by using enzyme cutting and sequencing. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into HSCs using Lipofectamine methods respectively. The cells were selected after growing in DMEM containing 300 μg/mL G418 for about 4 weeks. Gene expression of leptin and collagen I were showed by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Identification by enzyme cutting and sequencing showed that the leptin siRNA expression vectors were constructed successfully, and leptin siRNA could inhibit the leptin and collagen I gene expression effectively. It was concluded that RNA interference-mediated silencing of leptin gene diminished leptin and collagen I gene expression in HSCs. Furthermore, attenuated the extracellular matrix over-deposition at the same time. Leptin gene is ideal targets of gene therapy for liver fibrosis.

  16. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; ZHOU, SHU-FENG; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illu...

  17. An innovative pre-targeting strategy for tumor cell specific imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Peng, Meng-Yun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Cheng, Si-Xue; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-08-01

    A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the ``biotin-avidin'' interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging and therapeutic agents for tumor treatments.A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the ``biotin-avidin'' interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging

  18. Cell Membrane Capsules for Encapsulation of Chemotherapeutic and Cancer Cell Targeting in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li-Hua; Zhang, Yuan-Hong; Han, Li-Jie; Zhang, Chen-Zhen; Wu, Jia-He; Wang, Xia-Rong; Gao, Jian-Qing; Mao, Zheng-Wei

    2015-08-26

    Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents can cause indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. Until now, encapsulation and targeting of drugs have typically relied on synthetic vehicles, which cannot minimize the clearance by the renal system and may also increase the risk of chemical side effects. Cell membrane capsules (CMCs) provide a generic and far more natural approach to the challenges of drug encapsulation and delivery in vivo. Here aptamer AS1411, which can recognize and bind overexpressed nucleolin on a cancer cell membrane, was chemically conjugated onto CMCs. As a result, AS1411 modified CMCs showed enhanced ingestion in certain cancer cells in vitro and accumulation in mouse cancer xenografts in vivo. Chemotherapeutics and contrast agents with therapeutically significant concentrations can be packaged into CMCs by reversible permeating their plasma membranes. The systematic administration of cancer targeting CMCs loaded with doxorubicin hydrochloride can significantly inhibit tumor growth in mouse xenografts, with significantly reduced toxicity compared to free drug. These findings suggest that cancer targeting CMCs may have considerable benefits in drug delivery and cancer treatment. PMID:26262951

  19. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Sander A. A. Kooijmans; Gómez Aleza, Clara; Roffler, Steve R; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells.Methods: EV producing cells were transfected with vectors enco...

  20. Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase signaling as an emerging therapeutic agent of B-cell malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Bing; QU, FULIAN; Yuan, Tian; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is central to the development and function of B cells. BCR signaling has emerged as a pivotal pathway and a key driver of numerous B-cell lymphomas. Disruption of BCR signaling can be lethal to malignant B cells. Recently, kinase inhibitors that target BCR signaling have induced notable clinical responses. These inhibitors include spleen tyrosine kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, phosphoinositide 3′-kinase and Bruto...

  1. Campylobacter jejuni cell lysates differently target mitochondria and lysosomes on HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, B; Campana, R; Luchetti, F; Arcangeletti, M; Betti, M; Cesarini, E; Ciacci, C; Vittoria, E; Galli, L; Papa, S; Baffone, W

    2014-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The synthesis of cytolethal distending toxin appears essential in the infection process. In this work we evaluated the sequence of lethal events in HeLa cells exposed to cell lysates of two distinct strains, C. jejuni ATCC 33291 and C. jejuni ISS3. C. jejuni cell lysates (CCLys) were added to HeLa cell monolayers which were analysed to detect DNA content, death features, bcl-2 and p53 status, mitochondria/lysosomes network and finally, CD54 and CD59 alterations, compared to cell lysates of C. jejuni 11168H cdtA mutant. We found mitochondria and lysosomes differently targeted by these bacterial lysates. Death, consistent with apoptosis for C. jejuni ATCC 33291 lysate, occurred in a slow way (>48 h); concomitantly HeLa cells increase their endolysosomal compartment, as a consequence of toxin internalization besides a simultaneous and partial lysosomal destabilization. C. jejuni CCLys induces death in HeLa cells mainly via a caspase-dependent mechanism although a p53 lysosomal pathway (also caspase-independent) seems to appear in addition. In C. jejuni ISS3-treated cells, the p53-mediated oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components seems to be lost, inducing the deepest lysosomal alterations. Furthermore, CD59 considerably decreases, suggesting both a degradation or internalisation pathway. CCLys-treated HeLa cells increase CD54 expression on their surface, because of the action of lysate as its double feature of toxin and bacterial peptide. In conclusion, we revealed that C. jejuni CCLys-treated HeLa cells displayed different features, depending on the particular strain. PMID:24880782

  2. Designing gene therapy vectors targeting tumor cell endothelium

    OpenAIRE

    Pınar ÖZKAL BAYDIN; AKBULUT, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and metastasis. Targeting angiogenesis is one of the recent progresses in the therapeutic area of cancer. Gene therapy is one of the promis- ing strategies in the treatment of cancer. The gene therapy vectors targeting tumor endothelium carry the great therapeu- tic potential in cancer.

  3. MPLA incorporation into DC-targeting glycoliposomes favours anti-tumour T cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Martine A.; Ambrosini, Martino; Bruijns, Sven C.; Kalay, Hakan; Van Bloois, Louis; Storm, G; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dendritic cells (DC) are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy as they initiate strong and long-lived tumour-specific T cell responses. DC can be effectively targeted in vivo with tumour antigens by using nanocarriers such as liposomes. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens is enhance

  4. MPLA incorporation into DC-targeting glycoliposomes favours anti-tumour T cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, M.A.; Ambrosini, Martino; Bruijns, Sven C.M.; Kalay, Hakan; Bloois, van Louis; Storm, G.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Kooyk, van Y.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy as they initiate strong and long-lived tumour-specific T cell responses. DC can be effectively targeted in vivo with tumour antigens by using nanocarriers such as liposomes. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens is enhanced with st

  5. Multivalent glycopeptide dendrimers for the targeted delivery of antigens to dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. García-Vallejo; M. Ambrosini; A. Overbeek; W.E. van Riel; K. Bloem; W.W.J. Unger; F. Chiodo; J.G. Bolscher; K. Nazmi; H. Kalay; Y. van Kooyk

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most powerful type of antigen presenting cells. Current immunotherapies targeting dendritic cells have shown a relative degree of success but still require further improvement. One of the most important issues to solve is the efficiency of antigen delivery to dendritic cells

  6. Myeloid cells - targets of medication in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Manoj K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-09-01

    Discussions of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathophysiology tend to focus on T cells and B cells of the adaptive immune response. The innate immune system is less commonly considered in this context, although dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages and microglia - collectively referred to as myeloid cells - have prominent roles in MS pathogenesis. These populations of myeloid cells function as antigen-presenting cells and effector cells in neuroinflammation. Furthermore, a vicious cycle of interactions between T cells and myeloid cells exacerbates pathology. Several disease-modifying therapies are now available to treat MS, and insights into their mechanisms of action have largely focused on the adaptive immune system, but these therapies also have important effects on myeloid cells. In this Review, we discuss the evidence for the roles of myeloid cells in MS and the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of MS, and consider how interactions between myeloid cells and T cells and/or B cells promote MS pathology. Finally, we discuss the direct and indirect effects of existing MS medications on myeloid cells. PMID:27514287

  7. Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Coupled with Nuclear Localization Signal Peptide for Cell-Nucleus Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G; Chin, Y. Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-01-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear locali...

  8. Aspects of Tumour Targeting : Preclinical Studies on Human Malignant Cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström Wester, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Exclusive eradication of tumour cells causing minimal damage to healthy tissue, a concept referred to as targeting, is an interesting approach to improve the outcome for patients afflicted with cancer. The general aim of this thesis was to highlighten aspects that could be of importance in developing novel treatment regimens based on specific targeting of tumour cells. Two variants of targeting strategies, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR...

  9. Biosynthesis and characterization of a novel genetically engineered polymer for targeted gene transfer to cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Canine, Brenda F.; Wang, Yuhua; Hatefi, Arash

    2009-01-01

    A novel multi-domain biopolymer was designed and genetically engineered with the purpose to target and transfect cancer cells. The biopolymer contains at precise locations: 1) repeating units of arginine and histidine to condense pDNA and lyse endosome membranes, 2) a HER2 targeting affibody to target cancer cells, 3) a pH responsive fusogenic peptide to destabilize endosome membranes and enhance endosomolytic activity of histidine residues, and 4) a nuclear localization signal to enhance tra...

  10. Cell-based phenotypic screening of mast cell degranulation unveils kinetic perturbations of agents targeting phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shenlu; Wang, Xumeng; Wu, Huanwen; Xiao, Peng; Cheng, Hongqiang; Zhang, Xue; Ke, Yuehai

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in initiating allergic diseases. The activation of mast cells are controlled by a complicated signal network of reversible phosphorylation, and finding the key regulators involved in this network has been the focus of the pharmaceutical industry. In this work, we used a method named Time-dependent cell responding profile (TCRP) to track the process of mast cell degranulation under various perturbations caused by agents targeting phosphorylation. To test the feasibility of this high-throughput cell-based phenotypic screening method, a variety of biological techniques were used. We further screened 145 inhibitors and clustered them based on the similarities of their TCRPs. Stat3 phosphorylation has been widely reported as a key step in mast cell degranulation. Interestingly, our TCRP results showed that a Stat3 inhibitor JSI124 did not inhibit degranulation like other Stat3 inhibitors, such as Stattic, clearly inhibited degranulation. Regular endpoint assays demonstrated that the distinctive TCRP of JSI124 potentially correlated with the ability to induce apoptosis. Consequently, different agents possibly have disparate functions, which can be conveniently detected by TCRP. From this perspective, our TCRP screening method is reliable and sensitive when it comes to discovering and selecting novel compounds for new drug developments. PMID:27502076

  11. Hitting the Bull’s Eye: Targeting HMGA1 in Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yanagisawa, Breann L.; Resar, Linda M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that when cancer cells hijack normal stem cell properties, they acquire the ability to invade, metastasize to distant sites, and evade therapy. Thus, eliminating cancer cells with stem cell properties, or cancer stem cells, is of prime importance for the successful treatment of cancer, regardless of the tissue of origin. Previous efforts to target cancer stem cells, however, have been largely unsuccessful. Recent studies led to the discovery of a novel role for the ...

  12. Hampering the Immune Suppressors: Therapeutic Targeting of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Albeituni, Sabrin Husein; Ding, Chuanlin; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells with suppressive properties that preferentially expand in cancer. MDSC mainly suppress T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, inhibit NK cell activation, and induce the differentiation and expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The wide spectrum of MDSC suppressive activity in cancer and its role in tumor progression have rendered these cells a promising target for effective cancer immunotherapy...

  13. Targeted microbubbles for ultrasound mediated gene transfection and apoptosis induction in ovarian cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Shufang; Guo, Juan; Sun, Jiangchuan; Zhu, Shenyin; Yan, Yu; Zhu, Yi; Li, Min; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique can be potentially used for non-viral delivery of gene therapy. Targeting wild-type p53 (wtp53) tumor suppressor gene may provide a clinically promising treatment for patients with ovarian cancer. However, UTMD mediated gene therapy typically uses non-targeted microbubbles with suboptimal gene transfection efficiency. We synthesized a targeted microbubble agent for UTMD mediated wtp53 gene therapy in ovarian cancer cells. Lipid micr...

  14. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  15. Targeting the cancer cell cycle by cold atmospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, O.; Hawley, T. S.; Stepp, M. A.; Keidar, M.

    2012-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), a technology based on quasi-neutral ionized gas at low temperatures, is currently being evaluated as a new highly selective alternative addition to existing cancer therapies. Here, we present a first attempt to identify the mechanism of CAP action. CAP induced a robust ~2-fold G2/M increase in two different types of cancer cells with different degrees of tumorigenicity. We hypothesize that the increased sensitivity of cancer cells to CAP treatment is caused by differences in the distribution of cancer cells and normal cells within the cell cycle. The expression of γH2A.X (pSer139), an oxidative stress reporter indicating S-phase damage, is enhanced specifically within CAP treated cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. Together with a significant decrease in EdU-incorporation after CAP, these data suggest that tumorigenic cancer cells are more susceptible to CAP treatment.

  16. Cas9-mediated targeting of viral RNA in eukaryotic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Aryn A.; Sampson, Timothy R.; Ratner, Hannah K.; Grakoui, Arash; Weiss, David S

    2015-01-01

    The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats associated endonuclease, Cas9, has quickly become a revolutionary tool in genome engineering. Utilizing small guiding RNAs, Cas9 can be targeted to specific DNA sequences of interest, where it catalyzes DNA cleavage. We now demonstrate that Cas9 from the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella novicida (FnCas9) can be reprogrammed to target a specific RNA substrate, the genome of the +ssRNA virus, hepatitis C virus, in eukaryotic cel...

  17. Cancer Stem Cells: Biological Functions and Therapeutically Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Marius Eugen Ciurea; Ada Maria Georgescu; Stefana Oana Purcaru; Stefan-Alexandru Artene; Ghazaleh Hooshyar Emami; Mihai Virgil Boldeanu; Daniela Elise Tache; Anica Dricu

    2014-01-01

    Almost all tumors are composed of a heterogeneous cell population, making them difficult to treat. A small cancer stem cell population with a low proliferation rate and a high tumorigenic potential is thought to be responsible for cancer development, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Stem cells were reported to be involved in both normal development and carcinogenesis, some molecular mechanisms being common in both processes. No less controversial, stem cells are considered to be importan...

  18. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells with Nanoparticle-Enabled Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Andrew R.; Singh, Ravi N.; Carroll, David L.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that multiple tumor types are sustained by a small population of transformed stem-like cells that have the ability to both self-renew and give rise to non-tumorigenic daughter cells that constitute the bulk of a tumor. These cells, which generally constitute a minority of the overall cancer cell population, are highly resistant to conventional therapies and persist following treatment, leading to disease relapse and the formation of distant metastases. Therapies tha...

  19. Understanding How Zika Virus Enters and Infects Neural Target Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    Zika virus is a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that has become a public health concern because of its ability to cause microcephaly. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Tang et al. (2016) and Nowakowski et al. (2016) use human neural stem cell models and single-cell RNA sequencing to investigate Zika virus tropism and potential entry receptors. PMID:27152436

  20. Apoptosis and cancer stem cells : Implications for apoptosis targeted therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating showing that cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells are key drivers of tumor formation and progression. Successful therapy must therefore eliminate these cells, which is hampered by their high resistance to commonly used treatment modalities. Thus far, only a limited nu

  1. A drug target that stimulates development of healthy stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have overcome a major impediment to the development of effective stem cell therapies by studying mice that lack CD47, a protein found on the surface of both healthy and cancer cells. They discovered that cells obtained from the lungs of CD47-de

  2. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  3. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yingbin [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Cai, Shaoxi, E-mail: sxcai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Li [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Yu, Shuhui [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Library of Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhang, Haoxing [School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Liu, Lan [Department of Laboratory of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Chongqin Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Liu, Qun [College of Life Science and Technology, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China); Du, Jun [Center of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Cai, Shaohui [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Sung, K.L. Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering, University of California, SD 0412 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  4. Simultaneous Cell-to-Cell Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus to Multiple Targets through Polysynapses▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicka, Dominika; Feldmann, Jérôme; Porrot, Françoise; Wietgrefe, Steve; Guadagnini, Stéphanie; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Estaquier, Jérôme; Haase, Ashley T.; Sol-Foulon, Nathalie; Schwartz, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) efficiently propagates through cell-to-cell contacts, which include virological synapses (VS), filopodia, and nanotubes. Here, we quantified and characterized further these diverse modes of contact in lymphocytes. We report that viral transmission mainly occurs across VS and through “polysynapses,” a rosette-like structure formed between one infected cell and multiple adjacent recipients. Polysynapses are characterized by simultaneous HIV clustering and transfer at multiple membrane regions. HIV Gag proteins often adopt a ring-like supramolecular organization at sites of intercellular contacts and colocalize with CD63 tetraspanin and raft components GM1, Thy-1, and CD59. In donor cells engaged in polysynapses, there is no preferential accumulation of Gag proteins at contact sites facing the microtubule organizing center. The LFA-1 adhesion molecule, known to facilitate viral replication, enhances formation of polysynapses. Altogether, our results reveal an underestimated mode of viral transfer through polysynapses. In HIV-infected individuals, these structures, by promoting concomitant infection of multiple targets in the vicinity of infected cells, may facilitate exponential viral growth and escape from immune responses. PMID:19369333

  5. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm: From Origin of the Cell to Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laribi, Kamel; Denizon, Nathalie; Besançon, Anne; Farhi, Jonathan; Lemaire, Pierre; Sandrini, Jeremy; Truong, Catherine; Ghnaya, Habib; Baugier de Materre, Alix

    2016-08-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematological malignancy with an aggressive clinical course. It is grouped with acute myeloid leukemia-related precursor neoplasms in the 2008 World Health Organization classification. Most patients with BPDCN have skin lesions at diagnosis and subsequent or simultaneous involvement of the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and lymph nodes. Patients usually respond to initial chemotherapy but often relapse. Stem cell transplantation may improve survival. This neoplasm is derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells and is characterized by the coexpression of the immunophenotypic markers CD4, CD56, CD123, blood dendritic cell antigen-2, blood dendritic cell antigen-4, CD2AP, and lineage(-). Atypical immunophenotype expression may be present, making diagnosis difficult. BPDCN is often associated with a complex karyotype, frequent deletions of tumor suppressor genes, and mutations affecting either the DNA methylation or chromatin remodeling pathways. A better understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of this neoplasm could open the way to new therapies targeting specific signaling pathways or involving epigenetics. PMID:27026248

  6. Targeting memory T cells in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Mario R; Rigby, Mark R

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that leads to progressive destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Compared to healthy controls, a characteristic feature of patients with T1D is the presence of self-reactive T cells with a memory phenotype. These autoreactive memory T cells in both the CD4(+) and CD8(+) compartments are likely to be long-lived, strongly responsive to antigenic stimulation with less dependence on costimulation for activation and clonal expansion, and comparatively resistant to suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs) or downregulation by immune-modulating agents. Persistence of autoreactive memory T cells likely contributes to the difficulty in preventing disease progression in new-onset T1D and maintaining allogeneic islet transplants by regular immunosuppressive regimens. The majority of immune interventions that have demonstrated some success in preserving beta cell function in the new-onset period have been shown to deplete or modulate memory T cells. Based on these and other considerations, preservation of residual beta cells early after diagnosis or restoration of beta cell mass by use of stem cell or transplantation technology will require a successful strategy to control the autoreactive memory T cell compartment, which could include depletion, inhibition of homeostatic cytokines, induction of hyporesponsiveness, or a combination of these approaches. PMID:26370695

  7. Biofunctionalized magnetic vortex microdisks for targeted cancer cell destruction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.-H.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Ulasov, I. V.; Bader, S. D.; Rajh, T.; Lesniak, M. S.; Novosad, V.; Univ. of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

    2010-01-01

    Nanomagnetic materials offer exciting avenues for probing cell mechanics and activating mechanosensitive ion channels, as well as for advancing cancer therapies. Most experimental works so far have used superparamagnetic materials. This report describes a first approach based on interfacing cells with lithographically defined microdiscs that possess a spin-vortex ground state. When an alternating magnetic field is applied the microdisc vortices shift, creating an oscillation, which transmits a mechanical force to the cell. Because reduced sensitivity of cancer cells toward apoptosis leads to inappropriate cell survival and malignant progression, selective induction of apoptosis is of great importance for the anticancer therapeutic strategies. We show that the spin-vortex-mediated stimulus creates two dramatic effects: compromised integrity of the cellular membrane, and initiation of programmed cell death. A low-frequency field of a few tens of hertz applied for only ten minutes was sufficient to achieve {approx}90% cancer-cell destruction in vitro.

  8. Chemopreventive Effect of PSP Through Targeting of Prostate Cancer Stem Cell-Like Population

    OpenAIRE

    Luk, Sze-Ue; Lee, Terence Kin-Wah; Liu, Ji; Lee, Davy Tak-Wing; Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Ma, Stephanie; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Chan, Franky Leung; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggested that prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells (CSC) are responsible for cancer initiation as well as disease progression. Unfortunately, conventional therapies are only effective in targeting the more differentiated cancer cells and spare the CSCs. Here, we report that PSP, an active component extracted from the mushroom Turkey tail (also known as Coriolus versicolor), is effective in targeting prostate CSCs. We found that treatment of the prostate cancer cell line PC-3...

  9. Transient Proteolytic Modification of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Increases Lung Clearance Rate and Targeting to Injured Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Kerkelä, Erja; Hakkarainen, Tanja; Mäkelä, Tuomas; Raki, Mari; Kambur, Oleg; Kilpinen, Lotta; Nikkilä, Janne; Lehtonen, Siri; Ritamo, Ilja; Pernu, Roni; Pietilä, Mika; Takalo, Reijo; Juvonen, Tatu; Bergström, Kim; Kalso, Eija

    2013-01-01

    This study showed that an alternative cell detachment of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) with pronase instead of trypsin significantly accelerated the lung clearance of the cells and, importantly, increased their targeting to an area of injury. Pronase detachment could be used as a method to improve the MSC lung clearance and targeting in vivo. This may have a major impact on the bioavailability of MSCs in future therapeutic regimes.

  10. Cell cycle and anti-estrogen effects synergize to regulate cell proliferation and ER target gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    Full Text Available Antiestrogens are designed to antagonize hormone induced proliferation and ERalpha target gene expression in mammary tumor cells. Commonly used drugs such as OH-Tamoxifen and ICI 182780 (Fulvestrant block cell cycle progression in G0/G1. Inversely, the effect of cell cycle stage on ER regulated gene expression has not been tested directly. We show that in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 the estrogen receptor gene and downstream target genes are cell cycle regulated with expression levels varying as much as three-fold between phases of the cell cycle. Steroid free culture conditions commonly used to assess the effect of hormones or antiestrogens on gene expression also block MCF-7 cells in G1-phase when several ERalpha target genes are overexpressed. Thus, cell cycle effects have to be taken into account when analyzing the impact of hormonal treatments on gene transcription. We found that antiestrogens repress transcription of several ERalpha target genes specifically in S phase. This observation corroborates the more rapid and strong impact of antiestrogen treatments on cell proliferation in thymidine, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin arrested cells and correlates with an increase of apoptosis compared to similar treatments in lovastatin or nocodazol treated cells. Hence, cell cycle effects synergize with the action of antiestrogens. An interesting therapeutic perspective could be to enhance the action of anti-estrogens by associating hormone-therapy with specific cell cycle drugs.

  11. E7080, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor suppresses tumor cell migration and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E7080 is an orally active multi-targeted kinase inhibitor whose targets include vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR), fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and platelet derived growth factor receptors (PDGFR). It has been shown to inhibit tumor angiogenesis by targeting endothelial cells. A number of the targets of E7080 are also expressed on tumor cells and here we have looked at the direct effects of E7080 on tumor cell behavior. Using a panel of human tumor cell lines we determined the effect of E7080 on cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Inhibition of FGFR and PDGFR signaling in the cells was measured. E7080 had little effect on tumor cell proliferation. However, it blocked migration and invasion at concentrations that inhibited FGFR and PDGFR signaling. Knock-down of PDGFR-β in U2OS osteosarcoma cells also inhibited cell migration which, could not be further inhibited in the presence of E7080. Furthermore, E7080 could not inhibit the migration of a PDGFR negative cell line. E7080 does not significantly affect tumor cell proliferation but can inhibit their migration and invasion at concentrations that both inhibit its known targets and are achievable clinically

  12. Is B Cell-Targeted Therapy Effective in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paran, Daphna; Naparstek, Yaakov

    2015-02-01

    In the past decade we have witnessed a dramatic change in the management of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, due to the development of new biologic drugs designed to target key mediators in the autoimmune process. However, the development of similar target-specific drugs for the management of SLE has not been as successful. The B cell has long been considered central to the pathogenesis of SLE and has been regarded as an important target for biologic drugs. Several B cell-targeted drugs have been developed and although the mechanisms seem promising, most of the studies published to date have failed to achieve their primary endpoints, leading to an ongoing debate regarding the role of B cell therapy in SLE. The present report discusses the pros and cons of B cell-targeted therapy in SLE, reviews the clinical studies, and offers possible explanations forthe discrepancies between randomized control studies and real-life experience. PMID:26223085

  13. Differentiation of cytotoxicity using target cells labelled with europium and samarium by electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlen, H; Manzke, O; Engert, A; Hertel, M; Hippler-Altenburg, R; Diehl, V; Tesch, H

    1994-07-12

    We report the simultaneous use of europium-DTPA (Eu-DTPA) and samarium-DTPA (Sm-DTPA) in cytotoxicity experiments to analyze simultaneously LAK and NK cell lysis and to differentiate between specific target lysis and bystander killing. The target cells were either labelled with Eu-DTPA or Sm-DTPA chelates by electroporation, which permits the use of target cell lines or primary leukemic B cells (B-CLL) that cannot be labelled by the conventional dextran-sulphate method. The release of europium and samarium reaches a maximum at comparable time intervals (2-3 h). Due to the shorter counting interval within the samarium window the labelling efficiency is about ten times less efficient compared to europium. Using europium as label for the LAK target Daudi and samarium as label for the NK sensitive cell line K562 the differentiation of LAK versus NK activity can be performed in a single culture assay. Also, the killing of B cells and bystander cells by cytotoxic T cells was analyzed in a system where T cells were redirected to B cells through CD3 x CD19 bispecific antibodies. In fact, no bystander killing was noted when bispecific antibodies were used to bridge cytotoxic T cells to the B cells. This approach provides a simple non-radioactive method for evaluating cytotoxicity against two different cells in a single culture well. PMID:8034986

  14. Claudin 4-targeted protein incorporated into PLGA nanoparticles can mediate M cell targeted delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Rajapaksa, Thejani E.; Stover-Hamer, Mary; Fernandez, Xiomara; Eckelhoefer, Holly A.; Lo, David D.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-based microparticles are in clinical use mainly for their ability to provide controlled release of peptides and compounds, but they are also being explored for their potential to deliver vaccines and drugs as suspensions directly into mucosal sites. It is generally assumed that uptake is mediated by epithelial M cells, but this is often not directly measured. To study the potential for optimizing M cell uptake of polymer microparticles in vivo, we produced sub-micron size PLGA particl...

  15. Identification of human embryonic progenitor cell targeting peptides using phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola A Bignone

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem (hPS cells are capable of differentiation into derivatives of all three primary embryonic germ layers and can self-renew indefinitely. They therefore offer a potentially scalable source of replacement cells to treat a variety of degenerative diseases. The ability to reprogram adult cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has now enabled the possibility of patient-specific hPS cells as a source of cells for disease modeling, drug discovery, and potentially, cell replacement therapies. While reprogramming technology has dramatically increased the availability of normal and diseased hPS cell lines for basic research, a major bottleneck is the critical unmet need for more efficient methods of deriving well-defined cell populations from hPS cells. Phage display is a powerful method for selecting affinity ligands that could be used for identifying and potentially purifying a variety of cell types derived from hPS cells. However, identification of specific progenitor cell-binding peptides using phage display may be hindered by the large cellular heterogeneity present in differentiating hPS cell populations. We therefore tested the hypothesis that peptides selected for their ability to bind a clonal cell line derived from hPS cells would bind early progenitor cell types emerging from differentiating hPS cells. The human embryonic stem (hES cell-derived embryonic progenitor cell line, W10, was used and cell-targeting peptides were identified. Competition studies demonstrated specificity of peptide binding to the target cell surface. Efficient peptide targeted cell labeling was accomplished using multivalent peptide-quantum dot complexes as detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The cell-binding peptides were selective for differentiated hPS cells, had little or no binding on pluripotent cells, but preferential binding to certain embryonic progenitor cell lines and early endodermal hPS cell derivatives. Taken

  16. Lactoferrin targets T cells in the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Mie; Hansen, Gert Helge; Danielsen, E Michael

    2010-01-01

    cells in the lamina propria. However, they were CD3(+), identifying them as T lymphocytes. Lf labeling of these cells was mainly seen in the cytosol, but occasionally nuclear staining was seen as well, suggesting a direct regulatory role of Lf. CONCLUSION: We propose that Lf functions in the immune...... pathogens, and Lf receptors have been identified at the surfaces of a number of different cells. In the small intestine Lf binds to the luminal surface, but its further interaction with the epithelial cells is controversial. METHODS: In the present work, we studied the uptake of Lf in cultured mucosal...... enterocytes by 2 h incubation. However, in addition to enterocytes, a distinct subpopulation of cells in the lamina propria also took up Lf, most likely from the serosal side of the explants. None of these cells were apoptotic, nor did they belong to the predominant group of immunoglobulin-synthesizing plasma...

  17. Gastric cancer stem cells: A novel therapeutic target

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the leading causes of global cancer mortality. Multipotent gastric stem cells have been identified in both mouse and human stomachs, and they play an essential role in the self-renewal and homeostasis of gastric mucosa. There are several environmental and genetic factors known to promote gastric cancer. In recent years, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that gastric cancer may originate from normal stem cells or bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, ...

  18. Targeting CD8 T-Cell Metabolism in Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Yap, Michelle; Brouard, Sophie; Pecqueur, Claire; Degauque, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Infiltration of effector CD8 T cells plays a major role in allograft rejection, and increases in memory and terminally differentiated effector memory CD8 T cells are associated with long-term allograft dysfunction. Alternatively, CD8 regulatory T cells suppress the inflammatory responses of effector lymphocytes and induce allograft tolerance in animal models. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the field of immunometabolics and its important role in CD8 function and differentiation...

  19. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  20. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references

  1. Targeted Elimination of Breast Cancer Cells with Low Proteasome Activity is Sufficient for Tumor Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Vlashi, Erina; Lagadec, Chann; Chan, Mabel; Frohnen, Patricia; Jean McDonald, Alexandra; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancers are thought to be organized hierarchically with a small number of breast cancer stem cells, able to regrow a tumor after sublethal treatment while their progeny lack this feature. Furthermore, breast cancer stem cells are highly resistant to conventional anti-cancer treatments. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, all cancer stem cells in a tumor have to be eliminated to achieve cancer cure. In this study we tested if targeted elimination of breast cancer stem cells le...

  2. Monocyte cell membrane-derived nanoghosts for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Gnanasammandhan, M. K.; Xie, C.; Huang, K.; Cui, M. Y.; Chan, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Core-shell type `nanoghosts' were synthesized with a drug-loaded biodegradable PLGA core and a monocyte cell membrane-derived shell. The nanoghosts were monodisperse with an average size coated nanoparticle controls in metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines.Core-shell type `nanoghosts' were synthesized with a drug-loaded biodegradable PLGA core and a monocyte cell membrane-derived shell. The nanoghosts were monodisperse with an average size coated nanoparticle controls in metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07588b

  3. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinker, C Jeffrey; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L

    2015-03-31

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  4. Peptide aptamer identified by molecular docking targeting translationally controlled tumor protein in leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Onat; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Bioinformatics screening and molecular docking analyses were utilized to select high affinity peptides targeting translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP). Selected peptide aptamers were tested towards cancer cell lines with different levels of TCTP expression. One peptide (WGQWPYHC) revealed specific cytotoxicity according to the TCTP expression in tumor cells without affecting normal cells. Western blot analysis showed peptide-induced down-regulation of TCTP as primary target as well as of cell-cycle related downstream proteins (CDK2, CDK6, Cyclin D3) in MOLT-4 leukemia cells. "WGQWPYHC" deserves further analysis for targeted therapy of TCTP-expressing tumor cells. Graphical abstract Molecular docking on TCTP, cytotoxicity toward MOLT-4 leukemia cell line and downregulation of CDK2, CDK6, CyclinD3 and TCTP proteins. PMID:26972431

  5. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  6. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm2) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells

  7. The role of physical forces on cytotoxic T cell-target cell conjugate stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, B B; Glacken, M W; Rodgers, J R; Rich, R R

    1990-06-01

    Theoretical considerations suggest that external forces play a significant role in cell-cell conjugate formation and may lead to the misinterpretation of adhesion data. To test this, the stability of conjugates formed between CTL and fibroblast target cells (TC) was examined in the controlled shear environment of a parallel plate flow chamber. Murine fibroblast targets expressing class I maternally transmitted Ag Mtaa or Mtab were grown on a glass slide that formed one wall of the flow chamber and were used in conjunction with anti-Mtaa and anti-Mtab specific mouse CTL clones to establish a panel of Ag-reciprocal targets and lymphocytes. Although cytolysis assays indicated that lymphocytes recognized and destroyed appropriate but not inappropriate targets, the stability of some CTL/TC conjugates was Ag independent. In all cases, the conjugate stability was shear dependent over a 100-fold range (0.04 to 4.0 dynes/cm2). For some clones, the ratio of the stabilities of Ag-specific CTL/TC conjugates to nonspecific conjugates was significantly enhanced with increasing shear. This implies that the role of Ag specificity in CTL/TC adhesion may be misinterpreted if the shear environment of CTL/TC conjugates is unknown or uncontrolled. Kinetic analysis revealed that conjugate stability was dependent on the exposure time to external forces and that there existed two populations of conjugates; weak associations that disengaged within the first 30 s of flow, and strong associations that remained attached even after a 5-min exposure to a steady shear stress. The stability of Ag-specific CTL/TC conjugates at 0.04 dynes/cm2 was enhanced by 50% as the temperature was increased from 25 to 37 degrees C, whereas the stability of nonspecific CTL/TC associations was not affected. This result indicates that significant Ag-specific strengthening may occur at physiologic temperatures. This work suggests the importance of attention to role of fluid mechanical shear stress in standard

  8. Target cells involved in radiation and radiation leukemia virus leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative studies concerned with the induction and early proliferation phases of preleukemic cells in relation to host environments using radiation or radiation leukemia virus as the leukemogenic agents, indicated different developmental pathways. The lack of thymus in mice exposed to fractionated irradiation did not prevent preleukemic cell induction but did interfere with the incidence of RadLV induced preleukemic cells. Thymus removal within several days following RadLV inoculation prevented the establishment of preleukemic cells in the bone marrow. The radiation induced preleukemic cells in the bone marrow. The radiation induced preleukemic cells were not lysed by anti-Thy-1.2 serum treatment and guinea pig complement whereas the RadLV induced ones were lysed to different degrees. Elimination of Thy-1.2 bearing cells from the virus induced preleukemic population reduced the development of overt T leukemias of donor origin. The thymus seemed of essential importance for establishing the proliferation of RadLV induced preleukemic cells but not for those induced by fractionated irradiation

  9. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ∼100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s−1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells. (paper)

  10. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Selahi, AmirAli; Madadelahi, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ~100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s-1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells.

  11. Plectasin, a Fungal Defensin, Targets the Bacterial Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Tanja; Kruse, Thomas; Wimmer, Reinhard;

    2010-01-01

    plectasin, a fungal defensin, acts by directly binding the bacterial cell-wall precursor Lipid II. A wide range of genetic and biochemical approaches identify cell-wall biosynthesis as the pathway targeted by plectasin. In vitro assays for cell-wall synthesis identified Lipid II as the specific cellular...

  12. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleo Goyvaerts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  13. Oct4 targets regulatory nodes to modulate stem cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A Campbell

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1 is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain 'ES' have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer.

  14. A one-step rectification of sperm cell targeting ensures the success of double fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilei Huang; Yan Ju; Xiangfeng Wang; Quan Zhang; Sodmergen

    2015-01-01

    Successful fertilization in animals depends on competition among millions of sperm cells, whereas double fertilization in flowering plants usually involves just one pollen tube releasing two immobile sperm cells. It is largely a mystery how the plant sperm cells fuse efficiently with their female targets within an embryo sac. We show that the initial positioning of sperm cells upon discharge from the pollen tube is usually inopportune for gamete fusions and that adjustment of sperm cell targeting occurs through release and re-adhesion of one sperm cell, while the other connected sperm cell remains in stagnation. This enables proper adhesion of each sperm cell to a female gamete and coordinates the gamete fusions. Our findings reveal inner embryo sac dynamics that ensure the reproductive success of flowering plants and suggest a requirement for sperm cell differentiation as the basis of double fertilization.

  15. Predicting enzyme targets for cancer drugs by profiling human Metabolic reactions in NCI-60 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Wai-Ki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drugs can influence the whole metabolic system by targeting enzymes which catalyze metabolic reactions. The existence of interactions between drugs and metabolic reactions suggests a potential way to discover drug targets. Results In this paper, we present a computational method to predict new targets for approved anti-cancer drugs by exploring drug-reaction interactions. We construct a Drug-Reaction Network to provide a global view of drug-reaction interactions and drug-pathway interactions. The recent reconstruction of the human metabolic network and development of flux analysis approaches make it possible to predict each metabolic reaction's cell line-specific flux state based on the cell line-specific gene expressions. We first profile each reaction by its flux states in NCI-60 cancer cell lines, and then propose a kernel k-nearest neighbor model to predict related metabolic reactions and enzyme targets for approved cancer drugs. We also integrate the target structure data with reaction flux profiles to predict drug targets and the area under curves can reach 0.92. Conclusions The cross validations using the methods with and without metabolic network indicate that the former method is significantly better than the latter. Further experiments show the synergism of reaction flux profiles and target structure for drug target prediction. It also implies the significant contribution of metabolic network to predict drug targets. Finally, we apply our method to predict new reactions and possible enzyme targets for cancer drugs.

  16. Targeting glioma stem cells via the Hedgehog signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Gliomas are among the most devastating tumor types, and current clinical therapies are unsatisfactory. Recent reports revealed the importance of glioma-propagating cells in the malignancy of gliomas. These cells, also referred to as glioma stem cells (GSCs, share similarities with neural stem cells (NSCs. The Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway controls tissue polarity, patterning maintenance, and maintenance of NSCs during embryonic development. Aberrant activation of the Hh pathway resulting from mutation and deregulation has recently been recognized to cause tumorigenesis in a wide variety of tissues, including gliomas and GSCs. In this review, we explore the role of the Hh signaling pathway in GSCs and its potential as a therapeutic strategy.

  17. An electrochemical surface plasmon resonance imaging system targeting cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L. L.; Chen, X.; Wei, H. T.; Li, H.; Sun, J. H.; Cai, H. Y.; Chen, J. L.; Cui, D. F.

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents an electrochemical-surface plasmon resonance imaging (EC-SPRI) system, enabling the characterization of optical and electrical properties of cells, simultaneously. The developed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging system was capable of imaging micro cavities with a dimension of 10 μm × 10 μm and differentiated glycerol solutions with a group of refractive indices (RIs). Furthermore, the EC-SPRI system was used to image A549 cells, suggesting corresponding RI and morphology changes during the cell death process. In the end, electrochemical and SPR methods were used in combination, recording oxidation peaks of A549 cells in the cyclic voltage curves and SPR response unit increase, simultaneously.

  18. Fluorescent non-conjugated polymer dots for targeted cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bin; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Yibo; Tang, Qi; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Sun, Hongchen

    2016-05-01

    Through the chemical crosslinking of the sub-fluorophore, linear non-conjugated polymers can possess strong photoluminescence (PL), which is a very important fluorescence behavior and the non-conjugated polymer dots (PDs) are efficient bio-fluorophores for bio-based applications. Herein, the new type of non-conjugated polyethyleneimine (PEI) PDs was further modified by targeting molecules (folic acid) for a new generation of bio-fluorophores. The free folic acid can quench the PL of PDs by energy transfer, while the conjugated folic acid@PDs (FA@PDs) can still maintain their PL properties to a certain degree. The FA@PDs also possess lower toxicity compared with free PDs, which is possibly due to blocking of the amino groups. Moreover, we investigated the targeted bioimaging applications of the FA@PDs, which gave a very important direction for application of these types of materials.Through the chemical crosslinking of the sub-fluorophore, linear non-conjugated polymers can possess strong photoluminescence (PL), which is a very important fluorescence behavior and the non-conjugated polymer dots (PDs) are efficient bio-fluorophores for bio-based applications. Herein, the new type of non-conjugated polyethyleneimine (PEI) PDs was further modified by targeting molecules (folic acid) for a new generation of bio-fluorophores. The free folic acid can quench the PL of PDs by energy transfer, while the conjugated folic acid@PDs (FA@PDs) can still maintain their PL properties to a certain degree. The FA@PDs also possess lower toxicity compared with free PDs, which is possibly due to blocking of the amino groups. Moreover, we investigated the targeted bioimaging applications of the FA@PDs, which gave a very important direction for application of these types of materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01909a

  19. Targeting epidermal Langerhans cells by epidermal powder immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Immune reactions to foreign or self-antigens lead to protective immunity and, sometimes, immune disorders such as allergies and autoimmune diseases. Antigen presenting cells (APC) including epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) play an important role in the course and outcome of the immune reactions. Epidermal powder immunization (EPI) is a technology that offers a tool to manipulate the LCs and the potential to harness the immune reactions towards prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and immune disorders.

  20. The mesenchymal stromal cell magic bullet finds yet another target

    OpenAIRE

    Masterson, Claire; O’Toole, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Rojas and colleagues have presented an exciting paper demonstrating yet another relevant preclinical setting in which the mesenchymal stromal cell has a potential therapeutic application. What is particularly interesting about this study is that it addresses a disease, blood-borne systemic sepsis, which has multiple complex host responses and involves a variety of disparate organs and immune cell types. Here, the authors focus on how this injury relates more specifically to the lung, with qui...

  1. Targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase: a potential approach for cell labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)], E-mail: ganesan.v@duke.edu; Song, Haijing; Affleck, Donna; McDougald, Darryl L. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Storms, Robert W. [Division of Cellular Therapy, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R.; Chin, Bennett B. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Introduction: To advance the science and clinical application of stem cell therapy, the availability of a highly sensitive, quantitative and translational method for tracking stem cells would be invaluable. Because hematopoetic stem cells express high levels of the cytosolic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1), we sought to develop an agent that is specific to ALDH1 and thus to cells expressing the enzyme. Such an agent might be also helpful in identifying tumors that are resistant to cyclophosphomide chemotherapy because ALDH1 is known to be responsible for this resistance. Methods: We developed schemes for the synthesis of two radioiodinated aldehdyes - N-formylmethyl-5-[*I]iodopyridine-3-carboxamide ([*I]FMIC) and 4-diethylamino-3-[*I]iodobenzaldehyde ([*I]DEIBA)-at no-carrier-added levels from their respective tin precursors. These agents were evaluated using pure ALDH1 and tumor cells that expressed the enzyme. Results: The average radiochemical yields for the synthesis of [{sup 125}I]FMIC and [{sup 125}I]DEIBA were 70{+-}5% and 47{+-}14%, respectively. ALDH1 converted both compounds to respective acids suggesting their suitability as ALDH1 imaging agents. Although ability of ALDH1 within the cells to oxidize one of these substrates was shown, specific uptake in ALDH-expressing tumor cells could not be demonstrated. Conclusion: To pursue this approach for ALDH1 imaging, radiolabeled aldehydes need to be designed such that, in addition to being good substrates for ALDH1, the cognate products should be sufficiently polar so as to be retained within the cells.

  2. Targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase: a potential approach for cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: To advance the science and clinical application of stem cell therapy, the availability of a highly sensitive, quantitative and translational method for tracking stem cells would be invaluable. Because hematopoetic stem cells express high levels of the cytosolic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1), we sought to develop an agent that is specific to ALDH1 and thus to cells expressing the enzyme. Such an agent might be also helpful in identifying tumors that are resistant to cyclophosphomide chemotherapy because ALDH1 is known to be responsible for this resistance. Methods: We developed schemes for the synthesis of two radioiodinated aldehdyes - N-formylmethyl-5-[*I]iodopyridine-3-carboxamide ([*I]FMIC) and 4-diethylamino-3-[*I]iodobenzaldehyde ([*I]DEIBA)-at no-carrier-added levels from their respective tin precursors. These agents were evaluated using pure ALDH1 and tumor cells that expressed the enzyme. Results: The average radiochemical yields for the synthesis of [125I]FMIC and [125I]DEIBA were 70±5% and 47±14%, respectively. ALDH1 converted both compounds to respective acids suggesting their suitability as ALDH1 imaging agents. Although ability of ALDH1 within the cells to oxidize one of these substrates was shown, specific uptake in ALDH-expressing tumor cells could not be demonstrated. Conclusion: To pursue this approach for ALDH1 imaging, radiolabeled aldehydes need to be designed such that, in addition to being good substrates for ALDH1, the cognate products should be sufficiently polar so as to be retained within the cells.

  3. Bisphosphonates target B cells to enhance humoral immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Tonti, Elena; Jiménez de Oya, Nereida; Galliverti, Gabriele; Moseman, E. Ashley; Di Lucia, Pietro; Amabile, Angelo; Sammicheli, Stefano; De Giovanni, Marco; Sironi, Laura; Chevrier, Nicolas; Sitia, Giovanni; Gennari, Luigi; Guidotti, Luca G.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Iannacone, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs that are widely used to inhibit loss of bone mass in patients. We show here that the administration of clinically relevant doses of bisphosphonates in mice increases antibody responses to live and inactive viruses, proteins, haptens and existing commercial vaccine formulations. Bisphosphonates exert this adjuvant-like activity in the absence of CD4+ and γδ T cells, neutrophils or dendritic cells and their effect does not rely on local macrophage depletion ...

  4. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibi...

  5. A polarized gas internal target using a storage cell in an electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first experiment using a storage cell to increase the thickness of an internal polarized gas target in an electron beam storage ring was performed at the VEPP-3 facility. We describe the storage cell technique as applied in this measurement of elastic and inelastic electron scattering from tensor polarized deuterium. An analysis of electron-beam-induced depolarization of the target was performed and experimental tests were carried out which verify the effect. Other effects causing depolarization of the target are discussed as well as the means by which they are overcome. The effective pzz of the target, shown to be stable over 8 months, was 0.57±0.05; the total target thickness was increased over that of a jet target by a factor of fifteen. (orig.)

  6. CAM and cell fate targeting: molecular and energetic insights into cell growth and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Carlo

    2005-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence-based CAM. PMID:16136206

  7. CAM and Cell Fate Targeting: Molecular and Energetic Insights into Cell Growth and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ventura

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence–based CAM.

  8. MicroRNAs targeting TGFβ signalling underlie the regulatory T cell defect in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Mary E; Lee, Priscilla W; Liu, Yue; Selhorst, Amanda J; Gormley, Matthew G; Pei, Wei; Yang, Yuhong; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling is critical for regulatory T cell development and function, and regulatory T cell dysregulation is a common observation in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. In a comprehensive miRNA profiling study of patients with multiple sclerosis naïve CD4 T cells, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs predicted to target the TGFβ signalling pathway were identified, leading to the hypothesis that miRNAs may be responsible for the regulatory T cell defect observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Patients with multiple sclerosis had reduced levels of TGFβ signalling components in their naïve CD4 T cells. The differentially expressed miRNAs negatively regulated the TGFβ pathway, resulting in a reduced capacity of naïve CD4 T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the limited number of regulatory T cells, that did develop when these TGFβ-targeting miRNAs were overexpressed, were capable of suppressing effector T cells. As it has previously been demonstrated that compromising TGFβ signalling results in a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire insufficient to control autoimmunity, and patients with multiple sclerosis have a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire, these data indicate that the elevated expression of multiple TGFβ-targeting miRNAs in naïve CD4 T cells of patients with multiple sclerosis impairs TGFβ signalling, and dampens regulatory T cell development, thereby enhancing susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis. PMID:27190026

  9. Gene Targeting Using Homologous Recombination in Embryonic Stem Cells: The Future for Behavior Genetics?

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlai, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targe...

  10. Targeted Germline Modifications in Rats using CRISPR/Cas9 and Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Karen M. Chapman; Gerardo A. Medrano; Priscilla Jaichander; Jaideep Chaudhary; Alexandra E. Waits; Marcelo A. Nobrega; James M. Hotaling; Carole Ober; F. Kent Hamra

    2015-01-01

    Organisms with targeted genomic modifications are efficiently produced by gene editing in embryos using CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided DNA endonuclease. Here, to facilitate germline editing in rats, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to catalyze targeted genomic mutations in rat spermatogonial stem cell cultures. CRISPR/Cas9-modified spermatogonia regenerated spermatogenesis and displayed long-term sperm-forming potential following transplantation into rat testes. Targeted germline mutations in Epsti1 and Erbb3 wer...

  11. Targeted gene conversion induced by triplex-directed psoralen interstrand crosslinks in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yaobin; Nairn, Rodney S.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    Correction of a defective gene is a promising approach for both basic research and clinical gene therapy. However, the absence of site-specific targeting and the low efficiency of homologous recombination in human cells present barriers to successful gene targeting. In an effort to overcome these barriers, we utilized triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) conjugated to a DNA interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agent, psoralen (pTFO-ICLs), to improve the gene targeting efficiency at a specific si...

  12. Review of the current targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Kim-Son H.; Neal, Joel W.; Wakelee, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the development of oncogene-directed targeted therapies that have significantly changed the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this paper we review the data demonstrating efficacy of gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and crizotinib which targets anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). We discuss the challenge of acquired resistance to these small-molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitors and review...

  13. Sensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines to targeted inhibition of BET epigenetic signaling proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, William W; Zejnullahu, Kreshnik; James E Bradner; Varmus, Harold

    2012-01-01

    Bromodomain and extra terminal domain (BET) proteins function as epigenetic signaling factors that associate with acetylated histones and facilitate transcription of target genes. Inhibitors targeting the activity of BET proteins have shown potent antiproliferative effects in hematological cancers through the suppression of c-MYC and downstream target genes. However, as the epigenetic landscape of a cell varies drastically depending on lineage, transcriptional coactivators such as BETs would ...

  14. Identification and Regulation of c-Myb Target Genes in MCF-7 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The c-Myb transcription factor regulates differentiation and proliferation in hematopoietic cells, stem cells and epithelial cells. Although oncogenic versions of c-Myb were first associated with leukemias, over expression or rearrangement of the c-myb gene is common in several types of solid tumors, including breast cancers. Expression of the c-myb gene in human breast cancer cells is dependent on estrogen stimulation, but little is known about the activities of the c-Myb protein or what genes it regulates in estrogen-stimulated cells. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with whole genome promoter tiling microarrays to identify endogenous c-Myb target genes in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and characterized the activity of c-Myb at a panel of target genes during different stages of estrogen deprivation and stimulation. By using different antibodies and different growth conditions, the c-Myb protein was found associated with over 10,000 promoters in MCF-7 cells, including many genes that encode cell cycle regulators or transcription factors and more than 60 genes that encode microRNAs. Several previously identified c-Myb target genes were identified, including CCNB1, MYC and CXCR4 and novel targets such as JUN, KLF4, NANOG and SND1. By studying a panel of these targets to validate the results, we found that estradiol stimulation triggered the association of c-Myb with promoters and that association correlated with increased target gene expression. We studied one target gene, CXCR4, in detail, showing that c-Myb associated with the CXCR4 gene promoter and activated a CXCR4 reporter gene in transfection assays. Our results show that c-Myb associates with a surprisingly large number of promoters in human cells. The results also suggest that estradiol stimulation leads to large-scale, genome-wide changes in c-Myb activity and subsequent changes in gene expression in human breast cancer cells

  15. A novel strategy for cancer treatment:Targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jia; MA LeiNa; WANG YiGang; LIU XinYuan; QIAN QiJun

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating cell (CSC/TIC) is a subclass of cancer cells possessing parts of properties of normal stem cell. It has a high capacity of proliferation and plays a pivotal role in tumor recurrence and tumor resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. At present, small molecule in-hibitors and fusion proteins are widely used in the CSC-targeting strategy. Gene-virotherapy, which uses oncolytic adenovirus as a vector to mediate the expression of therapeutic gene, shows a signifi-cant superiority to other regimens of cancer treatment and has a good efficacy in the treatment of solid tumors. Thus, it is a promising choice to apply gene-virotherapy into the CSC-targeting treatment. Based on the molecular mechanism underlying CSC self-renewal, a series of effective strategies for targeting CSC have been established. This review will summarize the recent research progresses on CSC-targeting treatment.

  16. Separation of effector cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) to erythrocyte targets from those mediating ADC to tumor targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S B; Nelson, K; Grausz, J D

    1976-04-01

    Murine spleen cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) both to erythrocyte targets in a 51Cr release assay and to syngeneic tumor targets in a microcytotoxicity assay. The effector cells active in the two ADC assays can be separated by passage of the spleen cells through columns of Sephadex G-10 at 37 degrees C. Cells mediating ADC to sarcoma cells did not adhere to the G-10 and were recovered in the column effluent. These nonadherent cells were not cytotoxic to antibody-coated chicken red blood cells. Spleen cells which mediated ADC in a 51Cr release assay to the red cell targets adhered to G-10. Adherent effector cells could subsequently be recovered from the columns by elution with 5 X 10(-4) M EDTA. PMID:815438

  17. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as a novel target for the control of osteolytic bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Anandi; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) from mice bearing bone metastases differentiate into functional osteoclasts in vitro and in vivo, through a signaling pathway that relies on nitric oxide. In addition, MDSC-targeting drugs have been shown to robustly inhibit osteolysis. Thus, MDSC stand out as novel osteoclast progenitors and hence as candidate targets for the control of osteolytic bone disease.

  18. The Targeted Delivery of Multicomponent Cargos to Cancer Cells via Nanoporous Particle-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley, Carlee E.; CARNES, ERIC C.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Padilla, David; Durfee, Paul N.; Brown, Page A.; Hanna, Tracey N.; Liu, Juewen; Phillips, Brandy; Carter, Mark B.; Carroll, Nick J.; Jiang, Xingmao; Dunphy, Darren R.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Petsev, Dimiter N.

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulation of drugs within nanocarriers that selectively target malignant cells promises to mitigate side effects of conventional chemotherapy and to enable delivery of the unique drug combinations needed for personalized medicine. To realize this potential, however, targeted nanocarriers must simultaneously overcome multiple challenges, including specificity, stability, and a high capacity for disparate cargos. Here we report porous nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (protocells) that ...

  19. Tapping Stem Cells to Target AMD: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Brandl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are increasingly gaining attention in biomedicine as valuable resources to establish patient-derived cell culture models of the cell type known to express the primary pathology. The idea of “a patient in a dish” aims at basic, but also clinical, applications with the promise to mimic individual genetic and metabolic complexities barely reflected in current invertebrate or vertebrate animal model systems. This may particularly be true for the inherited and complex diseases of the retina, as this tissue has anatomical and physiological aspects unique to the human eye. For example, the complex age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the leading cause of blindness in Western societies, can be attributed to a large number of genetic and individual factors with so far unclear modes of mutual interaction. Here, we review the current status and future prospects of utilizing hPSCs, specifically induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, in basic and clinical AMD research, but also in assessing potential treatment options. We provide an outline of concepts for disease modelling and summarize ongoing and projected clinical trials for stem cell-based therapy in late-stage AMD.

  20. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-06-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:27234586

  1. Highly Sensitive Detection of Target Biomolecules on Cell Surface Using Gold Nanoparticle Conjugated with Aptamer Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Terazono, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Masahito; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    A method of gold nanoparticle (Au NP) labeling with backscattered electron (BE) imaging of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was applied for specific detection of target biomolecules on a cell surface. A single-stranded DNA aptamer, which specifically binds to the target molecule on a human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell, was conjugated with a 20 nm Au NP and used as a probe to label its target molecule on the cell. The Au NP probe was incubated with the cell, and the interaction was confirmed using BE imaging of FE-SEM through direct counting of the number of Au NPs attached on the target cell surface. Specific Au NP-aptamer probes were observed on a single cell surface and their spatial distributions including submicron-order localizations were also clearly visualized, whereas the nonspecific aptamer probes were not observed on it. The aptamer probe can be potentially dislodged from the cell surface with treatment of nucleases, indicating that Au NP-conjugated aptamer probes can be used as sensitive and reversible probes to label target biomolecules on cells.

  2. Targeting and Regulation of Cell Wall Synthesis During Tip Growth in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fangwei Gu; Erik Nielsen

    2013-01-01

    Root hairs and pollen tubes are formed through tip growth, a process requiring synthesis of new cell wall material and the precise targeting and integration of these components to a selected apical plasma membrane domain in the growing tips of these cells. Presence of a tip-focused calcium gradient, control of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, and formation and targeting of secretory vesicles are essential to tip growth. Similar to cells undergoing diffuse growth, cellulose, hemi-celluloses, and pectins are also deposited in the growing apices of tip-growing cells. However, differences in the manner in which these cell wall components are targeted and inserted in the expanding portion of tip-growing cells is reflected by the identification of elements of the plant cell wall synthesis machinery which have been shown to play unique roles in tip-growing cells. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the tip growth process, with a particular focus on the subcellular targeting of newly synthesized cell wall components, and their roles in this form of plant cell expansion.

  3. Targeting and Imaging of Cancer Cells via Monosaccharide-Imprinted Fluorescent Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangshou; Yin, Danyang; Wang, Wenjing; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    The recognition of cancer cells is a key for cancer diagnosis and therapy, but the specificity highly relies on the use of biorecognition molecules particularly antibodies. Because biorecognition molecules suffer from some apparent disadvantages, such as hard to prepare and poor storage stability, novel alternatives that can overcome these disadvantages are highly important. Here we present monosaccharide-imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for targeting and imaging of cancer cells. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) probe was fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped silica NPs with a shell imprinted with sialic acid, fucose or mannose as the template. The monosaccharide-imprinted NPs exhibited high specificity toward the target monosaccharides. As the template monosaccharides used are over-expressed on cancer cells, these monosaccharide-imprinted NPs allowed for specific targeting cancer cells over normal cells. Fluorescence imaging of human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) over normal hepatic cells (L-02) and mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) over normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by these NPs was demonstrated. As the imprinting approach employed herein is generally applicable and highly efficient, monosaccharide-imprinted NPs can be promising probes for targeting cancer cells.

  4. Polarizing T and B cell responses by APC-targeted subunit vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnveig eGrødeland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines mostly aim at the induction of specific neutralizing antibodies. While antibodies are important for protection against a particular virus strain, T cells can recognize epitopes that will offer broader protection against influenza. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine format by which protein antigens can be targeted specifically to receptors on antigen presenting cells (APCs. The DNA-encoded vaccine proteins are homodimers, each chain consisting of a targeting unit, a dimerization unit, and an antigen. The strategy of targeting antigen to APCs greatly enhances immune responses as compared to non-targeted controls. Furthermore, targeting of antigen to different receptors on APCs can polarize the immune response to different arms of immunity. Here, we discuss how targeting of hemagglutinin (HA to MHC class II molecules increases Th2 and IgG1 antibody responses, whereas targeting to chemokine receptors XCR1 or CCR1/3/5 increases Th1 and IgG2a responses, in addition to CD8+ T cell responses. We also discuss these results in relation to work published by others on APC-targeting. Differential targeting of APC surface molecules may allow the induction of tailor-made phenotypes of adaptive immune responses that are optimal for protection against various infectious agents, including influenza virus.

  5. Rapid and Cost-Effective Gene Targeting in Rat Embryonic Stem Cells by TALENs

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Chang; Huang, Guanyi; Ashton, Charles; WU, HONGPING; Yan, Hexin; Ying, Qi-Long

    2012-01-01

    The rat is the preferred animal model in many areas of biomedical research and drug development. Genetic manipulation in rats has lagged behind that in mice due to the lack of efficient gene targeting tools. Previously, we generated a knockout rat via conventional homologous recombination in rat embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here, we show that efficient gene targeting in rat ES cells can be achieved quickly through transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated DNA double-strand...

  6. Curcumin suppresses proliferation of colon cancer cells by targeting CDK2

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Tae-Gyu; Lee, Sung-Young; Huang, Zunnan; Lim, Do Young; Chen, Hanyong; Jung, Sung Keun; Bode, Ann M.; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, the yellow pigment of turmeric found in Southeast Indian food, is one of the most popular phytochemicals for cancer prevention. Numerous reports have demonstrated modulation of multiple cellular signaling pathways by curcumin and its molecular targets in various cancer cell lines. To identify a new molecular target of curcumin, we used shape screening and reverse docking to screen the protein data bank against curcumin. Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), a major cell cycle protein, w...

  7. cIBR effectively targets nanoparticles to LFA-1 on acute lymphoblastic T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chittasupho, Chuda; Manikwar, Prakash; Krise, Jeffrey P.; SIAHAAN, TERUNA J.; Berkland, Cory

    2010-01-01

    Leukocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) is a primary cell adhesion molecule of leukocytes required for mediating cellular transmigration into sites of inflammation via the vascular endothelium. A cyclic peptide, cIBR, possesses high affinity for LFA-1 and conjugation to the surface of poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles can specifically target and deliver the encapsulated agents to T cells expressing LFA-1. The kinetics of targeted nanoparticle uptake by acute lymphoblastic...

  8. Immune targeting of fibroblast activation protein triggers recognition of multipotent bone marrow stromal cells and cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Eric; Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a candidate universal target antigen because it has been reported to be selectively expressed in nearly all solid tumors by a subset of immunosuppressive tumor stromal fibroblasts. We verified that 18/18 human tumors of various histologies contained pronounced stromal elements staining strongly for FAP, and hypothesized that targeting tumor stroma with FAP-reactive T cells would inhibit tumor growth in cancer-bearing hosts. T cells genetically engineered...

  9. Chimeric nucleolin aptamer with survivin DNAzyme for cancer cell targeted delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Nithya; Kanwar, Jagat R; Akilandeswari, Balachandran; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Khetan, Vikas; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-04-25

    A chimeric aptamer-DNAzyme conjugate was generated for the first time using a nucleolin aptamer (NCL-APT) and survivin Dz (Sur_Dz) and exhibited the targeted killing of cancer cells. This proof of concept of using an aptamer for the delivery of DNAzyme can be applied to other cancer types to target survivin in cancer cells in a specific manner. PMID:25797393

  10. Promoting tolerance to proteolipid protein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through targeting dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stern, Joel N. H.; Keskin, Derin B.; Kato, Zenichiro; Waldner, Hanspeter; Schallenberg, Sonja; Anderson, Ana; von Boehmer, Harald; Kretschmer, Karsten; Strominger, Jack L.

    2010-01-01

    In T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, self-reactive T cells with known antigen specificity appear to be particularly promising targets for antigen-specific induction of tolerance without compromising desired protective host immune responses. Several lines of evidence suggest that delivery of antigens to antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in the steady state (i.e., to immature DCs) may represent a suitable approach to induce antigen-specific T-cell tolerance peripherally. Here, we repo...

  11. CD13 is a therapeutic target in human liver cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; Ishii, Hideshi; Mimori, Koshi; Tanaka, Fumiaki; OHKUMA, MASAHISA; Kim, Ho Min; Akita, Hirofumi; Takiuchi, Daisuke; Hatano, Hisanori; Nagano, Hiroaki; Barnard, Graham F.; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are generally dormant or slowly cycling tumor cells that have the ability to reconstitute tumors. They are thought to be involved in tumor resistance to chemo/radiation therapy and tumor relapse and progression. However, neither their existence nor their identity within many cancers has been well defined. Here, we have demonstrated that CD13 is a marker for semiquiescent CSCs in human liver cancer cell lines and clinical samples and that targeting these cells might pr...

  12. Molecular targets on mast cells and basophils for novel therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harvima, I.T.; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Dráber, Petr; Friedman, S.; Polakovičová, Iva; Gibbs, B.F.; Blank, U.; Nilsson, G.; Maurer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 3 (2014), s. 530-544. ISSN 0091-6749 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12073; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cell activation * mast cells and basophils * treatment of allergic diseases Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.476, year: 2014

  13. Review of the current targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim-Son H; Neal, Joel W; Wakelee, Heather

    2014-10-10

    The last decade has witnessed the development of oncogene-directed targeted therapies that have significantly changed the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this paper we review the data demonstrating efficacy of gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and crizotinib which targets anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). We discuss the challenge of acquired resistance to these small-molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitors and review promising agents which may overcome resistance, including the EGFR T790M-targeted agents CO-1686 and AZD9291, and the ALK-targeted agents ceritinib (LDK378), AP26113, alectinib (CH/RO5424802), and others. Emerging therapies directed against other driver oncogenes in NSCLC including ROS1, HER2, and BRAF are covered as well. The identification of specific molecular targets in a significant fraction of NSCLC has led to the personalized deployment of many effective targeted therapies, with more to come. PMID:25302162

  14. Cell-to-Cell Transmission Can Overcome Multiple Donor and Target Cell Barriers Imposed on Cell-Free HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Peng; Agosto, Luis M.; Ilinskaya, Anna; Dorjbal, Batsukh; Truong, Rosaline; Derse, David; Uchil, Pradeep D; Heidecker, Gisela; Mothes, Walther

    2013-01-01

    Virus transmission can occur either by a cell-free mode through the extracellular space or by cell-to-cell transmission involving direct cell-to-cell contact. The factors that determine whether a virus spreads by either pathway are poorly understood. Here, we assessed the relative contribution of cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission to the spreading of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We demonstrate that HIV can spread by a cell-free pathway if all the steps of the viral replication...

  15. Transient proteolytic modification of mesenchymal stromal cells increases lung clearance rate and targeting to injured tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkelä, Erja; Hakkarainen, Tanja; Mäkelä, Tuomas; Raki, Mari; Kambur, Oleg; Kilpinen, Lotta; Nikkilä, Janne; Lehtonen, Siri; Ritamo, Ilja; Pernu, Roni; Pietilä, Mika; Takalo, Reijo; Juvonen, Tatu; Bergström, Kim; Kalso, Eija; Valmu, Leena; Laitinen, Saara; Lehenkari, Petri; Nystedt, Johanna

    2013-07-01

    Systemic infusion of therapeutic cells would be the most practical and least invasive method of administration in many cellular therapies. One of the main obstacles especially in intravenous delivery of cells is a massive cell retention in the lungs, which impairs homing to the target tissue and may decrease the therapeutic outcome. In this study we showed that an alternative cell detachment of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) with pronase instead of trypsin significantly accelerated the lung clearance of the cells and, importantly, increased their targeting to an area of injury. Cell detachment with pronase transiently altered the MSC surface protein profile without compromising cell viability, multipotent cell characteristics, or immunomodulative and angiogenic potential. The transient modification of the cell surface protein profile was sufficient to produce effective changes in cell rolling behavior in vitro and, importantly, in the in vivo biodistribution of the cells in mouse, rat, and porcine models. In conclusion, pronase detachment could be used as a method to improve the MSC lung clearance and targeting in vivo. This may have a major impact on the bioavailability of MSCs in future therapeutic regimes. PMID:23734061

  16. Transient Proteolytic Modification of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Increases Lung Clearance Rate and Targeting to Injured Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Tanja; Mäkelä, Tuomas; Raki, Mari; Kambur, Oleg; Kilpinen, Lotta; Nikkilä, Janne; Lehtonen, Siri; Ritamo, Ilja; Pernu, Roni; Pietilä, Mika; Takalo, Reijo; Juvonen, Tatu; Bergström, Kim; Kalso, Eija; Valmu, Leena; Laitinen, Saara; Lehenkari, Petri; Nystedt, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Systemic infusion of therapeutic cells would be the most practical and least invasive method of administration in many cellular therapies. One of the main obstacles especially in intravenous delivery of cells is a massive cell retention in the lungs, which impairs homing to the target tissue and may decrease the therapeutic outcome. In this study we showed that an alternative cell detachment of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) with pronase instead of trypsin significantly accelerated the lung clearance of the cells and, importantly, increased their targeting to an area of injury. Cell detachment with pronase transiently altered the MSC surface protein profile without compromising cell viability, multipotent cell characteristics, or immunomodulative and angiogenic potential. The transient modification of the cell surface protein profile was sufficient to produce effective changes in cell rolling behavior in vitro and, importantly, in the in vivo biodistribution of the cells in mouse, rat, and porcine models. In conclusion, pronase detachment could be used as a method to improve the MSC lung clearance and targeting in vivo. This may have a major impact on the bioavailability of MSCs in future therapeutic regimes. PMID:23734061

  17. miR-1271 promotes non-small-cell lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion via targeting HOXA5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs (∼22 nt) that play important roles in the pathogenesis of human diseases by negatively regulating numerous target genes at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in lung cancer, particularly non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has remained elusive. In this study, two microRNAs, miR-1271 and miR-628, and their predicted target genes were identified differentially expressed in NSCLC by analyzing the miRNA and mRNA expression data from NSCLC tissues and their matching normal controls. miR-1271 and its target gene HOXA5 were selected for further investigation. CCK-8 proliferation assay showed that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-1271 in NSCLC cells, while miR-1271 inhibitor could significantly inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells. Interestingly, migration and invasion assay indicated that overexpression of miR-1271 could significantly promoted the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells, whereas miR-1271 inhibitor could inhibited both cell migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Western blot showed that miR-1271 suppressed the protein level of HOXA5, and luciferase assays confirmed that miR-1271 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of HOXA5. This study indicated indicate that miR-1271 regulates NSCLC cell proliferation and invasion, via the down-regulation of HOXA5. Thus, miR-1271 may represent a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC intervention. - Highlights: • Overexpression of miR-1271 promoted proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 inhibitor inhibited the proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 targets 3′ UTR of HOXA5 in NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 negatively regulates HOXA5 in NSCLC cells

  18. Cancer cell signaling pathways targeted by spice-derived nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, cardamonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. PMID:22149093

  19. Antimetastatic therapy targeting aberrant sialylation profiles in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Yong Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Neoplasm metastases involve a fixed cascade of pathological processes, and are responsible for more than 60% cancer deaths worldwide and can only be controlled or inhibited by drugs now. Antimetastatic drugs targeting aberrantly sialylated in tumors have involved about a quarter of a century and might be a future therapeutic option apart from currently utilized antimetastatic drugs, such as antivascular and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP inhibitors. Since neoplasm tissues often manifest high levels of sialic acids and sialyl antigens or glycoligands, and some types of sialic acid analogue, such as N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Nau5Gc occurred in most tumor tissues, is absent in common humans, more attentions are needed to work with new therapeutic approaches to target these changes. Previously preliminary data have shown some compounds that inhibit some pathways of sialic acids can inhibit the tumor metastasis in vitro and tumor metastasis in experimental animal models. This type of pharmacological work can be helped by glycome investigations in order to deep understanding their mechanisms. As the central dogma of glycobiology is still unknown, some fundamental questions related to carbohydrate itself are even more welcoming and decisive to our understanding to nature of cancer. These types of work also need mathematical analysis of data. In this review, we will document and discuss the latest experimental therapeutic data and their clinical significance between cancer pathological profiles and therapeutics benefits.

  20. Cancer Cell Signaling Pathways Targeted by Spice-Derived Nutraceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, car-damonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. PMID:22149093

  1. Monte Carlo Simulations of Necrotic Cell Targeted Alpha Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Hypoxic tumour cells are radioresistant and are significant contributors to the locoregional recurrences and distant metastases that mark treatment failure. Due to restricted circulatory supply, hypoxic tumor cells frequently become necrotic and thus necrotic areas often lie near hypoxic tumour areas. In this study we investigate the feasibility of binding an alpha-emitting conjugate to necrotic cells located in the proximity of hypoxic, viable tumour cells. Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations were performed to investigate the dose distribution resulting from the thorium 227 (Th227) decay chain in a representative tumour geometry. The Geant4 software toolkit was used to simulate the decay and interactions of the Th227 decay chain. The distribution of Th227 was based on a study by Thomlinson and Gray of human lung cancer histological samples (Thomlinson RH, Gray LH. Br J Cancer 1955; 9:539). The normalized dose distribution obtained with Geant4 from a cylindrical Th227 source in water is illustrated in Fig. I. The relative contribution of the different decay channels is displayed, together with a profile through the centre of the accumulated dose map. The results support the hypothesis that significant α-particle doses will be deposited in the hypoxic tumor tissue immediately surrounding the necrotic core (where the majority of Th227 will be located). As an internal a-particle generator, the Th227-radioimmunoconjugate shows potential as an efficient hypoxic tumour sterilizer.

  2. Targeted treatments in advanced renal cell carcinoma: focus on axitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzoni E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Elena Verzoni, Paolo Grassi, Isabella Testa, Roberto Iacovelli, Pamela Biondani, Enrico Garanzini , Filippo De Braud, Giuseppe ProcopioDepartment of Medical Oncology 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Antiangiogenesis options have evolved rapidly in the last few years, with an increasing number of agents currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been shown to be very effective for the treatment of metastatic renal cancer cell. Axitinib is a third-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and is currently being developed for the treatment of various malignancies. The pharmacokinetic properties of axitinib may have a selective therapeutic effect, with minimal adverse reactions and enhanced safety. In a large Phase III study of previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib achieved a longer progression-free survival than sorafenib with an acceptable safety profile and good quality of life. This review focuses on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity of axitinib in the current treatment of renal cell carcinoma. The role of axitinib in the adjuvant and/or neoadjuvant setting needs to be evaluated in further clinical trials.Keywords: axitinib, renal cell carcinoma, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, angiogenesis

  3. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  4. Mitochondria: An intriguing target for killing tumour-initiating cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yan, B.; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, JAN 2016 (2016), s. 86-93. ISSN 1567-7249 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Tumour-initiating cells * ALPHA-TOCOPHERYL SUCCINATE * Therapeutic resistance * Mitochondria Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.249, year: 2014

  5. Enhancing Oral Vaccine Potency by Targeting Intestinal M Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Azizi, A.; Kumar, A.; Diaz-Mitoma, F.; Městecký, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2010). ISSN 1553-7366 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : PATCH M-CELLS * UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA-COLI * MUCOSAL IMMUNE-SYSTEM Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.079, year: 2010

  6. CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics for hematologic malignancies: interpreting clinical outcomes to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae H; Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-06-30

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 has produced impressive results in treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Although these CAR-modified T cells target the same antigen, the designs of CARs vary as well as several key aspects of the clinical trials in which these CARs have been studied. It is unclear whether these differences have any impact on clinical outcome and treatment-related toxicities. Herein, we review clinical results reflecting the investigational use of CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics in patients with B-cell hematologic malignancies, in light of differences in CAR design and production, and outline the limitations inherent in comparing outcomes between studies. PMID:27207800

  7. Chemosensitization of cancer cells by siRNA using targeted nanogel delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemoresistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment. Targeted therapies that enhance cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents have the potential to increase drug efficacy while reducing toxic effects on untargeted cells. Targeted cancer therapy by RNA interference (RNAi) is a relatively new approach that can be used to reversibly silence genes in vivo by selectively targeting genes such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which has been shown to increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to taxane chemotherapy. However, delivery represents the main hurdle for the broad development of RNAi therapeutics. We report here the use of core/shell hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) functionalized with peptides that specially target the EphA2 receptor to deliver small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting EGFR. Expression of EGFR was determined by immunoblotting, and the effect of decreased EGFR expression on chemosensitization of ovarian cancer cells after siRNA delivery was investigated. Treatment of EphA2 positive Hey cells with siRNA-loaded, peptide-targeted nanogels decreased EGFR expression levels and significantly increased the sensitivity of this cell line to docetaxel (P < 0.05). Nanogel treatment of SK-OV-3 cells, which are negative for EphA2 expression, failed to reduce EGFR levels and did not increase docetaxel sensitivity (P > 0.05). This study suggests that targeted delivery of siRNAs by nanogels may be a promising strategy to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs for the treatment of ovarian cancer. In addition, EphA2 is a viable target for therapeutic delivery, and the siRNAs are effectively protected by the nanogel carrier, overcoming the poor stability and uptake that has hindered clinical advancement of therapeutic siRNAs

  8. Molecular imaging to target transplanted muscle progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutpell, Kelly; McGirr, Rebecca; Hoffman, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe genetic neuromuscular disorder that affects 1 in 3,500 boys, and is characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. In patients, the ability of resident muscle satellite cells (SCs) to regenerate damaged myofibers becomes increasingly inefficient. Therefore, transplantation of muscle progenitor cells (MPCs)/myoblasts from healthy subjects is a promising therapeutic approach to DMD. A major limitation to the use of stem cell therapy, however, is a lack of reliable imaging technologies for long-term monitoring of implanted cells, and for evaluating its effectiveness. Here, we describe a non-invasive, real-time approach to evaluate the success of myoblast transplantation. This method takes advantage of a unified fusion reporter gene composed of genes (firefly luciferase [fluc], monomeric red fluorescent protein [mrfp] and sr39 thymidine kinase [sr39tk]) whose expression can be imaged with different imaging modalities. A variety of imaging modalities, including positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and high frequency 3D-ultrasound are now available, each with unique advantages and limitations. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) studies, for example, have the advantage of being relatively low cost and high-throughput. It is for this reason that, in this study, we make use of the firefly luciferase (fluc) reporter gene sequence contained within the fusion gene and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for the short-term localization of viable C2C12 myoblasts following implantation into a mouse model of DMD (muscular dystrophy on the X chromosome [mdx] mouse). Importantly, BLI provides us with a means to examine the kinetics of labeled MPCs post-implantation, and will be useful to track cells repeatedly over time and following migration. Our reporter gene approach further allows us to merge multiple imaging modalities in a single living

  9. ALK signaling and target therapy in anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio eTabbo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The discovery by Morris SW et al. in 1994 of the genes contributing to the t(2;5(p23;q35 translocation has put the foundation for a molecular based recognition of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL and pointed out the need for a further stratification of T-cell neoplasia. Likewise the detection of ALK genetic lesions among many human cancers has defined unique subsets of cancer patients, providing new opportunities for innovative therapeutic interventions. The objective of this review is to appraise the molecular mechanisms driving ALK-mediated transformation, and to maintain the neoplastic phenotype. The understanding of these events will allow the design and implementation of novel tailored strategies for a well-defined subset of cancer patients.

  10. Susceptibility of adherent versus suspension target cells derived from adherent tissue culture lines to cell-mediated cytotoxicity in rapid 51Cr-release assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of target cells from tissue culture lines which grow adherent to tissue culture vessels is often desirable for tests of cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC). In the present study the authors used cells derived from adherent tissue culture lines to compare the merits of suspension vs. adherent target cells in short-term 51Cr-release assays. Cytotoxic activity of murine spleen cells sensitized in vitro against allogeneic spleen cells or syngeneic sarcoma cells was tested with fibroblast or sarcoma target cells. In parallel tests, aliquots of tissue culture lines were detached and used as either suspension or adherent target cells in CMC assays, matching the concentrations of suspension and adherent target cells. In both allogeneic and syngeneic combinations adherent target cells released less 51Cr spontaneously and were more susceptible to CMC than their suspension counterparts. (Auth.)

  11. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jean Y.; So, Po-Lin; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2006-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastro-intestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overvi...

  12. Pyrvinium targets autophagy addiction to promote cancer cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Longfei; Lei, Yunlong; Liu, Rui; Li, Jingyi; Yuan, Kefei; Li, Yi; Chen, Yi; Liu, Yi; Lu, You; Edwards III, Carl K; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process by which long-lived proteins and damaged organelles are degradated by lysosomes. Activation of autophagy is an important survival mechanism that protects cancer cells from various stresses, including anticancer agents. Recent studies indicate that pyrvinium pamoate, an FDA-approved antihelminthic drug, exhibits wide-ranging anticancer activity. Here we demonstrate that pyrvinium inhibits autophagy both in vitro and in vivo. We further demonstrate that...

  13. Targeting Protective Autophagy Exacerbates UV-Triggered Apoptotic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hwa Chiou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is activated by various stresses, including DNA damage, and previous studies of DNA damage-induced autophagy have focused on the response to chemotherapeutic drugs, ionizing radiation, and reactive oxygen species. In this study, we investigated the biological significance of autophagic response to ultraviolet (UV irradiation in A549 and H1299 cells. Our results indicated that UV induces on-rate autophagic flux in these cells. Autophagy inhibition resulting from the knockdown of beclin-1 and Atg5 reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptosis. Moreover, we found that ATR phosphorylation was accompanied by microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B II (LC3B-II expression during the early phases following UV irradiation, which is a well-established inducer of ATR. Knocking down ATR further attenuated the reduction in LC3B-II at early stages in response to UV treatment. Despite the potential role of ATR in autophagic response, reduced ATR expression does not affect autophagy induction during late phases (24 and 48 h after UV treatment. The result is consistent with the reduced ATR phosphorylation at the same time points and suggests that autophagic response at this stage is activated via a distinct pathway. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that autophagy acts as a cytoprotective mechanism against UV-induced apoptosis and that autophagy induction accompanied with apoptosis at late stages is independent of ATR activation.

  14. Receptor guanylyl cyclases in Inka cells targeted by eclosion hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jer-Cherng; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Adams, Michael E; Lu, Kuang-Hui

    2009-08-11

    A signature of eclosion hormone (EH) action in insect ecdysis is elevation of cGMP in Inka cells, leading to massive release of ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH) and ecdysis initiation. Although this aspect of EH-induced signal transduction is well known, the receptor mediating this process has not been identified. Here, we describe a receptor guanylyl cyclase BdmGC-1 and its isoform BdmGC-1B in the Oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis that are activated by EH. The B form exhibits the conserved domains and putative N-glycosylation sites found in BdmGC-1, but possesses an additional 46-amino acid insertion in the extracellular domain and lacks the C-terminal tail of BdmGC-1. Combined immunolabeling and in situ hybridization reveal that BdmGC-1 is expressed in Inka cells. Heterologous expression of BdmGC-1 in HEK cells leads to robust increases in cGMP following exposure to low picomolar concentrations of EH. The B-isoform responds only to higher EH concentrations, suggesting different physiological roles of these cyclases. We propose that BdmGC-1 and BdmGC-1B are high- and low-affinity EH receptors, respectively. PMID:19666575

  15. [Molecular biological foundation of targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lai; Xiaodong, Teng

    2016-05-25

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing. Radical cure by surgery can only be achieved in patients with early stage tumors. How to precisely use antineoplastic agents after surgery is an important problem to be solved. Most metastatic RCCs are pathologically identified as clear cell RCC (ccRCC), thus to develop agents targeting ccRCC is critical. Most clinically available targeted therapies are based on targeting some spots in specific pathways; or based on targeting new anti-tumor mechanisms, such as programmed death-1(PD-1), antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) and stem cells. There is still no targeted therapy having definite effect to most RCC patients. Only von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway so far has been confirmed to be related to ccRCC development and progression; the inactivation of VHL gene causes many significant downstream gene changes. The key proteins involved in VHL pathway may be potential therapeutic targets for ccRCC. In this article, we review the current progress of targeted therapy for RCC, focus on the molecular characteristics of ccRCC, its relation to VHL pathway, the potential therapeutic targets and future clinical application for metastatic ccRCC. PMID:27045248

  16. Targeting aberrant glutathione metabolism to eradicate human acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Neering, Sarah J; Lagadinou, Eleni D; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A; Becker, Michael W; Jordan, Craig T

    2013-11-22

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34(+)) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34(+) AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34(+) AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34(+) cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34(+) AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34(+) cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  17. Characterization of the major parathyroid hormone target cell in the endosteal metaphysis of rat long bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of in vivo competitive binding of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in the endosteal metaphysis of rat long bones was recently shown to be localized in the intertrabecular tissue to a cell that is distinct from a differentiated osteoblast. In the present report we have further characterized this cell, termed a parathyroid hormone target (PT) cell, by light and electron microscopy using radioautography and histochemical techniques. These studies demonstrate that the PT cell is a mononuclear cell with a large cell body located at times between clusters of differentiated osteoblasts, as well as in other regions of the intertrabecular tissue. Its long cytoplasmic processes extend from the bone matrix through the intertrabecular region toward vascular structures, interdigitating with various cells of the endosteum. A distinctive tubular structure originating in the Golgi system and often associated with long mitochondria and glycogen particles extends throughout the cytoplasmic processes of the PT cell. Based on its capacity to incorporate (3H)thymidine, the PT cell appears to divide rather slowly. The identification of occasional hybrid cells with ultrastructural features of both the PT cell and the differentiated osteoblast and the presence of histochemical evidence for alkaline phosphatase activity suggest that the PT cell is of the osteoblast lineage. These studies therefore morphologically define a major osseous target cell for PTH that, although of the osteoblast lineage, is not a differentiated osteoblast and provide in vivo evidence that characteristics of the 'osteoblast phenotype' are not restricted to a sole osseous cell type

  18. Cell to cell spreading of misfolded proteins as a therapeutic target in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Livia; Lenzi, Paola; Biagioni, Francesca; Siciliano, Gabriele; Fornai, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Despite a number of genetic mutations and molecular mechanisms are recognized to participate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), such a devastating neurological disorder still lacks a substantial cure. The present manuscript rather than a general overview of potential therapeutic approaches focuses on novel research findings detailing novel molecular mechanisms which appear to be promising for developing future ALS therapeutics. A special emphasis is given to the abnormal autophagy status and to those autophagy substrates which aggregate in the form of misfolded proteins. In fact, as reviewed in the first part of the manuscript, altered autophagy pathway is present in most genetic mutations responsible for familial ALS. These mutations impair clearance of autophagy substrates, which determines accumulation of giant altered mitochondria and misfolded proteins. Therefore, a considerable piece of the review is dedicated to unconventional processing of misfolded proteins leading to unconventional protein secretions which may underlie a prionoid cellto- cell spreading of ALS neuropathology. The intimate mechanisms regulating these steps are analyzed in order to comprehend which potential therapeutic targets might be considered in future studies. At the same time, negative findings concerning recent trials are explained in light of novel disease mechanisms. In the final part of the review the replacement therapy with focal stem cells implantation is discussed in relationship with toxic mechanisms operating in the intercellular space of the spinal cord and motor-related areas. PMID:24934358

  19. miR-126 inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cells proliferation by targeting EGFL7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yanqin; Bai, Yifeng; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Yu [Department of Pathology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Guo, Ying, E-mail: guohanjing001@163.com [Department of Organ Transplantation, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Guo, Linlang, E-mail: linlangg@yahoo.com [Department of Pathology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2010-01-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent an abundant group of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression, and have been demonstrated to play roles as tumor suppressor genes (oncogenes), and affect homeostatic processes such as development, cell proliferation, and cell death. Subsequently, epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7), which is confirmed to be involved in cellular responses such as cell migration and blood vessel formation, is identified as a potential miR-126 target by bioinformatics. However, there is still no evidence showing EGFL7's relationship with miR-126 and the proliferation of lung cancer cells. The aim of this work is to investigate whether miR-126, together with EGFL7, have an effect on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells' proliferation. Therefore, we constructed overexpressed miR-126 plasmid to target EGFL7 and transfected them into NSCLC cell line A549 cells. Then, we used methods like quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, flow cytometry assay, and immunohistochemistry staining to confirm our findings. The result was that overexpression of miR-126 in A549 cells could increase EGFL7 expression. Furthermore, the most notable finding by cell proliferation related assays is that miR-126 can inhibit A549 cells proliferation in vitro and inhibit tumor growth in vivo by targeting EGFL7. As a result, our study demonstrates that miR-126 can inhibit proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells through one of its targets, EGFL7.

  20. Specific silencing of the REST target genes in insulin-secreting cells uncovers their participation in beta cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David; Allagnat, Florent; Gesina, Emilie; Caille, Dorothee; Gjinovci, Asllan; Waeber, Gerard; Meda, Paolo; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine

    2012-01-01

    The absence of the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST) in insulin-secreting beta cells is a major cue for the specific expression of a large number of genes. These REST target genes were largely ascribed to a function of neurotransmission in a neuronal context, whereas their role in pancreatic beta cells has been poorly explored. To identify their functional significance, we have generated transgenic mice expressing REST in beta cells (RIP-REST mice), and previously discovered that REST target genes are essential to insulin exocytosis. Herein we characterized a novel line of RIP-REST mice featuring diabetes. In diabetic RIP-REST mice, high levels of REST were associated with postnatal beta cell apoptosis, which resulted in gradual beta cell loss and sustained hyperglycemia in adults. Moreover, adenoviral REST transduction in INS-1E cells led to increased cell death under control conditions, and sensitized cells to death induced by cytokines. Screening for REST target genes identified several anti-apoptotic genes bearing the binding motif RE-1 that were downregulated upon REST expression in INS-1E cells, including Gjd2, Mapk8ip1, Irs2, Ptprn, and Cdk5r2. Decreased levels of Cdk5r2 in beta cells of RIP-REST mice further confirmed that it is controlled by REST, in vivo. Using siRNA-mediated knock-down in INS-1E cells, we showed that Cdk5r2 protects beta cells against cytokines and palmitate-induced apoptosis. Together, these data document that a set of REST target genes, including Cdk5r2, is important for beta cell survival. PMID:23029270

  1. Specific silencing of the REST target genes in insulin-secreting cells uncovers their participation in beta cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Martin

    Full Text Available The absence of the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST in insulin-secreting beta cells is a major cue for the specific expression of a large number of genes. These REST target genes were largely ascribed to a function of neurotransmission in a neuronal context, whereas their role in pancreatic beta cells has been poorly explored. To identify their functional significance, we have generated transgenic mice expressing REST in beta cells (RIP-REST mice, and previously discovered that REST target genes are essential to insulin exocytosis. Herein we characterized a novel line of RIP-REST mice featuring diabetes. In diabetic RIP-REST mice, high levels of REST were associated with postnatal beta cell apoptosis, which resulted in gradual beta cell loss and sustained hyperglycemia in adults. Moreover, adenoviral REST transduction in INS-1E cells led to increased cell death under control conditions, and sensitized cells to death induced by cytokines. Screening for REST target genes identified several anti-apoptotic genes bearing the binding motif RE-1 that were downregulated upon REST expression in INS-1E cells, including Gjd2, Mapk8ip1, Irs2, Ptprn, and Cdk5r2. Decreased levels of Cdk5r2 in beta cells of RIP-REST mice further confirmed that it is controlled by REST, in vivo. Using siRNA-mediated knock-down in INS-1E cells, we showed that Cdk5r2 protects beta cells against cytokines and palmitate-induced apoptosis. Together, these data document that a set of REST target genes, including Cdk5r2, is important for beta cell survival.

  2. Targeting poly (ADP-ribose polymerase partially contributes to bufalin-induced cell death in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Huang

    Full Text Available Despite recent pharmaceutical advancements in therapeutic drugs, multiple myeloma (MM remains an incurable disease. Recently, ploy(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 has been shown as a potentially promising target for MM therapy. A previous report suggested bufalin, a component of traditional Chinese medicine ("Chan Su", might target PARP1. However, this hypothesis has not been verified. We here showed that bufalin could inhibit PARP1 activity in vitro and reduce DNA-damage-induced poly(ADP-ribosylation in MM cells. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the active site of bufalin interaction is within the catalytic domain of PAPR1. Thus, PARP1 is a putative target of bufalin. Furthermore, we showed, for the first time that the proliferation of MM cell lines (NCI-H929, U266, RPMI8226 and MM.1S and primary CD138(+ MM cells could be inhibited by bufalin, mainly via apoptosis and G2-M phase cell cycle arrest. MM cell apoptosis was confirmed by apoptotic cell morphology, Annexin-V positive cells, and the caspase3 activation. We further evaluated the role of PARP1 in bufalin-induced apoptosis, discovering that PARP1 overexpression partially suppressed bufalin-induced cell death. Moreover, bufalin can act as chemosensitizer to enhance the cell growth-inhibitory effects of topotecan, camptothecin, etoposide and vorinostat in MM cells. Collectively, our data suggest that bufalin is a novel PARP1 inhibitor and a potentially promising therapeutic agent against MM alone or in combination with other drugs.

  3. MicroRNA-145 targets YES and STAT1 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea H; Jacobsen, Anders B; Frankel, Lisa; Wen, Jiayu; Krogh, Anders; Lund, Anders H.

    2010-01-01

    miRNA overexpression. Gene Ontology analysis showed an overrepresentation of genes involved in cell death, cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle, gene expression and cancer. A number of the identified miRNA targets have previously been implicated in cancer, including YES, FSCN1, ADAM17, BIRC2......, VANGL1 as well as the transcription factor STAT1. Both YES and STAT1 were verified as direct miR-145 targets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study identifies and validates new cancer-relevant direct targets of miR-145 in colon cancer cells and hereby adds important mechanistic understanding of the tumor......BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important gene regulators and are recognized as key players in tumorigenesis. miR-145 is reported to be down-regulated in several cancers, but knowledge of its targets in colon cancer remains limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the...

  4. Identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies targeting brain tumor sphere cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Hashizume, Rintaro; James, C. David; Berger, Mitchel S.; Liu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor and there is no curative treatment to date. Resistance to conventional therapies and tumor recurrence pose major challenges to treatment and management of this disease, and therefore new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. Previous studies by other investigators have shown that a subpopulation of GBM cells can grow as neurosphere-like cells when cultured in restrictive media, and exhibit enhanced tumor initiating ability and resistance to therapy. We report here the identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies (scFvs) targeting GBM tumor sphere cells. We selected a large naive phage antibody display library on the glycosylation-dependent CD133 epitope-positive subpopulation of GBM cells grown as tumor spheres and identified internalizing scFvs that target tumor sphere cells broadly, as well as scFvs that target the CD133 positive subpopulation. These scFvs were found to be efficiently internalized by GBM tumor sphere cells. One scFv GC4 inhibited self-renewal of GBM tumor sphere cells in vitro. We have further developed a full-length human IgG1 based on this scFv and found that it potently inhibits proliferation of GBM tumor sphere cells and GBM cells grown in regular non-selective media. Taken together, these results show that internalizing human scFvs targeting brain tumor sphere cells can be readily identified from a phage antibody display library, which could be useful for further development of novel therapies that target subpopulations of GBM cells to combat recurrence and resistance to treatment. PMID:20587664

  5. Chitosan cross-linked docetaxel loaded EGF receptor targeted nanoparticles for lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, S; Sarmento, Bruno; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar; Menon, Deepthy; Seabra, Vitor; Jayakumar, R

    2014-08-01

    Lung cancer, associated with the up-regulated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to the development of EGFR targeted anticancer therapeutics. The biopolymeric nanoparticles form an outstanding system for the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. The present work evaluated the in vitro effects of chitosan cross-linked γ-poly(glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) nanoparticles (Nps) loaded with docetaxel (DTXL) and decorated with Cetuximab (CET), targeted to EGFR over-expressing non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC) cells (A549). CET-DTXL-γ-PGA Nps was prepared by ionic gelation and CET conjugation via EDC/NHS chemistry. EGFR specificity of targeted Nps was confirmed by the higher uptake rates of EGFR +ve A549 cells compared to that of EGFR -ve cells (NIH3T3). The cytotoxicity of Nps quantified using cell based (MTT/LDH) and flowcytometry (Cell-cycle analysis, Annexin V/PI and JC-1) assays showed superior antiproliferative activity of CET-DTXL-γ-PGA Nps over DTXL-γ-PGA Nps. The A549 cells treated with CET-DTXL-γ-PGA NPs underwent a G2/M phase cell cycle arrest followed by reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential of A549 cells, inducing apoptosis and necrosis resulting in enhanced cancer cell death. CET-DTXL-γ-PGA Nps exhibited enhanced cellular internalization and therapeutic activity, by actively targeting EGFR on NSCLC cells and hence could be an effective alternative to non-specific, conventional chemotherapy by increasing its efficiency by many folds. PMID:24950310

  6. Magnetic trapping with simultaneous photoacoustic detection of molecularly targeted rare circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been widely used in molecular imaging to detect diseased cells by targeting them with nanoparticle-based contrast agents. However, the sensitivity and specificity are easily degraded because contrast agent signals can be masked by the background. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging uses a new type of multifunctional composite particle combining an optically absorptive gold nanorod core and magnetic nanospheres, which can potentially accumulate and concentrate targeted cells while simultaneously enhancing their specific contrast compared to background signals. In this study, HeLa cells molecularly targeted using nanocomposites with folic acid mimicking targeted rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were circulated at a 6 ml/min flow rate for trapping and imaging studies. Preliminary results show that the cells accumulate rapidly in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system. The sensitivity of the current system can reach up to 1 cell/ml in clear water. By manipulating the trapped cells magnetically, the specificity of detecting cells in highly absorptive ink solution can be enhanced with 16.98 dB background suppression by applying motion filtering on PA signals to remove unwanted background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results appear promising for future preclinical studies on a small animal model and ultimate clinical detection of rare CTCs in the vasculature.

  7. Identification of CD90 as Putative Cancer Stem Cell Marker and Therapeutic Target in Insulinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buishand, Floryne O; Arkesteijn, Ger J A; Feenstra, Laurien R; Oorsprong, Claire W D; Mestemaker, Margiet; Starke, Achim; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Mol, Jan A

    2016-06-01

    The long-term prognosis after surgical resection of malignant insulinoma (INS) is poor. Novel adjuvant therapies, specifically targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs), are warranted. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize and target putative INS CSCs. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, human INS cell line CM and pancreatic carcinoid cell line BON1 were screened for the presence of stem cell-associated markers. CD90, CD166, and GD2 were identified as potential CSC markers. Only CD90(+) INS cells had an increased tumor-initiating potential in athymic nude mice. Anti-CD90 monoclonal antibodies decreased the viability and metastatic potential of injected cells in a zebrafish embryo INS xenograft model. Primary INS stained positive for CD90 by immunohistochemistry, however also intratumoral fibroblasts and vascular endothelium showed positive staining. The results of this study suggest that anti-CD90 monoclonals form a potential novel adjuvant therapeutic modality by targeting either INS cells directly, or by targeting the INS microenvironment. PMID:27049037

  8. Adenovirus vectors targeting distinct cell types in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweigard, J Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5DeltaRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5DeltaRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors. PMID:19892875

  9. Targeting T Cell Co-receptors for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Margaret K; Postow, Michael A; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2016-05-17

    Checkpoint-blocking antibodies can generate potent anti-tumor responses by encouraging the immune system to seek and destroy cancer cells. At this time, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved three checkpoint-blocking antibodies in three disease indications, and additional approvals are expected to broaden the clinical scope of immunotherapy. Herein, we review the clinical development of CTLA-4-, PD-1-, and PD-L1-blocking antibodies across tumor types and briefly discuss areas of active investigation of potential biomarkers. PMID:27192570

  10. A magnetic vehicle realized tumor cell-targeted radiotherapy using low-dose radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Ping; Tung, Fu-I; Chen, Ming-Hong; Liu, Tse-Ying

    2016-03-28

    Radiotherapy, a common cancer treatment, often adversely affects the surrounding healthy tissue and/or cells. Some tumor tissue-focused radiation therapies have been developed to lower radiation-induced lesion formation; however, achieving tumor cell-targeted radiotherapy (i.e., precisely focusing the radiation efficacy to tumor cells) remains a challenge. In the present study, we developed a novel tumor cell-targeted radiotherapy, named targeted sensitization-enhanced radiotherapy (TSER), that exploits tumor-specific folic acid-conjugated carboxymethyl lauryl chitosan/superparamagnetic iron oxide (FA-CLC/SPIO) micelles to effectively deliver chlorin e6 (Ce6, a sonosensitizer) to mitochondria of HeLa cells under magnetic guidance. For the in vitro tests, the sensitization of Ce6 induced by ultrasound, that could weaken the radiation resistant ability of tumor cells, occurred only in Ce6-internalizing tumor cells. Therefore, low-dose X-ray irradiation, that was not harmful to normal cells, could exert high tumor cell-specific killing ability. The ratio of viable normal cells to tumor cells was increased considerably, from 7.8 (at 24h) to 97.1 (at 72h), after they had received TSER treatment. Our data suggest that TSER treatment significantly weakens tumor cells, resulting in decreased viability in vitro as well as decreased in vivo subcutaneous tumor growth in nude mice, while the adverse effects were minimal. Taken together, TSER treatment appears to be an effective, clinically feasible tumor cell-targeted radiotherapy that can solve the problems of traditional radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy. PMID:26892750

  11. Tigecycline targets nonsmall cell lung cancer through inhibition of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xuefeng; Gu, Zhenfang; Chen, Wenming; Jiao, Junbo

    2016-08-01

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer with a high mortality rate and still remains therapeutically a challenge. A strategy to target NSCLC is to identify agents that are effective against NSCLC cells while sparing normal cells. We show that tigecycline, an FDA-approved antibiotic drug, preferentially targets NSCLC cells. Tigecycline is effective in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple cell lines derived from two common NSCLC subtypes: adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Tigecycline also dose-dependently inhibits colony formation of NSCLC subpopulation of cells with highly proliferative and invasive properties. Compared to NSCLC cells, tigecycline affects proliferation and survival of normal fibroblast cells significantly to a less extent. More importantly, tigecycline significantly inhibits NSCLC tumor growth through decreasing proliferation and increasing apoptosis of tumor cells in vivo. Tigecycline significantly inhibits mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that tigecycline impairs mitochondrial functions. Our study suggests that tigecycline may be a useful therapeutic agent, and inhibiting mitochondrial functions may represent a new targeted therapy for NSCLC. PMID:27009695

  12. Recombination induced by triple-helix-targeted DNA damage in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Faruqi, A F; Seidman, M M; Segal, D J; Carroll, D; Glazer, P M

    1996-01-01

    Gene therapy has been hindered by the low frequency of homologous recombination in mammalian cells. To stimulate recombination, we investigated the use of triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) to target DNA damage to a selected site within cells. By treating cells with TFOs linked to psoralen, recombination was induced within a simian virus 40 vector carrying two mutant copies of the supF tRNA reporter gene. Gene conversion events, as well as mutations at the target site, were also obs...

  13. siRNA targeting RBP2 inhibits expression, proliferation, tumorigenicity and invasion in thyroid carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    KONG, LING-LING; MAN, DONG-MEI; Wang, Tian; ZHANG, GUO-AN; Cui, Wen

    2015-01-01

    In order to estimate the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting retinoblastoma binding protein 2 (RBP2) on the proliferation, expression, invasion, migration and tumorigenicity abilities of papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cells, siRNA targeting RBP2 (RBP2-siRNA) and negative control siRNA were transfected into K1 cells. The mRNA levels of RBP2 in the transfected cells were estimated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and the protein levels of...

  14. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

  15. Induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells by targeting mitochondria with gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkandawire, M M; Lakatos, M; Springer, A; Clemens, A; Appelhans, D; Krause-Buchholz, U; Pompe, W; Rödel, G; Mkandawire, M

    2015-06-28

    A major challenge in designing cancer therapies is the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, although activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways by targeting gold nanoparticles to mitochondria is promising. We report an in vitro procedure targeting mitochondria with conjugated gold nanoparticles and investigating effects on apoptosis induction in the human breast cancer cell line Jimt-1. Gold nanoparticles were conjugated to a variant of turbo green fluorescent protein (mitoTGFP) harbouring an amino-terminal mitochondrial localization signal. Au nanoparticle conjugates were further complexed with cationic maltotriose-modified poly(propylene imine) third generation dendrimers. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that Au nanoparticle conjugates were directed to mitochondria upon transfection, causing partial rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane, triggering cell death. The ability to target Au nanoparticles into mitochondria of breast cancer cells and induce apoptosis reveals an alternative application of Au nanoparticles in photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26022234

  16. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging of Stem Cells in Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R. Santoso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has broad applications in regenerative medicine and increasingly within cardiovascular disease. Stem cells have emerged as a leading therapeutic option for many diseases and have broad applications in regenerative medicine. Injuries to the heart are often permanent due to the limited proliferation and self-healing capability of cardiomyocytes; as such, stem cell therapy has become increasingly important in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Despite extensive efforts to optimize cardiac stem cell therapy, challenges remain in the delivery and monitoring of cells injected into the myocardium. Other fields have successively used nanoscience and nanotechnology for a multitude of biomedical applications, including drug delivery, targeted imaging, hyperthermia, and tissue repair. In particular, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs have been widely employed for molecular and cellular imaging. In this mini-review, we focus on the application of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in targeting and monitoring of stem cells for the treatment of myocardial infarctions.

  17. Single-cell analysis of targeted transcriptome predicts drug sensitivity of single cells within human myeloma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, A K; Mukherjee, U K; Harding, T; Jang, J S; Stessman, H; Li, Y; Abyzov, A; Jen, J; Kumar, S; Rajkumar, V; Van Ness, B

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by significant genetic diversity at subclonal levels that have a defining role in the heterogeneity of tumor progression, clinical aggressiveness and drug sensitivity. Although genome profiling studies have demonstrated heterogeneity in subclonal architecture that may ultimately lead to relapse, a gene expression-based prediction program that can identify, distinguish and quantify drug response in sub-populations within a bulk population of myeloma cells is lacking. In this study, we performed targeted transcriptome analysis on 528 pre-treatment single cells from 11 myeloma cell lines and 418 single cells from 8 drug-naïve MM patients, followed by intensive bioinformatics and statistical analysis for prediction of proteasome inhibitor sensitivity in individual cells. Using our previously reported drug response gene expression profile signature at the single-cell level, we developed an R Statistical analysis package available at https://github.com/bvnlabSCATTome, SCATTome (single-cell analysis of targeted transcriptome), that restructures the data obtained from Fluidigm single-cell quantitative real-time-PCR analysis run, filters missing data, performs scaling of filtered data, builds classification models and predicts drug response of individual cells based on targeted transcriptome using an assortment of machine learning methods. Application of SCATT should contribute to clinically relevant analysis of intratumor heterogeneity, and better inform drug choices based on subclonal cellular responses. PMID:26710886

  18. Interferon-targeted therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus: Is this an alternative to targeting B and T cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalunian, K C

    2016-09-01

    Clinical trials of investigational agents in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have focused on targeting dysregulated B and T cells; however, recent translational research findings of the importance of the dysregulation of the innate immune system in SLE have led to clinical trials that target interferon. Three biologics that target type I interferons have been tested for their efficacy and safety in active SLE patients; these phase II trials have tested the hypothesis that down-regulation of interferon-regulated gene expression (the interferon signature) lessen the clinical burden of SLE. Rontalizumab, an anti-interferon-α monoclonal antibody, was studied in patients who had discontinued immunosuppressants. This study failed to show efficacy as assessed by both two outcome assessments; however, in low interferon signature patients, response was higher and corticosteroid usage was less in rontalizumab-treated patients. Sifalimumab, another anti-interferon-α monoclonal antibody, was studied in patients who remained on standard of care therapy. This study showed significantly better efficacy in patients treated with two sifalimumab dosages; significant differences were seen in the high interferon signature group. In a similar design and in a similar population as the sifalimumab study, anifrolumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to a type I interferon receptor, was studied in patients who remained on standard of care therapy. In this study, one dosage group demonstrated efficacy and statistically significant effects were achieved in both tested dosage groups with secondary end points. Oral corticosteroid reduction to ≤7.5 mg daily was achieved in one of the tested dosage groups and organ-specific outcomes were significantly improved in that same group. For all studies, no significant differences in serious adverse effects were seen; although, herpes zoster infections were increased in sifalimumab- and anifrolumab-treated patients and influenza rates were

  19. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Dotan

    Full Text Available The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches.Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining.TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls.A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam radiation or chemotherapy, with

  20. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  1. Targeting HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers to B Cells by Using APRIL Improves Antibody Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Melchers M; Bontjer I; Tong T; Chung NP; Klasse PJ; Eggink D; Montefiori DC; Gentile M; Cerutti A; Olson WC; Berkhout B; Binley JM; Moore JP; Sanders RW

    2012-01-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, in part because various factors limit the quantity and quality of the antibodies raised against the viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). We hypothesized that targeting Env vaccines directly to B cells, by fusing them to molecules that bind and activate these cells, would improve Env-specific antibody responses. Therefore, we fused trimeric Env gp140 to A PRoliferation-Inducing Ligand (APRIL), B-cell Activating Factor (BAFF), and CD40 Ligand (CD40L). The...

  2. Cancer Stem and Progenitor-Like Cells as Pharmacological Targets in Breast Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Valéria B. de Souza; Schenka, André A

    2015-01-01

    The present review is focused on the current role of neoplastic stem and progenitor-like cells as primary targets in the pharmacotherapy of cancer as well as in the development of new anticancer drugs. We begin by summarizing the main characteristics of these tumor-initiating cells and key concepts that support their participation in therapeutic failure. In particular, we discuss the differences between the major carcinogenesis models (ie, clonal evolution vs cancer stem cell (CSC) model) wit...

  3. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander A. A. Kooijmans

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods: EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF. EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results: V analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression, but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions: We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules.

  4. A possible usage of a CDK4 inhibitor for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A CDK4 inhibitor may be used for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy. ► The CDK4 inhibitor differentiated the cancer stem cell population (CD24−/CD44+) of MDA-MB-231. ► The differentiation of the cancer stem cells by the CDK4 inhibitor radiosensitized MDA-MB-231. -- Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are one of the main reasons behind cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapies. Thus, many efforts are being devoted to developing CSC-targeted therapies to overcome the resistance of CSCs to conventional anti-cancer therapies and decrease cancer recurrence. Differentiation therapy is one potential approach to achieve CSC-targeted therapies. This method involves inducing immature cancer cells with stem cell characteristics into more mature or differentiated cancer cells. In this study, we found that a CDK4 inhibitor sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells but not MCF7 cells to irradiation. This difference appeared to be associated with the relative percentage of CSC-population between the two breast cancer cells. The CDK4 inhibitor induced differentiation and reduced the cancer stem cell activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, which are shown by multiple marker or phenotypes of CSCs. Thus, these results suggest that radiosensitization effects may be caused by reducing the CSC-population of MDA-MB-231 through the use of the CDK4 inhibitor. Thus, further investigations into the possible application of the CDK4 inhibitor for CSC-targeted therapy should be performed to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy for breast cancer

  5. A possible usage of a CDK4 inhibitor for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Ga-Young; Chun, Sung Hak; Han, Jeong Yun; Kim, Sung Dae [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Janet [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Woo [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Kwangmo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Geun, E-mail: cglee@dirams.re.kr [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► A CDK4 inhibitor may be used for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy. ► The CDK4 inhibitor differentiated the cancer stem cell population (CD24{sup −}/CD44{sup +}) of MDA-MB-231. ► The differentiation of the cancer stem cells by the CDK4 inhibitor radiosensitized MDA-MB-231. -- Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are one of the main reasons behind cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapies. Thus, many efforts are being devoted to developing CSC-targeted therapies to overcome the resistance of CSCs to conventional anti-cancer therapies and decrease cancer recurrence. Differentiation therapy is one potential approach to achieve CSC-targeted therapies. This method involves inducing immature cancer cells with stem cell characteristics into more mature or differentiated cancer cells. In this study, we found that a CDK4 inhibitor sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells but not MCF7 cells to irradiation. This difference appeared to be associated with the relative percentage of CSC-population between the two breast cancer cells. The CDK4 inhibitor induced differentiation and reduced the cancer stem cell activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, which are shown by multiple marker or phenotypes of CSCs. Thus, these results suggest that radiosensitization effects may be caused by reducing the CSC-population of MDA-MB-231 through the use of the CDK4 inhibitor. Thus, further investigations into the possible application of the CDK4 inhibitor for CSC-targeted therapy should be performed to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy for breast cancer.

  6. Actin Is a Target of T-Cell Reactivity in Patients with Advanced Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Profumo; Brigitta Buttari; Linda Petrone; Giada Lacroce; Maria Chiara Tesori; Raffaele Capoano; Bruno Salvati; Rachele Riganò

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall associated with autoimmune reactions. In a previous study, we observed the presence of actin-specific antibodies in sera from patients with carotid atherosclerosis. To extend our previous results we evaluated the possible role of actin as antigenic target of cell-mediated immune reactions in carotid atherosclerosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 17 patients and 16 healthy subjects were tested by cell proli...

  7. Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitors: a promising novel targeted treatment for B cell lymphomas

    OpenAIRE

    Aalipour, Amin; Advani, Ranjana H.

    2013-01-01

    Constitutive or aberrant signalling of the B cell receptor signalling cascade has been implicated in the propagation and maintenance of a variety of B cell malignancies. Small molecule inhibitors of Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK), a protein early in this cascade and specifically expressed in B cells, have emerged as a new class of targeted agents. There are several BTK inhibitors, including ONO-WG-307, LFM-A13, dasatinib, CC-292, and PCI-32765 (ibrutinib), in preclinical and/or clinical develop...

  8. Targeting neoplastic B cells and harnessing microenvironment: the “double face” of ibrutinib and idelalisib

    OpenAIRE

    Maffei, Rossana; Fiorcari, Stefania; Martinelli, Silvia; Potenza, Leonardo; Luppi, Mario; Marasca, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting signaling molecules downstream B cell receptor (BCR) are powerfully spreading in the therapeutic landscape of B cell lymphoproliferative disease, due to a manageable toxicity profile and encouraging clinical effectiveness. In particular, ibrutinib, previously called PCI-32765, is a potent inhibitor of Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk), recently approved for the treatment of relapsed mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Moreo...

  9. Lentivirus-mediated shRNA targeting Nanog inhibits cell proliferation and attenuates cancer stem cell activities in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chun; Xu, Liang; Liang, Shujing; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yanyun; Zhang, Fengchun

    2016-06-01

    Emerging evidences suggest that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor growth, metastasis and treatment resistance. Nanog is one of the transcription factors that are essential for stem cellular physiology process. Previous studies reported that Nanog was detected in breast cancer and other solid tumors and indicated that it has oncogenic characteristics. However, expression feature of Nanog in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) enriched population and its biological function in BCSCs is poorly understood. In this study, CD44 + CD24- fraction sorting with Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter and mammosphere culture were used for enriching BCSCs. We report here that Nanog was highly expressed in CSCs-enriched population from the breast cancer cells, as well as stemness-associated genes. In addition, we employed the lentivirus-mediated shRNA targeting Nanog to investigate function of Nanog in BCSCs. We found that targeted inhibition of Nanog could suppress proliferation and colony formation in breast cancer cells. Further studies showed that targeted inhibition of Nanog resulted in a decrease of BCSCs activities, including mammosphere formation, CD44 + CD24- proportion and expressions of stemness-associated genes. These data therefore suggest that Nanog possesses important function in BCSCs and targeted inhibition of Nanog may provide a novel means of targeting and eliminating BCSCs. PMID:26339994

  10. Immune targeting of fibroblast activation protein triggers recognition of multipotent bone marrow stromal cells and cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a candidate universal target antigen because it has been reported to be selectively expressed in nearly all solid tumors by a subset of immunosuppressive tumor stromal fibroblasts. We verified that 18/18 human tumors of various histologies contained pronounced stromal elements staining strongly for FAP, and hypothesized that targeting tumor stroma with FAP-reactive T cells would inhibit tumor growth in cancer-bearing hosts. T cells genetically engineered with FAP-reactive chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) specifically degranulated and produced effector cytokines upon stimulation with FAP or FAP-expressing cell lines. However, adoptive transfer of FAP-reactive T cells into mice bearing a variety of subcutaneous tumors mediated limited antitumor effects and induced significant cachexia and lethal bone toxicities in two mouse strains. We found that FAP was robustly expressed on PDGFR-α+, Sca-1+ multipotent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in mice, as well as on well-characterized, clinical-grade multipotent human BMSCs. Accordingly, both mouse and human multipotent BMSCs were recognized by FAP-reactive T cells. The lethal bone toxicity and cachexia observed after cell-based immunotherapy targeting FAP cautions against its use as a universal target. Moreover, the expression of FAP by multipotent BMSCs may point toward the cellular origins of tumor stromal fibroblasts. PMID:23712432

  11. Strategies for Profiling Single Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Targeted Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    McDowell, W.; Box, A. (Antonio); Staehling, K.; Wang, F.; Li, L.; Zueckert-Gaudenz, K.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted gene expression profiling of single cells permits the study of heterogeneity in cell populations. Here, a pool of mouse intestinal crypt-base CD44+/GRP78- cells was collected by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Aliquots were either loaded onto Fluidigm's C1 System for microfluidic cell capture and cDNA synthesis in nanoliter volumes, or flow-sorted directly into individual PCR plate wells for cDNA synthesis in microliter volumes. The pre-amplified cDNAs were transferred to the Bi...

  12. Nanobiotechnology meets plant cell biology: Carbon nanotubes as organelle targeting nanocarriers

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2013-01-01

    For years, nanotechnology has shown great promise in the fields of biomedical and biotechnological sciences and medical research. In this review, we demonstrate its versatility and applicability in plant cell biology studies. Specifically, we discuss the ability of functionalized carbon nanotubes to penetrate the plant cell wall, target specific organelles, probe protein-carrier activity and induce organelle recycling in plant cells. We also, shed light on prospective applications of carbon nanomaterials in cell biology and plant cell transformation. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Targeted gene conversion induced by triplex-directed psoralen interstrand crosslinks in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaobin; Nairn, Rodney S; Vasquez, Karen M

    2009-10-01

    Correction of a defective gene is a promising approach for both basic research and clinical gene therapy. However, the absence of site-specific targeting and the low efficiency of homologous recombination in human cells present barriers to successful gene targeting. In an effort to overcome these barriers, we utilized triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) conjugated to a DNA interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agent, psoralen (pTFO-ICLs), to improve the gene targeting efficiency at a specific site in DNA. Gene targeting events were monitored by the correction of a deletion on a recipient plasmid with the homologous sequence from a donor plasmid in human cells. The mechanism underlying this event is stimulation of homologous recombination by the pTFO-ICL. We found that pTFO-ICLs are efficient in inducing targeted gene conversion (GC) events in human cells. The deletion size in the recipient plasmid influenced both the recombination frequency and spectrum of recombinants; i.e. plasmids with smaller deletions had a higher frequency and proportion of GC events. The polarity of the pTFO-ICL also had a prominent effect on recombination. Our results suggest that pTFO-ICL induced intermolecular recombination provides an efficient method for targeted gene correction in mammalian cells. PMID:19726585

  14. Combinatorial treatment of mammospheres with trastuzumab and salinomycin efficiently targets HER2-positive cancer cells and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, Prajakta S; Kopp, Florian; Thakur, Chitra; Ellwart, Joachim W; Rapp, Ulf R; Ullrich, Axel; Wagner, Ernst; Knyazev, Pjotr; Roidl, Andreas

    2012-12-15

    A major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer is the occurrence of chemoresistance. Cancer cells surviving chemotherapy and giving rise to a recurrence of the tumor are termed cancer stem cells and can be identified by elevated levels of certain stem cell markers. Eradication of this cell population is a priority objective in cancer therapy. Here, we report elevated levels of stem cell markers in MCF-7 mammospheres. Likewise, an upregulation of HER2 and its differential expression within individual cells of mammospheres was observed. Sorting for HER2(high) and HER2(low) cells revealed an upregulation of stem cell markers NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in the HER2(low) cell fraction. Accordingly, HER2(low) cells also showed reduced proliferation, ductal-like outgrowths and an increased number of colonies in matrigel. Xenografts from subcutaneously injected HER2(low) sorted cells exihibited earlier onset but slower growth of tumors and an increase in stem cell markers compared to tumors developed from the HER2(high) fraction. Treatment of mammospheres with salinomycin reduced the expression of SOX2 indicating a selective targeting of cancer stem cells. Trastuzumab however, did not reduce the expression of SOX2 in mammospheres. Furthermore, a combinatorial treatment of mammospheres with trastuzumab and salinomycin was superior to single treatment with each drug. Thus, targeting HER2 expressing tumors with anti-HER2 therapies will not necessarily eliminate cancer stem cells and may lead to a more aggressive cancer cell phenotype. Our study demonstrates efficient killing of both HER2 positive cells and cancer stem cells, hence opening a possibility for a new combinatorial treatment strategy. PMID:22511343

  15. Targeted alternative splicing of TAF4: a new strategy for cell reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Sadam, Helle; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells has become a versatile tool for biomedical research and for regenerative medicine. In the current study, we show that manipulating alternative splicing (AS) is a highly potent strategy to produce cells for therapeutic applications. We demonstrate that silencing of hTAF4-TAFH activity of TAF4 converts human facial dermal fibroblasts to melanocyte-like (iMel) cells. iMel cells produce melanin and express microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its target genes at levels comparable to normal melanocytes. Reprogramming of melanoma cells by manipulation with hTAF4-TAFH activity upon TAFH RNAi enforces cell differentiation towards chondrogenic pathway, whereas ectoptic expression of TAF4 results in enhanced multipotency and neural crest-like features in melanoma cells. In both cell states, iMels and cancer cells, hTAF4-TAFH activity controls migration by supporting E- to N-cadherin switches. From our data, we conclude that targeted splicing of hTAF4-TAFH coordinates AS of other TFIID subunits, underscoring the role of TAF4 in synchronised changes of Pol II complex composition essential for efficient cellular reprogramming. Taken together, targeted AS of TAF4 provides a unique strategy for generation of iMels and recapitulating stages of melanoma progression. PMID:27499390

  16. Sickle cell disease: time for a targeted neonatal screening programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, C

    2015-02-01

    Ireland has seen a steady increase in paediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). In 2005, only 25% of children with SCD were referred to the haemoglobinopathy service in their first year. A non-funded screening programme was implemented. This review aimed to assess the impact screening has had. All children referred to the haemoglobinopathy service born in Ireland after 2005 were identified. Data was collected from the medical chart and laboratory system. Information was analysed using Microsoft Excel. 77 children with SCD were identified. The median age at antibiotic commencement in the screened group was 56 days compared with 447 days in the unscreened group, p = < 0.0003. 22 (28%) of infants were born in centre\\'s that do not screen and 17 (81%) were over 6 months old at referral, compared with 14 (21%) in the screened group. 6 (27%) of those in the unscreened group presented in acute crisis compared with 2 (3%) in the screened population. The point prevalence of SCD in Ireland is 0.2% in children under 15 yr of African and Asian descent. We identified delays in referral and treatment, which reflect the lack of government funded support and policy. We suggest all maternity units commence screening for newborns at risk of SCD. It is a cost effective intervention with a number needed to screen of just 4 to prevent a potentially fatal crisis.

  17. Visual cells remember earlier applied target: plasticity of orientation selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcis Ghisovan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A canonical proposition states that, in mature brain, neurons responsive to sensory stimuli are tuned to specific properties installed shortly after birth. It is amply demonstrated that that neurons in adult visual cortex of cats are orientation-selective that is they respond with the highest firing rates to preferred oriented stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In anesthetized cats, prepared in a conventional fashion for single cell recordings, the present investigation shows that presenting a stimulus uninterruptedly at a non-preferred orientation for twelve minutes induces changes in orientation preference. Across all conditions orientation tuning curves were investigated using a trial by trial method. Contrary to what has been previously reported with shorter adaptation duration, twelve minutes of adaptation induces mostly attractive shifts, i.e. toward the adapter. After a recovery period allowing neurons to restore their original orientation tuning curves, we carried out a second adaptation which produced three major results: (1 more frequent attractive shifts, (2 an increase of their magnitude, and (3 an additional enhancement of responses at the new or acquired preferred orientation. Additionally, we also show that the direction of shifts depends on the duration of the adaptation: shorter adaptation in most cases produces repulsive shifts, whereas adaptation exceeding nine minutes results in attractive shifts, in the same unit. Consequently, shifts in preferred orientation depend on the duration of adaptation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The supplementary response improvements indicate that neurons in area 17 keep a memory trace of the previous stimulus properties, thereby upgrading cellular performance. It also highlights the dynamic nature of basic neuronal properties in adult cortex since repeated adaptations modified both the orientation tuning selectivity and the response strength to the preferred orientation. These

  18. NFL-lipid nanocapsules for brain neural stem cell targeting in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carradori, Dario; Saulnier, Patrick; Préat, Véronique; des Rieux, Anne; Eyer, Joel

    2016-09-28

    The replacement of injured neurons by the selective stimulation of neural stem cells in situ represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 showed specific interactions towards neural stem cells of the subventricular zone. The aim of our work was to produce a NFL-based drug delivery system able to target neural stem cells through the selective affinity between the peptide and these cells. NFL-TBS.40-63 (NFL) was adsorbed on lipid nanocapsules (LNC) whom targeting efficiency was evaluated on neural stem cells from the subventricular zone (brain) and from the central canal (spinal cord). NFL-LNC were incubated with primary neural stem cells in vitro or injected in vivo in adult rat brain (right lateral ventricle) or spinal cord (T10). NFL-LNC interactions with neural stem cells were different depending on the origin of the cells. NFL-LNC showed a preferential uptake by neural stem cells from the brain, while they did not interact with neural stem cells from the spinal cord. The results obtained in vivo correlate with the results observed in vitro, demonstrating that NFL-LNC represent a promising therapeutic strategy to selectively deliver bioactive molecules to brain neural stem cells. PMID:27503706

  19. Lipid raft-mediated Akt signaling as a therapeutic target in mantle cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent evidence shows that lipid raft membrane domains modulate both cell survival and death. Here, we have found that the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway is present in the lipid rafts of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells, and this location seems to be critical for full activation and MCL cell survival. The antitumor lipids (ATLs) edelfosine and perifosine target rafts, and we found that ATLs exerted in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity against MCL cells by displacing Akt as well as key regulatory kinases p-PDK1 (phosphatidylinositol-dependent protein kinase 1), PI3K and mTOR (mammalian TOR) from lipid rafts. This raft reorganization led to Akt dephosphorylation, while proapoptotic Fas/CD95 death receptor was recruited into rafts. Raft integrity was critical for Ser473 Akt phosphorylation. ATL-induced apoptosis appeared to correlate with the basal Akt phosphorylation status in MCL cell lines and primary cultures, and could be potentiated by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, or inhibited by the Akt activator pervanadate. Classical Akt inhibitors induced apoptosis in MCL cells. Microenvironmental stimuli, such as CD40 ligation or stromal cell contact, did not prevent ATL-induced apoptosis in MCL cell lines and patient-derived cells. These results highlight the role of raft-mediated PI3K/Akt signaling in MCL cell survival and chemotherapy, thus becoming a new target for MCL treatment

  20. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  1. Chaetoglobosin A preferentially induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by targeting the cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Hanna, B.; Ohl, S.;

    2013-01-01

    family that showed preferential induction of apoptosis in CLL cells, even under culture conditions that mimic lymphoid tissues. In vitro testing of 89 CLL cases revealed effective targeting of CLL cells by Chaetoglobosin A, independent of bad prognosis characteristics, like 17p deletion or TP53 mutation...... novel drugs that target CLL cells also in protective microenvironments, we performed a fungal extract screen using cocultures of primary CLL cells with bone marrow-derived stromal cells. A metabolite produced by Penicillium aquamarinium was identified as Chaetoglobosin A, a member of the cytochalasan...... treatment with PI3K and BTK inhibitors, suggesting this compound as a novel potential drug for CLL.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 27 November 2013. doi:10.1038/leu.2013.360....

  2. Cell-targeted 114Inm and drug (BCNU) combination therapy in a rat acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proportion of syngeneic female rats inoculated intramuscularly with a lethal T-cell lymphoblastic (Roser) leukaemia are cured by a single intraperitoneal injection of bischloroethylnitrosourea (BCNU) (Carmustine)(10 mg kg-1) given towards the end of the preleukaemic phase (day 7). Additional therapy on day 4, using intravenous leukaemia cells lethally labelled with the radionuclide 114Inm, enhanced the overall cure rate by 30%. The spleen is a major site of indium concentration from the targeting cells so that the continuous local radiation field appears to result in a substantial reduction of the body load of leukaemia cells in the enlarged spleen particularly, thus enhancing the curative potential of the drug. The results demonstrate in principle that in patients in remission a single dose of targeted radiotherapy in the spleen combined sequentially with an appropriate drug might provide considerable aid in eliminating a residual population of leukaemia cells. (author)

  3. CD133-targeted gene transfer into long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Christian; Goebel, Benjamin; Daniela, Abriss; Brugman, Martijn; Kneissl, Sabrina; Schwäble, Joachim; Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Müller-Kuller, Uta; Kunkel, Hana; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Abel, Tobias; Serve, Hubert; Bystrykh, Leonid; Buchholz, Christian J; Grez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy for hematological disorders relies on the genetic modification of CD34(+) cells, a heterogeneous cell population containing about 0.01% long-term repopulating cells. Here, we show that the lentiviral vector CD133-LV, which uses a surface marker on human primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as entry receptor, transfers genes preferentially into cells with high engraftment capability. Transduction of unstimulated CD34(+) cells with CD133-LV resulted in gene marking of cells with competitive proliferative advantage in vitro and in immunodeficient mice. The CD133-LV-transduced population contained significantly more cells with repopulating capacity than cells transduced with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-LV, a lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Upon transfer of a barcode library, CD133-LV-transduced cells sustained gene marking in vivo for a prolonged period of time with a 6.7-fold higher recovery of barcodes compared to transduced control cells. Moreover, CD133-LV-transduced cells were capable of repopulating secondary recipients. Lastly, we show that this targeting strategy can be used for transfer of a therapeutic gene into CD34(+) cells obtained from patients suffering of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. In conclusion, direct gene transfer into CD133(+) cells allows for sustained long-term engraftment of gene corrected cells. PMID:25189742

  4. Mitochondria-Targeted Analogues of Metformin Exhibit Enhanced Antiproliferative and Radiosensitizing Effects in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gang; Zielonka, Jacek; Ouari, Olivier; Lopez, Marcos; McAllister, Donna; Boyle, Kathleen; Barrios, Christy S; Weber, James J; Johnson, Bryon D; Hardy, Micael; Dwinell, Michael B; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2016-07-01

    Metformin (Met) is an approved antidiabetic drug currently being explored for repurposing in cancer treatment based on recent evidence of its apparent chemopreventive properties. Met is weakly cationic and targets the mitochondria to induce cytotoxic effects in tumor cells, albeit not very effectively. We hypothesized that increasing its mitochondria-targeting potential by attaching a positively charged lipophilic substituent would enhance the antitumor activity of Met. In pursuit of this question, we synthesized a set of mitochondria-targeted Met analogues (Mito-Mets) with varying alkyl chain lengths containing a triphenylphosphonium cation (TPP(+)). In particular, the analogue Mito-Met10, synthesized by attaching TPP(+) to Met via a 10-carbon aliphatic side chain, was nearly 1,000 times more efficacious than Met at inhibiting cell proliferation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Notably, in PDAC cells, Mito-Met10 potently inhibited mitochondrial complex I, stimulating superoxide and AMPK activation, but had no effect in nontransformed control cells. Moreover, Mito-Met10 potently triggered G1 cell-cycle phase arrest in PDAC cells, enhanced their radiosensitivity, and more potently abrogated PDAC growth in preclinical mouse models, compared with Met. Collectively, our findings show how improving the mitochondrial targeting of Met enhances its anticancer activities, including aggressive cancers like PDAC in great need of more effective therapeutic options. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3904-15. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216187

  5. The integrin αvβ6: a novel target for CAR T-cell immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whilding, Lynsey M; Vallath, Sabari; Maher, John

    2016-04-15

    Immunotherapy of cancer using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells is a rapidly expanding field. CARs are fusion molecules that couple the binding of a tumour-associated cell surface target to the delivery of a tailored T-cell activating signal. Re-infusion of such genetically engineered T-cells to patients with haematological disease has demonstrated unprecedented response rates in Phase I clinical trials. However, such successes have not yet been observed using CAR T-cells against solid malignancies and this is, in part, due to a lack of safe tumour-specific targets. The αvβ6 integrin is strongly up-regulated in multiple solid tumours including those derived from colon, lung, breast, cervix, ovaries/fallopian tube, pancreas and head and neck. It is associated with poorer prognosis in several cancers and exerts pro-tumorigenic activities including promotion of tumour growth, migration and invasion. By contrast, physiologic expression of αvβ6 is largely restricted to wound healing. These attributes render this epithelial-specific integrin a highly attractive candidate for targeting using immunotherapeutic strategies such as CAR T-cell adoptive immunotherapy. This mini-review will discuss the role and expression of αvβ6 in cancer, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target. PMID:27068939

  6. microRNA-181b targets MLK2 in HL-60 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    microRNAs(miRNAs) play critical roles in many different cellular processes,including metabolism,apoptosis,differentiation and development.We showed miR-181b to be highly expressed in acute myeloid leukemia(AML).Furthermore,miR-181b contributed to proliferation of AML cells by targeting MLK2.Our results demonstrated that miR-181b plays an important role in the biology of AML and may be useful in developing therapies targeting miRNAs.

  7. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    OpenAIRE

    Dowall, S. D.; Graham, V A; Corbin-Lickfett, K; C. Empig; Schlunegger, K.; Bruce, C B; Easterbrook, L.; Hewson, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity again...

  8. Identification of Novel Targets for PGC-1α and Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Neuroblastoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cowell, Rita M.; Talati, Pratik; Blake, Kathryn R.; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; Russell, James W.

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is involved in the pathology of Huntington’s Disease (HD). While animals lacking PGC-1α express lower levels of genes involved in antioxidant defense and oxidative phosphorylation in the brain, little is known about other targets for PGC-1α in neuronal cells and whether there are ways to pharmacologically target PGC-1α in neurons. Here, PGC-1α overexpression in SH...

  9. Self-assembled Targeting of Cancer Cells by Iron(III)-doped, Silica Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, K.K. Pohaku; Sandoval, S.; Cortes-Mateos, M. J.; Alfaro, J.G.; Kummel, A. C.; Trogler, W.C.

    2014-01-01

    Iron(III)-doped silica nanoshells are shown to possess an in vitro cell-receptor mediated targeting functionality for endocytosis. Compared to plain silica nanoparticles, iron enriched ones are shown to be target-specific, a property that makes them potentially better vehicles for applications, such as drug delivery and tumor imaging, by making them more selective and thereby reducing the nanoparticle dose. Iron(III) in the nanoshells can interact with endogenous transferrin, a serum protein ...

  10. Self-assembled targeting of cancer cells by iron(iii)-doped, silica nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, KKP; Sandoval, S.; Cortes-Mateos, MJ; Alfaro, JG; Kummel, AC; Trogler, WC

    2014-01-01

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Iron(iii)-doped silica nanoshells are shown to possess an in vitro cell-receptor mediated targeting functionality for endocytosis. Compared to plain silica nanoparticles, iron enriched ones are shown to be target-specific, a property that makes them potentially better vehicles for applications, such as drug delivery and tumor imaging, by making them more selective and thereby reducing the nanoparticle dose. Iron(iii) in the nanoshells can interact with endoge...

  11. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions In Small Cell Lung Cancer With a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Camilla L.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J; Carretero, Julian; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Zhang, Tinghu; Chipumuro, Edmond; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Akbay, Esra A; Altabef, Abigail; Zhang, Jianming; Shimamura, Takeshi; Capelletti, Marzia; Reibel, Jakob B.; Cavanaugh, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality. The identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library we observe that SCLC is sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, and in particular to THZ1, a recent identified covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7). We find that expression of super-enhancer associated transcription fact...

  12. Immunocapture and Identification of Cell Membrane Protein Antigenic Targets of Serum Autoantibodies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Edward; Dreger, Mathias; Palace, Jackie; Vincent, Angela

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of antibodies targeting specific membrane proteins in neurological and other diseases. The target(s) of these pathogenic antibodies is known in a few diseases, usually when candidate cell surface proteins have been tested. Approaches for identifying new antigens have mainly resulted in the identification of antibodies to intracellular proteins, which are often very useful as diagnostic markers for disease but unlikely to be directly involved in disease pathogenesis because they are not accessible to circulating antibodies. To identify cell surface antigens, we developed a “conformational membrane antigen isolation and identification” strategy. First, a cell line is identified that reacts with patient sera but not with control sera. Second, intact cells are exposed to sera to allow the binding of presumptive autoantibodies to their cell surface targets. After washing off non-bound serum components, the cells are lysed, and immune complexes are precipitated. Third, the bound surface antigen is identified by mass spectrometry. As a model system we used a muscle cell line, TE671, that endogenously expresses muscle-specific tyrosine receptor kinase (MuSK) and sera or plasmas from patients with a subtype of the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis in which patients have autoantibodies against MuSK. MuSK was robustly detected as the only membrane protein in immunoprecipitates from all three patient samples tested and not from the three MuSK antibody-negative control samples processed in parallel. Of note, however, there were many intracellular proteins found in the immunoprecipitates from both patients and controls, suggesting that these were nonspecifically immunoprecipitated from cell extracts. The conformational membrane antigen isolation and identification technique should be of value for the detection of highly relevant antigenic targets in the growing number of suspected antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders. The

  13. Identification of cell surface proteins as potential immunotherapy targets in twelve pediatric cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RimasJOrentas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances now allow us to rapidly produce CARs and other antibody-derived therapeutics targeting cell surface receptors. To maximize the potential of these new technologies, relevant extracellular targets must be identified. The Pediatric Oncology Branch of the NCI curates a freely accessible database of gene expression data for both pediatric cancers and normal tissues, through which we have defined discrete sets of over-expressed transcripts in twelve pediatric cancer subtypes as compared to normal tissues. We coupled gene expression profiles to current annotation databases (i.e., Affymetrix, Gene Ontology, Entrez Gene, in order to categorize transcripts by their subcellular location. In this manner we generated a list of potential immune targets expressed on the cell surface, ranked by their difference from normal tissue. Global differences from normal between each of the pediatric tumor types studied varied, indicating that some malignancies expressed transcript sets that were more highly diverged from normal tissues than others. The validity of our approach is seen by our findings for pre-B cell ALL, where targets currently in clinical trials were top-ranked hits (CD19, CD22. For some cancers, reagents already in development could potentially be applied to a new disease class, as exemplified by CD30 expression on sarcomas. Moreover, several potential new targets shared among several pediatric solid tumors are herein identified, such as MCAM (MUC18, MTDH (metadherin, and GPC2 (glypican-2. These targets have been identified at the mRNA level and are yet to be validated at the protein level. The safety of targeting these antigens has yet to be demonstrated and therefore the identified transcripts should be considered preliminary candidates for new CAR and therapeutic antibody targets. Prospective candidate targets will be evaluated by proteomic analysis including Westerns and immunohistochemistry of normal and tumor tissues.

  14. Monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles coupled with nuclear localization signal peptide for cell-nucleus targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G; Chin, Y Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-03-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. These NLS-coated nanoparticles were introduced into the HeLa cell cytoplasm and nucleus, where the particles were monodispersed and non-aggregated. The success of labeling was examined and identified by fluorescence microscopy and MRI. The work demonstrates that monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles can be readily functionalized and stabilized for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:18080259

  15. The Uses and Future Prospects of Metabolomics and Targeted Metabolite Profiling in Cell Factory Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Scott James; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The development of cell factories for the production of chemicals has traditionally relied on measurements of product metabolite titers to assess the performance of genetically manipulated strains. With the development of improved metabolomics and targeted metabolite profiling methods, these...... broader measurements of the cellular metabolic state are now becoming part of the toolbox used to characterize cell factories. In this review we briefly summarize the benefits and challenges of global metabolomics and targeted metabolite profiling methods and discuss the application of these methods in...... both pathway discovery and cell factory engineering. We focus particularly on exploring the potential of global metabolomics to complement more traditional targeted methods. We conclude the review by discussing emerging trends in metabolomics and how these developments can aid the engineering of better...

  16. Cancer Stem Cells: Cell Culture, Markers and Targets for New Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Candace A.; Ross, Alonzo H.

    2009-01-01

    A cancer stem cell is defined as an undifferentiated cell with the ability to self-renew, differentiate to multiple lineages and initiate tumors that mimic the parent tumor. In this review, we focus on glioblastomas, describing recent progress and problems in characterizing these cells. There have been advances in cancer stem cell culture, but tumor cell heterogeneity has made purification of cancer stem cells difficult. Indeed, it may be that cancer stem cells significantly vary from tumor t...

  17. Targeted Germline Modifications in Rats Using CRISPR/Cas9 and Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Chapman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Organisms with targeted genomic modifications are efficiently produced by gene editing in embryos using CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided DNA endonuclease. Here, to facilitate germline editing in rats, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to catalyze targeted genomic mutations in rat spermatogonial stem cell cultures. CRISPR/Cas9-modified spermatogonia regenerated spermatogenesis and displayed long-term sperm-forming potential following transplantation into rat testes. Targeted germline mutations in Epsti1 and Erbb3 were vertically transmitted from recipients to exclusively generate “pure,” non-mosaic mutant progeny. Epsti1 mutant rats were produced with or without genetic selection of donor spermatogonia. Monoclonal enrichment of Erbb3 null germlines unmasked recessive spermatogenesis defects in culture that were buffered in recipients, yielding mutant progeny isogenic at targeted alleles. Thus, spermatogonial gene editing with CRISPR/Cas9 provided a platform for generating targeted germline mutations in rats and for studying spermatogenesis.

  18. Tumor protein translationally controlled 1 is a p53 target gene that promotes cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weimin; Wang, Huihui; Tao, Shasha; Zheng, Yi; Wu, Wei; Lian, Fangru; Jaramillo, Melba; Fang, Deyu; Zhang, Donna D.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 maintains genome stability by differentially activating target genes that control diverse cellular responses, such as the antioxidant response, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Despite the fact that many p53 downstream genes have been well characterized, novel p53 target genes are continuously being identified. Here, we report that Tpt1 is a direct target gene of p53. We found that p53 upregulates the transcription of Tpt1 and identified a p53-responsive element in the pr...

  19. Targeted lipid-coated nanoparticles: delivery of tumor necrosis factor-functionalized particles to tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerschmidt, Sylvia K E; Musyanovych, Anna; Altvater, Martin; Scheurich, Peter; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Landfester, Katharina; Kontermann, Roland E

    2009-07-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles displaying tumor necrosis factor on their surface (TNF nanocytes) are useful carrier systems capable of mimicking the bioactivity of membrane-bound TNF. Thus, TNF nanocytes are potent activators of TNF receptor 1 and 2 leading to a striking enhancement of apoptosis. However, in vivo applications are hampered by potential systemic toxicity. Here, using TNF nanocytes as a model system, we developed a procedure to generate targeted lipid-coated particles (TLP) in which TNF activity is shielded. The TLPs generated here are composed of an inner single-chain TNF (scTNF)-functionalized, polymeric nanoparticle core surrounded by a lipid coat endowed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for sterical stabilization and a single-chain Fv (scFv) fragment for targeting. Using a scFv directed against the tumor stroma marker fibroblast activation protein (FAP) we show that TLP and scTNF-TLP specifically bind to FAP-expressing, but not to FAP-negative cells. Lipid coating strongly reduced nonspecific binding of particles and scTNF-mediated cytotoxicity towards FAP-negative cells. In contrast, an increased cytotoxicity of TLP was observed for FAP-positive cells. Thus, through liposome encapsulation, nanoparticles carrying bioactive molecules, which are subject to nonselective uptake and activity towards various cells and tissues, can be converted into target cell-specific composite particles exhibiting a selective activity towards antigen-positive target cells. Besides safe and targeted delivery of death ligands such as TNF, TLP should be suitable for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications, which benefit from a targeted delivery of reagents embedded into the particle core or displayed on the core particle surface. PMID:19306900

  20. Magnetic relaxometry with an atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensors on targeted cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Cort [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Adolphi, Natalie L. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Butler, Kimberly L.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Larson, Richard [Department of Pathology, University of New Mexico, Cancer Research and Treatment Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Schwindt, Peter D.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Flynn, Edward R., E-mail: seniorsci@comcast.net [Senior Scientific, LLC, 11109 Country Club NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Magnetic relaxometry methods have been shown to be very sensitive in detecting cancer cells and other targeted diseases. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors are one of the primary sensor systems used in this methodology because of their high sensitivity with demonstrated capabilities of detecting fewer than 100,000 magnetically-labeled cancer cells. The emerging technology of atomic magnetometers (AMs) represents a new detection method for magnetic relaxometry with high sensitivity and without the requirement for cryogens. We report here on a study of magnetic relaxometry using both AM and SQUID sensors to detect cancer cells that are coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles through antibody targeting. The AM studies conform closely to SQUID sensor results in the measurement of the magnetic decay characteristics following a magnetization pulse. The AM and SQUID sensor data are well described theoretically for superparamagnetic particles bound to cells and the results can be used to determine the number of cells in a cell culture or tumor. The observed fields and magnetic moments of cancer cells are linear with the number of cells over a very large range. The AM sensor demonstrates very high sensitivity for detecting magnetically labeled cells, does not require cryogenic cooling and is relatively inexpensive. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic relaxometry is used to study antibody targeted nanoparticles and cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensor performances are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High sensitivity of magnetic relaxometry for cancer cell detection is demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic relaxometry decay curves from cancer cells are fit by a log function.

  1. Magnetic relaxometry with an atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensors on targeted cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic relaxometry methods have been shown to be very sensitive in detecting cancer cells and other targeted diseases. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors are one of the primary sensor systems used in this methodology because of their high sensitivity with demonstrated capabilities of detecting fewer than 100,000 magnetically-labeled cancer cells. The emerging technology of atomic magnetometers (AMs) represents a new detection method for magnetic relaxometry with high sensitivity and without the requirement for cryogens. We report here on a study of magnetic relaxometry using both AM and SQUID sensors to detect cancer cells that are coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles through antibody targeting. The AM studies conform closely to SQUID sensor results in the measurement of the magnetic decay characteristics following a magnetization pulse. The AM and SQUID sensor data are well described theoretically for superparamagnetic particles bound to cells and the results can be used to determine the number of cells in a cell culture or tumor. The observed fields and magnetic moments of cancer cells are linear with the number of cells over a very large range. The AM sensor demonstrates very high sensitivity for detecting magnetically labeled cells, does not require cryogenic cooling and is relatively inexpensive. - Highlights: ► Magnetic relaxometry is used to study antibody targeted nanoparticles and cells. ► Atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensor performances are compared. ► High sensitivity of magnetic relaxometry for cancer cell detection is demonstrated. ► Magnetic relaxometry decay curves from cancer cells are fit by a log function.

  2. Indexing TNF-α gene expression using a gene-targeted reporter cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelhardt John F

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current cell-based drug screening technologies utilize randomly integrated reporter genes to index transcriptional activity of an endogenous gene of interest. In this context, reporter expression is controlled by known genetic elements that may only partially capture gene regulation and by unknown features of chromatin specific to the integration site. As an alternative technology, we applied highly efficient gene-targeting with recombinant adeno-associated virus to precisely integrate a luciferase reporter gene into exon 1 of the HeLa cell tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α gene. Drugs known to induce TNF-α expression were then used to compare the authenticity of gene-targeted and randomly integrated transcriptional reporters. Results TNF-α-targeted reporter activity reflected endogenous TNF-α mRNA expression, whereas randomly integrated TNF-α reporter lines gave variable expression in response to transcriptional and epigenetic regulators. 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA, currently used in cancer clinical trials to induce TNF-α gene transcription, was only effective at inducing reporter expression from TNF-α gene-targeted cells. Conclusion We conclude that gene-targeted reporter cell lines provide predictive indexing of gene transcription for drug discovery.

  3. Stanniocalcin-2 is a HIF-1 target gene that promotes cell proliferation in hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Alice Y.S. [Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wong, Chris K.C., E-mail: ckcwong@hkbu.edu.hk [Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2010-02-01

    Stanniocalcin-2 (STC2), the paralog of STC1, has been suggested as a novel target of oxidative stress response to protect cells from apoptosis. The expression of STC2 has been reported to be highly correlated with human cancer development. In this study, we reported that STC2 is a HIF-1 target gene and is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. STC2 was shown to be up-regulated in different breast and ovarian cancer cells, following exposure to hypoxia. Using ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3), the underlying mechanism of HIF-1 mediated STC2 gene transactivation was characterized. Hypoxia-induced STC2 expression was found to be HIF-1{alpha} dependent and required the recruitment of p300 and HDAC7. Using STC2 promoter deletion constructs and site-directed mutagenesis, two authentic consensus HIF-1 binding sites were identified. Under hypoxic condition, the silencing of STC2 reduced while the overexpression of STC2 increased the levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma and cyclin D in both SKOV3 and MCF7 cells. The change in cell cycle proteins correlated with the data of the serial cell counts. The results indicated that cell proliferation was reduced in STC2-silenced cells but was increased in STC2-overexpressing hypoxic cells. Solid tumor progression is usually associated with hypoxia. The identification and functional analysis of STC2 up-regulation by hypoxia, a feature of the tumor microenvironment, sheds light on a possible role for STC2 in tumors.

  4. Stanniocalcin-2 is a HIF-1 target gene that promotes cell proliferation in hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanniocalcin-2 (STC2), the paralog of STC1, has been suggested as a novel target of oxidative stress response to protect cells from apoptosis. The expression of STC2 has been reported to be highly correlated with human cancer development. In this study, we reported that STC2 is a HIF-1 target gene and is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. STC2 was shown to be up-regulated in different breast and ovarian cancer cells, following exposure to hypoxia. Using ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3), the underlying mechanism of HIF-1 mediated STC2 gene transactivation was characterized. Hypoxia-induced STC2 expression was found to be HIF-1α dependent and required the recruitment of p300 and HDAC7. Using STC2 promoter deletion constructs and site-directed mutagenesis, two authentic consensus HIF-1 binding sites were identified. Under hypoxic condition, the silencing of STC2 reduced while the overexpression of STC2 increased the levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma and cyclin D in both SKOV3 and MCF7 cells. The change in cell cycle proteins correlated with the data of the serial cell counts. The results indicated that cell proliferation was reduced in STC2-silenced cells but was increased in STC2-overexpressing hypoxic cells. Solid tumor progression is usually associated with hypoxia. The identification and functional analysis of STC2 up-regulation by hypoxia, a feature of the tumor microenvironment, sheds light on a possible role for STC2 in tumors.

  5. Potential therapeutic target for malignant paragangliomas: ATP synthase on the surface of paraganglioma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliedner, Stephanie MJ; Yang, Chunzhang; Thompson, Eli; Abu-Asab, Mones; Hsu, Chang-Mei; Lampert, Gary; Eiden, Lee; Tischler, Arthur S; Wesley, Robert; Zhuang, Zhengping; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    F1FoATP synthase (ATP synthase) is a ubiquitous enzyme complex in eukaryotes. In general it is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane and serves as the last step in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation of ADP to ATP, utilizing a proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane built by the complexes of the electron transfer chain. However some cell types, including tumors, carry ATP synthase on the cell surface. It was suggested that cell surface ATP synthase helps tumor cells thriving on glycolysis to survive their high acid generation. Angiostatin, aurovertin, resveratrol, and antibodies against the α and β subunits of ATP synthase were shown to bind and selectively inhibit cell surface ATP synthase, promoting tumor cell death. Here we show that ATP synthase β (ATP5B) is present on the cell surface of mouse pheochromocytoma cells as well as tumor cells of human SDHB-derived paragangliomas (PGLs), while being virtually absent on chromaffin primary cells from bovine adrenal medulla by confocal microscopy. The cell surface location of ATP5B was verified in the tissue of an SDHB-derived PGL by immunoelectron microscopy. Treatment of mouse pheochromocytoma cells with resveratrol as well as ATP5B antibody led to statistically significant proliferation inhibition. Our data suggest that PGLs carry ATP synthase on their surface that promotes cell survival or proliferation. Thus, cell surface ATP synthase may present a novel therapeutic target in treating metastatic or inoperable PGLs. PMID:26101719

  6. Enhanced delivery of liposomes to lung tumor through targeting interleukin-4 receptor on both tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Lianhua; Na, Moon-Hee; Jung, Hyun-Kyung; Vadevoo, Sri Murugan Poongkavithai; Kim, Cheong-Wun; Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Tae-In; Park, Jae-Yong; Hwang, Ilseon; Park, Keon Uk; Liang, Frank; Lu, Maggie; Park, Jiho; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2015-07-10

    A growing body of evidence suggests that pathological lesions express tissue-specific molecular targets or biomarkers within the tissue. Interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) is overexpressed in many types of cancer cells, including lung cancer. Here we investigated the properties of IL-4R-binding peptide-1 (IL4RPep-1), a CRKRLDRNC peptide, and its ability to target the delivery of liposomes to lung tumor. IL4RPep-1 preferentially bound to H226 lung tumor cells which express higher levers of IL-4R compared to H460 lung tumor cells which express less IL-4R. Mutational analysis revealed that C1, R2, and R4 residues of IL4RPep-1 were the key binding determinants. IL4RPep-1-labeled liposomes containing doxorubicin were more efficiently internalized in H226 cells and effectively delivered doxorubicin into the cells compared to unlabeled liposomes. In vivo fluorescence imaging of nude mice subcutaneously xenotransplanted with H226 tumor cells indicated that IL4RPep-1-labeled liposomes accumulate more efficiently in the tumor and inhibit tumor growth more effectively compared to unlabeled liposomes. Interestingly, expression of IL-4R was high in vascular endothelial cells of tumor, while little was detected in vascular endothelial cells of control organs including the liver. IL-4R expression in cultured human vascular endothelial cells was also up-regulated when activated by a pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, the up-regulation of IL-4R expression was observed in primary human lung cancer tissues. These results indicate that IL-4R-targeting nanocarriers may be a useful strategy to enhance drug delivery through the recognition of IL-4R in both tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells. PMID:25979323

  7. MiRNA-125a-5p inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation and promotes cell differentiation by targeting TAZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Expression of miR-125a-5p is inversely correlated with that of TAZ in glioma cells. • MiR-125a-5p represses TAZ expression in glioma cells. • MiR-125a-5p directly targets the 3′ UTR of TAZ mRNA and promotes its degradation. • MiR-125a-5p represses CTGF and survivin via TAZ, and inhibits glioma cell growth. • MiR-125a-5p inhibits the stem cell features of HFU-251 MG cells. - Abstract: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor due to the resistance to conventional therapies, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. TAZ, an important mediator of the Hippo pathway, was found to be up-regulated in diverse cancers, including in GBM, and plays important roles in tumor initiation and progression. However, little is known about the regulation of TAZ expression in tumors. In this study, we found that miR-125a-5p is an important regulator of TAZ in glioma cells by directly targeting the TAZ 3′ UTR. MiR-125a-5p levels are inversely correlated with that of TAZ in normal astrocytes and a panel of glioma cell lines. MiR-125a-5p represses the expression of TAZ target genes, including CTGF and survivin, and inhibits cell proliferation and induces the differentiation of GBM cells; whereas over-expression of TAZ rescues the effects of miR-125a-5p. This study revealed a mechanism for TAZ deregulation in glioma cells, and also demonstrated a tumor suppressor role of miR-125a-5p in glioblastoma cells

  8. MiRNA-125a-5p inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation and promotes cell differentiation by targeting TAZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Jian; Xiao, Gelei [Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); The Institute of Skull Base Surgery & Neuro-oncology at Hunan, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Peng, Gang [Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Liu, Dingyang [Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); The Institute of Skull Base Surgery & Neuro-oncology at Hunan, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Wang, Zeyou [Cancer Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Liao, Yiwei; Liu, Qing [Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); The Institute of Skull Base Surgery & Neuro-oncology at Hunan, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Wu, Minghua [The Institute of Skull Base Surgery & Neuro-oncology at Hunan, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Cancer Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Yuan, Xianrui, E-mail: xry69@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); The Institute of Skull Base Surgery & Neuro-oncology at Hunan, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • Expression of miR-125a-5p is inversely correlated with that of TAZ in glioma cells. • MiR-125a-5p represses TAZ expression in glioma cells. • MiR-125a-5p directly targets the 3′ UTR of TAZ mRNA and promotes its degradation. • MiR-125a-5p represses CTGF and survivin via TAZ, and inhibits glioma cell growth. • MiR-125a-5p inhibits the stem cell features of HFU-251 MG cells. - Abstract: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor due to the resistance to conventional therapies, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. TAZ, an important mediator of the Hippo pathway, was found to be up-regulated in diverse cancers, including in GBM, and plays important roles in tumor initiation and progression. However, little is known about the regulation of TAZ expression in tumors. In this study, we found that miR-125a-5p is an important regulator of TAZ in glioma cells by directly targeting the TAZ 3′ UTR. MiR-125a-5p levels are inversely correlated with that of TAZ in normal astrocytes and a panel of glioma cell lines. MiR-125a-5p represses the expression of TAZ target genes, including CTGF and survivin, and inhibits cell proliferation and induces the differentiation of GBM cells; whereas over-expression of TAZ rescues the effects of miR-125a-5p. This study revealed a mechanism for TAZ deregulation in glioma cells, and also demonstrated a tumor suppressor role of miR-125a-5p in glioblastoma cells.

  9. Aminopeptidase N/CD13 targeting fluorescent probes: synthesis and application to tumor cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhouen; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Kazuhito; Hatta, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishimoto, Sei-ichi

    2005-11-01

    A family of fluorescein-peptide conjugates (CNP1-3) for aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) targeting fluorescent probes were designed and synthesized. Among the three conjugates, CNP1 bearing tumor-homing cyclic peptide CNGRC, could selectively label APN/CD13 over-expressing on the surface of tumor cells of HT-1080, as identified by means of fluorescent microscopic cell imaging. CNP1 was shown to be a promising fluorescent probe applicable to tumor-targeting molecular imaging. PMID:15885853

  10. Rapid antibody responses by low-dose, single-step, dendritic cell-targeted immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui; Griffiths, Michelle N.; Burton, Dennis R; Ghazal, Peter

    2000-01-01

    We have compared the kinetics of antibody responses in conventional and dendritic cell-targeted immunization by using a model antigen in mice. Targeting was achieved by linking the reporter antigen (polyclonal goat anti-hamster antibody) to N418, a hamster mAb that binds to the CD11c molecule on the surface of murine dendritic cells. Intradermal injection of submicrogram quantities of goat anti-hamster antibody complexed to mAb N418 elicited goat antibody-specific serum IgG in mice. Antigen-s...

  11. Catechol Polymers for pH-Responsive, Targeted Drug Delivery to Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jing; Chen, Feng; Cryns, Vincent L.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2011-01-01

    A novel cell-targeting, pH-sensitive polymeric carrier was employed in this study for delivery of the anticancer drug bortezomib (BTZ) to cancer cells. Our strategy is based on facile conjugation of BTZ to catechol-containing polymeric carriers that are designed to be taken up selectively by cancer cells through cell surface receptor-mediated mechanisms. The polymer used as a building block in this study was poly(ethylene glycol), which was chosen for its ability to reduce nonspecific interac...

  12. Detection of circulating tumor cells using targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles and magnetic enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Paproski, Robert J.; Moore, Ronald; Zemp, Roger

    2014-05-01

    While more than 90% of cancer deaths are due to metastases, our ability to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is limited by low numbers of these cells in the blood and factors confounding specificity of detection. We propose a magnetic enrichment and detection technique for detecting CTCs with high specificity. We targeted both magnetic and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles to cancer cells. Only cells that are dual-labeled with both kinds of nanoparticles demonstrate an increasing SERS signal over time due to magnetic trapping.

  13. HIV-1-Induced Small T Cell Syncytia Can Transfer Virus Particles to Target Cells through Transient Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menelaos Symeonides

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Env mediates fusion of viral and target cell membranes, but it can also mediate fusion of infected (producer and target cells, thus triggering the formation of multinucleated cells, so-called syncytia. Large, round, immobile syncytia are readily observable in cultures of HIV-1-infected T cells, but these fast growing “fusion sinks” are largely regarded as cell culture artifacts. In contrast, small HIV-1-induced syncytia were seen in the paracortex of peripheral lymph nodes and other secondary lymphoid tissue of HIV-1-positive individuals. Further, recent intravital imaging of lymph nodes in humanized mice early after their infection with HIV-1 demonstrated that a significant fraction of infected cells were highly mobile, small syncytia, suggesting that these entities contribute to virus dissemination. Here, we report that the formation of small, migratory syncytia, for which we provide further quantification in humanized mice, can be recapitulated in vitro if HIV-1-infected T cells are placed into 3D extracellular matrix (ECM hydrogels rather than being kept in traditional suspension culture systems. Intriguingly, live-cell imaging in hydrogels revealed that these syncytia, similar to individual infected cells, can transiently interact with uninfected cells, leading to rapid virus transfer without cell-cell fusion. Infected cells were also observed to deposit large amounts of viral particles into the extracellular space. Altogether, these observations suggest the need to further evaluate the biological significance of small, T cell-based syncytia and to consider the possibility that these entities do indeed contribute to virus spread and pathogenesis.

  14. Challenges and limitations of targeting cancer stem cells and/or the tumour microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Sebastian Yakisich

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The existence of cancer cells with stem cell properties (Cancer Stem Cells, CSCs and their association with tumor resistance and relapse has led to the search for active compounds to eliminate these cells or modulate their stemness in the hope of curing cancer. So far, three classes of drugs that target cancer stemness (Stemness Modulator Drugs have been identified: i drugs that selectively eliminate CSCs (stem cell targeting drugs; ii drugs that decrease stemness (stemness inhibitor drugs; and iii drugs that promote stemness (stemness promoting drugs. In addition, microenvironment modulating drugs aimed at selectively targeting the stem cell niche are being investigated and may represent an important class of drug for cancer therapy. This article will briefly review the current use of these substances and discuss the potential outcomes, challenges and limitations of treatment modalities using these classes of drugs for cancer treatment. Finally, a modular tumor model will be proposed as a guide to integrate our knowledge on the biology of cancer stem cell with that of the tumor microenvironment to promote a more rational development of anticancer therapy.

  15. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  16. Peripherally administered nanoparticles target monocytic myeloid cells, secondary lymphoid organs and tumors in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraklis C Kourtis

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have been extensively developed for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. While the focus of nanoparticle trafficking in vivo has traditionally been on drug delivery and organ-level biodistribution and clearance, recent work in cancer biology and infectious disease suggests that targeting different cells within a given organ can substantially affect the quality of the immunological response. Here, we examine the cell-level biodistribution kinetics after administering ultrasmall Pluronic-stabilized poly(propylene sulfide nanoparticles in the mouse. These nanoparticles depend on lymphatic drainage to reach the lymph nodes and blood, and then enter the spleen rather than the liver, where they interact with monocytes, macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells. They were more readily taken up into lymphatics after intradermal (i.d. compared to intramuscular administration, leading to ∼50% increased bioavailability in blood. When administered i.d., their distribution favored antigen-presenting cells, with especially strong targeting to myeloid cells. In tumor-bearing mice, the monocytic and the polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cell compartments were efficiently and preferentially targeted, rendering this nanoparticulate formulation potentially useful for reversing the highly suppressive activity of these cells in the tumor stroma.

  17. Targeting anthracycline-resistant tumor cells with synthetic aloe-emodin glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiner-Goldstein, Elinor; Evron, Zoharia; Frenkel, Michael; Cohen, Keren; Meiron, Keren Nir; Peer, Dan; Roichman, Yael; Flescher, Eliezer; Fridman, Micha

    2011-07-14

    The cytotoxic activity of aloe-emodin (AE), a natural anthranoid that readily permeates anthracycline-resistant tumor cells, was improved by the attachment of an amino-sugar unit to its anthraquinone core. The new class of AE glycosides (AEGs) showed a significant improvement in cytotoxicity-up to more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than those of AE and the clinically used anthracycline doxorubicin (DOX)-against several cancer cell lines with different levels of DOX resistance. Incubation with the synthetic AEGs induced cell death in less than one cell cycle, indicating that these compounds do not directly target the cell division mechanism. Confocal microscopy provided evidence that unlike DOX, AEGs accumulated in anthracycline-resistant tumor cells in which resistance is conferred by P-glycoprotein efflux pumps. The results of this study demonstrate that AEGs may serve as a promising scaffold for the development of cytotoxic agents capable of overcoming anthracycline resistance in tumor cells. PMID:24900344

  18. Targeting of follicle stimulating hormone peptide-conjugated dendrimers to ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Dimple A.; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Bugno, Jason; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Hong, Seungpyo; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side effects. To address these issues, we have designed poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to selectively target the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), which is overexpressed by tumorigenic ovarian cancer cells but not by immature primordial follicles and other non-tumorigenic cells. Fluorescein-labeled generation 5 (G5) PAMAM dendrimers were conjugated with the binding peptide domain of FSH (FSH33) that has a high affinity to FSHR. The targeted dendrimers exhibited high receptor selectivity to FSHR-expressing OVCAR-3 cells, resulting in significant uptake and downregulation of an anti-apoptotic protein survivin, while showing minimal interactions with SKOV-3 cells that do not express FSHR. The selectivity of the FSH33-targeted dendrimers was further validated in 3D organ cultures of normal mouse ovaries. Immunostaining of the conjugates revealed their selective binding and uptake by ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) cells that express FSHR, while sparing the immature primordial follicles. In addition, an in vivo study monitoring tissue accumulation following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the conjugates showed significantly higher accumulation of FSH33-targeted dendrimers in the ovary and oviduct compared to the non-targeted conjugates. These proof-of-concept findings highlight the potential of these FSH33-targeted dendrimers to serve as a delivery platform for anti-ovarian cancer drugs, while reducing their systemic side effects by preventing nonspecific uptake by the primordial follicles.Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side

  19. Prolactin-induced Subcellular Targeting of GLUT1 Glucose Transporter in Living Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh Riskin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studying the biological pathways involved in mammalian milk production during lactation could have many clinical implications. The mammary gland is unique in its requirement for transport of free glucose into the cell for the synthesis of lactose, the primary carbohydrate in milk. Objective: To study GLUT1 trafficking and subcellular targeting in living mammary epithelial cells (MEC in culture. Methods: Immunocytochemistry was used to study GLUT1 hormonally regulated subcellular targeting in human MEC (HMEC. To study GLUT1 targeting and recycling in living mouse MEC (MMEC in culture, we constructed fusion proteins of GLUT1 and green fluorescent protein (GFP and expressed them in CIT3 MMEC. Cells were maintained in growth medium (GM, or exposed to secretion medium (SM, containing prolactin. Results: GLUT1 in HMEC localized primarily to the plasma membrane in GM. After exposure to prolactin for 4 days, GLUT1 was targeted intracellularly and demonstrated a perinuclear distribution, co-localizing with lactose synthetase. The dynamic trafficking of GFP-GLUT1 fusion proteins in CIT3 MMEC suggested a basal constitutive GLUT1 recycling pathway between an intracellular pool and the cell surface that targets most GLUT1 to the plasma membrane in GM. Upon exposure to prolactin in SM, GLUT1 was specifically targeted intracellularly within 90–110 minutes. Conclusions: Our studies suggest intracellular targeting of GLUT1 to the central vesicular transport system upon exposure to prolactin. The existence of a dynamic prolactin-induced sorting machinery for GLUT1 could be important for transport of free glucose into the Golgi for lactose synthesis during lactation.

  20. Targeting B cells in immune-mediated inflammatory disease: A comprehensive review of mechanisms of action and identification of biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Dörner; N. Kinnman; P.P. Tak

    2010-01-01

    B cell-depletion therapy, particularly using anti-CD20 treatment, has provided proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response may result in clinical improvements in immune-mediated inflammatory disease. In this review, the mechanisms of action of B cell-targeting drugs are investig

  1. Approaches to augment CAR T-cell therapy by targeting the apoptotic machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hannah

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells have shown impressive results in patients with B-cell leukaemia. Yet, in patients with lymphoma durable responses are still rare and heavy preconditioning required. Apoptosis resistance is considered a hallmark of cancer, often conveyed by a halted apoptosis signalling. Tumours regularly skew the balance of the components of the apoptotic machinery either through up-regulating anti-apoptotic proteins or silencing pro-apoptotic ones. Malignant B-cells frequently up-regulate anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins leading to therapy resistance. CAR T-cells kill tumour cells via apoptosis induction and their efficacy may be affected by the level of Bcl-2 family proteins. Hence, there is an interesting possibility to increase the effect of CAR T-cell therapy by combining it with apoptosis inhibitor blockade agents. Compounds that inhibit Bcl-2, B-cell lymphoma extra large (Bcl-xL) and Bcl-2-like protein 2 (Bcl-w), can restore execution of apoptosis in tumour cells or sensitize them to other apoptosis-dependent treatments. Hence, there is a great interest to combine such agents with CAR T-cell therapy to potentiate the effect of CAR T-cell killing. This review will focus on the potential of targeting the apoptotic machinery to sensitize tumour cells to CAR T-cell killing. PMID:27068942

  2. Early T Cell Recognition of B Cells following Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: Identifying Potential Targets for Prophylactic Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jill M; Long, Heather M; Tierney, Rose J; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Leese, Alison M; Fitzpatrick, Martin; Taylor, Graham S; Rickinson, Alan B

    2016-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus, a B-lymphotropic herpesvirus, is the cause of infectious mononucleosis, has strong aetiologic links with several malignancies and has been implicated in certain autoimmune diseases. Efforts to develop a prophylactic vaccine to prevent or reduce EBV-associated disease have, to date, focused on the induction of neutralising antibody responses. However, such vaccines might be further improved by inducing T cell responses capable of recognising and killing recently-infected B cells. In that context, EBNA2, EBNA-LP and BHRF1 are the first viral antigens expressed during the initial stage of B cell growth transformation, yet have been poorly characterised as CD8+ T cell targets. Here we describe CD8+ T cell responses against each of these three "first wave" proteins, identifying target epitopes and HLA restricting alleles. While EBNA-LP and BHRF1 each contained one strong CD8 epitope, epitopes within EBNA2 induced immunodominant responses through several less common HLA class I alleles (e.g. B*3801 and B*5501), as well as subdominant responses through common class I alleles (e.g. B7 and C*0304). Importantly, such EBNA2-specific CD8+ T cells recognised B cells within the first day post-infection, prior to CD8+ T cells against well-characterised latent target antigens such as EBNA3B or LMP2, and effectively inhibited outgrowth of EBV-transformed B cell lines. We infer that "first wave" antigens of the growth-transforming infection, especially EBNA2, constitute potential CD8+ T cell immunogens for inclusion in prophylactic EBV vaccine design. PMID:27096949

  3. Early T Cell Recognition of B Cells following Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: Identifying Potential Targets for Prophylactic Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M Brooks

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a B-lymphotropic herpesvirus, is the cause of infectious mononucleosis, has strong aetiologic links with several malignancies and has been implicated in certain autoimmune diseases. Efforts to develop a prophylactic vaccine to prevent or reduce EBV-associated disease have, to date, focused on the induction of neutralising antibody responses. However, such vaccines might be further improved by inducing T cell responses capable of recognising and killing recently-infected B cells. In that context, EBNA2, EBNA-LP and BHRF1 are the first viral antigens expressed during the initial stage of B cell growth transformation, yet have been poorly characterised as CD8+ T cell targets. Here we describe CD8+ T cell responses against each of these three "first wave" proteins, identifying target epitopes and HLA restricting alleles. While EBNA-LP and BHRF1 each contained one strong CD8 epitope, epitopes within EBNA2 induced immunodominant responses through several less common HLA class I alleles (e.g. B*3801 and B*5501, as well as subdominant responses through common class I alleles (e.g. B7 and C*0304. Importantly, such EBNA2-specific CD8+ T cells recognised B cells within the first day post-infection, prior to CD8+ T cells against well-characterised latent target antigens such as EBNA3B or LMP2, and effectively inhibited outgrowth of EBV-transformed B cell lines. We infer that "first wave" antigens of the growth-transforming infection, especially EBNA2, constitute potential CD8+ T cell immunogens for inclusion in prophylactic EBV vaccine design.

  4. Lithium inhibits tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through targeting hedgehog-GLI signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglu Peng

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a critical role in the initiation and development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA and represents an attractive target for PDA treatment. Lithium, a clinical mood stabilizer for mental disorders, potently inhibits the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β that promotes the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome degradation of GLI1, an important downstream component of hedgehog signaling. Herein, we report that lithium inhibits cell proliferation, blocks G1/S cell-cycle progression, induces cell apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through down-regulation of the expression and activity of GLI1. Moreover, lithium synergistically enhances the anti-cancer effect of gemcitabine. These findings further our knowledge of mechanisms of action for lithium and provide a potentially new therapeutic strategy for PDA through targeting GLI1.

  5. Inhibition of human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas by targeted silencing of tumor enhancer genes: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esophageal cancer has been reported as the ninth most common malignancy and ranks as the sixth most frequent cause of death worldwide. Esophageal cancer treatment involves surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or combination therapy. Novel strategies are needed to boost the oncologic outcome. Recent advances in the molecular biology of esophageal cancer have documented the role of genetic alterations in tumorigenesis. Oncogenes serve a pivotal function in tumorigenesis. Targeted therapies are directed at the unique molecular signature of cancer cells for enhanced efficacy with low toxicity. RNA interference (RNAi) technology is a powerful tool for silencing endogenous or exogenous genes in mammalian cells. Related results have shown that targeting oncogenes with siRNAs, specifically the mRNA, effectively reduces tumor cell proliferation and induces apoptotic cell death. This article will briefly review studies on silencing tumor enhancer genes related to the induction of esophageal cancer

  6. Eosinophils and mast cells as therapeutic targets in pediatric functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Craig; A; Friesen; Jennifer; V; Schurman; Jennifer; M; Colombo; Susan; M; Abdel-Rahman

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing appreciation for the importance of inflammation as a pathophysiologic entity that contributes to functional gastrointestinal disorders including functional dyspepsia(FD).Importantly,inflammation may serve as a mediator between psychologic and physiologic functions.This manuscript reviews the literature implicating two inflammatory cell types,mast cells and eosinophils,in the generation of dyspeptic symptoms and explores their potential as targets for the treatment of FD.There are a number of inciting events which may initiate an inflammatory response,and the subsequent recruitment and activation of mast cells and eosinophils.These include internal triggers such as stress and anxiety,as well as external triggers such as microbes and allergens.Previous studies suggest that there may be efficacy in utilizing medications directed at mast cells and eosinophils.Evidence exists to suggest that combining "anti-inflammatory" medications with other treatments targeting stress can improve the rate of symptom resolution in pediatric FD.

  7. A Sox2 BAC transgenic approach for targeting adult neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfei Kang

    Full Text Available The transcription factor gene Sox2 is expressed in embryonic neural stem/progenitor cells and previous evidence suggests that it is also expressed in adult neural stem cells. To target Sox2-expressing neural stem/progenitor cells in a temporal manner, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mouse line, in which an inducible form of Cre, CreER™, is expressed under Sox2 regulatory elements. Inducible Cre activity in these mice was characterized using floxed reporters. During development, the Sox2-CreER transgenic mice show inducible Cre activity specifically in CNS stem/progenitor cells, making them a useful tool to regulate the expression of floxed genes temporally in embryonic neural stem/progenitor cells. In the adult, we examined the cell-specific expression of Sox2 and performed long-term lineage tracing. Four months after the transient induction of Cre activity, recombined GFAP+ stem-like cells and DCX+ neuroblasts were still abundant in the neurogenic regions including the subventricular zone (SVZ, rostral migratory stream (RMS, and subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus. These results provide definitive in vivo evidence that Sox2 is expressed in neural stem cells (NSC in both the SVZ and SGZ that are capable of self-renewal and long-term neurogenesis. Therefore, Sox2-CreER mice should be useful in targeting floxed genes in adult neural stem cells.

  8. Nestin is a novel target for suppressing pancreatic cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoko; Naito, Zenya; Kawahara, Kiyoko; Nakazawa, Nando; Korc, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Nestin, is a class VI intermediate filament (IF) that is expressed in 30% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cases, and its expression in PDAC positively correlates with peripancreatic invasion. An expression vector carrying a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting nestin was stably transfected into PANC-1 and PK-45H human pancreatic cancer cells, which express high nestin levels. Alterations in morphology and alignment of actin filaments and α-tubulin were examined by phase-contrast and immunocytochemistry. Effects on cell growth, migration in scratch and Boyden chamber assays, invasion, cell adhesion, and in vivo growth were determined. Differences in mRNA levels were examined by arrays. Nestin shRNA-transfected cells exhibited decreased nestin expression, a sheet-like appearance with tight cell-cell adhesion, increased expression of filamentous F-actin and E-cadherin, and attenuated migration and invasion, both of which were enhanced following nestin re-expression. Expression of α-tubulin, and in vitro cell growth and adhesion were not altered by nestin downregulation, whereas hepatic metastases were decreased. Thus, nestin plays important roles in pancreatic cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis by selectively modulating the expression of actin and cell adhesion molecules, and may therefore be a novel therapeutic target in PDAC. PMID:21258211

  9. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  10. Targeting stemness is an effective strategy to control EML4-ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Jin; Noh, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young-Ho; Hong, Soon-Oh; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae Woo

    2015-11-24

    The fusion between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) is a causative factor in a unique subset of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although the inhibitor crizotinib, as it blocks the kinase activity of the resulting EML4-ALK fusion protein, displays remarkable initial responses, a fraction of NSCLC cases eventually become resistant to crizotinib by acquiring mutations in the ALK domain or activating bypass pathways via EGFR, KIT, or KRAS. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory provides a plausible explanation for acquisition of tumorigenesis and resistance. However, the question as to whether EML4-ALK-driven tumorigenesis is linked with the stem-like property and whether the stemness is an effective target in controlling EML4-ALK+ NSCLC including crizotinib-resistant NSCLC cells has not been addressed. Here, we report that stem-like properties stem from ALK activity in EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells. Notably, treatment with rapamycin, a CSC targeting agent, attenuates stem-like phenotypes of the EML4-ALK+ cells, which increased capability of tumor formation and higher expression of stemness-associated molecules such as ALDH, NANOG, and OCT4. Importantly, combinational treatment with rapamycin and crizotinib leads to synergistic anti-tumor effects on EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells as well as on those resistant to crizotinib. Thus, we provide a proof of principle that targeting stemness would be a novel strategy to control intractable EML4-ALK+ NSCLC. PMID:26517679

  11. Therapeutics formulated to target cancer stem cells: Is it in our future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Shaker A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the political, social and financial drives for cancer research, many advances have been made in the treatment of many different cancer types. For example, given the increase in awareness, early detection, and treatment of breast and prostate cancers, we have seen substantial increases in survival rates. Unfortunately there are some realms of cancer that have not seen these substantial advancements, largely due to their rapid progression and the inability to specifically target therapy. The hypothesis that cancers arise from a small population of cells, called cancer stem cells (CSCs, is gaining more popularity amongst researchers. There are, however, still many skeptics who bring into question the validity of this theory. Many skeptics believe that there is not a specific subset of cells that originate with these characteristics, but that they develop certain features over time making them more resistant to conventional therapy. It is theorized that many of the relapses occurring after remission are due to our inability to destroy the self-renewing CSCs. This central idea, that CSCs are biologically different from all other cancer cells, has directed research towards the development of therapy to target CSCs directly. The major dilemma in targeting therapy in myeloproliferative disorders, malignancies of the central nervous system or malignancies in general, is the inability to target CSCs as opposed to normal stem cells. However, with the recent advances in the identifications of unique molecular signatures for CSCs along with ongoing clinical trials targeting CSCs, it is possible to use targeted nanotechnology-based strategies in the management of different types of cancers.

  12. Assessment of Targeted and Non-Targeted Responses in Cells Deficient in ATM Function following Exposure to Low and High Dose X-Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Kiuru, Anne; Kämäräinen, Meerit; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Pylkäs, Katri; Chapman, Kim; Koivistoinen, Armi; Parviainen, Teuvo; Winqvist, Robert; Kadhim, Munira; Launonen, Virpi; Lindholm, Carita

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity at low and high dose exposure to X-rays was investigated by means of chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis in heterozygous ATM mutation carrier and A-T patient (biallelic ATM mutation) lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Targeted and non-targeted responses to acutely delivered irradiation were examined by applying a co-culture system that enables study of both directly irradiated cells and medium-mediated bystander effects in the same experimental setting. No indication of ...

  13. Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schlimper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells showed promise in a number of trials; the activation of CIK cells from cancer patients towards their autologous cancer cells still needs to be improved. Here, we generated CIK cells ex vivo from blood lymphocytes of colorectal cancer patients and engineered those cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with an antibody-defined specificity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. CIK cells thereby gained a new specificity as defined by the CAR and showed increase in activation towards CEA+ colon carcinoma cells, but less in presence of CEA− cells, indicated by increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Redirected CIK activation was superior by CAR-mediated CD28-CD3ζ than CD3ζ signaling only. CAR-engineered CIK cells from colon carcinoma patients showed improved activation against their autologous, primary carcinoma cells from biopsies resulting in more efficient tumour cell lysis. We assume that adoptive therapy with CAR-modified CIK cells shows improved selectivity in targeting autologous tumour lesions.

  14. GEM-loaded magnetic albumin nanospheres modified with cetuximab for simultaneous targeting, magnetic resonance imaging, and double-targeted thermochemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang L

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ling Wang,1 Yanli An,2 Chenyan Yuan,3 Hao Zhang,2 Chen Liang,2 Fengan Ding,2 Qi Gao,1 Dongsheng Zhang4 1Department of Ultrasonography, Zhong Da Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Clinical Laboratory, Zhong Da Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 4Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Background: Targeted delivery is a promising strategy to improve the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic effect of cancers. In this paper, novel cetuximab (C225-conjugated, gemcitabine (GEM-containing magnetic albumin nanospheres (C225-GEM/MANs were fabricated and applied as a theranostic nanocarrier to conduct simultaneous targeting, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and double-targeted thermochemotherapy against pancreatic cancer cells. Methods: Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs and GEM co-loaded albumin nanospheres (GEM/MANs were prepared, and then C225 was further conjugated to synthesize C225-GEM/MANs. Their morphology, mean particle size, GEM encapsulation ratio, specific cell-binding ability, and thermal dynamic profiles were characterized. The effects of discriminating different EGFR-expressing pancreatic cancer cells (AsPC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 and monitoring cellular targeting effects were assessed by targeted MRI. Lastly, the antitumor efficiency of double/C225/magnetic-targeted and nontargeted thermochemotherapy was compared with chemotherapy alone using 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT and flow cytometry (FCM assay. Results: When treated with targeted nanospheres, AsPC-1 cells showed a significantly less intense MRI T2 signal than MIA PaCa-2 cells, while both cells had similar signal strength when incubated with nontargeted nanospheres. T2 signal

  15. M-Cell Targeting of Whole Killed Bacteria Induces Protective Immunity against Gastrointestinal Pathogens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chionh, Yok-Teng; Wee, Janet L. K.; Every, Alison L.; Ng, Garrett Z.; Sutton, Philip

    2009-01-01

    As the majority of human pathogens infect via a mucosal surface, delivery of killed vaccines by mucosal routes could potentially improve protection against many such organisms. Our ability to develop effective killed mucosal vaccines is inhibited by a lack of adjuvants that are safe and effective in humans. The Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin specifically binds M cells lining the murine gastrointestinal tract. We explored the potential for M-cell-targeted vaccination of whole, kill...

  16. Emerging gene editing strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy targeting stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The progressive loss of muscle mass characteristic of many muscular dystrophies impairs the efficacy of most of the gene and molecular therapies currently being pursued for the treatment of those disorders. It is becoming increasingly evident that a therapeutic application, to be effective, needs to target not only mature myofibers, but also muscle progenitors cells or muscle stem cells able to form new muscle tissue and to restore myofibers lost as the result of the diseases or during normal...

  17. Targeted mRNA Profiling of Transfected Breast Cancer Gene in a Living Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Nawarathna, D.; Chang, R; Nelson, E.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Selective mRNA profiling of transfected breast cancer gene expression in a living cell is demonstrated. Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) probe tips are structurally modified to create a dielectrophoretic force that attracts mRNA molecules within the cell nucleus. The tip end is chemically modified to hybridize only to the target mRNA from a pool of molecules within the nucleus. We successfully combined this scheme with standard assay techniques to develop an assay technology that can be used for...

  18. Triple helix-forming oligonucleotides target psoralen adducts to specific chromosomal sequences in human cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, D H; Hanawalt, P C

    1999-01-01

    The ability to target photochemical adducts to specific genomic DNA sequences in cells is useful for studying DNA repair and mutagenesis in intact cells, and also as a potential mode of gene-specific therapy. Triple helix-forming DNA oligonucleotides linked to psoralen (psoTFOs) were designed to deliver UVA-induced psoralen photoadducts to two distinct sequences within the human interstitial collagenase gene. A primer extension assay demonstrated that the appropriate psoTFO selectively damage...

  19. Design of nanodrugs for miRNA targeting in tumor cells (13-510-R)

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Byunghee; Ghosh, Subrata K.; Kumar, Mohanraja; Moore, Anna; Yigit, Mehmet V.; Medarova, Zdravka

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of oligonucleotide antagonists to cytosolic RNA targets such as microRNA represents an avenue for the post-transcriptional control of cellular phenotype. In tumor cells, oncogenic miRNAs, termed oncomirs, are tightly linked to processes that ultimately determine cancer initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Therefore, the capacity to redirect tumor cell fate towards therapeutically beneficial phenotypes holds promise in a future clinical scenario. Previously, we have d...

  20. Different Forms of Vanadate on Sugar Transport in Insulin Target and Nontarget Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Germinario Ralph J.; Colby-Germinario Susan P.; Posner Barry I.; Nahm K.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of several vanadates (ie, orthovanadate, pervanadate, and two stable peroxovanadium compounds) on basal and insulin-stimulated 2-DG transport in insulin target and nontarget cell lines are reported, herein. In nontarget cells, exposure to vanadates ( 5 × 10 − 6 to 10 − 4 mol/L) resulted in 2-DG transport stimulatory responses similar to those observed in 2-DG transport post exposure to 667 nmol/L insulin alone, or insulin in combination with va...

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Peter J Nelson; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associa...

  2. Selective Cancer Targeting via Aberrant Behavior of Cancer Cell-associated Glucocorticoid Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Amarnath; Narayan, Kumar P; Pal, Krishnendu; Kumar, Jerald M.; Rangaraj, Nandini; Shasi V Kalivendi; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are ubiquitous, nuclear hormone receptors residing in cell types of both cancer and noncancerous origin. It is not known whether cancer cell–associated GR alone can be selectively manipulated for delivery of exogenous genes to its nucleus for eliciting anticancer effect. We find that GR ligand, dexamethasone (Dex) in association with cationic lipoplex (termed as targeted lipoplex) could selectively manipulate GR in cancer cells alone for the delivery of transgen...

  3. Chloroquine targets pancreatic cancer stem cells via inhibition of CXCR4 and hedgehog signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic, Anamaria; Sørensen, Morten Dræby; Trabulo, Sara Maria;

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest carcinomas and is characterized by highly tumorigenic and metastatic cancer stem cells (CSC). CSCs evade available therapies, which preferentially target highly proliferative and more differentiated progenies, leaving behind CSCs as a...... putative source for disease relapse. Thus, to identify potentially more effective treatment regimens, we screened established and new compounds for their ability to eliminate CSCs in primary pancreatic cancer (stem) cells in vitro and corresponding patient-derived pancreatic cancer tissue xenografts in...

  4. The Salmonella Translocated Effector SopA Is Targeted to the Mitochondria of Infected Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, Abigail N.; Brown, Philip J; Galyov, Edouard E.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the Salmonella effector protein SopA. We show that in Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin-infected cells, SopA1-347 fused to two carboxy-terminal hemagglutinin tags partially colocalized with mitochondria. Transfection of eukaryotic cells with a panel of constructs encoding truncated versions of SopA identified that amino acids 100 to 347 were sufficient to target SopA to the mitochondria.

  5. Salinomycin induces selective cytotoxicity to MCF-7 mammosphere cells through targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying-Zi; Yan, Yuan-Yuan; He, Miao; Xiao, Qing-Huan; Yao, Wei-Fan; Zhao, Lin; Wu, Hui-Zhe; Yu, Zhao-Jin; Zhou, Ming-Yi; Lv, Mu-Tian; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Wei, Min-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are believed to be responsible for tumor chemoresistance, recurrence, and metastasis formation. Salinomycin (SAL), a carboxylic polyether ionophore, has been reported to act as a selective breast CSC inhibitor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying SAL-induced cytotoxicity on BCSCs remain unclear. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in CSC maintenance and carcinogenesis. Here, we investigated whether SAL induces cytotoxicity on BCSCs through targeting Hh pathway. In the present study, we cultured breast cancer MCF-7 cells in suspension in serum-free medium to obtain breast CSC-enriched MCF-7 mammospheres (MCF-7 MS). MCF-7 MS cells possessed typical BCSC properties, such as CD44+CD24-/low phenotype, high expression of OCT4 (a stem cell marker), increased colony-forming ability, strong migration and invasion capabilities, differentiation potential, and strong tumorigenicity in xenografted mice. SAL exhibited selective cytotoxicity to MCF-7 MS cells relative to MCF-7 cells. The Hh pathway was highly activated in BCSC-enriched MCF-7 MS cells and SAL inhibited Hh signaling activation by downregulating the expression of critical components of the Hh pathway such as PTCH, SMO, Gli1, and Gli2, and subsequently repressing the expression of their essential downstream targets including C-myc, Bcl-2, and Snail (but not cyclin D1). Conversely, Shh-induced Hh signaling activation could largely reverse SAL-mediated inhibitory effects. These findings suggest that SAL-induced selective cytotoxicity against MCF-7 MS cells is associated with the inhibition of Hh signaling activation and the expression of downstream targets and the Hh pathway is an important player and a possible drug target in the pathogenesis of BCSCs. PMID:26718029

  6. Preparation of bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 targeted microbubbles and ultrasound molecular imaging for tumor vascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To prepare the bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST2)-targeted micro-bubbles (BST2-TMBs) for detecting the vascular endothelial cells of tumor via ultrasound molecular imaging technology. Methods: The targeted microbubbles (BST2-TMBs) were obtained through linking anti-BST2 antibodies to the surface of microbubbles via biotin-avidin bridge. The morphology of TMBs was examined under microscope and size distribution was observed using an optical particle counter. The specific binding of TMBs to endothelial cells was detected by in vitro cell adhesion assay. Murine prostatic carcinoma was used to investigate the capability of TMBs in detecting the vascular endothelial cells and for validating the expression of BST2 proteins. The t test was used by SPSS 19.0 to analyze the data. Results: The targeted microbubbles had the mean diameter of 1.61 μm, with 95% microbubbles between 1 to 5 μm. The in vitro cell adhesion assay demonstrated that the TMBs were able to specifically bind to the surface of endothelial cells, with (165 ±25) TMBs per field of view,significantly higher than that of the non-targeted microbubbles ((10 ± 3) microbubbles per field of view, t=10.662, P<0.01). The enhancement of ultrasonic signals of these cells bound with TMBs was also observed (TMBs: 27.93 ± 5.14 (gray-level), non-targeted microbubbles: 3.61 ± 1.67 (gray-level) ; t=7.239, P<0.01). Significant enhancement of signal intensity (gray-level: 38.79 ±0.29 at 7 min, remaining 47.65% of that (81.40 ±0.37) at 30 s) was found in the tumors of mice injected with BST2-TMBs, which was 4.27-fold higher than that (gray-level: 9.46 ±0.17 at 7 min, remaining 11.39% of that (83.01 ± 0.60) at 30 s) of mice injected with non-targeted microbubbles (t=65.587, P<0.01). This finding was further confirmed through immunohistochemistry assay. Conclusion: BST2-TMBs can be used for detecting the vascular endothelial cells of tumors via ultrasound molecular imaging. (authors)

  7. MiR-223 suppresses cell proliferation by targeting IGF-1R.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng You Jia

    Full Text Available To study the roles of microRNA-223 (miR-223 in regulation of cell growth, we established a miR-223 over-expression model in HeLa cells infected with miR-223 by Lentivirus pLL3.7 system. We observed in this model that miR-223 significantly suppressed the proliferation, growth rate, colony formation of HeLa cells in vitro, and in vivo tumorigenicity or tumor formation in nude mice. To investigate the mechanisms involved, we scanned and examined the potential and putative target molecules of miR-223 by informatics, quantitative PCR and Western blot, and found that insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R was the functional target of miR-223 inhibition of cell proliferation. Targeting IGF-1R by miR-223 was not only seen in HeLa cells, but also in leukemia and hepatoma cells. The downstream pathway, Akt/mTOR/p70S6K, to which the signal was mediated by IGF-1R, was inhibited as well. The relative luciferase activity of the reporter containing wild-type 3'UTR(3'untranslated region of IGF-1R was significantly suppressed, but the mutant not. Silence of IGF-1R expression by vector-based short hairpin RNA resulted in the similar inhibition with miR-223. Contrarily, rescued IGF-1R expression in the cells that over-expressed miR-223, reversed the inhibition caused by miR-223 via introducing IGF-1R cDNA that didn't contain the 3'UTR. Meanwhile, we also noted that miR-223 targeted Rasa1, but the downstream molecules mediated by Rasa1 was neither targeted nor regulated. Therefore we believed that IGF-1R was the functional target for miR-223 suppression of cell proliferation and its downstream PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway suppressed by miR-223 was by targeting IGF-1R.

  8. Enhanced CLIP uncovers IMP protein-RNA targets in human pluripotent stem cells important for cell adhesion and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Anne E.; Van Nostrand, Eric L.; Pratt, Gabriel A.; Aigner, Stefan; Wilbert, Melissa L.; Sundararaman, Balaji; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J.; Sathe, Shashank; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Essex, Anthony; Landais, Severine; Burge, Christopher B.; Jones, D. Leanne; Yeo, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) require precise control of post-transcriptional RNA networks to maintain proliferation and survival. Using enhanced UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (eCLIP), we identify RNA targets of the IMP/IGF2BP family of RNA-binding proteins in hPSCs. At the broad region- and binding site-level IMP1 and IMP2 show reproducible binding to a large and overlapping set of 3′UTR-enriched targets. RNA Bind-N-Seq applied to recombinant full-length IMP1 and IMP2 reveals CA-rich motifs that are enriched in eCLIP-defined binding sites. We observe that IMP1 loss in hPSCs recapitulates IMP1 phenotypes, including a reduction in cell adhesion and an increase in cell death. For cell adhesion, in hPSCs we find IMP1 maintains levels of integrin mRNA, specifically regulating RNA stability of ITGB5. Additionally, we show IMP1 can be linked to hPSC survival via direct target BCL2. Thus, transcriptome-wide binding profiles identify hPSC targets modulating well-characterized IMP1 roles. PMID:27068461

  9. Modeling bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two cell membrane targets indicates the importance of surface diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengers, Bram G; McGinty, Sean; Nouri, Fatma Z; Argungu, Maryam; Hawkins, Emma; Hadji, Aymen; Weber, Andrew; Taylor, Adam; Sepp, Armin

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a mathematical framework for describing a bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two independent membrane-bound targets that are expressed on the same cell surface. The bispecific antibody in solution binds either of the two targets first, and then cross-links with the second one while on the cell surface, subject to rate-limiting lateral diffusion step within the lifetime of the monovalently engaged antibody-antigen complex. At experimental densities, only a small fraction of the free targets is expected to lie within the reach of the antibody binding sites at any time. Using ordinary differential equation and Monte Carlo simulation-based models, we validated this approach against an independently published anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab experimental data set. As a result of dimensional reduction, the cell surface reaction is expected to be so rapid that, in agreement with the experimental data, no monovalently bound bispecific antibody binary complexes accumulate until cross-linking is complete. The dissociation of the bispecific antibody from the ternary cross-linked complex is expected to be significantly slower than that from either of the monovalently bound variants. We estimate that the effective affinity of the bivalently bound bispecific antibody is enhanced for about 4 orders of magnitude over that of the monovalently bound species. This avidity enhancement allows for the highly specific binding of anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab to the cells that are positive for both target antigens over those that express only one or the other We suggest that the lateral diffusion of target antigens in the cell membrane also plays a key role in the avidity effect of natural antibodies and other bivalent ligands in their interactions with their respective cell surface receptors. PMID:27097222

  10. MiR-614 Inhibited Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Proliferation via Targeting PSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang LV

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective MicroRNAs (miRNAs is a group of non-coding small RNA molecules, which play important roles in the development of tumor. The mechanisms of various kinds of miRNAs in lung cancer still need to be further elucidated. This study investigated the function of miR-614 on lung cancer cell invasion and proliferation. Methods Real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect the expression of miR-614 in lung cancer cell PGCL3 and PGLH7. Transwell assay was used to test the role of miR-614 on regulating invasion and migration of cells. CCK8 assay and BrdU incorporation assay was used to assess the role of miR-614 on cell proliferation. Bioinformatics software predicted the potential target genes of miR-614 and dual luciferase reporter gene was used to analyze the binding between miR-614 and 3’UTR of puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (PSA. Western blot detected the PSA protein levels. Results The expression of miR-614 in PGCL3 cells with high metastasis potential was significantly lower than that in PGLH7 cells with low metastasis potential. Furthermore, altered expression of miR-614 by transfection of pre-miR-614 mimics and inhibitor significantly affected the ability of invasion and proliferation of lung cancer cells. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that PSA was one of the potential target genes of miR-614. Altered expression of miR-614 markedly down-regulated the PSA protein levels of lung cancer cells. In addition, dual luciferase reporter gene assay indicated that miR-614 regulated PSA expression by binding to the 3’UTR of PSA mRNA. Conclusion MiR-614 inhibited cell invasion and proliferationa targeting PSA in lung cancer cells, PGCL3.

  11. B-cell-targeted therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Changhai; Foote, Simon; Jones, Graeme

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a classic autoimmune disease characterized by a myriad of immune system aberrations, most likely resulting from pathogenic autoantibody production, immune complex deposition, and subsequent end-organ damage. B cells play a key role in the pathogenesis; therefore, B-cell-targeted therapies, including B-cell depletion and blockage of B-cell survival factors such as B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), are potential therapeutic targets for SLE. In uncontrolled clinical trials from approximately 20 studies, rituximab--a mouse-human chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that effectively depletes B cells--has been demonstrated to reduce disease activity and decrease serum autoantibodies, with a clinical response of 86% in a case series of approximately 400 SLE patients with refractory disease, with or without concomitant use of cyclophosphamide. Epratuzumab, a humanized anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody that partially depletes B cells, has also been shown to reduce disease activity but not to decrease autoantibody levels in patients with moderately active SLE. Randomized controlled phase I/II trials in patients with active SLE have documented that belimumab, a humanized anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody, reduces B-cell numbers, inhibits disease activity and decreases anti-double-stranded DNA autoantibody in SLE patients. All these therapies are well tolerated, but accompanying infectious complications have been observed. Other B-cell-targeted therapies such as 'humanized' monoclonal antibodies to CD20 (e.g. ocrelizumab) and agents that interrupt B-cell/T-cell interactions also have potential, and the efficacy of these, along with rituximab, belimumab and epratuzumab, needs to be determined by randomized controlled trials. PMID:18611066

  12. Rationale for targeted therapies and potential role of pazopanib in advanced renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E Clark

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Peter E ClarkVanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USAAbstract: Advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC remains a challenging, major health problem. Recent advances in understanding the fundamental biology underlying one form of RCC, ie, clear cell (or conventional RCC, have opened the door to a series of targeted agents, such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, which have become the standard of care in managing advanced clear cell RCC. Among the newest of these agents to receive Food and Drug Administration approval in this disease is pazopanib. This review will summarize what is known about the fundamental biology that underlies clear cell RCC, the data surrounding the previously approved targeted agents for this disease, including not only the TKIs but also the mTOR inhibitors and the vascular endothelial growth factor-specific agent, bevacizumab, and the newest TKI, pazopanib. It will also explore the potential role for pazopanib relative to the other available agents and where it may fit into the armamentarium for treatment of advanced/metastatic RCC.Keywords: pazopanib, targeted therapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, clear cell renal cell carcinoma

  13. Novel pharmacologic targeting of tight junctions and focal adhesions in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Hensley

    Full Text Available Cancer cell resistance to anoikis driven by aberrant signaling sustained by the tumor microenvironment confers high invasive potential and therapeutic resistance. We recently generated a novel lead quinazoline-based Doxazosin® derivative, DZ-50, which impairs tumor growth and metastasis via anoikis. Genome-wide analysis in the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145 identified primary downregulated targets of DZ-50, including genes involved in focal adhesion integrity (fibronectin, integrin-α6 and talin, tight junction formation (claudin-11 as well as insulin growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3 and the angiogenesis modulator thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1. Confocal microscopy demonstrated structural disruption of both focal adhesions and tight junctions by the downregulation of these gene targets, resulting in decreased cell survival, migration and adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM components in two androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145. Stabilization of cell-ECM interactions by overexpression of talin-1 and/or exposing cells to a fibronectin-rich environment mitigated the effect of DZ-50. Loss of expression of the intracellular focal adhesion signaling effectors talin-1 and integrin linked kinase (ILK sensitized human prostate cancer to anoikis. Our findings suggest that DZ-50 exerts its antitumor effect by targeting the key functional intercellular interactions, focal adhesions and tight junctions, supporting the therapeutic significance of this agent for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  14. Exosomes from B cells and Dendritic cells: mechanisms of formation, secretion and targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschow, S.I.

    2006-01-01

    Many cell types, including dendritic cells (DC) and B cells, secrete small vesicles called exosomes. Exosomes from immune cells are thought to have immuno-regulatory functions but their precise role remains unresolved. The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was to get more insight into the

  15. Role of targeted therapy in combination with surgery in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bex, Axel; Powles, Thomas; Karam, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    Surgical complete resection is the only curative treatment of renal cell carcinoma including patients with locally advanced disease and those with limited metastatic disease. Patients at high risk of recurrence after complete resection might theoretically benefit from adjuvant and neoadjuvant systemic treatment strategies to prolong disease-free survival and ultimately overall survival. Another rationale for using targeted therapy includes downsizing/downstaging of surgically complex locally advanced renal cell carcinoma to facilitate complete resection or primary tumors to allow for nephron-sparing strategies. Unfortunately, a considerable percentage of patients are diagnosed with metastatic disease at first presentation. Although large population-based studies consistently show a survival benefit after cytoreductive nephrectomy in the targeted therapy era, confounding factors preclude definite conclusions for this heterogeneous patient group until ongoing phase III trials are published. Presurgical targeted therapy has been proposed to identify patients with clinical benefit and potentially long-term survival after cytoreductive nephrectomy. Recently, the use of targeted therapy before or after local treatment of metastases has been reported in small retrospective series. The present review revisits the current evidence base of targeted therapy in combination with surgery for the various disease stages in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26238981

  16. In situ Proteomic Profiling of Curcumin Targets in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Wong, Yin Kwan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    To date, the exact targets and mechanism of action of curcumin, a natural product with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, remain elusive. Here we synthesized a cell permeable curcumin probe (Cur-P) with an alkyne moiety, which can be tagged with biotin for affinity enrichment, or with a fluorescent dye for visualization of the direct-binding protein targets of curcumin in situ. iTRAQ(TM) quantitative proteomics approach was applied to distinguish the specific binding targets from the non-specific ones. In total, 197 proteins were confidently identified as curcumin binding targets from HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Gene Ontology analysis showed that the targets are broadly distributed and enriched in the nucleus, mitochondria and plasma membrane, and they are involved in various biological functions including metabolic process, regulation, response to stimulus and cellular process. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis(TM) (IPA) suggested that curcumin may exert its anticancer effects over multiple critical biological pathways including the EIF2, eIF4/p70S6K, mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways. Functional validations confirmed that curcumin downregulates cellular protein synthesis, and induces autophagy, lysosomal activation and increased ROS production, thus leading to cell death. PMID:26915414

  17. Endothelial precursor cell-based therapy to target the pathologic angiogenesis and compensate tumor hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Guillaume; Szade, Krzysztof; Nowak, Witold; Klimkiewicz, Krzysztof; El Hafny-Rahbi, Bouchra; Szczepanek, Karol; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Foucault-Collet, Alexandra; Guichard, Alan; Mazan, Andrzej; Nadim, Mahdi; Fasani, Fabienne; Lamerant-Fayel, Nathalie; Grillon, Catherine; Petoud, Stéphane; Beloeil, Jean-Claude; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Kieda, Claudine

    2016-01-28

    Hypoxia-inducing pathologies as cancer develop pathologic and inefficient angiogenesis which rules tumor facilitating microenvironment, a key target for therapy. As such, the putative ability of endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) to specifically home to hypoxic sites of neovascularization prompted to design optimized, site-specific, cell-mediated, drug-/gene-targeting approach. Thus, EPC lines were established from aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) of murine 10.5 dpc and 11.5 dpc embryo when endothelial repertoire is completed. Lines representing early endothelial differentiation steps were selected: MAgEC10.5 and MagEC11.5. Distinct in maturation, they differently express VEGF receptors, VE-cadherin and chemokine/receptors. MAgEC11.5, more differentiated than MAgEC 10.5, displayed faster angiogenesis in vitro, different response to hypoxia and chemokines. Both MAgEC lines cooperated to tube-like formation with mature endothelial cells and invaded tumor spheroids through a vasculogenesis-like process. In vivo, both MAgEC-formed vessels established blood flow. Intravenously injected, both MAgECs invaded Matrigel(TM)-plugs and targeted tumors. Here we show that EPCs (MAgEC11.5) target tumor angiogenesis and allow local overexpression of hypoxia-driven soluble VEGF-receptor2 enabling drastic tumor growth reduction. We propose that such EPCs, able to target tumor angiogenesis, could act as therapeutic gene vehicles to inhibit tumor growth by vessel normalization resulting from tumor hypoxia alleviation. PMID:26577811

  18. Targeting Leukemia Stem Cells in vivo with AntagomiR-126 Nanoparticles in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Neviani, Paolo; Ferenchak, Greg J.; Huang, Xiaomeng; Nicolet, Deedra; Maharry, Kati S.; Ozer, Hatice G; Hoellarbauer, Pia; Khalife, Jihane; Hill, Emily B.; Yadav, Marshleen; Bolon, Brad N.; Lee, Robert J.; Lee, L.James; Croce, Carlo M.; Garzon, Ramiro; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Marcucci., Guido

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are designed to target rapidly dividing blast populations with limited success in eradicating the functionally distinct leukemia stem cell (LSC) population, which is postulated to be responsible for disease resistance and relapse. We have previously reported high miR-126 expression levels to be associated with a LSC-gene expression profile. Therefore, we hypothesized that miR-126 contributes to “stemness” and is a viable target for eliminating the LSC in AML. Here we first validate the clinical relevance of miR-126 expression in AML by showing that higher expression of this microRNA (miR) is associated with worse outcome in a large cohort of older (≥60 years) cytogenetically normal AML patients treated with conventional chemotherapy. We then show that miR-126 overexpression characterizes AML LSC-enriched cell subpopulations and contributes to LSC long-term maintenance and self-renewal. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of therapeutic targeting of miR-126 in LSCs with novel targeting nanoparticles (NP) containing antagomiR-126 resulting in in vivo reduction of LSCs likely by depletion of the quiescent cell subpopulation. Our findings suggest that by targeting a single miR, i.e., miR-126, it is possible to interfere with LSC activity, thereby opening potentially novel therapeutic approaches to treat AML patients. PMID:26055302

  19. Targeting Foxp3+ regulatory T cells-related immunosuppression for cancer immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Li-li; WANG Xin

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the current research into Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) cell surface molecules, plasticity of Treg cells and mechanisms of Treg cell suppression and to explore the possibilities to interfere in Treg cell suppression of anti-tumor immunity.Data sources A literature search of all English articles was performed on the online electronic PubMed database dated 1995 to 2010. The keywords searched included: CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T lymphocytes, cancer, and immunotherapy. After finding relevant articles within these search limits, a manual search was conducted through the references from these articles.Study selection Articles regarding the role of Treg cells in tumor immunity and the utility of Treg cells in tumor immunotherapy.Results The results show that significant numbers of Treg cells are found in many tumors and it has been shown that the number of tumor infiltrating Treg cells correlates with adverse clinic outcomes. Treg cells are emerging as a key component of acquired tolerance to tumors.Conclusions Several mechanisms of immunosuppression can be mediated by Treg cell function. Distinct immunosuppressive molecules expressed by Treg cells or diverse molecules related to Treg induction or migration represent potential drug targets for caner immunotherapy.

  20. Lsd1 Restricts the Number of Germline Stem Cells by Regulating Multiple Targets in Escort Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eliazer, Susan; Palacios, Victor; Wang, Zhaohui; Kollipara, Rahul K.; Kittler, Ralf; Buszczak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Specialized microenvironments called niches regulate tissue homeostasis by controlling the balance between stem cell self-renewal and the differentiation of stem cell daughters. However the mechanisms that govern the formation, size and signaling of in vivo niches remain poorly understood. Loss of the highly conserved histone demethylase Lsd1 in Drosophila escort cells results in increased BMP signaling outside the cap cell niche and an expanded germline stem cell (GSC) phenotype. Here we pre...

  1. Tissue-specific targeting of cell fate regulatory genes by E2f factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, L M; Liu, Y; Pakenham, C A; Dugal-Tessier, D; Ruzhynsky, V; Bae, S; Tsai, S-Y; Leone, G; Slack, R S; Blais, A

    2016-04-01

    Cell cycle proteins are important regulators of diverse cell fate decisions, and in this capacity have pivotal roles in neurogenesis and brain development. The mechanisms by which cell cycle regulation is integrated with cell fate control in the brain and other tissues are poorly understood, and an outstanding question is whether the cell cycle machinery regulates fate decisions directly or instead as a secondary consequence of proliferative control. Identification of the genes targeted by E2 promoter binding factor (E2f) transcription factors, effectors of the pRb/E2f cell cycle pathway, will provide essential insights into these mechanisms. We identified the promoter regions bound by three neurogenic E2f factors in neural precursor cells in a genome-wide manner. Through bioinformatic analyses and integration of published genomic data sets we uncovered hundreds of transcriptionally active E2f-bound promoters corresponding to genes that control cell fate processes, including key transcriptional regulators and members of the Notch, fibroblast growth factor, Wnt and Tgf-β signaling pathways. We also demonstrate a striking enrichment of the CCCTC binding factor transcription factor (Ctcf) at E2f3-bound nervous system-related genes, suggesting a potential regulatory co-factor for E2f3 in controlling differentiation. Finally, we provide the first demonstration of extensive tissue specificity among E2f target genes in mammalian cells, whereby E2f3 promoter binding is well conserved between neural and muscle precursors at genes associated with cell cycle processes, but is tissue-specific at differentiation-associated genes. Our findings implicate the cell cycle pathway as a widespread regulator of cell fate genes, and suggest that E2f3 proteins control cell type-specific differentiation programs by regulating unique sets of target genes. This work significantly enhances our understanding of how the cell cycle machinery impacts cell fate and differentiation, and will

  2. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions in Small Cell Lung Cancer with a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J;

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality, and the identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library, we observe that SCLC is sensitive to ...

  3. MicroRNA-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion by targeting LATS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • miR-181b is upregulated in human ovarian cancer tissues. • miR-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell proliferation and invasion. • LATS2 is a direct target of miR-181b. • LATS2 is involved in miR-181b-induced ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are strongly implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this study, we showed significant upregulation of miR-181b in ovarian cancer tissues, compared with the normal ovarian counterparts. Forced expression of miR-181b led to remarkably enhanced proliferation and invasion of ovarian cancer cells while its knockdown induced significant suppression of these cellular events. The tumor suppressor gene, LATS2 (large tumor suppressor 2), was further identified as a novel direct target of miR-181b. Specifically, miR-181b bound directly to the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of LATS2 and suppressed its expression. Restoration of LATS2 expression partially reversed the oncogenic effects of miR-181b. Our results indicate that miR-181b promotes proliferation and invasion by targeting LATS2 in ovarian cancer cells. These findings support the utility of miR-181b as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for ovarian cancer

  4. MicroRNA-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion by targeting LATS2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Ying; Gao, Yan, E-mail: gaoyanhdhos@126.com

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • miR-181b is upregulated in human ovarian cancer tissues. • miR-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell proliferation and invasion. • LATS2 is a direct target of miR-181b. • LATS2 is involved in miR-181b-induced ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are strongly implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this study, we showed significant upregulation of miR-181b in ovarian cancer tissues, compared with the normal ovarian counterparts. Forced expression of miR-181b led to remarkably enhanced proliferation and invasion of ovarian cancer cells while its knockdown induced significant suppression of these cellular events. The tumor suppressor gene, LATS2 (large tumor suppressor 2), was further identified as a novel direct target of miR-181b. Specifically, miR-181b bound directly to the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of LATS2 and suppressed its expression. Restoration of LATS2 expression partially reversed the oncogenic effects of miR-181b. Our results indicate that miR-181b promotes proliferation and invasion by targeting LATS2 in ovarian cancer cells. These findings support the utility of miR-181b as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  5. Genome-wide mapping of Polycomb target genes unravels their roles in cell fate transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracken, Adrian P; Dietrich, Nikolaj; Pasini, Diego;

    2006-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form chromatin-modifying complexes that are essential for embryonic development and stem cell renewal and are commonly deregulated in cancer. Here, we identify their target genes using genome-wide location analysis in human embryonic fibroblasts. We find that Pol...

  6. The targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells by nanoporous particle-supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Carlee E.; Carnes, Eric C.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Padilla, David; Durfee, Paul N.; Brown, Page A.; Hanna, Tracey N.; Liu, Juewen; Phillips, Brandy; Carter, Mark B.; Carroll, Nick J.; Jiang, Xingmao; Dunphy, Darren R.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Petsev, Dimiter N.; Evans, Deborah G.; Parikh, Atul N.; Chackerian, Bryce; Wharton, Walker; Peabody, David S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Encapsulation of drugs within nanocarriers that selectively target malignant cells promises to mitigate side effects of conventional chemotherapy and to enable delivery of the unique drug combinations needed for personalized medicine. To realize this potential, however, targeted nanocarriers must simultaneously overcome multiple challenges, including specificity, stability and a high capacity for disparate cargos. Here we report porous nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (protocells) that synergistically combine properties of liposomes and nanoporous particles. Protocells modified with a targeting peptide that binds to human hepatocellular carcinoma exhibit a 10,000-fold greater affinity for human hepatocellular carcinoma than for hepatocytes, endothelial cells or immune cells. Furthermore, protocells can be loaded with combinations of therapeutic (drugs, small interfering RNA and toxins) and diagnostic (quantum dots) agents and modified to promote endosomal escape and nuclear accumulation of selected cargos. The enormous capacity of the high-surface-area nanoporous core combined with the enhanced targeting efficacy enabled by the fluid supported lipid bilayer enable a single protocell loaded with a drug cocktail to kill a drug-resistant human hepatocellular carcinoma cell, representing a 106-fold improvement over comparable liposomes.

  7. Targeted siRNA Delivery to Diseased Microvascular Endothelial Cells-Cellular and Molecular Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalski, Piotr S.; Leus, Niek G. J.; Scherphof, Gerrit L.; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Kamps, Jan A. A. M.; Molema, Grietje

    2011-01-01

    Increased insight in the role of endothelial cells in the pathophysiology of cancer, inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases, has drawn great interest in pharmacological interventions aiming at the endothelium in diseased sites. Their location in the body makes them suitable targets for therapeutic

  8. Targeting and molecular imaging of HepG2 cells using surface-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathinaraj, Pierson [Auckland University of Technology, Institute of Biomedical Technologies (New Zealand); Lee, Kyubae; Choi, Yuri; Park, Soo-Young [Kyungpook National University, School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Graduate School (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Hyeong [Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Inn-Kyu, E-mail: ikkang@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Graduate School (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Mercaptosuccinic acid (M)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (GM) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscope and dynamic light scattering. M was used to improve the monodispersity and non-specific intracellular uptake of nanoparticles. Lactobionic acid (L) was subsequently conjugated to the GM to target preferentially HepG2 cells (liver cancer cells) that express asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) on their membrane surfaces and facilitate the transit of nanoparticles across the cell membrane. The mean size of lactobionic acid-conjugated gold nanoparticle (GL) was approximately 10 ± 0.2 nm. Finally, the Atto 680 dye (A6) was coupled to the nanoparticles to visualize their internalization into HepG2 cells. The interaction of surface-modified gold nanoparticles with HepG2 cells was studied after culturing cells in media containing the GM or L-conjugated GM (GL)

  9. Targeting and molecular imaging of HepG2 cells using surface-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercaptosuccinic acid (M)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (GM) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscope and dynamic light scattering. M was used to improve the monodispersity and non-specific intracellular uptake of nanoparticles. Lactobionic acid (L) was subsequently conjugated to the GM to target preferentially HepG2 cells (liver cancer cells) that express asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) on their membrane surfaces and facilitate the transit of nanoparticles across the cell membrane. The mean size of lactobionic acid-conjugated gold nanoparticle (GL) was approximately 10 ± 0.2 nm. Finally, the Atto 680 dye (A6) was coupled to the nanoparticles to visualize their internalization into HepG2 cells. The interaction of surface-modified gold nanoparticles with HepG2 cells was studied after culturing cells in media containing the GM or L-conjugated GM (GL)

  10. Drug targets for cell cycle dysregulators in leukemogenesis: in silico docking studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Jayaraman

    Full Text Available Alterations in cell cycle regulating proteins are a key characteristic in neoplastic proliferation of lymphoblast cells in patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the routinely administered ALL chemotherapeutic agents would be able to bind and inhibit the key deregulated cell cycle proteins such as--Cyclins E1, D1, D3, A1 and Cyclin Dependent Kinases (CDK 2 and 6. We used Schrödinger Glide docking protocol to dock the chemotherapeutic drugs such as Doxorubicin and Daunorubicin and others which are not very common including Clofarabine, Nelarabine and Flavopiridol, to the crystal structures of these proteins. We observed that the drugs were able to bind and interact with cyclins E1 and A1 and CDKs 2 and 6 while their docking to cyclins D1 and D3 were not successful. This binding proved favorable to interact with the G1/S cell cycle phase proteins that were examined in this study and may lead to the interruption of the growth of leukemic cells. Our observations therefore suggest that these drugs could be explored for use as inhibitors for these cell cycle proteins. Further, we have also highlighted residues which could be important in the designing of pharmacophores against these cell cycle proteins. This is the first report in understanding the mechanism of action of the drugs targeting these cell cycle proteins in leukemia through the visualization of drug-target binding and molecular docking using computational methods.

  11. Targeted delivery of siRNA to cell death proteins in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmamdam, Pavan; Watanabe, Eizo; Unsinger, Jacqueline; Chang, Katherine C; Schierding, William; Hoekzema, Andrew S; Zhou, Tony T; McDonough, Jacquelyn S; Holemon, Heather; Heidel, Jeremy D; Coopersmith, Craig M; McDunn, Jonathan E; Hotchkiss, Richard S

    2009-08-01

    Immune suppression is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with sepsis. Apoptotic loss of immune effector cells such as CD4 T and B cells is a key component in the loss of immune competence in sepsis. Inhibition of lymphocyte apoptosis has led to improved survival in animal models of sepsis. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction of isolated splenic CD4 T and B cells, we determined that Bim and PUMA, two key cell death proteins, are markedly upregulated during sepsis. Lymphocytes have been notoriously difficult to transfect with small interfering RNA (siRNA). Consequently a novel, cyclodextrin polymer-based, transferrin receptor-targeted, delivery vehicle was used to coadminister siRNA to Bim and PUMA to mice immediately after cecal ligation and puncture. Antiapoptotic siRNA-based therapy markedly decreased lymphocyte apoptosis and prevented the loss of splenic CD4 T and B cells. Flow cytometry confirmed in vivo delivery of siRNA to CD4 T and B cells and also demonstrated decreases in intracellular Bim and PUMA protein. In conclusion, Bim and PUMA are two critical mediators of immune cell death in sepsis. Use of a novel cyclodextrin polymer-based, transferrin receptor-targeted siRNA delivery vehicle enables effective administration of antiapoptotic siRNAs to lymphocytes and reverses the immune cell depletion that is a hallmark of this highly lethal disorder. PMID:19033888

  12. Uptake of synthetic Low Density Lipoprotein by leukemic stem cells--a potential stem cell targeted drug delivery strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peixun; Hatziieremia, Sophia; Elliott, Moira A; Scobie, Linda; Crossan, Claire; Michie, Alison M; Holyoake, Tessa L; Halbert, Gavin W; Jørgensen, Heather G

    2010-12-20

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) stem/progenitor cells, which over-express Bcr-Abl, respond to imatinib by a reversible block in proliferation without significant apoptosis. As a result, patients are unlikely to be cured owing to the persistence of leukemic quiescent stem cells (QSC) capable of initiating relapse. Previously, we have reported that intracellular levels of imatinib in primary primitive CML cells (CD34+38(lo/⁻)), are significantly lower than in CML progenitor cells (total CD34+) and leukemic cell lines. The aim of this study was to determine if potentially sub-therapeutic intracellular drug concentrations in persistent leukemic QSC may be overcome by targeted drug delivery using synthetic Low Density Lipoprotein (sLDL) particles. As a first step towards this goal, however, the extent of uptake of sLDL by leukemic cell lines and CML patient stem/progenitor cells was investigated. Results with non-drug loaded particles have shown an increased and preferential uptake of sLDL by Bcr-Abl positive cell lines in comparison to Bcr-Abl negative. Furthermore, CML CD34+ and primitive CD34+38(lo/⁻) cells accumulated significantly higher levels of sLDL when compared with non-CML CD34+ cells. Thus, drug-loading the sLDL nanoparticles could potentially enhance intracellular drug concentrations in primitive CML cells and thus aid their eradication. PMID:20869412

  13. MicroRNA-141 is downregulated in human renal cell carcinoma and regulates cell survival by targeting CDC25B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu XY

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Xiu-yue Yu, Zhe Zhang, Jiao Liu, Bo Zhan, Chui-ze Kong Department of Urology, the First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Background/objective: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs (ribonucleic acids, approximately 22 nucleotides in length, that function as regulators of gene expression. Dysregulation of miRNAs has been associated with the initiation and progression of oncogenesis in humans. The cell division cycle (CDC25 phosphatases are important regulators of the cell cycle. Their abnormal expression detected in a number of tumors implies that their dysregulation is involved in malignant transformation. Methods: Using miRNA target prediction software, we found that miR-141 could target the 3´ untranslated region (3´UTR sequence of CDC25B. To shed light on the role of miR-141 in renal cell carcinogenesis, the expression of miR-141 was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in renal cell carcinoma and normal tissues. The impact of miR-141 re-expression on 769-P cells was analyzed using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and colony-forming assay. A luciferase reporter assay was applied to prove the functionality of the miR-141 binding site. Results: miR-141 is significantly downregulated in renal cell carcinoma. miR-141 re-expression suppressed cell growth in 769-P cells. Luciferase expression from a reporter vector containing the CDC25B-3'UTR was decreased when this construct was transfected with miR-141 in 769-P cells. The overexpression of miR-141 suppressed the endogenous CDC25B protein level in 769-P cells. Conclusion: For the first time, we demonstrated that CDC25B is a direct target of miR-141 in renal cell carcinoma. The transcriptional loss of miR-141 and the resultant increase in CDC25B expression facilitates increased genomic instability at an early stage of renal cell carcinoma development. Keywords: carcinogenesis, 769-P, target, Micro

  14. Targeted agents in non-small cell lung cancer therapy: What is there on the horizon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M Villaflor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases. There has been much research in lung cancer over the past decade which has advanced our ability to treat these patients with a more personalized approach. The scope of this paper is to review the literature and give a broad understanding of the current molecular targets for which we currently have therapies as well as other targets for which we may soon have therapies. Additionally, we will cover some of the issues of resistance with these targeted therapies. The molecular targets we intend to discuss are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, anaplastic large-cell lymphoma kinase (ALK, KRAS, C-MET/RON, PIK3CA. ROS-1, RET Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR. Ephrins and their receptors, BRAF, and immunotherapies/vaccines. This manuscript only summarizes the work which has been done to date and in no way is meant to be comprehensive.

  15. Targeting SHP2 for EGFR inhibitor resistant non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jie; Zeng, Li-Fan; Shen, Weihua [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Turchi, John J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Zhang, Zhong-Yin, E-mail: zyzhang@iu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •SHP2 is required for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC H1975 cell proliferation. •SHP2 inhibitor blocks EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and proliferation. •SHP2 inhibitor exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. •SHP2 inhibitor synergizes with PI3K inhibitor in suppressing cell growth. •Targeting SHP2 represents a novel strategy for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs. -- Abstract: Targeted therapy with inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has produced a noticeable benefit to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose tumors carry activating mutations (e.g. L858R) in EGFR. Unfortunately, these patients develop drug resistance after treatment, due to acquired secondary gatekeeper mutations in EGFR (e.g. T790M). Given the critical role of SHP2 in growth factor receptor signaling, we sought to determine whether targeting SHP2 could have therapeutic value for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC. We show that SHP2 is required for EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation and proliferation in EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC cell line H1975, which harbors the EGFR T790M/L858R double-mutant. We demonstrate that treatment of H1975 cells with II-B08, a specific SHP2 inhibitor, phenocopies the observed growth inhibition and reduced ERK1/2 activation seen in cells treated with SHP2 siRNA. Importantly, we also find that II-B08 exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. Finally, we observe that combined inhibition of SHP2 and PI3K impairs both the ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling axes and produces significantly greater effects on repressing H1975 cell growth than inhibition of either protein individually. Collectively, these results suggest that targeting SHP2 may represent an effective strategy for treatment of EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs.

  16. PEGylated and targeted extracellular vesicles display enhanced cell specificity and circulation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijmans, S A A; Fliervoet, L A L; van der Meel, R; Fens, M H A M; Heijnen, H F G; van Bergen En Henegouwen, P M P; Vader, P; Schiffelers, R M

    2016-02-28

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are increasingly being recognized as candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transfer biological cargo between cells. However, the therapeutic applicability of EVs may be limited due to a lack of cell-targeting specificity and rapid clearance of exogenous EVs from the circulation. In order to improve EV characteristics for drug delivery to tumor cells, we have developed a novel method for decorating EVs with targeting ligands conjugated to polyethylene glycol (PEG). Nanobodies specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were conjugated to phospholipid (DMPE)-PEG derivatives to prepare nanobody-PEG-micelles. When micelles were mixed with EVs derived from Neuro2A cells or platelets, a temperature-dependent transfer of nanobody-PEG-lipids to the EV membranes was observed, indicative of a 'post-insertion' mechanism. This process did not affect EV morphology, size distribution, or protein composition. After introduction of PEG-conjugated control nanobodies to EVs, cellular binding was compromised due to the shielding properties of PEG. However, specific binding to EGFR-overexpressing tumor cells was dramatically increased when EGFR-specific nanobodies were employed. Moreover, whereas unmodified EVs were rapidly cleared from the circulation within 10min after intravenous injection in mice, EVs modified with nanobody-PEG-lipids were still detectable in plasma for longer than 60min post-injection. In conclusion, we propose post-insertion as a novel technique to confer targeting capacity to isolated EVs, circumventing the requirement to modify EV-secreting cells. Importantly, insertion of ligand-conjugated PEG-derivatized phospholipids in EV membranes equips EVs with improved cell specificity and prolonged circulation times, potentially increasing EV accumulation in targeted tissues and improving cargo delivery. PMID:26773767

  17. Targeting SHP2 for EGFR inhibitor resistant non-small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •SHP2 is required for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC H1975 cell proliferation. •SHP2 inhibitor blocks EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and proliferation. •SHP2 inhibitor exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. •SHP2 inhibitor synergizes with PI3K inhibitor in suppressing cell growth. •Targeting SHP2 represents a novel strategy for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs. -- Abstract: Targeted therapy with inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has produced a noticeable benefit to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose tumors carry activating mutations (e.g. L858R) in EGFR. Unfortunately, these patients develop drug resistance after treatment, due to acquired secondary gatekeeper mutations in EGFR (e.g. T790M). Given the critical role of SHP2 in growth factor receptor signaling, we sought to determine whether targeting SHP2 could have therapeutic value for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC. We show that SHP2 is required for EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation and proliferation in EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC cell line H1975, which harbors the EGFR T790M/L858R double-mutant. We demonstrate that treatment of H1975 cells with II-B08, a specific SHP2 inhibitor, phenocopies the observed growth inhibition and reduced ERK1/2 activation seen in cells treated with SHP2 siRNA. Importantly, we also find that II-B08 exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. Finally, we observe that combined inhibition of SHP2 and PI3K impairs both the ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling axes and produces significantly greater effects on repressing H1975 cell growth than inhibition of either protein individually. Collectively, these results suggest that targeting SHP2 may represent an effective strategy for treatment of EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs

  18. MicroRNA-133a Inhibits Osteosarcoma Cells Proliferation and Invasion via Targeting IGF-1R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangnan Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by repressing translation or cleaving RNA transcripts in a sequence-specific manner. Downregulated microRNAs and their roles in cancer development have attracted much attention. A growing body of evidence showed that microRNA-133a (miR-133a has inhibitory effects on cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and metastasis of osteosarcoma. Methods: MiR-133a expression in human osteosarcoma cell lines and human normal osteoblastic cell line hFOB was investigated by real-time PCR (RT-PCR. The role of miR-133a in human osteosarcoma growth and invasion was assessed in cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Then, luciferase reporter assay validated IGF-1R as a downstream and functional target of miR-133a, and functional studies revealed that the anti-tumor effect of miR-133a was probably due to targeting and repressing of IGF-1R expression. Results: MiR-133a was lower expressed in human osteosarcoma cell lines than human normal osteoblastic cell line hFOB and its effect on inhibiting proliferation, invasion and metastasis is mediated by its direct interaction with the IGF-1R. Furthermore, the tumour-suppressive function of miR-133a probably contributed to inhibiting the activation AKT and ERK signaling pathway. Conclusion: MiR-133a suppresses osteosarcoma progression and metastasis by targeting IGF-1R in human osteosarcoma cells, providing a novel candidate prognostic factor and a potential anti-metastasis therapeutic target in osteosarcoma.

  19. High throughput determination of TGFβ1/SMAD3 targets in A549 lung epithelial cells.

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    Yingze Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1 plays a major role in many lung diseases including lung cancer, pulmonary hypertension, and pulmonary fibrosis. TGFβ1 activates a signal transduction cascade that results in the transcriptional regulation of genes in the nucleus, primarily through the DNA-binding transcription factor SMAD3. The objective of this study is to identify genome-wide scale map of SMAD3 binding targets and the molecular pathways and networks affected by the TGFβ1/SMAD3 signaling in lung epithelial cells. METHODOLOGY: We combined chromatin immunoprecipitation with human promoter region microarrays (ChIP-on-chip along with gene expression microarrays to study global transcriptional regulation of the TGFβ1/SMAD3 pathway in human A549 alveolar epithelial cells. The molecular pathways and networks associated with TGFβ1/SMAD3 signaling were identified using computational approaches. Validation of selected target gene expression and direct binding of SMAD3 to promoters were performed by quantitative real time RT-PCR and electrophoretic mobility shift assay on A549 and human primary lung epithelial cells. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Known TGFβ1 target genes such as SERPINE1, SMAD6, SMAD7, TGFB1 and LTBP3, were found in both ChIP-on-chip and gene expression analyses as well as some previously unrecognized targets such as FOXA2. SMAD3 binding of FOXA2 promoter and changed expression were confirmed. Computational approaches combining ChIP-on-chip and gene expression microarray revealed multiple target molecular pathways affected by the TGFβ1/SMAD3 signaling. Identification of global targets and molecular pathways and networks associated with TGFβ1/SMAD3 signaling allow for a better understanding of the mechanisms that determine epithelial cell phenotypes in fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis as does the discovery of the direct effect of TGFβ1 on FOXA2.

  20. Up-regulation of hexokinaseII in myeloma cells: targeting myeloma cells with 3-bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Ayako; Miki, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Shingen; Harada, Takeshi; Oda, Asuka; Amou, Hiroe; Fujii, Shiro; Kagawa, Kumiko; Takeuchi, Kyoko; Ozaki, Shuji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Abe, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    Hexokinase II (HKII), a key enzyme of glycolysis, is widely over-expressed in cancer cells. However, HKII levels and its roles in ATP production and ATP-dependent cellular process have not been well studied in hematopoietic malignant cells including multiple myeloma (MM) cells.We demonstrate herein that HKII is constitutively over-expressed in MM cells. 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA), an inhibitor of HKII, promptly and substantially suppresses ATP production and induces cell death in MM cells. Interestingly, cocultures with osteoclasts (OCs) but not bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt along with an increase in HKII levels and lactate production in MM cells. The enhancement of HKII levels and lactate production in MM cells by OCs were mostly abrogated by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, suggesting activation of glycolysis in MM cells by OCs via the PI3K-Akt-HKII pathway. Although BMSCs and OCs stimulate MM cell growth and survival, 3BrPA induces cell death in MM cells even in cocultures with OCs as well as BMSCs. Furthermore, 3BrPA was able to diminish ATP-dependent ABC transporter activity to restore drug retention in MM cells in the presence of OCs. These results may underpin possible clinical application of 3BrPA in patients with MM. PMID:22298254

  1. Sox10 controls migration of B16F10 melanoma cells through multiple regulatory target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikjoo Seong

    Full Text Available It is believed that the inherent differentiation program of melanocytes during embryogenesis predisposes melanoma cells to high frequency of metastasis. Sox10, a transcription factor expressed in neural crest stem cells and a subset of progeny lineages, plays a key role in the development of melanocytes. We show that B16F10 melanoma cells transfected with siRNAs specific for Sox10 display reduced migratory activity which in turn indicated that a subset of transcriptional regulatory target genes of Sox10 is likely to be involved in migration and metastasis of melanoma cells. We carried out a microarray-based gene expression profiling using a Sox10-specific siRNA to identify relevant regulatory targets and found that multiple genes including melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r partake in the regulation of migration. We provide evidences that the effect of Sox10 on migration is mediated in large part by Mitf, a transcription factor downstream to Sox10. Among the mouse melanoma cell lines examined, however, only B16F10 showed robust down-regulation of Sox10 and inhibition of cell migration indicating that further dissection of dosage effects and/or cell line-specific regulatory networks is necessary. The involvement of Mc1r in migration was studied in detail in vivo using a murine metastasis model. Specifically, B16F10 melanoma cells treated with a specific siRNA showed reduced tendency in metastasizing to and colonizing the lung after being injected in the tail vein. These data reveal a cadre of novel regulators and mediators involved in migration and metastasis of melanoma cells that represents potential targets of therapeutic intervention.

  2. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth. PMID:21220492

  3. Tumor cell-specific photothermal killing by SELEX-derived DNA aptamer-targeted gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya; Lee, Alexander Sheng Wei; Yap, Lim Wei; Jans, David A.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread availability of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, the killing of tumour cells without affecting healthy surrounding tissue remains elusive, although recent developments in terms of plasmonic nanoparticles capable of photothermal killing have some promise. Here we describe novel DNA aptamer-tethered gold nanorods (GNRs) that act as efficient photothermal therapeutics against tumour cells, but not their isogenic normal cell counterparts. A modified Cell-SELEX process was developed to select a novel DNA aptamer (KW16-13) that specifically recognised and was internalised by cells of the MCF10CA1h human breast ductal carcinoma line but not by those of its isogenic normal counterpart (MCF10A). GNRs conjugated to KW16-13 were readily internalized by the MCF10CA1h tumour cells with minimal uptake by MCF10A normal cells. Upon near infrared (NIR) light irradiation, tumour cell death of >96%, could be effected, compared to 71-fold tumor cell death than GNRs-targeted with a previously described aptamer. This demonstrates the significant potential for aptamer functionalised-GNRs to be used effective and above all selective anti-cancer photothermal therapeutics.Despite widespread availability of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, the killing of tumour cells without affecting healthy surrounding tissue remains elusive, although recent developments in terms of plasmonic nanoparticles capable of photothermal killing have some promise. Here we describe novel DNA aptamer-tethered gold nanorods (GNRs) that act as efficient photothermal therapeutics against tumour cells, but not their isogenic normal cell counterparts. A modified Cell-SELEX process was developed to select a novel DNA aptamer (KW16-13) that specifically recognised and was internalised by cells of the MCF10CA1h human breast ductal carcinoma line but not by those of its isogenic normal counterpart (MCF10A). GNRs conjugated to KW16-13 were readily internalized by the MCF10CA1h tumour cells with minimal

  4. Single agent- and combination treatment with two targeted suicide gene therapy systems is effective in chemoresistant small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe R; Christensen, Camilla L; Sehested, Maxwell;

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional targeted suicide gene (SG) therapy driven by the insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1) promoter makes it possible to target suicide toxin production and cytotoxicity exclusively to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells and tumors. It remains to be determined whether acquired chemoresistance......, as observed in the majority of SCLC patients, desensitizes SCLC cells to INSM1 promoter-driven SG therapy....

  5. Characterization and targeting of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Michel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PI3K and mTOR are key components of signal transduction pathways critical for cell survival. Numerous PI3K inhibitors have entered clinical trials, while mTOR is the target of approved drugs for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC. We characterized expression of p85 and p110α PI3K subunits and mTOR in RCC specimens and assessed pharmacologic co-targeting of these molecules in vitro. Methods We employed tissue microarrays containing 330 nephrectomy cases using a novel immunofluorescence-based method of Automated Quantitative Analysis (AQUA of in situ protein expression. In RCC cell lines we assessed synergism between PI3K and mTOR inhibitors and activity of NVP-BEZ235, which co-targets PI3K and mTOR. Results p85 expression was associated with high stage and grade (P in vitro with IC50s in the low ηM range and resultant PARP cleavage. Conclusions High PI3K and mTOR expression in RCC defines populations with decreased survival, suggesting that they are good drug targets in RCC. These targets tend to be co-expressed, and co-targeting these molecules is synergistic. NVP-BEZ235 is active in RCC cells in vitro; suggesting that concurrent PI3K and mTOR targeting in RCC warrants further investigation.

  6. Molecular targeted therapy to improve radiotherapeutic outcomes for non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Bhaskar; Bhardwaj, Himanshu; Balusu, Sree; Shwaiki, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatments for non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) remain elusive. The use of concurrent chemotherapy with radiotherapy (RT) has improved outcomes, but a significant proportion of NSCLC patients are too frail to be able to tolerate an intense course of concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The development of targeted therapies ignited new hope in enhancing radiotherapeutic outcomes. The use of targeted therapies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has offered slight but significant benefits in concurrent use with RT for certain patients in certain situations. However, despite theoretical promise, the use of anti-angiogenics, such as bevacizumab and endostatin, has not proven clinically safe or useful in combination with RT. However, many new targeted agents against new targets are being experimented for combined use with RT. It is hoped that these agents may provide a significant breakthrough in the radiotherapeutic management of NSCLC. The current review provides a brief discussion about the targets, the targeted therapies, the rationale for the use of targeted therapies in combination with RT, and a brief review of the existing data on the subject. PMID:26904572

  7. Nanoparticles inhibit cancer cell invasion and enhance antitumor efficiency by targeted drug delivery via cell surface-related GRP78

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Liang Zhao,1,* Hongdan Li,2,* Yijie Shi,1 Guan Wang,2 Liwei Liu,1 Chang Su,3 Rongjian Su2 1School of Pharmacy, Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Central Laboratory of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Veterinary Medicine, Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nanoparticles (NPs which target specific agents could effectively recognize the target cells and increase the stability of chemical agents by encapsulation. As such, NPs have been widely used in cancer treatment research. Recently, over 90% of treatment failure cases in patients with metastatic cancer were attributed to resistance to chemotherapy. Surface-exposed glucose-regulated protein of 78 kDa (GRP78 is expressed highly on many tumor cell surfaces in many human cancers and is related to the regulation of invasion and metastasis. Herein, we report that NPs conjugated with antibody against GRP78 (mAb GRP78-NPs inhibit the adhesion, invasion, and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and promote drug delivery of 5-fluorouracil into GRP78 high-expressed human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Our new findings suggest that mAb GRP78-NPs could enhance drug accumulation by effectively transporting NPs into cell surface GRP78-overexpressed human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and then inhibit cell proliferation and viability and induce cell apoptosis by regulating caspase-3. In brief, mAb GRP78-NPs effectively inhibit cancer cell invasion and enhance antitumor efficiency by targeted drug delivery. Keywords: 5-Fu, apoptosis, HCC, caspase-3

  8. Mitochondrial-Targeting MET Kinase Inhibitor Kills Erlotinib-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianming; Ng, Wai Har; Chen, Huan; Chomchopbun, Kamon; Huynh, The Hung; Go, Mei Lin; Kon, Oi Lian

    2016-08-11

    Lung cancer cells harboring activating EGFR mutations acquire resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) by activating several bypass mechanisms, including MET amplification and overexpression. We show that a significant proportion of activated MET protein in EGFR TKI-resistant HCC827 lung cancer cells resides within the mitochondria. Targeting the total complement of MET in the plasma membrane and mitochondria should render these cells more susceptible to cell death and hence provide a means of circumventing drug resistance. Herein, the mitochondrial targeting triphenylphosphonium (TPP) moiety was introduced to the selective MET kinase inhibitor PHA665752. The resulting TPP analogue rapidly localized to the mitochondria of MET-overexpressing erlotinib-resistant HCC827 cells, partially suppressed the phosphorylation (Y1234/Y1235) of MET in the mitochondrial inner membrane and was as cytotoxic and apoptogenic as the parent compound. These findings provide support for the targeting of mitochondrial MET with a TPP-TKI conjugate as a means of restoring responsiveness to chemotherapy. PMID:27563407

  9. Dual targeting of EGFR and focal adhesion kinase in 3D grown HNSCC cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) show frequent overexpression and hyperactivity in various human malignancies including head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). To examine effects of dual EGFR/FAK inhibition on cellular radiosensitivity of HNSCC cells in a more physiological environment, we employed a previously established laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) based three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model. Materials and methods: UTSCC15 and SAS HNSCC cell lines stably transfected with EGFR-CFP or CFP were used. Single or combined EGFR (Cetuximab, siRNA) and FAK (TAE226, siRNA) inhibition were accomplished prior to measuring clonogenic survival and protein expression and phosphorylation. Immunofluorescence enabled visualization of EGFR-CFP and FAK. Results: Cetuximab resulted in higher radiosensitization in EGFR-CFP overexpressing cell lines than CFP controls. Single EGFR or FAK inhibition mediated radiosensitization, while dual EGFR/FAK targeting further augmented this effect. Despite signaling alterations upon Cetuximab and siRNA knockdown, analysis of protein expression and phosphorylation indicates EGFR and FAK signaling coexistence without obvious overlap. Conclusions: Combined EGFR/FAK targeting yielded stronger radiosensitization than either approach alone, which might be based on non-overlapping downstream signaling. Whether dual targeting of EGFR and FAK can reasonably be combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy needs clarification.

  10. Liraglutide prevents high glucose level induced insulinoma cells apoptosis by targeting autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ze-fang; LI Yan-bo; HAN Jun-yong; YIN Jia-jing; WANG Yang; ZHU Li-bo; XIE Guang-ying

    2013-01-01

    increase of autophagy,suggesting that liraglutide plays a role in beta cell apoptosis by targeting autophagy.Thus,autophagy may be a new target for the prevention or treatment of diabetes.

  11. Design of High-Specificity Nanocarriers by Exploiting Non-Equilibrium Effects in Cancer Cell Targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Tsekouras

    Full Text Available Although targeting of cancer cells using drug-delivering nanocarriers holds promise for improving therapeutic agent specificity, the strategy of maximizing ligand affinity for receptors overexpressed on cancer cells is suboptimal. To determine design principles that maximize nanocarrier specificity for cancer cells, we studied a generalized kinetics-based theoretical model of nanocarriers with one or more ligands that specifically bind these overexpressed receptors. We show that kinetics inherent to the system play an important role in determining specificity and can in fact be exploited to attain orders of magnitude improvement in specificity. In contrast to the current trend of therapeutic design, we show that these specificity increases can generally be achieved by a combination of low rates of endocytosis and nanocarriers with multiple low-affinity ligands. These results are broadly robust across endocytosis mechanisms and drug-delivery protocols, suggesting the need for a paradigm shift in receptor-targeted drug-delivery design.

  12. Targeted Correction and Restored Function of the CFTR Gene in Cystic Fibrosis Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Ana M. Crane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed reprogramming and genome editing technologies make possible the derivation of corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cell sources—potentially useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Starting with skin fibroblasts from patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, we derived and characterized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines. We then utilized zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs, designed to target the endogenous CFTR gene, to mediate correction of the inherited genetic mutation in these patient-derived lines via homology-directed repair (HDR. We observed an exquisitely sensitive, homology-dependent preference for targeting one CFTR allele versus the other. The corrected cystic fibrosis iPSCs, when induced to differentiate in vitro, expressed the corrected CFTR gene; importantly, CFTR correction resulted in restored expression of the mature CFTR glycoprotein and restoration of CFTR chloride channel function in iPSC-derived epithelial cells.

  13. miR-101 inhibits cell proliferation by targeting Rac1 in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIN, XIAOJIE; GUAN, HONGYU; LI, HAI; LIU, LIEHUA; LIU, JUAN; WEI, GUOHONG; HUANG, ZHIMIN; LIAO, ZHIHONG; LI, YANBING

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that some microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) progression. However, it remains necessary to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. In the present study, we investigated the role of microRNA-101 (miR-101) in PTC via targeting of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). The results showed that miR-101 was significantly downregulated in PTC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Restoration of miR-101 expression significantly inhibited cell proliferation in the K1 PTC cell line. Moreover, algorithm-based and experimental strategies verified Rac1 as a direct target of miR-101 in the K1 cell line. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-101 inhibited PTC growth via the downregulation of Rac1 expression, providing a better understanding of miRNA-modulated signaling networks for future cancer therapeutics. PMID:24649082

  14. Genistein inhibits prostate cancer cell growth by targeting miR-34a and oncogenic HOTAIR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Chiyomaru

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Genistein is a soy isoflavone that has antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. It has been shown that genistein inhibits many type of cancers including prostate cancer (PCa by regulating several cell signaling pathways and microRNAs (miRNAs. Recent studies suggest that the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are also involved in many cellular processes. At present there are no reports about the relationship between gensitein, miRNAs and lncRNAs. In this study, we focused on miRNAs, lncRNA that are regulated by genistein and investigated their functional role in PCa. METHOD: Microarray (SurePrint G3 Human GE 8×60K was used for expression profiling of genistein treated and control PCa cells (PC3 and DU145. Functional assay (cell proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle assays were performed with the PCa cell lines, PC3 and DU145. Both in vitro and in vivo (nude mouse models were used for growth assays. Luciferase reporter assays were used for binding of miR-34a to HOTAIR. RESULTS: LncRNA profiling showed that HOTAIR was highly regulated by genistein and its expression was higher in castration-resistant PCa cell lines than in normal prostate cells. Knockdown (siRNA of HOTAIR decreased PCa cell proliferation, migration and invasion and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. miR-34a was also up-regulated by genistein and may directly target HOTAIR in both PC3 and DU145 PCa cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that genistein inhibited PCa cell growth through down-regulation of oncogenic HOTAIR that is also targeted by tumor suppressor miR-34a. These findings enhance understanding of how genistein regulates lncRNA HOTAIR and miR-34a in PCa.

  15. Bezielle selectively targets mitochondria of cancer cells to inhibit glycolysis and OXPHOS.

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    Vivian Chen

    Full Text Available Bezielle (BZL101 is a candidate oral drug that has shown promising efficacy and excellent safety in the early phase clinical trials for advanced breast cancer. Bezielle is an aqueous extract from the herb Scutellaria barbata. We have reported previously that Bezielle was selectively cytotoxic to cancer cells while sparing non-transformed cells. In tumor, but not in non-transformed cells, Bezielle induced generation of ROS and severe DNA damage followed by hyperactivation of PARP, depletion of the cellular ATP and NAD, and inhibition of glycolysis. We show here that tumor cells' mitochondria are the primary source of reactive oxygen species induced by Bezielle. Treatment with Bezielle induces progressively higher levels of mitochondrial superoxide as well as peroxide-type ROS. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration prevents generation of both types of ROS and protects cells from Bezielle-induced death. In addition to glycolysis, Bezielle inhibits oxidative phosphorylation in tumor cells and depletes mitochondrial reserve capacity depriving cells of the ability to produce ATP. Tumor cells lacking functional mitochondria maintain glycolytic activity in presence of Bezielle thus supporting the hypothesis that mitochondria are the primary target of Bezielle. The metabolic effects of Bezielle towards normal cells are not significant, in agreement with the low levels of oxidative damage that Bezielle inflicts on them. Bezielle is therefore a drug that selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria, and is distinguished from other such drugs by its ability to induce not only inhibition of OXPHOS but also of glycolysis. This study provides a better understanding of the mechanism of Bezielle's cytotoxicity, and the basis of its selectivity towards cancer cells.

  16. Colon-targeted delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics including microencapsulated live bacterial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Satya Prakash; Aleksandra Malgorzata Urbanska

    2008-01-01

    Satya Prakash, Aleksandra Malgorzata UrbanskaBiomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Physiology, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaAbstract: There has been an ample interest in delivery of therapeutic molecules using live cells. Oral delivery has been stipulated as best way to deliver live cells to humans for therapy. Colon, in particular, is a part of gastr...

  17. Emerging targets in pancreatic cancer: epithelial–mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellanos JA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Jason A Castellanos,1 Nipun B Merchant,1–3 Nagaraj S Nagathihalli1–31Department of Surgery, 2Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA; 3Vanderbilt-Ingram Comprehensive Cancer Center, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive solid malignancies and is characterized by poor response to current therapy and a dismal survival rate. Recent insights regarding the role of cancer stem cells (CSCs and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT in tumorigenesis have brought further understanding to the field and have highlighted new therapeutic targets. CSCs are a distinct subset of cancer cells, with the ability to differentiate into other cell types and self-renew in order to fuel the maintenance of tumor amplification. Transition of a cancer cell from an EMT leads to increased migratory and invasive properties, and thus facilitates initiation of metastasis. EMT is regulated by a complex network of factors that includes cytokines, growth factors, aberrant signaling pathways, transcription factors, and the tumor microenvironment. There is emerging evidence that the EMT process may give rise to CSCs, or at least cells with stem cell-like properties. We review the key pathways involved in both of these processes, the biomarkers used to identify CSCs, and new therapeutic approaches targeting CSCs and EMT in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.Keywords: epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cancer stem cells, tumor microenvironment, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

  18. The centrosome protein NEDD1 as a potential pharmacological target to induce cell cycle arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etievant Chantal

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NEDD1 is a protein that binds to the gamma-tubulin ring complex, a multiprotein complex at the centrosome and at the mitotic spindle that mediates the nucleation of microtubules. Results We show that NEDD1 is expressed at comparable levels in a variety of tumor-derived cell lines and untransformed cells. We demonstrate that silencing of NEDD1 expression by treatment with siRNA has differential effects on cells, depending on their status of p53 expression: p53-positive cells arrest in G1, whereas p53-negative cells arrest in mitosis with predominantly aberrant monopolar spindles. However, both p53-positive and -negative cells arrest in mitosis if treated with low doses of siRNA against NEDD1 combined with low doses of the inhibitor BI2536 against the mitotic kinase Plk1. Simultaneous reduction of NEDD1 levels and inhibition of Plk1 act in a synergistic manner, by potentiating the anti-mitotic activity of each treatment. Conclusion We propose that NEDD1 may be a promising target for controlling cell proliferation, in particular if targeted in combination with Plk1 inhibitors.

  19. Sensitivity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to small targeted therapeutic molecules: An in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvan, Sandra Eketorp; Skribek, Henriette; Norin, Stefan; Muhari, Orsolya; Österborg, Anders; Szekely, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    New drugs targeting important cellular signaling pathways are currently being developed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It is therefore of interest to analyze their in vitro killing capacity in manufacturer-independent, comparative experiments. We here report on the sensitivity of CLL cells to a panel of emerging targeted therapeutics using high-throughput screening based on an automated fluorescence digital scanning system. Fresh CLL cells from 42 patients with indolent or progressive CLL were cultured for 72 hours on microtiter plates in a unique primary cell culture medium. Antitumor effects of 31 small therapeutic molecules (and, as controls, 29 cytostatic agents) at equimolar concentration were compared in a fluorescence survival assay. In vitro sensitivity to each drug exhibited considerable interpatient variability. The highest mean direct killing was observed for one survivin inhibitor (YM-155), two bcl-2 inhibitors (ABT-199, ABT-737), and one selective CDK inhibitor (dinaciclib). Their killing capacity was, in contrast to most cytostatic agents, similarly high in refractory versus untreated CLL patients and was significantly higher on cells with the 17p deletion/TP53 mutation than on cells with other cytogenetic abnormalities (p = 0.02). Sensitivity of bone marrow and lymph node cells was highly correlated with that of blood cells. Even though direct killing may not be the only therapeutic effector function in vivo, results from this head-to-head comparison may help to identify drugs of particular interest for intensified clinical development. PMID:26325331

  20. Propentofylline inhibits glioblastoma cell invasion and survival by targeting the TROY signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhruv, Harshil D; Roos, Alison; Tomboc, Patrick J; Tuncali, Serdar; Chavez, Ashley; Mathews, Ian; Berens, Michael E; Loftus, Joseph C; Tran, Nhan L

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary tumor of the CNS and carries a dismal prognosis. The aggressive invasion of GBM cells into the surrounding normal brain makes complete resection impossible, significantly increases resistance to the standard therapy regimen, and virtually assures tumor recurrence. Median survival for newly diagnosed GBM is 14.6 months and declines to 8 months for patients with recurrent GBM. New therapeutic strategies that target the molecular drivers of invasion are required for improved clinical outcome. We have demonstrated that TROY (TNFRSF19), a member of the TNFR super-family, plays an important role in GBM invasion and resistance. Knockdown of TROY expression inhibits GBM cell invasion, increases sensitivity to temozolomide, and prolongs survival in an intracranial xenograft model. Propentofylline (PPF), an atypical synthetic methylxanthine compound, has been extensively studied in Phase II and Phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia where it has demonstrated blood-brain permeability and minimal adverse side effects. Here we showed that PPF decreased GBM cell expression of TROY, inhibited glioma cell invasion, and sensitized GBM cells to TMZ. Mechanistically, PPF decreased glioma cell invasion by modulating TROY expression and downstream signaling, including AKT, NF-κB, and Rac1 activation. Thus, PPF may provide a pharmacologic approach to target TROY, inhibit cell invasion, and reduce therapeutic resistance in GBM. PMID:26559543

  1. Internalization of targeted quantum dots by brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris-Robidas, Sarah; Brouard, Danny; Emond, Vincent; Parent, Martin; Calon, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Receptors located on brain capillary endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier are the target of most brain drug delivery approaches. Yet, direct subcellular evidence of vectorized transport of nanoformulations into the brain is lacking. To resolve this question, quantum dots were conjugated to monoclonal antibodies (Ri7) targeting the murine transferrin receptor. Specific transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis of Ri7-quantum dots was first confirmed in N2A and bEnd5 cells. After intravenous injection in mice, Ri7-quantum dots exhibited a fourfold higher volume of distribution in brain tissues, compared to controls. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that Ri7-quantum dots were sequestered throughout the cerebral vasculature 30 min, 1 h, and 4 h post injection, with a decline of signal intensity after 24 h. Transmission electron microscopic studies confirmed that Ri7-quantum dots were massively internalized by brain capillary endothelial cells, averaging 37 ± 4 Ri7-quantum dots/cell 1 h after injection. Most quantum dots within brain capillary endothelial cells were observed in small vesicles (58%), with a smaller proportion detected in tubular structures or in multivesicular bodies. Parenchymal penetration of Ri7-quantum dots was extremely low and comparable to control IgG. Our results show that systemically administered Ri7-quantum dots complexes undergo extensive endocytosis by brain capillary endothelial cells and open the door for novel therapeutic approaches based on brain endothelial cell drug delivery. PMID:26661181

  2. Design of nanodrugs for miRNA targeting in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byunghee; Ghosh, Subrata K; Kumar, Mohanraja; Moore, Anna; Yigit, Mehmet V; Medarova, Zdravka

    2014-06-01

    The delivery of oligonucleotide antagonists to cytosolic RNA targets such as microRNA represents an avenue for the post-transcriptional control of cellular phenotype. In tumor cells, oncogenic miRNAs, termed oncomirs, are tightly linked to processes that ultimately determine cancer initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Therefore, the capacity to redirect tumor cell fate towards therapeutically beneficial phenotypes holds promise in a future clinical scenario. Previously, we have designed "nanodrugs" for the specific inhibition of oncogenic microRNAs in tumor cells. The basic design of these nanodrugs includes dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles, conjugated to a tumor-targeting peptide, and a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified antisense oligonucleotide that stably binds and inhibits the complementary mature miRNA. Here, we focus on elucidating an optimal nanodrug design for effective miRNA inhibition in tumor cells. Specifically, we investigate the choice of chemical linker for the conjugation of the oligonucleotide to the nanoparticles and evaluate the contribution of tumor-cell targeting to nanodrug uptake and functionality. We find that short labile linkers (SPDP; N-Succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate) are superior to non-labile short linkers (GMBS; N-(gamma-Maleimidobutyryloxy)succinimide ester) or non-labile long linkers (PEG24; Succinimidyl-([N-maleimidopropionamido]-24ethyleneglycol)ester) in terms of their capacity to gain access to the cytosolic cellular compartment and to engage their cognate miRNA. Furthermore, using the nanodrug design that incorporates SPDP as a linker, we establish that the addition of tumor-cell targeting through functionalization of the nanodrug with the alphavbeta3-specific cyclic RGDfK-PEG peptide does not confer an advantage in vitro at long incubation times required for inhibition. PMID:24749405

  3. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted. PMID:26028028

  4. The garlic compound ajoene targets protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschula, Catherine H; Hunter, Roger; Cotton, Jonathan; Tuveri, Rossana; Ngarande, Ellen; Dzobo, Kevin; Schäfer, Georgia; Siyo, Vuyolwethu; Lang, Dirk; Kusza, Daniel A; Davies, Bronwen; Katz, Arieh A; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-08-01

    Ajoene is a natural allylsulfur compound found in crushed garlic that arrests growth and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. To gain mechanistic insights into the cytotoxicity of ajoene in cancer cells, two fluorescently labelled ajoene analogs with dansyl- (DP) and fluorescein- (FOX) tags were synthesized. The tagged ajoenes were found to retain their activity at inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 human breast-cancer and WHCO1 human esophageal-cancer cells. Both tagged ajoenes localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in MDA-MB-231 cells as observed by live cell confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and confirmed by generating an MDA-MB-231 cell line expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in the ER. DP appears to S-thiolate multiple protein targets in MDA-MB-231 cells as observed by immunoblotting under non-reducing conditions only; and a competition assay demonstrated that DP and Z-ajoene in fact share the same target. Ajoene S-thiolation interfered with protein folding and led to an accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates and activated the unfolded protein response (UPR). Consistent with this mechanism, increased levels of GRP78 and total ubiquitinated proteins were observed; and an ER-folded protein, type-1 collagen, was tracked to the proteasome following ajoene treatment. The intracellular protein aggregates were observed by CLSM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This is the first time that ajoene has been shown to target protein folding in the ER of cancer cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26207910

  5. Analysis of 4070A envelope levels in retroviral preparations and effect on target cell transduction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slingsby, J H; Baban, D; Sutton, J; Esapa, M; Price, T; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Slade, A

    2000-07-01

    A number of stable producer cell lines for high-titer Mo-MuLV vectors have been constructed. Development has previously centered on increasing end-point titers by producing maximal levels of Mo-MuLV Gag/Pol, envelope glycoproteins, and retroviral RNA genomes. We describe the production yields and transduction efficiency characteristics of two Mo-MuLV packaging cell lines, FLYA13 and TEFLYA. Although they both produce 4070A-pseudotyped retroviral vectors reproducibly at >1 x 10(6) LFU ml(-1), the transduction efficiency of unconcentrated and concentrated virus from FLYA13 lines is poor compared with vector preparations from TEFLYA lines. A powerful inhibitor of retroviral transduction is secreted by FLYA13 packaging cells. We show that the inhibitory factor does not affect transduction of target cells by RD114-pseudotyped vectors. This suggests that the inhibitory factor functions at the level of envelope-receptor interactions. Phosphate starvation of target cells shows a two-fold increase in Pit2 receptor mRNA and causes some improvement in FLYA13 virus transduction efficiency. Western blots show that FLYA13 viral samples contain an eight-fold higher ratio of 4070A envelope to p30gag than that of virus produced by TEFLYA producer cell lines. This study correlates overexpression of 4070A envelope glycoprotein in retroviral preparations with a reduction of transduction efficiency at high multiplicities of infection. We suggest that TEFLYA packaging cells express preferable levels of 4070A compared with FLYA13, which not only enables high-titer stocks to be generated, but also facilitates a high efficiency of transduction of target cells. PMID:10910141

  6. Targeting Cell Cycle Proteins in Breast Cancer Cells with siRNA by Using Lipid-Substituted Polyethylenimines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Manoj B; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Mahdipoor, Parvin; Kucharski, Cezary; Maranchuk, Robert; Hugh, Judith C; Uludağ, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The cell cycle proteins are key regulators of cell cycle progression whose deregulation is one of the causes of breast cancer. RNA interference (RNAi) is an endogenous mechanism to regulate gene expression and it could serve as the basis of regulating aberrant proteins including cell cycle proteins. Since the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a main barrier for implementation of RNAi therapy, we explored the potential of a non-viral delivery system, 2.0 kDa polyethylenimines substituted with linoleic acid and caprylic acid, for this purpose. Using a library of siRNAs against cell cycle proteins, we identified cell division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), a recombinase RAD51, and serine-threonine protein kinase CHEK1 as effective targets for breast cancer therapy, and demonstrated their therapeutic potential in breast cancer MDA-MB-435, MDA-MB-231, and MCF7 cells with respect to another well-studied cell cycle protein, kinesin spindle protein. We also explored the efficacy of dicer-substrate siRNA (DsiRNA) against CDC20, RAD51, and CHEK1, where a particular DsiRNA against CDC20 showed an exceptionally high inhibition of cell growth in vitro. There was no apparent effect of silencing selected cell cycle proteins on the potency of the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin. The efficacy of DsiRNA against CDC20 was subsequently assessed in a xenograft model, which indicated a reduced tumor growth as a result of CDC20 DsiRNA therapy. The presented study highlighted specific cell cycle protein targets critical for breast cancer therapy, and provided a polymeric delivery system for their effective down-regulation. PMID:25763370

  7. A novel transferrin receptor-targeted hybrid peptide disintegrates cancer cell membrane to induce rapid killing of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is a cell membrane-associated glycoprotein involved in the cellular uptake of iron and the regulation of cell growth. Recent studies have shown the elevated expression levels of TfR on cancer cells compared with normal cells. The elevated expression levels of this receptor in malignancies, which is the accessible extracellular protein, can be a fascinating target for the treatment of cancer. We have recently designed novel type of immunotoxin, termed 'hybrid peptide', which is chemically synthesized and is composed of target-binding peptide and lytic peptide containing cationic-rich amino acids components that disintegrates the cell membrane for the cancer cell killing. The lytic peptide is newly designed to induce rapid killing of cancer cells due to conformational change. In this study, we designed TfR binding peptide connected with this novel lytic peptide and assessed the cytotoxic activity in vitro and in vivo. In vitro: We assessed the cytotoxicity of TfR-lytic hybrid peptide for 12 cancer and 2 normal cell lines. The specificity for TfR is demonstrated by competitive assay using TfR antibody and siRNA. In addition, we performed analysis of confocal fluorescence microscopy and apoptosis assay by Annexin-V binding, caspase activity, and JC-1 staining to assess the change in mitochondria membrane potential. In vivo: TfR-lytic was administered intravenously in an athymic mice model with MDA-MB-231 cells. After three weeks tumor sections were histologically analyzed. The TfR-lytic hybrid peptide showed cytotoxic activity in 12 cancer cell lines, with IC50 values as low as 4.0-9.3 μM. Normal cells were less sensitive to this molecule, with IC50 values > 50 μM. Competition assay using TfR antibody and knockdown of this receptor by siRNA confirmed the specificity of the TfR-lytic hybrid peptide. In addition, it was revealed that this molecule can disintegrate the cell membrane of T47D cancer cells just in 10 min, to effectively

  8. Target antigen expression on a professional antigen-presenting cell induces superior proliferative antitumor T-cell responses via chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossig, Claudia; Bär, Annette; Pscherer, Sibylle; Altvater, Bianca; Pule, Martin; Rooney, Cliona M; Brenner, Malcolm K; Jürgens, Heribert; Vormoor, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Human T cells expressing tumor antigen-specific chimeric receptors fail to sustain their growth and activation in vivo, which greatly reduces their therapeutic value. The defective proliferative response to tumor cells in vitro can partly be overcome by concomitant CD28 costimulatory signaling. We investigated whether T-cell activation via chimeric receptors (chRec) can be further improved by ligand expression on antigen-presenting cells of B-cell origin. We generated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) expressing a CD19-specific chRec. These CTLs are provided with native receptor stimulation by autologous EBV-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) but exclusively with chRec (CD19-specific) stimulation by allogeneic, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched CD19+ LCLs. CD19zeta-transduced EBV-specific CTLs specifically lysed both allogeneic EBV targets and CD19+ tumor cells through the chRec in a major histocompatibility complex-independent manner, while maintaining their ability to recognize autologous EBV targets through the native T-cell receptor. The transduced CTLs failed to proliferate in response to CD19+ tumor targets even in the presence of CD28 costimulatory signaling. By contrast, CD19 expressed on HLA-mismatched LCL-induced T-cell activation and long-term proliferation that essentially duplicated the result from native receptor stimulation with autologous LCLs, suggesting that a deficit of costimulatory molecules on target cells in addition to CD28 is indeed responsible for inadequate chRec-mediated T-cell function. Hence, effective tumor immunotherapy may be favored if engagement of the chRec on modified T cells is complemented by interaction with multiple costimulator molecules. The use of T cells with native specificity for EBV may be one means of attaining this objective. PMID:16365597

  9. miRNA-135a promotes breast cancer cell migration and invasion by targeting HOXA10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    miRNAs are a group of small RNA molecules regulating target genes by inducing mRNA degradation or translational repression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs correlates with various cancers. Although miR-135a has been implicated in several other cancers, its role in breast cancer is unknown. HOXA10 however, is associated with multiple cancer types and was recently shown to induce p53 expression in breast cancer cells and reduce their invasive ability. Because HOXA10 is a confirmed miR-135a target in more than one tissue, we examined miR-135a levels in relation to breast cancer phenotypes to determine if miR-135a plays role in this cancer type. Expression levels of miR-135a in tissues and cells were determined by poly (A)-RT PCR. The effect of miR-135a on proliferation was evaluated by CCK8 assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays, and target protein expression was determined by western blotting. GFP and luciferase reporter plasmids were constructed to confirm the action of miR-135a on downstream target genes including HOXA10. Results are reported as means ± S.D. and differences were tested for significance using 2-sided Student's t-test. Here we report that miR-135a was highly expressed in metastatic breast tumors. We found that the expression of miR-135a was required for the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells, but not their proliferation. HOXA10, which encodes a transcription factor required for embryonic development and is a metastasis suppressor in breast cancer, was shown to be a direct target of miR-135a in breast cancer cells. Our analysis showed that miR-135a suppressed the expression of HOXA10 both at the mRNA and protein level, and its ability to promote cellular migration and invasion was partially reversed by overexpression of HOXA10. In summary, our results indicate that miR-135a is an onco-miRNA that can promote breast cancer cell migration and invasion. HOXA10 is a target gene for mi

  10. Biofunctional quantum dots as fluorescence probe for cell-specific targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ag, Didem; Bongartz, Rebecca; Dogan, Leyla Eral; Seleci, Muharrem; Walter, Johanna-G; Demirkol, Dilek Odaci; Stahl, Frank; Ozcelik, Serdar; Timur, Suna; Scheper, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    We describe here the synthesis, characterization, bioconjugation, and application of water-soluble thioglycolic acid TGA-capped CdTe/CdS quantum dots (TGA-QDs) for targeted cellular imaging. Anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibodies were conjugated to TGA-QDs to target HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. TGA-QDs and TGA-QDs/anti-HER2 bioconjugates were characterized by fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), hydrodynamic sizing, electron microscopy, and gel electrophoresis. TGA-QDs and TGA-QDs/anti-HER2 were incubated with cells to examine cytotoxicity, targeting efficiency, and cellular localization. The cytotoxicity of particles was measured using an MTT assay and the no observable adverse effect concentration (NOAEC), 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50), and total lethal concentration (TLC) were calculated. To evaluate localization and targeting efficiency of TGA-QDs with or without antibodies, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry were performed. Our results indicate that antibody-conjugated TGA-QDs are well-suited for targeted cellular imaging studies. PMID:24176888

  11. Identification of target genes of transcription factor activator protein 2 gamma in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activator protein 2 gamma (AP-2γ) is a member of the transcription factor activator protein-2 (AP-2) family, which is developmentally regulated and plays a role in human neoplasia. AP-2γ has been found to be overexpressed in most breast cancers, and have a dual role to inhibit tumor initiation and promote tumor progression afterwards during mammary tumorigensis. To identify the gene targets that mediate its effects, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to isolate AP-2γ binding sites on genomic DNA from human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-453. 20 novel DNA fragments proximal to potential AP-2γ targets were obtained. They are categorized into functional groups of carcinogenesis, metabolism and others. A combination of sequence analysis, reporter gene assays, quantitative real-time PCR, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays and immunoblot analysis further confirmed the four AP-2γ target genes in carcinogenesis group: ErbB2, CDH2, HPSE and IGSF11. Our results were consistent with the previous reports that ErbB2 was the target gene of AP-2γ. Decreased expression and overexpression of AP-2γ in human breast cancer cells significantly altered the expression of these four genes, indicating that AP-2γ directly regulates them. This suggested that AP-2γ can coordinate the expression of a network of genes, involving in carcinogenesis, especially in breast cancer. They could serve as therapeutic targets against breast cancers in the future

  12. Choroidal mast cells in retinal pathology: a potential target for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Elodie; Zhao, Min; Thillaye-Goldenberg, Brigitte; Lorena, Viera; Castaneda, Beatriz; Naud, Marie Christine; Bergin, Ciara; Besson-Lescure, Bernadette; Behar-Cohen, Francine; de Kozak, Yvonne

    2015-08-01

    Mast cells are important in the initiation of ocular inflammation, but the consequences of mast cell degranulation on ocular pathology remain uncharacterized. We induced mast cell degranulation by local subconjunctival injection of compound 48/80. Initial degranulation of mast cells was observed in the choroid 15 minutes after the injection and increased up to 3 hours after injection. Clinical signs of anterior segment inflammation paralleled mast cell degranulation. With the use of optical coherence tomography, dilation of choroidal vessels and serous retinal detachments (SRDs) were observed and confirmed by histology. Subconjunctival injection of disodium cromoglycate significantly reduced the rate of SRDs, demonstrating the involvement of mast cell degranulation in posterior segment disorders. The infiltration of polymorphonuclear and macrophage cells was associated with increased ocular media concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, CXCL1, IL-6, IL-5, chemokine ligand 2, and IL-1β. Analysis of the amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor and IL-18 showed an opposite evolution of vascular endothelial growth factor compared with IL-18 concentrations, suggesting that they regulate each other's production. These findings suggest that the local degranulation of ocular mast cells provoked acute ocular inflammation, dilation, increased vascular permeability of choroidal vessels, and SRDs. The involvement of mast cells in retinal diseases should be further investigated. The pharmacologic inhibition of mast cell degranulation may be a potential target for intervention. PMID:26166807

  13. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83; Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  14. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Lu, Qing-Yi; Rao, JianYu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2011-05-01

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83 Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  15. Identification of Cell Surface Targets through Meta-analysis of Microarray Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Haeberle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution image guidance for resection of residual tumor cells would enable more precise and complete excision for more effective treatment of cancers, such as medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain cancer. Numerous studies have shown that brain tumor patient outcomes correlate with the precision of resection. To enable guided resection with molecular specificity and cellular resolution, molecular probes that effectively delineate brain tumor boundaries are essential. Therefore, we developed a bioinformatics approach to analyze micro-array datasets for the identification of transcripts that encode candidate cell surface biomarkers that are highly enriched in medulloblastoma. The results identified 380 genes with greater than a two-fold increase in the expression in the medulloblastoma compared with that in the normal cerebellum. To enrich for targets with accessibility for extracellular molecular probes, we further refined this list by filtering it with gene ontology to identify genes with protein localization on, or within, the plasma membrane. To validate this meta-analysis, the top 10 candidates were evaluated with immunohistochemistry. We identified two targets, fibrillin 2 and EphA3, which specifically stain medulloblastoma. These results demonstrate a novel bioinformatics approach that successfully identified cell surface and extracellular candidate markers enriched in medulloblastoma versus adjacent cerebellum. These two proteins are high-value targets for the development of tumor-specific probes in medulloblastoma. This bioinformatics method has broad utility for the identification of accessible molecular targets in a variety of cancers and will enable probe development for guided resection.

  16. Metabolomics reveals that carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 is a novel target for oxidative inactivation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoyama, Daiki; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative dysfunction in the metabolism has long been implicated in diverse biological disorders. Although a substantial number of metabolic enzymes are targeted for inactivation by oxidative stress, identifying those targets remains difficult due to a lack of comprehensive observations of the metabolism acting through the stress response. We herein developed a metabolomics strategy using integrative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and observing rapid metabolomic changes in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced oxidative stress in HeLa cells. Among the many metabolite changes detected, the most characteristic metabolites uniquely indicated carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), the critical enzyme for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, to be a target for oxidative inactivation. We showed that the enzymatic activity of CPT1 significantly declined by H2 O2 in several human cells. Interestingly, the inactivation was shown to be a direct effect of H2 O2 in vitro, but substantially occurred when cells were cultured with some reagents that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, our results suggest the generality of CPT1 inhibition under various stress conditions associated with ROS generation, providing an insight into a mechanism for oxidative dysfunction in mitochondrial metabolism. Our metabolome data additionally suggest that certain methyltransferase(s) may be targets of oxidative stress as well. PMID:24118240

  17. In Vivo Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Endogenous Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Rodent Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Mei Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain have a significant level of neurogenesis plasticity. In vivo monitoring of adult endogenous NSCs would be of great benefit to the understanding of the neurogenesis plasticity under normal and pathological conditions. Here we show the feasibility of in vivo targeted MR imaging of endogenous NSCs in adult mouse brain by intraventricular delivery of monoclonal anti-CD15 antibody conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. After intraventricular administration of these nanoparticles, the subpopulation of NSCs in the anterior subventricular zone and the beginning of the rostral migratory stream could be in situ labeled and were in vivo visualized with 7.0-T MR imaging during a period from 1 day to 7 days after the injection. Histology confirmed that the injected targeted nanoparticles were specifically bound to CD15 positive cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix. Our results suggest that in vivo targeted MR imaging of endogenous neural stem cells in adult rodent brain could be achieved by using anti-CD15-SPIONs as the molecular probe; and this targeting imaging strategy has the advantage of a rapid in vivo monitoring of the subpopulation of endogenous NSCs in adult brains.

  18. Target-dependent biogenesis of cognate microRNAs in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Mainak; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research has established how miRNAs regulate target mRNAs by translation repression and/or endonucleolytic degradation in metazoans. However, information related to the effect of target mRNA on biogenesis and stability of corresponding miRNAs in animals is limited. Here we report regulated biogenesis of cognate miRNAs by their target mRNAs. Enhanced pre-miRNA processing by AGO-associated DICER1 contributes to this increased miRNP formation. The processed miRNAs are loaded onto AGO2 to form functionally competent miRISCs both in vivo and also in a cell-free in vitro system. Thus, we identify an additional layer of posttranscriptional regulation that helps the cell to maintain requisite levels of mature forms of respective miRNAs by modulating their processing in a target-dependent manner, a process happening for miR-122 during stress reversal in human hepatic cells. PMID:27448149

  19. Interleukin-33: a mediator of inflammation targeting hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and their progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongnga eLe

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is defined as a physiological response initiated by a variety of conditions that cause insult to the body, such as infection and tissue injury. Inflammation is triggered by specialized receptors in the innate immune system, which recognized by microbial components known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or endogenous signals produced by damaged cells (damage-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs. IL-33 is a cytokine that is released predominantly at the epithelial barrier when it is exposed to pathogens, allergens, or injury-inducing stimuli. IL-33 target cells are various, ranging from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs and essentially all types of their progeny to many nonhematopoietic cells. The pleiotrophic actions of IL-33 suggest that IL-33 is involved in every phase of the inflammatory process. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of how IL-33 orchestrates inflammatory responses by regulating HSPCs and innate immune cells.

  20. Enterocolitis induced by autoimmune targeting of enteric glial cells: A possible mechanism in Crohn's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Anne; Savidge, Tor C.; Cabarrocas, Julie; Deng, Wen-Lin; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Lassmann, Hans; Desreumaux, Pierre; Liblau, Roland S.

    2001-11-01

    Early pathological manifestations of Crohn's disease (CD) include vascular disruption, T cell infiltration of nerve plexi, neuronal degeneration, and induction of T helper 1 cytokine responses. This study demonstrates that disruption of the enteric glial cell network in CD patients represents another early pathological feature that may be modeled after CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune targeting of enteric glia in double transgenic mice. Mice expressing a viral neoself antigen in astrocytes and enteric glia were crossed with specific T cell receptor transgenic mice, resulting in apoptotic depletion of enteric glia to levels comparable in CD patients. Intestinal and mesenteric T cell infiltration, vasculitis, T helper 1 cytokine production, and fulminant bowel inflammation were characteristic hallmarks of disease progression. Immune-mediated damage to enteric glia therefore may participate in the initiation and/or the progression of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. Combining targeted drugs to overcome and prevent resistance of solid cancers with some stem-like cell features

    OpenAIRE

    Jokinen, Elina; Laurila, Niina; Koivunen, Peppi; Koivunen, Jussi P

    2014-01-01

    Treatment resistance significantly inhibits the efficiency of targeted cancer therapies in drug-sensitive genotypes. In the current work, we studied mechanisms for rapidly occurring, adaptive resistance in targeted therapy-sensitive lung, breast, and melanoma cancer cell lines. The results show that in ALK translocated lung cancer lines H3122 and H2228, cells with cancer stem-like cell features characterized by high expression of cancer stem cell markers and/or in vivo tumorigenesis can media...

  2. miR-375 Inhibits Proliferation of Mouse Pancreatic Progenitor Cells by Targeting YAP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Wu Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The Hippo signaling pathway regulates expansion and differentiation of stem cells and tissue progenitor cells during organ development and tissue regeneration. Previous studies have shown that YAP1, a potent effector of the Hippo signaling pathway, plays a crucial role in pancreas development, but the function of YAP1 in pancreatic progenitor cells is less known. Methods: The spatio-temporal expression pattern of YAP1 in mouse developing pancreata was detected by in situ hybridization. The effect of silencing YAP1 on the proliferation of pancreatic progenitor cells was analyzed by CCK-8 assay and Ki67 immunostaining. The regulation of miR-375 on YAP1 expression was determined by dual luciferase reporter assay, QRT-PCR and western blot. Finally, the influence of miR-375 on proliferation of pancreatic progenitor cells was analyzed by CCK-8 assay and Ki67 immunostaining. Results: We found that YAP1 was highly expressed in embryonic and adult pancreatic progenitor cells. Knocking down YAP1 by siRNA inhibited the proliferation of pancreatic progenitor cells. The mouse YAP1 was a target gene of miR-375, and miR-375 could target the 3' UTR of YAP1 mRNA to decrease its protein and mRNA levels. Similar to silencing YAP1 by siRNA, the proliferation of pancreatic progenitor cells was inhibited significantly by miR-375. Conclusion: Our results indicate that YAP1 is necessary for the proliferation of pancreatic progenitor cells and miR-375 participates in regulating YAP1 expression during pancreatic progenitor cells differentiation.

  3. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER+ and ER− breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen

  4. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar, E-mail: sekarashok@gmail.com

    2015-08-28

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER{sup +} and ER{sup −} breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen.

  5. [Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qi; Jiao, Shunchang; Li, Fang

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastasis, a common complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with an incidence rate of 30%-50%, significantly affects the patients' quality of life. The prognosis of patients of NSCLC with brain metastasis is extremely poor, the average median survival is only 1 m-2 m without treatment. The targeted therapy based on lung cancer driven gene is a new treatment. Besides, the immunotherapy which can enhance the effect of anti-cancer by simulating the immune system is a new approach. The combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy can greatly benefit patients in clinical work. PMID:27561803

  6. Telomerase inhibition effectively targets mouse and human AML stem cells and delays relapse following chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruedigam, Claudia; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Heidel, Florian H.;

    2014-01-01

    priority. Here, we show that targeting telomerase activity eradicates AML LSCs. Genetic deletion of the telomerase subunit Terc in a retroviral mouse AML model induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of LSCs, and depletion of telomerase-deficient LSCs is partially rescued by p53 knockdown. Murine Terc......(-/-) LSCs express a specific gene expression signature that can be identified in human AML patient cohorts and is positively correlated with patient survival following chemotherapy. In xenografts of primary human AML, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of telomerase targets LSCs, impairs leukemia...... progression, and delays relapse following chemotherapy. Altogether, these results establish telomerase inhibition as an effective strategy for eliminating AML LSCs....

  7. Advances of Driver Gene and Targeted Therapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dan; Huang, Yan; Wang, Hongyang

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the worldwide. The discovery of drive gene makes tumor treatment is no longer "one-size-fits-all". Targeted therapy to change the present situation of cancer drugs become "bullet" with eyes, the effect is visible and bring a revolution in the treatment of lung cancer. The diver gene and targeted therapy have became the new cedule of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has showed 11 kinds of div...

  8. Targeting cancer cells through Mn(Ⅱ)-dpa grafted silica nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The unique properties of paramagnetic nanoscale metal-organic frameworks provide them with high potential as key probes and vectors in the next generation of biomedical applications.To increase the nanoparticle targeting at the tumor site,the grafting of Mn(Ⅱ)-dpa (dpa =di(picolyl)amines) on oxide nanoparticles (SiO2) is proposed.The new Mn(Ⅱ)-dpa-grafted silica nanoparticles can enhance the MR imaging area in cancer tissues and perturb the Ca2+-loaded mitochondria swelling.Experimental results indicate the cancer cells may be targeted through possible intracellular Ca2+ signaling mitochondria accumulating in vivo.

  9. A novel targeted system to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to EphA2-expressing cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Si; Placzek, William J.; Stebbins, John L.; Mitra, Sayantan; Noberini, Roberta; Koolpe, Mitchell; Zhang, Ziming; Dahl, Russell; Pasquale, Elena B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-cancer drugs is often limited by their systemic toxicities and adverse side effects. We report that the EphA2 receptor is over-expressed preferentially in several human cancer cell lines compared to normal tissues and that an EphA2 targeting peptide (YSAYPDSVPMMS) can be effective in delivering anti-cancer agents to such tumors. Hence, we report on the synthesis and characterizations of a novel EphA2-targeting agent conjugated with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel. We...

  10. An integrative genomic and transcriptomic analysis reveals potential targets associated with cell proliferation in uterine leiomyomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirilo, Priscila Daniele Ramos; Marchi, Fábio Albuquerque; Barros Filho, Mateus de Camargo;

    2013-01-01

    integrated analysis identified the top 3